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Sample records for peroxidation protein glycation

  1. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid on High Glucose-Induced Protein Glycation, Lipid Peroxidation, and Membrane Ion Pump Activity in Human Erythrocytes.

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    Weerachat Sompong

    Full Text Available Ferulic acid (FA is the ubiquitous phytochemical phenolic derivative of cinnamic acid. Experimental studies in diabetic models demonstrate that FA possesses multiple mechanisms of action associated with anti-hyperglycemic activity. The mechanism by which FA prevents diabetes-associated vascular damages remains unknown. The aim of study was to investigate the protective effects of FA on protein glycation, lipid peroxidation, membrane ion pump activity, and phosphatidylserine exposure in high glucose-exposed human erythrocytes. Our results demonstrated that FA (10-100 μM significantly reduced the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c whereas 0.1-100 μM concentrations inhibited lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes exposed to 45 mM glucose. This was associated with increased glucose consumption. High glucose treatment also caused a significant reduction in Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the erythrocyte plasma membrane which could be reversed by FA. Furthermore, we found that FA (0.1-100 μM prevented high glucose-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism of FA for the prevention of vascular dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  2. Inhibition of protein glycation and advanced glycation end products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatima

    2012-06-26

    Jun 26, 2012 ... acid (AA) can react with proteins, including hemoglobin and possibly interfere with protein glycation process. .... 50 mM) and AA (100, 200, 300 and 400 mM) at 37°C for five weeks ... drops were removed by patting the plate over a paper towel. The .... adults participating in the Beaver Dam Eye Study. In.

  3. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...

  4. Glycated Lysine Residues: A Marker for Non-Enzymatic Protein Glycation in Age-Related Diseases

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    Nadeem A. Ansari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonenzymatic glycosylation or glycation of macromolecules, especially proteins leading to their oxidation, play an important role in diseases. Glycation of proteins primarily results in the formation of an early stage and stable Amadori-lysine product which undergo further irreversible chemical reactions to form advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs. This review focuses these products in lysine rich proteins such as collagen and human serum albumin for their role in aging and age-related diseases. Antigenic characteristics of glycated lysine residues in proteins together with the presence of serum autoantibodies to the glycated lysine products and lysine-rich proteins in diabetes and arthritis patients indicates that these modified lysine residues may be a novel biomarker for protein glycation in aging and age-related diseases.

  5. Glycated Lysine Residues: A Marker for Non-Enzymatic Protein Glycation in Age-Related Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Nadeem A.; Moinuddin,; Ali, Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycosylation or glycation of macromolecules, especially proteins leading to their oxidation, play an important role in diseases. Glycation of proteins primarily results in the formation of an early stage and stable Amadori-lysine product which undergo further irreversible chemical reactions to form advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). This review focuses these products in lysine rich proteins such as collagen and human serum albumin for their role in aging and age-related dise...

  6. Inhibition of protein glycation and advanced glycation end products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation is increased in diabetes mellitus, leading to microvascular and macrovascular complications. Recently, much attention has been focused on natural and synthetic inhibitors to delay the onset or progression of diabetes and its comorbidities. Ascorbic acid (AA) can react with ...

  7. Ascorbic acid glycation of lens proteins produces UVA sensitizers similar to those in human lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortwerth, B.J.; Linetsky, Mikhail; Olesen, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble calf lens proteins were extensively glycated during a 4 week incubation with ascorbic acid in the presence of oxygen. Amino acids analysis of the dialyzed proteins removed at weekly intervals showed an increasing loss of lysine, arginine and histidine, consistent with the extensive protein cross-linking observed. Irradiation of the dialyzed samples with UVA light (1.0 kJ/cm 2 total illumination through a 338 nm cutoff filter) caused an increasing loss of tryptophan, an additional loss of histidine and the production of micromolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. No alteration in amino acid content and no photolytic effects were seen in proteins incubated without ascorbic acid in proteins incubated with glucose for 4 weeks. The rate of hydrogen peroxide formation was linear with each glycated sample with a maximum production of 25 nmol/mg protein illuminated. The possibility that the sensitizer activity was due to an ascorbate-induced oxidation of tryptophan was eliminated by the presence of a heavy metal ion chelator during the incubation and by showing equivalent effects with ascorbate-incubated ribonuclease A, which is devoid of tryptophan. The ascorbate-incubated samples displayed increasing absorbance at wavelengths above 300 nm and increasing fluorescence (340/430) as glycation proceeded. The spectra of the 4 week glycated proteins were identical to those obtained with a solubilized water-insoluble fraction from human lens, which is known to have UVA sensitizer activity. (Author)

  8. Protein Glycation in Diabetes as Determined by Mass Spectrometry

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    Annunziata Lapolla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a common endocrine disorder characterized by hyperglycemia leading to nonenzymatic glycation of proteins, responsible for chronic complications. The development of mass spectrometric techniques able to give highly specific and reliable results in proteome field is of wide interest for physicians, giving them new tools to monitor the disease progression and the possible complications related to diabetes, as well as the effectiveness of therapeutic treatments. This paper reports and discusses some of the data pertaining protein glycation in diabetic subjects obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry (MS. The preliminary studies carried out by in vitro protein glycation experiments show clear differences in molecular weight of glycated and unglycated proteins. Then, the attention was focused on plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and immunoglobulin G (IgG. Enzymatic degradation products of in vitro glycated HSA were studied in order to simulate the in vivo enzymatic digestion of glycated species by the immunological system leading to the highly reactive advanced glycation end-products (AGEs peptides. Further studies led to the evaluation of glycated Apo A-I and glycated haemoglobin levels. A different MALDI approach was employed for the identification of markers of disease in urine samples of healthy, diabetic, nephropathic, and diabetic-nephropathic subjects.

  9. Assessment of nonenzymatic glycation in protein by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero de Joshi, Virginia; Joshi, Narahari V.; Gil, Herminia; Velasquez, William; Contreras, Silvia; Marquez, Glevis

    1999-04-01

    Detection of nonenzymatic glycated proteins is a very significant feature in diabetes, aging and related diseases, therefore we have carried out an FTIR spectroscopic study for glycated and native proteins such as (gamma) -globulin, human serum albumin. For this purpose, commercially available proteins were glycated by a usual procedure and their FTIR spectra were recorded together with that of the native ones. In order to follow the changes in time, (gamma) -globulin was glycated during 1, 2, 3, 5 and 8 weeks and their spectra were recorded. Direct verification was obtained by examining a model unit where the -NH2 group was attached to glucose. The spectrum shows a strong peak at 3500 cm-1 confirming the observed variation in time dependent spectra. The general features of the spectra are very similar and there was no additional structure or change in the peaks. This is understandable as not all the lysine residues are glycated, only a small fraction. Glucose is attached to the (epsilon) -amino group of lysine to form Amadori products, and therefore, the vibrational modes corresponding to the (epsilon) -NH2 unit of lysine are expected to be altered. This region exactly lies in the Amide I region of protein structure. Careful investigation of this part, indeed, shows a complex structure originated from alternations of -NH2 group. Thus, the present investigation indicates that an optical approach could be a rapid and effective method to identify the nonenzymatic glycation process.

  10. Inhibition of Nonenzymatic Protein Glycation by Pomegranate and Other Fruit Juices

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    Dorsey, Pamela Garner; Greenspan, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts in diabetes leads to the crosslinking of proteins and disease complications. Our study sought to demonstrate the effect of commonly consumed juices (pomegranate, cranberry, black cherry, pineapple, apple, and Concord grape) on the fructose-mediated glycation of albumin. Albumin glycation decreased by 98% in the presence of 10 μL of pomegranate juice/mL; other juices inhibited glycation by only 20%. Pomegranate juice produced the greatest inhibition on protein glycation when incubated at both the same phenolic concentration and the same antioxidant potential. Both punicalagin and ellagic acid significantly inhibited the glycation of albumin by ∼90% at 5 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that pomegranate, but not apple juice, protected albumin from modification. These results demonstrate that pomegranate juice and two of its major constituents are potent inhibitors of fructose-mediated protein glycation. PMID:24433074

  11. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  12. Glycation inhibitors extend yeast chronological lifespan by reducing advanced glycation end products and by back regulation of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration.

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    Kazi, Rubina S; Banarjee, Reema M; Deshmukh, Arati B; Patil, Gouri V; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2017-03-06

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) are implicated in aging process. Thus, reducing AGEs by using glycation inhibitors may help in attenuating the aging process. In this study using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast system, we show that Aminoguanidine (AMG), a well-known glycation inhibitor, decreases the AGE modification of proteins in non-calorie restriction (NR) (2% glucose) and extends chronological lifespan (CLS) similar to that of calorie restriction (CR) condition (0.5% glucose). Proteomic analysis revealed that AMG back regulates the expression of differentially expressed proteins especially those involved in mitochondrial respiration in NR condition, suggesting that it switches metabolism from fermentation to respiration, mimicking CR. AMG induced back regulation of differentially expressed proteins could be possibly due to its chemical effect or indirectly by glycation inhibition. To delineate this, Metformin (MET), a structural analog of AMG and a mild glycation inhibitor and Hydralazine (HYD), another potent glycation inhibitor but not structural analog of AMG were used. HYD was more effective than MET in mimicking AMG suggesting that glycation inhibition was responsible for restoration of differentially expressed proteins. Thus glycation inhibitors particularly AMG, HYD and MET extend yeast CLS by reducing AGEs, modulating the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and possibly by scavenging glucose. This study reports the role of glycation in aging process. In the non-caloric restriction condition, carbohydrates such as glucose promote protein glycation and reduce CLS. While, the inhibitors of glycation such as AMG, HYD, MET mimic the caloric restriction condition by back regulating deregulated proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration which could facilitate shift of metabolism from fermentation to respiration and extend yeast CLS. These findings suggest that glycation inhibitors can be potential molecules that can be used

  13. Effect of Maillard induced glycation on protein hydrolysis by lysine/arginine and non-lysine/arginine specific proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Y.; Wierenga, P.A.; Schols, H.A.; Sforza, S.; Gruppen, H.

    2017-01-01

    Enzymatic protein hydrolysis is sensitive to modifications of protein structure, e.g. Maillard reaction. In early stages of the reaction glycation takes place, modifying the protein primary structure. In later stages protein aggregation occurs. The specific effect of glycation on protein

  14. Beyond genetic factors in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: protein glycation and the loss of fibrinogen's chaperone activity.

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    Gonçalo da Costa

    Full Text Available Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP is a systemic conformational disease characterized by extracellular amyloid fibril formation from plasma transthyretin (TTR. This is a crippling, fatal disease for which liver transplantation is the only effective therapy. More than 80 TTR point mutations are associated with amyloidotic diseases and the most widely accepted disease model relates TTR tetramer instability with TTR point mutations. However, this model fails to explain two observations. First, native TTR also forms amyloid in systemic senile amyloidosis, a geriatric disease. Second, age at disease onset varies by decades for patients bearing the same mutation and some mutation carrier individuals are asymptomatic throughout their lives. Hence, mutations only accelerate the process and non-genetic factors must play a key role in the molecular mechanisms of disease. One of these factors is protein glycation, previously associated with conformational diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. The glycation hypothesis in FAP is supported by our previous discovery of methylglyoxal-derived glycation of amyloid fibrils in FAP patients. Here we show that plasma proteins are differentially glycated by methylglyoxal in FAP patients and that fibrinogen is the main glycation target. Moreover, we also found that fibrinogen interacts with TTR in plasma. Fibrinogen has chaperone activity which is compromised upon glycation by methylglyoxal. Hence, we propose that methylglyoxal glycation hampers the chaperone activity of fibrinogen, rendering TTR more prone to aggregation, amyloid formation and ultimately, disease.

  15. Evaluation of the site specific protein glycation and antioxidant capacity of rare sugar-protein/peptide conjugates.

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    Sun, Yuanxia; Hayakawa, Shigeru; Ogawa, Masahiro; Izumori, Ken

    2005-12-28

    Protein-sugar conjugates generated in nonenzymatic glycation of alpha-lactalbumin (LA) with rare sugars [D-allose (All) and D-psicose (Psi)] and alimentary sugars as controls [D-glucose (Glc) and D-fructose (Fru)] were qualitatively determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Mass spectra revealed that the extent of glycation at lysine residues on LA with D-aldose molecules was very much higher than that of glycation with d-ketose molecules. To identify the specific site of glycation, the peptide mapping was established from protease V8 digestion, using a combination of computational cutting of proteins and MALDI-TOF-MS. As compared to peptide mapping, three and seven glycation sites were located in the primary structure of LA-ketose and LA-aldose conjugates, respectively. On the other hand, the antioxidant activities of protein-sugar conjugates and their peptic hydrolysates were investigated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging method. The antioxidant activities of proteins/peptides glycated with rare sugars were significantly higher than those modified with the control sugars. The results indicated that the glycation degree and position were not markedly different between rare sugar and corresponding control sugar, but the antioxidant properties of protein and its hydrolysate were significantly enhanced by modifying with rare sugar.

  16. Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins and its role in atherosclerosis 

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    Aleksandra Kuzan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycation consists in formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE during non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. This review is focused mainly on glycation of collagen and its role in acceleration of vascular disease. Collagen is an extracellular matrix protein characterized by unique structure forming fibrils with great anti-tensile and anti-breaking strength. The protein builds the connective tissue and is responsible for biomechanical properties of blood vessels. It is reported that higher content of glycated collagen correlates with lower elasticity and greater toughness of the vessel walls and, as a consequence, a faster rate of atherosclerosis development. Numerous mechanisms connected with AGE formation are involved in atherogenesis, among others: receptor-mediated production of free radicals, triggering an inflammatory process, activation of leukocytes and thrombocytes, facilitation of LDL binding, change in level of growth factors, adhesion molecules, MMP and some other proteins’ expression. The coverages allow the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or slow down the pathological processes connected with glycation of collagen and other proteins in the artery wall. The main strategies are based on limitation of exogenous AGE, consumption of products which contain rutin, treatment with drugs which inhibit AGE formation, such aspyridoxamine, and chemicals which are able to cleave already formed AGE protein-protein crosslinks, such as ALT-711.

  17. Using an enzymatic galactose assay to detect lactose glycation extents of two proteins caseinate and soybean protein isolate via the Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Peng; Zhao, Xin-Huai

    2017-06-01

    Glycation of food proteins via the Maillard reaction has been widely studied in the recent years; however, the amount of saccharide connected to proteins is usually not determined. An enzymatic galactose assay was proposed firstly in this study to detect lactose glycation extents of caseinate and soybean protein isolate (SPI) during the Maillard reaction at two temperatures and different times. The separated glycated proteins were hydrolysed to release galactose necessary for the enzymatic assay and glycation calculation. Caseinate and SPI both obtained the highest lactose glycation extents at 100 °C or 121 °C by a reaction time of 180 or 20 min. Short- and long-time reaction resulted in lower glycation extents. During the reaction, three chemical indices (absorbences at 294/490 nm and fluorescence intensities) of reaction mixtures increased continually, but another index reactable NH 2 of glycated proteins showed the opposite trend. In general, changing profiles of the four indices were inconsistent with those profiles of lactose glycation extents of glycated proteins, implying practical limitation of the four indices in studies. This proposed enzymatic assay could directly detect lactose glycation of the two proteins, and thus was more useful than the four chemical indices to monitor glycation of the two proteins. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Fisetin lowers methylglyoxal dependent protein glycation and limits the complications of diabetes.

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    Pamela Maher

    Full Text Available The elevated glycation of macromolecules by the reactive dicarbonyl and α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal (MG has been associated with diabetes and its complications. We have identified a rare flavone, fisetin, which increases the level and activity of glyoxalase 1, the enzyme required for the removal of MG, as well as the synthesis of its essential co-factor, glutathione. It is shown that fisetin reduces two major complications of diabetes in Akita mice, a model of type 1 diabetes. Although fisetin had no effect on the elevation of blood sugar, it reduced kidney hypertrophy and albuminuria and maintained normal levels of locomotion in the open field test. This correlated with a reduction in proteins glycated by MG in the blood, kidney and brain of fisetin-treated animals along with an increase in glyoxalase 1 enzyme activity and an elevation in the expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of glutathione, a co-factor for glyoxalase 1. The expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, serum amyloid A and serum C-reactive protein, markers of protein oxidation, glycation and inflammation, were also increased in diabetic Akita mice and reduced by fisetin. It is concluded that fisetin lowers the elevation of MG-protein glycation that is associated with diabetes and ameliorates multiple complications of the disease. Therefore, fisetin or a synthetic derivative may have potential therapeutic use for the treatment of diabetic complications.

  19. Fisetin Lowers Methylglyoxal Dependent Protein Glycation and Limits the Complications of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pamela; Dargusch, Richard; Ehren, Jennifer L.; Okada, Shinichi; Sharma, Kumar; Schubert, David

    2011-01-01

    The elevated glycation of macromolecules by the reactive dicarbonyl and α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal (MG) has been associated with diabetes and its complications. We have identified a rare flavone, fisetin, which increases the level and activity of glyoxalase 1, the enzyme required for the removal of MG, as well as the synthesis of its essential co-factor, glutathione. It is shown that fisetin reduces two major complications of diabetes in Akita mice, a model of type 1 diabetes. Although fisetin had no effect on the elevation of blood sugar, it reduced kidney hypertrophy and albuminuria and maintained normal levels of locomotion in the open field test. This correlated with a reduction in proteins glycated by MG in the blood, kidney and brain of fisetin-treated animals along with an increase in glyoxalase 1 enzyme activity and an elevation in the expression of the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of glutathione, a co-factor for glyoxalase 1. The expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), serum amyloid A and serum C-reactive protein, markers of protein oxidation, glycation and inflammation, were also increased in diabetic Akita mice and reduced by fisetin. It is concluded that fisetin lowers the elevation of MG-protein glycation that is associated with diabetes and ameliorates multiple complications of the disease. Therefore, fisetin or a synthetic derivative may have potential therapeutic use for the treatment of diabetic complications. PMID:21738623

  20. Role of protein-bound carbonyl groups in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggins, J; Furth, A J

    1997-08-22

    Several mechanisms have been postulated for the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) from glycated proteins; they all feature protein-bound carbonyl intermediates. Using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), we have detected these intermediates on bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and beta-lactoglobulin after in vitro glycation by glucose or fructose. Carbonyls were formed in parallel with AGE-fluorophores, via oxidative Maillard reactions. Neither Amadori nor Heyns products contributed to the DNPH reaction. Fluorophore and carbonyl yields were much enhanced in lipid-associated proteins, but both groups could also be detected in lipid-free proteins. When pre-glycated proteins were incubated in the absence of free sugar, carbonyl groups were rapidly lost in a first-order reaction, while fluorescence continued to develop beyond the 21 days of incubation. Another unexpected finding was that not all carbonyl groups were blocked by aminoguanidine, although there was complete inhibition of reactions leading to AGE-fluorescence. It is suggested that carbonyls acting as fluorophore precursors react readily with aminoguanidine, while others are resistant to this hydrazine, possibly because they are involved in ring closure. Factors influencing the relative rates of acyclisation and hydrazone formation are discussed, together with possible implications for antiglycation therapy.

  1. Analysis of glycation induced protein cross-linking inhibitory effects of some antidiabetic plants and spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Handunge Kumudu Irani; Handuwalage, Charith Sandaruwan

    2015-06-09

    Protein cross-linking which occurs towards the latter part of protein glycation is implicated in the development of chronic diabetic complications. Glycation induced protein cross-linking inhibitory effects of nine antidiabetic plants and three spices were evaluated in this study using a novel, simple, electrophoresis based method. Methanol extracts of thirteen plants including nine antidiabetic plants and three spices were used. Lysozyme and fructose were incubated at 37 °C in the presence or absence of different concentrations of plant extracts up to 31 days. Standard glycation inhibitor aminoguanidine and other appropriate controls were included. A recently established sodium dodecyl polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) method was used to detect the products of protein cross-linking in the incubation mixtures. High molecular weight protein products representing the dimer, trimer and tetramer of lysozyme were detected in the presence of fructose. Among the nine antidiabetic plants, seven showed glycation induced protein cross-linking inhibitory effects namely Ficus racemosa (FR) stem bark, Gymnema sylvestre (GS) leaves, Musa paradisiaca (MP) yam, Phyllanthus debilis (PD) whole plant, Phyllanthus emblica (PE) fruit, Pterocarpus marsupium (PM) latex and Tinospora cordifolia (TC) leaves. Inhibition observed with Coccinia grandis (CG) leaves and Strychnos potatorum (SP) seeds were much low. Leaves of Gymnema lactiferum (GL), the plant without known antidiabetic effects showed the lowest inhibition. All three spices namely Coriandrum sativum (CS) seeds, Cinnamomum zeylanicum (CZ) bark and Syzygium aromaticum (SA) flower buds showed cross-link inhibitory effects with higher effects in CS and SA. PD, PE, PM, CS and SA showed almost complete inhibition on the formation of cross-linking with 25 μg/ml extracts. Methanol extracts of PD, PE, PM, CS and SA have shown promising inhibitory effects on glycation induced protein cross-linking.

  2. Singlet oxygen-mediated formation of protein peroxides within cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.; Policarpio, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Singlet oxygen is generated by a number of cellular, enzymatic and chemical reactions as well as by exposure to UV, or visible light in the presence of a sensitizer; as a consequence this oxidant has been proposed as a damaging agent in a number of pathologies including photo-aging and skin cancer. Proteins are major targets for singlet oxygen as a result of their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. In this study it is shown that illumination of viable, sensitizer-loaded, THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells with visible light gives rise to intra-cellular protein-derived peroxides. The peroxide yield increases with illumination time, requires the presence of the sensitizer, is enhanced in D 2 O, and decreased by azide; these data are consistent with the mediation of singlet oxygen. The concentration of peroxides detected, which is not affected by glucose or ascorbate loading of the cells, corresponds to ca. 1.5 nmoles peroxide per 10 6 cells using rose bengal as sensitizer, or 10 nmoles per mg cell protein and account for up to ca. 15% of the O 2 consumed by the cells. Similar peroxides have been detected on isolated cellular proteins exposed to light in the presence of rose bengal and oxygen. After cessation of illumination, the cellular protein peroxide levels decreases with t 1/2 ca. 4 hrs at 37 deg C, and this is associated with increased cell lysis. Decomposition of protein peroxides formed within cells, or on isolated cellular proteins, by metal ions, gives rise to radicals as detected by EPR spin trapping. These protein peroxides, and radicals derived from them, can inactivate key cellular enzymes (including caspases, GAPDH and glutathione reductase) and induce DNA base oxidation, strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links. These studies demonstrate that exposure of intact cells to visible light in the presence of a sensitizer gives rise to novel long-lived, but reactive, intra-cellular protein peroxides via singlet oxygen

  3. Aspirin-mediated acetylation of haemoglobin increases in presence of high glucose concentration and decreases protein glycation

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    Francesco Finamore

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycation represents the first stage in the development of diabetic complications. Aspirin was shown to prevent sugars reacting with proteins, but the exact mechanism of this interaction was not well defined. We performed a quantitative analysis to calculate the levels of acetylation and glycation of haemoglobin, among others red blood cell (RBC proteins, using a label free approach. After glucose incubation, increases in the acetylation levels were seen for several haemoglobin subunits, while a parallel decrease of their glycation levels was observed after aspirin incubation. These results suggest that, a mutual influence between these two modifications, occur at protein level.

  4. Inhibitory effect of Piper betle Linn. leaf extract on protein glycation--quantification and characterization of the antiglycation components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Abhishek; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2013-12-01

    Piper betle Linn. is a Pan-Asiatic plant having several beneficial properties. Protein glycation and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation are associated with different pathophysiological conditions, including diabetes mellitus. Our study aims to find the effect of methanolic extract of P. betle leaves on in vitro protein glycation in bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glucose model. The extract inhibits glucose-induced glycation, thiol group modification and carbonyl formation in BSA in dose-dependent manner. It inhibits different stages of protein glycation, as demonstrated by using glycation models: hemoglobin-delta-gluconolactone (for early stage, Amadori product formation), BSA-methylglyoxal (for middle stage, formation of oxidative cleavage products) and BSA-glucose (for last stage, formation of AGEs) systems. Several phenolic compounds are isolated from the extract. Considering their relative amounts present in the extract, rutin appears to be the most active antiglycating agent. The extract of P. betle leaf may thus have beneficial effect in preventing protein glycation and associated complications in pathological conditions.

  5. Fluorescent eosin probe in investigations of structural changes in glycated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdin, A. B.; Kochubey, V. I.; Mel'Nikov, A. G.

    2010-08-01

    The possibility of using the luminescent-kinetic probe method to investigate structural changes in bovine serum albumin (BSA) upon nonenzymatic thermal glycation is studied. An increase in the glycation time lead to a decrease in the intensity of the probe (eosin) fluorescence and to a long-wavelength shift of its maximum, as well as to an increase in the eosin phosphorescence intensity, which indicates that eosin binds to hydrophobic regions of protein at any times of incubation of BSA with glucose. From a decrease in the rate constant of the triplet-triplet energy transfer between the donor (eosin) and acceptor (anthracene) bound to proteins, it is found that the changes observed in the spectral characteristics of eosin are caused by structural changes in albumin globules as a result of glycosylation.

  6. Characteristics and enhanced antioxidant activity of glycated Morchella esculenta protein isolate

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    Qiang ZHANG

    Full Text Available Abstract Morchella esculenta (L Pers. is a highly valued edible and medicinal fungus that remains underutilized. For this study, the effects of glycation treatment on antioxidant activity and characteristics of the M. esculenta protein isolate (MPI were investigated via the Maillard reaction. Conjugation between MPI and xylose was proven via UV-vis, FT-IR, intrinsic fluorescence analysis, and SDS-PAGE. Amino acid analysis revealed involvement of lysine, arginine and tyrosine in MPI, forming a covalent cross-link with xylose. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results showed that glycated MPI (MPIG possesses a more favorable thermal stability compared to native MPI (MPIN, heated MPI (MPIH and an unheated mixture of MPI and xylose (MPI-XM. MPIG exhibited significantly enhanced antioxidant activity compared to MPIN, MPIH, and MPI-XM. These results indicate MPIG can serve as a promising novel source of nutraceutical and functional ingredients that exert antioxidant activity.

  7. Synthesis of 2,4,6-trichlorophenyl hydrazones and their inhibitory potential against glycation of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Shah, Zarbad; Ahmad, Viqar Uddin; Khan, Momin; Taha, Muhammad; Rahim, Fazal; Jahan, Humera; Perveen, Shahnaz; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2011-11-01

    2,4,6-Trichlorophenyl hydrazones 1-35 were synthesized and their in vitro antiglycation potential was evaluated. Compounds 14 (IC50 = 27.2 ± 0.00 μM), and 18 (IC50 = 55.7 ± 0.00 μM) showed an excellent activity against glycation of protein, better than the standard (rutin, IC50 = 70 ± 0.50 μM). This study thus identified a novel series of antiglycation agents. A structure-activity relationship has been studied, and all the compounds were characterized by spectroscopic techniques.

  8. The Major Chromophore Arising from Glucose Degradation and Oxidative Stress Occurrence during Lens Proteins Glycation Induced by Glucose

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    Felipe Ávila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose autoxidation has been proposed as a key reaction associated with deleterious effects induced by hyperglycemia in the eye lens. Little is known about chromophores generated during glucose autoxidation. In this study, we analyzed the effect of oxidative and dicarbonyl stress in the generation of a major chromophore arising from glucose degradation (GDC and its association with oxidative damage in lens proteins. Glucose (5 mM was incubated with H2O2 (0.5–5 mM, Cu2+ (5–50 μM, glyoxal (0.5–5 mM or methylglyoxal (0.5–5 mM at pH 7.4, 5% O2, 37 °C, from 0 to 30 days. GDC concentration increased with incubation time, as well as when incubated in the presence of H2O2 and/or Cu2+, which were effective even at the lowest concentrations. Dicarbonylic compounds did not increase the levels of GDC during incubations. 1H, 13C and FT-IR spectra from the purified fraction containing the chromophore (detected by UV/vis spectroscopy showed oxidation products of glucose, including gluconic acid. Lens proteins solutions (10 mg/mL incubated with glucose (30 mM presented increased levels of carboxymethyl-lysine and hydrogen peroxide that were associated with GDC increase. Our results suggest a possible use of GDC as a marker of autoxidative reactions occurring during lens proteins glycation induced by glucose.

  9. Protective mechanisms against peptide and protein peroxides generated by singlet oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    or detoxify such peroxides. It is shown that catalase, horseradish peroxidase, and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase do not react rapidly with these peroxides. Oxymyoglobin and oxyhemoglobin, but not the met (Fe3+) forms of these proteins, react with peptide but not protein, peroxides with oxidation of the heme iron...

  10. Inactivation of cellular enzymes by carbonyls and protein-bound glycation/glycoxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    products. In this study, we have examined the effect of glucose and carbonyl compounds (methylglyoxal, glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and hydroxyacetone), and glycation products arising from reaction of these materials with model proteins, on the activity of three key cellular enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate...... dehydrogenase (GAPDH), glutathione reductase, and lactate dehydrogenase, both in isolation and in cell lysates. In contrast to glucose (1M, both fresh and aged for 8 weeks), which had no effect, marked inhibition of all three enzymes was observed with methylglyoxal and glyoxal. GAPDH was also inhibited...... by glycolaldehyde and hydroxyacetone. Incubation of these enzymes with proteins that had been preglycated with methylglyoxal, but not glucose, also resulted in significant time- and concentration-dependent inhibition with both isolated enzymes and cell lysates. This inhibition was not metal ion, oxygen, superoxide...

  11. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) modified proteins in tears of diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhenjun; Liu, Jingfang; Shi, Bingyin; He, Shuixiang; Yao, Xiaoli; Willcox, Mark D P

    2010-08-11

    High glucose level in diabetic patients may lead to advanced glycation end product (AGE) modified proteins. This study investigated AGE modified proteins in tears and compared their levels in diabetic patients (DM) with non-diabetic controls (CTL). Basal tears were collected from DM with (DR) or without (DNR) retinopathy and CTL. Total AGE modified proteins were detected quantitatively by a dot immunobinding assay. The AGE modified proteins were separated in 1D- and 2D-SDS gels and detected by western-blotting. The individual AGE modified proteins were also compared between groups using densitometry. Compared with the CTL group, tear concentrations of AGE modified proteins were significantly elevated in DR and DNR groups. The concentration of AGE modified proteins in diabetic tears were positively correlated with AGE modified hemoglobin (HbA1c) and postprandial blood glucose level (PBG). Western blotting of AGE modified proteins from 1D-SDS gels showed several bands, the major one at around 60 kDa. The intensities of AGE modified protein bands were higher in DM tears than in CTL tears. Western blotting from 2D-SDS gels showed a strongly stained horizontal strip, which corresponded to the major band in 1D-SDS gels. Most of the other AGE modified protein species were within molecular weight of 30-60 kDa, PI 5.2-7.0. Densitometry analysis demonstrated several AGE modified proteins were elevated in DR or DNR tears. Total and some individual AGE modified proteins were elevated in DM tears. AGE modified proteins in tears may be used as biomarkers to diagnose diabetes and/or diabetic retinopathy.

  12. INTERACTION OF ALDEHYDES DERIVED FROM LIPID PEROXIDATION AND MEMBRANE PROTEINS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania ePizzimenti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions.

  13. A Perspective on the Maillard Reaction and the Analysis of Protein Glycation by Mass Spectrometry: Probing the Pathogenesis of Chronic Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Ames, Jennifer M.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-12-18

    The Maillard reaction, starting from the glycation of protein and progressing to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is implicated in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, renal, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this perspective review, we provide on overview on the relevance of the Maillard reaction in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and discuss traditional approaches and recent developments in the analysis of glycated proteins by mass spectrometry. We propose that proteomics approaches, particularly bottom-up proteomics, will play a significant role in analyses of clinical samples leading to the identification of new markers of disease development and progression.

  14. A perspective on the Maillard reaction and the analysis of protein glycation by mass spectrometry: probing the pathogenesis of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qibin; Ames, Jennifer M; Smith, Richard D; Baynes, John W; Metz, Thomas O

    2009-02-01

    The Maillard reaction, starting from the glycation of protein and progressing to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is implicated in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, renal, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this perspective review, we provide an overview on the relevance of the Maillard reaction in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and discuss traditional approaches and recent developments in the analysis of glycated proteins by mass spectrometry. We propose that proteomics approaches, particularly bottom-up proteomics, will play a significant role in analyses of clinical samples leading to the identification of new markers of disease development and progression.

  15. Generation of Soluble Advanced Glycation End Products Receptor (sRAGE)-Binding Ligands during Extensive Heat Treatment of Whey Protein/Lactose Mixtures Is Dependent on Glycation and Aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fahui; Teodorowicz, Gosia; Wichers, Harry J.; Boekel, van Tiny; Hettinga, Kasper A.

    2016-01-01

    Heating of protein- and sugar-containing materials is considered the primary factor affecting the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This study aimed to investigate the influence of heating conditions, digestion, and aggregation on the binding capacity of AGEs to the soluble AGE

  16. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both [ 3 H]NaBH 4 reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated

  17. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegele, Joerg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N ε -fructoselysine (FL), N ε -carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34 ± 3.81 nmol CML per μmol of free Lys (Lys free ) and 81.5 ± 87.8 nmol Pyr μmol -1 Lys free -1 vs. 3.72 ± 1.29 nmol FL μmol -1 Lys free -1 . In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47 ± 0.08 nmol FL μmol -1 of protein-bound Lys (Lys p-b ), 0.04 ± 0.03 nmol CML μmol -1 Lys p-b -1 and 0.06 ± 0.02 nmol Pyr μmol -1 Lys p-b -1 . It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products

  18. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegele, Joerg [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)], E-mail: joerg.hegele@rdls.nestle.com; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)

    2008-06-09

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N{sup {epsilon}}-fructoselysine (FL), N{sup {epsilon}}-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34 {+-} 3.81 nmol CML per {mu}mol of free Lys (Lys{sub free}) and 81.5 {+-} 87.8 nmol Pyr {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub free}{sup -1} vs. 3.72 {+-} 1.29 nmol FL {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub free}{sup -1}. In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47 {+-} 0.08 nmol FL {mu}mol{sup -1} of protein-bound Lys (Lys{sub p-b}), 0.04 {+-} 0.03 nmol CML {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub p-b}{sup -1} and 0.06 {+-} 0.02 nmol Pyr {mu}mol{sup -1} Lys{sub p-b}{sup -1}. It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products.

  19. A Perspective on the Maillard Reaction and the Analysis of Protein Glycation by Mass Spectrometry: Probing the Pathogenesis of Chronic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qibin; Ames, Jennifer M.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John W.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    The Maillard reaction, starting from the glycation of protein and progressing to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is implicated in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, renal, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this perspective review, we provide an overview on the relevance of the Maillard reaction in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and discuss traditional approaches and recent developments in the ...

  20. Determination of amino acid and protein peroxides by the xylenol orange-Fe(III) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.; Craig, G.; Gebicki, J.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress imposed on living organisms is believed to lead to the depletion of their antioxidant defences, followed by chemical changes in the cell constituents. These may ultimately develop into pathological conditions such as cancer or cardiovascular disease. An assay of peroxides which could be applied to tissues or simple tissue extracts would prove extremely useful in the studies of the phenomenon of oxidative stress. With this purpose, the authors have tested the ability of two peroxide assay techniques to measure the formation of amino acid and protein peroxides in aqueous solutions irradiated with gamma rays, using a modification of the method based on the oxidation of Fe(II)) by peroxides and complexing of the Fe(III) produced by xylenol orange. The molar extinction coefficients of the peroxides tested were determined by comparison with the well-tested iodometric assay. This work was extended to the detection of all organic peroxides in human blood plasma or serum subjected to oxidative stress, where the iodometric assay proved difficult to apply and unreliable because of the binding of iodine to the blood components. Preliminary results suggest that exposure of serum to gamma radiation leads to immediate peroxidation of the proteins, with a delay before generation of lipid peroxides

  1. Influence of storage and heating on protein glycation levels of processed lactose-free and regular bovine milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkovska-Stamenova, Sanja; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2017-04-15

    Thermal treatment preserves the microbiological safety of milk, but also induces Maillard reactions modifying for example proteins. The purpose of this study was evaluating the influence of consumer behaviors (storage and heating) on protein glycation degrees in bovine milk products. Lactosylation and hexosylation sites were identified in ultra-high temperature (UHT), lactose-free pasteurized, and lactose-free UHT milk (ULF) and infant formula (IF) using tandem mass spectrometry (electron transfer dissociation). Overall, 303 lactosylated and 199 hexosylated peptides were identified corresponding to 170 lactosylation (31 proteins) and 117 hexosylation sites (25 proteins). In quantitative terms, storage increased lactosylation up to fourfold in UHT and IF and hexosylation up to elevenfold in ULF and threefold in IF. These levels increased additionally twofold when the stored samples were heated (40°C). In conclusion, storage and heating appear to influence protein glycation levels in milk at similar or even higher degrees than industrial processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comprehensive Identification of Glycated Peptides and Their Glycation Motifs in Plasma and Erythrocytes of Control and Diabetic Subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Monroe, Matthew E.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Meng, Da; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-07-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is implicated in diabetes mellitus and its related complications. In this report, we extend our previous development and refinement of proteomics-based methods for the analysis of non-enzymatically glycated proteins to comprehensively identify glycated proteins in normal and diabetic human plasma and erythrocytes. Using immunodepletion, enrichment, and fractionation strategies, we identified 7749 unique glycated peptides, corresponding to 3742 unique glycated proteins. Semi-quantitative comparisons revealed a number of proteins with glycation levels significantly increased in diabetes relative to control samples and that erythrocyte proteins are more extensively glycated than plasma proteins. A glycation motif analysis revealed amino acids that are favored more than others in the protein primary structures in the vicinity of the glycation sites in both sample types. The glycated peptides and corresponding proteins reported here provide a foundation for the potential identification of novel markers for diabetes, glycemia, or diabetic complications.

  3. Serum levels of advanced glycation endproducts and other markers of protein damage in early diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Perkins

    Full Text Available To determine the role of markers of plasma protein damage by glycation, oxidation and nitration in microalbuminuria onset or subsequent decline of glomerular filtration rate (termed "early GFR decline" in patients with type 1 diabetes.From the 1(st Joslin Kidney Study, we selected 30 patients with longstanding normoalbuminuria and 55 patients with new onset microalbuminuria. Patients with microalbuminuria had 8-12 years follow-up during which 33 had stable GFR and 22 early GFR decline. Mean baseline GFR(CYSTATIN C was similar between the three groups. Glycation, oxidation and nitration markers were measured in protein and ultrafiltrate at baseline by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using the most reliable methods currently available.Though none were significantly different between patients with microalbuminuria with stable or early GFR decline, levels of 6 protein damage adduct residues of plasma protein and 4 related free adducts of plasma ultrafiltrate were significantly different in patients with microalbuminuria compared to normoalbuminuria controls. Three protein damage adduct residues were decreased and 3 increased in microalbuminuria while 3 free adducts were decreased and one increased in microalbuminuria. The most profound differences were of N-formylkynurenine (NFK protein adduct residue and N(ω-carboxymethylarginine (CMA free adduct in which levels were markedly lower in microalbuminuria (P<0.001 for both.Complex processes influence levels of plasma protein damage and related proteolysis product free adducts in type 1 diabetes and microalbuminuria. The effects observed point to the possibility that patients who have efficient mechanisms of disposal of damaged proteins might be at an increased risk of developing microalbuminuria but not early renal function decline. The findings support the concept that the mechanisms responsible for microalbuminuria may differ from the mechanisms involved in the initiation of early

  4. Sensory and Functionality Differences of Whey Protein Isolate Bleached by Hydrogen or Benzoyl Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tucker J; Foegeding, E Allen; Drake, MaryAnne

    2015-10-01

    Whey protein is a highly functional food ingredient used in a wide variety of applications. A large portion of fluid whey produced in the United States is derived from Cheddar cheese manufacture and contains annatto (norbixin), and therefore must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare sensory and functionality differences between whey protein isolate (WPI) bleached by benzoyl peroxide (BP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP). HP and BP bleached WPI and unbleached controls were manufactured in triplicate. Descriptive sensory analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were conducted to determine flavor differences between treatments. Functionality differences were evaluated by measurement of foam stability, protein solubility, SDS-PAGE, and effect of NaCl concentration on gelation relative to an unbleached control. HP bleached WPI had higher concentrations of lipid oxidation and sulfur containing volatile compounds than both BP and unbleached WPI (P protein loss at pH 4.6 of WPI decreased by bleaching with either hydrogen peroxide or benzoyl peroxide (P whey with either BP or HP resulted in protein degradation, which likely contributed to functionality differences. These results demonstrate that bleaching has flavor effects as well as effects on many of the functionality characteristics of whey proteins. Whey protein isolate (WPI) is often used for its functional properties, but the effect of oxidative bleaching chemicals on the functional properties of WPI is not known. This study identifies the effects of hydrogen peroxide and benzoyl peroxide on functional and flavor characteristics of WPI bleached by hydrogen and benzoyl peroxide and provides insights for the product applications which may benefit from bleaching. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  5. Photo-oxidation of cells generates long-lived intracellular protein peroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, Adam; Hawkins, Clare Louise; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is generated by several cellular, enzymatic, and chemical reactions as well as by exposure to UV or visible light in the presence of a sensitizer. Consequently, this oxidant has been proposed to be a damaging agent many pathologies. Proteins are major targets for singlet oxygen...... as a result of their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. In this study, we show that illumination of viable rose bengal-loaded THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells with visible light gives rise to intracellular protein-derived peroxides. The peroxide yield increases with illumination time, requires....../2) about 4 h at 37 degrees C. Decomposition of protein peroxides formed within cells, or on isolated cellular proteins, by metal ions gives rise to radicals as detected by EPR spin trapping. These studies demonstrate that exposure of intact cells to visible light in the presence of a sensitizer leads...

  6. Pomegranate (Punicagranatum juice decreases lipid peroxidation, but has no effect on plasma advanced glycated end-products in adults with type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golbon Sohrab

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus characterized by hyperglycemia could increase oxidative stress and formation of advanced glycated end-products (AGEs, which contribute to diabetic complications. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of pomegranate juice (PJ containing natural antioxidant on lipid peroxidation and plasma AGEs in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D. Materials and methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 patients (age range 56±6.8 years, T2D were randomly assigned to one of two groups: group A (PJ, n=22 and group B (Placebo, n=22. At the baseline and the end of 12-week intervention, biochemical markers including fasting plasma glucose, insulin, oxidative stress, and AGE markers including carboxy methyl lysine (CML and pentosidine were assayed. Results: At baseline, there were no significant differences in plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC levels between the two groups, but malondialdehyde (MDA decreased levels were significantly different (P<0.001. After 12 weeks of intervention, TAC increased (P<0.05 and MDA decreased (P<0.01 in the PJ group when compared with the placebo group. However, no significant differences were observed in plasma concentration of CML and pentosidine between the two groups. Conclusions: The study showed that PJ decreases lipid peroxidation. Therefore, PJ consumption may delay onset of T2D complications related to oxidative stress.

  7. UVA Light-excited Kynurenines Oxidize Ascorbate and Modify Lens Proteins through the Formation of Advanced Glycation End Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Fan, Xingjun; Monnier, Vincent M.; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to lens protein pigmentation and cross-linking during aging and cataract formation. In vitro experiments have shown that ascorbate (ASC) oxidation products can form AGEs in proteins. However, the mechanisms of ASC oxidation and AGE formation in the human lens are poorly understood. Kynurenines are tryptophan oxidation products produced from the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-mediated kynurenine pathway and are present in the human lens. This study investigated the ability of UVA light-excited kynurenines to photooxidize ASC and to form AGEs in lens proteins. UVA light-excited kynurenines in both free and protein-bound forms rapidly oxidized ASC, and such oxidation occurred even in the absence of oxygen. High levels of GSH inhibited but did not completely block ASC oxidation. Upon UVA irradiation, pigmented proteins from human cataractous lenses also oxidized ASC. When exposed to UVA light (320–400 nm, 100 milliwatts/cm2, 45 min to 2 h), young human lenses (20–36 years), which contain high levels of free kynurenines, lost a significant portion of their ASC content and accumulated AGEs. A similar formation of AGEs was observed in UVA-irradiated lenses from human IDO/human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter-2 mice, which contain high levels of kynurenines and ASC. Our data suggest that kynurenine-mediated ASC oxidation followed by AGE formation may be an important mechanism for lens aging and the development of senile cataracts in humans. PMID:24798334

  8. Analysis of drug-protein binding using on-line immunoextraction and high-performance affinity microcolumns: Studies with normal and glycated human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Jobe, Donald; Beyersdorf, Jared; Hage, David S

    2015-10-16

    A method combining on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was developed and tested for use in examining drug-protein interactions with normal or modified proteins. Normal human serum albumin (HSA) and glycated HSA were used as model proteins for this work. High-performance immunoextraction microcolumns with sizes of 1.0-2.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. and containing anti-HSA polyclonal antibodies were developed and tested for their ability to bind normal HSA or glycated HSA. These microcolumns were able to extract up to 82-93% for either type of protein at 0.05-0.10 mL/min and had a binding capacity of 0.34-0.42 nmol HSA for a 1.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. microcolumn. The immunoextraction microcolumns and their adsorbed proteins were tested for use in various approaches for drug binding studies. Frontal analysis was used with the adsorbed HSA/glycated HSA to measure the overall affinities of these proteins for the drugs warfarin and gliclazide, giving comparable values to those obtained previously using similar protein preparations that had been covalently immobilized within HPAC columns. Zonal elution competition studies with gliclazide were next performed to examine the specific interactions of this drug at Sudlow sites I and II of the adsorbed proteins. These results were also comparable to those noted in prior work with covalently immobilized samples of normal HSA or glycated HSA. These experiments indicated that drug-protein binding studies can be carried out by using on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with HPAC. The same method could be used in the future with clinical samples and other drugs or proteins of interest in pharmaceutical studies or biomedical research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lipids and Protein Peroxidation in Children and Teenager Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Poliakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of literature about the study of lipid and protein peroxidation in children and teenagers with pulmonary tuberculosis nowadays was carried out. It was established that there is a great number works dedicated to the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protective system in various pathological conditions of the respiratory system, including pulmonary tuberculosis in children and teenagers today. Oxidative modification proteins products are the earliest markers of oxidative stress in patients. There is no information on the oxidative modification of proteins in children and teenagers suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis in the literature. The study of oxidative modification of proteins will facilitate the development of more efficient new diagnosis methods and pathogenetic treatment of children and teenagers with pulmonary tuberculosis, that will increase the treatment effectiveness.

  10. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(lll)/O-2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid......-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate fatty acids were oxidized in the presence...... in the formation of protein carbonyls, These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues...

  11. Products by Glycation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Ortega

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant properties of sweet and acid whey products were incremented by polymerization of their proteins by glycation of whey protein concentrates (WPC and their hydrolyzates (WPCH with ribose and glucose in individual experiments under similar concentration. Heating at 50°C during 20 h maximum and pH 7 and pH 9 were used in all tests. The higher activity was found in WPC glycosylates products with ribose at pH 7 and heating during 10–15 h. In comparable form, antioxidant activity in WPCH was incremented by prior hydrolysis to glycation with 25–45% of hydrolysis degree. Further functional properties of whey proteins (solubility, emulsion, and foam were also improved by the polymerization with ribose. The color of polymerized products due to Maillard reactions was associated with antioxidant activity of each compound; however comparative color in glycosylates products with glucose and ribose did not show this effect.

  12. Advanced glycation end products impair function of late endothelial progenitor cells through effects on protein kinase Akt and cyclooxygenase-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Qin; Dong Li; Wang Lian; Kang Lina; Xu Biao

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) exhibit impaired function in the context of diabetes, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in diabetes, may contribute to this. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which AGEs impair late EPC function. EPCs from human umbilical cord blood were isolated, and incubated with AGE-modified albumin (AGE-albumin) at different concentrations found physiologically in plasma. Apoptosis, migration, and tube formation assays were used to evaluate EPC function including capacity for vasculogenesis, and expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) were determined. Anti-RAGE antibody was used to block RAGE function. AGE-albumin concentration-dependently enhanced apoptosis and depressed migration and tube formation, but did not affect proliferation, of late EPCs. High AGE-albumin increased RAGE mRNA and protein expression, and decreased Akt and COX-2 protein expression, whilst having no effect on eNOS mRNA or protein in these cells. These effects were inhibited by co-incubation with anti-RAGE antibody. These results suggest that RAGE mediates the AGE-induced impairment of late EPC function, through down-regulation of Akt and COX-2 in these cells.

  13. High-dose thiamine therapy counters dyslipidemia and advanced glycation of plasma protein in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachalias, Nikolaos; Babaei-Jadidi, Roya; Kupich, Christian; Ahmed, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2005-06-01

    The streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetic rat experimental model of diabetes on insulin maintenance therapy exhibits dyslipidemia, mild thiamine deficiency, and increased plasma protein advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The reversal of thiamine deficiency by high-dose thiamine and S-benzoylthiamine monophosphate (benfotiamine) prevented the development of incipient nephropathy. Recently, we reported that high-dose thiamine (but not benfotiamine) countered diabetic dyslipidemia. To understand further the differences between the effects of thiamine and benfotiamine therapy, we quantified the levels of the AGEs in plasma protein. We found hydroimidazolone AGE residues derived from glyoxal and methylglyoxal, G-H1 and MG-H1, were increased 115% and 68% in STZ diabetic rats, with respect to normal controls, and were normalized by both thiamine and benfotiamine; whereas N-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML) and N-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL) residues were increased 74% and 118% in STZ diabetic rats and were normalized by thiamine only. The lack of effect of benfotiamine on plasma CML and CEL residue concentrations suggests there may be important precursors of plasma protein CML and CEL residues other than glyoxal and methylglyoxal. These are probably lipid-derived aldehydes.

  14. The Inhibitory Effect of Prunella vulgaris L. on Aldose Reductase and Protein Glycation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Mei Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the aldose reductase (AR enzyme inhibitory ability of Prunella vulgaris L. extract, six compounds were isolated and tested for their effects. The components were subjected to in vitro bioassays to investigate their inhibitory assays using rat lens aldose reductase (rAR and human recombinant AR (rhAR. Among them, caffeic acid ethylene ester showed the potent inhibition, with the IC50 values of rAR and rhAR at 3.2±0.55 μM and 12.58±0.32 μM, respectively. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/concentration of substrate, this compound showed noncompetitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, it inhibited galactitol formation in a rat lens incubated with a high concentration of galactose. Also it has antioxidative as well as advanced glycation end products (AGEs inhibitory effects. As a result, this compound could be offered as a leading compound for further study as a new natural products drug for diabetic complications.

  15. Ethanolic extract of Passiflora edulis Sims leaves inhibits protein glycation and restores the oxidative burst in diabetic rat macrophages after Candida albicans exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Fernandes Ribas Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available abstract This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of the ethanolic extract of Passiflora edulis leaves on blood glucose, protein glycation, NADPH oxidase activity and macrophage phagocytic capacity after Candida albicans exposure in diabetic rats. The Passiflora edulis Sims leaves were dried to 40°C, powdered, extracted by maceration in 70% ethanol, evaporated under reduced pressure and lyophilised. The biochemical tests performed were total phenolic content (TP as determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay, trapping potential DPPH assay and total iron-reducing potential. Diabetes was induced by alloxan injection. Protein glycation was determined by AGE and fructosamine serum concentrations. Extract-treated diabetic animals demonstrated lower fructosamine concentrations compared with the diabetic group. Our results suggest that ethanolic Passiflora edulis Sims leaf extraction may have beneficial effects on diabetes and may improve glycaemic control in diabetic rats.

  16. Open-tubular capillary electrochromatography with bare gold nanoparticles-based stationary phase applied to separation of trypsin digested native and glycated proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikšík, Ivan; Lacinová, Kateřina; Zmatlíková, Zdeňka; Sedláková, Pavla; Král, V.; Sýkora, D.; Řezanka, P.; Kašička, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 8 (2012), s. 994-1002 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/0675; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : capillary electrochromatography * gold nanoparticles * glycation * peptide maps * proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.591, year: 2012

  17. Bimolecular interaction of argpyrimidine (a Maillard reaction product) in in vitro non-enzymatic protein glycation model and its potential role as an antiglycating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Abhishek; Dhara, Kaliprasanna; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2017-09-01

    Non- enzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, is one of the most important and investigated reactions in biochemistry. Maillard reaction products (MRPs) like protein-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are often referred to cause pathophysiological complications in human systems. On contrary, several MRPs are exogenously used as antioxidant, antimicrobial and flavouring agents. In the preset study, we have shown that argpyrimidine, a well-established AGE, interacts with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glucose individually in standard BSA-glucose model system and successfully inhibits glycation of the protein. Bimolecular interaction of argpyrimidine with glucose or BSA has been studied independently. Chromatographic purification, different spectroscopic studies and molecular modeling have been used to evaluate the nature and pattern of interactions. Binding of argpyrimidine with BSA prevents incorporation of glucose inside the native protein. Argpyrimidine can also directly entrap glucose. Both these interactions may be associated with the antiglycation potential of argpyrimidine, indicating a beneficial function of an AGE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of lipid and protein membrane components of erythrocytes oxidized with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendanha, S.A.; Anjos, J.L.V.; Silva, A.H.M.; Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin labels was used to monitor membrane dynamic changes in erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The lipid spin label, 5-doxyl stearic acid, responded to dramatic reductions in membrane fluidity, which was correlated with increases in the protein content of the membrane. Membrane rigidity, associated with the binding of hemoglobin (Hb) to the erythrocyte membrane, was also indicated by a spin-labeled maleimide, 5-MSL, covalently bound to the sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. At 2% hematocrit, these alterations in membrane occurred at very low concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 µM) after only 5 min of incubation at 37°C in azide phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Lipid peroxidation, suggested by oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde formation, started at 300 µM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (for incubation of 3 h), which is a concentration about six times higher than those detected with the probes. Ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol protected the membrane against lipoperoxidation, but did not prevent the binding of proteins to the erythrocyte membrane. Moreover, the antioxidant (+)-catechin, which also failed to prevent the cross-linking of cytoskeletal proteins with Hb, was very effective in protecting erythrocyte ghosts from lipid peroxidation induced by the Fenton reaction. This study also showed that EPR spectroscopy can be useful to assess the molecular dynamics of red blood cell membranes in both the lipid and protein domains and examine oxidation processes in a system that is so vulnerable to oxidation.

  19. Effects of sterilization, packaging, and storage on vitamin C degradation, protein denaturation, and glycation in fortified milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliguem, H; Birlouez-Aragon, I

    2005-03-01

    Monitoring the nutritional quality of dietetic milk throughout its shelf life is particularly important due to the high susceptibility of some vitamins to oxidation, and the continuous development of the Maillard reaction during storage. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the vitamin C content and protein modification by denaturation and glycation on fortified milk samples (growth milks) destined for 1- to 3-yr-old children. The influences of the sterilization process, formulation, packaging, and storage duration at ambient temperature in the dark were studied. Vitamin C degradation was particularly influenced by type of packaging. The use of a 3-layered opaque bottle was associated with complete oxidation of vitamin C after 1 mo of storage, whereas in the 6-layered opaque bottle, which has an oxygen barrier, the vitamin C content slowly decreased to reach 25% of the initial concentration after 4 mo of storage. However, no significant effect of vitamin C degradation during storage could be observed in terms of Maillard reaction, despite the fact that a probable impact occurred during sterilization. Furosine content and the FAST (fluorescence of advanced Maillard products and soluble tryptophan) index-indicators of the early and advanced Maillard reaction, respectively-were significantly higher in the in-bottle sterilized milk samples compared with UHT samples, and in fortified milk samples compared with cow milk. However, after 1 mo, the impact of storage was predominant, increasing the furosine level and the FAST index at similar levels for the differently processed samples. The early Maillard reaction developed continuously throughout the storage period.In conclusion, only packaging comprising an oxygen and light barrier is compatible with vitamin C fortification of milk. Furthermore, short storage time or low storage temperature is needed to retard vitamin C degradation, protein denaturation, and development of the Maillard reaction.

  20. Nutritional supplements modulate fluorescent protein-bound advanced glycation endproducts and digestive enzymes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Emily R; Deo, Permal

    2016-09-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia enhances the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), contributing to diabetic complications. Thus, controlling blood glucose levels, inhibiting the formation of AGEs and reducing ROS are key therapeutic targets in early stage type 2 diabetes. The inhibitory effects of seven commercial liquid nutritional supplements against carbohydrate hydrolysing enzymes, α-amylase and α-glucosidase, was determined by dinitrosalicylic (DNS) reagent and p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside solution, respectively. Antiglycation activity was determined using the formation of fluorescent protein-bound AGEs. Total phenolic and flavonoid content and antioxidant properties (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl antioxidant activity (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)) were determined for correlation among these components and inhibitory activities. Samoan noni juice showed the greatest inhibitory effects against α-amylase, whereas chlorophyll extracts showed the greatest inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase. Inhibition of α-glucosidase correlated with TFC (r(2) = 0.766; p 1) and FRAP (r(2) = 0.750; p 1) whereas no correlation was observed for α-amylase inhibition. All supplements inhibited fluorescent protein-bound AGEs, with the greatest effect exerted by Olive Leaf Extract, Blood Sugar Support (IC50 = 0.5 mg/ml). The IC50 values negatively correlated with TPC (r(2) = -0.707; p 1) and DPPH scavenging activities (r(2) = 0.515; p nutritional supplements in managing and treating type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  1. New Locus for Skin Intrinsic Fluorescence in Type 1 Diabetes Also Associated With Blood and Skin Glycated Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshandel, Delnaz; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Atzmon, Gil; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Crandall, Jill P.; Barzilai, Nir; Bull, Shelley B.; Canty, Angelo J.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Hiraki, Linda T.; Maynard, John; Sell, David R.; Monnier, Vincent M.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Braffett, Barbara H.; Paterson, Andrew D.

    Skin fluorescence (SF) noninvasively measures advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the skin and is a risk indicator for diabetes complications. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is the only known locus influencing SF. We aimed to identify additional genetic loci influencing SF in type 1 diabetes

  2. Glycation Reactions of Casein Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeckel, Ulrike; Duerasch, Anja; Weiz, Alexander; Ruck, Michael; Henle, Thomas

    2016-04-13

    After suspensions of micellar casein or nonmicellar sodium caseinate had been heated, respectively, in the presence and absence of glucose for 0-4 h at 100 °C, glycation compounds were quantitated. The formation of Amadori products as indicators for the "early" Maillard reaction were in the same range for both micellar and nonmicellar caseins, indicating that reactive amino acid side chains within the micelles are accessible for glucose in a comparable way as in nonmicellar casein. Significant differences, however, were observed concerning the formation of the advanced glycation end products (AGEs), namely, N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML), pyrraline, pentosidine, and glyoxal-lysine dimer (GOLD). CML could be observerd in higher amounts in nonmicellar casein, whereas in the micelles the pyrraline formation was increased. Pentosidine and GOLD were formed in comparable amounts. Furthermore, the extent of protein cross-linking was significantly higher in the glycated casein micelles than in the nonmicellar casein samples. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy showed that glycation has no influence on the size of the casein micelles, indicating that cross-linking occurs only in the interior of the micelles, but altered the surface morphology. Studies on glycation and nonenzymatic cross-linking can contribute to the understanding of the structure of casein micelles.

  3. Xanthium strumarium as an Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase, Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1β, Protein Glycation and ABTS⁺ for Diabetic and Its Complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Yoon, Ha Na; Lim, Soon Sung

    2016-09-16

    Phytochemical investigation of the natural products from Xanthium strumarium led to the isolation of fourteen compounds including seven caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) derivatives. The individual compounds were screened for inhibition of α-glucosidase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β (PTP1β), advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and ABTS⁺ radical scavenging activity using in vitro assays. Among the isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-caffeoyquinic acid exhibited significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (18.42 μM), PTP1β (1.88 μM), AGEs (82.79 μM), and ABTS⁺ (6.03 μM). This effect was marked compared to that of the positive controls (acarbose 584.79 μM, sumarin 5.51 μM, aminoguanidine 1410.00 μM, and trolox 29.72 μM respectively). In addition, 3,5-di-O-CQA (88.14 μM) and protocatechuic acid (32.93 μM) had a considerable inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase and ABTS⁺. Based on these findings, methyl-3,5-di-caffeoyquinic acid was assumed to be potentially responsible for the anti-diabetic actions of X. strumarium.

  4. Xanthium strumarium as an Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase, Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1β, Protein Glycation and ABTS+ for Diabetic and Its Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Hwang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigation of the natural products from Xanthium strumarium led to the isolation of fourteen compounds including seven caffeoylquinic acid (CQA derivatives. The individual compounds were screened for inhibition of α-glucosidase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1β (PTP1β, advanced glycation end products (AGEs, and ABTS+ radical scavenging activity using in vitro assays. Among the isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-caffeoyquinic acid exhibited significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (18.42 μM, PTP1β (1.88 μM, AGEs (82.79 μM, and ABTS+ (6.03 μM. This effect was marked compared to that of the positive controls (acarbose 584.79 μM, sumarin 5.51 μM, aminoguanidine 1410.00 μM, and trolox 29.72 μM respectively. In addition, 3,5-di-O-CQA (88.14 μM and protocatechuic acid (32.93 μM had a considerable inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase and ABTS+. Based on these findings, methyl-3,5-di-caffeoyquinic acid was assumed to be potentially responsible for the anti-diabetic actions of X. strumarium.

  5. 3-Deoxyglucosone: a potential glycating agent accountable for structural alteration in H3 histone protein through generation of different AGEs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalaluddin M Ashraf

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs are heterogeneous group of compounds, known to be implicated in diabetic complications. One of the consequences of the Maillard reaction is attributed to the production of reactive intermediate products such as α-oxoaldehydes. 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG, an α-oxoaldehyde has been found to be involved in accelerating vascular damage during diabetes. In the present study, calf thymus histone H3 was treated with 3-deoxyglucosone to investigate the generation of AGEs (Nε-carboxymethyllysine, pentosidine, by examining the degree of side chain modifications and formation of different intermediates and employing various physicochemical techniques. The results clearly indicate the formation of AGEs and structural changes upon glycation of H3 by 3-deoxyglucosone, which may hamper the normal functioning of H3 histone, that may compromise the veracity of chromatin structures and function in secondary complications of diabetes.

  6. In vitro inhibitory activities of selected Australian medicinal plant extracts against protein glycation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and digestive enzymes linked to type II diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Permal; Hewawasam, Erandi; Karakoulakis, Aris; Claudie, David J; Nelson, Robert; Simpson, Bradley S; Smith, Nicholas M; Semple, Susan J

    2016-11-04

    There is a need to develop potential new therapies for the management of diabetes and hypertension. Australian medicinal plants collected from the Kuuku I'yu (Northern Kaanju) homelands, Cape York Peninsula, Queensland, Australia were investigated to determine their therapeutic potential. Extracts were tested for inhibition of protein glycation and key enzymes relevant to the management of hyperglycaemia and hypertension. The inhibitory activities were further correlated with the antioxidant activities. Extracts of five selected plant species were investigated: Petalostigma pubescens, Petalostigma banksii, Memecylon pauciflorum, Millettia pinnata and Grewia mesomischa. Enzyme inhibitory activity of the plant extracts was assessed against α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Antiglycation activity was determined using glucose-induced protein glycation models and formation of protein-bound fluorescent advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). Antioxidant activity was determined by measuring the scavenging effect of plant extracts against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and using the ferric reducing anti-oxidant potential assay (FRAP). Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also determined. Extracts of the leaves of Petalostigma banksii and P. pubescens showed the strongest inhibition of α-amylase with IC 50 values of 166.50 ± 5.50 μg/mL and 160.20 ± 27.92 μg/mL, respectively. The P. pubescens leaf extract was also the strongest inhibitor of α-glucosidase with an IC 50 of 167.83 ± 23.82 μg/mL. Testing for the antiglycation potential of the extracts, measured as inhibition of formation of protein-bound fluorescent AGEs, showed that P. banksii root and fruit extracts had IC 50 values of 34.49 ± 4.31 μg/mL and 47.72 ± 1.65 μg/mL, respectively, which were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than other extracts. The inhibitory effect on α-amylase, α-glucosidase and the antiglycation potential of

  7. Characterization and cytological effects of a novel glycated gelatine substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonkaew, Benjawan; Supaphol, Pitt; Tompkins, Kevin; Manokawinchoke, Jeeranan; Pavasant, Prasit

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in diabetes results in the glycation of long-lived proteins. Protein glycation leads to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are implicated in delayed wound healing and other diabetes-associated pathologies, one of which is periodontal disease. Research into the mechanisms by which glycated long-lived proteins such as collagen exert their effects can allow for the understanding of diabetic pathologies and the development of appropriate treatments. However, the high cost of purified protein can be a limitation for many laboratories around the world. The objective of this study was to develop a low-cost in vitro model of glycated gelatine as an alternative to the glycated collagen model. We investigated the glycation of gelatine type A, a denatured form of collagen, which is low-cost and abundantly available. In this study, gelatine was incubated for 7 days with ribose or methylglyoxal (MG). Cross-linking, autofluorescence and UV–Vis spectrophotometry assays were performed and indicated a dose-dependent linear increase in cross-linking and autofluorescence of gelatine by ribose and MG. MG produced more cross-linking compared to ribose at the same concentrations. The UV–Vis spectra of the glycated gelatines confirmed the presence of AGE fluorophores. Because diabetes is a risk factor for periodontal disease, the effect of the glycated substrates on the basic behaviour of human periodontal ligament (HPDL) cells was evaluated. Glycation dose dependently reduced HPDL attachment and cell spreading, indicating that the novel glycated gelatine substrate affects cell behaviour. These results show that gelatine glycated with ribose or MG can be used as low-cost in vitro models to study the effects of protein glycation on cell behaviour in diabetes and ageing. (paper)

  8. Revealing the glycation sites in synthetic neoglycoconjugates formed by conjugation of the antigenic monosaccharide hapten of Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Ogawa with the BSA protein carrier using LC-ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahouh, Farid; Saksena, Rina; Kováč, Pavol; Banoub, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present the determination of glycation sites in synthetic neoglycoconjugates formed by conjugation of the antigenic monosaccharide hapten of Vibrio cholerae O1 serotype Ogawa to BSA using nano- liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS). The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-TOF/TOF-MS/MS analyses of the tryptic digests of the glycoconjugates having a hapten:BSA ratio of 4.3:1, 6.6:1 and 13.2:1 revealed only three glycation sites, on the following lysine residues: Lys 235, Lys 437 and Lys 455. Digestion of the neoglycoconjugates with the proteases trypsin and GluC V8 gave complementary structural information and was shown to maximize the number of recognized glycation sites. Here, we report identification of 20, 27 and 33 glycation sites using LC-ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS analysis of a series of synthetic neoglycoconjugates with a hapten:BSA ratio of, respectively, 4.3:1, 6.6:1 and 13.2:1. We also tentatively propose that all the glycated lysine residues are located mainly near the outer surface of the protein. PMID:22791257

  9. Assessment of lipid and protein peroxidation markers in non-pregnant and pregnant female dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczubiał, M; Kankofer, M; Dąbrowski, R; Bochniarz, M; Urban-Chmiel, R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate oxidative stress during normal pregnancy in female dogs based on an evaluation of plasma markers for lipid and protein peroxidation. Twenty clinically healthy female dogs (10 non-pregnant and 10 pregnant) were used in the study. Blood samples from the pregnant animals were collected at 19-21, 38-40, and 56-58 days of pregnancy. Blood samples from non-pregnant female dogs were obtained between 20 and 35 days after ineffective breeding. As indicators of oxidative stress, we measured the following using spectrophotometric and spectrof- luorimetric methods: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), radical cations of N,N, diethylparaphenylene diamine (RC-DEPPD), sulfhydryl groups (SH groups), bityrosine and formylkynurenine. The mean plasma TBARS concentration in the pregnant dogs (0.486 ± 0.071-0.581 ± 0.191 μmol/g protein) was significantly higher (p pregnant animals (0.274 ± 0.111 μmol/g protein). A marked, although not significant, decrease in SH group content, as well as an increase in bityrosine and formylkynurenine concentration were concurrently observed in the pregnant dogs. No significant differences were found in terms of the studied markers in the pregnant animals when comparing the values obtained during the investigated periods of pregnancy, although there was a progressive decrease in TBARS concentration and a progressive increase in RC-DEPPD, bityrosine and formylkynurenine contents. Our findings suggest that normal pregnancy in female dogs is associated with oxidative stress. Further studies are necessary to establish the physiological ranges of antioxidative/oxidative profiles in pregnant dogs and to explain if and how the intensity of oxidative stress might contribute to the risk of the complications of pregnancy.

  10. Kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and its protein complex by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Antina, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of oxidation reactions of bilirubin and its complex with albumin was carried out in aqueous solutions under the action of hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen at different pH values. Free radical oxidation of the pigment in both free and bound forms at pH 7.4 was shown not to lead to the formation of biliverdin, but to be associated with the decomposition of the tetrapyrrole chromophore into monopyrrolic products. The effective and true rate constants of the reactions under study were determined. It was assumed that one possible mechanism of the oxidation reaction is associated with the interaction of peroxyl radicals and protons of the NH groups of bilirubin molecules at the limiting stage with the formation of a highly reactive radical intermediate. The binding of bilirubin with albumin was found to result in a considerable reduction in the rate of the oxidation reaction associated with the kinetic manifestation of the protein protection effect. It was found that the autoxidation of bilirubin by molecular oxygen with the formation of biliverdin at the intermediate stage can be observed with an increase in the pH of solutions.

  11. Digestibility of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) Protein Concentrate and Its Potential to Inhibit Lipid Peroxidation in the Zebrafish Larvae Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilcacundo, R; Barrio, D; Carpio, C; García-Ruiz, A; Rúales, J; Hernández-Ledesma, B; Carrillo, W

    2017-09-01

    Quinoa protein concentrate (QPC) was extracted and digested under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions. The protein content of QPC was in the range between 52.40 and 65.01% depending on the assay used. Quinoa proteins were almost completely hydrolyzed by pepsin at pH of 1.2, 2.0, and 3.2. At high pH, only partial hydrolysis was observed. During the duodenal phase, no intact proteins were visible, indicating their susceptibility to the in vitro simulated digestive conditions. Zebrafish larvae model was used to evaluate the in vivo ability of gastrointestinal digests to inhibit lipid peroxidation. Gastric digestion at pH 1.2 showed the highest lipid peroxidation inhibition percentage (75.15%). The lipid peroxidation activity increased after the duodenal phase. The digest obtained at the end of the digestive process showed an inhibition percentage of 82.10%, comparable to that showed when using BHT as positive control (87.13%).

  12. Protein conjugated with aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation as an independent parameter of the carbonyl stress in the kidney damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina-Navarro Rafael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the well-defined and characterized protein modifications usually produced by oxidation is carbonylation, an irreversible non-enzymatic modification of proteins. However, carbonyl groups can be introduced into proteins by non-oxidative mechanisms. Reactive carbonyl compounds have been observed to have increased in patients with renal failure. In the present work we have described a procedure designed as aldehyde capture to calculate the protein carbonyl stress derived solely from lipid peroxidation. Methods Acrolein-albumin adduct was prepared as standard at alkaline pH. Rat liver microsomal membranes and serum samples from patients with diabetic nephropathy were subjected to the aldehyde capture procedure and aldol-protein formation. Before alkalinization and incubation, samples were precipitated and redisolved in 6M guanidine. The absorbances of the samples were read with a spectrophotometer at 266 nm against a blank of guanidine. Results Evidence showed abundance of unsaturated aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomal membranes and in the serum of diabetic patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. Carbonyl protein and aldol-proteins resulted higher in the diabetic nephropathy patients (p Conclusion The aldehyde-protein adduct represents a non oxidative component of carbonyl stress, independent of the direct amino acid oxidation and could constitute a practical and novelty strategy to measure the carbonyl stress derived solely from lipid peroxidation and particularly in diabetic nephropathy patients. In addition, we are in a position to propose an alternative explanation of why alkalinization of urine attenuates rhabdomyolysis-induced renal dysfunction.

  13. Inhibition of Protein Glycation by Tiger Milk Mushroom [Lignosus rhinocerus (Cooke Ryvarden] and Search for Potential Anti-diabetic Activity-Related Metabolic Pathways by Genomic and Transcriptomic Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Yeng Y. Yap

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring anti-glycation compounds have drawn much interest in recent years as they show potential in reducing or preventing the risk of chronic complications for diabetic patients. In this study, annotation of the genome–transcriptome data from tiger milk mushroom (Lignosus rhinocerus, syn. Lignosus rhinocerotis to PlantCyc enzymes database identified transcripts that are related to anti-diabetic properties, and these include genes that are involved in carotenoid and abscisic acid biosynthesis as well as genes that code for glyoxalase I, catalase-peroxidases, and superoxide dismutases. The existence of these genes suggests that L. rhinocerus may contain bioactive compound(s with anti-glycation properties that can be exploited for management of diabetic complications. A medium-molecular-weight (MMW fraction which was obtained from a combination of cold water extraction and Sephadex® G-50 (fine gel filtration chromatography of L. rhinocerus sclerotia powder was demonstrated to exhibit potent anti-glycation activity. The fraction specifically inhibited the formation of N-(carboxymethyllysine, pentosidine, and other advanced glycation end-product (AGE structures in a human serum albumin-glucose system, with an IC50 value of 0.001 mg/ml, almost 520 times lower than that of the positive control, aminoguanidine hydrochloride (IC50 = 0.52 mg/ml. Its ability to suppress protein glycation may be partly associated with its strong superoxide anion radical scavenging activity (10.16 ± 0.12 mmol TE/g. Our results suggest that the MMW fraction of L. rhinocerus shows potential to be developed into a potent glycation inhibitor for preventing AGE-mediated diabetic complications.

  14. Co-localisation of advanced glycation end products and D-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins in gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Takazawa, Yutaka; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujii, Noriko

    2012-08-01

    Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD), also known as familial subepithelial corneal amyloidosis, is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes progressive corneal opacity due to accumulation of amyloid fibrils in the corneal stroma. Genetic analyses have revealed that a mutation in membrane component chromosome 1 surface marker 1 gene is responsible for GDLD. However, the mechanism of amyloid formation in the corneal stroma remains unclear. The present study attempted to reveal the role of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and d-amino acids in amyloid formation in GDLD. Informed consent was obtained from five patients with GDLD, three patients with bullous keratopathy and three patients with interstitial keratitis and all the specimens were analysed. Localisation of amyloid fibrils was analysed using Congo-red and thioflavin T staining. In addition, the localisation of AGE (N(ε)-carboxy(methyl)-L-lysine, pyrraline and pentosidine) and D-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins, a major form of d-amino acid-containing proteins, was analysed immunohistochemically. In all GDLD specimens, strong immunoreactivity to AGE and D-β-aspartic acid-containing proteins was detected in the subepithelial amyloid-rich region. In contrast, amyloid fibrils, AGE, or D-amino acid-containing proteins were slightly detected in the corneal stroma of patients with bullous keratopathy and interstitial keratitis. Abnormally accumulated proteins rich in AGE and D-β-aspartic acid co-localise in the amyloid lesions in GDLD. These results indicate that non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of proteins, including AGE formation and isomerisation of aspartyl residues, will be the cause as well as the result of amyloid fibril formations in GDLD.

  15. Advanced glycation end products-modified proteins and oxidized LDL mediate down-regulation of leptin in mouse adipocytes via CD36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unno, Yuka; Sakai, Masakazu; Sakamoto, Yu-ichiro; Kuniyasu, Akihiko; Nakayama, Hitoshi; Nagai, Ryoji; Horiuchi, Seikoh

    2004-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE)-modified proteins as well as oxidized-LDL (Ox-LDL) undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis by CHO cells overexpressing CD36, a member of class B scavenger receptor family. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of glycolaldehyde-modified BSA (GA-BSA) as an AGE-ligand and Ox-LDL on leptin expression in adipocytes. GA-BSA decreased leptin expression at both protein and mRNA levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and mouse epididymal adipocytes. Ox-LDL showed a similar inhibitory effect on leptin expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which effect was protected by N-acetylcysteine, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor. Binding of 125 I-GA-BSA or 125 I-Ox-LDL to 3T3-L1 adipocytes and subsequent endocytic degradation were inhibited by a neutralizing anti-CD36 antibody. Furthermore, this antibody also suppressed Ox-LDL-induced leptin down-regulation. These results clarify that the interaction of GA-BSA and Ox-LDL with CD36 leads to down-regulation of leptin expression via ROS system(s) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting that a potential link of AGE- and/or Ox-LDL-induced leptin down-regulation might be linked to insulin-sensitivity in metabolic syndrome

  16. A high-fat diet increases oxidative renal injury and protein glycation in D-galactose-induced aging rats and its prevention by Korea red ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sok; Kim, Chan-Sik; Min, Jinah; Lee, Soo Hwan; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Declining renal function is commonly observed with age. Obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD) may reduce renal function. Korean red ginseng (KRG) has been reported to ameliorate oxidative tissue injury and have an anti-aging effect. This study was designed to investigate whether HFD would accelerate the D-galactose-induced aging process in the rat kidney and to examine the preventive effect of KRG on HFD and D-galactose-induced aging-related renal injury. When rats with D-galactose-induced aging were fed an HFD for 9 wk, enhanced oxidative DNA damage, renal cell apoptosis, protein glycation, and extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), a signal of tissue damage, were observed in renal glomerular cells and tubular epithelial cells. However, treatment of rats with HFD- plus D-galactose-induced aging with KRG restored all of these renal changes. Our data suggested that a long-term HFD may enhance D-galactose-induced oxidative renal injury in rats and that this age-related renal injury could be suppressed by KRG through the repression of oxidative injury.

  17. Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide Sanitization of an Isolator for Aseptic Filling of Monoclonal Antibody Drug Product - Hydrogen Peroxide Uptake and Impact on Protein Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Aaron; Reodl, Thomas; Hui, Ada; Knueppel, Stephanie; Eppler, Kirk; Lehnert, Siegfried; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2018-03-15

    A monoclonal antibody drug product (DP) manufacturing process was transferred to a different production site, where aseptic filling took place within an isolator that was sanitized using vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP). A quality-by-design approach was applied for study design to understand the impact of VPHP uptake in the isolator on DP quality. A combination of small-scale and manufacturing-scale studies was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of the monoclonal antibody to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as VPHP uptake mechanisms during the filling process. The acceptable H2O2 level was determined to be 100 ng/mL for the antibody in the H2O2 spiking study; protein oxidation was observed above this threshold. The most prominent sources of VPHP uptake were identified to be via the silicone tubing assembly (associated with the peristaltic pumps) and open, filled vials. Silicone tubing, an effective depot to H2O2, could absorb VPHP during different stages of the filling process and discharge H2O2 into the DP solution during filling interruptions. A small-scale isolator model, established to simulate manufacturing-scale conditions, was a useful tool in understanding H2O2 uptake in relation to tubing dimensions and VPHP concentration in the isolator air (or atmosphere). Although the tubing assembly had absorbed a substantial amount of VPHP during the decontamination phase, the majority of H2O2 could be removed during tubing cleaning and sterilization in the subsequent isolator aeration phase, demonstrating that H2O2 in the DP solution is taken up primarily via atmospheric VPHP residues in the isolator during filling. Picarro sensor monitoring suggested that the validated VPHP aeration process generates reproducible residual VPHP profiles in isolator air, thus allowing small-scale studies to provide more relevant recommendations on tubing size and interruption time limits for commercial manufacturing. The recommended process parameters were demonstrated to be

  18. PSEUDOAFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY ENRICHMENT OF GLYCATED PEPTIDES FOR MONITORING ADVANCED GLYCATION END PRODUCTS (AGES IN METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekar R. Prasanna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Glycation End (AGE products are produced due to diabetic progression and they are responsible for many complications in the diabetic disorder. The diabetic progression is measured, particularly following glycated hemoglobin using specific antibodies. However, the most abundant protein in blood, human serum albumin, is also found to be glycated which has a much shorter half life and gives information on short term glycemic control. In addition, glycated albumins are considered as markers of diabetic complications such as nephropathy, peripheral vascular calcification and also in Alzheimer’s disease. The glycation proceeds from the interaction between aldehyde group of sugar and the free amino group of the protein, resulting in the formation of Schiff’s base, which undergoes a series of modifications leading to generation of imidazoyl derivatives of amino acids known as Amadori rearrangement products. The imidazoyl derivatives from arginine and lysine are the most prominent modifications observed in proteins in the presence of reducing sugar and these imidazoyl derivatives have an affinity towards certain transition metal ions. Based on our earlier exhaustive work on trapping the histidine peptides using transition metal ion, Cu(II linked to imino-diacetate complex, we explored Cu(II immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC as a potential tool for specific detection of glycated peptides of human serum albumin. Our results clearly demonstrate that Cu(II IMAC is able to detect glycated peptides very efficiently while the non-glycated forms were not retained on the Cu (II column as confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. We further discuss the utility of IMAC technology to enrich the detection of AGE products in plasma. We anticipate that these studies may provide valuable information on understanding disease pathologies and the potential of AGE products as biomarkers of various diseases including neurodegenerative, renal and

  19. Advanced oxidation protein products induce chondrocyte apoptosis via receptor for advanced glycation end products-mediated, redox-dependent intrinsic apoptosis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Zhong, Zhao-Ming; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Liao, Cong-Rui; Pan, Ying; Zeng, Ji-Huan; Zheng, Shuai; Ding, Ruo-Ting; Lin, Qing-Song; Ye, Qing; Ye, Wen-Bin; Li, Wei; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced chondrocyte apoptosis is a primary cause of cartilage destruction in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), a novel pro-inflammatory mediator, have been confirmed to accumulate in patients with RA. However, the effect of AOPPs accumulation on chondrocyte apoptosis and the associated cellular mechanisms remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that the plasma formation of AOPPs was enhanced in RA rats compared with normal. Then, chondrocyte were treated with AOPPs-modified rat serum albumin (AOPPs-RSA) in vitro. Exposure of chondrocyte to AOPPs activated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, which was mediated by receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not scavenger receptor CD36. Moreover, AOPPs challenge triggered NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation which induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress resulted in activation of caspase family that eventually lead to apoptosis. Lastly, blockade of RAGE, instead of CD36, largely attenuated these signals. Our study demonstrated first time that AOPPs induce chondrocyte apoptosis via RAGE-mediated and redox-dependent intrinsic apoptosis pathway in vitro. These data implicates that AOPPs may represent a novel pathogenic factor that contributes to RA progression. Targeting AOPPs-triggered cellular mechanisms might emerge as a promising therapeutic option for patients with RA.

  20. Inhibitory effect of Clitoria ternatea flower petal extract on fructose-induced protein glycation and oxidation-dependent damages to albumin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayaratanasin, Poramin; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; Suanpairintr, Nipattra; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2015-02-18

    The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in body tissue has been implicated in the progression of age-related diseases. Inhibition of AGE formation is the imperative approach for alleviating diabetic complications. Clitoria ternatea extract (CTE) has been demonstrated to possess anti-diabetic activity. However, there is no scientific evidence supporting its anti-glycation activity. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibitory effect of CTE on fructose-induced formation of AGEs and protein oxidation. Antioxidant activity of CTE was also assessed by various methods. The aqueous extract of CTE (0.25-1.00 mg/ml) was measured for the content of total phenolic compounds, flavonoid, and anthocyanin by Folin-Ciocalteu assay, AlCl3 colorimetric method, and pH differential method, respectively. The various concentrations of CTE were incubated with BSA and fructose at 37°C for 28 days. The formation of fluorescent AGEs, the level of fructosamine, protein carbonyl content, and thiol group were measured. The in vitro antioxidant activity was measured by the 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (HRSA), superoxide radical scavenging activity (SRSA), and ferrous ion chelating power (FICP). The results demonstrated that the content of total phenolics, flavonoids and total anthocyanins in CTE was 53 ± 0.34 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dried extract, 11.2 ± 0.33 mg catechin equivalents/g dried extract, and 1.46 ± 0.04 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents/g dried extract, respectively. Moreover, CTE (0.25-1.00 mg/ml) significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs in a concentration-dependent manner. CTE also markedly reduced the levels of fructosamine and the oxidation of protein by decreasing protein carbonyl content and preventing free thiol depletion. In the DPPH radical scavenging

  1. A study on human serum albumin influence on glycation of fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielmas, Martyna; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Stefanowicz, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The glycation of fibrinogen was investigated by isotopic labeling method. •The potential glycation sites in fibrinogen were identified. •Human serum albumin (HSA) inhibits the glycation of fibrinogen. •The effect of HSA on fibrinogen glycation is sequence-dependent. -- Abstract: Although in vivo glycation proceeds in complex mixture of proteins, previous studies did not take in consideration the influence of protein–protein interaction on Maillard reaction. The aim of our study was to test the influence of human serum albumin (HSA) on glycation of fibrinogen. The isotopic labeling using [ 13 C 6 ] glucose combined with LC-MS were applied as tool for identification possible glycation sites in fibrinogen and for evaluation the effect of HSA on the glycation level of selected amino acids in fibrinogen. The obtained data indicate that the addition of HSA protects the fibrinogen from glycation. The level of glycation in presence of HSA is reduced by 30–60% and depends on the location of glycated residue in sequence of protein

  2. A study on human serum albumin influence on glycation of fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielmas, Martyna; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Stefanowicz, Piotr, E-mail: Piotr.stefanowicz@chem.uni.wroc.pl

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •The glycation of fibrinogen was investigated by isotopic labeling method. •The potential glycation sites in fibrinogen were identified. •Human serum albumin (HSA) inhibits the glycation of fibrinogen. •The effect of HSA on fibrinogen glycation is sequence-dependent. -- Abstract: Although in vivo glycation proceeds in complex mixture of proteins, previous studies did not take in consideration the influence of protein–protein interaction on Maillard reaction. The aim of our study was to test the influence of human serum albumin (HSA) on glycation of fibrinogen. The isotopic labeling using [{sup 13}C{sub 6}] glucose combined with LC-MS were applied as tool for identification possible glycation sites in fibrinogen and for evaluation the effect of HSA on the glycation level of selected amino acids in fibrinogen. The obtained data indicate that the addition of HSA protects the fibrinogen from glycation. The level of glycation in presence of HSA is reduced by 30–60% and depends on the location of glycated residue in sequence of protein.

  3. Aldehyde-sequestering drugs: tools for studying protein damage by lipid peroxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Philip C; Kaminskas, Lisa M; Fontaine, Frank R; Petersen, Dennis R; Pyke, Simon M

    2002-12-27

    Elevated levels of reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes (e.g. malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal and acrolein) in the affected tissues of various degenerative conditions suggest these substances are active propagators of the disease process. One experimental approach to attenuating damage by these intermediates employs 'aldehyde-sequestering drugs' as sacrificial nucleophiles, thereby sparing cell macromolecules and perhaps slowing disease progression. Drugs with demonstrated trapping activity toward lipid-derived aldehydes include various amine compounds such as aminoguanidine, carnosine and pyridoxamine. We have focused on identifying scavengers of acrolein, perhaps the most toxic aldehyde formed during lipid peroxidation cascades. Various phthalazine compounds (hydralazine and dihydralazine) were found to trap acrolein readily, forming hydrazone derivatives in a rapid Schiff-type reaction. These compounds strongly protect against acrolein-mediated toxicity in isolated hepatocytes.

  4. RECOMBINANT FLUORESCENT SENSOR OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE HyPer FUSED WITH ADAPTOR PROTEIN Ruk/CIN85: DESIGNING OF EXPRESSION VECTOR AND ITS FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Bazalii

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design the expression vector encoding fluorescent sensor of hydrogen peroxide HyPer fused with adaptor protein Ruk/CIN85 as well as to check its subcellular distribution and ability to sense hydrogen peroxide. It was demonstrated that in transiently transfected HEK293 and MCF-7 cells Ruk/CIN85-HyPer is concentrated in dot-like vesicular structures of different size while HyPer is diffusely distributed throughout the cell. Using live cell fluorescence microscopy we observed gradual increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in representative vesicular structures during the time of experiment. Thus, the developed genetic construction encoding the chimeric Ruk/CIN85-HyPer fluorescent protein represents a new tool to study localized H2O2 production in living cells.

  5. Concentration of Endogenous Secretory Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and Matrix Gla Protein in Controlled and Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Yuniati Daulay

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGE and their receptor (RAGE system play an important role in the development of diabetic vascular complications. Recently, an endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE has been identified as a novel splice variant, which lacks the transmembrane domain and is secreted in human sera. Interestingly, it was reported that esRAGE binds AGE ligands and neutralizes AGE actions. Many studies have reported that diabetes mellitus correlates with vascular calcification event and increases progressively in uncontrolled diabetes. Matrix Gla Protein (MGP is known to act as an inhibitor in vascular calcification. The aim of this study was to observe progress of vascular calcification in uncontrolled diabetes patient by biochemical markers MGP as inhibitor in vascular calcification, via mechanism of AGEs. METHODS: This study was an observational study with cross sectional design on adult type 2 diabetic male patients who were defined by the 2011 Indonesian diabetes mellitus consensus criteria. RESULTS: The results of this study showed that there was a positive significant correlation between esRAGE and HbA1C (r=0.651, p=0.009, and negative correlation between MGP and HbA1C (r=-0.465, p=0.081 in controlled diabetes group. In uncontrolled diabetes group there was a positive significant correlation between MGP and HbA1C (r=0.350, p=0.023, despite the fact esRAGE showed no significant correlation with HbA1C. There was no significant difference in level of esRAGE and MGP in controlled and uncontrolled diabetes group, but MGP showed lower level in uncontrolled diabetes group, contrary to esRAGE that had higher concentration. CONCLUSIONS: In diabetes condition, complications of vascular calcification are caused by the mechanism of increased AGE formation represented by esRAGE. In diabetes control it is very important to keep the blood vessels from complications caused by vascular calcification. KEYWORDS: type 2 diabetes mellitus

  6. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on improving the heat stability of whey protein isolate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutariya, Suresh; Patel, Hasmukh

    2017-05-15

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions (12.8%w/w protein) were treated with varying concentrations of H 2 O 2 in the range of 0-0.144 H 2 O 2 to protein ratios (HTPR) by the addition of the required quantity of H 2 O 2 and deionized water. The samples were analyzed for heat stability, rheological properties, denaturation level of β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) and α-lactalbumin (α-LA). The samples treated with H 2 O 2 concentration >0.072 (HTPR) showed significant improvement in the heat stability, and decreased whey protein denaturation and aggregation. The WPI solution treated with H 2 O 2 (>0.072 HTPR) remained in the liquid state after heat treatment at 120°C, whereas the control samples formed gel upon heat treatment. Detailed analysis of these samples suggested that the improvement in the heat stability of H 2 O 2 treated WPI solution was attributed to the significant reduction in the sulfhydryl-disulfide interchange reaction during denaturation of β-LG and α-LA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel monoclonal antibody targeting carboxymethyllysine, an advanced glycation end product in atherosclerosis and pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Wendel

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products are formed by non-enzymatic reactions between proteins and carbohydrates, causing irreversible lysine and arginine alterations that severely affect protein structure and function. The resulting modifications induce inflammation by binding to scavenger receptors. An increase in advanced glycation end products is observed in a number of diseases e.g. atherosclerosis and cancer. Since advanced glycation end products also are present in healthy individuals, their detection and quantification are of great importance for usage as potential biomarkers. Current methods for advanced glycation end product detection are though limited and solely measure total glycation. This study describes a new epitope-mapped single chain variable fragment, D1-B2, against carboxymethyllysine, produced from a phage library that was constructed from mouse immunizations. The phage library was selected against advanced glycation end product targets using a phage display platform. Characterization of its binding pattern was performed using large synthetic glycated peptide and protein libraries displayed on microarray slides. D1-B2 showed a preference for an aspartic acid, three positions N-terminally from a carboxymethyllysine residue and also bound to a broad collection of glycated proteins. Positive immunohistochemical staining of mouse atherosclerotic plaques and of a tissue microarray of human pancreatic tumors confirmed the usability of the new scFv for advanced glycation end product detection in tissues. This study demonstrates a promising methodology for high-throughput generation of epitope-mapped monoclonal antibodies against AGE.

  8. Ex vivo instability of glycated albumin: A role for autoxidative glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Joshua W; Ferdosi, Shadi; Yassine, Hussein N; Borges, Chad R

    2017-09-01

    Ex vivo protein modifications occur within plasma and serum (P/S) samples due to prolonged exposure to the thawed state-which includes temperatures above -30 °C. Herein, the ex vivo glycation of human serum albumin from healthy and diabetic subjects was monitored in P/S samples stored for hours to months at -80 °C, -20 °C, and room temperature, as well as in samples subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles, incubated at different surface area-to-volume ratios or under different atmospheric compositions. A simple dilute-and-shoot method utilizing trap-and-elute LC-ESI-MS was employed to determine the relative abundances of the glycated forms of albumin-including forms of albumin bearing more than one glucose molecule. Significant increases in glycated albumin were found to occur within hours at room temperature, and within days at -20 °C. These increases continued over a period of 1-2 weeks at room temperature and over 200 days at -20 °C, ultimately resulting in a doubling of glycated albumin in both healthy and diabetic patients. It was also shown that samples stored at lower surface area-to-volume ratios or incubated under a nitrogen atmosphere experienced less rapid glucose adduction of albumin-suggesting a role for oxidative glycation in the ex vivo glycation of albumin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative analysis of changes in protein and lipid metabolism, lipid peroxidation, and hemostasis under the effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuntsevich, A.D.; Baulin, S.I.; Golovkov, V.F.; Rembovskii, V.R.; Smirnova, L.A.; Troshkin, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and ionizing radiation are among the most hazardous environmental factors causing ecological catastrophes and mass afflications in various accidents involving nuclear power plants and chemical industrial enterprises. The authors previously established that the simultaneous action of a toxic dose of PCDD and ionizing radiation increases the combined toxic effect. The effects of these chemical and physical factors were superadditive (the biological potentiation effect). Here, the authors compare the effects of PCDD and irradiation on protein and lipid metabolism, lipid peroxidation, and hemostasis in order to learn more about biochemical mechanisms mediating the potentiation effect. The experimental evidence suggests that PCDD can modify the biological effects of ionizing radiation through the generation of free radicals and activation of the chain reactions of free-radical lipid peroxidation, such as the formation of peroxides or malonic dialdehyde. The toxic effects of PCDD and ionizing radiation are based on free-radical reactions and chemical pathology. In other words, the chemical and physical factors directly and selectively hit the same biological target, thereby increasing their combined toxic effects. The results can partially explain the observed potentiating effect of the combined action of ionizing radiation and PCDD on the body. This phenomenon is based on biochemical processes generating an abundance of products of lipid peroxidation and the decrease in the body's defenses caused by disorders in protein and lipid metabolism and blood coagulation

  10. Alleviative effects of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) flower on lipid peroxidation and protein degradation in emulsified pork meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Sheng-Yao; Yang, Deng-Jye; Chang, Ming-Hsu; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2015-09-01

    To avoid or retard the lipid peroxidation of meat products, antioxidants are commonly added. Considering the safety and health of additives in meat products, consumers prefer natural antioxidants rather than synthetic ones. Gentisic acid and epicatechin were identified as the major phenolic acid and flavonoid, respectively, of litchi flowers (LFs). The physicochemical properties of pork meatballs with or without dried LF powders (0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%, w/w) and tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ; 0.01%, w/w) were analyzed during a 4-week frozen storage period. LF and TBHQ decreased (p meatballs. LF added to meatballs improved (p meatballs redder and darker (p < 0.05) than the control and TBHQ groups, they did not affect the preference of panelists. The addition of 0.5% LF powders exhibited the best (p < 0.05) overall sensory panel acceptance. LFs may be an effective natural antioxidant to reduce lipid and protein oxidation for frozen cooked meat products. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Alleviative effects of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn. flower on lipid peroxidation and protein degradation in emulsified pork meatballs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ding

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To avoid or retard the lipid peroxidation of meat products, antioxidants are commonly added. Considering the safety and health of additives in meat products, consumers prefer natural antioxidants rather than synthetic ones. Gentisic acid and epicatechin were identified as the major phenolic acid and flavonoid, respectively, of litchi flowers (LFs. The physicochemical properties of pork meatballs with or without dried LF powders (0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5%, w/w and tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ; 0.01%, w/w were analyzed during a 4-week frozen storage period. LF and TBHQ decreased (p < 0.05 thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS values but increased (p < 0.05 thiol group contents in meatballs. LF added to meatballs improved (p < 0.05 texture and water-holding capacity (centrifugation/purge losses more than in the control group upon the storage. Although LF powders made meatballs redder and darker (p < 0.05 than the control and TBHQ groups, they did not affect the preference of panelists. The addition of 0.5% LF powders exhibited the best (p < 0.05 overall sensory panel acceptance. LFs may be an effective natural antioxidant to reduce lipid and protein oxidation for frozen cooked meat products.

  12. Cross-Linking in Collagen by Nonenzymatic Glycation Increases the Matrix Stiffness in Rabbit Achilles Tendon

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, G. Kesava

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174–180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendo...

  13. Heme oxygenase is the major 32-kDa stress protein induced in human skin fibroblasts by UVA radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium arsenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyse, S.M.; Tyrrell, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    We have shown that UVA (320-380 nm) radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium arsenite induce a stress protein of approximately 32 kDa in human skin fibroblasts. The synthesis and cloning of cDNA from arsenite-induced mRNA populations have now allowed us to unequivocally identify the 32-kDa protein as heme oxygenase. By mRNA analysis we have shown that the heme oxygenase gene is also induced in cultured human skin fibroblasts by UVA radiation, hydrogen peroxide, cadmium chloride, iodoacetamide, and menadione. The known antioxidant properties of heme catabolites taken together with the observation of a high level of induction of the enzyme in cells from an organ not involved in hemoglobin breakdown strongly supports the proposal that the induction of heme oxygenase may be a general response to oxidant stress and constitutes an important cellular defense mechanism against oxidative damage

  14. Extracellular matrix glycation and receptor for advanced glycation end-products activation: a missing piece in the puzzle of the association between diabetes and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Armando; Añazco, Carolina; González, Ileana; Araya, Paulina

    2018-04-05

    A growing body of epidemiologic evidence suggests that people with diabetes are at a significantly higher risk of many forms of cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this association are not fully understood. Cancer cells are surrounded by a complex milieu, also known as tumor microenvironment, which contributes to the development and metastasis of tumors. Of note, one of the major components of this niche is the extracellular matrix (ECM), which becomes highly disorganized during neoplastic progression, thereby stimulating cancer cell transformation, growth and spread. One of the consequences of chronic hyperglycemia, the most frequently observed sign of diabetes and the etiological source of diabetes complications, is the irreversible glycation and oxidation of proteins and lipids leading to the formation of the advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). These compounds may covalently crosslink and biochemically modify structure and functions of many proteins, and AGEs accumulation is particularly high in long-living proteins with low biological turnover, features that are shared by most, if not all, ECM proteins. AGEs-modified proteins are recognized by AGE-binding proteins, and thus glycated ECM components have the potential to trigger Receptor for advanced glycation end-products-dependent mechanisms. The biological consequence of receptor for advanced glycation end-products activation mechanisms seems to be connected, in different ways, to drive some hallmarks of cancer onset and tumor growth. The present review intends to highlight the potential impact of ECM glycation on tumor progression by triggering receptor for advanced glycation end-products-mediated mechanisms.

  15. Application of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation biomarkers for oxidative damage in mammalian cells. A comparison with two fluorescent probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orhan, H.; Gurer-Orhan, H.; Vriese, E.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Meerman, J.H.N.

    2006-01-01

    We recently developed two biomarker sets for oxidative damage: one for determination of lipid peroxidation (LPO) degradation products; acetaldehyde, propanal, butanal, pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, malondialdehyde and acetone, by a gas chromatography-electron capture detection

  16. Dietary advanced glycation endproducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Malene Wibe

    High heat cooking induces flavor, aroma, and color of food, but leads to formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) by the Maillard reaction. In addition to the formation in food, AGEs are also formed in vivo, and increased endogenous formation of AGEs has been linked to diabetic...... on postprandial subjective appetite sensations, appetite hormones, and markers of inflammation of two cooking methods that respectively induce or limit AGE formation were investigated in healthy overweight individuals. It was concluded that the meals affected subjective appetite sensations similarly, but the high...... sensitivity of cooking methods that induce or limit AGE formation were investigated in healthy overweight women. It was concluded that insulin sensitivity was improved with use of low heat cooking methods, compared with high heat cooking methods. In a rat study, effects on expression of AGE receptors, insulin...

  17. "STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF GARLIC ON THE IN VITRO ALBUMIN GLYCATION REACTION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sheikh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Garlic, an antioxidant plant, can react with amino groups of proteins to form Schiff bases. As diabetes leads to glycation of various proteins and this in turn has some effects on the structure of proteins and biochemical activity of them, the inhibition of this process seems very vital. For several years researchers in this field have done their best to recognize the antidiabetic compounds. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of garlic on albumin glycation in vitro.In the presence of various concentrations of garlic, albumin was glycated and evaluated using TBA (thio-barbituric acid method. The results showed that garlic has a statistically significant (P<0.05 effect in inhibiting or decreasing the reaction of albumin glycation. The findings of this research shows that garlic probably inhibits the reaction of glycation and decreases complications occurring in diabetes.

  18. The influence of Bauhinia forficata Link subsp. pruinosa tea on lipid peroxidation and non-protein SH groups in human erythrocytes exposed to high glucose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Andréia C F; Leal, Carina Q; Bianchini, Matheus C; Prado, Ianeli O; Mendez, Andreas S L; Puntel, Robson L; Folmer, Vanderlei; Soares, Félix A; Avila, Daiana S; Puntel, Gustavo O

    2013-06-21

    Bauhinia forficata (BF) has been traditionally used as tea in folk medicine of Brazil for treatment of Diabetes mellitus (DM). To evaluate the effects of BF leaf tea on markers of oxidative damage and antioxidant levels in an experimental model of hyperglycemia in human erythrocytes in vitro. Human erythrocytes were incubated with high glucose concentrations or glucose and BF tea for 24h and 48h. After incubation lipid peroxidation and non-protein SH levels were analyzed. Moreover, quantification of polyphenols and flavonoids, iron chelating property, scavenging of DPPH, and prevention of lipid peroxidation in isolated lipids were also assessed. A significant amount of polyphenols and flavonoids was observed. The main components found by LC-MS analysis were quercetin-3-O-(2-rhamnosyl) rutinoside, kaempferol-3-O-(2-rhamnosyl) rutinoside, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside and kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside. BF tea presents important antioxidant and chelating properties. Moreover, BF tea was effective to increase non-protein SH levels and reduce lipid peroxidation induced by high glucose concentrations in human erythrocytes. The antioxidant effects of BF tea could be related to the presence of different phenolic and flavonoids components. We believe that these components can be responsible to protect human erythrocytes exposed to high glucose concentrations against oxidative damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Coptis chinensis Polysaccharides Inhibit Advanced Glycation End Product Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Li, Yun; Yin, Dengke; Chen, Song; Gao, Xiangdong

    2016-06-01

    Coptis chinensis Franch (Huanglian) is commonly used to treat diabetes in China. In this study, the effects of the C. chinensis Franch polysaccharides (CCP) on advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation in vitro and in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were investigated. CCP significantly inhibited all the three periods of nonenzymatic protein glycation in vitro, including Amadori product, dicarbonyl compound, and AGE formation (P < .01). In diabetic mice, the administration of CCP not only improved both bodyweight and serum insulin and decreased fasting blood glucose and glycated serum protein concentrations but also decreased the AGE accumulations and morphological abnormalities in pancreas and liver. The inhibitory effects of CCP on AGE formation afford a potential therapeutic use in the prevention and treatment of diabetes.

  20. Protein modification and replicative senescence of WI-38 human embryonic fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter

    2010-01-01

    reflects a preferential accumulation of damaged proteins within the mitochondria during cellular senescence. Accumulation of AGE-modified proteins could be explained by the senescence-associated decreased activity of glyoxalase-I, the major enzyme involved in the detoxification of the glycating agents...... methylglyoxal and glyoxal, in both cytosol and mitochondria. This finding suggests a role of detoxification systems in the age-related build-up of damaged proteins. Moreover, the oxidized protein repair system methionine sulfoxide reductase was more affected in the mitochondria than in the cytosol during......Summary Oxidized proteins as well as proteins modified by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and by glycation (AGE) have been shown to accumulate with aging in vivo and during replicative senescence in vitro. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins...

  1. Both near ultraviolet radiation and the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide induce a 32-kDa stress protein in normal human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyse, S.M.; Tyrrell, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have analyzed the pattern of protein synthesis in solar near ultraviolet (334 nm, 365 nm) and near visible (405 nm) irradiated normal human skin fibroblasts. Two hours after irradiation we find that one major stress protein of approximately 32 kDa is induced in irradiated cells. This protein is not induced by ultraviolet radiation at wavelengths shorter than 334 nm and is not inducible by heat shock treatment of these cells. Although sodium arsenite, diamide, and menadione all induced a 32-kDa protein, they also induced the major heat shock proteins. In contrast, the oxidizing agent, hydrogen peroxide, induced the low molecular weight stress protein without causing induction of the major heat shock proteins. A comparison of the 32-kDa proteins induced by sodium arsenite, H 2 O 2 , and solar near ultraviolet radiation using chemical peptide mapping shows that they are closely related. These results imply that the pathways for induction of the heat shock response and the 32-kDa protein are not identical and suggest that, at least in the case of radiation and treatment with H 2 O 2 , the 32-kDa protein might be induced in response to cellular oxidative stress. This conclusion is supported by the observation that depletion of endogenous cellular glutathione prior to solar near ultraviolet irradiation lowers the fluence threshold for induction of the 32-kDa stress protein

  2. Calorimetric investigation of diclofenac drug binding to a panel of moderately glycated serum albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indurthi, Venkata S K; Leclerc, Estelle; Vetter, Stefan W

    2014-08-01

    Glycation alters the drug binding properties of serum proteins and could affect free drug concentrations in diabetic patients with elevated glycation levels. We investigated the effect of bovine serum albumin glycation by eight physiologically relevant glycation reagents (glucose, ribose, carboxymethyllysine, acetoin, methylglyoxal, glyceraldehyde, diacetyl and glycolaldehyde) on diclofenac drug binding. We used this non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac as a paradigm for acidic drugs with high serum binding and because of its potential cardiovascular risks in diabetic patients. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that glycation reduced the binding affinity Ka of serum albumin and diclofenac 2 to 6-fold by reducing structural rigidity of albumin. Glycation affected the number of drug binding sites in a glycation reagent dependent manner and lead to a 25% decrease for most reagent, expect for ribose, with decreased by 60% and for the CML-modification, increased the number of binding sites by 60%. Using isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry we derived the complete thermodynamic characterization of diclofenac binding to all glycated BSA samples. Our results suggest that glycation in diabetic patients could significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of the widely used over-the-counter NSDAI drug diclofenac and with possibly negative implications for patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of the Antioxidant Activity of Silybum marianum Seed Extract and Its Protective Effect against DNA Oxidation, Protein Damage and Lipid Peroxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Serçe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant properties of ethanol extract of Silybum marianum (milk thistle seeds was investigated. We have also investigated the protein damage activated by oxidative Fenton reaction and its prevention by Silybum marianum seed extract. Antioxidant potential of Silybum marianum seed ethanol extract was measured using diff erent in vitro methods, such as lipid peroxidation, 1,1–diphenyl–2–picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and ferric reducing power assays. The extract significantly decreased DNA damage caused by hydroxyl radicals. Protein damage induced by hydroxyl radicals was also effi ciently inhibited, which was confirmed by the presence of protein damage markers, such as protein carbonyl formation and by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE. The present study shows that milk thistle seeds have good DPPH free radical scavenging activity and can prevent lipid peroxidation. Therefore, Silybum marianum can be used as potentially rich source of antioxidants and food preservatives. The results suggest that the seeds may have potential beneficial health effects providing opportunities to develop value-added products.

  4. Effect of Temperature on Tolbutamide Binding to Glycated Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Szkudlarek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycation process occurs in protein and becomes more pronounced in diabetes when an increased amount of reducing sugar is present in bloodstream. Glycation of protein may cause conformational changes resulting in the alterations of its binding properties even though they occur at a distance from the binding sites. The changes in protein properties could be related to several pathological consequences such as diabetic and nondiabetic cardiovascular diseases, cataract, renal dysfunction and Alzheimer’s disease. The experiment was designed to test the impact of glycation process on sulfonylurea drug tolbutamide-albumin binding under physiological (T = 309 K and inflammatory (T = 311 K and T = 313 K states using fluorescence and UV-VIS spectroscopies. It was found in fluorescence analysis experiments that the modification of serum albumin in tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues environment may affect the tolbutamide (TB binding to albumin in subdomain IIA and/or IIIA (Sudlow’s site I and/or II, and also in subdomains IB and IIB. We estimated the binding of tolbutamide to albumin described by a mixed nature of interaction (specific and nonspecific. The association constants Ka (L∙mol−1 for tolbutamide at its high affinity sites on non-glycated albumin were in the range of 1.98–7.88 × 104 L∙mol−1 (λex = 275 nm, 1.20–1.64 × 104 L∙mol−1 (λex = 295 nm and decreased to 1.24–0.42 × 104 L∙mol−1 at λex = 275 nm (T = 309 K and T = 311 K and increased to 2.79 × 104 L∙mol−1 at λex = 275 nm (T = 313 K and to 4.43–6.61 × 104 L∙mol−1 at λex = 295 nm due to the glycation process. Temperature dependence suggests the important role of van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding in hydrophobic interactions between tolbutamide and both glycated and non-glycated albumin. We concluded that the changes in the environment of TB binding of albumin in subdomain IIA and/or IIIA as well as in subdomains IB and IIB influence on

  5. Evaluation of Aldose Reductase, Protein Glycation, and Antioxidant Inhibitory Activities of Bioactive Flavonoids in Matricaria recutita L. and Their Structure-Activity Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Hwang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activities of Matricaria recutita L. 70% methanol extract were evaluated by isolating and testing 10 of its compounds on rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR, advanced glycation end products (AGEs, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging. Among these compounds, apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucoside, apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide, 3,5-O-di-caffeoylquinic acid, apigenin, and luteolin showed potent inhibition, and their IC50 values in RLAR were 4.25, 1.12, 1.16, 0.85, 0.72, 1.72, and 1.42 μM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds suppressed sorbitol accumulation in rat lens under high-glucose conditions, demonstrating their potential to prevent sorbitol accumulation ex vivo. Notably, luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide and luteolin showed antioxidative as well as AGE-inhibitory activities (IC50 values of these compounds in AGEs were 3.39 and 6.01 μM. These results suggest that the M. recutita extract and its constituents may be promising agents for use in the prevention or treatment of diabetic complications.

  6. The ethyl acetate fraction of corn silk exhibits dual antioxidant and anti-glycation activities and protects insulin-secreting cells from glucotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chuan; Yuan, Wei; Roan, Hsiao-Yuh; Chang, Jia-Ling; Huang, Hsiu-Chen; Lee, Yu-Ching; Tsay, Huey Jen; Liu, Hui-Kang

    2016-11-03

    In this study, we aimed to develop a Stigmata Maydis (corn silk) fraction with dual bio-activities against oxidative stress and protein glycation to protect β-cells from diabetes-induced failure. Corn silk fractions were prepared by partition and chemically characterised by thin-layer chromatography. Free radical scavenging assay, glycation assay, and cell-based viability test (neutral red) were employed to decide the best fraction. Cell death analysis was executed by annexin V/ Propidium iodide staining. Cell proliferation was measured by WST-1. Finally, β-cell function was evaluated by β-cell marker gene expression (RT-PCR) and acute insulin secretion test. Four corn silk fractions were prepared from an ethanolic crude extract of corn silk. In vitro assays indicate ethyl acetate fraction (YMS-EA) was the most potent fraction. YMS-EA also attenuated the hydrogen peroxide- or methylglyoxal-induced induction of reactive oxygen species, reduction of cell viability, and inhibition of cell proliferation. However, YMS-EA was unable to prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis or advanced glycation end-products-induced toxicity. Under hyperglycemic conditions, YMS-EA effectively reduced ROS levels, improved mRNA expression of insulin, glucokinase, and PDX-1, and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The similarity of bioactivities among apigenin, luteolin, and YMS-EA indicated that dual activities of YMS-EA might be derived from those compounds. We concluded that YMS-EA fraction could be developed as a preventive food agent against the glucotoxicity to β-cells in Type 2 diabetes.

  7. The effect of melanin-free extract from Sepia esculenta ink on lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and water-holding capacity of tilapia fillet during cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhen-Hua; Liu, Hua-Zhong; Luo, Ping; Gu, Yi-Peng; Li, Yan-Qun

    2018-03-14

    Preservative effect of melanin-free extract of Sepia esculenta ink (MFESI) on Sparus latus fillet has been verified in our previous work. This study aims to further approach the mechanism of MFESI for extending the shelf-life of fish fillet during cold storage. Tilapia fillets were treated with different dosage of MFESI (0, 15, 25 and 35 mg/ml) and packed with preservative film for succedent cold-storage at 4 °C for scheduled time. Contents of total volatile basic nitrogen and sulfydryl and carbanyl groups were measured for evaluating protein oxidation. Malondialdehyde contents were measured for estimating lipid peroxidation and loss of water was used to determine water-holding capacity of fillet. The data indicated that MFESI not only possessed certain degree of antioxidant capacity in vitro, also lengthened shelf-life of tilapia fillet in cold-storage condition. Apart from 15 mg/ml, both 25 and 35 mg/ml of MFESI obviously prevented lipid and protein from oxidation and reduced loss of water from tilapia fillets, and the latter was more effective than the former. MFESI can repress lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation and reduce water loss, maintain the tilapia fillets quality and, thus, it could be an effective and natural preservative for extending the shelf-life of tilapia fillets during cold storage.

  8. Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful diagnostic tool for accurate determination of albumin glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Horowitz, Gary L; Kang, Jeon Woong; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Barman, Ishan

    2012-01-01

    We present the first demonstration of glycated albumin detection and quantification using Raman spectroscopy without the addition of reagents. Glycated albumin is an important marker for monitoring the long-term glycemic history of diabetics, especially as its concentrations, in contrast to glycated hemoglobin levels, are unaffected by changes in erythrocyte life times. Clinically, glycated albumin concentrations show a strong correlation with the development of serious diabetes complications including nephropathy and retinopathy. In this article, we propose and evaluate the efficacy of Raman spectroscopy for determination of this important analyte. By utilizing the pre-concentration obtained through drop-coating deposition, we show that glycation of albumin leads to subtle, but consistent, changes in vibrational features, which with the help of multivariate classification techniques can be used to discriminate glycated albumin from the unglycated variant with 100% accuracy. Moreover, we demonstrate that the calibration model developed on the glycated albumin spectral dataset shows high predictive power, even at substantially lower concentrations than those typically encountered in clinical practice. In fact, the limit of detection for glycated albumin measurements is calculated to be approximately four times lower than its minimum physiological concentration. Importantly, in relation to the existing detection methods for glycated albumin, the proposed method is also completely reagent-free, requires barely any sample preparation and has the potential for simultaneous determination of glycated hemoglobin levels as well. Given these key advantages, we believe that the proposed approach can provide a uniquely powerful tool for quantification of glycation status of proteins in biopharmaceutical development as well as for glycemic marker determination in routine clinical diagnostics in the future.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy Provides a Powerful Diagnostic Tool for Accurate Determination of Albumin Glycation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Horowitz, Gary L.; Kang, Jeon Woong; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Barman, Ishan

    2012-01-01

    We present the first demonstration of glycated albumin detection and quantification using Raman spectroscopy without the addition of reagents. Glycated albumin is an important marker for monitoring the long-term glycemic history of diabetics, especially as its concentrations, in contrast to glycated hemoglobin levels, are unaffected by changes in erythrocyte life times. Clinically, glycated albumin concentrations show a strong correlation with the development of serious diabetes complications including nephropathy and retinopathy. In this article, we propose and evaluate the efficacy of Raman spectroscopy for determination of this important analyte. By utilizing the pre-concentration obtained through drop-coating deposition, we show that glycation of albumin leads to subtle, but consistent, changes in vibrational features, which with the help of multivariate classification techniques can be used to discriminate glycated albumin from the unglycated variant with 100% accuracy. Moreover, we demonstrate that the calibration model developed on the glycated albumin spectral dataset shows high predictive power, even at substantially lower concentrations than those typically encountered in clinical practice. In fact, the limit of detection for glycated albumin measurements is calculated to be approximately four times lower than its minimum physiological concentration. Importantly, in relation to the existing detection methods for glycated albumin, the proposed method is also completely reagent-free, requires barely any sample preparation and has the potential for simultaneous determination of glycated hemoglobin levels as well. Given these key advantages, we believe that the proposed approach can provide a uniquely powerful tool for quantification of glycation status of proteins in biopharmaceutical development as well as for glycemic marker determination in routine clinical diagnostics in the future. PMID:22393405

  10. Lactation Affects Isolated Mitochondria and Its Fatty Acid Composition but Has No Effect on Tissue Protein Oxidation, Lipid Peroxidation or DNA-Damage in Laboratory Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa G. Valencak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linking peak energy metabolism to lifespan and aging remains a major question especially when focusing on lactation in females. We studied, if and how lactation affects in vitro mitochondrial oxygen consumption and mitochondrial fatty acid composition. In addition, we assessed DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyls to extrapolate on oxidative stress in mothers. As model system we used C57BL/6NCrl mice and exposed lactating females to two ambient temperatures (15 °C and 22 °C while they nursed their offspring until weaning. We found that state II and state IV respiration rates of liver mitochondria were significantly higher in the lactating animals than in non-lactating mice. Fatty acid composition of isolated liver and heart mitochondria differed between lactating and non-lactating mice with higher n-6, and lower n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the lactating females. Surprisingly, lactation did not affect protein carbonyls, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, nor did moderate cold exposure of 15 °C. We conclude that lactation increases rates of mitochondrial uncoupling and alters mitochondrial fatty acid composition thus supporting the “uncoupling to survive” hypothesis. Regarding oxidative stress, we found no impact of lactation and lower ambient temperature and contribute to growing evidence that there is no linear relationship between oxidative damage and lactation.

  11. Exploring the antioxidant property of bioflavonoid quercetin in preventing DNA glycation: A calorimetric and spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Bidisa; Uematsu, Takashi; Jacobsson, Per; Swenson, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Reducing sugars for example glucose, fructose, etc., and their phosphate derivatives non-enzymatically glycate biological macromolecules (e.g., proteins, DNA and lipids) and is related to the production of free radicals. Here we present a novel study, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) along with UV/Vis absorption and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), on normal and glycated human placenta DNA and have explored the antioxidant property of the naturally occurring polyhydroxy flavone quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) in preventing the glycation. The decrease in the absorption intensity of DNA in presence of sugars clearly indicates the existence of sugar molecules between the two bases of a base pair in the duplex DNA molecule. Variations were perceptible in the PCS relaxation profiles of normal and glycated DNA. The melting temperature of placenta DNA was decreased when glycated suggesting a decrease in the structural stability of the double-stranded glycated DNA. Our DSC and PCS data showed, for the first time, that the dramatic changes in the structural properties of glycated DNA can be prevented to a significant extent by adding quercetin. This study provides valuable insights regarding the structure, function, and dynamics of normal and glycated DNA molecules, underlying the manifestation of free radical mediated diseases, and their prevention using therapeutically active naturally occurring flavonoid quercetin

  12. Effects of non-enzymatic glycation in human serum albumin. Spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkudlarek, A.; Sułkowska, A.; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Chudzik, M.; Równicka-Zubik, J.

    2016-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), transporting protein, is exposed during its life to numerous factors that cause its functions become impaired. One of the basic factors - glycation of HSA - occurs in diabetes and may affect HSA-drug binding. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) leads to diseases e.g. diabetic and non-diabetic cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer disease, renal disfunction and in normal aging. The aim of the present work was to estimate how non-enzymatic glycation of human serum albumin altered its tertiary structure using fluorescence technique. We compared glycated human serum albumin by glucose (gHSAGLC) with HSA glycated by fructose (gHSAFRC). We focused on presenting the differences between gHSAFRC and nonglycated (HSA) albumin used acrylamide (Ac), potassium iodide (KI) and 2-(p-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (TNS). Changes of the microenvironment around the tryptophan residue (Trp-214) of non-glycated and glycated proteins was investigated by the red-edge excitation shift method. Effect of glycation on ligand binding was examined by the binding of phenylbutazone (PHB) and ketoprofen (KP), which a primary high affinity binding site in serum albumin is subdomain IIA and IIIA, respectively. At an excitation and an emission wavelength of λex 335 nm and λem 420 nm, respectively the increase of fluorescence intensity and the blue-shift of maximum fluorescence was observed. It indicates that the glycation products decreases the polarity microenvironment around the fluorophores. Analysis of red-edge excitation shift method showed that the red-shift for gHSAFRC is higher than for HSA. Non-enzymatic glycation also caused, that the Trp residue of gHSAFRC becomes less accessible for the negatively charged quencher (I-), KSV value is smaller for gHSAFRC than for HSA. TNS fluorescent measurement demonstrated the decrease of hydrophobicity in the glycated albumin. KSV constants for gHSA-PHB systems are higher than for the unmodified serum

  13. Glycation of human cortical and cancellous bone captures differences in the formation of Maillard reaction products between glucose and ribose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna E Sroga

    Full Text Available To better understand some aspects of bone matrix glycation, we used an in vitro glycation approach. Within two weeks, our glycation procedures led to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs at the levels that corresponded to approx. 25-30 years of the natural in vivo glycation. Cortical and cancellous bones from human tibias were glycated in vitro using either glucose (glucosylation or ribose (ribosylation. Both glucosylation and ribosylation led to the formation of higher levels of AGEs and pentosidine (PEN in cancellous than cortical bone dissected from all tested donors (young, middle-age and elderly men and women. More efficient glycation of bone matrix proteins in cancellous bone most likely depended on the higher porosity of this tissue, which facilitated better accessibility of the sugars to the matrix proteins. Notably, glycation of cortical bone from older donors led to much higher AGEs levels as compared to young donors. Such efficient in vitro glycation of older cortical bone could result from aging-related increase in porosity caused by the loss of mineral content. In addition, more pronounced glycation in vivo would be driven by elevated oxidation processes. Interestingly, the levels of PEN formation differed pronouncedly between glucosylation and ribosylation. Ribosylation generated very high levels of PEN (approx. 6- vs. 2.5-fold higher PEN level than in glucosylated samples. Kinetic studies of AGEs and PEN formation in human cortical and cancellous bone matrix confirmed higher accumulation of fluorescent crosslinks for ribosylation. Our results suggest that in vitro glycation of bone using glucose leads to the formation of lower levels of AGEs including PEN, whereas ribosylation appears to support a pathway toward PEN formation. Our studies may help to understand differences in the progression of bone pathologies related to protein glycation by different sugars, and raise awareness for excessive sugar

  14. Monitoring the progress of non-enzymatic glycation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.; Crabbe, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The progress of in vitro non-enzymatic glycation of bovine serum albumin was followed by using 14 C-glucose and a nitroblue tetrazolium assay, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS gel electrophoresis and protease digestion. The number of adducts detectable using both 14 C-tracers and a fructosamine assay remained low at physiological glucose concentrations, fewer than five adducts being detectable. When glucose concentrations > 1.0 M were used the number of adducts was found to greatly exceed the number of lysyl residues available in BSA, indicative of cross-linking between Maillard products. Incubation of BSA with glucose concentrations of up to 160 mM for one month produced no observable increase in molecular weight by SDS gel electrophoresis, showing that at physiological glucose concentrations, increases in molecular weight were minimal for short incubation periods. Increases in absorption were proportial to both the glucose concentration and the incubation time. Several absorption peaks, at 370, 488 and 554 nm, were consistent in appearance throughout the course of each incubation. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the modified proteins showed a disappearance of the fluorescence associated with peptide bonds and aromatic residues and the appearance of a broad peak at longer wavelengths due to the wide range of absorptive/fluorescent wavelengths of the developing Maillard products. Protease digestion gave similar patterns with non-glycated and glycated protein, suggesting that glycation did not block digestion sites, and that partial digestion did not cause significant further exposure of susceptible sites. Our results show that while glycation ultimately results in protein conformational changes and the formation of large molecular weight species, these occur at a relatively late stage in the maturation of protein Maillard products, after ≥ nine months of incubation with glucose concentration of ≥ 20 mM. Monitoring of AGE maturation in vitro is better

  15. Protein-directed in situ synthesis of platinum nanoparticles with superior peroxidase-like activity, and their use for photometric determination of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lijian; Wang, Nan; Wang, Xindong; Ai, Shiyun

    2013-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) with sizes in the range from 10 to 30 nm were synthesized using protein-directed one-pot reduction. The model globular protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was exploited as the template, and the resulting BSA/Pt-NPs were studied by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy. The modified nanoparticles display a peroxidase-like activity that was exploited in a rapid method for the colorimetric determination of hydrogen peroxide which can be detected in the 50 μM to 3 mM concentration range. The limit of detection is 7.9 μM, and the lowest concentration that can be visually detected is 200 μM. (author)

  16. Role of TGF-beta1-independent changes in protein neosynthesis, p38alphaMAPK, and cdc42 in hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence-like morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrétien, Aline; Dierick, Jean-François; Delaive, Edouard

    2008-01-01

    for p38(MAPK) activation, in turn triggering phosphorylation of L-caldesmon and HSP27. Cdc42 was also shown to be mainly responsible for the increase in TGF-beta1 mRNA level observed at 24 h after treatment with H(2)O(2) and onward. This study further clarified the mechanisms of senescence......The role of TGF-beta1 in hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence-like morphogenesis has been described. The aim of this work was to investigate whether TGF-beta1-independent changes in protein synthesis are involved in this morphogenesis and to study possible mechanisms occurring earlier than TGF-beta......1 overexpression. Among the multiple TGF-beta1-independent changes in protein neosynthesis, followed or not by posttranslational modifications, identified by proteomic analysis herein, those of ezrin, L-caldesmon, and HSP27 were particularly studied. Rho-GTPase cdc42 was shown to be responsible...

  17. Effect of glycation on α-crystallin structure and chaperone-like function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P. Anil; Kumar, M. Satish; Reddy, G. Bhanuprakash

    2007-01-01

    The chaperone-like activity of α-crystallin is considered to play an important role in the maintenance of the transparency of the eye lens. However, in the case of aging and in diabetes, the chaperone function of α-crystallin is compromized, resulting in cataract formation. Several post-translational modifications, including non-enzymatic glycation, have been shown to affect the chaperone function of α-crystallin in aging and in diabetes. A variety of agents have been identified as the predominant sources for the formation of AGEs (advanced glycation end-products) in various tissues, including the lens. Nevertheless, glycation of α-crystallin with various sugars has resulted in divergent results. In the present in vitro study, we have investigated the effect of glucose, fructose, G6P (glucose 6-phosphate) and MGO (methylglyoxal), which represent the major classes of glycating agents, on the structure and chaperone function of α-crystallin. Modification of α-crystallin with all four agents resulted in the formation of glycated protein, increased AGE fluorescence, protein cross-linking and HMM (high-molecular-mass) aggregation. Interestingly, these glycation-related profiles were found to vary with different glycating agents. For instance, CML [Nϵ-(carboxymethyl)lysine] was the predominant AGE formed upon glycation of α-crystallin with these agents. Although fructose and MGO caused significant conformational changes, there were no significant structural perturbations with glucose and G6P. With the exception of MGO modification, glycation with other sugars resulted in decreased chaperone activity in aggregation assays. However, modification with all four sugars led to the loss of chaperone activity as assessed using an enzyme inactivation assay. Glycation-induced loss of α-crystallin chaperone activity was associated with decreased hydrophobicity. Furthermore, α-crystallin isolated from glycated TSP (total lens soluble protein) had also increased AGE

  18. Heat, hydrogen peroxide, and UV resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores with increased core water content and with or without major DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popham, D.L.; Sengupta, S.; Setlow, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spores of a Bacillus subtilis strain with an insertion mutation in the dacB gene, which codes for an enzyme involved in spore cortex biosynthesis, have a higher core water content than wild-type spores. Spores lacking the two major α/β-type small, acid-soluble proteins (SASP) (termed a α - β - spores) have the same core water content as do wild-type spores, but α - β - dacB spores had more core water than did dacB spores. The resistance of α - β - , α - β - dacB, dacB, and wild-type spores to dry and moist heat, hydrogen peroxide, and UV radiation has been determined, as has the role of DNA damage in spore killing by moist heat and hydrogen peroxide. These data (1) suggest that core water content has little if any role in spore UV resistance and are consistent with binding of α/β-type SASP to DNA being the major mechanism providing protection to spores from UV radiation; (2) suggest that binding of αβ-type SASP to DNA is the major mechanism unique to spores providing protection from dry heat; (3) suggest that spore resistance to moist heat and hydrogen peroxide is affected to a large degree by the core water content, as increased core water resulted in large decreases in spore resistance to these agents; and (4) indicate that since this decreased resistance (i.e., in dacB spores) is not associated with increased spore killing by DNA damage, spore DNA must normally be extremely well protected against such damage, presumably by the saturation of spore DNA by α/β-type SASP. 19 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Advanced glycation end products in clinical nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalousová, M; Zima, T; Tesar, V; Stípek, S; Sulková, S

    2004-01-01

    As a result of oxidative and carbonyl stress, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are involved in the pathogenesis of severe and frequent diseases and their fatal vascular/cardiovascular complications, i.e. diabetes mellitus and its complications (nephropathy, angiopathy, neuropathy and retinopathy, renal failure and uremic and dialysis-associated complications), atherosclerosis and dialysis-related amyloidosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and rheumatoid arthritis. They are formed via non-enzymatic glycation which is specifically enhanced through the presence of oxidative and carbonyl stress, and their ability to form glycoxidation products in peptide and protein structures finally modulating or inducing biological reactivity. Food can be another source of AGEs; however, high serum AGEs in hemodialysis patients might reflect nutritional status better. Several methods of renal replacement therapy have been studied in connection with the AGE removal, but unfortunately the possibilities are still unsatisfactory even if high flux dialysis, hemofiltration, or hemodiafiltration give better results than conventional low flux dialysis. AGEs are currently being studied in the patients on peritoneal dialysis as their precursors can be formed in the dialysis fluid. AGEs can cause damage to the peritoneum and so a loss of ultrafiltration capacity. Many compounds give promising results in AGE inhibition (inhibition of formation of AGEs, inhibition of their action or degradation of AGEs), are tested for these properties, and eventually undergo clinical studies (e.g. aminoguanidine, OPB-9195, pyridoxamine, antioxidants, N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, antihypertensive drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor-1 antagonists). Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Proteins oxidation and autoantibodies' reactivity against hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde -oxidized thyroid antigens in patients' plasmas with Graves' disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mseddi, Malek; Ben Mansour, Riadh; Gargouri, Bochra; Mnif, Fatma; El Ghawi, Samir; Hammami, Boutheina; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Abid, Mohamed; Lassoued, Saloua

    2017-06-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate proteins oxidation in plasmas of two autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD): Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto Thyroiditis (HT), and to determine whether oxidative modification of thyroid antigens (T.Ag) enhanced the reactivity of autoantibodies in plasmas of AITD patients compared with the reactivity towards native T.Ag. Carbonyl and thiol groups and MDA-protein adducts were assessed spectrophotometric methods in plasmas of 74 AITD patients and 65 healthy controls. The reactivities immunoglobulin (Ig)G autoantibodies towards malondialdéhyde (MDA)-modified T.Ag, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-modified T.Ag, native T.Ag and native derm were checked by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Evaluation of oxidized proteins exhibited high levels of MDA bound to proteins and carbonyl groups, as well as reduced thiol level in plasmas of AITD patients by comparison to healthy controls (p thyroid stimulating hormone level in HT patients in the other (r = 0.65, p < 0.001). The data suggest that high production of H 2 O 2 probably occurred during hormone synthesis could contribute to protein oxidation in AITD and to create neoepitopes responsible for autoantibody reactivity's to H 2 O 2 -oxidized T.Ag enhancement. These results provide support to the involvement of oxidative stress in AITD development and/or exacerbation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Destructive effect of non-enzymatic glycation on catalase and remediation via curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi Najjar, Fayezeh; Taghavi, Fereshteh; Ghadari, Rahim; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2017-09-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is a post-translational modification that is produced by a covalent binding between reducing sugars and amino groups of lysine and arginine residues. In this paper the effect of pathological conditions, derived from hyperglycemia on bovine liver catalase (BLC) as a model protein was considered by measuring enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and changes in catalase conformational properties. We observed that in the presence of glucose, the catalase activity gradually decreased. ROS generation was also involved in the glycation process. Thus, decreased BLC activity was partly considered as a result of ROS generation through glycation. However, in the presence of curcumin the amount of ROS was reduced resulting in increased activity of the glycated catalase. The effect of high glucose level and the potential inhibitory effect of curcumin on aggregation and structural changes of catalase were also investigated. Molecular dynamic simulations also showed that interaction of catalase with curcumin resulted in changes in accessible surface area (ASA) and pKa, two effective parameters of glycation, in potential glycation lysine residues. Thus, the decrease in ASA and increase in pKa of important lysine residues were considered as predominant factors in decreased glycation of BLC by curcumin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Glycation alters ligand binding, enzymatic, and pharmacological properties of human albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraka-Vidot, Jennifer; Planesse, Cynthia; Meilhac, Olivier; Militello, Valeria; van den Elsen, Jean; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Philippe

    2015-05-19

    Albumin, the major circulating protein in blood plasma, can be subjected to an increased level of glycation in a diabetic context. Albumin exerts crucial pharmacological activities through its drug binding capacity, i.e., ketoprofen, and via its esterase-like activity, allowing the conversion of prodrugs into active drugs. In this study, the impact of the glucose-mediated glycation on the pharmacological and biochemical properties of human albumin was investigated. Aggregation product levels and the redox state were quantified to assess the impact of glycation-mediated changes on the structural properties of albumin. Glucose-mediated changes in ketoprofen binding properties and esterase-like activity were evaluated using fluorescence spectroscopy and p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis assays, respectively. With the exception of oxidative parameters, significant dose-dependent alterations in biochemical and functional properties of in vitro glycated albumin were observed. We also found that the dose-dependent increase in levels of glycation and protein aggregation and average molecular mass changes correlated with a gradual decrease in the affinity of albumin for ketoprofen and its esterase-like property. In parallel, significant alterations in both pharmacological properties were also evidenced in albumin purified from diabetic patients. Partial least-squares regression analyses established a significant correlation between glycation-mediated changes in biochemical and pharmacological properties of albumin, highlighting the important role for glycation in the variability of the drug response in a diabetic situation.

  3. Protein S-glutathionylation lowers superoxide/hydrogen peroxide release from skeletal muscle mitochondria through modification of complex I and inhibition of pyruvate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Gill

    Full Text Available Protein S-glutathionylation is a reversible redox modification that regulates mitochondrial metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS production in liver and cardiac tissue. However, whether or not it controls ROS release from skeletal muscle mitochondria has not been explored. In the present study, we examined if chemically-induced protein S-glutathionylation could alter superoxide (O2●-/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 release from isolated muscle mitochondria. Disulfiram, a powerful chemical S-glutathionylation catalyst, was used to S-glutathionylate mitochondrial proteins and ascertain if it can alter ROS production. It was found that O2●-/H2O2 release rates from permeabilized muscle mitochondria decreased with increasing doses of disulfiram (100-500 μM. This effect was highest in mitochondria oxidizing succinate or palmitoyl-carnitine, where a ~80-90% decrease in the rate of ROS release was observed. Similar effects were detected in intact mitochondria respiring under state 4 conditions. Incubation of disulfiram-treated mitochondria with DTT (2 mM restored ROS release confirming that these effects were associated with protein S-glutathionylation. Disulfiram treatment also inhibited phosphorylating and proton leak-dependent respiration. Radiolabelled substrate uptake experiments demonstrated that disulfiram inhibited pyruvate import but had no effect on carnitine uptake. Immunoblot analysis of complex I revealed that it contained several protein S-glutathionylation targets including NDUSF1, a subunit required for NADH oxidation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that O2●-/H2O2 release from muscle mitochondria can be altered by protein S-glutathionylation. We attribute these changes to the protein S-glutathionylation complex I and inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier.

  4. Glycation induces formation of amyloid cross-beta structure in albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Barend; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Wu, Ya-Ping; Brünjes, Bettina; Posthuma, George; Kranenburg, Onno; de Groot, Philip G; Voest, Emile E; Gebbink, Martijn F B G

    2003-10-24

    Amyloid fibrils are components of proteinaceous plaques that are associated with conformational diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and familial amyloidosis. Amyloid polypeptides share a specific quarternary structure element known as cross-beta structure. Commonly, fibrillar aggregates are modified by advanced glycation end products (AGE). In addition, AGE formation itself induces protein aggregation. Both amyloid proteins and protein-AGE adducts bind multiligand receptors, such as receptor for AGE, CD36, and scavenger receptors A and B type I, and the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). Based on these observations, we hypothesized that glycation induces refolding of globular proteins, accompanied by formation of cross-beta structure. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate here that glycated albumin condensates into fibrous or amorphous aggregates. These aggregates bind to amyloid-specific dyes Congo red and thioflavin T and to tPA. In contrast to globular albumin, glycated albumin contains amino acid residues in beta-sheet conformation, as measured with circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. Moreover, it displays cross-beta structure, as determined with x-ray fiber diffraction. We conclude that glycation induces refolding of initially globular albumin into amyloid fibrils comprising cross-beta structure. This would explain how glycated ligands and amyloid ligands can bind to the same multiligand "cross-beta structure" receptors and to tPA.

  5. Cytosolic Calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and related gene expression and protein modulation in Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures respond immediately to altered gravitation: Parabolic flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Hausmann, Niklas; Neef, Maren; Fengler, Svenja

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) were exposed to parabolic flights in order to assess molecular short-term responses to altered gravity fields. Using transgenic cell lines, hydrogen peroxide and cytosolic Ca2+ were continuously monitored. In parallel, the metabolism of samples was chemically quenched (RNAlater, Ambion, for RNA; acid/base for NADPH, NADP) at typical stages of a parabola (1g before pull up; end of pull up (1.8 g), end of microgravity (µg, 20 sec), and end of pull out (1.8 g)). Cells exhibited an increase of both Ca2+ and hydrogen peroxide with the onset of µg, and a decline thereafter. This behaviour was accompanied by a decrease of the NADPH/NADP redox ratio, indicating a Ca2+-dependent activation of a NADPH oxidase. Microarray analyses revealed concomitant expression profiles. At the end of the microgravity phase, 396 transcripts were specifically up-, while 485 were down-regulated. Up-regulation was dominated by Ca2+- and ROS(reactive oxygen species)-related gene products. The same material was also used for the analysis of phosphopeptides by 2D SDS PAGE. Relevant spots were identified by liquid chromatography-MS. With the exception of a chaperone (HSP 70-3), hypergravity (1.8 g) and microgravity modified different sets of proteins. These are partly involved in primary metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citrate cycle) and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these data show that both gene expression and protein modulation jointly respond within seconds to alterations in the gravity field, with a focus on metabolic adaptation, signalling and control of ROS.

  6. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-κB in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (Gαi1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of Gαi1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of Gαi1QL. Gαi1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-κB, which resulted from an increase in NF-κB p50 protein. We conclude that Gαi1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-κB activation.

  7. Glycated albumin as a marker of glycemia in diabetes and its vascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Warwas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective glycemic control is very important to prevent the onset and the progression of chronic complications in diabetic patients. It is known that glycation of various proteins is increased in diabetic patients compared with non-diabetics. Among these glycated proteins, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is commonly used as a gold standard index of glycemic control in the clinical setting. However, it can be unreliable in conditions affecting the lifespan of erythrocytes (120 days as well as in the clinical state in which glycemic control alleviates or deteriorates in a short period. By overcoming the shortcomings of HbA1c, glycated albumin (GA has gained interest as a useful index for an intermediate glycation period (2 weeks and pathogenic protein.After giving a brief overview of the key role of HbA1c as a long-term glycemic marker, this review focuses on (a glycation of human albumin and its main properties, (b methods of GA determination, (c the recent clinical status of GA as a glycemic index in diabetic patients and its association with vascular complications. Finally, conditions with a possible inaccurate GA level are also mentioned.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  9. Binding to the minor groove of the double-strand, tau protein prevents DNA from damage by peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan; Qu, Mei-Hua; Wang, Xing-Sheng; Chen, Lan; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Hua, Qian; He, Rong-Qiao

    2008-07-02

    Tau, an important microtubule associated protein, has been found to bind to DNA, and to be localized in the nuclei of both neurons and some non-neuronal cells. Here, using electrophoretic mobility shifting assay (EMSA) in the presence of DNA with different chain-lengths, we observed that tau protein favored binding to a 13 bp or a longer polynucleotide. The results from atomic force microscopy also showed that tau protein preferred a 13 bp polynucleotide to a 12 bp or shorter polynucleotide. In a competitive assay, a minor groove binder distamycin A was able to replace the bound tau from the DNA double helix, indicating that tau protein binds to the minor groove. Tau protein was able to protect the double-strand from digestion in the presence of DNase I that was bound to the minor groove. On the other hand, a major groove binder methyl green as a negative competitor exhibited little effect on the retardation of tau-DNA complex in EMSA. This further indicates the DNA minor groove as the binding site for tau protein. EMSA with truncated tau proteins showed that both the proline-rich domain (PRD) and the microtubule-binding domain (MTBD) contributed to the interaction with DNA; that is to say, both PRD and MTBD bound to the minor groove of DNA and bent the double-strand, as observed by electron microscopy. To investigate whether tau protein is able to prevent DNA from the impairment by hydroxyl free radical, the chemiluminescence emitted by the phen-Cu/H(2)O(2)/ascorbate was measured. The emission intensity of the luminescence was markedly decreased when tau protein was present, suggesting a significant protection of DNA from the damage in the presence of hydroxyl free radical.

  10. Cross-linking in collagen by nonenzymatic glycation increases the matrix stiffness in rabbit achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, G Kesava

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174-180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendon. The glycation process was initiated by incubating the Achilles tendons (n = 6) in phosphate-buffered saline containing ribose, whereas control tendons (n = 6) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline without ribose. Eight weeks following glycation, the biomechanical attributes as well as the degree of collagen cross-linking were determined to examine the potential associations between matrix stiffness and molecular properties of collagen. Compared to nonglycated tendons, the glycated tendons showed increased maximum load, stress, strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness indicating that glycation increases the matrix stiffness in the tendons. Glycation of tendons resulted in a considerable decrease in soluble collagen content and a significant increase in insoluble collagen and pentosidine. Analysis of potential associations between the matrix stiffness and degree of collagen cross-linking showed that both insoluble collagen and pentosidine exhibited a significant positive correlation with the maximum load, stress, and strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness (r values ranging from.61 to.94) in the Achilles tendons. However, the soluble collagen content present in neutral salt buffer, acetate buffer, and acetate buffer containing pepsin showed an inverse relation with the various biomechanical attributes tested (r values ranging from.22 to.84) in the Achilles tendons. The results of the study demonstrate that glycation-induced collagen cross

  11. Evaluation of the Antioxidant and Anti-glication Effects of the Hexane Extract from Piper auritum Leaves in Vitro and Beneficial Activity on Oxidative Stress and Advanced Glycation End-Product-Mediated Renal Injury in Streptozotocin-Treated Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria Neira Gonzalez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant activity of hexane extracts from leaves of Piper auritum (HS. Eight complementary in vitro test methods were used, including inhibition of DPPH· radicals, nitric oxide, superoxide anion, ion-chelating, ABTS, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, β-carotene bleaching and peroxy radical scavenging. The results indicated that HS possesses high antioxidant activity. To add to these finding we tested the effect against oxidative stress in liver, pancreas and kidney in diabetic rats. Low levels of SOD, CAT, GPx and GSH in diabetic rats were reverted to near normal values after treatment with HS. These results suggest that P. auritum prevents oxidative stress, acting as a suppressor of liver cell damage. Given the link between glycation and oxidation, we proposed that HS might possess significant in vitro antiglycation activity. Our data confirmed the inhibitory effect of HS on bovine serum albumin, serum glycosylated protein, glycation of LDL, and glycation hemoglobin. The effect of HS on diabetic renal damage was investigated using streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The oral administration of HS at a dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days significantly reduced advanced glycation endproduct (AGE formation, elevated renal glucose and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance levels in the kidneys of diabetic rats. This implies that HS would alleviate the oxidative stress under diabetes through the inhibition of lipid peroxidation. These findings indicate that oxidative stress is increased in the diabetic rat kidney and that HS can prevent renal damage associated with diabetes by attenuating the oxidative stress.

  12. Vanillin restrains non-enzymatic glycation and aggregation of albumin by chemical chaperone like function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-06-01

    Vanillin a major component of vanilla bean extract is commonly used a natural flavoring agent. Glycation is known to induce aggregation and fibrillation of globular proteins such as albumin, hemoglobin. Here we report the inhibitory potential of vanillin toward early and advanced glycation modification and amyloid like aggregation of albumin based on the determination of both early and advanced glycation and conformational changes in albumin using circular dichroism. Inhibition of aggregation and fibrillation of albumin was determined based on amyloid specific dyes i.e., Congo red and Thioflavin T and microscopic imaging. It was evident that vanillin restrains glycation of albumin and exhibits protective effect toward its native conformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Accumulation of glycation products in. cap alpha. -H pig lens crystallin and its bearing to diabetic cataract genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, P; Cabezas-Cerrato, J

    1988-01-01

    The incorporation of /sup 11/C-glucose in native pig crystalline by in vitro incubation was found, after subsequent dialysis, to affect all 5 classes of crystallin separated by Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. Though the radioactivity of the ..cap alpha..-H fraction was three times greater than that of any of the others, autoradiographs of SDS-PAGE gels showed /sup 11/C-glucose adducts to be present in all soluble protein subunits, without there being any evidence of preferential glycation of the ..cap alpha..-H subunits. The concentration of stable glycation products in the ..cap alpha..-H chromatographic fraction of soluble crystallins is suggested to be due the addition of glycated material to this fraction as result of glycation-induced hyperaggregation, and not because the ..cap alpha..-H subunits were especially susceptible to glycation.

  14. Detection of Catalase as a major protein target of the lipid peroxidation product 4-HNE and the lack of its genetic association as a risk factor in SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto Hiroyuki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multifactorial disorder characterized by the presence of autoantibodies. We and others have implicated free radical mediated peroxidative damage in the pathogenesis of SLE. Since harmful free radical products are formed during this oxidative process, including 4-hydroxy 2-nonenol (4-HNE and malondialdehyde (MDA, we hypothesized that specific HNE-protein adducts would be present in SLE red blood cell (RBC membranes. Catalase is located on chromosome 11p13 where linkage analysis has revealed a marker in the same region of the genome among families with thrombocytopenia, a clinical manifestation associated with severe lupus in SLE affected pedigrees. Moreover, SLE afflicts African-Americans three times more frequently than their European-American counterparts. Hence we investigated the effects of a genetic polymorphism of catalase on risk and severity of SLE in 48 pedigrees with African American ancestry. Methods Tryptic digestion followed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS analysis was used to identify the protein modified by HNE, following Coomassie staining to visualize the bands on the acrylamide gels. Genotyping analysis for the C → T, -262 bp polymorphism in the promoter region of catalase was performed by PCR-RFLP and direct PCR-sequencing. We used a "pedigree disequilibrium test" for the family based association analysis, implemented in the PDT program to analyze the genotyping results. Results We found two proteins to be HNE-modified, migrating around 80 and 50 kD respectively. Tryptic digestion followed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS analysis of the Coomassie stained 80 kD band revealed that the target of HNE modification was catalase, a protein shown to associate with RBC membrane proteins. All the test statistics carried out on the genotyping analysis for the

  15. Antioxidative capacity and binding affinity of the complex of green tea catechin and beta-lactoglobulin glycated by the Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Mihailovic, Jelena; Minic, Simeon; Trifunovic, Sara; Prodic, Ivana; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja

    2017-10-01

    Major green tea catechin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), binds non-covalently to numerous dietary proteins, including beta-lactoglobulin of cow's milk. The effects of glycation of proteins via Maillard reaction on the binding capacity for polyphenols and the antiradical properties of the formed complexes have not been studied previously. Binding constant of BLG glycated by milk sugar lactose to EGCG was measured by the method of fluorophore quenching. Binding of EGCG was confirmed by CD and FTIR. The antioxidative properties of the complexes were examined by measuring ABTS radical scavenging capacity, superoxide anion scavenging capacity and total reducing power assay. Glycation of BLG does not significantly influence the binding constant of EGCG for the protein. Conformational changes were observed for both native and glycated BLG upon complexation with EGCG. Masking effect of polyphenol complexation on the antioxidative potential of the protein was of the similar degree for both glycated BLG and native BLG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Acceleration of lipid peroxidation in alpha-tocopherol transfer protein-knockout mice following the consumption of drinking water containing a radical initiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasukazu; Hayakawa, Mieko; Cynshi, Osamu; Jishage, Kou-ichi; Niki, Etsuo

    2008-01-01

    To assess the antioxidative role of vitamin E (VE) in a mouse model of severe VE deficiency by using biomarkers, alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (alpha-TTP(-/-))-knockout mice were maintained on a VE-deficient diet for 28 weeks [KO group, n = 6]. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice were maintained on a diet containing 0.002% alpha-tocopherol [WT group, n = 6]. The animals were housed individually in a metabolic cage from the age of 9 weeks (Week 0) to 27 weeks. Urine was collected every week, and the levels of total hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (tHODE), 7-hydroxycholesterol (t7-OHCh), and 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha)(t8-isoPGF(2alpha)), which are biomarkers for lipid peroxidation, were measured by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry. From the age of 21 weeks (Week 12), three mice in each group were provided drinking water containing the water-soluble radical initiator 2,2'-azobis[2-(2-imidazolin-2-yl)propane] dihydrochloride (AIPH) until the end of the study (Week 19). Blood and tissue samples were collected, and the levels of the abovementioned biomarkers therein were assessed. AIPH consumption clearly elevated the plasma and erythrocyte levels of tHODE and t8-isoPGF(2alpha) in both the WT and KO groups except for the erythrocyte level of tHODE in the WT group. Furthermore, this elevation was more prominent in the KO group than in the WT group. Interestingly, AIPH consumption reduced the stereoisomer ratio of HODE (ZE/EE), which is reflective of the efficacy of a compound as an antioxidant in vivo; this suggests that free radical-mediated oxidation reduces the antioxidant capacity in vivo. The urine levels of tHODE, t7-OHCh, and t8-isoPGF(2alpha) tended to increase with AIPH consumption, but these individual levels fluctuated. It was clearly demonstrated by the proposed biomarkers that maintaining alpha-TTP(-/-) mice on a VE-deficient diet results in a severe VE deficiency and promotes lipid peroxidation.

  17. Total soluble and endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in IBD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Berrie; Hoskin, Teagan; Ashcroft, Anna; Burgess, Laura; Keenan, Jacqueline I.; Falvey, James; Gearry, Richard B.; Day, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment and activation of neutrophils, with release of specific proteins such as S100 proteins, is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Soluble forms of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGE), and variants such as endogenous secretory (esRAGE), can act as decoy

  18. Biological variability of glycated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Federica; Dolci, Alberto; Mosca, Andrea; Panteghini, Mauro

    2010-11-11

    The measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) has a pivotal role in monitoring glycemic state in diabetic patients. Furthermore, the American Diabetes Association has recently recommended the use of HbA(1c) for diabetes diagnosis, but a clear definition of the clinically allowable measurement error is still lacking. Information on biological variability of the analyte can be used to achieve this goal. We systematically reviewed the published studies on the biological variation of HbA(1c) to check consistency of available data in order to accurately define analytical goals. The nine recruited studies were limited by choice of analytic methodology, population selection, protocol application and statistical analyses. There is an urgent need to determine biological variability of HbA(1c) using a specific and traceable assay, appropriate protocol and appropriate statistical evaluation of data. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors

  20. Posttranslational nitro-glycative modifications of albumin in Alzheimer's disease: implications in cytotoxicity and amyloid-β peptide aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Tajes, Marta; Palomer, Ernest; Ill-Raga, Gerard; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Guivernau, Biuse; Román-Dégano, Irene; Eraso-Pichot, Abel; Alcolea, Daniel; Fortea, Juan; Nuñez, Laura; Paez, Antonio; Alameda, Francesc; Fernández-Busquets, Xavier; Lleó, Alberto; Elosúa, Roberto; Boada, Mercé; Valverde, Miguel A; Muñoz, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Glycation and nitrotyrosination are pathological posttranslational modifications that make proteins prone to losing their physiological properties. Since both modifications are increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, we have studied their effect on albumin, the most abundant protein in cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Brain and plasmatic levels of glycated and nitrated albumin were significantly higher in AD patients than in controls. In vitro turbidometry and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that glycation and nitrotyrosination promote changes in albumin structure and biochemical properties. Glycated albumin was more resistant to proteolysis and less uptake by hepatoma cells occurred. Glycated albumin also reduced the osmolarity expected for a solution containing native albumin. Both glycation and nitrotyrosination turned albumin cytotoxic in a cell type-dependent manner for cerebral and vascular cells. Finally, of particular relevance to AD, these modified albumins were significantly less effective in avoiding Aβ aggregation than native albumin. In summary, nitrotyrosination and especially glycation alter albumin structural and biochemical properties, and these modifications might contribute for the progression of AD.

  1. Glycated albumin: from biochemistry and laboratory medicine to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozio, Elena; Di Gaetano, Nicola; Findeisen, Peter; Corsi Romanelli, Massimiliano Marco

    2017-03-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge about glycated albumin. We review the changes induced by glycation on the properties of albumin, the pathological implications of high glycated albumin levels, glycated albumin quantification methods, and the use of glycated albumin as a complementary biomarker for diabetes mellitus diagnosis and monitoring and for dealing with long-term complications. The advantages and limits of this biomarker in different clinical settings are also discussed.

  2. In Vitro Inhibitory Activity of Acca sellowiana Fruit Extract on End Products of Advanced Glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Alethia; Garcia, Abraham H; Pérez, Rosa M; García, Efren V; González, Daphne E

    2018-02-01

    Hyperglycemia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, as it increases protein glycation, as well as the progressive accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are complex structures that produce fluorescence. The glycation reaction raises the levels of protein carbonyl, N ε -(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), and fructosamine and decreases the level of thiol groups. In the present study, the antiglycation activity was determined by fluorescence intensity using the bovine serum albumin (BSA)/glucose, CML method, and the level of fructosamine. The oxidation of proteins was determined by the carbonyl protein content and thiol groups. The results show that the hexane extract of Acca sellowiana (FOH) at different concentrations (0.30-5 mg/ml) significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs in the BSA/glucose model during the 4 weeks of the study. FOH reduced the levels of fructosamine and CML. Our results showed a significant effect of FOH in the prevention of oxidative damage of proteins, as well as an effect on the oxidation of thiol groups and carbonyl proteins. The present study indicates that FOH is effective in inhibiting the glycation of proteins in vitro, so it can prevent or ameliorate the chronic conditions of diabetes associated with the formation of AGEs.

  3. THE EFFECTS OF GLYCATION ON THE BINDING OF HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN TO WARFARIN AND L-TRYPTOPHAN

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes leads to elevated levels of glucose in blood which, in turn, can lead to the non-enzymatic glycation of serum proteins such as human serum albumin (HSA). It has been suggested that this increase in glycation can alter the ability of HSA to bind to drugs and other small solutes. This study used high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) to see if there is any significant change related to glycation in the binding of HSA to warfarin and L-tryptophan, which are often used as probe ...

  4. Relationship between glycated haemoglobin and fasting plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emmanuel Musenge

    2016-07-30

    Jul 30, 2016 ... Relationship between glycated haemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose ... major stakeholders in the management of diabetes mellitus to consider FPG as an ..... HbA1c among customers of health examination services.

  5. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caropreso, F.E.; Kreuz, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A process is claimed of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H 2 O 2 per part of vanadium (V 2 O 5 ) above the stoichiometric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three sequential phases consisting of I, a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction medium maintained in the range of 2.5 to 5.5 for a period of from about 1 to 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; II, a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 5 to 180 minutes and III, a final phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. The excess hydrogen peroxide is maintained during the entire treatment up until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction medium

  6. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Chapman-Novakofski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are a heterogeneous, complex group of compounds that are formed when reducing sugar reacts in a non-enzymatic way with amino acids in proteins and other macromolecules. This occurs both exogenously (in food and endogenously (in humans with greater concentrations found in older adults. While higher AGEs occur in both healthy older adults and those with chronic diseases, research is progressing to both quantify AGEs in food and in people, and to identify mechanisms that would explain why some human tissues are damaged, and others are not. In the last twenty years, there has been increased evidence that AGEs could be implicated in the development of chronic degenerative diseases of aging, such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and with complications of diabetes mellitus. Results of several studies in animal models and humans show that the restriction of dietary AGEs has positive effects on wound healing, insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, the effect of restriction in AGEs intake has been reported to increase the lifespan in animal models. This paper will summarize the work that has been published for both food AGEs and in vivo AGEs and their relation with aging, as well as provide suggestions for future research.

  7. Plasma disappearance of glycated and non-glycated albumin in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bent-Hansen, L; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Kverneland, Arne

    1993-01-01

    transport ratio) was determined from the disappearance data. The index was high in control subjects (1.021 +/- 0.0057 (SEM)). This reflects a mean difference between the two escape rates of 2.1% per hour (for comparison the mean of the fractional escape rate of non-glycated albumin of the normal control......The fractional plasma escape rates of glycated and non-glycated albumin have earlier been measured in groups of Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients and control subjects. The escape of non-glycated albumin was similar in control subjects and normoalbuminuric patients, but elevated...... in patients with micro or macroalbuminuria. In all groups the escape rate of glycated albumin was lower than that of non-glycated albumin. Glycation increases the anionic charge of albumin. To assay for charge-dependent alterations of transport a selectivity index (non-glycated albumin/glycated albumin...

  8. Advanced glycation end-products (AGES) and heart failure : Pathophysiology and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Jasper W. L.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Smit, Andries J.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are molecules formed during a non-enzymatic reaction between proteins and sugar residues, called the Maillard reaction. AGEs accumulate in the human body with age, and accumulation is accelerated in the presence of diabetes mellitus. In patients with diabetes,

  9. The Effect of Turmeric , Cardamom and Ginger on in vitro Albumin Glycation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sheikh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common disease in the world that imposes a tremendous health and societal burden whether that burden is measured in terms of sickness , use of health systems resources or costs. Hyperglycemia is the most important clinical sign of diabetes leading to glycation of the various proteins in the body that leads to change in their nature , structure and biochemical activity. One of the probable methods in the treatment of diabetes mellitus is decrease or inhibition of this reaction. It seems that Turmeric , Cardamom and Ginger are useful for this purpose. The main goal of this research is to determine the effect of above agents on in vitro albumin glycation. In the presence of various concentration of these agents , albumin was glycated and evaluated using TBA method. Results showed that these food additives have inhibitory effects on albumin glycation reaction with the concentraction of 1 g/dl , 0.2 g/dl and 0.1 g/dl. Among these agents , Ginger had the most inhibitory effect (78% with the concentration of 1 g/dl. The sequence of effect is : Ginger > Cardamom > Turmeric These findings showed that these agents decrease albumin glycation reaction.

  10. Oncocalyxone A functions as an anti-glycation agent in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Sofia Vieira de Melo

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation endproducts (AGE are the result of post-translational changes to proteins, which ultimately compromise their structure and/or function. The identification of methods to prevent the formation of these compounds holds great promise in the development of alternative therapies for diseases such as diabetes. Plants used in traditional medicine are often rich sources of anti-glycation agents. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-glycation activity of one such compound, Oncocalyxone A (Onco A. Using spectrofluorimetric techniques, we determined that Onco A inhibits AGE formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Its IC50 value (87.88 ± 3.08 μM was almost two times lower than the standard anti-glycation compound aminoguanidine (184.68 ± 4.85 μM. The excellent anti-glycation activity of Onco A makes it an exciting candidate for the treatment of diseases associated with excessive accumulation of AGE. However, additional studies are necessary to identify its mechanism of action, as well as the in vivo response in suitable model organisms.

  11. Advanced glycation end products and RAGE: a common thread in aging, diabetes, neurodegeneration, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Vannucci, Susan J; Yan, Shirley Shi Du; Herold, Kevan; Yan, Shi Fang; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2005-07-01

    The products of nonenzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins and lipids, the advanced glycation end products (AGEs), accumulate in a wide variety of environments. AGEs may be generated rapidly or over long times stimulated by a range of distinct triggering mechanisms, thereby accounting for their roles in multiple settings and disease states. A critical property of AGEs is their ability to activate receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a signal transduction receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily. It is our hypothesis that due to such interaction, AGEs impart a potent impact in tissues, stimulating processes linked to inflammation and its consequences. We hypothesize that AGEs cause perturbation in a diverse group of diseases, such as diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and aging. Thus, we propose that targeting this pathway may represent a logical step in the prevention/treatment of the sequelae of these disorders.

  12. Skin beautification with oral non-hydrolized versions of carnosine and carcinine: Effective therapeutic management and cosmetic skincare solutions against oxidative glycation and free-radical production as a causal mechanism of diabetic complications and skin aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Savel'yeva, Ekaterina L; Lankin, Vadim Z; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2012-10-01

    Advanced glycation Maillard reaction end products (AGEs) are causing the complications of diabetes and skin aging, primarily via adventitious and cross-linking of proteins. Long-lived proteins such as structural collagen are particularly implicated as pathogenic targets of AGE processes. The formation of α-dicarbonyl compounds represents an important step for cross-linking proteins in the glycation or Maillard reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of glycation coupled to the glycation free-radical oxidation reactions as markers of protein damage in the aging of skin tissue proteins and diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism for the cross-linking reaction, we studied the reaction between a three-carbon α-dicarbonyl compound, methylglyoxal, and amino acids using EPR spectroscopy, a spectrophotometric kinetic assay of superoxide anion production at the site of glycation and a chemiluminescence technique. The transglycating activity, inhibition of transition metal ions peroxidative catalysts, resistance to hydrolysis of carnosine mimetic peptide-based compounds with carnosinase and the protective effects of carnosine, carcinine and related compounds against the oxidative damage of proteins and lipid membranes were assessed in a number of biochemical and model systems. A 4-month randomized, double-blind, controlled study was undertaken including 42 subjects where the oral supplement of non-hydrolized carnosine (Can-C Plus® formulation) was tested against placebo for 3 months followed by a 1-month supplement-free period for both groups to assess lasting effects. Assessment of the age-related skin parameters and oral treatment efficacy measurements included objective skin surface evaluation with Visioscan® VC 98 and visual assessment of skin appearance parameters. The results together confirm that a direct one-electron transfer between a Schiff base methylglyoxal dialkylimine (or its protonated form) and methylglyoxal is responsible for

  13. Relationship between Advanced Glycation End Products and Steroidogenesis in PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Deepika; Merhi, Zaher

    2016-10-21

    Women with PCOS have elevated levels of the harmful Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs), which are highly reactive molecules formed after glycation of lipids and proteins. Additionally, AGEs accumulate in the ovaries of women with PCOS potentially contributing to the well-documented abnormal steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis. A systematic review of articles and abstracts available in PubMed was conducted and presented in a systemic manner. This article reports changes in steroidogenic enzyme activity in granulosa and theca cells in PCOS and PCOS-models. It also described the changes in AGEs and their receptors in the ovaries of women with PCOS and presents the underlying mechanism(s) whereby AGEs could be responsible for the PCOS-related changes in granulosa and theca cell function thus adversely impacting steroidogenesis and follicular development. AGEs are associated with hyperandrogenism in PCOS possibly by altering the activity of various enzymes such as cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme cytochrome P450, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, 17α-hydroxylase, and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. AGEs also affect luteinizing hormone receptor and anti-Mullerian hormone receptor expression as well as their signaling pathways in granulosa cells. A better understanding of how AGEs alter granulosa and theca cell function is likely to contribute meaningfully to a conceptual framework whereby new interventions to prevent and/or treat ovarian dysfunction in PCOS can ultimately be developed.

  14. Consequential secondary structure alterations and aggregation during prolonged casein glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Supriya; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) of casein is a process used not just to ameliorate the quality of dairy products but also to increase the shelf life of canned foods, including baby milk supplements. Incubation of κ-casein with reducing sugars for 15 days at physiological temperature showed the formation of a molten globule state at day 9 and 12 during fructation and glucation respectively. This state exhibits substantial secondary structure and maximum ANS binding. Later on, glycation resulted in the formation of aggregates at day 12 in presence of fructose and day 15 in presence of glucose. Aggregates possess extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and FTIR. These aggregates showed altered tryptophan environment, decrease ANS binding relative to molten globule state and increase in Thioflavin T fluorescence. Aggregates were also accompanied by the accumulation of AGEs, indicative of structural damage to the protein and formation of potentially harmful species at the physiological level. Fructose was more reactive than glucose and thus caused early and significant changes in the protein. From our studies, we conclude that controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction in the food industry is essential to counter its negative effects and expand its safety spectrum.

  15. Glycation, oxidation and glycoxidation of IgG: a biophysical, biochemical, immunological and hematological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sidra; Moinuddin; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Raghav, Alok; Habib, Safia; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2017-09-12

    Glycation and oxidation induce structural alterations in the proteins in an interdependent manner with consequent pathological implications. The published literature presents wide range of modifications in conformational characteristics of proteins by glycation and oxidation; however, there is little data that could elaborate the cumulative effect of both the processes. This study has analysed the modifications in IgG by methylglyoxal (MG) (glycative stress), hydroxyl radical ([Formula: see text]) (oxidative stress) and by their combined action i.e. [Formula: see text] treatment of MG glycated IgG (glycoxidation). It further addresses the implications of the altered structural integrity of IgG on its immunological characteristics and impact on haematological parameters in rabbits. Using circular dichroism, FTIR, SDS-PAGE analysis, thioflavin-T fluorescence assay, congo red absorbance analysis, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, ELISA, blood cell counts and rectal temperature studies, we report that the glycoxidative modification caused maximum alteration in the IgG as compared to the glycatively and oxidatively modified protein. Far-UV CD results confirmed the highest decline in the beta-pleated sheet content of the protein by glycoxidation. The damage led to the reduced flexibility and enhanced electronic interactions in IgG as observed by near-UV CD. Modifications caused cross-linking and adduct formation in the serum protein. The electron micrograph confirmed amorphous aggregation in modified IgG. The modifications increased the hydrodynamic radius of IgG by allowing the attachment of [Formula: see text] and MG residues. The glycoxidatively modified IgG induced the maximum antibody titres that showed high specificity towards the altered IgG. The glycoxidation of IgG leads to activation of inflammatory pathways.

  16. A facile route to glycated albumin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohli, Nadra; Meilhac, Olivier; Rondeau, Philippe; Gueffrache, Syrine; Mora, Laurence; Abdelghani, Adnane

    2018-07-01

    In this paper we propose an easy way to detect the glycated form of human serum albumin which is biomarker for several diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer. The detection platform is a label free impedimetric immunosensor, in which we used a monoclonal human serum albumin antibody as a bioreceptor and electrochemical impedance as a transducing method. The antibody was deposited onto a gold surface by simple physisorption technique. Bovine serum albumin was used as a blocking agent for non-specific binding interactions. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for the characterization of each layer. Human serum albumin was glycated at different levels with several concentrations of glucose ranging from 0 mM to 500 mM representing physiological, pathological (diabetic albumin) and suprapathological concentration of glucose. Through the calibration curves, we could clearly distinguish between two different areas related to physiological and pathological albumin glycation levels. The immunosensor displayed a linear range from 7.49% to 15.79% of glycated albumin to total albumin with a good sensitivity. Surface plasmon resonance imaging was also used to characterize the developed immunosensor. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of Cerasus avium stalk extract on albumin glycation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohadeseh Abdoli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins is the major cause of diabetic complications. The inhibition of glycation process can reduce complications of diabetes. In the Iranian traditional medicine, the decoction (boiled extraction of Cerasus avium stalk is used as a hypoglycemic agent. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro inhibitory effects of decoction and ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Cerasus avium stalk on albumin glycation reaction. Methods: In this experimental study, first, the ethanolic, aqueous and decoction extracts of Cerasus avium stalk were prepared. Then, different concentrations of these extracts were prepared and added to albumin and glucose solutions. Finally, compared to control group that was not treated with any extracts, the albumin glycation rate in the groups treated with various concentrations of extracts was evaluated using TBA (thio-barbituric acid method. Results: The results showed that compared to control group, decoction of Cerasus avium stalk in the concentrations of 20, 10 and 2 mg/dl could reduce albumin glycation to 85.10±1.55, 72.35±1.75 and 51.25±1.22 %, respectively (P>0.001. Moreover, in the concentration of 20 mg/dl, the inhibitory effect of decoction of Cerasus avium stalk on the albumin glycation reaction was higher than those of aqueous (P=0.021 and ethanolic (P=0.009 extracts. Conclusion: The findings showed that the extracs of Cerasus avium stalk, in particular in the decoction form, could significantly reduce the rate of albumin glycation; therefore, it can be used for decreasing diabetes mellitus complications.

  18. The Preventive Effect of L-Lysine on Lysozyme Glycation in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mirmiranpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysozyme is a bactericidal enzyme whose structure and functions change in diabetes. Chemical chaperones are small molecules including polyamines (e.g. spermine, amino acids (e.g. L-lysine and polyols (e.g. glycerol. They can improve protein conformation in several stressful conditions such as glycation. In this study, the authors aimed to observe the effect of L-lysine as a chemical chaperone on structure and function of glycated lysozyme. In this study, in vitro and in vivo effects of L-lysine on lysozyme glycation were investigated. Lysozyme was incubated with glucose and/or L-lysine, followed by an investigation of its structure by electrophoresis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism spectroscopy and also assessment of its bactericidal activity against M. lysodeikticus. In the clinical trial, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were randomly divided into two groups of 25 (test and control. All patients received metformin and glibenclamide for a three months period. The test group was supplemented with 3 g/day of L-lysine. The quantity and activity of lysozyme and other parameters were then measured. Among the test group, L-lysine was found to reduce the advanced glycation end products (AGEs in the sera of patients with T2DM and in vitro condition. This chemical chaperone reversed the alteration in lysozyme structure and function due to glycation and resulted in increased lysozyme activity. Structure and function of glycated lysozyme are significantly improved by l-lysine; therefore it can be considered an effective therapeutic supplementation in T2DM, decreasing the risk of infection in these patients.

  19. Inhibitory effect of gold nanoparticles on the D-ribose glycation of bovine serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Weixi Liu,1 Menashi A Cohenford,1–3 Leslie Frost,3 Champika Seneviratne,4 Joel A Dain1 1Department of Chemistry, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA; 2Department of Integrated Science and Technology, 3Department of Chemistry, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA; 4Department of Chemistry, College of the North Atlantic, Labrador, NL, Canada Abstract: Formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs by nonenzymatic glycation of proteins is a major contributory factor to the pathophysiology of diabetic conditions including senile dementia and atherosclerosis. This study describes the inhibitory effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs on the D-ribose glycation of bovine serum albumin (BSA. A combination of analytical methods including ultraviolet–visible spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography, circular dichroism, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry were used to determine the extent of BSA glycation in the presence of citrate reduced spherical GNPs of various sizes and concentrations. GNPs of particle diameters ranging from 2 nm to 20 nm inhibited BSA’s AGE formation. The extent of inhibition correlated with the total surface area of the nanoparticles. GNPs of highest total surface area yielded the most inhibition whereas those with the lowest total surface area inhibited the formation of AGEs the least. Additionally, when GNPs’ total surface areas were set the same, their antiglycation activities were similar. This inhibitory effect of GNPs on BSA’s glycation by D-ribose suggests that colloidal particles may have a therapeutic application for the treatment of diabetes and conditions that promote hyperglycemia. Keywords: gold nanoparticles, glycation, AGEs, GNPs, BSA

  20. Advanced glycation endproducts in food and their effects on health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Malene Wibe; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Andersen, Jeanette Marker

    2013-01-01

    of AGEs. Some AGEs interact with specific pro- or anti-inflammatory receptors. Most studies on the biological effects of AGEs have been carried out by administering heated foods. The pro-inflammatory and deteriorating biological effects of AGEs in these studies, therefore, need further confirmation......Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) form by Maillard-reactions after initial binding of aldehydes with amines or amides in heated foods or in living organisms. The mechanisms of formation may include ionic as well as oxidative and radical pathways. The reactions may proceed within proteins...... to form high-molecular weight (HMW) AGEs or among small molecules to form low-molecular weight (LMW) AGEs. All free amino acids form AGEs, but lysine or arginine side chains dominate AGE formation within proteins. The analysis of AGEs in foods and body fluids is most often performed by ELISA or LC...

  1. The effect of glycation on bovine serum albumin conformation and ligand binding properties with regard to gliclazide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żurawska-Płaksej, Ewa; Rorbach-Dolata, Anna; Wiglusz, Katarzyna; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    Albumin, the major serum protein, plays a variety of functions, including binding and transporting endogenous and exogenous ligands. Its molecular structure is sensitive to different environmental modifiers, among which glucose is one of the most significant. In vivo albumin glycation occurs under physiological conditions, but it is increased in diabetes. Since bovine serum albumin (BSA) may serve as a model protein in in vitro experiments, we aimed to investigate the impact of glucose-mediated BSA glycation on the binding capacity towards gliclazide, as well as the ability of this drug to prevent glycation of the BSA molecule. To reflect normo- and hyperglycemia, the conditions of the glycation process were established. Structural changes of albumin after interaction with gliclazide (0-14 μM) were determined using fluorescence quenching and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Moreover, thermodynamic parameters as well as energy transfer parameters were determined. Calculated Stern-Volmer quenching constants, as well as binding constants for the BSA-gliclazide complex, were lower for the glycated form of albumin than for the unmodified protein. The largest, over 2-fold, decrease in values of binding parameters was observed for the sample with 30 mM of glucose, reflecting the poorly controlled diabetic state, which indicates that the degree of glycation had a critical influence on binding with gliclazide. In contrast to significant changes in the tertiary structure of BSA upon binding with gliclazide, only slight changes in the secondary structure were observed, which was reflected by about a 3% decrease of the α-helix content of glycated BSA (regardless of glucose concentration) in comparison to unmodified BSA. The presence of gliclazide during glycation did not affect its progress. The results of this study indicate that glycation significantly changed the binding ability of BSA towards gliclazide and the scale of these changes depended on glucose concentration. It

  2. Open tubular capillary electrochromatography: A useful microreactor for collagen I glycation and interaction studies with low-density lipoprotein particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ulivo, Lucia; Witos, Joanna; Ooerni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T.; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes, a multifunctional disease and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries, strongly associates with the development and progression of atherosclerosis. One of the consequences of high level of glucose in the blood circulation is glycation of long-lived proteins, such as collagen I, the most abundant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the arterial wall. Glycation is a long-lasting process that involves the reaction between a carbonyl group of the sugar and an amino group of the protein, usually a lysine residue. This reaction generates an Amadori product that may evolve in advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs, as reactive molecules, can provoke cross-linking of collagen I fibrils. Since binding of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) to the ECM of the inner layer of the arterial wall, the intima, has been implicated to be involved in the onset of the development of an atherosclerotic plaque, collagen modifications, which can affect the affinity of native and oxidized LDL for collagen I, can promote the entrapment of LDLs in the intima and accelerate the progression of atherosclerosis. In this study, open tubular capillary electrochromatography is proposed as a new microreactor to study in situ glycation of collagen I. The kinetics of glycation was first investigated in a fused silica collagen I-coated capillary. Dimethyl sulphoxide, injected as an electroosmotic flow marker, gave information about the charge of coating. Native and oxidized LDL, and selected peptide fragments from apolipoprotein B-100, the protein covering LDL particles, were injected as marker compounds to clarify the interactions between LDLs and the glycated collagen I coating. The method proposed is simple and inexpensive, since only small amounts of collagen and LDL are required. Atomic force microscopy images complemented our studies, highlighting the difference between unmodified and glycated collagen I surfaces.

  3. Open tubular capillary electrochromatography: A useful microreactor for collagen I glycation and interaction studies with low-density lipoprotein particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ulivo, Lucia; Witos, Joanna [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Ooerni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T. [Wihuri Research Institute, Kalliolinnantie 4, FIN-00140, Helsinki (Finland); Riekkola, Marja-Liisa, E-mail: marja-liisa.riekkola@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-04-07

    Diabetes, a multifunctional disease and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries, strongly associates with the development and progression of atherosclerosis. One of the consequences of high level of glucose in the blood circulation is glycation of long-lived proteins, such as collagen I, the most abundant component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the arterial wall. Glycation is a long-lasting process that involves the reaction between a carbonyl group of the sugar and an amino group of the protein, usually a lysine residue. This reaction generates an Amadori product that may evolve in advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs, as reactive molecules, can provoke cross-linking of collagen I fibrils. Since binding of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) to the ECM of the inner layer of the arterial wall, the intima, has been implicated to be involved in the onset of the development of an atherosclerotic plaque, collagen modifications, which can affect the affinity of native and oxidized LDL for collagen I, can promote the entrapment of LDLs in the intima and accelerate the progression of atherosclerosis. In this study, open tubular capillary electrochromatography is proposed as a new microreactor to study in situ glycation of collagen I. The kinetics of glycation was first investigated in a fused silica collagen I-coated capillary. Dimethyl sulphoxide, injected as an electroosmotic flow marker, gave information about the charge of coating. Native and oxidized LDL, and selected peptide fragments from apolipoprotein B-100, the protein covering LDL particles, were injected as marker compounds to clarify the interactions between LDLs and the glycated collagen I coating. The method proposed is simple and inexpensive, since only small amounts of collagen and LDL are required. Atomic force microscopy images complemented our studies, highlighting the difference between unmodified and glycated collagen I surfaces.

  4. Yeast Metabolites of Glycated Amino Acids in Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Michael; Beer, Falco; Witte, Sophia; Henle, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Glycation reactions (Maillard reactions) during the malting and brewing processes are important for the development of the characteristic color and flavor of beer. Recently, free and protein-bound Maillard reaction products (MRPs) such as pyrraline, formyline, and maltosine were found in beer. Furthermore, these amino acid derivatives are metabolized by Saccharomyces cerevisiae via the Ehrlich pathway. In this study, a method was developed for quantitation of individual Ehrlich intermediates derived from pyrraline, formyline, and maltosine. Following synthesis of the corresponding reference material, the MRP-derived new Ehrlich alcohols pyrralinol (up to 207 μg/L), formylinol (up to 50 μg/L), and maltosinol (up to 6.9 μg/L) were quantitated for the first time in commercial beer samples by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. This is equivalent to ca. 20-40% of the concentrations of the parent glycated amino acids. The metabolites were almost absent from alcohol-free beers and malt-based beverages. Two previously unknown valine-derived pyrrole derivatives were characterized and qualitatively identified in beer. The metabolites investigated represent new process-induced alkaloids that may influence brewing yeast performance due to structural similarities to quorum sensing and metal-binding molecules.

  5. Chromium-induced accumulation of peroxide content, stimulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium (Cr)-induced oxidative damage and changes in contents of chlorophyll, protein, peroxide and malondialdehyde (MDA) and activities of enzymatic antioxidants were investigated in 4-day-old green gram (Vigna radiata L. cv. Wilczek) seedlings. Cr increased the contents of peroxide and MDA but decreased the ...

  6. Evaluation of Structure, Chaperone-Like Activity and Allergenicity of Reduced Glycated Adduct of Bovine β-casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Reza; Ferdowsi, Leila; Tavaf, Zohreh; Sadeghian, Tanaz; Tamaddon, Ali M; Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Pourpak, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Milk has a potent reducing environment with an important quantity of sugar levels. In the current study β-casein was glycated in the presence of D-glucose and sodium cyanoborohydride as a reducing agent. Then, the reduced glucitol adduct of β-casein was used for the structural and functional analyses using different spectroscopic techniques. The results of fluorescence and far ultraviolet circular dichroism assessments suggest important structural alteration upon non-enzymatic glycation of β-casein. In addition, the chaperone activity, micellization properties and antioxidant activity of this protein were altered upon glucose modification. Also, as a result of reduced glycation, the allergenicity profile of this protein remained largely unchanged. Additional to its energetic and nutritional values, β-casein has important functional properties. The native structure of this protein is important to perform accurately its biological functions. Non-enzymatic glycation under reducing state was capable to alter both structural and functional aspects of β-casein. Due to effective reducing environment and significant quantity of reducing sugar of human milk, similar structural and functional alterations are most likely to occur upon reducing glycation of β-casein in vivo. Also, these changes might be even intensified during chronic hyperglycemia in diabetic mothers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. N-acetylcysteine Counteracts Adipose Tissue Macrophage Infiltration and Insulin Resistance Elicited by Advanced Glycated Albumin in Healthy Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolline S. da Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advanced glycation endproducts elicit inflammation. However, their role in adipocyte macrophage infiltration and in the development of insulin resistance, especially in the absence of the deleterious biochemical pathways that coexist in diabetes mellitus, remains unknown. We investigated the effect of chronic administration of advanced glycated albumin (AGE-albumin in healthy rats, associated or not with N-acetylcysteine (NAC treatment, on insulin sensitivity, adipose tissue transcriptome and macrophage infiltration and polarization.Methods: Male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with control (C or AGE-albumin alone, or, together with NAC in the drinking water. Biochemical parameters, lipid peroxidation, gene expression and protein contents were, respectively, determined by enzymatic techniques, reactive thiobarbituric acid substances, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry or immunoblot. Carboxymethyllysine (CML and pyrraline (PYR were determined by LC/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and ELISA.Results: CML and PYR were higher in AGE-albumin as compared to C. Food consumption, body weight, systolic blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, hepatic and renal function, adipose tissue relative weight and adipocyte number were similar among groups. In AGE-treated animals, insulin resistance, adipose macrophage infiltration and Col12a1 mRNA were increased with no changes in M1 and M2 phenotypes as compared to C-albumin-treated rats. Total GLUT4 content was reduced by AGE-albumin as compared to C-albumin. NAC improved insulin sensitivity, reduced urine TBARS, adipose macrophage number and Itgam and Mrc mRNA and increased Slc2a4 and Ppara. CD11b, CD206, Ager, Ddost, Cd36, Nfkb1, Il6, Tnf, Adipoq, Retn, Arg, and Il12 expressions were similar among groups.Conclusions: AGE-albumin sensitizes adipose tissue to inflammation due to macrophage infiltration and reduces GLUT4, contributing to insulin resistance in healthy rats. NAC antagonizes AGE

  8. Proteomics of the oxidative stress response induced by hydrogen peroxide and paraquat reveals a novel AhpC-like protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Nathan J; Scott, Nichollas E; Shin, Eun Hye H

    2011-01-01

    hypothetical antioxidant protein (PA3450) that shares sequence similarity with 1-Cys peroxiredoxins. Other induced proteins included known oxidative stress proteins (superoxide dismutase and catalase), as well as those involved in iron acquisition (siderophore biosynthesis and receptor proteins FpvA and Fpt...

  9. Recent advances in α-synuclein functions, advanced glycation, and toxicity: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erika; Vasudevaraju, P; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Britton, G B; Rao, K S

    2013-04-01

    The toxicity of α-synuclein in the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease which includes its hallmark aggregation has been studied scrupulously in the last decade. Although little is known regarding the normal functions of α-synuclein, its association with membrane phospholipids suggests its potential role in signaling pathways. Following extensive evidences for its nuclear localization, we and others recently demonstrated DNA binding activity of α-synuclein that modulates its conformation as well as aggregation properties. Furthermore, we also underscored the similarities among various amyloidogenic proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases including amyloid beta peptides and tau. Our more recent studies show that α-synuclein is glycated and glycosylated both in vitro and in neurons, significantly affecting its folding, oligomeric, and DNA binding properties. Glycated α-synuclein causes increased genome damage both via its direct interaction with DNA and by increased generation of reactive oxygen species as glycation byproduct. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of glycation and other posttranslational modifications of α-synuclein, including phosphorylation and nitration, and their role in neuronal death in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Advanced glycation end products induce differential structural modifications and fibrillation of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Saraswathi, N. T.

    2016-06-01

    Glycation induced amyloid fibrillation is fundamental to the development of many neurodegenerative and cardiovascular complications. Excessive non-enzymatic glycation in conditions such as hyperglycaemia results in the increased accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are highly reactive pro-oxidants, which can lead to the activation of inflammatory pathways and development of oxidative stress. Recently, the effect of non-enzymatic glycation on protein structure has been the major research area, but the role of specific AGEs in such structural alteration and induction of fibrillation remains undefined. In this study, we determined the specific AGEs mediated structural modifications in albumin mainly considering carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and argpyrimidine (Arg-P) which are the major AGEs formed in the body. We studied the secondary structural changes based on circular dichroism (CD) and spectroscopic analysis. The AGEs induced fibrillation was determined by Congo red binding and examination of scanning and transmission electron micrographs. The amyloidogenic regions in the sequence of BSA were determined using FoldAmyloid. It was observed that CEL modification of BSA leads to the development of fibrillar structures, which was evident from both secondary structure changes and TEM analysis.

  11. Activity of glycated chitosan and other adjuvants to PDT vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Čiplys, Evaldas; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Bielawska, Alicja; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Glycated chitosan (GC), a water soluble galactose-conjugated natural polysaccharide, has proven to be an effective immunoadjuvant for treatment of tumors based on laser thermal therapy. It was also shown to act as adjuvant for tumor therapy with high-intensity ultrasound and in situ photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present study, GC was examined as potential adjuvant to PDT-generated cancer vaccine. Two other agents, pure calreticulin protein and acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521, were also tested as prospective adjuvants for use in conjunction with PDT vaccines. Single treatment with GC, included with PDT vaccine cells suspension, improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to vaccine alone. This attractive prospect of GC application remains to be carefully optimized and mechanistically elucidated. Both calreticulin and LCL521 proved also effective adjuvants when combined with PDT vaccine tumor treatment.

  12. Gas stunning with CO2 affected meat color, lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress, and gene expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases, glutathione S-transferases, and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase in the skeletal muscles of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Zhang, Haijun; Yue, Hongyuan; Wu, Shugeng; Yang, Haiming; Wang, Zhiyue; Qi, Guanghai

    2018-01-01

    Meat color and lipid peroxidation are important traits related to meat quality. CO 2 concentration is a critical factor that can affect meat quality in the commercial use of gas stunning (GS). However, the effect and mechanism of CO 2 stunning on meat color and lipid peroxidation during long-term storage remain poorly studied. We aimed to study the effects of GS methods, especially CO 2 concentration, on meat color and meat lipid peroxidation in broilers during long-term storage at 4 °C and to explore the potential mechanism of meat color change via lipid peroxidation and the inner lipid peroxide scavenging system. Eighteen broilers were sacrificed after exposure to one of the following gas mixtures for 90 s: 40% CO 2  + 21% O 2  + 39% N 2 (G40%), 79% CO 2  + 21% O 2 (G79%), or no stunning (0% CO 2 , control). Meat color, serum variables, enzyme activities, and the gene expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase ( MAPK ), nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 ( Nrf2 ), glutathione S-transferase ( GST ) and superoxide dismutase ( SOD ) were determined. The concentrations of serum triiodothyronine (T3, P  = 0.03) and the ratio of serum free triiodothyronine/free thyroxine (FT3/FT4, P  meat and the TBARS 3 d in thigh meat ( P  meat ( r  = - 0.63, P  meat and in the thigh meat ( r  = - 0.57, P  = 0.01; and r  = - 0.53, P  = 0.03 respectively). Compared with the control group, Lightness (L*) 1 d ( P =  0.03) and L* 9 d ( P meat of both the G40% and G79% groups. The values of yellowness (b*) 3 d ( P =  0.01), b* 6 d ( P meat were lower in both the G40% and G79% groups than in the control group. In the breast muscle, the mRNA levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 ( JNK2, P  = 0.03), GSTT1 ( P  = 0.04), and SOD1 ( P  = 0.05) were decreased, and the mRNA levels of JNK1 ( P  = 0.07), Nrf2 ( P  = 0.09), and GSTA3 ( P  = 0.06) were slightly lower in both the G40% and G79% groups

  13. Development of Diagnostic Fragment Ion Library for Glycated Peptides of Human Serum Albumin: Targeted Quantification in Prediabetic, Diabetic, and Microalbuminuria Plasma by Parallel Reaction Monitoring, SWATH, and MSE*

    OpenAIRE

    Korwar, Arvind M.; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G.; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H.; Bhat, Shweta; Regin, Bhaskaran S.; Ramaswamy, Sureshkumar; Giri, Ashok P.; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Kulkarni, Mahesh J.

    2015-01-01

    Human serum albumin is one of the most abundant plasma proteins that readily undergoes glycation, thus glycated albumin has been suggested as an additional marker for monitoring glycemic status. Hitherto, only Amadori-modified peptides of albumin were quantified. In this study, we report the construction of fragment ion library for Amadori-modified lysine (AML), N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML)-, and N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL)-modified peptides of the corresponding synthetically modified...

  14. Glycation in human fingernail clippings using ATR-FTIR spectrometry, a new marker for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopman, Renaat; Van de Vyver, Thijs; Kishabongo, Antoine Sadiki; Katchunga, Philippe; Van Aken, Elisabeth H; Cikomola, Justin; Monteyne, Tinne; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Delanghe, Joris R

    2017-01-01

    Although HbA1c is a good diagnostic tool for diabetes, the precarity of the health system and the costs limit the use of this biomarker in developing countries. Fingernail clippings contain ±85% of keratins, which are prone to glycation. Nail keratin glycation may reflect the average glycemia over the last months. We explored if attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) can be used as a non-invasive tool for assessing glycation in diabetes. Using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, glycation and deglycation experiments with fructosamine 3-kinase allowed to identify the spectrum that corresponds with keratin glycation in fingernail clippings. Clippings of 105 healthy subjects and 127 diabetics were subjected to the standardized ATR-FTIR spectroscopy method. In vitro glycation resulted in an increased absorption at 1047cm -1 . Following enzymatic deglycation, this peak diminished significantly, proving that the AUC between 970 and 1140cm -1 corresponded with glycated proteins. Within-run CV of the assay was 3%. Storage of nail clippings at 37°C for 2weeks did not significantly change results. In diabetics, glycated nail protein concentrations (median: 1.51μmol/g protein, IQR: 1.37-1.85μmol/g protein) were significantly higher than in the controls (median: 1.19μmol/g protein, IQR: 1.09-1.26μmol/g protein) (p<0.0001). ROC analysis yielded an AUC of 0.92 at a cut-off point of 1.28μmol/g nail (specificity: 82%; sensitivity: 90%). No correlation was observed between the glycated nail protein concentrations and HbA1c. Protein glycation analysis in fingernails with ATR-FTIR spectroscopy could be an alternative affordable technique for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes. As the test does not consume reagents, and the preanalytical phase is extremely robust, the test could be particularly useful in developing countries. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of high-protein versus high-carbohydrate diets on markers of β-cell function, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipokines in obese, premenopausal women without diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabchi, Abbas E; McDaniel, Kristin A; Wan, Jim Y; Tylavsky, Frances A; Jacovino, Crystal A; Sands, Chris W; Nyenwe, Ebenezer A; Stentz, Frankie B

    2013-07-01

    To study the effects of high-protein versus high-carbohydrate diets on various metabolic end points (glucoregulation, oxidative stress [dichlorofluorescein], lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde], proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6], adipokines, and resting energy expenditure [REE]) with high protein-low carbohydrate (HP) and high carbohydrate-low protein (HC) diets at baseline and after 6 months of dietary intervention. We recruited obese, premenopausal women aged 20-50 years with no diabetes or prediabetes who were randomized to HC (55% carbohydrates, 30% fat, and 15% protein) or HP (40% carbohydrates, 30% fat, and 30% protein) diets for 6 months. The diets were provided in prepackaged food, which provided 500 kcal restrictions per day. The above metabolic end points were measured with HP and HC diet at baseline and after 6 months of dietary intervention. After 6 months of the HP versus HC diet (12 in each group), the following changes were significantly different by Wilcoxon rank sum test for the following parameters: dichlorofluorescein (-0.8 vs. -0.3 µmol/L, P vs. -0.2 μmol/L, P = 0.0004), C-reactive protein (-2.1 vs. -0.8 mg/L, P = 0.0003), E-selectin (-8.6 vs. -3.7 ng/mL, P = 0.0007), adiponectin (1,284 vs. 504 ng/mL, P = 0.0011), tumor necrosis factor-α (-1.8 vs. -0.9 pg/mL, P vs. -0.4 pg/mL, P vs. 0.16 mmol/L, P = 0.0002), REE (259 vs. 26 kcal, P vs. 0.9, P vs. 2.1, P < 0.0001). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the significant advantages of a 6-month hypocaloric HP diet versus hypocaloric HC diet on markers of β-cell function, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipokines in normal, obese females without diabetes.

  16. Semi-purification procedures of prions from a prion-infected brain using sucrose has no influence on the nonenzymatic glycation of the disease-associated prion isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeong-Gon; Kim, Jae-Il; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Carp, Richard I; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Nε-carboxymethyl group is linked to not only one or more N-terminal Lys residues but also to one or more Lys residues of the protease-resistant core region of the pathogenic prion isoform (PrPSc) in prion-infected brains. Using an anti-advanced glycation end product (AGE) antibody, we detected nonenzymatically glycated PrPSc (AGE-PrPSc) in prion-infected brains following concentration by a series of ultracentrifugation steps with a sucrose cushion. In the present study, the levels of in vitro nonenzymatic glycation of PrPSc using sucrose were investigated to determine whether sucrose cushion can artificially and nonenzymatically induce in vitro glycation during ultracentrifugation. The first insoluble pellet fraction following the first ultracentrifugation (PU1st) collected from 263K scrapie-infected brains was incubated with sucrose, glucose or colloidal silica coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (percoll). None of the compounds in vitro resulted in AGE-PrPSc. Nonetheless, glucose and percoll produced AGEs in vitro from other proteins within PU1st of the infected brains. This reaction could lead to the AGE-modified polymer(s) of nonenzymatic glycation-prone protein(s). This study showed that PrPSc is not nonenzymatically glycated in vitro with sucrose, glucose or percoll and that AGE-modified PrPSc can be isolated and enriched from prion-infected brains.

  17. Inhibition of Connexin 26/43 and Extracellular-Regulated Kinase Protein Plays a Critical Role in Melatonin Facilitated Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication in Hydrogen Peroxide-Treated HaCaT Keratinocyte Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jung Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Though melatonin was known to regulate gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC in chick astrocytes and mouse hepatocytes, the underlying mechanism by melatonin was not elucidated in hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2- treated HaCaT keratinocyte cells until now. In the current study, though melatonin at 2 mM and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 at 300 μM showed weak cytotoxicity in HaCaT keratinocyte cells, melatonin significantly suppressed the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in H2O2-treated HaCaT cells compared to untreated controls. Also, the scrape-loading dye-transfer assay revealed that melatonin enhances the intercellular communication by introducing Lucifer Yellow into H2O2-treated cells. Furthermore, melatonin significantly enhanced the expression of connexin 26 (Cx26 and connexin 43 (Cx43 at mRNA and protein levels, but not that of connexin 30 (Cx30 in H2O2-treated HaCaT cells. Of note, melatonin attenuated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERKs more than p38 MAPK or JNK in H2O2-treated HaCaT cells. Conversely, ERK inhibitor PD98059 promoted the intercellular communication in H2O2-treated HaCaT cells. Furthermore, combined treatment of melatonin (200 μM and vitamin C (10 μg/mL significantly reduced ROS production in H2O2-treated HaCaT cells. Overall, these findings support the scientific evidences that melatonin facilitates gap junctional intercellular communication in H2O2-treated HaCaT keratinocyte cells via inhibition of connexin 26/43 and ERK as a potent chemopreventive agent.

  18. Anti-glycation and anti-oxidation properties of Capsicum frutescens and Curcuma longa fruits: possible role in prevention of diabetic complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ibrar; Ahmad, Haroon; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-09-01

    The accumulation of advanced glycationend products (AGE's) in the body, due to the non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is associated with several pathological conditions like aging and diabetes mellitus. Hence a plant having anti-glycation and anti-oxidation potentials may serve as therapeutic agent for diabetic complications and aging. In this study the anti-glycation and anti-oxidation properties of crude methanolic extracts of fruits of Capsicum frutescens and Curcuma longa were investigated. Among the two C. frutescens had more anti-glycation ability with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50) of 90βg/mLas compared to 324βg/mL MIC50 of C. longa. Curcuma longa had the more anti-oxidation potential i.e. 35.01, 30.83 and 28.08% at 0.5mg, 0.25mg and 0.125mg respectively.

  19. Peroxide organometallic compounds and their transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razuvaev, G.A.; Brilkina, T.G.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given experimental works on synthesis and reactions of peroxide organometallic compounds. Reactions have been considered of organometallic compounds with oxygen and organic peroxides which result in formation of both peroxide and non-peroxide products. Possible routes and mechanisms of chemical transformations of peroxide organometallic compounds have been discussed. Reactions of organometallic compounds with oxygen and peroxides have been considered

  20. Effect of Terminalia chebula fruit extract on lipid peroxidation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... products mainly edible vegetables and spices, have a key role in chemopreventers ... protein; dunit/minute/mg protein ; eµg/mg protein; fn moles of H2O2 ... induce peroxidation of cell membrane lipids (Bhattacharya et al., 1999). .... catalase – like activities in seminal plasma and spermatozoa. Int. J. Androl.

  1. The mechanism of reduced IgG/IgE-binding of β-lactoglobulin by pulsed electric field pretreatment combined with glycation revealed by ECD/FTICR-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenhua; Tu, Zongcai; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Kaltashov, Igor A; Zhao, Yunlong; Niu, Chendi; Yao, Honglin; Ye, Wenfeng

    2018-01-24

    Bovine β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) is a major allergen existing in milk and causes about 90% of IgE-mediated cow's milk allergies. Previous studies showed that pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment could partially unfold the protein, which may contribute to the improvement of protein glycation. In this study, the effect of PEF pretreatment combined with glycation on the IgG/IgE-binding ability and the structure of β-Lg was investigated. The result showed that PEF pretreatment combined with glycation significantly reduced the IgG and IgE binding abilities, which was attributed to the changes of secondary and tertiary structure and the increase in glycation sites and degree of substitution per peptide (DSP) value determined by electron capture dissociation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ECD/FTICR-MS). Unexpectedly, glycation sites (K47, K91 and K135) added by two mannose molecules were identified in glycated β-Lg with PEF pretreatment. Moreover, the results indicated that PEF pretreatment at 25 kV cm -1 for 60 μs promoted the reduction of IgG/IgE-binding capacity by increasing the glycation degree of β-Lg, whereas single PEF treatment under the same conditions markedly enhanced the IgG/IgE-binding ability by partially unfolding the structure of β-Lg. The results suggested that ECD/FTICR-MS could help us to understand the mechanism of reduction in the IgG/IgE-binding of β-Lg by structural characterization at the molecular level. Therefore, PEF pretreatment combined with glycation may provide an alternative method for β-Lg desensitization.

  2. Evaluation of a reference material for glycated haemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weykamp, CW; Penders, TJ; Muskiet, FAJ; vanderSlik, W

    The use of lyophilized blood as a reference material for glycated haemoglobin was investigated with respect to IFCC criteria for calibrators and control materials. Ninety-two laboratories, using 11 methods, detected no changes in glycated haemoglobin content when the lyophilizate was stored for one

  3. Advanced glycation endproducts form during ovalbumin digestion in the presence of fructose: Inhibition by chlorogenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Yasmin; Gugliucci, Alejandro; Caccavello, Russell

    2017-07-01

    One mechanism by which fructose could exert deleterious effects is through intestinal formation and absorption of pro-inflammatory advanced glycation endproducts via the Maillard reaction. We employed simulated stomach and duodenum digestion of ovalbumin (OVA) to test the hypothesis that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are formed by fructose during simulated digestion of a ubiquitous food protein under model physiological conditions. OVA was subjected to simulated gastric and intestinal digestion using standard models, in presence of fructose or glucose (0-100mM). Peptide fractions were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy and intensity at Excitation: λ370nm, Emission: λ 440nm. AGE adducts formed between fructose and OVA, evidenced by the peptide fractions (fructose-AGE formation on a ubiquitous dietary protein under model physiological conditions. Our study also suggests ways to decrease the damage: enteral fructose-AGE formation may be partially inhibited by co-intake of beverages, fruits and vegetables with concentrations of phenolics high enough to serve as anti-glycation agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonenzymatic glycation of phosphatidylethanolamine in erythrocyte vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patkowska, M.J.; Horowitz, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    Unsealed inside-out and right-side out vesicles were prepared from human red cells. The vesicles were incubated with D-glucose [ 14 C(U)] and sodium cyanoborohydride in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. After incubation, lipids were extracted with 1-butanol and non-lipid contaminants removed by Sephadex G-25 chromatography. Phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol was purified by chromatography on columns of silicic acid and phenylboronate agarose gel. Phospholipase C (B. cereus) liberated phosphoethanolamine-sorbitol (I) which comigrated on TLC with synthetic I prepared by reductive condensation of phosphoethanolamine and D-glucose and also with the product of phospholipase C (B. cereus) hydrolysis of reference phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol. Exposure of I to alkaline phosphatase (E. coli) gave P/sub i/ and ethanolamine-sorbitol (II) which comigrated on TLC with synthetic II prepared by reductive condensation of ethanolamine and D-glucose or by phospholipase D hydrolysis of reference phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol. These studies demonstrate that vesicular phosphatidylethanolamine can be reductively glycated and illustrate the applicability of both phospholipase C and phospholipase D in characterizing glycated phosphoglycerides

  5. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rifampicin reduces advanced glycation end products and activates DAF-16 to increase lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golegaonkar, Sandeep; Tabrez, Syed S; Pandit, Awadhesh; Sethurathinam, Shalini; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Bansode, Sneha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan; Kulkarni, Mahesh J; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab

    2015-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are formed when glucose reacts nonenzymatically with proteins; these modifications are implicated in aging and pathogenesis of many age-related diseases including type II diabetes, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, pharmaceutical interventions that can reduce AGEs may delay age-onset diseases and extend lifespan. Using LC-MS(E), we show that rifampicin (RIF) reduces glycation of important cellular proteins in vivo and consequently increases lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by up to 60%. RIF analog rifamycin SV (RSV) possesses similar properties, while rifaximin (RMN) lacks antiglycation activity and therefore fails to affect lifespan positively. The efficacy of RIF and RSV as potent antiglycating agents may be attributed to the presence of a p-dihydroxyl moiety that can potentially undergo spontaneous oxidation to yield highly reactive p-quinone structures, a feature absent in RMN. We also show that supplementing rifampicin late in adulthood is sufficient to increase lifespan. For its effect on longevity, rifampicin requires DAF-18 (nematode PTEN) as well as JNK-1 and activates DAF-16, the FOXO homolog. Interestingly, the drug treatment modulates transcription of a different subset of DAF-16 target genes, those not controlled by the conserved Insulin-IGF-1-like signaling pathway. RIF failed to increase the lifespan of daf-16 null mutant despite reducing glycation, showing thereby that DAF-16 may not directly affect AGE formation. Together, our data suggest that the dual ability to reduce glycation in vivo and activate prolongevity processes through DAF-16 makes RIF and RSV effective lifespan-extending interventions. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. (R)-α-Lipoic acid inhibits fructose-induced myoglobin fructation and the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelani, Hardik; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Pragada, Rajeswara Rao; Nammi, Srinivas

    2018-01-15

    Fructose-mediated protein glycation (fructation) has been linked to an increase in diabetic and cardiovascular complications due to over consumption of high-fructose containing diets in recent times. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the protective effect of (R)-α-lipoic acid (ALA) against fructose-induced myoglobin fructation and the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in vitro. The anti-glycation activity of ALA was determined using the formation of AGEs fluorescence intensity, iron released from the heme moiety of myoglobin and the level of fructosamine. The fructation-induced myoglobin oxidation was examined using the level of protein carbonyl content and thiol group estimation. The results showed that co-incubation of myoglobin (1 mg/mL), fructose (1 M) and ALA (1, 2 and 4 mM) significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs during the 30 day study period. ALA markedly decreased the levels of fructosamine, which is directly associated with the reduction of AGEs formation. Furthermore, ALA significantly reduced free iron release from myoglobin which is attributed to the protection of myoglobin from fructose-induced glycation. The results also demonstrated a significant protective effect of ALA on myoglobin oxidative damages, as seen from decreased protein carbonyl content and increased protein thiols. These findings provide new insights into the anti-glycation properties of ALA and emphasize that ALA supplementation is beneficial in the prevention of AGEs-mediated diabetic and cardiovascular complications.

  8. Attenuation of nonenzymatic glycation, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by chloroform leaf extract of Azadirachta indica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Rosa Martha Pérez; Gómez, Yolanda Gómez Y.; Guzman, Mónica Damián

    2011-01-01

    Background: The hypoglycemic effects of hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of leaves of Azadirachta indica (AI) were evaluated by oral administration in streptozotocin-induced severe diabetic rats (SD). Materials and Methods: The effect of chronic oral administration of the extract for 28 days was evaluated in streptozotozin diabetic rats. Lipid peroxidation, glycogen content of liver and skeletal muscles, insulin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were determined. In addition, advanced glycation end product formation (AGEs) was evaluated. Results: The most active extracts were obtained with chloroform. Chloroform extract from AI shows increased levels of SOD, GSH, GSSG and CAT, hepatic glycogen content, glucose-6-phosphatase and insulin plasma levels, which also decreased the glucokinase (GK), lipid peroxidation and insulin resistance. The chloroform extract exhibited significant inhibitory activity against advanced glycation end product formation with an IC50 average range of 79.1 mg/ml. Conclusion: Azadirachta indica can improve hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinema in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats and, therefore, AI can be potentially considered to be an antidiabetic-safe agent. PMID:21969798

  9. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetone peroxides. 172.802 Section 172.802 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.802 Acetone peroxides. The food additive acetone peroxides may be safely used in... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide...

  10. DAF in diabetic patients is subject to glycation/inactivation at its active site residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger, Rudolf; Cocuzzi, Enzo; Nagaraj, Ram H; Shoham, Menachem; Kern, Timothy S; Medof, M Edward

    2018-01-01

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF or CD55) is a cell associated C3 and C5 convertase regulator originally described in terms of protection of self-cells from systemic complement but now known to modulate adaptive T cell responses. It is expressed on all cell types. We investigated whether nonenzymatic glycation could impair its function and potentially be relevant to complications of diabetes mellitus and other conditions that result in nonenzymatic glycation including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and aging. Immunoblots of affinity-purified DAF from erythrocytes of patients with diabetes showed pentosidine, glyoxal-AGEs, carboxymethyllysine, and argpyrimidine. HPLC/MS analyses of glucose modified DAF localized the sites of AGE modifications to K 125 adjacent to K 126 , K 127 at the junction of CCPs2-3 and spatially near R 96 , and R 100 , all identified as being critical for DAF's function. Functional analyses of glucose or ribose treated DAF protein showed profound loss of its regulatory activity. The data argue that de-regulated activation of systemic complement and de-regulated activation of T cells and leukocytes could result from non-enzymatic glycation of DAF. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Fucoidan as an inhibitor of thermally induced collagen glycation examined by acetate electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Paluch, Jadwiga

    2014-08-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) in vitro could be a simple method to obtain glycoconjugates for studying their biological properties. Hence, fucoidan was retained by acetate electrophoresis indicating a strong interaction with the protein. A loss of colour in fucoidan bands was found for samples incubated with collagen as compared with samples of free fucoidan. Also under in vitro conditions at 100°C - simulating a sudden burn incident - fucoidan binds with collagen as a result of the Maillard reaction. In contrast, the colour of the fucoidan bands intensified for samples incubated with collagen, with the addition of glucose. Electrophoretic analyses were carried out after heating the samples to a temperature simulating a burn incident. The bands were found to intensify for samples incubated with collagen during a 30-day-long incubation. Thus, spontaneous in vitro glycation - i.e. without the addition of glucose - was confirmed. This process is highly intensified both by the temperature and time of incubation. For a sample incubated in vitro in a fucoidan solution containing glucose, glycation was confirmed in a preliminary FTIR and acetate electrophoresis examinations, occurring in collagen obtained from chicken skins. In particular, a new band emerging around 1746 cm(-1) was observed for above samples, as was its increasing intensity, as compared with samples without the addition of glucose. In the collagen glycation assay, while glucose reacts with collagen and forms cross-linked aggregates, fucoidan decreases the process of aggregation and recovery of native collagen. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. 糖基化终末产物及其受体在糖尿病大鼠胃组织中的分布 (Distribution of advanced glycation end products and their receptor in the stomach of diabetic rats)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jia Xing; Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the distribution of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) in the stomach of diabetic rats. METHODS: Diabetes mellitus (DM) and control (CON) rats were reared for eight weeks. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated serum protein (GSP) and gastric layer...... with the CON group (P stomach was significantly higher in the DM group than in the CON group (P ...: The expression of AGEs and RAGE is up-regulated in the stomach of diabetic rats. The increased levels of AGE and RAGE in gastric tissue may contribute to diabetic gastrointestinal dysfunction. © 2015 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. Key Words: Diabetes mellitus; Stomach; Advanced glycation...

  13. Lack of association of glycated haemoglobin with blood pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... Therefore, we examined the relationships of fasting glucose and glycated ... but factors that did associate significantly were age, male gender, rural location, abdominal obesity, alcohol intake .... in continuous variables were.

  14. Correlation of advanced glycation end products to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-yan MA

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a common retrograde neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system, as well as the most common type of dementia in the aged, the main manifestations of AD are progressive decline of cognitive function and daily life ability. AD seriously affects the quality of life and physical and mental health of the aged, and increased the burden of family and society. The etiology and pathogenesis of AD remain unclear nowadays, and there is no objective and specific biological marker to help the early diagnosis and effective treatment. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are stable end products formed by non enzymatic reaction between the free amino groups of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids macromolecules and the carbonyls of glucose or other reduced sugars. Recent years, more and more studies have focused on the correlation between AGEs and its receptors (RAGE in patients with cognitive impairment, however, the role played by AGEs in the pathogenesis of AD remains unclear. The present paper will give an overview from three aspects: the structure and characteristics of AGEs, the relationship between the occurrence and development of AD and AGEs and the relationship between AGEs and prognosis of cognitive impairment which we've known so far. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2018.01.16

  15. Protective effect of surface layer proteins isolated from four Lactobacillus strains on hydrogen-peroxide-induced HT-29 cells oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin-Bin; Meng, Jun; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Kang, Ting-Ting; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the antioxidant effect of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) and their mechanism. We investigated four SLPs which were extracted from L. casei zhang, L. rhamnosus, L. gasseri and L. acidophilus NCFM respectively using LiCl. The protective effect of SLPs on H 2 O 2 -induced HT-29 cells oxidative injury was investigated. As results, SLPs (100μg/mL) could significantly mitigate HT-29 cells cytotoxicity, improve the activities of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), decrease the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), compared with H 2 O 2 -induced group (Pproteins of caspase-3 and caspase-9 (Pcells induced by H 2 O 2 , and the mechanism could be attributed to SLPs' ability to enhance the activity of the intracellular antioxidant enzyme system, reduce ROS accumulation and to inhibit apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Testing isotopic labeling with [¹³C₆]glucose as a method of advanced glycation sites identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielmas, Martyna; Kijewska, Monika; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2012-12-01

    The Maillard reaction occurring between reducing sugars and reactive amino groups of biomolecules leads to the formation of a heterogeneous mixture of compounds: early, intermediate, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These compounds could be markers of certain diseases and of the premature aging process. Detection of Amadori products can be performed by various methods, including MS/MS techniques and affinity chromatography on immobilized boronic acid. However, the diversity of the structures of AGEs makes detection of these compounds more difficult. The aim of this study was to test a new method of AGE identification based on isotope (13)C labeling. The model protein (hen egg lysozyme) was modified with an equimolar mixture of [(12)C(6)]glucose and [(13)C(6)]glucose and then subjected to reduction of the disulfide bridges followed by tryptic hydrolysis. The digest obtained was analyzed by LC-MS. The glycation products were identified on the basis of characteristic isotopic patterns resulting from the use of isotopically labeled glucose. This method allowed identification of 38 early Maillard reaction products and five different structures of the end glycation products. This isotopic labeling technique combined with LC-MS is a sensitive method for identification of advanced glycation end products even if their chemical structure is unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bio-optic signatures for advanced glycation end products in the skin in streptozotocin (STZ) Induced Diabetes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidian, Mayer; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Rowland, Rebecca A.; Balbado, Melisa L.; Lentsch, Griffin; Balu, Mihaela; Alexander, Micheal; Shiri, Li; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Kohen, Roni; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-02-01

    Type 1diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder that occurs due to the rapid destruction of insulin-producing beta cells, leading to insulin deficiency and the inability to regulate blood glucose levels and leads to destructive secondary complications. Advanced glycation end (AGEs) products, the result of the cross-linking of reducing sugars and proteins within the tissues, are one of the key causes of major complications associated with diabetes such as renal failure, blindness, nerve damage and vascular changes. Non-invasive techniques to detect AGEs are important for preventing the harmful effects of AGEs during diabetes mellitus. In this study, we utilized multiphoton microscopy to image biopsies taken from control rats and compared them to biopsies taken from streptozotocin (STZ) induced adult male diabetic rats. This was done at two and four weeks after the induction of hyperglycemia (>400 mg/dL) specifically to evaluate the effects of glycation on collagen. We chose to use an in-situ multiphoton microscopy method that combines multiphoton auto-florescence (AF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) to detect the microscopic influence of glycation. Initial results show high auto-florescence levels were present on the collagen, as a result of the accumulation of AGEs only two weeks after the STZ injection and considerably higher levels were present four weeks after the STZ injection. Future projects could involve evaluating advanced glycation end products in a clinical trial of diabetic patients.

  18. Effects of advanced glycation end products on ezrin-dependent functions in LLC-PK1 proximal tubule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A; Gallicchio, Marisa A; McRobert, E Anne; Tikoo, Anjali; Cooper, Mark E

    2005-06-01

    We have recently shown that advanced glycation products (AGEs) bind to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins. ERM proteins act as cross-linkers between cell membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. They are also involved in signal transduction pathways. They therefore have a critical role in normal cell processes, including modulation of cell shape, adhesion, and motility. We postulate that AGEs may contribute to diabetic complications by disrupting ERM function. In support of this hypothesis, AGEs inhibit ezrin-dependent tubulogenesis of proximal tubule cells. Phosphorylation is an important activating mechanism for ERM proteins, and AGEs inhibit ezrin phosphorylation mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor.

  19. Complexity of Advanced Glycation End Products in Foods: Where Are We Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingdong; Snooks, Hunter; Sang, Shengmin

    2018-02-14

    Recent clinical trials indicate that consumption of dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may promote the development of major chronic diseases. However, the outcomes of human studies have proven inconclusive as a result of estimates of the total AGE intake being taken with a single AGE in most of the studies. In this perspective, we summarized the major types of AGEs derived from proteins, nucleic acids, and phospholipids during food processing and suggested a panel of AGEs as markers to better measure the intake of total dietary AGEs in human studies.

  20. Sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulates hydrogen peroxide generation through activation of phospholipase C-Ca2+ system in FRTL-5 thyroid cells: possible involvement of guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins in the lipid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, F; Tomura, H; Sho, K; Kimura, T; Sato, K; Im, D S; Akbar, M; Kondo, Y

    1997-01-01

    Exogenous sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) stimulated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation in association with an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in FRTL-5 thyroid cells. S1P also induced inositol phosphate production, reflecting activation of phospholipase C (PLC) in the cells. These three S1P-induced events were inhibited partially by pertussis toxin (PTX) and markedly by U73122, a PLC inhibitor, and were conversely potentiated by N6-(L-2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine, an A1-adenosine receptor agonist. In FRTL-5 cell membranes, S1P also activated PLC in the presence of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S), but not in its absence. Guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) inhibited the S1P-induced GTP gamma S-dependent activation of the enzyme. To characterize the signaling pathways, especially receptors and G proteins involved in the S1P-induced responses, cross-desensitization experiments were performed. Under the conditions where homologous desensitization occurred in S1P-, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-, and bradykinin-induced induction of Ca2+ mobilization, no detectable cross-desensitization of S1P and bradykinin was observed. This suggests that the primary action of S1P in its activation of the PLC-Ca2+ system was not the activation of G proteins common to S1P and bradykinin, but the activation of a putative S1P receptor. On the other hand, there was a significant cross-desensitization of S1P and LPA; however, a still significant response to S1P (50-80% of the response in the nontreated control cells) was observed depending on the lipid dose employed after a prior LPA challenge. S1P also inhibited cAMP accumulation in a PTX-sensitive manner. We conclude that S1P stimulates H2O2 generation through a PLC-Ca2+ system and also inhibits adenylyl cyclase in FRTL-5 thyroid cells. The S1P-induced responses may be mediated partly through a putative lipid receptor that is coupled to both PTX-sensitive and insensitive G proteins.

  1. Cross talk among calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide and activation of gene expression involving calmodulins and calcium-dependent protein kinases in Ulva compressa exposed to copper excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alberto; Cabrera, M de Los Ángeles; Henríquez, M Josefa; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Morales, Bernardo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2012-03-01

    To analyze the copper-induced cross talk among calcium, nitric oxide (NO), and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and the calcium-dependent activation of gene expression, the marine alga Ulva compressa was treated with the inhibitors of calcium channels, ned-19, ryanodine, and xestospongin C, of chloroplasts and mitochondrial electron transport chains, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and antimycin A, of pyruvate dehydrogenase, moniliformin, of calmodulins, N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalene sulfonamide, and of calcium-dependent protein kinases, staurosporine, as well as with the scavengers of NO, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, and of H(2)O(2), ascorbate, and exposed to a sublethal concentration of copper (10 μm) for 24 h. The level of NO increased at 2 and 12 h. The first peak was inhibited by ned-19 and 3-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and the second peak by ned-19 and antimycin A, indicating that NO synthesis is dependent on calcium release and occurs in organelles. The level of H(2)O(2) increased at 2, 3, and 12 h and was inhibited by ned-19, ryanodine, xestospongin C, and moniliformin, indicating that H(2)O(2) accumulation is dependent on calcium release and Krebs cycle activity. In addition, pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoxglutarate dehydrogenase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities of the Krebs cycle increased at 2, 3, 12, and/or 14 h, and these increases were inhibited in vitro by EGTA, a calcium chelating agent. Calcium release at 2, 3, and 12 h was inhibited by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and ascorbate, indicating activation by NO and H(2)O(2). In addition, the level of antioxidant protein gene transcripts decreased with N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalene sulfonamide and staurosporine. Thus, there is a copper-induced cross talk among calcium, H(2)O(2), and NO and a calcium-dependent activation of gene expression involving calmodulins and calcium-dependent protein

  2. Prior lactose glycation of caseinate via the Maillard reaction affects in vitro activities of the pepsin-trypsin digest toward intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X P; Zhao, X H

    2017-07-01

    The well-known Maillard reaction in milk occurs between lactose and milk proteins during thermal treatment, and its effects on milk nutrition and safety have been well studied. A lactose-glycated caseinate was prepared via this reaction and digested using 2 digestive proteases, pepsin and trypsin. The glycated caseinate digest was assessed for its in vitro activities on rat intestinal epithelial cells in terms of growth proliferation, anti-apoptotic effect, and differentiation induction using caseinate digest as reference, to verify potential effects of the Maillard reaction on these activities of caseinate digest to the cells. Two digests had proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects, and reached the highest effects at 0.02 g/L of digest concentration with treatment time of 24 h. In comparison with caseinate digest, glycated caseinate digest always showed weaker proliferative (5.3-14.2%) and anti-apoptotic (5.9-39.0%) effects, and was more toxic to the cells at 0.5 g/L of digest concentration with treatment time of 48 h. However, glycated caseinate digest at 2 incubation times of 4 to 7 d showed differentiation induction higher than caseinate digest, as it could confer the cells with increased activities in lactase (16.3-26.6%), sucrase (22.4-31.2%), and alkaline phosphatase (17.4-24.8%). Transmission electron microscopy observation results also confirmed higher differentiation induction of glycated caseinate digest. Amino acid loss and lactose glycation partially contributed to these decreased and enhanced activities of glycated caseinate digest, respectively. The Maillard reaction of caseinate and lactose is thus shown in this study to have effects on the activities of caseinate digest to intestinal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Signal Diversity of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Kinoshita, Rie; Putranto, Endy Widya; Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Sumardika, I Wayan; Youyi, Chen; Tomonobu, Naoko; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Murata, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in inflammatory pathogenesis. It functions as a receptor to multiple ligands such as AGEs, HMGB1 and S100 proteins, activating multiple intracellular signaling pathways with each ligand binding. The molecular events by which ligand-activated RAGE controls diverse signaling are not well understood, but some progress was made recently. Accumulating evidence revealed that RAGE has multiple binding partners within the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane. It was first pointed out in 2008 that RAGE's cytoplasmic tail is able to recruit Diaphanous-1 (Dia-1), resulting in the acquisition of increased cellular motility through Rac1/Cdc42 activation. We also observed that within the cytosol, RAGE's cytoplasmic tail behaves similarly to a Toll-like receptor (TLR4)-TIR domain, interacting with TIRAP and MyD88 adaptor molecules that in turn activate multiple downstream signals. Subsequent studies demonstrated the presence of an alternative adaptor molecule, DAP10, on the plasma membrane. The coupling of RAGE with DAP10 is critical for enhancing the RAGE-mediated survival signal. Interestingly, RAGE interaction on the membrane was not restricted to DAP10 alone. The chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) formyl peptide receptors1 and 2 (FPR1 and FPR2) also interacted with RAGE on the plasma membrane. Binding interaction between leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1) and RAGE was also demonstrated. All of the interactions affected the RAGE signal polarity. These findings indicate that functional interactions between RAGE and various molecules within the cytoplasmic area or on the membrane area coordinately regulate multiple ligand-mediated RAGE responses, leading to typical cellular phenotypes in several pathological settings. Here we review RAGE's signaling diversity, to contribute to the understanding of the elaborate functions of RAGE in physiological and pathological contexts.

  4. The narrow therapeutic window of glycated hemoglobin and assay variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S S; Bibler, I; Charles, M A

    1999-12-01

    Glycated hemoglobin is measured by a variety of assays, each of which has a unique normal level. Our purpose is to show that among the different assays available in the United States, using the same patient's blood sample, assay results may vary widely and may more or less easily achieve a glycated hemoglobin value within the normal range. The following assays were compared using the same patient's blood sample for each pair of assays: glycohemoglobin affinity assay (GHB Reader; Isolab, Akron, OH) versus gel electrophoresis assay (n = 76); Isolab versus ion capture assay (IMX; Abbott Laboratories, Irving, TX) (n = 57); monoclonal antibody assay (DCA2000; Bayer Diagnostics, Pittsburgh, PA) versus IMX (n = 100); and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay (Bio-Rad Variant A1c; Bio-Rad Laboratories, Richmond, CA) versus IMX assay (n = 55). Our analyses indicate that a relative ranking can be established for the ease of achieving a normal glycated hemoglobin level. The ranking indicates that the most stringent or difficult assays for achieving a normal level are the Isolab and DCA2000 assays. The intermediate assays are the IMX and Bio-Rad Variant, and the easiest method for achieving a normal value is the gel electrophoresis assay. Our results indicate that various glycated hemoglobin assays vary widely and are associated with more or less difficulty for an individual patient to achieve a glycated hemoglobin level within the normal range. These results are especially significant with respect to (1) the clinically narrow therapeutic window of glycated hemoglobin values in type 1 diabetes to avoid rapidly advancing severe hypoglycemia rates and chronic microvascular complication rates, and (2) the glycated hemoglobin threshold for rapidly advancing macrovascular disease in both type 1 and type 2 patients.

  5. In situ characterization of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in collagen and model extracellular matrix by solid state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Rajan, R; Wong, W C V; Reid, D G; Duer, M J; Somovilla, V J; Martinez-Saez, N; Bernardes, G J L; Hayward, R; Shanahan, C M

    2017-12-14

    Non-enzymatic glycation of extracellular matrix with (U- 13 C 5 )-d-ribose-5-phosphate (R5P), enables in situ 2D ssNMR identification of many deleterious protein modifications and crosslinks, including previously unreported oxalamido and hemiaminal (CH 3 -CH(OH)NHR) substructures. Changes in charged residue proportions and distribution may be as important as crosslinking in provoking and understanding harmful tissue changes.

  6. Betanin reduces the accumulation and cross-links of collagen in high-fructose-fed rat heart through inhibiting non-enzymatic glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junyan; Tan, Chang; Wang, Yiheng; Yang, Shaobin; Tan, Dehong

    2015-02-05

    We attempted to determine whether betanin (from natural pigments) that has antioxidant properties would be protective against fructose-induced diabetic cardiac fibrosis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Fructose water solution (30%) was accessed freely, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was administered by intra-gastric gavage continuously for 60 d. Rats were sacrificed after overnight fast. The rat blood and left ventricle were collected. In vitro antiglycation assay in bovine serum albumin/fructose system was also performed. In rats treated only with fructose, levels of plasma markers: glucose, insulin, HOMA and glycated hemoglobin rised, left ventricle collagen accumulated and cross-linked, profibrotic factor-transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein expression increased, and soluble collagen decreased, compared with those in normal rats, showing fructose induces diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with betanin antagonized the changes of these parameters, demonstrating the antifibrotic role of betanin in the selected diabetic models. In further mechanistic study, betanin decreased protein glycation indicated by the decreased levels of protein glycation reactive intermediate (methylglyoxal), advanced glycation end product (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine) and receptors for advanced glycation end products (AGEs), antagonized oxidative stress and nuclear factor-κB activation elicited by fructose feeding, suggesting inhibition of glycation, oxidative stress and nuclear factor-κB activation may be involved in the antifibrotic mechanisms. Betanin also showed anitglycative effect in BSA/fructose system, which supported that anitglycation was involved in betanin's protective roles in vivo. Taken together, the potential for using betanin as an auxillary therapy for diabetic cardiomyopathy deserves to be explored further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The specific localization of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in rat pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Yuta; Teshigawara, Kiyoshi; Tomono, Yasuko; Wang, Dengli; Izushi, Yasuhisa; Wake, Hidenori; Liu, Keyue; Takahashi, Hideo Kohka; Mori, Shuji; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are produced by non-enzymatic glycation between protein and reducing sugar such as glucose. Although glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs (Glycer-AGEs), one of the AGEs subspecies, have been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of various age-relating diseases such as diabetes mellitus or arteriosclerosis, little is known about the pathological and physiological mechanism of AGEs in vivo. In present study, we produced 4 kinds of polyclonal antibodies against AGEs subspecies and investigated the localization of AGEs-modified proteins in rat peripheral tissues, making use of these antibodies. We found that Glycer-AGEs and methylglyoxal-derived AGEs (MGO-AGEs) were present in pancreatic islets of healthy rats, distinguished clearly into the pancreatic α and β cells, respectively. Although streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats suffered from remarkable impairment of pancreatic islets, the localization and deposit levels of the Glycer- and MGO-AGEs were not altered in the remaining α and β cells. Remarkably, the MGO-AGEs in pancreatic β cells were localized into the insulin-secretory granules. These results suggest that the cell-specific localization of AGEs-modified proteins are presence generally in healthy peripheral tissues, involved in physiological intracellular roles, such as a post-translational modulator contributing to the secretory and/or maturational functions of insulin. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen, Austin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  9. Effects of thyroid status on glycated hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Bhattacharjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c can be altered in different conditions. We hypothesize that HbA1c levels may change due to altered thyroid status, possibly due to changes in red blood cell (RBC turnover. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of altered thyroid status on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes, with overt hyper- and hypo-thyroidism, and if present, whether such changes in HbA1c are reversed after achieving euthyroid state. Methods: Euglycemic individuals with overt hypo- or hyper-thyroidism were selected. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Baseline HbA1c and reticulocyte counts (for estimation of RBC turnover were estimated in all the patients and compared. Thereafter, stable euthyroidism was achieved in a randomly selected subgroup and HbA1c and reticulocyte count was reassessed. HbA1c values and reticulocyte counts were compared with baseline in both the groups. Results: Hb A1c in patients initially selected was found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid group. HbA1c values in hyperthyroid patients were not significantly different from controls. HbA1c reduction and rise in reticulocyte count were significant in hypothyroid group following treatment without significant change in glucose level. Hb A1c did not change significantly following treatment in hyperthyroid group. The reticulocyte count, however, decreased significantly. Conclusion: Baseline HbA1c levels were found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid patients, which reduced significantly after achievement of euthyroidism without any change in glucose levels. Significant baseline or posttreatment change was not observed in hyperthyroid patients. Our study suggests that we should be cautious while interpreting HbA1c data in patients with hypothyroidism.

  10. Study on the relationship between blood levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and micro-vascular nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Rong; Li Zhuocheng; Yan Dewen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between blood levels of glycated hemoglobin and microvascular nephropathy in patients with type diabetes. Methods: Blood Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were determined with affinity chromatography and 24 hour urinary microalbumin (m-Alb), β 2 microglobin (β 2 -m) quantified with RIA in 76 patients and 30 controls. Results: With glycated hemoglobin within normal range, there were no differences between the amounts of patients' urinary protein contents and those in controls (P>0.05). With higher blood glycated hemoglobin levels, significant differences could be observed (P 2 microglobin. Differences among the 24 hour urinary quantities of mAlb and β 2 -m in the three groups of patients (divided according to the HbA1c levels, namely 9.0%) were also significant (P 2 microglobin is very important for early detection of diabetic nephropathy

  11. Inactivation of cellular caspases by peptide-derived tryptophan and tyrosine peroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampton, Mark B; Morgan, Philip E; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Peroxides generated on peptides and proteins within cells, as a result of radical attack or reaction with singlet oxygen, are longer-lived than H(2)O(2) due to their poor removal by protective enzymes. These peroxides readily oxidize cysteine residues and can inactivate thiol-dependent enzymes. W...

  12. Advanced glycation end products in the skin are enhanced in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhorst, Susan J. M.; Loi, Adele T. Lo Tam; Hartman, Jorine E.; Telenga, Eef D.; van den Berge, Maarten; Koenderman, Leo; Lammers, Jan Willem J.; Boezen, H. Marike; Postma, Dirkje S.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.

    Background. Cigarette smoking is the main cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) inducing oxidative stress and local tissue injury, resulting in pulmonary inflammation. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are produced by glycation and oxidation processes and their formation is

  13. Blood lipid metabolites and meat lipid peroxidation responses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esnart Mukumbo

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Fat and protein contents of thigh muscle and abdominal fat weight were measured and reported. Chickens fed LPO had greater serum triacylglycerol and very low ... favour lipid peroxidation, inhibit synthesis of higher homologous of ... The ambient temperature was gradually decreased from 33 °C at first.

  14. Blood lipid metabolites and meat lipid peroxidation responses of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were collected from broilers to evaluate serum biochemical metabolites on day 41. Thigh meat samples were provided and analysed after 1, 5 and 10 days' storage to evaluate lipid peroxidation at the end of the experiment. Fat and protein contents of thigh muscle and abdominal fat weight were measured ...

  15. Raman Spectroscopy Provides a Powerful Diagnostic Tool for Accurate Determination of Albumin Glycation

    OpenAIRE

    Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Barman, Ishan; Horowitz, Gary Leigh

    2012-01-01

    We present the first demonstration of glycated albumin detection and quantification using Raman spectroscopy without the addition of reagents. Glycated albumin is an important marker for monitoring the long-term glycemic history of diabetics, especially as its concentrations, in contrast to glycated hemoglobin levels, are unaffected by changes in erythrocyte life times. Clinically, glycated albumin concentrations show a strong correlation with the development of serious diabetes complications...

  16. An advanced glycation endproduct (AGE)-rich diet promotes accumulation of AGEs in Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Svensson, Rene B; Scheijen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated the rela......Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated...... the relationship between AGE content in the diet and accumulation of AGEs in weight-bearing animal Achilles tendon. Two groups of mice (C57BL/6Ntac) were fed with either high-fat diet low in AGEs high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 14) or normal diet high in AGEs (ND) (n = 11). AGE content in ND was six to 50-fold higher...... than HFD The mice were sacrificed at week 40 and Achilles and tail tendons were carefully excised to compare weight and nonweight-bearing tendons. The amount of the AGEs carboxymethyllysine (CML), methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1) and carboxyethyllysine (CEL) in Achilles and tail tendon...

  17. Effect of taurine on advanced glycation end products-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.-S.; Chuang, L.-Y.; Guh, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-S.

    2008-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that advanced glycation end products (AGE) play a major role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Taurine is a well documented antioxidant agent. To explore whether taurine was linked to altered AGE-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in DN, we examined the molecular mechanisms of taurine responsible for inhibition of AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells. We found that AGE (but not non-glycated BSA) caused inhibition of cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, bcl-2 protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in BSA, AGE, or the antioxidant taurine treatments in these cells. AGE-induced the Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was markedly blocked by taurine. Furthermore, taurine, the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor GW5074, and the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 may have the ability to induce cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression from AGE-treated cells. The ability of taurine, GW5074, or PD98059 to inhibit AGE-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of RAGE, p27 Kip1 , collagen IV, and fibronectin. The results obtained in this study suggest that taurine may serve as the potential anti-fibrotic activity in DN through mechanism dependent of its Raf-1/ERK inactivation in AGE-induced hypertrophy in renal tubular epithelial cells

  18. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppe, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Kongsgaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between...... tissue cross-linking were greater in diabetic patients compared to controls. The higher foot pressure indicates that material stiffness of tendon and other tissue (e.g skin and joint capsule) may influence on foot gait. The difference in foot pressure distribution may contribute to the development...... of foot ulcers in diabetic patients....

  19. Aspartic acid functions as carbonyl trapper to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products by chemical chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Govindarajan; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were implicated in pathology of numerous diseases. In this study, we present the bioactivity of aspartic acid (Asp) to inhibit the AGEs. Hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated with glucose, fructose, and ribose in the presence and absence of Asp (100-200 μM). HbA1c inhibition was investigated using human blood and characterized by micro-column ion exchange chromatography. The effect of methyl glyoxal (MG) on hemoglobin and BSA was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. The effect of MG on red blood cells morphology was characterized by scanning electron micrographs. Molecular docking was performed on BSA with Asp. Asp is capable of inhibiting the formation of fluorescent AGEs by reacting with the reducing sugars. The presence of Asp as supplement in whole blood reduced the HbA1c% from 8.8 to 6.1. The presence of MG showed an increase in fluorescence and the presence of Asp inhibited the glycation thereby the fluorescence was quenched. MG also affected the electrophoretic mobility of hemoglobin and BSA by forming high molecular weight aggregates. Normal RBCs showed typical biconcave shape. MG modified RBCs showed twisted and elongated shape whereas the presence of ASP tends to protect RBC from twisting. Asp interacted with arginine residues of bovine serum albumin particularly ARG 194, ARG 198, and ARG 217 thereby stabilized the protein complex. We conclude that Asp has dual functions as a chemical chaperone to stabilize protein and as a dicarbonyl trapper, and thereby it can prevent the complications caused by glycation.

  20. Evaluation of glycated albumin (GA) and GA/HbA1c ratio for diagnosis of diabetes and glycemic control: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Sara; Rabiee, Mohammad; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Abdolrahim, Mojgan; Rajab, Asadollah; Jazayeri, Hossein E; Tayebi, Lobat

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic high blood glucose concentrations (hyperglycemia). When it is left untreated or improperly managed, it can lead to acute complications including diabetic ketoacidosis and non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma. In addition, possible long-term complications include impotence, nerve damage, stroke, chronic kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, foot ulcers, and retinopathy. Historically, universal methods to measure glycemic control for the diagnosis of diabetes included fasting plasma glucose level (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose (2HP), and random plasma glucose. However, these measurements did not provide information about glycemic control over a long period of time. To address this problem, there has been a switch in the past decade to diagnosing diabetes and its severity through measurement of blood glycated proteins such as Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glycated albumin (GA). Diagnosis and evaluation of diabetes using glycated proteins has many advantages including high accuracy of glycemic control over a period of time. Currently, common laboratory methods used to measure glycated proteins are high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunoassay, and electrophoresis. HbA1c is one of the most important diagnostic factors for diabetes. However, some reports indicate that HbA1c is not a suitable marker to determine glycemic control in all diabetic patients. GA, which is not influenced by changes in the lifespan of erythrocytes, is thought to be a good alternative indicator of glycemic control in diabetic patients. Here, we review the literature that has investigated the suitability of HbA1c, GA and GA:HbA1c as indicators of long-term glycemic control and demonstrate the importance of selecting the appropriate glycated protein based on the patient's health status in order to provide useful and modern point-of-care monitoring and treatment.

  1. Glycation and glycoxidation of low-density lipoproteins by glucose and low-molecular mass aldehydes. Formation of modified and oxidized particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Heather M; Brown, Bronwyn E; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    by the adduction of glucose or species derived from glucose, such as low-molecular mass aldehydes, to proteins. These reactions can be nonoxidative (glycation) or oxidative (glycoxidation) and result in the conversion of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) to a form that is recognized by the scavenger receptors...... with glucose. These processes are rapid and unaffected by low concentrations of copper ions. In contrast, lipid and protein oxidation are slow processes and occur to a limited extent in the absence of added copper ions. No evidence was obtained for the stimulation of lipid or protein oxidation by glucose...... or methylglyoxal in the presence of copper ions, whereas glycolaldehyde stimulated such reactions to a modest extent. These results suggest that the earliest significant events in this system are metal ion-independent glycation (modification) of the protein component of LDL, whilst oxidative events (glycoxidation...

  2. Aluminum induces lipid peroxidation and aggregation of human blood platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.J.C. Neiva

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al3+ intoxication is thought to play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease and in certain pathologic manifestations arising from long-term hemodialysis. Although the metal does not present redox capacity, it can stimulate tissue lipid peroxidation in animal models. Furthermore, in vitro studies have revealed that the fluoroaluminate complex induces diacylglycerol formation, 43-kDa protein phosphorylation and aggregation. Based on these observations, we postulated that Al3+-induced blood platelet aggregation was mediated by lipid peroxidation. Using chemiluminescence (CL of luminol as an index of total lipid peroxidation capacity, we established a correlation between lipid peroxidation capacity and platelet aggregation. Al3+ (20-100 µM stimulated CL production by human blood platelets as well as their aggregation. Incubation of the platelets with the antioxidants nor-dihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA (100 µM and n-propyl gallate (NPG (100 µM, inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway, completely prevented CL and platelet aggregation. Acetyl salicylic acid (ASA (100 µM, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase pathway, was a weaker inhibitor of both events. These findings suggest that Al3+ stimulates lipid peroxidation and the lipoxygenase pathway in human blood platelets thereby causing their aggregation

  3. Relationship Between Glycated Haemoglobin and Body Mass Index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure, Height, Weight were all measured and body mass index (BMI) calculated as weight (in kilograms) divided by height (in meters squared). Glycated haemoglobin was estimated using the ion exchange chromatography method. Result: A total of 100 healthy subjects, 50 males and 50 females, ages ranging ...

  4. Effect of some high consumption spices on hemoglobin glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, G H; Dinani, Narges J; Asgary, S; Taher, M; Nikkhoo, N; Boshtam, M

    2014-01-01

    Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/glucose model system and compared their potency with each other. For this subject the best concentration and time to incubate glucose with hemoglobin was investigated. Then the glycosylation degree of hemoglobin in the presence of extracts by the three concentrations 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml was measured colorimetrically at 520 nm. Results represent that some of extracts such as wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper have inhibitory effects on hemoglobin glycation. But some of the extracts such as anise and saffron have not only inhibitory effects but also aggravated this event and have proglycation properties. In accordance with the results obtained we can conclude that wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper especially wild caraway extracts are potent antiglycation agents, which can be of great value in the preventive glycation-associated complications in diabetes.

  5. Glycated Hemoglobin Measurement and Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Khan, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The value of measuring levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) for the prediction of first cardiovascular events is uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether adding information on HbA1c values to conventional cardiovascular risk factors is associated with improvement in prediction of c...

  6. Uranium precipitation with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Although hydrogen peroxide precipitation of uranium continues to be used primarily as means of producing a high purity yellowcake, it has also become an important process due to its superior physical properties. Processing costs such as filtering, drying and/or calcining and drumming, can be reduced. 5 refs

  7. Hydrogen peroxide: importance and determination

    OpenAIRE

    Mattos, Ivanildo Luiz de; Shiraishi, Karina Antonelli; Braz, Alexandre Delphini; Fernandes, João Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A brief discussion about the hydrogen peroxide importance and its determination is presented. It was emphasized some consideration of the H2O2 as reagent (separated or combined), uses and methods of analysis (techniques, detection limits, linear response intervals, sensor specifications). Moreover, it was presented several applications, such as in environmental, pharmaceutical, medicine and food samples.

  8. Commercial processed soy-based food product contains glycated and glycoxidated lunasin proteoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Aida; Gallart-Palau, Xavier; See-Toh, Rachel Su-En; Hemu, Xinya; Tam, James P; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2016-05-18

    Nutraceuticals have been proposed to exert positive effects on human health and confer protection against many chronic diseases. A major bioactive component of soy-based foods is lunasin peptide, which has potential to exert a major impact on the health of human consumers worldwide, but the biochemical features of dietary lunasin still remain poorly characterized. In this study, lunasin was purified from a soy-based food product via strong anion exchange solid phase extraction and then subjected to top-down mass spectrometry analysis that revealed in detail the molecular diversity of lunasin in processed soybean foods. We detected multiple glycated proteoforms together with potentially toxic advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from lunasin. In both cases, modification sites were Lys24 and Lys29 located at the helical region that shows structural homology with a conserved region of chromatin-binding proteins. The identified post-translational modifications may have an important repercussion on lunasin epigenetic regulatory capacity. Taking together, our results demonstrate the importance of proper chemical characterization of commercial processed food products to assess their impact on consumer's health and risk of chronic diseases.

  9. Determination of the glycation sites of Bacillus anthracis neoglycoconjugate vaccine by MALDI-TOF/TOF-CID-MS/MS and LC-ESI-QqTOF-tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahouh, Farid; Hou, Shu-jie; Kováč, Pavol; Banoub, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    We present herein an efficient mass spectrometric method for the localization of the glycation sites of a model neoglycoconjugate vaccine formed by a construct of the tetrasaccharide side chain of the Bacillus anthracis exosporium and the protein carrier bovine serum albumin. The glycoconjugate was digested with both trypsin and GluC V8 endoproteinases, and the digests were then analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-CID-MS/MS and nano-LC-ESI-QqTOF-CID-MS/MS. The sequences of the unknown peptides analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-CID-MS/MS, following digestion with the GluC V8 endoproteinase, allowed us to recognize three glycopeptides whose glycation occupancies were, respectively, on Lys 235, Lys 420, and Lys 498. Similarly, the same analysis was performed on the tryptic digests, which permitted us to recognize two glycation sites on Lys 100 and Lys 374. In addition, we have also used LC-ESI-QqTOF-CID-MS/MS analysis for the identification of the tryptic digests. However, this analysis identified a higher number of glycopeptides than would be expected from a glycoconjugate composed of a carbohydrate–protein ratio of 5.4:1, which would have resulted in glycation occupancies of 18 specific sites. This discrepancy was due to the large number of glycoforms formed during the synthetic carbohydrate–spacer–carrier protein conjugation. Likewise, the LC-ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS analysis of the GluC V8 digest also identified 17 different glycation sites on the synthetic glycoconjugate. PMID:22012665

  10. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen peroxide...

  11. Implication of advanced glycation end products (Ages) and their receptor (Rage) on myocardial contractile and mitochondrial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neviere, Remi; Yu, Yichi; Wang, Lei; Tessier, Frederic; Boulanger, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role for the development and/or progression of cardiovascular diseases, mainly through induction of oxidative stress and inflammation. AGEs are a heterogeneous group of molecules formed by non-enzymatic reaction of reducing sugars with amino acids of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. AGEs are mainly formed endogenously, while recent studies suggest that diet constitutes an important exogenous source of AGEs. The presence and accumulation of AGEs in various cardiac cell types affect extracellular and intracellular structure and function. AGEs contribute to a variety of microvascular and macrovascular complications through the formation of cross-links between molecules in the basement membrane of the extracellular matrix and by engaging the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Activation of RAGE by AGEs causes up regulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and its target genes. of the RAGE engagement stimulates oxidative stress, evokes inflammatory and fibrotic reactions, which all contribute to the development and progression of devastating cardiovascular disorders. This review discusses potential targets of glycation in cardiac cells, and underlying mechanisms that lead to heart failure with special interest on AGE-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the myocardium.

  12. Development of a screen-printed carbon electrode based disposable enzyme sensor strip for the measurement of glycated albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, Mika; Tsugawa, Wakako; Kamio, Eri; Loew, Noya; Klonoff, David C; Sode, Koji

    2017-02-15

    Glycated proteins, such as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) or glycated albumin (GA) in the blood, are essential indicators of glycemic control for diabetes mellitus. Since GA, compared to HbA1c, is more sensitive to short term changes in glycemic levels, GA is expected to be used as an alternative or together with HbA1c as a surrogate marker indicator for glycemic control. In this paper we report the development of a sensing system for measuring GA by combining an enzyme analysis method, which is already used in clinical practice, with electrochemical principles. We used fructosyl amino acid oxidase, hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride as the electron mediator, and an inexpensive and economically attractive screen-printed carbon electrode. We used chronoamperometry to measure protease-digested GA samples. The developed sensor strips were able to measure protease-digested samples containing GA in very small sample volumes (1.3μL) within about 1min. We also prepared enzyme sensor strips suitable for clinical use in which the enzyme and the mediator were deposited and dried on. This sensor system showed a clear correlation between the GA concentration and the resulting current. The strips were stable following 3 months of storage at 37°C. We conclude that this disposable enzyme sensor strip system for measuring GA is suitable for point-of-care test (POCT) applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced glycation endproducts alter functions and promote apoptosis in endothelial progenitor cells through receptor for advanced glycation endproducts mediate overpression of cell oxidant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianfei; Song, Minbao; Yu, Shiyong; Gao, Pan; Yu, Yang; Wang, Hong; Huang, Lan

    2010-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in preventing atherosclerosis. The factors that regulate the function of EPCs are not completely clear. Increased formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) is generally regarded as one of the main mechanisms responsible for vascular damage in patients with diabetes and atherosclerosis. AGEs lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and part of the regenerative capacity of EPCs seems to be due to their low baseline ROS levels and reduced sensitivity to ROS-induced cell apoptosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that AGEs can alter functions and promote apoptosis in EPCs through overpress cell oxidant stress. EPCs, isolated from bone marrow, were cultured in the absence or presence of AGEs (50, 100, and 200 microg/ml). A modified Boyden's chamber was used to assess the migration of EPCs and the number of recultured EPCs was counted to measure the adhesiveness function. MTT assay was used to determine the proliferation function. ROS were analyzed using the ROS assay kit. A spectrophotometer was used to assess superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity, and PCR was used to test mRNA expression of SOD and GSH-PX. SiRNA was used to block receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGEs) expression. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin V immunostaining and TUNEL staining. Co-culturing with AGEs increases ROS production, decreases anti-oxidant defenses, overpresses oxidant stress, inhibits the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of EPCs, and induces EPCs apoptosis. In addition, these effects were attenuated during block RAGE protein expression by siRNA. AGEs may serve to impair EPCs functions through RAGE-mediate oxidant stress, and promote EPCs sensitivity toward oxidative-stress-mediated apoptosis, which indicates a new pathophysiological mechanism of disturbed vascular adaptation in atherosclerosis and suggests that lower levels of AGEs might improve the

  14. Association of subclinical inflammation, glycated hemoglobin and risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurea, Carolina Vicaria Rodrigues; Cerazi, Bruno Gion de Andrade; Laurinavicius, Antonio Gabriele; Janovsky, Carolina Castro Porto Silva; Conceição, Raquel Dilguerian de Oliveira; Santos, Raul D; Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the inter-relation between high sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycated hemoglobin in prediction of risk of obstructive sleep apnea. We included all individuals participating in a check-up program at the Preventive Medicine Center of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in 2014. The Berlin questionnaire for risk of obstructive sleep apnea was used, and the high sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycated hemoglobin levels were evaluated. The sample included 7,115 participants (age 43.4±9.6 years, 24.4% women). The Berlin questionnaire showed changes in 434 (6.1%) individuals. This finding was associated with high sensitivity C-reactive protein and glycated hemoglobin levels (papneia obstrutiva do sono. Foram incluídos todos os indivíduos participantes do programa de check-up do Centro de Medicina Preventiva Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein em 2014. Foi aplicado o questionário de Berlin sobre risco de apneia do sono, e avaliadas as dosagens de hemoglobina glicada e proteína C-reativa de alta sensibilidade. Foram incluídos 7.115 participantes (idade 43,4±9,6 anos, 24,4% mulheres). A prevalência de alteração no questionário de Berlin foi de 434 (6,1%). A alteração do questionário de Berlin associou-se positivamente aos resultados da proteína C-reativa de alta sensibilidade e da hemoglobina glicada (papneia obstrutiva do sono, mesmo após ajuste para obesidade e proteína C-reativa. Estes achados sugerem possível ligação fisiopatológica entre alterações na resistência insulínica e a síndrome da apneia obstrutiva do sono, que independe da obesidade ou inflamação de baixo grau.

  15. Thermochemistry of cyclic acetone peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinditskii, V.P., E-mail: vps@rctu.ru [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kolesov, V.I.; Egorshev, V.Yu.; Patrikeev, D.I. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 9 Miusskaya Square, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, O.V. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Old data on DADP and TATP enthalpies of formation have been revised. • Combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme allowed calculated enthalpies of formation of TATP and DADP. • Oxygen bomb calorimetry measurements allowed experimental enthalpies of formation of the peroxides. • Both experimental and calculated values show a satisfactory agreement between each other. • The newly obtained enthalpies reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and explosion. - Abstract: Two potentially initiating explosive peroxides, diacetonediperoxide (DADP) and triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), were studied in respect to their thermochemical properties. To get the internally self-consistent estimations of gas-phase enthalpy of formation of DADP and TATP, their values were calculated by combining Gaussian-4 (G4) theory with an isodesmic reaction scheme. The energies of combustion (Δ{sub c}U) were measured and the standard enthalpies of formation (Δ{sub f}H{sub 298}{sup °}) of DADP and TATP were derived using the standard enthalpies of formation of the combustion products. The heat of explosion was measured for small low-pressed charges of the peroxides. The obtained enthalpies of formation of DADP and TATP were found to agree well with quantum chemical calculations and reasonably account for the observed derivative parameters: heats of decomposition, combustion, and detonation.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide kinetics in water radiolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro; Sundin, Sara; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2018-04-01

    The kinetics of the formation and reaction of hydrogen peroxide in the long time γ- radiolysis of water is examined using a combination of experiment with model calculations. Escape yields of hydrogen peroxide on the microsecond time scale are easily measured with added radical scavengers even with substantial amounts of initial added hydrogen peroxide. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions without added radical scavengers reach a steady state limiting concentration of hydrogen peroxide with increasing dose, and that limit is directly proportional to the initial concentration of added hydrogen peroxide. The dose necessary to reach that limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration is also proportional to the initial concentration, but dose rate has a very small effect. The addition of molecular hydrogen to aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide leads to a decrease in the high dose limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration that is linear with the initial hydrogen concentration, but the amount of decrease is not stoichiometric. Proton irradiations of solutions with added hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen are more difficult to predict because of the decreased yields of radicals; however, with a substantial increase in dose rate there is a sufficient decrease in radical yields that hydrogen addition has little effect on hydrogen peroxide decay.

  17. Determination of glycation sites by tandem mass spectrometry in a synthetic lactose-bovine serum albumin conjugate, a vaccine model prepared by dialkyl squarate chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahouh, Farid; Hou, Shu-jie; Kováč, Pavol; Banoub, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE Neoglycoconjugate vaccines synthesized by the squaric acid spacer method allow single point attachment of the carbohydrate antigen to the protein carrier. However, the localization of the carbohydrate antigen sites of conjugation on the protein carrier has been an elusive task difficult to achieve. METHOD Covalent attachment of the lactose antigen to the bovine serum albumin (BSA) was prepared by the squaric acid method using a hapten:BSA ratio of 20:1. Different reaction times were used during the conjugation reaction and two different lactose-BSA glycoconjugate vaccines were obtained. The carbohydrate antigen hapten:BSA ratios of these lactose-BSA glycoconjugate vaccines were determined by MALDI-TOF/RTOF-MS and the glycation sites in the neoglycoconjugates were determined using nano-LC/ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS analysis of the trypsin and GluC V8 digests of the conjugates. RESULTS We have identified a total of 15 glycation sites located on the BSA lysine residues for the neoglycoconjugate vaccine formed with a hapten:BSA ratio of 5.1:1, However, the tryptic and GluC V8 digests of the hapten-BSA glycoconjugate with a hapten:BSA ratio of 19.0:1 allowed identification of 30 glycation sites located on the BSA. These last results seem to indicate that this conjugation results in formation of various glycoforms. CONCLUSIONS It was observed that the number of identified glycation sites increased when the hapten:BSA ratio of glycoconjugate formation increased, and that the location of the glycation sites appears to be mainly on the outer surface of the BSA carrier molecule which is in line with the assumption that the sterically more accessible lysine residues, namely those located on the outer surface of the BSA, would be conjugated preferentially. PMID:22368054

  18. An advanced glycation endproduct (AGE)-rich diet promotes accumulation of AGEs in Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Svensson, Rene B; Scheijen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    the relationship between AGE content in the diet and accumulation of AGEs in weight-bearing animal Achilles tendon. Two groups of mice (C57BL/6Ntac) were fed with either high-fat diet low in AGEs high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 14) or normal diet high in AGEs (ND) (n = 11). AGE content in ND was six to 50-fold higher......Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated...... was measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and pentosidine with high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescent detection. AGEs in Achilles tendon were higher than in tail tendon for CML (P

  19. SERUM MAGNESIUM, LIPID PROFILE AND GLYCATED HAEMOGLOBIN IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunanda Vusikala

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic retinopathy is one of the important microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus of long duration. Alterations in trace metals like magnesium and lipid profile was observed in diabetic retinopathy with hyperglycaemic status. AIM The study was taken up to assess the role of magnesium, lipid profile and glycated haemoglobin in diabetic retinopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 80 subjects between 40-65 years were included in the study. Group 1 includes 20 age and sex matched healthy controls. Group 2 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus without retinopathy. Group 3 includes 30 cases of Diabetes mellitus with retinopathy. RESULTS Magnesium was found to be significantly low in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly elevated in the diabetic group with retinopathy. Fasting and Postprandial plasma glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c levels confirmed the glycaemic status of each of the groups. CONCLUSIONS Hypomagnesemia, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridemia was observed in diabetic retinopathy along with increased levels of glycated haemoglobin in our study.

  20. Ovalbumin with Glycated Carboxyl Groups Shows Membrane-Damaging Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chia Tang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate whether glycated ovalbumin (OVA showed novel activity at the lipid-water interface. Mannosylated OVA (Man-OVA was prepared by modification of the carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-dextro (d-mannopyranoside. An increase in the number of modified carboxyl groups increased the membrane-damaging activity of Man-OVA on cell membrane-mimicking vesicles, whereas OVA did not induce membrane permeability in the tested phospholipid vesicles. The glycation of carboxyl groups caused a notable change in the gross conformation of OVA. Moreover, owing to their spatial positions, the Trp residues in Man-OVA were more exposed, unlike those in OVA. Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that the Trp residues in Man-OVA were located on the interface binds with the lipid vesicles, and their microenvironment was abundant in positively charged residues. Although OVA and Man-OVA showed a similar binding affinity for lipid vesicles, the lipid-interacting feature of Man-OVA was distinct from that of OVA. Chemical modification studies revealed that Lys and Arg residues, but not Trp residues, played a crucial role in the membrane-damaging activity of Man-OVA. Taken together, our data suggest that glycation of carboxyl groups causes changes in the structural properties and membrane-interacting features of OVA, generating OVA with membrane-perturbing activities at the lipid-water interface.

  1. Multicenter evaluation of an enzymatic method for glycated albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleari, Renata; Bonetti, Graziella; Callà, Cinzia; Carta, Mariarosa; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Di Gaetano, Nicola; Ferri, Marilisa; Guerra, Elena; Lavalle, Gabriella; Cascio, Claudia Lo; Martino, Francesca Gabriela; Montagnana, Martina; Moretti, Marco; Santini, Gabriele; Scribano, Donata; Testa, Roberto; Vero, Anna; Mosca, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    The use of glycated albumin (GA) has been proposed as an additional glycemic control marker particularly useful in intermediate-term monitoring and in situation when HbA 1c test is not reliable. We have performed the first multicenter evaluation of the analytical performance of the enzymatic method quantILab Glycated Albumin assay implemented on the most widely used clinical chemistry analyzers (i.e. Abbott Architect C8000, Beckman Coulter AU 480 and 680, Roche Cobas C6000, Siemens ADVIA 2400 and 2400 XPT). The repeatability of the GA measurement (expressed as CV, %) implemented in the participating centers ranged between 0.9% and 1.2%. The within-laboratory CVs ranged between 1.2% and 1.6%. A good alignment between laboratories was found, with correlation coefficients from 0.996 to 0.998. Linearity was confirmed in the range from 7.6 to 84.7%. The new enzymatic method for glycated albumin evaluated by our investigation is suitable for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cloning and characterization of the canine receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murua Escobar, Hugo; Soller, Jan T; Sterenczak, Katharina A; Sperveslage, Jan D; Schlueter, Claudia; Burchardt, Birgit; Eberle, Nina; Fork, Melanie; Nimzyk, Rolf; Winkler, Susanne; Nolte, Ingo; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2006-03-15

    Metastasis is one of the major problems when dealing with malignant neoplasias. Accordingly, the finding of molecular targets, which can be addressed to reduce tumour metastasising, will have significant impact on the development of new therapeutic approaches. Recently, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)-high mobility group B1 (HMGB1) protein complex has been shown to have significant influence on invasiveness, growth and motility of tumour cells, which are essential characteristics required for metastatic behaviour. A set of in vitro and in vivo approaches showed that blocking of this complex resulted in drastic suppression of tumour cell growth. Due to the similarities of human and canine cancer the dog has joined the common rodent animal model for therapeutic and preclinical studies. However, complete characterisation of the protein complex is a precondition to a therapeutic approach based on the blocking of the RAGE-HMGB1 complex to spontaneously occurring tumours in dogs. We recently characterised the canine HMGB1 gene and protein completely. Here we present the complete characterisation of the canine RAGE gene including its 1384 bp mRNA, the 1215 bp protein coding sequence, the 2835 bp genomic structure, chromosomal localisation, gene expression pattern, and its 404 amino acid protein. Furthermore we compared the CDS of six different canine breeds and screened them for single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  3. Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity Induces Ras Signaling in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirapa Chetsawang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that overproduction of reactive oxygen species occurs after brain injury and mediates neuronal cells degeneration. In the present study, we examined the role of Ras signaling on hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cells degeneration in dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. An inhibitor of the enzyme that catalyzes the farnesylation of Ras proteins, FTI-277, and a competitive inhibitor of GTP-binding proteins, GDP-beta-S significantly decreased hydrogen peroxide-induced reduction in cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. The results of this study might indicate that a Ras-dependent signaling pathway plays a role in hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in neuronal cells.

  4. Comparative effects of gamma-rays and electron beams on peroxide formation in phosphatidylcholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todoriki, S.; Hayashi, T.

    1994-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine was irradiated in the state of a film or liposome with gamma-rays or electron beams, and the amount of peroxide was determined to compare the effects of the two types of radiation. The amounts of peroxide formed in both the film and liposome with gamma-rays were significantly larger than those with electron beams, when the samples were irradiated at the same dose. Proteins such as bacteriorhodopsin reduced the degree of peroxide formation in liposome, and the effect of gamma-rays was much larger than that of electron beams, even in the presence of protein. The results of the present investigation indicate that the effects of gamma-rays on peroxide formation in phosphatidylcholine were significantly larger than those of electron beams, irrespective of the state of the lipid

  5. Detection of hydrogen peroxide with graphyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, R.; Karami, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electronic properties of graphyne has been investigated to explore the possibility of using graphyne based biosensor. We have used density functional theory to study the electronic properties of γ-graphyne in the presence of different number of hydrogen peroxide. The optimal adsorption position, orientation, and distance of hydrogen peroxide adsorbed on the graphyne sheet have been determined by calculating adsorption energy. It is found that γ-graphyne which is an intrinsic semiconductor becomes an n-type semiconductor due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The energy band gap of γ-graphyne is decreased by increasing the number of hydrogen peroxide. The results demonstrate that γ-graphyne is a promising candidate for biosensor application because of its electrical sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide.

  6. PEROXIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G.T.; Perlman, I.

    1958-09-16

    reduced state, from hexavalent uranium. It consists in treating an aqueous solution containing such uranium and plutonium ions with sulfate ions in order to form a soluble uranium sulfate complex and then treating the solution with a soluble thorium compound and a soluble peroxide compound in order to ferm a thorium peroxide carrier precipitate which carries down with it the plutonium peroxide present. During this treatment the pH of the solution must be maintained between 2 and 3.

  7. A novel mechanism for antiglycative action of limonene through stabilization of protein conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, Madhav M; Panaskar, Shrimant N; Chougale, Ashok D; Kulkarni, Mahesh J; Arvindekar, Akalpita U

    2013-10-01

    Inhibition of protein glycation is known to ameliorate secondary complications in diabetes. In the present study antiglycative properties of limonene, a natural product, were evaluated using BSA as a model protein. AMG (aminoguanidine) was used as a positive control. Measurement of total AGEs (Advanced Glycation End-products) and specific AGEs revealed that limonene could inhibit protein glycation to the extent of 56.3% and 75.1% respectively at 50 μM concentration as against 54.4% and 82.2% by AMG at 1 mM. Congo red binding and CD (Circular Dichroism) analysis revealed inhibition of α-helix to β-sheet transition wherein 18.5% β-sheet structures were observed in glycated BSA (bovine serum albumin) as against 4.9% with limonene. Glycation of protein in the presence of urea was enhanced by 18%, while in the presence of limonene it was reduced by 23% revealing the stabilizing effect of limonene. Electrophoretic mobility was similar to the normal control and a zeta potential value of -12.1 mV as against -15.1 mV in diabetic control was observed. Inhibition of glycation in limonene treated samples was confirmed through LC-MS analysis wherein AGEs such as pentosidine, CML (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)lysine), CEL (N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine), MOLD (methylglyoxal-lysine dimer) and imidazolone observed in glycated samples were absent in limonene treated samples. PatchDock studies revealed that limonene could bind to the major glycation sites IB, IIA and IIB sub domains and AMG to the IIIA sub domain. Thus limonene is a potent protein glycation inhibitor that prevents protein glycation through a novel mechanism of stabilization of protein structure through hydrophobic interactions.

  8. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, w...

  9. Photo-oxidation of histidine peptides yields high concentrations of unstable peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policarpio, V.V.; Hawkins, C.L.; Davies, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation of proteins by UV, and visible light in the presence of sensitizers, results in side chain modification as well as aggregation and fragmentation. In particular, singlet oxygen has been reported to oxidize Met, Trp, Tyr, Cys and His side chains in a selective manner. In this study the oxidation of histidine and its derivatives, and His-containing peptides is examined using a range of sensitizers, to determine whether peroxides are major intermediates, and the mechanism of formation of these species. Visible light-sensitised oxidation of Gly-His-Gly in the presence of oxygen and rose bengal gives unstable substrate-derived peroxides with the peroxide yield increasing with increasing photolysis time. Similar behaviour was detected with other photosensitizers, though the peroxide yields varied with the sensitizer at identical concentrations with rose bengal > aluminium phthalocyanine > hematoporphyrin IX > zinc phthalocyanine > tetrakisporphine. The peroxide yield was decreased in the presence of azide and enhanced when deuterium oxide was employed as the solvent, consistent with peroxide formation being singlet oxygen mediated. Experiments using anoxic conditions gave low yields of peroxides confirming the oxygen-dependence of these reactions. HPLC analysis showed rapid loss of the parent peptide, with subsequent formation of both stable and unstable products; these are currently being characterized by MS and NMR. Similar behavior has been observed with other His derivatives. The yield of singlet oxygen formed in these reactions has been estimated using a bleaching assay (N, N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline). Quantification of singlet oxygen formation and Gly-His-Gly derived peroxide during rose bengal-mediated photooxidation indicated a conversion efficiency of the initial singlet oxygen into substrate-derived peroxides of ca. 75% indicating that peroxide formation is a highly efficient and major reaction pathway

  10. Dysfunctional lipoproteins from young smokers exacerbate cellular senescence and atherogenesis with smaller particle size and severe oxidation and glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Hoon; Shin, Dong-Gu; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    Until now, there has been limited information on the effects of smoking on atherogenesis and senescence in the context of lipoprotein parameters, particularly in young smokers who have smoked fewer than 10 cigarettes per day for 3 years. In this study, lipoprotein profiles and functions were compared between smoker (n = 21) and control groups (n = 20). In the smoking group, ferric ion reduction abilities of serum and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) fractions were significantly reduced, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was severely oxidized. All lipoprotein particles from the smoker group showed higher advanced glycated end products with more triglyceride (TG) content compared with the control group. Lipoproteins from smokers showed faster agarose gel electromobility as well as greater smear band intensity in SDS-PAGE due to oxidation and glycation. LDL from smokers was more sensitive to oxidation and promoted foam cell forma-tion in macrophages. Gel filtration column chromatography revealed that the protein and cholesterol peaks of VLDL and LDL were elevated in the smoker group, whereas those of HDL were reduced. Human dermal fibroblast cells from the smoker group showed severe senescence following treatment with HDL2 and HDL3. Although HDL from young smokers showed impaired antioxidant ability, smaller particle size, and increased TG content, cholesteryl ester transfer protein activities were greatly enhanced in the serum and HDL fractions of the smoker group. In conclusion, smoking can cause production of dysfunctional lipoproteins having a smaller particle size that exacerbate senescence and atherogenic progress due to oxidation and glycation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Glycation and secondary conformational changes of human serum albumin: study of the FTIR spectroscopic curve-fitting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was attempted to investigate both the glycation kinetics and protein secondary conformational changes of human serum albumin (HSA after the reaction with ribose. The browning and fluorescence determinations as well as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR microspectroscopy with a curve-fitting technique were applied. Various concentrations of ribose were incubated over a 12-week period at 37 ± 0.5 oC under dark conditions. The results clearly shows that the glycation occurred in HSA-ribose reaction mixtures was markedly increased with the amount of ribose used and incubation time, leading to marked alterations of protein conformation of HSA after FTIR determination. In addition, the browning intensity of reaction solutions were colored from light to deep brown, as determined by optical observation. The increase in fluorescence intensity from HSA–ribose mixtures seemed to occur more quickly than browning, suggesting that the fluorescence products were produced earlier on in the process than compounds causing browning. Moreover, the predominant α-helical composition of HSA decreased with an increase in ribose concentration and incubation time, whereas total β-structure and random coil composition increased, as determined by curve-fitted FTIR microspectroscopy analysis. We also found that the peak intensity ratios at 1044 cm−1/1542 cm−1 markedly decreased prior to 4 weeks of incubation, then almost plateaued, implying that the consumption of ribose in the glycation reaction might have been accelerated over the first 4 weeks of incubation, and gradually decreased. This study first evidences that two unique IR peaks at 1710 cm−1 [carbonyl groups of irreversible products produced by the reaction and deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs] and 1621 cm−1 (aggregated HSA molecules were clearly observed from the curve-fitted FTIR spectra of HSA-ribose mixtures over the course of incubation time. This study

  12. Transcapillary escape rate and relative metabolic clearance of glycated and non-glycated albumin in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bent-Hansen, L; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Kverneland, A

    1987-01-01

    The transcapillary escape rate and relative plasma disappearance of glycated and non-glycated albumin were measured in 25 male Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients using a double tracer technique. The patients were divided into three groups on the basis of their urinary albumin excretion......: group 1, normal albumin excretion (less than 30 mg/24 h) (n = 8); group 2, microalbuminuria (30-300 mg/24 h) (n = 9); and group 3, clinical nephropathy (greater than 300 mg/24 h) (n = 8). Six male age-matched non-diabetic persons served as control subjects. The transcapillary escape rate of glycated...... significant role in the development of late diabetic microvascular complications....

  13. Evidence for Consistency of the Glycation Gap in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Ananth U.; Holland, Martin R.; Macdonald, David R.; Nevill, Alan; Singh, Baldev M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Discordance between HbA1c and fructosamine estimations in the assessment of glycemia is often encountered. A number of mechanisms might explain such discordance, but whether it is consistent is uncertain. This study aims to coanalyze paired glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c)-fructosamine estimations by using fructosamine to determine a predicted HbA1c, to calculate a glycation gap (G-gap) and to determine whether the G-gap is consistent over time. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We include...

  14. Phenol oxidation with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramiez Cortina, R.C.; Hernadez Perez, I. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, Div. de CBI, Dept. de Energia, Azcapotzalco (Mexico); Ortiz Lozoya, C.E. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco, Div. de CBI, Dept. de Energia, Azcapotzalco (Mexico)]|[Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexico); Alonso Gutierrez, M.S. [Inst. National Polytechnique, ENSCT, Lab. of Chimie Agro-Industrielle, Toulouse (France)

    2003-07-01

    In this work the process application of advanced oxidation is investigated with hydrogen peroxide, for the phenol destruction. The experiments were carried out in a glass reactor of 750 mL. Three phenol concentrations were studied (2000, 1000 and 500 ppm) being oxidized with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (1, 2 and 3 M). The tests of oxidation had a reaction time of 48 h at ambient temperature and pressure. The phenol degradation was determined as COD at different reaction times and intermediate oxidation products were analyzed by chromatography. The results of this study show that it is possible to degrade phenol (1000 ppm) until 90% with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} 2M. Being achieved the best efficiency with a good molar relationship of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/phenol. Intends a reaction outline in the degradation of the phenol. (orig.)

  15. Assay to detect lipid peroxidation upon exposure to nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Timothy M; Neun, Barry W; Stern, Stephan T

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for the analysis of human hepatocarcinoma cells (HEP G2) for lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA), following treatment with nanoparticle formulations. Oxidative stress has been identified as a likely mechanism of nanoparticle toxicity, and cell-based in vitro systems for evaluation of nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress are widely considered to be an important component of biocompatibility screens. The products of lipid peroxidation, lipid hydroperoxides, and aldehydes, such as MDA, can be measured via a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay. In this assay, which can be performed in cell culture or in cell lysate, MDA combines with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) to form a fluorescent adduct that can be detected at an excitation wavelength of 530 nm and an emission wavelength of 550 nm. The results are then expressed as MDA equivalents, normalized to total cellular protein (determined by Bradford assay).

  16. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the U.S...

  17. Problem of the lithium peroxide thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefedov, R A; Ferapontov, Yu A; Kozlova, N P

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of lithium peroxide and lithium peroxide monohydrate samples under heating in atmospheric air was studied by the method of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). It was found that in the temperature range of 32°C to 82°C the interaction of lithium peroxides and steam with the formation of lithium peroxide monohydrate occurs, which was confirmed chemically and by X-ray Single-qualitative analysis. It was experimentally found that lithium peroxide starts to decompose into the lithium oxide and oxygen in the temperature range of 340 ÷ 348°C. It was established that the resulting thermal decomposition of lithium oxide, lithium peroxide at the temperature of 422°C melts with lithium carbonate eutecticly. The manifestation of polymorphism was not marked(seen or noticed) under the heating of studied samples of lithium peroxide and lithium peroxide monohydrate in the temperature range of 25°C ÷ 34°C. (paper)

  18. Accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts reduces chondrocyte-mediated extracellular matrix turnover in human articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degroot, J.; Verzijl, N.; Jacobs, K. M.; Budde, M.; Bank, R. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.; TeKoppele, J. M.; Lafeber, F. P.

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of osteoarthritis (OAs) increases with age and coincides with the accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in articular cartilage, suggesting that accumulation of glycation products may be involved in the development of OA. This study was designed to examine the effects

  19. Glycated haemoglobin may in future be reported as estimated mean blood glucose concentration--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, R.; Nerup, J.; Nathan, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) is widely used to determine levels of chronic glycaemia, to judge the adequacy of diabetes treatment and to adjust therapy. HbA 1c results are expressed as the percentage of HbA that is glycated. Day-to-day management is guided by self-monitoring of capillary glucose...

  20. Determination of supplier-to-supplier and lot-to-lot variability in glycation of recombinant human serum albumin expressed in Oryza sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant E Frahm

    Full Text Available The use of different expression systems to produce the same recombinant human protein can result in expression-dependent chemical modifications (CMs leading to variability of structure, stability and immunogenicity. Of particular interest are recombinant human proteins expressed in plant-based systems, which have shown particularly high CM variability. In studies presented here, recombinant human serum albumins (rHSA produced in Oryza sativa (Asian rice (OsrHSA from a number of suppliers have been extensively characterized and compared to plasma-derived HSA (pHSA and rHSA expressed in yeast (Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The heterogeneity of each sample was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography (SEC, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and capillary electrophoresis (CE. Modifications of the samples were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. The secondary and tertiary structure of the albumin samples were assessed with far U/V circular dichroism spectropolarimetry (far U/V CD and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Far U/V CD and fluorescence analyses were also used to assess thermal stability and drug binding. High molecular weight aggregates in OsrHSA samples were detected with SEC and supplier-to-supplier variability and, more critically, lot-to-lot variability in one manufactures supplied products were identified. LC-MS analysis identified a greater number of hexose-glycated arginine and lysine residues on OsrHSA compared to pHSA or rHSA expressed in yeast. This analysis also showed supplier-to-supplier and lot-to-lot variability in the degree of glycation at specific lysine and arginine residues for OsrHSA. Both the number of glycated residues and the degree of glycation correlated positively with the quantity of non-monomeric species and the chromatographic profiles of the samples. Tertiary structural changes were observed for most OsrHSA samples which

  1. Hydrogen peroxide treatment of TCE contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, D.H.; Robinson, K.G.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Solvent contaminated soils are ubiquitous in the industrial world and represent a significant environmental hazard due to their persistence and potentially negative impacts on human health and the environment. Environmental regulations favor treatment of soils with options which reduce the volume and toxicity of contaminants in place. One such treatment option is the in-situ application of hydrogen peroxide to soils contaminated with chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE). This study investigated hydrogen peroxide mass loading rates on removal of TCE from soils of varying organic matter content. Batch experiments conducted on contaminated loam samples using GC headspace analysis showed up to 80% TCE removal upon peroxide treatment. Column experiments conducted on sandy loam soils with high organic matter content showed only 25% TCE removal, even at hydrogen peroxide additions of 25 g peroxide per kg soil

  2. Rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Yaremenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review is the first to collate and summarize main data on named and unnamed rearrangement reactions of peroxides. It should be noted, that in the chemistry of peroxides two types of processes are considered under the term rearrangements. These are conventional rearrangements occurring with the retention of the molecular weight and transformations of one of the peroxide moieties after O–O-bond cleavage. Detailed information about the Baeyer−Villiger, Criegee, Hock, Kornblum−DeLaMare, Dakin, Elbs, Schenck, Smith, Wieland, and Story reactions is given. Unnamed rearrangements of organic peroxides and related processes are also analyzed. The rearrangements and related processes of important natural and synthetic peroxides are discussed separately.

  3. Inhibition of macrophage oxidative stress prevents the reduction of ABCA-1 transporter induced by advanced glycated albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Pinto, Raphael; Castilho, Gabriela; Paim, Bruno Alves; Machado-Lima, Adriana; Inada, Natalia M; Nakandakare, Edna Regina; Vercesi, Aníbal Eugênio; Passarelli, Marisa

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the role of aminoguanidine and benfotiamine on the inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in macrophages induced by advanced glycated albumin (AGE-albumin) and its relationship with cell cholesterol homeostasis, emphasizing the expression of the ATP binding cassette transporter A-1 (ABCA-1). AGE-albumin was made by incubating fatty acid-free albumin with 10 mM glycolaldehyde. ROS production and ABCA-1 protein level were determined by flow cytometry in J774 macrophages treated along time with control (C) or AGE-albumin alone or in the presence of aminoguanidine or benfotiamine. Mitochondrial function was evaluated by oxygraphy. Compared to C-albumin, AGE-albumin increased ROS production in macrophages, which was ascribed to the activities of NADPH oxidase and of the mitochondrial system. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity was reduced in cells incubated with AGE-albumin. ROS generation along time was associated with the reduction in macrophage ABCA-1 protein level. Aminoguanidine prevented ROS elevation and restored the ABCA-1 content in macrophages; on the other hand, benfotiamine that promoted a lesser reduction in ROS generation was not able to restore ABCA-1 levels. Inhibition of oxidative stress induced by AGE-albumin prevents disturbances in reverse cholesterol transport by curbing the reduction of ABCA-1 elicited by advanced glycation in macrophages and therefore may contribute to the prevention of atherosclerosis in diabetes mellitus.

  4. Arg354 in the catalytic centre of bovine liver catalase is protected from methylglyoxal-mediated glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckhuber, Christian Q

    2015-12-30

    In addition to controlled post-translational modifications proteins can be modified with highly reactive compounds. Usually this leads to a compromised functionality of the protein. Methylglyoxal is one of the most common agents that attack arginine residues. Methylglyoxal is also regarded as a pro-oxidant that affects cellular redox homeostasis by contributing to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Antioxidant enzymes like catalase are required to protect the cell from oxidative damage. These enzymes are also targets for methylglyoxal-mediated modification which could severely affect their catalytic activity in breaking down reactive oxygen species to less reactive or inert compounds. Here, bovine liver catalase was incubated with high levels of methylglyoxal to induce its glycation. This treatment did not lead to a pronounced reduction of enzymatic activity. Subsequently methylglyoxal-mediated arginine modifications (hydroimidazolone and dihydroxyimidazolidine) were quantitatively analysed by sensitive nano high performance liquid chromatography/electron spray ionisation/tandem mass spectrometry. Whereas several arginine residues displayed low to moderate levels of glycation (e.g., Arg93, Arg365, Arg444) Arg354 in the active centre of catalase was never found to be modified. Bovine liver catalase is able to tolerate very high levels of the modifying α-oxoaldehyde methylglyoxal so that its essential enzymatic function is not impaired.

  5. Enhanced Formation of Methylglyoxal-Derived Advanced Glycation End Products in Arabidopsis Under Ammonium Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Borysiuk

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO3– and ammonium (NH4+ are prevalent nitrogen (N sources for plants. Although NH4+ should be the preferred form of N from the energetic point of view, ammonium nutrition often exhibits adverse effects on plant physiological functions and induces an important growth-limiting stress referred as ammonium syndrome. The effective incorporation of NH4+ into amino acid structures requires high activity of the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glycolytic pathway. An unavoidable consequence of glycolytic metabolism is the production of methylglyoxal (MG, which is very toxic and inhibits cell growth in all types of organisms. Here, we aimed to investigate MG metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown on NH4+ as a sole N source. We found that changes in activities of glycolytic enzymes enhanced MG production and that markedly elevated MG levels superseded the detoxification capability of the glyoxalase pathway. Consequently, the excessive accumulation of MG was directly involved in the induction of dicarbonyl stress by introducing MG-derived advanced glycation end products (MAGEs to proteins. The severe damage to proteins was not within the repair capacity of proteolytic enzymes. Collectively, our results suggest the impact of MG (mediated by MAGEs formation in proteins in the contribution to NH4+ toxicity symptoms in Arabidopsis.

  6. Total soluble and endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Berrie; Hoskin, Teagan; Ashcroft, Anna; Burgess, Laura; Keenan, Jacqueline I; Falvey, James; Gearry, Richard B; Day, Andrew S

    2014-06-01

    Recruitment and activation of neutrophils, with release of specific proteins such as S100 proteins, is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Soluble forms of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGE), and variants such as endogenous secretory (esRAGE), can act as decoy receptors by binding ligands, including S100A12. The aims of this study were to determine total sRAGE and esRAGE concentrations in patients with IBD and correlate these with C-reactive protein (CRP), endoscopic scores and clinical disease activity scores. EDTA-plasma was collected from patients undergoing colonoscopy including those with Crohn's disease (CD: n=125), ulcerative colitis (UC: n=79) and control patients without endoscopic signs of inflammation (non-IBD: n=156). Concentrations of sRAGE and esRAGE were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and plasma CRP concentrations measured. Standard clinical disease activity and endoscopic severity scores were defined for all subjects. Plasma sRAGE concentrations were lower in UC (but not CD) than non-IBD subjects (pdefine the significance of sRAGE and esRAGE in IBD. Copyright © 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome by Advanced Glycation End Products Promotes Pancreatic Islet Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Kong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs contributes to ageing and age-related diseases, especially type 2 diabetes. The NLRP3 inflammasome, as a vital component of the innate immune system, is implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in AGE-induced pancreatic islet damage remains largely unclear. Results showed that administration of AGEs (120 mg/kg for 6 weeks in C57BL/6J mice induced an abnormal response to glucose (as measured by glucose tolerance and insulin release, pancreatic β-cell ultrastructural lesion, and cell death. These effects were associated with an excessive superoxide anion level, significant increased protein expression levels for NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2, thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP, NLRP3, and cleaved IL-1β, enhanced caspase-1 activity, and a significant increase in the levels of TXNIP–NLRP3 protein interaction. Ablation of the NLRP3 inflammasome or treatment with antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC clearly ameliorated these effects. In conclusion, our results reveal a possible mechanism for AGE-induced pancreatic islet damage upon NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

  8. Enhanced Formation of Methylglyoxal-Derived Advanced Glycation End Products in Arabidopsis Under Ammonium Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysiuk, Klaudia; Ostaszewska-Bugajska, Monika; Vaultier, Marie-Noëlle; Hasenfratz-Sauder, Marie-Paule; Szal, Bożena

    2018-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3–) and ammonium (NH4+) are prevalent nitrogen (N) sources for plants. Although NH4+ should be the preferred form of N from the energetic point of view, ammonium nutrition often exhibits adverse effects on plant physiological functions and induces an important growth-limiting stress referred as ammonium syndrome. The effective incorporation of NH4+ into amino acid structures requires high activity of the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glycolytic pathway. An unavoidable consequence of glycolytic metabolism is the production of methylglyoxal (MG), which is very toxic and inhibits cell growth in all types of organisms. Here, we aimed to investigate MG metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown on NH4+ as a sole N source. We found that changes in activities of glycolytic enzymes enhanced MG production and that markedly elevated MG levels superseded the detoxification capability of the glyoxalase pathway. Consequently, the excessive accumulation of MG was directly involved in the induction of dicarbonyl stress by introducing MG-derived advanced glycation end products (MAGEs) to proteins. The severe damage to proteins was not within the repair capacity of proteolytic enzymes. Collectively, our results suggest the impact of MG (mediated by MAGEs formation in proteins) in the contribution to NH4+ toxicity symptoms in Arabidopsis. PMID:29881392

  9. Effect of heating and glycation on the allergenicity of 2S albumins (Ara h 2/6 from peanut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne M Vissers

    Full Text Available Peanut allergy is one of the most common and severe food allergies, and processing is known to influence the allergenicity of peanut proteins. We aimed to establish the effect of heating and glycation on the IgE-binding properties and biological activity of 2S albumins (Ara h 2/6 from peanut.Native Ara h 2/6 was purified from raw peanuts and heated in solution (15 min, 110°C in the presence or absence of glucose. Ara h 2 and 6 were also purified from roasted peanut. Using PBMC and sera from peanut-allergic patients, the cellular proliferative potency and IgE reactivity (reverse EAST inhibition and functionality (basophil degranulation capacity of allergens were assessed. Heating Ara h 2/6 at 110°C resulted in extensive denaturation, hydrolysis and aggregation of the protein, whilst Ara h 2 and 6 isolated from roasted peanut retained its native conformation. Allergen stimulation of PBMC induced proliferation and Th2 cytokine secretion which was unaffected by thermal processing. Conversely, IgE reactivity and functionality of Ara h 2/6 was decreased by heating. Whilst heating-glycation further reduced the IgE binding capacity of the proteins, it moderated their loss of histamine releasing capacity. Ara h 2 and 6 purified from roasted peanut demonstrated the same IgE reactivity as unheated, native Ara h 2/6.Although no effect of processing on T-cell reactivity was observed, heat induced denaturation reduced the IgE reactivity and subsequent functionality of Ara h 2/6. Conversely, Ara h 2 and 6 purified from roasted peanut retained the structure and IgE reactivity/functionality of the native protein which may explain the allergenic potency of this protein. Through detailed molecular study and allergenicity assessment approaches, this work then gives new insights into the effect of thermal processing on structure/allergenicity of peanut proteins.

  10. Inactivation of animal and human prions by hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez-Kreuz, C; Yousfi, R; Soufflet, C; Quadrio, I; Yan, Z-X; Huyot, V; Aubenque, C; Destrez, P; Roth, K; Roberts, C; Favero, M; Clayette, P

    2009-08-01

    Prions cause various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. They are highly resistant to the chemical and physical decontamination and sterilization procedures routinely used in healthcare facilities. The decontamination procedures recommended for the inactivation of prions are often incompatible with the materials used in medical devices. In this study, we evaluated the use of low-temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization systems and other instrument-processing procedures for inactivating human and animal prions. We provide new data concerning the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide against prions from in vitro or in vivo tests, focusing on the following: the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide sterilization and possible interactions with enzymatic or alkaline detergents, differences in the efficiency of this treatment against different prion strains, and the influence of contaminating lipids. We found that gaseous hydrogen peroxide decreased the infectivity of prions and/or the level of the protease-resistant form of the prion protein on different surface materials. However, the efficiency of this treatment depended strongly on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the delivery system used in medical devices, because these effects were more pronounced for the new generation of Sterrad technology. The Sterrad NX sterilizer is 100% efficient (0% transmission and no protease-resistant form of the prion protein signal detected on the surface of the material for the mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy 6PB1 strain and a variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease strain). Thus, gaseous or vaporized hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivates prions on the surfaces of medical devices.

  11. Formation of Fructose-Mediated Advanced Glycation End Products and Their Roles in Metabolic and Inflammatory Diseases12

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Fructose is associated with the biochemical alterations that promote the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes. Its consumption has increased in parallel with MetS. It is metabolized by the liver, where it stimulates de novo lipogenesis. The triglycerides synthesized lead to hepatic insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Fructose-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may be involved via the Maillard reaction. Fructose has not been a main focus of glycation research because of the difficulty in measuring its adducts, and, more importantly, because although it is 10 times more reactive than glucose, its plasma concentration is only 1% of that of glucose. In this focused review, I summarize exogenous and endogenous fructose metabolism, fructose glycation, and in vitro, animal, and human data. Fructose is elevated in several tissues of diabetic patients where the polyol pathway is active, reaching the same order of magnitude as glucose. It is plausible that the high reactivity of fructose, directly or via its metabolites, may contribute to the formation of intracellular AGEs and to vascular complications. The evidence, however, is still unconvincing. Two areas that have been overlooked so far and should be actively explored include the following: 1) enteral formation of fructose AGEs, generating an inflammatory response to the receptor for AGEs (which may explain the strong association between fructose consumption and asthma, chronic bronchitis, and arthritis); and 2) inactivation of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase by a fructose-mediated increase in methylglyoxal flux (perpetuating lipogenesis, fatty liver, and insulin resistance). If proven correct, these mechanisms would put the fructose-mediated Maillard reaction in the limelight again as a contributing factor in chronic inflammatory diseases and MetS. PMID:28096127

  12. Formation of Fructose-Mediated Advanced Glycation End Products and Their Roles in Metabolic and Inflammatory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliucci, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Fructose is associated with the biochemical alterations that promote the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes. Its consumption has increased in parallel with MetS. It is metabolized by the liver, where it stimulates de novo lipogenesis. The triglycerides synthesized lead to hepatic insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Fructose-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs) may be involved via the Maillard reaction. Fructose has not been a main focus of glycation research because of the difficulty in measuring its adducts, and, more importantly, because although it is 10 times more reactive than glucose, its plasma concentration is only 1% of that of glucose. In this focused review, I summarize exogenous and endogenous fructose metabolism, fructose glycation, and in vitro, animal, and human data. Fructose is elevated in several tissues of diabetic patients where the polyol pathway is active, reaching the same order of magnitude as glucose. It is plausible that the high reactivity of fructose, directly or via its metabolites, may contribute to the formation of intracellular AGEs and to vascular complications. The evidence, however, is still unconvincing. Two areas that have been overlooked so far and should be actively explored include the following: 1) enteral formation of fructose AGEs, generating an inflammatory response to the receptor for AGEs (which may explain the strong association between fructose consumption and asthma, chronic bronchitis, and arthritis); and 2) inactivation of hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase by a fructose-mediated increase in methylglyoxal flux (perpetuating lipogenesis, fatty liver, and insulin resistance). If proven correct, these mechanisms would put the fructose-mediated Maillard reaction in the limelight again as a contributing factor in chronic inflammatory diseases and MetS. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. d-Ribose as a Contributor to Glycated Haemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixi Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c is the most important marker of hyperglycaemia in diabetes mellitus. We show that d-ribose reacts with haemoglobin, thus yielding HbA1c. Using mass spectrometry, we detected glycation of haemoglobin with d-ribose produces 10 carboxylmethyllysines (CMLs. The first-order rate constant of fructosamine formation for d-ribose was approximately 60 times higher than that for d-glucose at the initial stage. Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF rat, a common model for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, had high levels of d-ribose and HbA1c, accompanied by a decrease of transketolase (TK in the liver. The administration of benfotiamine, an activator of TK, significantly decreased d-ribose followed by a decline in HbA1c. In clinical investigation, T2DM patients with high HbA1c had a high level of urine d-ribose, though the level of their urine d-glucose was low. That is, d-ribose contributes to HbA1c, which prompts future studies to further explore whether d-ribose plays a role in the pathophysiological mechanism of T2DM.

  14. The problem of peroxidation in radiolis logy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baraboj, V.A.; Chebotarev, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    A hypothesis is validated concerning the products of freeradical oxidation of lipids and the phenol compounds as a mediator of the stress-syndrome. The data are reviewed on activation of peroxidation under the effect of radiation, cytochemical agents, etc., secondarily stimulating the neurohumoral system function of homeostasis regulation. With the emotional-algesic and cold-stresses, the regulatory system stimulation is of primary, reflex, nature, but it secondarily promotes the peroxidation activation. The radiotoxins (of the quinoid and lipid nature) appearing in tissues under the effect of ionizing radiation, are smilar in structure and mechanism of action to peroxidation activation products formed under the effect of other stress-agents

  15. Inorganic precursor peroxides for antifouling coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, S.M.; Pedersen, L.T.; Hermann, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Modern antifouling coatings are generally based on cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and organic biocides as active ingredients. Cu2O is prone to bioaccumulation, and should therefore be replaced by more environmentally benign compounds when technically possible. However, cuprous oxide does not only provide...... antifouling properties, it is also a vital ingredient for the antifouling coating to obtain its polishing and leaching mechanism. In this paper, peroxides of strontium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc are tested as pigments in antifouling coatings. The peroxides react with seawater to create hydrogen peroxide...... matrix provides antifouling properties exceeding those of a similar coating based entirely on zinc oxide....

  16. Evidence that L-Arginine inhibits glycation of human serum albumin (HSA) in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servetnick, D.A.; Wiesenfeld, P.L.; Szepesi, B.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work by Brownlee has shown that glycation of bovine serum albumin can be reduced in the presence of aminoguanidine (AG). Presumably, the guanidinium group on AG interferes with further rearrangement of amadori products to advanced glycosylated end products (AGE). Since L-arginine (ARG) also contains a guanidinium group, its ability to inhibit the formation of AGE products was investigated. HSA was incubated at 37 degrees C in the presence or absence of glucose; with glucose and fructose; or with sugars in the presence or absence of ARG or AG. A tracer amount of U- 14 C-glucose was added to each tube containing sugars. Protein bound glucose was separated from unreacted glucose by gel filtration. Radioactivity, total protein, fluorescence, and glucose concentration were measured. Preliminary data show enhanced binding of 14 C-glucose to HSA with fructose at all time points. A 30-40% decrease in 14 C-glucose incorporation was observed when ARG or AG as present. ARG and AG were equally effective in inhibiting incorporation of 14 C-glucose. FPLC analysis is in progress to determine the type and degree of HSA crosslinking during the 2 week incubation period

  17. Advanced glycation end products and sorbitol in blood from differently compensated diabetic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comazzi, S; Bertazzolo, W; Bonfanti, U; Spagnolo, V; Sartorelli, P

    2008-06-01

    Canine diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common metabolic disorder with long term complications, most of which are caused by glycosylation of structural proteins, decreases in antioxidant concentrations, altered osmotic balance and hypoxia due to impaired oxygen transport. Previous studies have demonstrated that under hyperglycemic conditions canine erythrocytes undergo swelling, probably due to activation of the polyol pathway. The present work aimed to assess the plasma concentration of advanced glycation end (AGE) products, stable Amadori-products generated by non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins and the intracellular concentration of sorbitol, produced by the activation of polyol pathway in 34 blood samples from diabetic dogs and in 14 controls. AGE products were significantly higher (pdogs compared with control animals. The sorbitol concentration in erythrocytes was also significantly higher in diabetic dogs and, in particular, in poorly compensated animals and in dogs with ketonuria. In five cases that were analysed before and after clinical improvement, sorbitol concentration was found to correlate with improvement. These results suggest that non-specific glycosylation is increased and that the polyol pathway is activated in diabetic dogs in a manner that is proportionate to the severity of disease. Moreover, the concentration of AGE products and sorbitol may be useful for monitoring the onset of diabetic complications and assessing the most appropriate therapeutic approaches for management of canine DM.

  18. Receptor for advanced glycation end-products is a marker of type I lung alveolar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Madoka; Fujiwara, Naoyuki; Hirabayashi, Susumu; Ohno, Hideki; Iida, Junko; Makita, Koshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2004-02-01

    Lung alveolar epithelial cells are comprised of type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells. ATI cells are polarized, although they have very flat morphology. The identification of marker proteins for apical and basolateral membranes of ATI cells is important to investigate into the differentiation of ATI cells. In this paper, we characterized receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) as a marker for ATI cells. RAGE was localized on basolateral membranes of ATI cells in the immunoelectron microscopy and its expression was enhanced in a parallel manner to the differentiation of ATI cells in vivo and in primary cultures of ATII cells. RAGE and T1 alpha, a well-known ATI marker protein, were targeted to basolateral and apical membranes, respectively, when expressed in polarized Madine Darby canine kidney cells. Moreover, RAGE was expressed in ATI cells after T1 alpha in vivo and in ex in vivo organ cultures. In conclusion, RAGE is a marker for basolateral membranes of well-differentiated ATI cells. ATI cells require some signal provided by the in vivo environment to express RAGE.

  19. Hair cortisol concentration and glycated hemoglobin in African American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, H Matthew; Dubois, Susan K; Maslowsky, Julie; Laudenslager, Mark L; Steinhardt, Mary A

    2016-10-01

    African Americans have higher diabetes prevalence compared to Whites. They also have elevated cortisol levels - indicating possible HPA axis dysregulation - which may raise blood glucose as part of the biological response to physiological and psychosocial stress. Little is known about chronic cortisol levels in African Americans, and even less about the role of chronically elevated cortisol in type 2 diabetes development in this racial group. We used analysis of cortisol in hair to examine associations of long-term (∼3months) cortisol levels with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in a group of African American adults. In exploratory analyses, we also studied the relationship of hair dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) with HbA1c. Participants were 61 community-dwelling African American adults (85% female; mean age 54.30 years). The first 3cm of scalp-near hair were analyzed for cortisol and DHEA concentration using enzyme-linked immunoassay analysis. Glycated hemoglobin was assessed, and regression analyses predicting HbA1c from hair cortisol and DHEA were performed in the full sample and in a subsample of participants (n=20) meeting the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Disease (NIDDK) criteria for type 2 diabetes (HbA1c≥6.5%). In the full sample, HbA1c increased with hair cortisol level (β=0.22, p=0.04, f(2)=0.10), independent of age, sex, chronic health conditions, diabetes medication use, exercise, and depressive symptoms. In the subsample of participants with an HbA1c≥6.5%, hair cortisol was also positively related to HbA1c (β=0.45, p=0.04, f(2)=0.32), independent of diabetes medication use. Glycated hemoglobin was unrelated to hair DHEA in both the full sample and HbA1c≥6.5% subsample. Long-term HPA axis dysregulation in the form of elevated hair cortisol is associated with elevated HbA1c in African American adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of glycation of albumin on its renal clearance in normal and diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layton, G.J.; Jerums, G.

    1988-01-01

    Two independent techniques have been used to study the renal clearances of nonenzymatically glycated albumin and nonglycated albumin in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, 16 to 24 weeks after the onset of diabetes. In the first technique, serum and urinary endogenous glycated and nonglycated albumin were separated using m-aminophenylboronate affinity chromatography and subsequently quantified by radioimmunoassay. Endogenous glycated albumin was cleared approximately twofold faster than nonglycated albumin in normal and diabetic rats. However, no difference was observed in the glycated albumin/nonglycated albumin clearance ratios (Cga/Calb) in normal and diabetic rats, respectively (2.18 +/- 0.39 vs 1.83 +/- 0.22, P greater than 0.05). The second technique measured the renal clearance of injected 125I-labelled glycated albumin and 125I-labelled albumin. The endogenous results were supported by the finding that 125I-labelled glycated albumin was cleared more rapidly than 125I-labelled albumin in normal (P less than 0.01) and diabetic (P less than 0.05) rats. The Cga/Calb ratio calculated for the radiolabelled albumins was 1.4 and 2.0 in normal and diabetic rats, respectively. This evidence suggests that nonenzymatic glycation of albumin increases its renal clearance to a similar degree in normal and diabetic rats

  1. Functional analysis of a novel hydrogen peroxide resistance gene in Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serata, Masaki; Kiwaki, Mayumi; Iino, Tohru

    2016-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have a variety of mechanisms for tolerance to oxygen and reactive oxygen species, and these mechanisms differ among species. Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota grows well under aerobic conditions, indicating that the various systems involved in oxidative stress resistance function in this strain. To elucidate the mechanism of oxidative stress resistance in L. casei strain Shirota, we examined the transcriptome response to oxygen or hydrogen peroxide exposure. We then focused on an uncharacterized gene that was found to be up-regulated by both oxygen and hydrogen peroxide stress; we named the gene hprA1 (hydrogen peroxide resistance gene). This gene is widely distributed among lactobacilli. We investigated the involvement of this gene in oxidative stress resistance, as well as the mechanism of tolerance to hydrogen peroxide. Growth of L. casei MS105, an hprA1-disrupted mutant, was not affected by oxygen stress, whereas the survival rate of MS105 after hydrogen peroxide treatment was markedly reduced compared to that of the wild-type. However, the activity of MS105 in eliminating hydrogen peroxide was similar to that of the wild-type. We cloned hprA1 from L. caseiShirota and purified recombinant HprA1 protein from Escherichia coli. We demonstrated that the recombinant HprA1 protein bound to iron and prevented the formation of a hydroxyl radical in vitro. Thus, HprA1 protein probably contributes to hydrogen peroxide tolerance in L. casei strain Shirota by binding to iron in the cells and preventing the formation of a hydroxyl radical.

  2. Rich Medium Composition Affects Escherichia coli Survival, Glycation, and Mutation Frequency during Long-Term Batch Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, Karin E; Finkel, Steven E

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli are frequently grown to high density to produce biomolecules for study in the laboratory. To achieve this, cells can be incubated in extremely rich media that increase overall cell yield. In these various media, bacteria may have different metabolic profiles, leading to changes in the amounts of toxic metabolites produced. We have previously shown that stresses experienced during short-term growth can affect the survival of cells during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP). Here, we incubated cells in LB, 2× yeast extract-tryptone (YT), Terrific Broth, or Super Broth medium and monitored survival during the LTSP, as well as other reporters of genetic and physiological change. We observe differential cell yield and survival in all media studied. We propose that differences in long-term survival are the result of changes in the metabolism of components of the media that may lead to increased levels of protein and/or DNA damage. We also show that culture pH and levels of protein glycation, a covalent modification that causes protein damage, affect long-term survival. Further, we measured mutation frequency after overnight incubation and observed a correlation between high mutation frequencies at the end of the log phase and loss of viability after 4 days of LTSP incubation, indicating that mutation frequency is potentially predictive of long-term survival. Since glycation and mutation can be caused by oxidative stress, we measured expression of the oxyR oxidative stress regulator during log-phase growth and found that higher levels of oxyR expression during the log phase are consistent with high mutation frequency and lower cell density during the LTSP. Since these complex rich media are often used when producing large quantities of biomolecules in the laboratory, the observed increase in damage resulting in glycation or mutation may lead to production of a heterogeneous population of plasmids or proteins, which could affect the

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin, and glycated hemoglobin under compression and shear exhibit an anisotropic mechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesudasan, Sumith; Wang, Xianqiao; Averett, Rodney D

    2018-05-01

    We developed a new mechanical model for determining the compression and shear mechanical behavior of four different hemoglobin structures. Previous studies on hemoglobin structures have focused primarily on overall mechanical behavior; however, this study investigates the mechanical behavior of hemoglobin, a major constituent of red blood cells, using steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to obtain anisotropic mechanical behavior under compression and shear loading conditions. Four different configurations of hemoglobin molecules were considered: deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO 2 ), carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO), and glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1C ). The SMD simulations were performed on the hemoglobin variants to estimate their unidirectional stiffness and shear stiffness. Although hemoglobin is structurally denoted as a globular protein due to its spherical shape and secondary structure, our simulation results show a significant variation in the mechanical strength in different directions (anisotropy) and also a strength variation among the four different hemoglobin configurations studied. The glycated hemoglobin molecule possesses an overall higher compressive mechanical stiffness and shear stiffness when compared to deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and carboxyhemoglobin molecules. Further results from the models indicate that the hemoglobin structures studied possess a soft outer shell and a stiff core based on stiffness.

  4. Peroxides and radiation impairment of oxidative phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovgii, I E; Akoev, I G

    1975-09-01

    An increase in the peroxidase activity of the mitochondria and a simultaneous rise in the amount of peroxide compounds, which are half lipid-like substances, are detected within the first 10 minutes after irradiation (1000 r). A mechanism of radiation impairment of oxidative phosphorylation is connected with the penetration of its inhibitors to the mitochondria due to the disturbed permeability of membranes affected by peroxides.

  5. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  6. Determination of advanced glycation endproducts in cooked meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gengjun; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), a pathogenic factor implicated in diabetes and other chronic diseases, are produced in cooked meat products. The objective of this study was to determine the AGE content, as measured by Nε-carboxymethyllysine (CML) levels, in cooked chicken, pork, beef and fish (salmon and tilapia) prepared by three common cooking methods used by U.S. consumers: frying, baking, and broiling. The CML was detected in all the cooked samples, but the levels were dependent on types of meat, cooking conditions, and the final internal temperature. Broiling and frying at higher cooking temperature produced higher levels of CML, and broiled beef contained the highest CML content (21.8μg/g). Baked salmon (8.6μg/g) and baked tilapia (9.7μg/g) contained less CML as compared to the other muscle food samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Targeted reduction of advanced glycation improves renal function in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harcourt, Brooke E; Sourris, Karly C; Coughlan, Melinda T

    2011-01-01

    -lowering pharmaceutical, alagebrium, and mice in which the receptor for AGE (RAGE) was deleted. Obesity, resulting from a diet high in both fat and AGE, caused renal impairment; however, treatment of the RAGE knockout mice with alagebrium improved urinary albumin excretion, creatinine clearance, the inflammatory profile...... if treatments that lower tissue AGE burden in patients and mice would improve obesity-related renal dysfunction. Overweight and obese individuals (body mass index (BMI) 26-39¿kg/m(2)) were recruited to a randomized, crossover clinical trial involving 2 weeks each on a low- and a high-AGE-containing diet. Renal......, and renal oxidative stress. Alagebrium treatment, however, resulted in decreased weight gain and improved glycemic control compared with wild-type mice on a high-fat Western diet. Thus, targeted reduction of the advanced glycation pathway improved renal function in obesity....

  8. Lipid peroxidation is increased in tears from the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch-Navarro, Soledad; Franco, Ilenia; Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Silvestre, Dolores; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2013-10-01

    We describe a procedure in which tears, obtained from Schirmer strips, are used to measure a marker of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde (MDA). We also compared the levels of proteins and MDA in tears from two groups of people: young adults (18-30 years old) and elderly adults (65-85 years old), because the data related to total protein concentration of human tears vary widely and because the majority of people over the age of 65 experience some symptoms of dry eyes and this condition has been recognized as an oxidative stress-induced disease. Our results show a significant difference in the protein concentration of the tears taken from the two age categories, younger adults (18-30 years old) and older adults (65-85 years old). Herein, we report for the first time an increase in MDA concentrations determined by HPLC in human tears based on age. It is possible that alterations in the tear lipid layer may lead to an increase in lipid peroxidation. Further studies are needed to understand the nature and function of tear film and stability in order to obtain new methods to analyze tears in patients with different diseases. In this sense, it would be interesting to compare MDA concentration in tears from control subjects and from people with meibomian gland dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide as a sustainable energy carrier: Electrocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide and the fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal–oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O 2 -reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O 2 , which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  11. EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HALGREN DL

    2008-01-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation

  12. Enhancement of Antioxidative and Intestinal Anti-inflammatory Activities of Glycated Milk Casein after Fermentation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus 4B15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Nam Su; Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2017-06-14

    In this study, we investigated the glycoproteomics of glycated milk casein (GMC) and GMC fermented by Lactobacillus rhamnosus 4B15 (FGMC) and determined their biological implications. There was a significant increase in the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities of GMC with galactose, which were higher than those of GMC with glucose (GMC-glc). Furthermore, the fermentation of GMC by L. rhamnosus 4B15 synergistically enhanced the above activities compared to those of unfermented GMC. Especially, fermented GMC-glc (FGMC-glc) possessed remarkably improved reducing power and radical scavenging activities. Moreover, FGMC-glc ameliorated the inflammatory response and tight junction-related intestinal epithelial dysfunction. Additionally, hexose-derived glycation and modification sites in protein sequences of GMC were identified. In particular, glycosylation and sulfation of serine and threonine residues were observed, and distinct modification sites were detected after fermentation. Therefore, these results indicated that glycation-induced modification of casein and fermentation correlated strongly with the enhanced functional properties.

  13. Detection of AGEs as markers for carbohydrate metabolism and protein denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Ryoji; Shirakawa, Jun-Ichi; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ohno, Rei-Ichi; Moroishi, Narumi; Sakata, Noriyuki; Nagai, Mime

    2014-07-01

    Approximately 100 years have passed since the Maillard reaction was first reported in the field of food chemistry as a condensation reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids. This reaction is thought to progress slowly primarily from glucose with proteins in vivo. An early-stage product, called the "Amadori product", is converted into advanced glycation end products. Those accumulate in the body in accordance with age, with such accumulation being enhanced by lifestyle-related diseases that result in the denaturation of proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that intermediate carbonyls are generated by several pathways, and rapidly generate many glycation products. However, accurate quantification of glycation products in vivo is difficult due to instability and differences in physicochemical properties. In this connection, little is known about the relationship between the structure of glycation products and pathology. Furthermore, the interaction between proteins modified by glycation and receptors for advanced glycation end products is also known to induce the production of several inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, those inhibitors have been developed over the world to prevent lifestyle-related diseases. In this review, we describe the process of protein denaturation induced by glycation and discuss the possibility of using the process as a marker of age-related diseases.

  14. N-epsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine, a product of the chemical modification of proteins by methylglyoxal, increases with age in human lens proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, M U; Brinkmann Frye, E; Degenhardt, T P; Thorpe, S R; Baynes, J W

    1997-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products and glycoxidation products, such as Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and pentosidine, accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins with age and are implicated in the aging of tissue proteins and in the development of pathology in diabetes, atherosclerosis and other diseases. In this paper we describe a new advanced glycation end-product, Nepsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), which is formed during the reaction of methylglyoxal with lysine residues in model compo...

  15. Mutagenesis and repair induced by the DNA advanced glycation end product N2-1-(carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamae, Daniel; Lim, Punnajit; Wuenschell, Gerald E; Termini, John

    2011-03-29

    Glycation of biopolymers by glucose-derived α-oxo-aldehydes such as methylglyoxal (MG) is believed to play a major role in the complex pathologies associated with diabetes and metabolic disease. In contrast to the extensive literature detailing the formation and physiological consequences of protein glycation, there is little information about the corresponding phenomenon for DNA. To assess the potential contribution of DNA glycation to genetic instability, we prepared shuttle vectors containing defined levels of the DNA glycation adduct N(2)-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG) and transfected them into isogenic human fibroblasts that differed solely in the capacity to conduct nucleotide excision repair (NER). In the NER-compromised fibroblasts, the induced mutation frequencies increased up to 18-fold relative to background over a range of ∼10-1400 CEdG adducts/10(5) dG, whereas the same substrates transfected into NER-competent cells induced a response that was 5-fold over background at the highest adduct density. The positive linear correlation (R(2) = 0.998) of mutation frequency with increasing CEdG level in NER-defective cells suggested that NER was the primary if not exclusive mechanism for repair of this adduct in human fibroblasts. Consistent with predictions from biochemical studies using CEdG-substituted oligonucleotides, guanine transversions were the predominant mutation resulting from replication of MG-modified plasmids. At high CEdG levels, significant increases in the number of AT → GC transitions were observed exclusively in NER-competent cells (P involvement of an NER-dependent mutagenic process in response to critical levels of DNA damage, possibly mediated by error-prone Y-family polymerases.

  16. The Glycated Albumin to Glycated Hemoglobin Ratio Might Not Be Associated with Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonjin Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe ratio of glycated albumin to glycated hemoglobin (GA/A1c is known to be elevated in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM who had decreased insulin secretion. Additionally, the carotid intima media thickness (IMT is greater in T2DM patients with higher GA/A1c ratios. We investigated whether increased GA/A1c ratio and IMT are also associated in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, which is characterized by lack of insulin secretory capacity.MethodsIn this cross-sectional study, we recruited 81 T1DM patients (33 men, 48 women; mean age 44.1±13.0 years who underwent carotid IMT, GA, and HbA1c measurements.ResultsThe mean GA/A1c ratio was 2.90. Based on these results, we classified the subjects into two groups: group I (GA/A1c ratio <2.90, n=36 and group II (GA/A1c ratio ≥2.90, n=45. Compared with group I, the body mass indexes (BMIs, waist circumferences, and IMTs were lower in group II. GA/A1c ratio was negatively correlated with BMI, urine albumin to creatinine ratio (P<0.001 for both, and both the mean and maximal IMT (P=0.001, both. However, after adjusting the confounding factors, we observed that IMT was no longer associated with GA/A1c ratio.ConclusionIn contrast to T2DM, IMT was not significantly related to GA/A1c ratio in the subjects with T1DM. This suggests that the correlations between GA/A1c ratio and the parameters known to be associated with atherosclerosis in T2DM could be manifested differently in T1DM. Further studies are needed to investigate these relationships in T1DM.

  17. PROCESS OF ELIMINATING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J.G.; Fries, B.A.

    1960-09-27

    A procedure is given for peroxide precipitation processes for separating and recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution. When plutonium peroxide is precipitated from an aqueous solution, the supernatant contains appreciable quantities of plutonium and peroxide. It is desirable to process this solution further to recover plutonium contained therein, but the presence of the peroxide introduces difficulties; residual hydrogen peroxide contained in the supernatant solution is eliminated by adding a nitrite or a sulfite to this solution.

  18. Characterisation of advanced glycation endproducts in saliva from patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Min-Sung; Jankowski, Vera; Montag, Susanne; Zidek, Walter; Henning, Lars; Schlueter, Hartmut; Tepel, Martin; Jankowski, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are prone to develop increased advanced glycation endproducts causing local complications and increased overall morbidity and mortality. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were determined in saliva of 52 consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus and 47 age-matched healthy control subjects. Resonance spectra showed specific peaks at 2.3, 7.3, and 8.4 ppm in saliva from patients with diabetes mellitus. These peaks could be generated by incubation of saliva from healthy control subjects with hypochloric acid in vitro, indicating the presence of advanced glycation endproducts. The presence of advanced glycation endproducts in patients with diabetes mellitus was associated with approximal plaque index, indicating increased periodontal damage. The study indicates that increased advanced glycation endproducts are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications

  19. Neurite regeneration in adult rat retinas exposed to advanced glycation end-products and regenerative effects of neurotrophin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbova, Guzel; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2013-10-09

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of low concentrations of advanced glycation end-products on neurite regeneration in isolated rat retinas, and to determine the effects of neurotrophin-4 on regeneration in advanced glycation end-products exposed retinas. Retinal explants of 4 adult Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured on collagen gel and were incubated in; (1) serum-free control culture media, (2) glucose-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (3) glycolaldehyde-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (4) glyceraldehyde-advanced glycation end-products-bovine serum albumin media, (5) glucose-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 media, (6) glycolaldehyde-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 media, or (7) glyceraldehyde-advanced glycation end-products+neurotrophin-4 supplemented culture media. After 7 days, the number of regenerating neurites from the explants was counted. Then, explants were fixed, cryosectioned, and stained for TUNEL. The ratio of TUNEL-positive cells to all cells in the ganglion cell layer was determined. Immunohistochemical examinations for the active-form of caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor were performed. In retinas incubated with advanced glycation end-products containing media, the number of regenerating neurites were fewer than in retinas without advanced glycation end-products, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells and caspase-9- and apoptosis-inducing factor-immunopositive cells was significantly higher than in control media. Neurotrophin-4 supplementation increased the numbers of regenerating neuritis, and the number of TUNEL-positives, caspase-9-, and apoptosis-inducing factor-immunopositive cells were significantly fewer than that in advanced glycation end-products without neurotrophin-4 media. Low doses of advanced glycation end-products impede neurite regeneration in the rat retinas. Neurotrophin-4 significantly enhances neurite regeneration in

  20. Advanced glycation end-products inhibition improves endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngle, Ashit; Vohra, Kanchan; Garg, Nidhi; Kaur, Ladbans; Chand, Prem

    2012-02-01

    Chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction. The objective was to study the efficacy and safety of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) inhibitor (benfotiamine 50 mg + pyridoxamine 50 mg + methylcobalamin 500 μg, Vonder(®) (ACME Lifescience, Baddi, Himachal Pradesh, India)) on endothelial function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-four patients with established active RA with high disease activity (Disease Activity Score of 28 joints [DAS28 score] > 5.1) despite treatment with stable doses of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were investigated. Inflammatory disease activity (DAS28 and Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index [HAQ-DI] scores, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR] and C-reactive protein [CRP]), markers of endothelial dysfunction, serum nitrite concentration and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation of the brachial artery were measured before and after 12 weeks therapy with twice a day oral AGEs inhibitor. After treatment, flow-mediated vasodilation improved from 9.64 ± 0.65% to 15.82 ± 1.02% (P < 0.01), whereas there was no significant change in endothelium-independent vasodilation with nitroglycerin and baseline diameter; serum nitrite concentration significantly reduced from 5.6 ± 0.13 to 5.1 ± 0.14 μmol/L (P = 0.004), ESR from 63.00 ± 3.5 to 28.08 ± 1.5 mm in the first h (P < 0.01) and CRP levels from 16.7 ± 4.1 to 10.74 ± 2.9 mg/dL (P < 0.01). DAS28 and HAQ-DI scores were significantly reduced, from 5.9 ± 0.17 to 3.9 ± 0.17 (P < 0.01) and 4.6 ± 0.17 to 1.7 ± 0.22 (P < 0.01), respectively. Advanced glycation end products inhibitor improves endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory disease activity in RA. In RA, endothelial dysfunction is part of the disease process and is mediated by AGEs-induced inflammation. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and

  1. Monotopic modifications derived from in vitro glycation of albumin with ribose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pataridis, Statis; Šťastná, Zdeňka; Sedláková, Pavla; Mikšík, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2013), s. 1757-1763 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : advanced glycation end product (AGE) * albumin * CE-MS * glycation * LC-MS/MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.161, year: 2013

  2. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE maintains pulmonary structure and regulates the response to cigarette smoke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Wolf

    Full Text Available The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE is highly expressed in the lung but its physiological functions in this organ is still not completely understood. To determine the contribution of RAGE to physiological functions of the lung, we analyzed pulmonary mechanics and structure of wildtype and RAGE deficient (RAGE-/- mice. RAGE deficiency spontaneously resulted in a loss of lung structure shown by an increased mean chord length, increased respiratory system compliance, decreased respiratory system elastance and increased concentrations of serum protein albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Pulmonary expression of RAGE was mainly localized on alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Primary murine alveolar epithelial cells isolated from RAGE-/- mice revealed an altered differentiation and defective barrier formation under in vitro conditions. Stimulation of interferone-y (IFNy-activated alveolar macrophages deficient for RAGE with Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands resulted in significantly decreased release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Exposure to chronic cigarette smoke did not affect emphysema-like changes in lung parenchyma in RAGE-/- mice. Acute cigarette smoke exposure revealed a modified inflammatory response in RAGE-/- mice that was characterized by an influx of macrophages and a decreased keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC release. Our data suggest that RAGE regulates the differentiation of alveolar epithelial cells and impacts on the development and maintenance of pulmonary structure. In cigarette smoke-induced lung pathology, RAGE mediates inflammation that contributes to lung damage.

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yijun; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-κB, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-κB, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease

  4. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, David P

    2015-05-15

    Low income, poor diet, obesity, and a lack of exercise are interrelated lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biologic make up to increase cancer risk, growth, and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate-derived metabolites and cancer, which may provide a biologic consequence of lifestyle that can directly affect tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGE) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. Failure to remove these highly reactive metabolites can lead to protein damage, aberrant cell signaling, increased stress responses, and decreased genetic fidelity. Critically, AGE accumulation is also directly affected by our lifestyle choices and shows a race-specific, tumor-dependent pattern of accumulation in cancer patients. This review will discuss the contribution of AGEs to the cancer phenotype, with a particular emphasis on their biologic links with the socioeconomic and environmental risk factors that drive cancer disparity. Given the potential benefits of lifestyle changes and the potential biologic role of AGEs in promoting cancer, opportunities exist for collaborations affecting basic, translational, epidemiologic, and cancer prevention initiatives. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Update on Mechanisms of Renal Tubule Injury Caused by Advanced Glycation End Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN caused by advanced glycation end products (AGEs may be associated with lipid accumulation in the kidneys. This study was designed to investigate whether Nε-(carboxymethyl lysine (CML, a member of the AGEs family increases lipid accumulation in a human renal tubular epithelial cell line (HK-2 via increasing cholesterol synthesis and uptake and reducing cholesterol efflux through endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS. Our results showed that CML disrupts cholesterol metabolism in HK-2 cells by activating sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP-2 and liver X receptor (LXR, followed by an increase in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR mediated cholesterol synthesis and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr mediated cholesterol uptake and a reduction in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 mediated cholesterol efflux, ultimately causing lipid accumulation in HK-2 cells. All of these responses could be suppressed by an ERS inhibitor, which suggests that CML causes lipid accumulation in renal tubule cells through ERS and that the inhibition of ERS is a potential novel approach to treating CML-induced renal tubular foam cell formation.

  6. Advanced glycation end products delay corneal epithelial wound healing through reactive oxygen species generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Long; Chen, Hongmei; Yu, Xiaoming; Wu, Xinyi

    2013-11-01

    Delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds is a serious complication in diabetes. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are intimately associated with the diabetic complications and are deleterious to the wound healing process. However, the effect of AGEs on corneal epithelial wound healing has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) on corneal epithelial wound healing and its underlying mechanisms. Our data showed that AGE-BSA significantly increased the generation of intracellular ROS in telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells. However, the generation of intracellular ROS was completely inhibited by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), anti-receptor of AGEs (RAGE) antibodies, or the inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. Moreover, AGE-BSA increased NADPH oxidase activity and protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, p22phox and Nox4, but anti-RAGE antibodies eliminated these effects. Furthermore, prevention of intracellular ROS generation using NAC or anti-RAGE antibodies rescued AGE-BSA-delayed epithelial wound healing in porcine corneal organ culture. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that AGE-BSA impaired corneal epithelial wound healing ex vivo. AGE-BSA increased intracellular ROS generation through NADPH oxidase activation, which accounted for the delayed corneal epithelial wound healing. These results may provide better insights for understanding the mechanism of delayed healing of corneal epithelial wounds in diabetes.

  7. Glycated albumin is set lower in relation to plasma glucose levels in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Otsuki, Michio; Tamada, Daisuke; Tabuchi, Yukiko; Mukai, Kosuke; Morita, Shinya; Kasayama, Soji; Shimomura, Iichiro; Koga, Masafumi

    2013-09-23

    Glycated albumin (GA) is an indicator of glycemic control, which has some specific characters in comparison with HbA1c. Since glucocorticoids (GC) promote protein catabolism including serum albumin, GC excess state would influence GA levels. We therefore investigated GA levels in patients with Cushing's syndrome. We studied 16 patients with Cushing's syndrome (8 patients had diabetes mellitus and the remaining 8 patients were non-diabetic). Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 32 non-diabetic subjects matched for age, sex and BMI were used as controls. In the patients with Cushing's syndrome, GA was significantly correlated with HbA1c, but the regression line shifted downwards as compared with the controls. The GA/HbA1c ratio in the patients with Cushing's syndrome was also significantly lower than the controls. HbA1c in the non-diabetic patients with Cushing's syndrome was not different from the non-diabetic controls, whereas GA was significantly lower. In 7 patients with Cushing's syndrome who performed self-monitoring of blood glucose, the measured HbA1c was matched with HbA1c estimated from mean blood glucose, whereas the measured GA was significantly lower than the estimated GA. We clarified that GA is set lower in relation to plasma glucose levels in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Aptasensor based optical detection of glycated albumin for diabetes mellitus diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shreya; Datta, Debopam; Cheema, Mehar; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A.

    2017-10-01

    Glycated albumin (GA) has been reported as an important biomarker for diabetes mellitus. This study investigates an optical sensor comprised of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) aptamer, semiconductor quantum dot and gold (Au) nanoparticle for the detection of GA. The system functions as a ‘turn on’ sensor because an increase in photoluminescence intensity is observed upon the addition of GA to the sensor. This is possibly because of the structure of the DNA aptamer, which folds to form a large hairpin loop before the addition of the analyte and is assumed to open up after the addition of target to the sensor in order to bind to GA. This pushes the quantum dot and the Au nanoparticle away causing an increase in photoluminescence. A linear increase in photoluminescence intensity and quenching efficiency of the sensor is observed as the GA concentration is varied between 0-14 500 nM. Time based photoluminescence studies with the sensor show the decrease in binding rate of the aptamer to the target within a specific time period. The sensor was found to have a higher selectivity towards GA than other control proteins. Further investigation of this simple sensor with greater number of clinical samples can open up avenues for an efficient diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus when used in conjunction with the traditional method of glucose level monitoring.

  9. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE and Its Ligands: Focus on Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Song

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI results in neuronal and glial death and the loss of axons at the injury site. Inflammation after SCI leads to the inhibition of tissue regeneration and reduced neuronal survival. In addition, the loss of axons after SCI results in functional loss below the site of injury accompanied by neuronal cell body’s damage. Consequently, reducing inflammation and promoting axonal regeneration after SCI is a worthy therapeutic goal. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE is a transmembrane protein and receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily. RAGE is implicated in inflammation and neurodegeneration. Several recent studies demonstrated an association between RAGE and central nervous system disorders through various mechanisms. However, the relationship between RAGE and SCI has not been shown. It is imperative to elucidate the association between RAGE and SCI, considering that RAGE relates to inflammation and axonal degeneration following SCI. Hence, the present review highlights recent research regarding RAGE as a compelling target for the treatment of SCI.

  10. Effects of ginger on serum glucose, advanced glycation end products, and inflammation in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Hossein; Tabibi, Hadi; Najafi, Iraj; Atabak, Shahnaz; Hedayati, Mehdi; Rahmani, Leila

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ginger supplementation on serum glucose, advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress, and systemic and vascular inflammatory markers in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 36 patients on PD were randomly assigned to either the ginger or the placebo group. The patients in the ginger group received 1000 mg/d ginger for 10 wk, whereas the placebo group received corresponding placebos. At baseline and the end of week 10, serum concentrations of glucose, carboxymethyl lysine, pentosidine, malondialdehyde (MDA), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 (sVCAM-1), and sE-selectin were measured after a 12- to 14-h fast. Serum fasting glucose decreased significantly up to 20% in the ginger group at the end of week 10 compared with baseline (P ginger reduces serum fasting glucose, which is a risk factor for hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, peritoneal membrane fibrosis, and cardiovascular disease, in patients on PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Safe handling of potential peroxide forming compounds and their corresponding peroxide yielded derivatives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Boyle, Timothy J.; Dean, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    This report addresses recent developments concerning the identification and handling of potential peroxide forming (PPF) and peroxide yielded derivative (PYD) chemicals. PPF chemicals are described in terms of labeling, shelf lives, and safe handling requirements as required at SNL. The general peroxide chemistry concerning formation, prevention, and identification is cursorily presented to give some perspective to the generation of peroxides. The procedure for determining peroxide concentrations and the proper disposal methods established by the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility are also provided. Techniques such as neutralization and dilution are provided for the safe handling of any PYD chemicals to allow for safe handling. The appendices are a collection of all available SNL documentation pertaining to PPF/PYD chemicals to serve as a single reference.

  12. Inhibitory effect of alliin from Allium sativum on the glycation of superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shehwaz; Younus, Hina

    2017-10-01

    Inhibition of glycation is an important approach for alleviating diabetic complications. Alliin, the most abundant sulphur compound in garlic has been demonstrated to possess antidiabetic activity. However, there is no scientific evidence supporting its antiglycating activity. The objective of this study was to determine the inhibitory effect of alliin on glucose and methyglyoxal (MG)-induced glycation of an important antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD). Glycation of SOD resulted in a decrease in enzyme activity, fragmentation/cross-linking, reduced cross-reactivity with anti-SOD antibodies, both tertiary and secondary structural changes, and formation of AGEs and fibrils. Alliin offered protection against glucose or MG induced glycation of SOD. The antiglycating potential of alliin appears to be comparable with that of quercetin which is reported to be a potent natural inhibitor of glycation. Alliin has a good antiglycating effect and hence is expected to have therapeutic potential in the prevention of glycation-mediated diabetic complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Glycation of polyclonal IgGs: Effect of sugar excipients during stability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Y; Bihoreau, N; Jube, M; Andre, M-H; Tellier, Z; Chevreux, G

    2016-05-01

    A number of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations are stabilized with sugar additives that may lead over time to undesirable glycation reactions especially in liquid formulation. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of sugar excipients on such preparations in condition of temperature, formulation and concentration commonly used for pharmaceutical products. Through an innovative LC-MS method reported to characterize post-translational modifications of IgGs Fc/2 fragments, a stability study of IVIg formulated with reducing and non-reducing sugars has been undertaken. The rate of polyclonal IgGs glycation was investigated during 6months at 5, 25, 30 and 40°C. High levels of glycation were observed with reducing sugars such as glucose and maltose in the first months of the stability study from 25°C. Non-reducing sugars presented a low reactivity even at the highest tested temperature (40°C). Furthermore, a site by site analysis was performed by MS/MS to determine the glycation sites which were mainly identified at Lys246, Lys248 and Lys324. This work points out the high probability of glycation reactions in some commercialized products and describes a useful method to characterize IVIg glycated products issued from reducing sugar excipients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Associations between advanced glycation endproducts and matrix metalloproteinases and its inhibitor in individuals with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, S A; Engelen, L; Buijs, J

    2018-01-01

    the production of MMPs and/or TIMP-1. Therefore, we investigated associations between specific AGEs and MMP-1, -2, -3, -9, and -10, and TIMP-1 in individuals with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: In 670 type 1 diabetic individuals we determined serum levels of protein-bound AGEs Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine......AIMS: Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and altered extracellular matrix remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) are associated with vascular complications in type 1 diabetes. Experimental studies have shown that AGEs regulate...... (CEL), 5-hydro-5-methylimidazolone (MG-H1) and pentosidine, and MMP-1, -2, -3, -9, and -10, and TIMP-1. We performed linear regression analyses to investigate associations between AGEs and markers of the MMP-TIMP system. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, HbA1c and duration of diabetes...

  15. Iron release from ferritin and lipid peroxidation by radiolytically generated reducing radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.W.; Schubert, J.; Aust, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Iron is involved in the formation of oxidants capable of damaging membranes, protein, and DNA. Using 137 Cs gamma radiation, we investigated the release of iron from ferritin and concomitant lipid peroxidation by radiolytically generated reducing radicals, superoxide and the carbon dioxide anion radical. Both radicals released iron from ferritin with similar efficiencies and iron mobilization from ferritin required an iron chelator. Radiolytically generated superoxide anion resulted in peroxidation of phospholipid liposomes as measured by malondialdehyde formation only when ferritin was included as an iron source and the released iron was found to be chelated by the phospholipid liposomes

  16. HEMOGLOBINA GLICOSILADA O HEMOGLOBINA GLICADA, ¿CUÁL DE LAS DOS? | GLYCOSILATED HEMOGLOBIN OR GLYCATED HEMOGLOBIN, WHICH OF THE TWO?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Bracho-Nava

    2015-11-01

    , according to the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC, as a generic term referring to a group of substances that are formed from biochemical reactions between hemoglobin A (HbA and some reducing sugars present in the bloodstream, glucose being the most abundant of them. This reaction is known as the Maillard reaction, which is based on a non-enzimatic glycosylation, or more correctly called, in a glycation. Custom, ignorance or confusion among both chemical processes has led to use the term glycosylated hemoglobin instead of glycated hemoglobin. This article provides a review of the process of formation of hemoglobin A1c, defining the reaction of glycosylation and the protein glycation, the chemical species that favor the glycation, the characteristics of the process of glycation of hemoglobin, stages in which it occurs and the effects related to the glycation of proteins in human beings, to finally conclude with a passage of designations which has received the HbA1c to the present; all with the aim of clarifying and giving property to the use of the term glycated hemoglobin.

  17. Radiation induced peroxidation in model lipid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan, K.Z.B.H.M.

    1981-08-01

    In the studies of radiation induced lipid peroxidation, lecithin-liposomes and aqueous micellar solutions of sodium linoleate (or linoleic acid) have been used as models of lipid membrane systems. The liposomes and aqueous linoleate micelles were irradiated in the presence of O 2 and N 2 O/O 2 (80/20 v/v). The peroxidation was initiated using gamma radiation from 60 Co radiation source and was monitored by measuring the increase in absorbance of conjugated diene at 232 nm and by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. The oxidation products were also identified by GLC and GLC-MS analysis. (author)

  18. Precipitation of uranium concentrates by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa Filho, O.; Teixeira, L.A.C.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study on the precipitation of uranyl peroxide (UO 4 x H 2 O) has been carried out in a laboratory scale. The objective was to assess the possibility of the peroxide route as an alternative to a conventional ammonium diuranate process. A factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the initial pH, precipitation pH and H 2 O 2 /UO 2 2+ ratio upon the process. The responses were measured in terms of: efficiency of U precipitation, content of U in the precipitates, and distribution of impurities in the precipitates. (Author) [pt

  19. Uranium peroxide precipitate drying temperature relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, C.; Dyck, B., E-mail: chick_rodgers@cameco.com [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Cameco Corporation is in the process of revitalizing the mill at its Key Lake operation in northern Saskatchewan. The current Key Lake process employs ammonia stripping and ammonia precipitation. As part of the revitalization, the company is considering installing strong acid stripping in solvent extraction as used at its Rabbit Lake operation. This change would lead to using hydrogen peroxide for uranium precipitation. As part of the process evaluation, tests were carried out to study how changes in the temperature of an indirect fired dryer affected the properties of uranium peroxide [yellowcake] precipitate. This paper discusses the results of the test work, including the relationships between drying temperature and the following: (author)

  20. Prediction of post translational modifications in avicennia marina Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase: implication of glycation on the enzyme structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabeen, U.; Salim, A.; Abbasi, A.

    2012-01-01

    3D homology model of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) from Avicennia marina (AMSOD) was constructed using the structural coordinates of Spinach SOD (SSOD). Prediction of post translational modification was done by PROSITE. The predicted sites were examined in the 3D model. AMSOD model was glycated using modeling software and changes in the structure was analyzed after glycation. The analysis revealed some potential sites and structural changes after glycation. (author)

  1. Determination of glycated hemoglobin in patients with advanced liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahousen, Theresa; Hegenbarth, Karin; Ille, Rottraut; Lipp, Rainer W.; Krause, Robert; Little, Randie R.; Schnedl, Wolfgang J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c) determination methods and to determine fructosamine in patients with chronic hepatitis, compensated cirrhosis and in patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin. METHODS: HbA1c values were determined in 15 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis and in 20 patients with chronic hepatitis using the ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography and the immunoassay methods. Fructosamine was determined using nitroblue tetrazolium. RESULTS: Forty percent of patients with liver cirrhosis had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method, while fructosamine results were either within the reference range or elevated. Twenty percent of patients with chronic hepatitis (hepatic fibrosis) had HbA1c results below the non -diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method. In patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin, 50% of HbA1c results were below the non-diabetic reference using at least one of the HbA1c methods. CONCLUSION: Only evaluated in context with all liver function parameters as well as a red blood count including reticulocytes, HbA 1c results should be used in patients with advanced liver disease. HbA 1c and fructosamine measurements should be used with caution when evaluating long-term glucose control in patients with hepatic cirrhosis or in patients with chronic hepatitis and ribavirin treatment. PMID:15259084

  2. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Cardiometabolic Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luévano-Contreras, Claudia; Gómez-Ojeda, Armando; Macías-Cervantes, Maciste Habacuc; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia

    2017-08-01

    This report analyzes emerging evidence about the role of dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs) as a cardiometabolic risk factor. Two important aspects are discussed: First, the modulation of AGE load by dietary AGEs; second, if the evidence of clinical and observational studies is enough to make dietary recommendations towards lowering AGE intake. Clinical studies in subjects with diabetes mellitus have shown that high intake of dietary AGEs increases inflammation markers, oxidative stress, and could impair endothelial function. In subjects at risk for cardiometabolic diseases (with overweight, obesity, or prediabetes), dietary AGE restriction decreases some inflammatory molecules and improves insulin sensitivity. However, studies in healthy subjects are limited, and not all of the studies have shown a decrease in circulating AGEs. Therefore, it is still unclear if dietary AGEs represent a health concern for people potentially at risk for cardiometabolic diseases. The evidence shows that dietary AGEs are bioavailable and absorbed, and the rate of excretion depends on dietary intake. The metabolic fate of most dietary AGEs remains unknown. Regardless, most studies have shown that by diminishing AGE intake, circulating levels will also decrease. Thus, dietary AGEs can modulate the AGE load at least in patients with DM, overweight, or obesity. Studies with specific clinical outcomes and large-scale observational studies are needed for a better risk assessment of dietary AGEs and to establish dietary recommendations accordingly.

  3. Molten globule of hemoglobin proceeds into aggregates and advanced glycated end products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Iram

    Full Text Available Conformational alterations of bovine hemoglobin (Hb upon sequential addition of glyoxal over a range of 0-90% v/v were investigated. At 20% v/v glyoxal, molten globule (MG state of Hb was observed by altered tryptophan fluorescence, high ANS binding, existence of intact heme, native-like secondary structure as depicted by far-UV circular dichroism (CD and ATR-FTIR spectra as well as loss in tertiary structure as confirmed by near-UV CD spectra. In addition, size exclusion chromatography analysis depicted that MG state at 20% v/v glyoxal corresponded to expanded pre-dissociated dimers. Aggregates of Hb were detected at 70% v/v glyoxal. These aggregates of Hb had altered tryptophan environment, low ANS binding, exposed heme, increased β-sheet secondary structure, loss in tertiary structure, enhanced thioflavin T (ThT fluorescence and red shifted Congo Red (CR absorbance. On incubating Hb with 30% v/v glyoxal for 0-20 days, advanced glycation end products (AGEs were detected on day 20. These AGEs were characterised by enhanced tryptophan fluorescence at 450 nm, exposure of heme, increase in intermolecular β-sheets, enhanced ThT fluorescence and red shift in CR absorbance. Comet assay revealed aggregates and AGEs to be genotoxic in nature. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the amorphous structure of aggregates and branched fibrils of AGEs. The transformation of α-helix to β-sheet usually alters the normal protein to amyloidogenic resulting in a variety of protein conformational disorders such as diabetes, prion and Huntington's.

  4. Studies on lipid peroxidation and anti-LPO chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongdao; Qiang Yizhong; Lao Qinhua

    1995-02-01

    The contents of lipid peroxides (LPO) in sera and tissues were determined by the modified spectrophotometry of TBA, and the effects of three chemicals on lipid peroxidation induced by radiation were observed. The items studied included: (1) the normal values of LPO of sera in rats and adults: (2) the normal values in some tissues of rats; (3) the changes of LPO levels of sera in patients with some mental diseases and patients with malignant tumours before and after local gamma irradiation exposure; (4) the changes of LPO contents of some tissues in rats after whole-body gamma irradiation exposure; (5) the changes of LPO contents of some tissues in mice after internal exposure by Th(NO 3 ) 4 solution; (6) the effects of chinonin, tannic acid and squalene on lipid peroxidation induced by irradiation. The results were as follows: (1) the LPO contents in patients with some mental diseases dramatically increased; (2) there was marked difference between the LPO levels before and after local gamma irradiation exposure in patients with malignant tumours; (3) the LPO contents in some tissues of rats remarkably increased after whole-body gamma irradiation exposure; (4) the LPO contents in some tissues of mice dramatically increased and their protein contents markedly reduced after internal exposure, showing a negative correlation between them; (5) a gradual increase in LPO contents in some tissues of mice appeared with increasing dosage of whole-body gamma irradiation exposure at dose range from 0 to 4 Gy. A linear relationship between the dose and the LPO contents was observed; (6) all three chemicals could reduce the LPO levels in liver, spleen and kidney of the irradiated mice. The efficacy of chinonin was better than that of tannic acid and squalene. (5 tabs., 1 fig.)

  5. Dietary intake of advanced glycation endproducts is associated with higher levels of advanced glycation endproducts in plasma and urine: The CODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheijen, Jean L J M; Hanssen, Nordin M J; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M; Van der Kallen, Carla J; Feskens, Edith J M; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2018-06-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are formed by the reaction between reducing sugars and proteins. AGEs in the body have been associated with several age-related diseases. High-heat treated and most processed foods are rich in AGEs. The aim of our study was to investigate whether dietary AGEs, are associated with plasma and urinary AGE levels. In 450 participants of the Cohort on Diabetes and Atherosclerosis Maastricht study (CODAM study) we measured plasma and urine concentrations of the AGEs Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), Nε-(1-carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) and Nδ-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H1) using UPLC-MS/MS. We also estimated dietary intake of CML, CEL and MG-H1 with the use of a dietary AGE database and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). We used linear regression to investigate the association between standardized dietary AGE intake and standardized plasma or urinary AGE levels, after adjustment for age, sex, glucose metabolism status, waist circumference, kidney function, energy- and macro-nutrient intake, smoking status, physical activity, alcohol intake, LDL-cholesterol and markers of oxidative stress. We found that higher intake of dietary CML, CEL and MG-H1 was associated with significantly higher levels of free plasma and urinary CML, CEL and MG-H1 (βCML = 0.253 (95% CI 0.086; 0.415), βCEL = 0.194 (95% CI 0.040; 0.339), βMG-H1 = 0.223 (95% CI 0.069; 0.373) for plasma and βCML = 0.223 (95% CI 0.049; 0.393), βCEL = 0.180 (95% CI 0.019; 0.332), βMG-H1 = 0.196 (95% CI 0.037; 0.349) for urine, respectively). In addition, we observed non-significant associations of dietary AGEs with their corresponding protein bound plasma AGEs. We demonstrate that higher intake of dietary AGEs is associated with higher levels of AGEs in plasma and urine. Our findings may have important implications for those who ingest a diet rich in AGEs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and

  6. Spatial and temporal dynamics of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, integrins, and actin cytoskeleton as probed with fluorescence-based imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Aleem [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systematic spatial and temporal fluctuations are a fundamental part of any biological process. For example, lateral diffusion of membrane proteins is one of the key mechanisms in their cellular function. Lateral diffusion governs how membrane proteins interact with intracellular, transmembrane, and extracellular components to achieve their function. Herein, fluorescence-based techniques are used to elucidate the dynamics of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and integrin membrane proteins. RAGE is a transmembrane protein that is being used as a biomarker for various diseases. RAGE dependent signaling in numerous pathological conditions is well studied. However, RAGE lateral diffusion in the cell membrane is poorly understood. For this purpose, effect of cholesterol, cytoskeleton dynamics, and presence of ligand on RAGE lateral diffusion is investigated.

  7. Quality control of photosystem II: lipid peroxidation accelerates photoinhibition under excessive illumination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffanie Chan

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses lower the efficiency of photosynthesis and sometimes cause irreversible damage to plant functions. When spinach thylakoids and Photosystem II membranes were illuminated with excessive visible light (100-1,000 µmol photons m(-1 s(-1 for 10 min at either 20°C or 30°C, the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II decreased as the light intensity and temperature increased. Reactive oxygen species and endogenous cationic radicals produced through a photochemical reaction at and/or near the reaction center have been implicated in the damage to the D1 protein. Here we present evidence that lipid peroxidation induced by the illumination is involved in the damage to the D1 protein and the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II. This is reasoned from the results that considerable lipid peroxidation occurred in the thylakoids in the light, and that lipoxygenase externally added in the dark induced inhibition of Photosystem II activity in the thylakoids, production of singlet oxygen, which was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping, and damage to the D1 protein, in parallel with lipid peroxidation. Modification of the subunits of the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II by malondialdehyde as well as oxidation of the subunits was also observed. We suggest that mainly singlet oxygen formed through lipid peroxidation under light stress participates in damaging the Photosystem II subunits.

  8. Lipid Peroxidation and Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Levels in Gastric Cancer at Pathologic Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Sefa; Yücel, Ahmet Fikret; Pergel, Ahmet; Kemik, Ahu Sarbay; Kemik, Ozgür

    2012-09-01

    High levels of TGF-β1 and enhanced TGF-β1 receptor signaling are related to the pathology of gastric cancer. This effect is caused by oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation products. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of TGF-β1 and lipid peroxidation products in gastric cancer patients and their correlation with pathologic stage. Lipid peroxidation products and TGF-β1 levels were studied in the serum samples of 50 gastric cancer patients and 18 control subjects. HNE-protein adducts and TGF-β1 levels were significantly higher in T2, T3 and T4 gastric cancers than in either the T1 stage or controls (p<0.001). Pathologic stage was correlated with TGF-β1 levels (r=0.702, p<0.05). These markers production may contribute to tumor angiogenesis and aid in the prognosis of the gastric cancer.

  9. Acute insulin resistance mediated by advanced glycation endproducts in severely burned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Cai, Xiaoqing; Ji, Lele; Li, Jia; Cao, Bing; Li, Jun; Hu, Dahai; Li, Yan; Wang, Haichang; Xiong, Lize; Xiao, Ruiping; Gao, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Hyperglycemia often occurs in severe burns; however, the underlying mechanisms and importance of managing postburn hyperglycemia are not well recognized. This study was designed to investigate the dynamic changes of postburn hyperglycemia and the underlying mechanisms and to evaluate whether early glycemic control is beneficial in severe burns. Prospective, randomized experimental study. Animal research laboratory. Sprague-Dawley rats. Anesthetized rats were subjected to a full-thickness burn injury comprising 40% of the total body surface area and were randomized to receive vehicle, insulin, and a soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts treatments. An in vitro study was performed on cultured H9C2 cells subjected to vehicle or carboxymethyllysine treatment. We found that blood glucose change presented a distinct pattern with two occurrences of hyperglycemia at 0.5- and 3-hour postburn, respectively. Acute insulin resistance evidenced by impaired insulin signaling and glucose uptake occurred at 3-hour postburn, which was associated with the second hyperglycemia and positively correlated with mortality. Mechanistically, we found that serum carboxymethyllysine, a dominant species of advanced glycation endproducts, increased within 1-hour postburn, preceding the occurrence of insulin resistance. More importantly, treatment of animals with soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, blockade of advanced glycation endproducts signaling, alleviated severe burn-induced insulin resistance. In addition, early hyperglycemic control with insulin not only reduced serum carboxymethyllysine but also blunted postburn insulin resistance and reduced mortality. These findings suggest that severe burn-induced insulin resistance is partly at least mediated by serum advanced glycation endproducts and positively correlated with mortality. Early glycemic control with insulin or inhibition of advanced glycation endproducts with soluble form of receptor

  10. Evaluation of Polyphenol Anthocyanin-Enriched Extracts of Blackberry, Black Raspberry, Blueberry, Cranberry, Red Raspberry, and Strawberry for Free Radical Scavenging, Reactive Carbonyl Species Trapping, Anti-Glycation, Anti-β-Amyloid Aggregation, and Microglial Neuroprotective Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Ma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycation is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, where it potentiates the aggregation and toxicity of proteins such as β-amyloid (Aβ. Published studies support the anti-glycation and neuroprotective effects of several polyphenol-rich fruits, including berries, which are rich in anthocyanins. Herein, blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts were evaluated for: (1 total phenolic and anthocyanins contents, (2 free radical (DPPH scavenging and reactive carbonyl species (methylglyoxal; MGO trapping, (3 anti-glycation (using BSA-fructose and BSA-MGO models, (4 anti-Aβ aggregation (using thermal- and MGO-induced fibrillation models, and, (5 murine microglia (BV-2 neuroprotective properties. Berry crude extracts (CE were fractionated to yield anthocyanins-free (ACF and anthocyanins-enriched (ACE extracts. The berry ACEs (at 100 μg/mL showed superior free radical scavenging, reactive carbonyl species trapping, and anti-glycation effects compared to their respective ACFs. The berry ACEs (at 100 μg/mL inhibited both thermal- and MGO-induced Aβ fibrillation. In addition, the berry ACEs (at 20 μg/mL reduced H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, and lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide species in BV-2 microglia as well as decreased H2O2-induced cytotoxicity and caspase-3/7 activity in BV-2 microglia. The free radical scavenging, reactive carbonyl trapping, anti-glycation, anti-Aβ fibrillation, and microglial neuroprotective effects of these berry extracts warrant further in vivo studies to evaluate their potential neuroprotective effects against AD.

  11. Vitamin C Supplementation Reduces Peroxidative Damage without ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was designed to assess the effects of vitamin C supplementation on the lung function tests and peroxidative damage in asthmatic children. Methodology: Fifteen asthmatics aged between 8 - 14 years, all in the stable state were used in this study. Three millilitres of blood were drawn from the antecubital ...

  12. Relationship Between Calorie Restriction, Lipid Peroxidation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the brain of the caloric restricted rats, there was little or no change in the tGSH and GSH, although the GSSG and GSSG/GSH% ratio were increased significantly. These results suggest that aging of rats had been decelerated by caloric restriction due to the decrease in the peroxidative damage in the lungs and brain.

  13. A1C Combined With Glycated Albumin Improves Detection of Prediabetes in Africans: The Africans in America Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Michelle T.; Aldana, Paola C.; Ricks, Madia; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K.; Lozier, Jay N.; Chung, Stephanie T.; Sacks, David B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Slowing the diabetes epidemic in Africa requires improved detection of prediabetes. A1C, a form of glycated hemoglobin A, is recommended for diagnosing prediabetes. The glycated proteins, fructosamine and glycated albumin (GA), are hemoglobin-independent alternatives to A1C, but their efficacy in Africans is unknown. Our goals were to determine the ability of A1C, fructosamine, and GA to detect prediabetes in U.S.-based Africans and the value of combining A1C with either fructosamine or GA. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed in 217 self-identified healthy African immigrants (69% male, age 39 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], BMI 27.6 ± 4.5 kg/m2). A1C, fructosamine, and GA were measured. Prediabetes was diagnosed by American Diabetes Association criteria for glucose obtained from a 2-h OGTT. The thresholds to diagnose prediabetes by A1C, fructosamine, and GA were the cutoff at the upper tertile for each variable: ≥5.7% (39 mmol/mol) (range 4.2–6.6% [22.4–48.6 mmol/mol]), ≥230 µmol/L (range 161–269 µmol/L), and ≥13.35% (range 10.20–16.07%), respectively. RESULTS Prediabetes occurred in 34% (74 of 217). The diagnostic sensitivities of A1C, fructosamine, and GA were 50%, 41%, and 42%, respectively. The P values for comparison with A1C were both >0.3. Combining A1C with either fructosamine or GA increased sensitivities. However, the sensitivity of A1C combined with fructosamine was not better than for A1C alone (72% vs. 50%, P = 0.172). In contrast, the sensitivity of A1C combined with GA was higher than for A1C alone (78% vs. 50%, P prediabetes. However, combining A1C with GA made it possible to identify nearly 80% of Africans with prediabetes. PMID:26681716

  14. A1C Combined With Glycated Albumin Improves Detection of Prediabetes in Africans: The Africans in America Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Anne E; Duong, Michelle T; Aldana, Paola C; Ricks, Madia; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Lozier, Jay N; Chung, Stephanie T; Sacks, David B

    2016-02-01

    Slowing the diabetes epidemic in Africa requires improved detection of prediabetes. A1C, a form of glycated hemoglobin A, is recommended for diagnosing prediabetes. The glycated proteins, fructosamine and glycated albumin (GA), are hemoglobin-independent alternatives to A1C, but their efficacy in Africans is unknown. Our goals were to determine the ability of A1C, fructosamine, and GA to detect prediabetes in U.S.-based Africans and the value of combining A1C with either fructosamine or GA. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed in 217 self-identified healthy African immigrants (69% male, age 39 ± 10 years [mean ± SD], BMI 27.6 ± 4.5 kg/m(2)). A1C, fructosamine, and GA were measured. Prediabetes was diagnosed by American Diabetes Association criteria for glucose obtained from a 2-h OGTT. The thresholds to diagnose prediabetes by A1C, fructosamine, and GA were the cutoff at the upper tertile for each variable: ≥5.7% (39 mmol/mol) (range 4.2-6.6% [22.4-48.6 mmol/mol]), ≥230 µmol/L (range 161-269 µmol/L), and ≥13.35% (range 10.20-16.07%), respectively. Prediabetes occurred in 34% (74 of 217). The diagnostic sensitivities of A1C, fructosamine, and GA were 50%, 41%, and 42%, respectively. The P values for comparison with A1C were both >0.3. Combining A1C with either fructosamine or GA increased sensitivities. However, the sensitivity of A1C combined with fructosamine was not better than for A1C alone (72% vs. 50%, P = 0.172). In contrast, the sensitivity of A1C combined with GA was higher than for A1C alone (78% vs. 50%, P prediabetes. However, combining A1C with GA made it possible to identify nearly 80% of Africans with prediabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  15. Microsomal lipid peroxidation as a mechanism of cellular damage. [Dissertation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornbrust, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The NADPH/iron-dependent peroxidation of lipids in rat liver microsomes was found to be dependent on the presence of free ferrous ion and maintains iron in the reduced Fe/sup 2 +/ state. Chelation of iron by EDTA inhibited peroxidation. Addition of iron, after preincubation of microsomes in the absence of iron, did not enhance the rate of peroxidation suggesting that iron acts by initiating peroxidative decomposition of membrane lipids rather than by catalyzing the breakdown of pre-formed hydroperoxides. Liposomes also underwent peroxidation in the presence of ferrous iron at a rate comparable to intact microsomes and was stimulated by ascorbate. Carbon tetrachloride initiated lipid peroxidation in the absence of free metal ions. Rates of in vitro lipid peroxidation of microsomes and homogenates were found to vary widely between different tissues and species. The effects of paraquat on lipid peroxidation was also studied. (DC)

  16. Anti-glycated and antiradical activities in vitro of polysaccharides from Ganoderma capense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunyan; Kong, Fansheng; Zhang, Dezhi; Cui, Jiangxia

    2013-01-01

    Ganoderma capense is a Ganoderma species and is widely used, especially in Asia, as a well-known medicinal mushroom for health-promoting effect and for treatment of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, aging, etc. G. capense is rich of polysaccharide. To isolate the polysaccharides from G. capense and evaluate their anti-glycated and antiradical activities in vitro. The dried powder of submerged fermentation culturing mycelium of G. capense was defatted, extracted with water/alkaline water followed by ethanol precipitation and deproteinated. And four crude polysaccharides, named as GC50, GC70, GC90 and GCB, were obtained. For the first time, the in vitro anti-glycated activities of the four samples were studied by non-enzymatic glycation reaction. Then, the DPPH radical and hydroxyl radical assays were established to estimate the antiradical capacity of the four samples. Meanwhile the contents of polysaccharides were determined by phenol-sulphuric acid colorimetry. Preliminary antiradical in vitro studies indicated that the four crude polysaccharides showed concentration-dependent scavenging abilities on DPPH and hydroxyl radicals. The evaluation of anti-glycation activity suggested that GC70 had good potential for inhibiting the formation of advanced glycation end products. Time- and dose-dependent effects were also observed for all GC70 samples.

  17. Oxalomalate, a competitive inhibitor of NADP+ -dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, regulates lipid peroxidation-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun Sun; Yang, Joon-Hyuck; Park, Ji Eun; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2005-01-01

    Membrane lipid peroxidation processes yield products that may react with DNA and proteins to cause oxidative modifications. Recently, we demonstrated that the control of cytosolic redox balance and the cellular defense against oxidative damage is one of the primary functions of cytosolic NADP+ -dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDPc) through to supply NADPH for antioxidant systems. The protective role of IDPc against lipid peroxidation-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells was investigated in control and cells pre-treated with oxlalomalate, a competitive inhibitor of IDPc. Upon exposure to 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) to U937 cells, which induces lipid peroxidation in membranes, the susceptibility to apoptosis was higher in oxalomalate-treated cells as compared to control cells. The results suggest that IDPc plays an important protective role in apoptosis of U937 cells induced by lipid peroxidation-mediated oxidative stress.

  18. Proteomic characterization of intermediate and advanced glycation end-products in commercial milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzone, Giovanni; Arena, Simona; Scaloni, Andrea

    2015-03-18

    The Maillard reaction consists of a number of chemical processes affecting the structure of the proteins present in foods. We previously accomplished the proteomic characterization of the lactosylation targets in commercial milk samples. Although characterizing the early modification derivatives, this analysis did not describe the corresponding advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), which may be formed from the further oxidation of former ones or by reaction of oxidized sugars with proteins, when high temperatures are exploited. To fill this gap, we have used combined proteomic procedures for the systematic characterization of the lactosylated and AGE-containing proteins from the soluble and milk fat globule membrane fraction of various milk products. Besides to confirm all lactulosyl-lysines described previously, 40 novel lactosylation sites were identified. More importantly, 308 additional intermediate and advanced glyco-oxidation derivatives (including cross-linking adducts) were characterized in 31 proteins, providing the widest qualitative inventory of modified species ascertained in commercial milk samples so far. Amadori adducts with glucose/galactose, their dehydration products, carboxymethyllysine and glyoxal-, 3-deoxyglucosone/3-deoxygalactosone- and 3-deoxylactosone-derived dihydroxyimidazolines and/or hemiaminals were the most frequent derivatives observed. Depending on thermal treatment, a variable number of modification sites was identified within each protein; their number increased with harder food processing conditions. Among the modified proteins, species involved in assisting the delivery of nutrients, defense response against pathogens and cellular proliferation/differentiation were highly affected by AGE formation. This may lead to a progressive decrease of the milk nutritional value, as it reduces the protein functional properties, abates the bioavailability of the essential amino acids and eventually affects food digestibility. These aspects

  19. RAGE, receptor of advanced glycation endoproducts, negatively regulates chondrocytes differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Kosaka

    Full Text Available RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE, has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms.

  20. Effect of dietary advanced glycation end products on mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Patel

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: The exact pathophysiology of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is not known. Previous studies suggest that dietary advanced glycation end products (AGEs can cause oxidative stress in liver. We aim to study the effects of dietary AGEs on liver health and their possible role in the pathogenesis of NASH. METHODS: Two groups of mice were fed the same diet except the AGE content varied. One group was fed a high AGE diet and the second group was fed a regular AGE diet. Liver histology, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, insulin resistance and glucose tolerance were assessed. RESULTS: Histology revealed that neutrophil infiltration occurred in the livers of the high AGE group at week 26; steatosis did not accompany liver inflammation. At week 39 livers from both groups exhibited macro- or micro-steatosis, yet no inflammation was detected. Higher insulin levels were detected in the regular AGE group at week 26 (P = 0.034, compared to the high AGE group. At week 39, the regular AGE group showed higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (P<0.01 and aspartate aminotransferase (P = 0.02 than those of the high AGE group. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that a high AGE diet can cause liver inflammation in the absence of steatosis. Our results show that dietary AGEs could play a role in initiating liver inflammation contributing to the disease progression of NASH. Our observation that the inflammation caused by high AGE alone did not persist suggests interesting future directions to investigate how AGEs contribute to pro-oxidative and anti-oxidative pathways in the liver.

  1. Glycated hemoglobin biosensing integration formed on Au nanoparticle-dotted tubular TiO{sub 2} nanoarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Utkarsh [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida, 201303, Uttar Pradesh (India); Singh, Anamika [Department of Biotechnology, UIET, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, 136 119, Haryana (India); Kuchhal, Naresh Kumar [Clinical Biochemistry Department, Bio-Diagnostics, Rohini, Delhi, 110085 (India); Chauhan, Nidhi, E-mail: nidhichauhan2007@rediffmail.com [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida, 201303, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2016-11-16

    Excessive glucose present in the blood of diabetic patients binds with the hemoglobin of red blood cells resulting in the formation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA{sub 1c}). Measurement of HbA{sub 1c} levels may help in identifying the efficacy of the ongoing treatment and hence provide a better control over the disease. In the present study, we have synthesized a sensitive and stable scaffold, which consists of Au nanoparticles (GNPs)-dotted tubular TiO{sub 2}, for the construction of an electrochemical HbA{sub 1c} biosensor. 12-phosphotungstic acid has been used as a reducer after depositing well-dispersed GNPs on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs) and an electron mediator by accelerating the electron transfer between the conductor and protein. The fabricated electrode was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis (EIS). Biosensor exhibited low detection limit (0.5 μM), fast response time (3 s) and wide linearity (from 0.5 to 2000 μM). The working electrode was used 100 times over 4 months, when stored at 4 °C. The HbA1c biosensor was then effectively used to measure the % of HbA{sub 1c} in the blood of apparently healthy persons and diabetic patients. - Highlights: • Fabrication of a highly sensitive and stable sensing interface consisting of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and tubular TiO2. • Biosensor exhibited low detection limit (0.5 μM). • The half life of electrode was 4 months. • Biosensor was suitable for detection of glycated hemoglobin in whole blood.

  2. Ionizing radiation and lipid peroxidation in human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    1997-07-01

    Lipids are organic compounds constituting the living cells. Lipid molecules can be disassembled through peroxidative pathways and hydrocarbons can be bred as end-product of lipid peroxidation in vivo. Lipid peroxidation can be started by an indirect effect of ionizing radiation. So a radioinduced cellular damage in human body can be detected by monitoring the production of specific hydrocarbons

  3. Artificial photosynthesis for production of hydrogen peroxide and its fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-01

    The reducing power released from photosystem I (PSI) via ferredoxin enables the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, which is essential in the Calvin-Benson cycle to make sugars in photosynthesis. Alternatively, PSI can reduce O2 to produce hydrogen peroxide as a fuel. This article describes the artificial version of the photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from water and O2 using solar energy. Hydrogen peroxide is used as a fuel in hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to make electricity. The combination of the photocatalytic H2O2 production from water and O2 using solar energy with one-compartment H2O2 fuel cells provides on-site production and usage of H2O2 as a more useful and promising solar fuel than hydrogen. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--The design and engineering of electronc transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A high throughput screening assay for identifying glycation inhibitors on MALDI-TOF target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuting; Tu, Zongcai; Wang, Hui; Fan, Liangliang; Huang, Xiaoqin; Xiao, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The Maillard reaction plays an important role in the food industry, however, the deleterious effects generated by the advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been well recognized. Many efforts have been made to seek new AGE inhibitors, in particular those natural ones without adverse effect. We have developed a rapid, mass spectrometry based, on-plate screening assay for novel AGE inhibitors. The glycation reaction, inhibition feedback as well as the subsequent MALDI mass spectrometric analysis occurred on one single MALDI plate. At 1:10 M ratio of peptide to sugar, as little as 4h incubation time allowed the screening test to be ready for analysis. DSP, inhibition and IC50 were calculated to evaluate selected inhibitors and resulting inhibition efficiencies were consistent with available references. We demonstrated that this method provide a potential high throughput screening assay to analyze and identify the anti-glycation agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  6. Contribution of dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) to circulating AGE: role of dietary fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathleen E; Prasad, Chandan; Vijayagopal, Parakat; Juma, Shanil; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Imrhan, Victorine

    2015-12-14

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether macronutrient content (low-fat v. high-fat diet) influences an indicator of advanced glycation end products (AGE), N(ε) carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), in the context of a 1-d, high-AGE diet. The effect of the diets on inflammatory markers was also assessed. A total of nineteen overweight and obese adults (nine men and ten women) without known disease were recruited to participate in a crossover challenge of a high-fat, high-AGE (HFHA) and low-fat, high-AGE (LFHA) diet. In each phase patients had fasting blood drawn, followed by consumption of a high-fat or low-fat breakfast test meal, then three postprandial blood draws at 1, 2 and 3 h after consuming the test meal. After consuming high-AGE meals for the remainder of the day, participants returned the next day for a follow-up analysis. A different pattern in the 3-h post-meal CML and soluble receptor for AGE response to the two diets was observed (P=0·01 and 0·05, respectively). No change in serum CML was observed following consumption of a LFHA breakfast (535 (25th-75th percentile 451-790) to 495 (25th-75th percentile 391-682) ng/ml; P=0·36), whereas a rise in CML occurred after the HFHA breakfast (463 (25th-75th percentile 428-664) to 578 (25th-75th percentile 474-865) ng/ml; P=0·05). High sensitivity C-reactive protein and high molecular weight adiponectin were not affected by either diet. These findings suggest that dietary CML may not be as important in influencing serum CML as other dietary factors. In addition, acute exposure to dietary CML may not influence inflammation in adults without diabetes or kidney disease. This is contrary to previous findings.

  7. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Ageing Indices in Relation to Glycated Haemoglobin in Healthy and Diabetic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna H I, Shruthi; Moodithaya, Shailaja; Sharma, Raghava

    2017-01-01

    Ageing is a natural phenomenon that has tremendous amount of control over normal physiological functions. Diabetes mellitus and ageing share common symptoms like stiffness and loss of functioning of tissues due to cross-liked proteins and free radicals. Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1c) is often used as a stable cumulative index of glycemic control and has shown that even in non-diabetic adults, there is a steady increase in HbA1c levels with age. Aim of the study is to evaluate the strength of association of HbA1c with metabolic and cardiovascular ageing indices in subjects between the age group of 40 to 60 yrs. A total of 220 subjects, with (n=110) and without (n=110) diabetes were assessed for the metabolic and cardiovascular ageing indices. BMI, waist hip ratio, fat percentage, Fasting blood sugar and HbA1c were assessed as metabolic ageing indices. The cardiovascular ageing indices measured were resting heart rate, blood pressure and heart rate variability. Ageing indices were compared between subjects with and without diabetes using independent' t' test and showed that the T2DM group exhibit significant accelerated ageing as compared to that of the controls. Pearson's and partial correlation coefficient was used to assess the association of HbA1c with the ageing indices without and with controlling for chronological age, indicated that, strength of association of levels of HBA1c with cardiovascular and other metabolic indices of ageing is statistically significant. The study concludes that the tightness of glycemic control has a significant impact on the biological ageing process. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Liraglutide attenuates the migration of retinal pericytes induced by advanced glycation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Jian; Ma, Xue-Fei; Hao, Ming; Zhou, Huan-Ran; Yu, Xin-Yang; Shao, Ning; Gao, Xin-Yuan; Kuang, Hong-Yu

    2018-07-01

    Retinal pericyte migration represents a novel mechanism of pericyte loss in diabetic retinopathy (DR), which plays a crucial role in the early impairment of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been shown to protect the diabetic retina in the early stage of DR; however, the relationship between GLP-1 and retinal pericytes has not been discussed. In this study, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) significantly increased the migration of primary bovine retinal pericytes without influencing cell viability. AGEs also significantly enhanced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt activation, and changed the expressions of migration-related proteins, including phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and vinculin. PI3K inhibition significantly attenuated the AGEs-induced migration of retinal pericytes and reversed the overexpression of MMP-2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r) was expressed in retinal pericytes, and liraglutide, a GLP-1 analog, significantly attenuated the migration of pericytes by Glp1r and reversed the changes in p-Akt/Akt, p-FAK/FAK, vinculin and MMP-2 levels induced by AGEs, indicating that the protective effect of liraglutide was associated with the PI3K/Akt pathway. These results provided new insights into the mechanism underlying retinal pericyte migration. The early use of liraglutide exerts a potential bebefical effect on regulating pericyte migration, which might contribute to mechanisms that maintain the integrity of vascular barrier and delay the development of DR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacologic Approaches Against Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) in Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenna, Antonio; Nappi, Francesco; Avtaar Singh, Sanjeet Singh; Sutherland, Fraser W; Di Domenico, Fabio; Chello, Massimo; Spadaccio, Cristiano

    2015-05-01

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are signaling proteins associated to several vascular and neurological complications in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. AGEs proved to be a marker of negative outcome in both diabetes management and surgical procedures in these patients. The reported role of AGEs prompted the development of pharmacological inhibitors of their effects, giving rise to a number of both preclinical and clinical studies. Clinical trials with anti-AGEs drugs have been gradually developed and this review aimed to summarize most relevant reports. Evidence acquisition process was performed using PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov with manually checked articles. Pharmacological approaches in humans include aminoguanidine, pyridoxamine, benfotiamine, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, statin, ALT-711 (alagebrium) and thiazolidinediones. The most recent promising anti-AGEs agents are statins, alagebrium and thiazolidinediones. The role of AGEs in disease and new compounds interfering with their effects are currently under investigation in preclinical settings and these newer anti-AGEs drugs would undergo clinical evaluation in the next years. Compounds with anti-AGEs activity but still not available for clinical scenarios are ALT-946, OPB-9195, tenilsetam, LR-90, TM2002, sRAGE and PEDF. Despite most studies confirm the efficacy of these pharmacological approaches, other reports produced conflicting evidences; in almost any case, these drugs were well tolerated. At present, AGEs measurement has still not taken a precise role in clinical practice, but its relevance as a marker of disease has been widely shown; therefore, it is important for clinicians to understand the value of new cardiovascular risk factors. Findings from the current and future clinical trials may help in determining the role of AGEs and the benefits of anti-AGEs treatment in cardiovascular disease.

  10. Selection of aptamers specific for glycated hemoglobin and total hemoglobin using on-chip SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-I; Wu, Ching-Chu; Yang, Ching-Hsuan; Chang, Ko-Wei; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Shiesh, Shu-Chu

    2015-01-21

    Blood glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels reflecting average glucose concentrations over the past three months are fundamental for the diagnosis, monitoring, and risk assessment of diabetes. It has been hypothesized that aptamers, which are single-stranded DNAs or RNAs that demonstrate high affinity to a large variety of molecules ranging from small drugs, metabolites, or proteins, could be used for the measurement of HbA1c. Aptamers are selected through an in vitro process called systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), and they can be chemically synthesized with high reproducibility at relatively low costs. This study therefore aimed to select HbA1c- and hemoglobin (Hb)-specific single-stranded DNA aptamers using an on-chip SELEX protocol. A microfluidic SELEX chip was developed to continuously and automatically carry out multiple rounds of SELEX to screen specific aptamers for HbA1c and Hb. HbA1c and Hb were first coated onto magnetic beads. Following several rounds of selection and enrichment with a randomized 40-mer DNA library, specific oligonucleotides were selected. The binding specificity and affinity were assessed by competitive and binding assays. Using the developed microfluidic system, the incubation and partitioning times were greatly decreased, and the entire process was shortened dramatically. Both HbA1c- and Hb-specific aptamers selected by the microfluidic system showed high specificity and affinity (dissociation constant, Kd = 7.6 ± 3.0 nM and 7.3 ± 2.2 nM for HbA1c and Hb, respectively). With further refinements in the assay, these aptamers may replace the conventional antibodies for in vitro diagnostics applications in the near future.

  11. Effects of alagebrium, an advanced glycation endproduct breaker, on exercise tolerance and cardiac function in patients with chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Jasper W. L.; Willemsen, Suzan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Posma, Jan L.; van Wijk, Leen M.; Hummel, Yoran M.; Hillege, Hans L.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    Aims Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been associated with the development and progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). Advanced glycation endproducts-crosslink breakers might be of benefit in HF, but only small-scale and uncontrolled data are available. Our aim was to conduct a

  12. Skin advanced glycation end products in HIV infection are increased and predictive of development of cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprenger, Herman G.; Bierman, Wouter F.; Martes, Melanie I.; Graaff, Reindert; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Smit, Andries J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: HIV-1 infection is associated with an increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Advanced glycation end products are formed as stable markers of glycaemic and oxidative stress. Skin autofluorescence (SAF) as marker of accumulated advanced glycation end products is increased and

  13. Reference values for the Chinese population of skin autofluorescence as a marker of advanced glycation end products accumulated in tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, X.; Hu, H.; Koetsier, M.; Graaff, R.; Han, C.

    Aim Advanced glycation end products play an important role in the pathophysiology of several chronic and age-related diseases, especially diabetes mellitus. Skin autofluorescence is a non-invasive method for assessing levels of tissue advanced glycation end products. This study aims to establish the

  14. Crystal structure of rubidium peroxide ammonia disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Grassl

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, Rb2O2·2NH3, has been obtained as a reaction product of rubidium metal dissolved in liquid ammonia and glucuronic acid. As a result of the low-temperature crystallization, a disolvate was formed. To our knowledge, only one other solvate of an alkali metal peroxide is known: Na2O2·8H2O has been reported by Grehl et al. [Acta Cryst. (1995, C51, 1038–1040]. We determined the peroxide bond length to be 1.530 (11 Å, which is in accordance with the length reported by Bremm & Jansen [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. (1992, 610, 64–66]. One of the ammonia solvate molecules is disordered relative to a mirror plane, with 0.5 occupancy for the corresponding nitrogen atom.

  15. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  16. Boronate-Modified Interdigitated Electrode Array for Selective Impedance-Based Sensing of Glycated Hemoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonyasit, Yuwadee; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2016-01-01

    An impedance-based label-free affinity sensor was developed for the recognition of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Interdigitated gold microelectrode arrays (IDA) were first modified with a self-assembled monolayer of cysteamine followed by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and subsequent binding of 3......-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA), which selectively binds HbA1c via cis-diol interactions. Impedance sensing was demonstrated to be highly responsive to the clinically relevant HbA1c levels (0.1%-8.36%) with a detection limit of 0.024% (3σ). The specificity of the assay was evaluated with non-glycated hemoglobin (Hb...

  17. Hydrogen-peroxide-modified egg albumen for transparent and flexible resistive switching memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangdong; Yao, Yanqing; Lu, Zhisong; Yang, Xiude; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Gang; Rao, Xi; Li, Ping; Liu, Qian; Song, Qunliang

    2017-10-01

    Egg albumen is modified by hydrogen peroxide with concentrations of 5%, 10%, 15% and 30% at room temperature. Compared with devices without modification, a memory cell of Ag/10% H2O2-egg albumen/indium tin oxide exhibits obviously enhanced resistive switching memory behavior with a resistance ratio of 104, self-healing switching endurance for 900 cycles and a prolonged retention time for a 104 s @ 200 mV reading voltage after being bent 103 times. The breakage of massive protein chains occurs followed by the recombination of new protein chain networks due to the oxidation of amidogen and the synthesis of disulfide during the hydrogen peroxide modifying egg albumen. Ions such as Fe3+, Na+, K+, which are surrounded by protein chains, are exposed to the outside of protein chains to generate a series of traps during the egg albumen degeneration process. According to the fitting results of the double logarithm I-V curves and the current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) images of the ON and OFF states, the charge transfer from one trap center to its neighboring trap center is responsible for the resistive switching memory phenomena. The results of our work indicate that hydrogen- peroxide-modified egg albumen could open up a new avenue of biomaterial application in nanoelectronic systems.

  18. Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Begum

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preeclampsia is the most common and major medical complication of pregnancy with a high incidence of maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. During pregnancy abnormally increased lipid peroxidation and free radical formation as well as significantly decreased antioxidants production in maternal blood may lead to pathogenesis of preeclampsia. So, we designed this study as little information is known about lipid peroxidation and antioxidant level in preeclampsia. Objectives: To assess the serum malondialdehyde (MDA level as a lipid peroxidation product and vitamin E (antioxidant level in women with preeclampsia as well as in normal pregnancy and to compare the values. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 60 women aged from 25 to 35 years in the department of Biochemistry, Budi Kemuliaan Maternity Hospital (BKMH in Jakarta during the period April to July 2004. Twenty were normal pregnant women and 20 were preeclamptic patients. For comparison age matched 20 apparently healthy nonpregnant women were included in the study. The study subjects were selected from outpatient department (OPD of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of BKMH in Jakarta. Serum MDA (lipid peroxidation product level was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay (TBRAS method and vitamin E was estimated spectroflurometrically. Data were analyzed by unpaired Student’s t test between the groups by using SPSS version 12. Results: The mean serum MDA levels were significantly higher in normal pregnancy and also in preeclampsia than that of nonpregnant control group women (p<0.001. Again the serum MDA levels were significantly higher in preeclampsia than that of normal pregnant women (p<0.001. The serum vitamin E levels were significantly lower in preeclampsia and also in normal pregnancy than that of nonpregnant control women (p<0.001. Moreover, the serum vitamin E levels were significantly lower in preeclampsia compared to that of normal

  19. Application of FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy to Determine the Extent of Lipid Peroxidation in Plasma during Haemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Oleszko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During a haemodialysis (HD, because of the contact of blood with the surface of the dialyser, the immune system becomes activated and reactive oxygen species (ROS are released into plasma. Particularly exposed to the ROS are lipids and proteins contained in plasma, which undergo peroxidation. The main breakdown product of oxidized lipids is the malondialdehyde (MDA. A common method for measuring the concentration of MDA is a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS method. Despite the formation of MDA in plasma during HD, its concentration decreases because it is removed from the blood in the dialyser. Therefore, this research proposes the Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR spectroscopy, which enables determination of primary peroxidation products. We examined the influence of the amount of hydrogen peroxide added to lipid suspension that was earlier extracted from plasma specimen on lipid peroxidation with use of TBARS and FTIR-ATR methods. Linear correlation between these methods was shown. The proposed method was effective during the evaluation of changes in the extent of lipid peroxidation in plasma during a haemodialysis in sheep. A measurement using the FTIR-ATR showed an increase in plasma lipid peroxidation after 15 and 240 minutes of treatment, while the TBARS concentration was respectively lower.

  20. The role of proteins in damage induced by free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicki, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The initial consequence of oxidative stress in living organisms is chemical modification of cell components. Recently increasing attention in this area has been paid to the modification of proteins. A form of protein modification which has been studied in some detail only recently is peroxidation. In the last 8 years, we and our collaborators have shown that a range of isolated proteins acquire hydroperoxide groups when exposed to a range of biologically plausible oxidants. These include HO free radicals generated by radiation or in the Fenton reaction, peroxyl radicals, oxidants released by activated neutrophils, and peroxynitrite. In more complex systems, we also found protein peroxides in the apo B component of LDL treated with 20 μM Cu ++ , and in irradiated blood serum. These observations suggest that the formation of protein peroxides is a possible consequence of oxidative stress in vivo. A remarkable feature of the process of protein peroxidation is its high efficiency. This is most easily measured with proteins oxidized by radiation-generated free radicals. It was found that, for some proteins, peroxide yields reached 40% of the numbers of HO radicals generated. Thus in effect, almost half of these radicals can be converted to the much more long-lived protein peroxide groups. If they, in turn, have the capacity to damage other molecules, the major oxidative pathway in vivo may have the sequence: free radical ? protein peroxide ? another oxidized molecule. This hypothesis was tested by studying the ability of protein peroxides to react with selected molecules and the results are briefly discussed. Clearly, these effects are specific to individual proteins. More generally, amino acid and protein peroxides were found to be a potential source of a range of free radicals when reduced by Fe ++ . If this turns out to be a common phenomenon, protein peroxides may prove to be a major source of oxidative damage

  1. The role of proteins in damage induced by free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebicki, J.M. [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia). School of Biological Sciences

    1996-12-31

    The initial consequence of oxidative stress in living organisms is chemical modification of cell components. Recently increasing attention in this area has been paid to the modification of proteins. A form of protein modification which has been studied in some detail only recently is peroxidation. In the last 8 years, we and our collaborators have shown that a range of isolated proteins acquire hydroperoxide groups when exposed to a range of biologically plausible oxidants. These include HO free radicals generated by radiation or in the Fenton reaction, peroxyl radicals, oxidants released by activated neutrophils, and peroxynitrite. In more complex systems, we also found protein peroxides in the apo B component of LDL treated with 20 {mu}M Cu{sup ++}, and in irradiated blood serum. These observations suggest that the formation of protein peroxides is a possible consequence of oxidative stress in vivo. A remarkable feature of the process of protein peroxidation is its high efficiency. This is most easily measured with proteins oxidized by radiation-generated free radicals. It was found that, for some proteins, peroxide yields reached 40% of the numbers of HO radicals generated. Thus in effect, almost half of these radicals can be converted to the much more long-lived protein peroxide groups. If they, in turn, have the capacity to damage other molecules, the major oxidative pathway in vivo may have the sequence: free radical ? protein peroxide ? another oxidized molecule. This hypothesis was tested by studying the ability of protein peroxides to react with selected molecules and the results are briefly discussed. Clearly, these effects are specific to individual proteins. More generally, amino acid and protein peroxides were found to be a potential source of a range of free radicals when reduced by Fe{sup ++}. If this turns out to be a common phenomenon, protein peroxides may prove to be a major source of oxidative damage.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide stabilization in one-dimensional flow columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Ahmad, Mushtaque; Teel, Amy L.; Watts, Richard J.

    2011-09-01

    Rapid hydrogen peroxide decomposition is the primary limitation of catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations in situ chemical oxidation (CHP ISCO) remediation of the subsurface. Two stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide, citrate and phytate, were investigated for their effectiveness in one-dimensional columns of iron oxide-coated and manganese oxide-coated sand. Hydrogen peroxide (5%) with and without 25 mM citrate or phytate was applied to the columns and samples were collected at 8 ports spaced 13 cm apart. Citrate was not an effective stabilizer for hydrogen peroxide in iron-coated sand; however, phytate was highly effective, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals two orders of magnitude over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Both citrate and phytate were effective stabilizers for manganese-coated sand, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals by four-fold over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Phytate and citrate did not degrade and were not retarded in the sand columns; furthermore, the addition of the stabilizers increased column flow rates relative to unstabilized columns. These results demonstrate that citrate and phytate are effective stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide under the dynamic conditions of one-dimensional columns, and suggest that citrate and phytate can be added to hydrogen peroxide before injection to the subsurface as an effective means for increasing the radius of influence of CHP ISCO.

  3. Nutrient Patterns Associated with Fasting Glucose and Glycated Haemoglobin Levels in a Black South African Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikowore, T.; Pisa, P.T.; Zyl, van Tertia; Feskens, E.J.M.; Wentzel-Viljoen, E.; Conradie, K.R.

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) burden is increasing globally. However, evidence regarding nutrient patterns associated with the biomarkers of T2D is limited. This study set out to determine the nutrient patterns associated with fasting glucose and glycated haemoglobin the biomarkers of T2D. Factor analysis

  4. Receptor for advanced glycation end product polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes: the CODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaens, K.H.; Kallen, C.J.; Greevenboek, van M.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Stehouwer, C.D.; Schalkwijk, C.G.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variation in the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) gene may alter the expression and function of RAGE and affect disease development and outcome. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in RAGE were associated with diabetes and parameters of glucose

  5. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and

  6. Genetic determinants of glycated hemoglobin levels in the Greenlandic Inuit population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel, Emil V R; Moltke, Ida; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2018-01-01

    We previously showed that a common genetic variant leads to a remarkably increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the small and historically isolated Greenlandic population. Motivated by this, we aimed at discovering novel genetic determinants for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and at estimating...

  7. Effect of collagen turnover on the accumulation of advanced glycation end products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, N.; Degroot, J.; Thorpe, S. R.; Bank, R. A.; Shaw, J. N.; Lyons, T. J.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Lafeber, F. P.; Baynes, J. W.; TeKoppele, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Collagen molecules in articular cartilage have an exceptionally long lifetime, which makes them susceptible to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In fact, in comparison to other collagen-rich tissues, articular cartilage contains relatively high amounts of the AGE

  8. Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Malene Wibe; Andersen, Jeanette Marker; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg

    2016-01-01

    Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) formed during heating of food have gained interest as potential nutritional toxins with adverse effects on inflammation and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we investigated the short-term effects of high and low molecular weight (HMW and LMW)...

  9. Current therapeutic interventions in the glycation pathway: evidence from clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, L; Stehouwer, C D A; Schalkwijk, C G

    2013-08-01

    The increased formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) constitutes a potential mechanism of hyperglycaemia-induced micro- and macrovascular disease in diabetes. In vitro and animal experiments have shown that various interventions can inhibit formation and/or actions of AGEs, in particular the specific AGE inhibitor aminoguanidine and the AGEs crosslink breaker alagebrium, and the B vitamins pyridoxamine and thiamine, and the latter's synthetic derivative, benfotiamine. The potential clinical value of these interventions, however, remains to be established. The present review provides, from the clinical point of view, an overview of current evidence on interventions in the glycation pathway relating to (i) the clinical benefits of specific AGE inhibitors and AGE breakers and (ii) the potential AGE-inhibiting effects of therapies developed for purposes unrelated to the glycation pathway. We found that safety and/or efficacy in clinical studies with the specific AGE inhibitor, aminoguanidine and the AGE breaker, alagebrium, appeared to be a concern. The clinical evidence on the potential AGE-inhibiting effects of B vitamins is still limited. Finally, current evidence for AGE inhibition by therapies developed for purposes unrelated to glycation is limited due to a large heterogeneity in study designs and/or measurement techniques, which have often been sub-optimal. We conclude that, clinical evidence on interventions to inhibit formation and/or action of AGEs is currently weak and unconvincing. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Association between Fluorescent Advanced Glycation End-Products and Vascular Complications in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Guerin-Dubourg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Diabetes is a major health problem associated with hyperglycemia and chronically increased oxidative stress and enhanced formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. The aim of this study was to determine whether oxidative plasma biomarkers in diabetic patients could be evidenced and associated with vascular complications. Methods. Oxidative stress biomarkers such as thiols, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA, glycated albumin (GA, fructosamine, and AGEs were measured in 75 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c > 7.5% with (44 or without (31 vascular disease and in 31 nondiabetic controls. Results. Most biomarkers of oxidation and glycation were significantly increased in diabetic patients in comparison with nondiabetics. Fructosamines, GA, IMA, and AGEs were positively correlated and levels of fluorescent AGEs were significantly increased in the plasma from patients presenting vascular complication. Conclusions. These results bring new evidence for the potential interest of glycated albumin, oxidative stress, and glycoxidation parameters in the monitoring of type 2 diabetic patients. Furthermore, it emphasizes fluorescent AGEs as a putative indicator for vascular event prediction in diabetic patients.

  11. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Impairs Host Defense in Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zoelen, Marieke A. D.; Schouten, Marcel; de Vos, Alex F.; Florquin, Sandrine; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; van der Poll, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that is expressed ubiquitously in the lungs. Engagement of RAGE leads to activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways,

  12. Temperature effect on formation of advanced glycation end products in infant formula milk powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Ru-Gang; Cheng, Hong; Li, Li

    2018-01-01

    For a standard infant formula milk powder, browning reactions were shown to become limiting for shelflife for storage at higher temperature rather than lipid oxidation. Advanced glycation end (AGE) products were found in the temperature range 65e115 C to have an energy of activation...

  13. Differential Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Expression in Preeclamptic, Intrauterine Growth Restricted, and Gestational Diabetic Placentas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Kristen L; Mejia, Camilo A; Jordan, Clinton; Nelson, Michael B; Howell, Brian M; Jones, Cameron M; Reynolds, Paul R; Arroyo, Juan A

    2016-02-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a receptor implicated in the modulation of inflammation. Inflammation has been associated with pregnancy pathologies including preeclampsia (PE), intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Our objective was to examine placental RAGE expression in PE, IUGR, and GDM complications. Human placental tissues were obtained for RAGE determination using Q-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot. Invasive trophoblast cells were cultured and treated with AGES for RAGE activation studies. Compared to control placenta, we observed: (i) decreased RAGE gene expression during GDM, (ii) increased RAGE protein in the PE placenta, and (iii) decreased RAGE protein in the IUGR placenta. In trophoblast cells exposed AGEs, we observed: (i) decreased trophoblast invasion, (ii) increased c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and (iii) increased TNF-α and IL-1β secretion. We conclude that placental RAGE is activated during PE and that RAGE-mediated inflammation in the trophoblast involves increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Determination of advanced glycation endproducts by LC-MS/MS in raw and roasted almonds (Prunus dulcis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gong; Huang, Guangwei; Xiao, Lu; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2011-11-23

    A sensitive and reliable LC-(ESI)MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous analysis of five common advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) after enzymatic digestion in raw and roasted almonds. AGEs included carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL), pyralline (Pyr), argpyrimidine (Arg-p), and pentosidine (Pento-s). This method allows accurate quantitation of free and AGE-protein adducts of target AGEs. Results indicate that CML and CEL are found in both raw and roasted almonds. Pyr was identified for the first time in roasted almonds and accounted for 64.4% of free plus bound measured AGEs. Arg-p and Pento-s were below the limit of detection in all almond samples tested. Free AGEs accounted for 1.3-26.8% of free plus bound measured AGEs, indicating that protein-bound forms predominate. The roasting process significantly increased CML, CEL, and Pyr formation, but no significant correlation was observed between these AGEs and roasting temperature.

  15. Glycation and glycoxidation of low-density lipoproteins by glucose and low-molecular mass aldehydes. Formation of modified and oxidized particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Heather M; Brown, Bronwyn E; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    of macrophages. This results in the accumulation of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters within macrophages and the formation of foam cells, a hallmark of atherosclerosis. The nature of the LDL modifications required for cellular recognition and unregulated uptake are poorly understood. We have therefore examined...... or methylglyoxal in the presence of copper ions, whereas glycolaldehyde stimulated such reactions to a modest extent. These results suggest that the earliest significant events in this system are metal ion-independent glycation (modification) of the protein component of LDL, whilst oxidative events (glycoxidation...... or direct oxidation of lipid or proteins) only occur to any significant extent at later time points. This 'carbonyl-stress' may facilitate the formation of foam cells and the vascular complications of diabetes....

  16. Alkaline Peroxide Delignification of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Ashutosh [Biosciences; Katahira, Rui [National; Donohoe, Bryon S. [Biosciences; Black, Brenna A. [National; Pattathil, Sivakumar [Complex; Stringer, Jack M. [National; Beckham, Gregg T. [National

    2017-05-30

    Selective biomass fractionation into carbohydrates and lignin is a key challenge in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. In the present study, alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment was investigated to fractionate lignin from polysaccharides in corn stover (CS), with a particular emphasis on the fate of the lignin for subsequent valorization. The influence of peroxide loading on delignification during AHP pretreatment was examined over the range of 30-500 mg H2O2/g dry CS at 50 degrees C for 3 h. Mass balances were conducted on the solid and liquid fractions generated after pretreatment for each of the three primary components, lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose. AHP pretreatment at 250 mg H2O2/g dry CS resulted in the pretreated solids with more than 80% delignification consequently enriching the carbohydrate fraction to >90%. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) spectroscopy of the AHP pretreated residue shows that, under high peroxide loadings (>250 mg H2O2/g dry CS), most of the side chain structures were oxidized and the aryl-ether bonds in lignin were partially cleaved, resulting in significant delignification of the pretreated residues. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis shows that AHP pretreatment effectively depolymerizes CS lignin into low molecular weight (LMW) lignin fragments in the aqueous fraction. Imaging of AHP pretreated residues shows a more granular texture and a clear lamellar pattern in secondary walls, indicative of layers of varying lignin removal or relocalization. Enzymatic hydrolysis of this pretreated residue at 20 mg/g of glucan resulted in 90% and 80% yields of glucose and xylose, respectively, after 120 h. Overall, AHP pretreatment is able to selectively remove more than 80% of the lignin from biomass in a form that has potential for downstream valorization processes and enriches the solid pulp into a highly digestible material.

  17. Engineering bacterial motility towards hydrogen-peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgile, Chelsea; Hauk, Pricila; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Shang, Wu; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic biologists construct innovative genetic/biological systems to treat environmental, energy, and health problems. Many systems employ rewired cells for non-native product synthesis, while a few have employed the rewired cells as 'smart' devices with programmable function. Building on the latter, we developed a genetic construct to control and direct bacterial motility towards hydrogen peroxide, one of the body's immune response signaling molecules. A motivation for this work is the creation of cells that can target and autonomously treat disease, the latter signaled by hydrogen peroxide release. Bacteria naturally move towards a variety of molecular cues (e.g., nutrients) in the process of chemotaxis. In this work, we engineered bacteria to recognize and move towards hydrogen peroxide, a non-native chemoattractant and potential toxin. Our system exploits oxyRS, the native oxidative stress regulon of E. coli. We first demonstrated H2O2-mediated upregulation motility regulator, CheZ. Using transwell assays, we showed a two-fold increase in net motility towards H2O2. Then, using a 2D cell tracking system, we quantified bacterial motility descriptors including velocity, % running (of tumble/run motions), and a dynamic net directionality towards the molecular cue. In CheZ mutants, we found that increased H2O2 concentration (0-200 μM) and induction time resulted in increased running speeds, ultimately reaching the native E. coli wild-type speed of ~22 μm/s with a ~45-65% ratio of running to tumbling. Finally, using a microfluidic device with stable H2O2 gradients, we characterized responses and the potential for "programmed" directionality towards H2O2 in quiescent fluids. Overall, the synthetic biology framework and tracking analysis in this work will provide a framework for investigating controlled motility of E. coli and other 'smart' probiotics for signal-directed treatment.

  18. Peroxide coordination of tellurium in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhaylov, Alexey A.; Medvedev, Alexander G. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Churakov, Andrei V.; Grishanov, Dmitry A.; Prikhodchenko, Petr V. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lev, Ovadia [The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-02-15

    Tellurium-peroxo complexes in aqueous solutions have never been reported. In this work, ammonium peroxotellurates (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} (1) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH).1.28 H{sub 2}O.0.72 H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (2) were isolated from 5 % hydrogen peroxide aqueous solutions of ammonium tellurate and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, by Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The crystal structure of 1 comprises ammonium cations and a symmetric binuclear peroxotellurate anion [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}]{sup 4-}. The structure of 2 consists of an unsymmetrical [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH)]{sup 5-} anion, ammonium cations, hydrogen peroxide, and water. Peroxotellurate anions in both 1 and 2 contain a binuclear Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O) fragment with one μ-oxo- and two μ-peroxo bridging groups. {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopic analysis shows that the peroxo bridged bitellurate anions are the dominant species in solution, with 3-40 %wt H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and for pH values above 9. DFT calculations of the peroxotellurate anion confirm its higher thermodynamic stability compared with those of the oxotellurate analogues. This is the first direct evidence for tellurium-peroxide coordination in any aqueous system and the first report of inorganic tellurium-peroxo complexes. General features common to all reported p-block element peroxides could be discerned by the characterization of aqueous and crystalline peroxotellurates. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Secondary radicals derived from chloramines of apolipoprotein B-100 contribute to HOCl-induced lipid peroxidation of low-density lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazell, L J; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Stocker, R

    1999-01-01

    component to be the major site of attack, whereas others describe extensive lipid peroxidation. The present study addresses this controversy. The results obtained are consistent with the hypothesis that radical-induced oxidation of LDL's lipids by HOCl is a secondary reaction, with most HOCl consumed via...... by an extended period of lipid peroxidation during which further protein oxidation does not occur. The secondary lipid peroxidation process involves EPR-detectable radicals, is attenuated by a radical trap or treatment of HOCl-oxidized LDL with methionine, and occurs less rapidly when the lipoprotein...

  20. N-Acetyl Cysteine Attenuated the Deleterious Effects of Advanced Glycation End-Products on the Kidney of Non-Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Thieme

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the renal effects of chronic exposure to advanced glycation end-products (AGEs in the absence of diabetes and the potential impact of concomitant treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC. Methods: Wistar rats received intraperitoneally 20 mg/kg/day of albumin modified (AlbAGE or not (AlbC by advanced glycation for 12 weeks and oral NAC (600mg/L; AlbAGE+NAC and AlbC+NAC, respectively. Biochemical, urinary and renal morphological analyses; carboxymethyl-lysine (CML, an AGE, CD68 (macrophage infiltration, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, marker of oxidative stress immunostaining; intrarenal mRNA expression of genes belonging to pathways related to AGEs (Ager, Ddost, Nfkb1, renin-angiotensin system (Agt, Ren, Ace, fibrosis (Tgfb1, Col4a1, oxidative stress (Nox4, Txnip, and apoptosis (Bax, Bcl2; and reactive oxidative species (ROS content were performed. Results: AlbAGE significantly increased urine protein-to-creatinine ratio; glomerular area; renal CML content and macrophage infiltration; expression of Ager, Nfkb1, Agt, Ren, Tgfb1, Col4a1, Txnip, Bax/Bcl2 ratio; and 4-HNE and ROS contents. Some of these effects were attenuated by NAC concomitant treatment. Conclusion: Because AGEs are highly consumed in modern diets and implicated in the progression of different kidney diseases, NAC could be a therapeutic intervention to decrease renal damage, considering that long-term restriction of dietary AGEs is difficult to achieve in practice.

  1. The plasma level of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anna Nashaat Abou-Raya

    2015-07-23

    Jul 23, 2015 ... American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria for the diagnosis of SLE. Active ... culating compounds such as lipids, proteins, or nucleic acids. ... has the same structure but lacks the cytosolic and transmem-.

  2. Effect of cadmium chloride on hepatic lipid peroxidation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H R; Andersen, O

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride to 8-12 weeks old CBA-mice enhanced hepatic lipid peroxidation. A positive correlation between cadmium chloride dose and level of peroxidation was observed in both male and female mice. A sex-related difference in mortality was not observed...... but at a dose of 25 mumol CdCl2/kg the level of hepatic lipid peroxidation was higher in male mice than in female mice. The hepatic lipid peroxidation was not increased above the control level in 3 weeks old mice, while 6 weeks old mice responded with increased peroxidation as did 8-12 weeks old mice....... The mortality after an acute toxic dose of cadmium chloride was the same in the three age groups. Pretreatment of mice with several low intraperitoneal doses of cadmium chloride alleviated cadmium induced mortality and lipid peroxidation. The results demonstrate both age dependency and a protective effect...

  3. Hydrogen peroxide probes directed to different cellular compartments.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikalai Malinouski; You Zhou; Vsevolod V Belousov; Dolph L Hatfield; Vadim N Gladyshev

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells. Principal Findings Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular ...

  4. Radiation-induced peroxidation of egg lecithin liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisby, R.H.; Cundall, R.B.; Tomaszewski, K.E.; Coleman, M.H.; Gould, G.

    1983-01-01

    Peroxidation of multilamellar vesicles of egg lecithin was measured following γ-irradiation of oxygen saturated suspensions. The addition of hydroxyl radical scavengers and the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase was used to show that hydroxyl radicals were the major species initiating peroxidation. Superoxide radicals were found to be much less effective initiators of peroxidation. Trolox C, a water soluble analogue of vitamin E, was found to act as an efficient antioxidant in this system. (author)

  5. Precipitation of uranium concentrates by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa Filho, O.

    1986-12-01

    An experimental study on the (UO 4 .xH 2 ) uranyl peroxide precipitation from a uranium process strip solution is presented. The runs were performed in a batch reactor, in laboratory scale. The main objective was to assess the possibility of the peroxide route as an alternative to a conventional ammonium diuranate process. The chemical composition of process solution was obtained. The experiments were conducted according to a factorial design, aiming to evaluate the effects of initial pH, precipitation pH and H 2 O 2 /UO 2 2+ ratio upon the process. The responses were measured in terms of the efficiency of U precipitation, the content of U in the precipitates and the distribution of impurities in the precipitates. The results indicated that the process works is satisfactory on the studied conditions and depending on conditions, it is possible to achieve levels of U precipitation efficiency greater than 99.9% in reaction times of 2 hours. The precipitates reach grades around 99% U 3 O 8 after calcination (900 0 C) and impurities fall below the limit for penalties established by the ASTM and the Allied Chemical Standards. The precipitates are composed of large aggregates of crystals of 1-4 μm, are fast settling and filtering, and are free-flowing when dry. (Author) [pt

  6. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombrecht, E.J.; De Tollenaere, C.B.; Aerts, K.; Cos, P.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Bridts, C.H.; Van Offel, J.F.; Ebo, D.G.; Stevens, W.J.; De Clerck, L.S.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY 581/591 was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe 2+ /EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe 2+ /EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H 2 O 2 , BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis

  7. A survey of chemicals inducing lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, H

    1987-01-01

    A great number of drugs and chemicals are reviewed which have been shown to stimulate lipid peroxidation in any biological system. The underlying mechanisms, as far as known, are also dealt with. Lipid peroxidation induced by iron ions, organic hydroperoxides, halogenated hydrocarbons, redox cycling drugs, glutathione depleting chemicals, ethanol, heavy metals, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and a number of miscellaneous compounds, e.g. hydrazines, pesticides, antibiotics, are mentioned. It is shown that lipid peroxidation is stimulated by many of these compounds. However, quantitative estimates cannot be given yet and it is still impossible to judge the biological relevance of chemical-induced lipid peroxidation.

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Probes Directed to Different Cellular Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Zhou, You; Belousov, Vsevolod V.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells. Principal Findings Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular compartments, HyPer occurred in the reduced state in the nucleus, cytosol, peroxisomes, mitochondrial intermembrane space and mitochondrial matrix, but low levels of the oxidized form of the biosensor were also observed in each of these compartments, consistent with a low peroxide tone in mammalian cells. In contrast, HyPer was mostly oxidized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using this system, we characterized control of hydrogen peroxide in various cell systems, such as cells deficient in thioredoxin reductase, sulfhydryl oxidases or subjected to selenium deficiency. Generation of hydrogen peroxide could also be monitored in various compartments following signaling events. Conclusions We found that HyPer can be used as a valuable tool to monitor hydrogen peroxide generated in different cellular compartments. The data also show that hydrogen peroxide generated in one compartment could translocate to other compartments. Our data provide information on compartmentalization, dynamics and homeostatic control of hydrogen peroxide in mammalian cells. PMID:21283738

  9. Hydrogen peroxide probes directed to different cellular compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikalai Malinouski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells.Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular compartments, HyPer occurred in the reduced state in the nucleus, cytosol, peroxisomes, mitochondrial intermembrane space and mitochondrial matrix, but low levels of the oxidized form of the biosensor were also observed in each of these compartments, consistent with a low peroxide tone in mammalian cells. In contrast, HyPer was mostly oxidized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using this system, we characterized control of hydrogen peroxide in various cell systems, such as cells deficient in thioredoxin reductase, sulfhydryl oxidases or subjected to selenium deficiency. Generation of hydrogen peroxide could also be monitored in various compartments following signaling events.We found that HyPer can be used as a valuable tool to monitor hydrogen peroxide generated in different cellular compartments. The data also show that hydrogen peroxide generated in one compartment could translocate to other compartments. Our data provide information on compartmentalization, dynamics and homeostatic control of hydrogen peroxide in mammalian cells.

  10. Synthesis and thermal properties of strontium and calcium peroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Warren H.; Kraft, Patricia A.

    1989-01-01

    A practical synthesis and a discussion of some chemical properties of pure strontium peroxide and calcium peroxide are presented. The general synthesis of these peroxides involves precipitation of their octahydrates by addition of H2O2 to aqueous ammoniacal Sr(NO3)2 or CaCl2. The octahydrates are converted to the anhydrous peroxides by various dehydration techniques. A new x-ray diffraction powder pattern for CaO2 x 8H2O is given from which lattice parameters a=6.212830 and c=11.0090 were calculated on the basis of the tetragonal crystal system.

  11. Effect of antioxidants and silicates on peroxides in povidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ajit S; Rao, Venkatramana M; Desai, Divyakant S

    2012-01-01

    Reactive peroxides in povidone often lead to degradation of oxidation-labile drugs. To reduce peroxide concentration in povidone, the roles of storage conditions, antioxidants, and silicates were investigated. Povidone alone and its physical mixtures with ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, sodium sulfite, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), or butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were stored at 25 °C and 40 °C, at 11%, 32%, and 50% relative humidity. In addition, povidone solution in methanol was equilibrated with silicates (silica gel and molecular sieves), followed by solvent evaporation to recover povidone powder. Peroxide concentrations in povidone were measured. The concentration of peroxides in povidone increased under very-low-humidity storage conditions. Among the antioxidants, ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, and sodium sulfite reduced the peroxide concentration in povidone, whereas BHA and BHT did not. Water solubility appeared to determine the effectiveness of antioxidants. Also, some silicates significantly reduced peroxide concentration in povidone without affecting its functionality as a tablet binder. Porosity of silicates was critical to their ability to reduce the peroxide concentration in povidone. A combination of these approaches can reduce the initial peroxide concentration in povidone and minimize peroxide growth under routine storage conditions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide production is affected by oxygen levels in mammalian cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Lucas A; Selim, Shehab M; Fonseca, Joao; Messner, Holt; McGowan, Shannon; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2017-11-04

    Although oxygen levels in the extracellular space of most mammalian tissues are just a few percent, under standard cell culture conditions they are not regulated and are often substantially higher. Some cellular sources of reactive oxygen species, like NADPH oxidase 4, are sensitive to oxygen levels in the range between 'normal' physiological (typically 1-5%) and standard cell culture (up to 18%). Hydrogen peroxide in particular participates in signal transduction pathways via protein redox modifications, so the potential increase in its production under standard cell culture conditions is important to understand. We measured the rates of cellular hydrogen peroxide production in some common cell lines, including C2C12, PC-3, HeLa, SH-SY5Y, MCF-7, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) maintained at 18% or 5% oxygen. In all instances the rate of hydrogen peroxide production by these cells was significantly greater at 18% oxygen than at 5%. The increase in hydrogen peroxide production at higher oxygen levels was either abolished or substantially reduced by treatment with GKT 137831, a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase subunits 1 and 4. These data indicate that oxygen levels experienced by cells in culture influence hydrogen peroxide production via NADPH oxidase 1/4, highlighting the importance of regulating oxygen levels in culture near physiological values. However, we measured pericellular oxygen levels adjacent to cell monolayers under a variety of conditions and with different cell lines and found that, particularly when growing at 5% incubator oxygen levels, pericellular oxygen was often lower and variable. Together, these observations indicate the importance, and difficulty, of regulating oxygen levels experienced by cells in culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs acutely impair Ca2+ signalling in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim eNaser

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification of proteins in diabetes, including formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs are believed to contribute to vascular dysfunction and disease. Impaired function of the endothelium is an early indicator of vascular dysfunction in diabetes and as many endothelial cell processes are dependent upon intracellular [Ca2+] and Ca2+ signalling, the aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of AGEs on Ca2+ signalling in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC. Ca2+ signalling was studied using the fluorescent indicator dye Fura2-AM. AGEs were generated by incubating bovine serum albumin with 0 - 250 mM glucose or glucose-6-phosphate for 0 to 120 days at 37ºC. Under all conditions, the main AGE species generated was carboxymethyl lysine (CML as assayed using both GC-MS and HPLC. In Ca2+-replete solution, exposure of BAEC to AGEs for 5 min caused an elevation in basal [Ca2+] and attenuated the increase in intracellular [Ca2+] caused by ATP (100 µM. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, exposure of BAEC to AGEs for 5 min caused an elevation in basal [Ca2+] and attenuated subsequent intracellular Ca2+ release caused by ATP, thapsigargin (0.1 µM and ionomycin (3 µM, but AGEs did not affect extracellular Ca2+ entry induced by the re-addition of Ca2+ to the bathing solution in the presence of any of these agents. The anti-oxidant α-lipoic acid (2 µM and NAD(PH oxidase inhibitors apocynin (500 µM and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, 1 µM abolished these effects of AGEs on BAECs, as did the IP3 receptor antagonist xestospongin C (1 µM. In summary, AGEs caused an acute depletion of Ca2+ from the intracellular store in BAECs, such that the Ca2+ signal stimulated by the subsequent application other agents acting upon this store is reduced. The mechanism may involve generation of ROS from NAD(PH oxidase and possible activation of the IP3 receptor.

  14. The association between various smoking behaviors, cotinine biomarkers and skin autofluorescence, a marker for advanced glycation end product accumulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waateringe, Robert P.; Mook-Kanamori, Marjonneke J.; Slagter, Sandra N.; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Graaff, Reindert; Lutgers, Helen L.; Suhre, Karsten; Selim, Mohammed M. El-Din; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skin autofluorescence, a biomarker for advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulation, has been shown to predict diabetes-related cardiovascular complications and is associated with several environmental and lifestyle factors. In the present study, we examined the association

  15. Alkaline peroxide pretreatment of corn stover: effects of biomass, peroxide, and enzyme loading and composition on yields of glucose and xylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pretreatment is a critical step in the conversion of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars. Although many pretreatment processes are currently under investigation, none of them are entirely satisfactory in regard to effectiveness, cost, or environmental impact. The use of hydrogen peroxide at pH 11.5 (alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP)) was shown by Gould and coworkers to be an effective pretreatment of grass stovers and other plant materials in the context of animal nutrition and ethanol production. Our earlier experiments indicated that AHP performed well when compared against two other alkaline pretreatments. Here, we explored several key parameters to test the potential of AHP for further improvement relevant to lignocellulosic ethanol production. Results The effects of biomass loading, hydrogen peroxide loading, residence time, and pH control were tested in combination with subsequent digestion with a commercial enzyme preparation, optimized mixtures of four commercial enzymes, or optimized synthetic mixtures of pure enzymes. AHP pretreatment was performed at room temperature (23°C) and atmospheric pressure, and after AHP pretreatment the biomass was neutralized with HCl but not washed before enzyme digestion. Standard enzyme digestion conditions were 0.2% glucan loading, 15 mg protein/g glucan, and 48 h digestion at 50°C. Higher pretreatment biomass loadings (10% to 20%) gave higher monomeric glucose (Glc) and xylose (Xyl) yields than the 2% loading used in earlier studies. An H2O2 loading of 0.25 g/g biomass was almost as effective as 0.5 g/g, but 0.125 g/g was significantly less effective. Optimized mixtures of four commercial enzymes substantially increased post-AHP-pretreatment enzymatic hydrolysis yields at all H2O2 concentrations compared to any single commercial enzyme. At a pretreatment biomass loading of 10% and an H2O2 loading of 0.5 g/g biomass, an optimized commercial mixture at total protein loadings of 8 or 15 mg/g glucan gave

  16. Alkaline peroxide pretreatment of corn stover: effects of biomass, peroxide, and enzyme loading and composition on yields of glucose and xylose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodge David B

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pretreatment is a critical step in the conversion of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars. Although many pretreatment processes are currently under investigation, none of them are entirely satisfactory in regard to effectiveness, cost, or environmental impact. The use of hydrogen peroxide at pH 11.5 (alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP was shown by Gould and coworkers to be an effective pretreatment of grass stovers and other plant materials in the context of animal nutrition and ethanol production. Our earlier experiments indicated that AHP performed well when compared against two other alkaline pretreatments. Here, we explored several key parameters to test the potential of AHP for further improvement relevant to lignocellulosic ethanol production. Results The effects of biomass loading, hydrogen peroxide loading, residence time, and pH control were tested in combination with subsequent digestion with a commercial enzyme preparation, optimized mixtures of four commercial enzymes, or optimized synthetic mixtures of pure enzymes. AHP pretreatment was performed at room temperature (23°C and atmospheric pressure, and after AHP pretreatment the biomass was neutralized with HCl but not washed before enzyme digestion. Standard enzyme digestion conditions were 0.2% glucan loading, 15 mg protein/g glucan, and 48 h digestion at 50°C. Higher pretreatment biomass loadings (10% to 20% gave higher monomeric glucose (Glc and xylose (Xyl yields than the 2% loading used in earlier studies. An H2O2 loading of 0.25 g/g biomass was almost as effective as 0.5 g/g, but 0.125 g/g was significantly less effective. Optimized mixtures of four commercial enzymes substantially increased post-AHP-pretreatment enzymatic hydrolysis yields at all H2O2 concentrations compared to any single commercial enzyme. At a pretreatment biomass loading of 10% and an H2O2 loading of 0.5 g/g biomass, an optimized commercial mixture at total protein loadings of 8 or 15 mg

  17. Relationship between advanced glycation end-products with the severity of chronic heart failure in 85 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Farhang Zand Parsa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs came up with the recent researches regarding new biomarkers for the diagnosis of heart failure. AGEs are the end products of non-enzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins, lipids and nucleotides during Maillard biochemical reaction. Although it has been known that AGEs have a role in the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure (CHF, information regarding its role and its pathogenetic mechanism is very limited. The aim of this study was to find any relationship between AGEs with the etiology and severity of chronic heart failure.Methods: This study is a prospective cross sectional study that enrolled 85 patients with chronic heart failure. Measurement of left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF was done by echocardiography. Blood samples were collected for measuring AGEs just before or after echocardiography assessment (in the same session. Measurement of AGEs was done by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. The relationship between AGEs with the severity of CHF and as well as the etiology of CHF were evaluated via SPSS-15.Results: Of 85 patients 48 (56.5% patients were male and 37 (43.5% were female; Mean±SD of their ages was 55.8±13.4 years old (ranges from 27 to 84 years. Correlation coefficient between LVEF and AGEs was 0.269 (P=0.013. Mean of AGEs in patients with and without ischemic etiology of their heart failure were 16.8±9.8µg/ml and 11.6±7.3 µg/ml, respectively. Although trend was in favor of ischemic heart failure, the difference between two groups was not statistically significant (P= 0.141.Conclusion: According to this study the rate of AGES could be helpful in the diagnosis and assessment of severity of CHF. Based on our findings, higher blood levels of AGEs in the ischemic CHF cases, also it could be concluded that in the future this marker may be used for etiologic differentiation of heart failure syndrome.

  18. Effect of dietary advanced glycation end products on postprandial appetite, inflammation, and endothelial activation in healthy overweight individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Malene Wibe; Bak, Monika Judyta; Andersen, Jeanette Marker

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formed in food during high-heat cooking may induce overeating and inflammation. We investigated whether AGE contents in a single meal affect postprandial appetite and markers of inflammation, endothelial activation, and oxidative stress.......Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formed in food during high-heat cooking may induce overeating and inflammation. We investigated whether AGE contents in a single meal affect postprandial appetite and markers of inflammation, endothelial activation, and oxidative stress....

  19. Influence of smoking and diet on glycated haemoglobin and 'pre-diabetes' categorisation: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassopoulos, Antonis; Lean, Michael E J; Combet, Emilie

    2013-10-26

    The new HbA1c criteria for diagnosis of pre-diabetes have been criticised for misdiagnosis. It is possible that some elevation of HbA1c is not driven by hyperglycaemia. This study assesses associations of HbA1c, commonly assumed to relate solely to glucose concentration, with (i) smoking, a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and (ii) fruit & vegetables consumption associated with improved redox status. One-way ANOVA, Chi-squared and multivariate linear regressions, adjusted for all known confounders were used to explore associations of HbA1c with self-reported smoking status and fruit & vegetables consumptions in the Scottish Health Surveys 2003-2010, among individuals without known diabetes and HbA1c 20 cigarettes/day) than non-smokers (p smoking (an oxidative stress proxy) with protein glycation in normoglycaemic subjects, with implications for individuals exposed to ROS and for epidemiological interpretation of HbA1c.

  20. Overexpression of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Human Dental Pulp Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salunya Tancharoen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a nonhistone DNA-binding protein, is released into the extracellular space and promotes inflammation. HMGB1 binds to related cell signaling transduction receptors, including receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, which actively participate in vascular and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether RAGE and HMGB1 are involved in the pathogenesis of pulpitis and investigate the effect of Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia lipopolysaccharide (LPS on RAGE and HMGB1 expression in odontoblast-like cells (OLC-1. RAGE and HMGB1 expression levels in clinically inflamed dental pulp were higher than those in healthy dental pulp. Upregulated expression of RAGE was observed in odontoblasts, stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells, and endothelial-like cell lining human pulpitis tissue. Strong cytoplasmic HMGB1 immunoreactivity was noted in odontoblasts, whereas nuclear HMGB1 immunoreactivity was seen in stromal pulp fibroblasts-like cells in human pulpitis tissue. LPS stimulated OLC-1 cells produced HMGB1 in a dose-dependent manner through RAGE. HMGB1 translocation towards the cytoplasm and secretion from OLC-1 in response to LPS was inhibited by TPCA-1, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that RAGE and HMGB1 play an important role in the pulpal immune response to oral bacterial infection.

  1. Effect of benfotiamine on advanced glycation endproducts and markers of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Alkhalaf

    Full Text Available Formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs, endothelial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation are intermediate pathways of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications. We investigated the effect of benfotiamine on markers of these pathways in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy.Patients with type 2 diabetes and urinary albumin excretion in the high-normal and microalbuminuric range (15-300 mg/24h were randomized to receive benfotiamine (n = 39 or placebo (n = 43. Plasma and urinary AGEs (N(ε-(carboxymethyl lysine [CML], N(ε-(Carboxyethyl lysine [CEL], and 5-hydro-5-methylimidazolone [MG-H1] and plasma markers of endothelial dysfunction (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [sVCAM-1], soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 [sICAM-1], soluble E-selectin and low-grade inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP], serum amyloid-A [SAA], myeloperoxidase [MPO] were measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks.Compared to placebo, benfotiamine did not result in significant reductions in plasma or urinary AGEs or plasma markers of endothelial dysfunction and low-grade inflammation.Benfotiamine for 12 weeks did not significantly affect intermediate pathways of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications. TRIAL REGRISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00565318.

  2. Effect of benfotiamine on advanced glycation endproducts and markers of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalaf, Alaa; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H; Bilo, Henk J G; Gans, Reinold O B; Heeringa, Peter; Scheijen, Jean L; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Navis, Gerjan J; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2012-01-01

    Formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), endothelial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation are intermediate pathways of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications. We investigated the effect of benfotiamine on markers of these pathways in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy. Patients with type 2 diabetes and urinary albumin excretion in the high-normal and microalbuminuric range (15-300 mg/24h) were randomized to receive benfotiamine (n = 39) or placebo (n = 43). Plasma and urinary AGEs (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine [CML], N(ε)-(Carboxyethyl) lysine [CEL], and 5-hydro-5-methylimidazolone [MG-H1]) and plasma markers of endothelial dysfunction (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [sVCAM-1], soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 [sICAM-1], soluble E-selectin) and low-grade inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP], serum amyloid-A [SAA], myeloperoxidase [MPO]) were measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks. Compared to placebo, benfotiamine did not result in significant reductions in plasma or urinary AGEs or plasma markers of endothelial dysfunction and low-grade inflammation. Benfotiamine for 12 weeks did not significantly affect intermediate pathways of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications. TRIAL REGRISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00565318.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    during the HP decomposition. The model assumes that the enzyme decay is controlled by an inactivation stoichiometry related to the HP decomposition. In order to make the model easily applicable, it is furthermore assumed that the COD is a proxy of the active biomass concentration of the water and thereby......Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...

  4. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Nur Hamidah Abdul; Heng, Lee Yook; Hashim, Uda

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a biosensor utilizing modified titania, TiO2 particles using aminopropyl-triethoxy-silane, (APTS) for developing hydrogen peroxide biosensor is presented. The surface of Ti-APTS particles is used as a support for hemoglobin immobilization via covalent bonding. The performance of the biosensor is determined by differential pulse voltammetry. The linear response was observed at the reduction current of redox mediator probe [FeCN6]3-/4- at potential between 0.22 V to 0.24 V. The preliminary result for electrochemistry study on this modified electrode is reported. The preliminary linear range is obtained from 1×10-2 M to 1×10-8 M.

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-01-01

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results

  6. Role of Lipid Peroxidation-Derived α, β-Unsaturated Aldehydes in Vascular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular diseases are the most prominent cause of death, and inflammation and vascular dysfunction are key initiators of the pathophysiology of vascular disease. Lipid peroxidation products, such as acrolein and other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, have been implicated as mediators of inflammation and vascular dysfunction. α, β-Unsaturated aldehydes are toxic because of their high reactivity with nucleophiles and their ability to form protein and DNA adducts without prior metabolic activation. This strong reactivity leads to electrophilic stress that disrupts normal cellular function. Furthermore, α, β-unsaturated aldehydes are reported to cause endothelial dysfunction by induction of oxidative stress, redox-sensitive mechanisms, and inflammatory changes such as induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokines. This review provides an overview of the effects of lipid peroxidation products, α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, on inflammation and vascular dysfunction.

  7. Effect of menadione and hydrogen peroxide on catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda EFREMOVA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been studied the possibility of utilization of two important oxidant factors as regulators of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts. In this paper results of the screening of some Saccharomyces yeast strains for potential producers of catalase are presented. Results of the screening for potential catalase producer have revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 strain possesses the highest catalase activity (2900 U/mg protein compared with other samples. Maximum increase of catalase activity with 50-60% compared to the reference sample was established in the case of hydrogen peroxide and menadione utilization in optimal concentrations of 15 and 10 mM. This research has been demonstrated the potential benefits of application of hydrogen peroxide and menadione as stimulatory factors of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts.

  8. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H.

    2016-01-01

    70% of the original insoluble material as high molar mass soluble polysaccharides. A design of experiment was used to quantify the effects of pH, reaction time, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the reaction yield, average molar mass, and free monosaccharides generated. The resulting product......In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than...... is low in protein, fat, and minerals and contains predominantly water-soluble polysaccharides of high molar mass, including arabinan, type I arabinogalactan, homogalacturonan, xyloglucan, rhamnogalacturonan, and (glucurono)arabinoxylan. This treatment provides a straightforward approach for generation...

  9. Lipid peroxidation and ascorbic acid levels in Nigeria children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to establish data on the roles of lipid peroxidation and ascorbic acid in the pathology of malaria in Nigeria children. We measured the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation and ascorbic acid in the plasma of 406 parasitaemic and 212 non-parasitaemic Nigerian children.

  10. effect of hydrogen peroxide and thiourea on dormancy breaking of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (Claassens and. Vreugdenhil, 2000; Suttle, 2004). Hence, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide and thiourea on dormancy and sprouting of potato microtubers and field grown tubers is described. MATERIELS AND METHODS. Production of microtubers.

  11. Plasma lipid peroxidation and progression of disability in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M.; Mostert, J.; Arutjunyan, A. V.; Stepanov, M.; Teelken, A.; Heersema, D.; De Keyser, J.

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS), but its relation to disease progression is uncertain. To evaluate the relationship of plasma lipid peroxidation with progression of disability in MS, we measured blood plasma fluorescent lipid peroxidation

  12. Propylene epoxydation with hydrogen peroxide in acidic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kertalli, E.; Rijnsoever, L.S.; Paunovic, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Neira d'Angelo, M.F.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the epoxidation of propylene with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of acids and halides is studied. The presence of acids and halides is indispensable for increasing the selectivity of the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, the first step of the direct propylene oxide

  13. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet; van den Berg, Albert

    2004-01-01

    An increase in produced hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  14. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    2005-01-01

    An increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to the lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  15. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paunovic, V.; Schouten, J.C.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    The direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide in a microreactor is a safe and efficient process. Conventionally, hydrogen peroxide is produced using the anthraquinone autooxidation process, which is rather complex and can only be performed cost-effectively on a large scale. As a result, hydrogen

  16. The evaluation of hydrogen peroxide bleaching of Gonometa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide bleaching on Gonometa postica silk and the influence that temperature, pH and time duration had on hydrogen peroxide release , colour change, breaking load and stiffness were determined. The best bleaching (81 delta E) of the Gonometa postica silk fabric was obtained with 60 minutes ...

  17. Advanced glycation end products overload might explain intracellular cobalamin deficiency in renal dysfunction, diabetes and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Rima; Shannan, Batool; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to aging. Cobalamin (Cbl) is required for cell growth and functions, and its deficiency causes serious complications. Diabetics and renal patients show high concentrations of Cbl, but metabolic evidence of Cbl deficiency that is reversible after Cbl treatment. Cbl might be sequestered in blood and cannot be delivered to the cell. Megalin mediates the uptake of transcobalamin-Cbl complex into the proximal tubule cells. Megalin is involved in the uptake and degradation of AGEs. In aging, diabetes or renal dysfunction, AGEs might overload megalin thus lowering Cbl uptake. Transcobalamin-Cbl might retain in blood. Shedding of megalin and transcobalamin receptor under glycation conditions is also a possible mechanism of this phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Product: A Biomarker for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise J. N. Jensen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE and its ligands are linked to the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD, and circulating soluble receptor of advanced glycation end products (sRAGE, reflecting the RAGE activity, is suggested as a potential biomarker. Elevated sRAGE levels are reported in relation to acute ischemia and this review focuses on the role of sRAGE as a biomarker for the acute coronary syndrome (ACS. The current studies demonstrated that sRAGE levels are elevated in relation to ACS, however during a very narrow time period, indicating that the time of sampling needs attention. Interestingly, activation of RAGE may influence the pathogenesis and reflection in sRAGE levels in acute and stable CAD differently.

  19. Ebselen exhibits glycation-inhibiting properties and protects against osmotic fragility of human erythrocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Julio C M; Folmer, Vanderlei; Da Rocha, João B T; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2014-05-01

    Diabetic status is associated with an increase on oxidative stress markers in humans and animal models. We have investigated the in vitro effects of high concentrations of glucose on the profile of oxidative stress and osmotic fragility of blood from control and diabetic patients; we considered whether its antioxidant properties could afford some protection against glucose-induced osmotic fragility, and whether ebselen could act as an inhibitor of hemoglobin glycation. Raising blood glucose to 5-100 mmol/L resulted in a concentration-dependent increase of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; P Ebselen significantly reduced the glucose-induced increase in osmotic fragility and inhibited HbA1c formation (P < 0.0001). These results indicate that blood from patients with uncontrolled diabetes are more sensitive to osmotic shock than from patients with controlled diabetes and control subjects in relation to increased production of free radicals in vivo. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  20. Radiation effect on lipid peroxide content of spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Nobutada; Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the radiation-induced deterioration of lipid in spices, peroxide value, iodine value and acid value were measured after extraction by chloroform. Peroxide values of black pepper and white pepper were not increased by gamma-irradiation with doses below 30 kGy and gradually increased at higher dose up to 80 kGy in this study. On contrary, peroxide values of clove and rosemary increased rather quickly below 20 kGy of gamma-irradiation, and they became stationary at higher dose. Iodine values and acid values had relationship with peroxide values on each kind of spices. On the storage study of irradiated spices, peroxide values decreased quickly during 20 days storage as same as nonirradiated spices, and it became stationary after 20 to 50 days storage at 30degC. Enhancement of oxidized deterioration were not observed even higher irradiation doses up to 80 kGy in this study. (author)

  1. Determination of active oxygen content in rare earth peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Carlos A.S.; Abrao, Alcidio

    1993-01-01

    The content of active oxygen in rare earth peroxides have been determined after the dissolution of the samples with hydrocloridic acid in the presence of potassium iodide. The free generated iodine is titrated with sodium thiosulfate using starch as indicator. The oxidation of iodide to the free iodine indicates the presence of a higher valence state rare earth oxide, until now specifically recognized for the oxides of cerium (Ce O 2 ), praseodymium (Pr 6 O 1 1) and terbium (TB 4 O 7 ). recently the authors synthesized a new series of rare earth compounds, the peroxides. These new compounds were prepared by precipitating the rare earth elements complexed with carbonate ion by addition of hydrogen peroxide. the authors demonstrated that all rare earth elements, once solubilized by complexing with carbonate ion, are quantitatively precipitated as peroxide by addition of hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells restore frataxin expression and increase hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes in Friedreich ataxia fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kemp

    Full Text Available Dramatic advances in recent decades in understanding the genetics of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA--a GAA triplet expansion causing greatly reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein frataxin--have thus far yielded no therapeutic dividend, since there remain no effective treatments that prevent or even slow the inevitable progressive disability in affected individuals. Clinical interventions that restore frataxin expression are attractive therapeutic approaches, as, in theory, it may be possible to re-establish normal function in frataxin deficient cells if frataxin levels are increased above a specific threshold. With this in mind several drugs and cytokines have been tested for their ability to increase frataxin levels. Cell transplantation strategies may provide an alternative approach to this therapeutic aim, and may also offer more widespread cellular protective roles in FRDA. Here we show a direct link between frataxin expression in fibroblasts derived from FRDA patients with both decreased expression of hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes and increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. We demonstrate that normal human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs induce both an increase in frataxin gene and protein expression in FRDA fibroblasts via secretion of soluble factors. Finally, we show that exposure to factors produced by human MSCs increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity in FRDA fibroblasts through, at least in part, restoring the expression of the hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase 1. These findings suggest, for the first time, that stem cells may increase frataxin levels in FRDA and transplantation of MSCs may offer an effective treatment for these patients.

  3. Glycoproteins and protein glycations identified in barley grain and malt by 2D-HPLC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žídková, Jitka; Petry-Podgorska, Inga; Laštovičková, Markéta; Bobálová, Janette

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2013), s. 43 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussion in Structural Molecular Biology /11./. 14.03.2013-16.03.2013, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP503/12/P395 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : barley grain * glycoproteins * 2D-HPLC * MS/MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  4. 2D-HPLC and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis of barley proteins glycated during brewing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petry-Podgorska, Inga; Žídková, Jitka; Flodrová, Dana; Bobálová, Janette

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 878, č. 30 (2010), s. 3143-3148 ISSN 1570-0232 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : 2D-HPLC * MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry * barley Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.971, year: 2010

  5. Advanced glycation end-products: a biological consequence of lifestyle contributing to cancer disparity

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Low income, poor diet, obesity and a lack of exercise are inter-related lifestyle factors that can profoundly alter our biological make-up to increase cancer risk, growth and development. We recently reported a potential mechanistic link between carbohydrate derived metabolites and cancer which may provide a biological consequence of lifestyle that can directly impact tumor biology. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are reactive metabolites produced as a by-product of sugar metabolism. F...

  6. Fluorescent advanced glycation end products in the detection of factual stages of cartilage degeneration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Handl, M.; Filová, Eva; Kubala, M.; Lánský, Z.; Koláčná, Lucie; Vorlíček, Jaroslav; Trč, T.; Amler, Evžen

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2007), s. 235-242 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400110403; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500390702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Nonenzymic glycation * Cartilage * Knee joint Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  7. Anti-glycated and antiradical activities in vitro of polysaccharides from Ganoderma capense

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Chunyan; Kong, Fansheng; Zhang, Dezhi; Cui, Jiangxia

    2013-01-01

    Background : Ganoderma capense is a Ganoderma species and is widely used, especially in Asia, as a well-known medicinal mushroom for health-promoting effect and for treatment of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, aging, etc. G. capense is rich of polysaccharide. Objective: To isolate the polysaccharides from G. capense and evaluate their anti-glycated and antiradical activities in vitro. Materials and Methods : The dried powder of submerged fermentation culturing mycelium of G. capense was d...

  8. Analysis of glycated hemoglobin A1c by capillary electrophoresis and capillary isoelectric focusing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koval, Dušan; Kašička, Václav; Cottet, H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 413, č. 1 (2011), s. 8-15 ISSN 0003-2697 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/09/P485; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : capillary zone electrophoresis * capillary isoelectric focusing * glycated hemoglobin HbA1c Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.996, year: 2011

  9. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halgren, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft 2 ) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  10. The in vitro effects of advanced glycation end products on basophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kaiyu; Suzukawa, Maho; Yamaguchi, Masao; Sugimoto, Naoya; Nakase, Yuko; Toda, Takako; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Basophils are thought to play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions, but their roles in inflammation associated with systemic abnormalities such as metabolic disorders remain largely unknown. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are potentially important substances produced in high-glucose disease conditions. In this in vitro study, we investigated whether the biological functions of human basophils can be influenced by AGEs. We analyzed the effects of AGEs on various functions and markers of human basophils, including CD11b expression, apoptosis, degranulation, and cytokine production. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the level of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on the surface of freshly isolated basophils was very low but was clearly upregulated by IL-3. Apoptosis of basophils was induced by high concentrations of glycated albumin. Although glycated albumin failed to affect the level of surface CD11b expression or to trigger degranulation or production of IL-4 and IL-13 in basophils, it dose-dependently induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. AGEs seem to act on human basophils; they suppress the cells' longevity but elicit secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Through these biological changes, basophils might play some roles in inflammatory conditions associated with metabolic disorders presenting elevated levels of AGEs. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Glycation and transglutaminase mediated glycosylation of fish gelatin peptides with glucosamine enhance bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pui Khoon; Gottardi, Davide; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Betti, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    A mixture of novel glycopeptides from glycosylation between cold water fish skin gelatin hydrolysates and glucosamine (GlcN) via transglutaminase (TGase), as well as glycation between fish gelatin hydrolysate and GlcN were identified by their pattern of molecular distribution using MALDI-TOF-MS. Glycated/glycosylated hydrolysates showed superior bioactivity to their original hydrolysates. Alcalase-derived fish skin gelatin hydrolysate glycosylated with GlcN in the presence of TGase at 25°C (FAT25) possessed antioxidant activity when tested in a linoleic acid oxidation system, when measured according to its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity and when tested at the cellular level with human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells as target cells. In addition, Alcalase-derived glycosylated hydrolysates showed specificity toward the inhibition of Escherichia coli (E. coli). The Flavourzyme-derived glycopeptides prepared at 37°C (FFC37 and FFT37) showed better DPPH scavenging activity than their native hydrolysates. The glycated Flavourzyme-derived hydrolysates were found to act as potential antimicrobial agents when incubated with E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Caffeic acid attenuates the inflammatory stress induced by glycated LDL in human endothelial cells by mechanisms involving inhibition of AGE-receptor, oxidative, and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Laura; Sanda, Gabriela M; Niculescu, Loredan S; Deleanu, Mariana; Stancu, Camelia S; Sima, Anca V

    2017-09-10

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a worldwide epidemic and its atherosclerotic complications determine the high morbidity and mortality of diabetic patients. Caffeic acid (CAF), a phenolic acid present in normal diets, is known for its antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate CAF's anti-inflammatory properties and its mechanism of action, using cultured human endothelial cells (HEC) incubated with glycated low-density lipoproteins (gLDL). Levels of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), inflammatory stress markers (C reactive protein, CRP; vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, VCAM-1; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1), and oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) markers were evaluated in gLDL-exposed HEC, in the presence/absence of CAF. RAGE silencing or blocking, specific inhibitors for oxidative stress (apocynin, N-acetyl-cysteine), and ERS (salubrinal) were used. The results showed that: (i) gLDL induced CRP synthesis and secretion through mechanisms involving NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidative stress and ERS in HEC; (ii) gLDL-RAGE interaction, oxidative stress, and ERS stimulated the secretion of VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in HEC; and (iii) CAF reduced the secretion of CRP, VCAM-1, and MCP-1 in gLDL-exposed HEC by inhibiting RAGE expression, oxidative stress, and ERS. In conclusion, CAF might be a promising alternative to ameliorate a wide spectrum of disorders due to its complex mechanisms of action resulting in anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. © 2017 BioFactors, 43(5):685-697, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Methionine Oxidation in Monoclonal Antibodies from Hydrogen Peroxide Spiking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ada; Lam, Xanthe M; Kuehl, Christopher; Grauschopf, Ulla; Wang, Y John

    2015-01-01

    When isolator technology is applied to biotechnology drug product fill-finish process, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) spiking studies for the determination of the sensitivity of protein to residual peroxide in the isolator can be useful for assessing a maximum vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP) level. When monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug products were spiked with H2O2, an increase in methionine (Met 252 and Met 428) oxidation in the Fc region of the mAbs with a decrease in H2O2 concentration was observed for various levels of spiked-in peroxide. The reaction between Fc-Met and H2O2 was stoichiometric (i.e., 1:1 molar ratio), and the reaction rate was dependent on the concentrations of mAb and H2O2. The consumption of H2O2 by Fc-Met oxidation in the mAb followed pseudo first-order kinetics, and the rate was proportional to mAb concentration. The extent of Met 428 oxidation was half of that of Met 252, supporting that Met 252 is twice as reactive as Met 428. Similar results were observed for free L-methionine when spiked with H2O2. However, mAb formulation excipients may affect the rate of H2O2 consumption. mAb formulations containing trehalose or sucrose had faster H2O2 consumption rates than formulations without the sugars, which could be the result of impurities (e.g., metal ions) present in the excipients that may act as catalysts. Based on the H2O2 spiking study results, we can predict the amount Fc-Met oxidation for a given protein concentration and H2O2 level. Our kinetic modeling of the reaction between Fc-Met oxidation and H2O2 provides an outline to design a H2O2 spiking study to support the use of VPHP isolator for antibody drug product manufacture. Isolator technology is increasing used in drug product manufacturing of biotherapeutics. In order to understand the impact of residual vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP) levels on protein product quality, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) spiking studies may be performed to determine the sensitivity of monoclonal antibody

  14. Tyrosine-lipid peroxide adducts from radical termination: para coupling and intramolecular Diels-Alder cyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepin, Roman; Möller, Matias N; Kim, Hye-young H; Hatch, Duane M; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael; Porter, Ned A

    2010-12-15

    Free radical co-oxidation of polyunsaturated lipids with tyrosine or phenolic analogues of tyrosine gave rise to lipid peroxide-tyrosine (phenol) adducts in both aqueous micellar and organic solutions. The novel adducts were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry (MS). The spectral data suggest that the polyunsaturated lipid peroxyl radicals give stable peroxide coupling products exclusively at the para position of the tyrosyl (phenoxy) radicals. These adducts have characteristic (13)C chemical shifts at 185 ppm due to the cross-conjugated carbonyl of the phenol-derived cyclohexadienone. The primary peroxide adducts subsequently undergo intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) cyclization, affording a number of diastereomeric tricyclic adducts that have characteristic carbonyl (13)C chemical shifts at ~198 ppm. All of the NMR HMBC and HSQC correlations support the structure assignments of the primary and Diels-Alder adducts, as does MS collision-induced dissociation data. Kinetic rate constants and activation parameters for the IMDA reaction were determined, and the primary adducts were reduced with cuprous ion to give a phenol-derived 4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienone. No products from adduction of peroxyls at the phenolic ortho position were found in either the primary or cuprous reduction product mixtures. These studies provide a framework for understanding the nature of lipid-protein adducts formed by peroxyl-tyrosyl radical-radical termination processes. Coupling of lipid peroxyl radicals with tyrosyl radicals leads to cyclohexenone and cyclohexadienone adducts, which are of interest in and of themselves since, as electrophiles, they are likely targets for protein nucleophiles. One consequence of lipid peroxyl reactions with tyrosyls may therefore be protein-protein cross-links via interprotein Michael adducts.

  15. Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars Phoenix spacecraft assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derecho, I; McCoy, K B; Vaishampayan, P; Venkateswaran, K; Mogul, R

    2014-10-01

    The microbiological inventory of spacecraft and the associated assembly facility surfaces represent the primary pool of forward contaminants that may impact the integrity of life-detection missions. Herein, we report on the characterization of several strains of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter, which were isolated during the Mars Phoenix lander assembly. All Phoenix-associated Acinetobacter strains possessed very high catalase specific activities, and the specific strain, A. gyllenbergii 2P01AA, displayed a survival against hydrogen peroxide (no loss in 100 mM H2O2 for 1 h) that is perhaps the highest known among Gram-negative and non-spore-forming bacteria. Proteomic characterizations reveal a survival mechanism inclusive of proteins coupled to peroxide degradation (catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), energy/redox management (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase), protein synthesis/folding (EF-G, EF-Ts, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, DnaK), membrane functions (OmpA-like protein and ABC transporter-related protein), and nucleotide metabolism (HIT family hydrolase). Together, these survivability and biochemical parameters support the hypothesis that oxidative tolerance and the related biochemical features are the measurable phenotypes or outcomes for microbial survival in the spacecraft assembly facilities, where the low-humidity (desiccation) and clean (low-nutrient) conditions may serve as selective pressures. Hence, the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter, due to the conferred oxidative tolerances, may ultimately hinder efforts to reduce spacecraft bioburden when using chemical sterilants, thus suggesting that non-spore-forming bacteria may need to be included in the bioburden accounting for future life-detection missions.

  16. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  17. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  18. Advanced glycation end product Nε-carboxymethyllysine induces endothelial cell injury: the involvement of SHP-1-regulated VEGFR-2 dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing Hwa; Sheu, Wayne Huey Herng; Lee, Maw Rong; Lee, Wen Jane; Yi, Yu Chiao; Yang, Tzung Jie; Jen, Jen Fon; Pan, Hung Chuan; Shen, Chin Chang; Chen, Wen Bao; Tien, Hsing Ru; Sheu, Meei Ling

    2013-06-01

    N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML), a major advanced glycation end product, plays a crucial role in diabetes-induced vascular injury. The roles of protein tyrosine phosphatases and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors in CML-related endothelial cell injury are still unclear. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are a commonly used human EC type. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NADPH oxidase/reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) activation by CML inhibits the VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2, KDR/Flk-1) activation, resulting in HUVEC injury. CML significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and reduced VEGFR-2 activation in parallel with the increased SHP-1 protein expression and activity in HUVECs. Adding recombinant VEGF increased forward biological effects, which were attenuated by CML. The effects of CML on HUVECs were abolished by SHP-1 siRNA transfection. Exposure of HUVECs to CML also remarkably escalated the integration of SHP-1 with VEGFR-2. Consistently, SHP-1 siRNA transfection and pharmacological inhibitors could block this interaction and elevating [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. CML also markedly activated the NADPH oxidase and ROS production. The CML-increased SHP-1 activity in HUVECs was effectively attenuated by antioxidants. Moreover, the immunohistochemical staining of SHP-1 and CML was increased, but phospho-VEGFR-2 staining was decreased in the aortic endothelium of streptozotocin-induced and high-fat diet-induced diabetic mice. We conclude that a pathway of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1-regulated VEGFR-2 dephosphorylation through NADPH oxidase-derived ROS is involved in the CML-triggered endothelial cell dysfunction/injury. These findings suggest new insights into the development of therapeutic approaches to reduce diabetic vascular complications. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Receptor for advanced glycation end products mediates sepsis-triggered amyloid-β accumulation, Tau phosphorylation, and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparotto, Juciano; Girardi, Carolina S; Somensi, Nauana; Ribeiro, Camila T; Moreira, José C F; Michels, Monique; Sonai, Beatriz; Rocha, Mariane; Steckert, Amanda V; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Gelain, Daniel P

    2018-01-05

    Patients recovering from sepsis have higher rates of CNS morbidities associated with long-lasting impairment of cognitive functions, including neurodegenerative diseases. However, the molecular etiology of these sepsis-induced impairments is unclear. Here, we investigated the role of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration-associated changes, and cognitive dysfunction arising after sepsis recovery. Adult Wistar rats underwent cecal ligation and perforation (CLP), and serum and brain (hippocampus and prefrontal cortex) samples were obtained at days 1, 15, and 30 after the CLP. We examined these samples for systemic and brain inflammation; amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and Ser-202-phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau Ser-202 ) levels; and RAGE, RAGE ligands, and RAGE intracellular signaling. Serum markers associated with the acute proinflammatory phase of sepsis (TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6) rapidly increased and then progressively decreased during the 30-day period post-CLP, concomitant with a progressive increase in RAGE ligands (S100B, N ϵ-[carboxymethyl]lysine, HSP70, and HMGB1). In the brain, levels of RAGE and Toll-like receptor 4, glial fibrillary acidic protein and neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, and Aβ and p-Tau Ser-202 also increased during that time. Of note, intracerebral injection of RAGE antibody into the hippocampus at days 15, 17, and 19 post-CLP reduced Aβ and p-Tau Ser-202 accumulation, Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin signaling, levels of ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and behavioral deficits associated with cognitive decline. These results indicate that brain RAGE is an essential factor in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders following acute systemic inflammation. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Hyperglycemia-related advanced glycation end-products is associated with the altered phosphatidylcholine metabolism in osteoarthritis patients with diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Zhang

    Full Text Available To test whether type 2 diabetic patients have an elevated level of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs and responsible for altered phosphatidylcholine metabolism, which we recently found to be associated with osteoarthritis (OA and diabetes mellitus (DM, synovial fluid (SF and plasma samples were collected from OA patients with and without DM. Hyperglycemia-related AGEs including methylglyoxal (MG, free methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1, and protein bound N-(Carboxymethyllysine (CML and N-(Carboxyethyllysine (CEL levels were measured in both SF and plasma samples using liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry methodology. The correlation between these AGEs and phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C34:3 (PC ae C34:3 and C36:3 (PC ae C36:3 were examined. Eighty four patients with knee OA, including 46 with DM and 38 without DM, were included in the study. There was no significant difference in plasma levels of MG, MG-H1, CML, and CEL between OA patients with and without DM. However, the levels of MG and MG-H1, but not CML and CEL in SF were significantly higher in OA patients with DM than in those without (all p ≤0.04. This association strengthened after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI, sex and hexose level (p<0.02. Moreover, the levels of MG-H1 in SF was negatively and significantly correlated with PC ae C34:3 (ρ = -0.34; p = 0.02 and PC ae C36:3 (ρ = -0.39; P = 0.03 after the adjustment of age, BMI, sex and hexose level. Our data indicated that the production of non-protein bound AGEs was increased within the OA-affected joint of DM patients. This is associated with changes in phosphatidylcholine metabolism and might be responsible for the observed epidemiological association between OA and DM.

  1. Unusual adaptive, cross protection responses and growth phase resistance against peroxide killing in a bacterial shrimp pathogen, Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattanaviboon, P; Mongkolsuk, S

    2001-06-12

    Oxidant induced protection against peroxide killing was investigated in a prawn bacterial pathogen, Vibrio harveyi. Exposure to 250 microM H(2)O(2) induced adaptive protection against subsequent exposure to killing concentrations of H(2)O(2). In addition, 200 microM t-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) induced cross protection to H(2)O(2) killing. On the other hand, peroxide pretreatment did not induce protection against tBOOH killing. Peroxide induced adaptive and cross protection responses required new protein synthesis and were abolished by addition of a protein synthesis inhibitor. Pretreatments of V. harveyi with 250 microM H(2)O(2) and 200 microM tBOOH induced an increase in peroxide scavenging enzymes, catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C. In addition, stationary phase cells of V. harveyi were more resistant to H(2)O(2) and iodoacetamide killing but highly susceptible to tBOOH killing compared to exponential phase cells. Many aspects of the oxidative stress response of V. harveyi are different from those of other bacteria and these factors may be important for bacterial survival in the environment and during interactions with host shrimp.

  2. NOX4-dependent Hydrogen peroxide promotes shear stress-induced SHP2 sulfenylation and eNOS activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Calvo, Enrique; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Fierro-Fernández, Marta; Anilkumar, Narayana; Shah, Ajay M; Schröder, Katrin; Brandes, Ralf P; Vázquez, Jesús; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Laminar shear stress (LSS) triggers signals that ultimately result in atheroprotection and vasodilatation. Early responses are related to the activation of specific signaling cascades. We investigated the participation of redox-mediated modifications and in particular the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the sulfenylation of redox-sensitive phosphatases. Exposure of vascular endothelial cells to short periods of LSS (12 dyn/cm(2)) resulted in the generation of superoxide radical anion as detected by the formation of 2-hydroxyethidium by HPLC and its subsequent conversion to H2O2, which was corroborated by the increase in the fluorescence of the specific peroxide sensor HyPer. By using biotinylated dimedone we detected increased total protein sulfenylation in the bovine proteome, which was dependent on NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4)-mediated generation of peroxide. Mass spectrometry analysis allowed us to identify the phosphatase SHP2 as a protein susceptible to sulfenylation under LSS. Given the dependence of FAK activity on SHP2 function, we explored the role of FAK under LSS conditions. FAK activation and subsequent endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation were promoted by LSS and both processes were dependent on NOX4, as demonstrated in lung endothelial cells isolated from NOX4-null mice. These results support the idea that LSS elicits redox-sensitive signal transduction responses involving NOX4-dependent generation of hydrogen peroxide, SHP2 sulfenylation, and ulterior FAK-mediated eNOS activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ageing mechanisms in chickpea seeds: Relationship of sugar hydrolysis and lipid peroxidation with Amadori and Millard reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahdi shaaban

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was performed in order to study on ageing mechanisms of chickpea seeds (Cicer arietinum L. in natural storage and accelerated ageing conditions in seed laboratory of Gorgan Agricultural Science and Natural Resources, Gorgan, Iran at 2015. Experiment was in completely randomized design arrangement with four replications. Treatments were 2 and 4 years natural storage and 1-5 days of accelerated ageing with control treatment. The results showed that with increasing of natural storage and accelerated ageing duration, germination percentage was decreased. Increasing of ageing duration decreased soluble sugars, non-reducing sugars and soluble proteins but lipid peroxidation, reducing sugars, protein carbonylation and Amadori and Millard reaction were increased. In natural storage condition lipid peroxidation was more than sugar hydrolysis but in accelerated ageing condition sugar hydrolysis was more than lipid peroxidation. These results show that the main reason of Amadori and Millard reaction in chickpea seeds in natural storage condition is lipid peroxidation and in accelerated ageing condition is sugar hydrolysis. Also, the results showed that Amadori reaction in natural storage condition was more than Amadori reaction and in accelerated ageing condition Millard reaction was more than Amadori reaction. The results of the present study showed that sever Millard reaction after Amadori reaction induced higher damage on seed and results to more decrease of seed viability and reduce of seed germination percentage in accelerated ageing than natural storage.

  4. Bruton's tyrosine kinase is essential for hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, S; Chock, P B

    2001-07-10

    Using Btk-deficient DT40 cells and the transfectants expressing wild-type Btk or Btk mutants in either kinase (Arg(525) to Gln), Src homology 2 (SH2, Arg(307) to Ala), or pleckstrin homology (PH, Arg(28) to Cys) domains, we investigated the roles and structure-function relationships of Btk in hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium mobilization. Our genetic evidence showed that Btk deficiency resulted in a significant reduction in hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium response. This impaired calcium signaling is correlated with the complete elimination of IP3 production and the significantly reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma2 in Btk-deficient DT40 cells. All of these defects were fully restored by the expression of wild-type Btk in Btk-deficient DT40 cells. The data from the point mutation study revealed that a defect at any one of the three functional domains would prevent a full recovery of Btk-mediated hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular calcium mobilization. However, mutation at either the SH2 or PH domain did not affect the hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of Btk. Mutation at the SH2 domain abrogates both IP3 generation and calcium release, while the mutant with the nonfunctional PH domain can partially activate PLCgamma2 and catalyze IP3 production but fails to produce significant calcium mobilization. Thus, these observations suggest that Btk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma2 is required but not sufficient for hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium mobilization. Furthermore, hydrogen peroxide stimulates a Syk-, but not Btk-, dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of B cell linker protein BLNK. The overall results, together with those reported earlier [Qin et al. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 7118], are consistent with the notion that functional SH2 and PH domains are required for Btk to form a complex with PLCgamma2 through BLNK in order to position the Btk, PLCgamma2, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in close proximity for

  5. Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christopher R; Nyman, May; Shvareva, Tatiana; Sigmon, Ginger E; Burns, Peter C; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-02-07

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances.

  6. Electron irradiation effects on lithium peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Jun; Shiotsuki, Taishi; Shimo, Yusuke; Koshiya, Shogo; Nagai, Takuro; Nito, Takehiro; Kimoto, Koji

    2018-03-01

    In this study, electron irradiation effects on lithium peroxide (Li2O2), which is an important discharge product of Li-air (or Li-O2) batteries, were investigated using selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The results obtained show that Li2O2 to Li2O transformation occurs with 80 and 300 keV incident electrons under high electron dose rates at 20 and -183 °C. The Li2O2 to Li2O transformation rate for 300 keV was 1/5 of that for 80 keV with the irradiation taking place at -183 °C. We also present a series of the EELS spectra that can be used as a criterion to judge the molar ratio of Li2O to Li2O2 in the general systems where Li2O2 and Li2O coexist.

  7. Analysis of lipid peroxidation kinetics. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktorov, Alexander B.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden

    2008-01-01

    concentrations of reactants or different ways of initiating the re-  action. Nor has it been possible to predict the time dependence of the  products. The reason for these problems is the complicated structure  of the kinetic scheme, which includes a chain reaction. In this work  we perform an in depth analysis......  The kinetics of the lipid peroxidation reaction is only partly under-  stood. Although the set of reactions constituting the overall reaction  is believed to be known, it has not been possible to predict how the  reaction will respond to a change of one or more of the parameters, e.g.  initial...... of the importance of the individual  reaction steps and we introduce a new quasi-stationary concentration  method based on the assumption that one or more concentrations vary  much slower than the others. We show that it is justified to use a  quasi-stationary concentration approximation for the alkyl radical L...

  8. Plutonium peroxide precipitation: review and current research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, P.G.; Miner, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Increasing the HNO 3 concentration decreases the filtration time but increases the plutonium concentration in the filtrate. A compromise was therefore necessary. If a minimum plutonium concentration is required in the filtrate, the acidity could be lowered to 1.9M with an approximate doubling in the filtration time. The H 2 O 2 concentration has little effect on filtration time. However, the higher the H 2 O 2 concentration, the less plutonium lost to the filtrate. Concentrations higher than the 22 moles/mole Pu recommended (at least up to 30 molar which was the highest investigated) would be beneficial if reagent costs are not excessive and production capacity exists for destroying the excess H 2 O 2 in the filtrate. Although the effect is not large, filtration time is shorter and the plutonium concentration in the filtrate is lower if metallic impurities are present. The slowest rate of H 2 O 2 addition investigated gives a plutonium peroxide precipitate with the fastest filtration time. The rate of addition has very little effect on the plutonium concentration in the filtrate. The temperature has little effect on the filtration time. 14 0 C is recommended since decomposition of H 2 O 2 would be slower at 14 0 C than at 22 0 C (min. Pu content in the filtrate). The effect of digestion time on both the filtration time and the plutonium content in the filtrate is minor, so the shortest digestion time investigated is recommended

  9. Glutathione delays varies as-tocopherol oxidation and subsequent lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robey, S.; Mavis, R.

    1986-01-01

    A method has been developed for in vitro trace radiolabeling of rat liver microsomes with 3 H-α-tocopherol (αT*) which allows virtually complete oxidation of the αT* under oxidizing conditions. The supernatant of a 16,000 xg centrifugation of homogenized rat liver, containing the cytosolic rat liver vitamin E (VE) transfer protein, was incubated with an ethanolic solution of αT* for 10 minutes at 37 0 C. Labeled microsomes were collected in the washed 100,000 xg pellet. Microsomes were then incubated with 30 μM Fe 2+ in an NADPH-generating system, and both production of malondialdehyde (MDA) (a product of lipid peroxidation) and oxidation of αT* were monitored over a time course in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The results indicate virtually complete oxidation of αT* precedes significant membrane lipid peroxidation, and that addition of 5 mM GSH delays both αT* oxidation and subsequent MDA production. This suggests that the previously observed VE-dependent heat labile inhibition of microsomal lipid peroxidation by GSH involves maintaining membrane levels of α-tocopherol

  10. Lipid Peroxidation and Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Levels in Gastric Cancer at Pathologic Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Kemik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: High levels of TGF-β1 and enhanced TGF-β1 receptor signaling are related to the pathology of gastric cancer. This effect is caused by oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation products. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of TGF-β1 and lipid peroxidation products in gastric cancer patients and their correlation with pathologic stage. Material and Methods: Lipid peroxidation products and TGF-β1 levels were studied in the serum samples of 50 gastric cancer patients and 18 control subjects.Results: HNE-protein adducts and TGF-β1 levels were significantly higher in T2, T3 and T4 gastric cancers than in either the T1 stage or controls (p<0.001. Pathologic stage was correlated with TGF-β1 levels (r=0.702, p<0.05.Conclusion: These markers production may contribute to tumor angiogenesis and aid in the prognosis of the gastric cancer.

  11. Benfotiamine alleviates diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative damage independent of advanced glycation end-product, tissue factor and TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shan; Ren, Jun

    2006-02-13

    Diabetes mellitus leads to thiamine deficiency and multiple organ damage including diabetic neuropathy. This study was designed to examine the effect of benfotiamine, a lipophilic derivative of thiamine, on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced cerebral oxidative stress. Adult male FVB mice were made diabetic with a single injection of STZ (200 mg/kg, i.p.). Fourteen days later, control and diabetic (fasting blood glucose >13.9 mM) mice received benfotiamine (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 14 days. Oxidative stress and protein damage were evaluated by glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) assay and protein carbonyl formation, respectively. Pro-oxidative or pro-inflammatory factors including advanced glycation end-product (AGE), tissue factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were evaluated by immunoblot analysis. Four weeks STZ treatment led to hyperglycemia, enhanced cerebral oxidative stress (reduced GSH/GSSG ratio), elevated TNF-alpha and AGE levels without changes in protein carbonyl or tissue factor. Benfotiamine alleviated diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative stress without affecting levels of AGE, protein carbonyl, tissue factor and TNF-alpha. Collectively, our results indicated benfotiamine may antagonize diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative stress through a mechanism unrelated to AGE, tissue factor and TNF-alpha.

  12. Insights into the role of oxidative stress in the pathology of Friedreich ataxia using peroxidation resistant polyunsaturated fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grazia Cotticelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich ataxia is an autosomal recessive, inherited neuro- and cardio-degenerative disorder characterized by progressive ataxia of all four limbs, dysarthria, areflexia, sensory loss, skeletal deformities, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Most disease alleles have a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the first intron of the FXN gene, which decreases expression of the encoded protein frataxin. Frataxin is involved in iron–sulfur-cluster (ISC assembly in the mitochondrial matrix, and decreased frataxin is associated with ISC-enzyme and mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial iron accumulation, and increased oxidative stress. To assess the role of oxidative stress in lipid peroxidation in Friedreich ataxia we used the novel approach of treating Friedreich ataxia cell models with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs deuterated at bis-allylic sites. In ROS-driven oxidation of PUFAs, the rate-limiting step is hydrogen abstraction from a bis-allylic site; isotopic reinforcement (deuteration of bis-allylic sites slows down their peroxidation. We show that linoleic and α-linolenic acids deuterated at the peroxidation-prone bis-allylic positions actively rescue oxidative-stress-challenged Friedreich ataxia cells. The protective effect of the deuterated PUFAs is additive in our models with the protective effect of the CoQ10 analog idebenone, which is thought to decrease the production of free radicals. Moreover, the administration of deuterated PUFAs resulted in decreased lipid peroxidation as measured by the fluorescence of the fatty acid analog C11-BODIPY (581/591 probe. Our results are consistent with a role for lipid peroxidation in Friedreich ataxia pathology, and suggest that the novel approach of oral delivery of isotope-reinforced PUFAs may have therapeutic potential in Friedreich ataxia and other disorders involving oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation.

  13. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant activity in patients in labor with nonreassuring fetal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, F S; Guney, Yildiz; Dede, Hulya; Koca, Cemile; Dilbaz, Berna; Bilgihan, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate lipid peroxidation products and antioxidant enzyme activity in placental tissue and umbilical cord blood, as a marker for fetal hypoxia in patients in labor with nonreassuring fetal status. Umbilical cord arterial blood and placental tissue samples were collected from 24 patients with term pregnancies in labor and nonreassuring fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns (study) and 24 women with normal pregnancies in labor and normal FHR tracings (controls) for determination of malondialdehyde (MDA) as a marker for lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase (SOD) for the antioxidant activity. Measured values were compared statistically between two groups using independent samples t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test. The median 1min Apgar score was 8 (range 4-9) in the study group and 9 (range 8-10) in the control group, respectively (p 0.05). Placental MDA levels in patients with nonreassuring fetal status were found to be significantly elevated compared to the control group (12.14 nmol/g tissue versus 9.75 nmol/g tissue; p < 0.01). The placental SOD activity in the study group was significantly higher (p < 0.01) compared to controls (3.57 U/mg protein versus 2.63 U/mg protein). The umbilical cord blood MDA levels in the study group were higher than in normal pregnancies (4.99 nmol/mL, 3.88 nmol/mL; p < 0.05). The activity of SOD in umbilical cord blood was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in patients with nonreassuring fetal status when compared with the control group (11.62 versus 6.95 U/mL). Lipid peroxidation products and antioxidant functions were elevated in the umbilical cord blood and placenta of patients having nonreassuring FHR tracings during labor. These findings indicate that lipid peroxidation products in placenta and umbilical cord blood can be used as a possible marker for fetal hypoxia during labor and SOD levels may discriminate acute from chronic hypoxia. Further investigations are needed with large number of series to

  14. Association of peripheral neuropathy with circulating advanced glycation end products, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and other risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, C E; Michel, P-L; Gillery, P; Jaisson, S; Fonfrede, M; Morel, F; Hartemann, A; Bourron, O

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy remains uncertain and nonenzymatic glycoxidation is one of the contributing mechanisms. The aim of this study was to assess the respective relationship of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with glycoxidation, compared with other identified risk factors, in patients with type 2 diabetes. We included 198 patients with type 2 diabetes and high risk for vascular complications. Circulating concentrations of three advanced glycation end products (carboxymethyllysine, methyl-glyoxal-hydroimidazolone-1, pentosidine) and of their soluble receptor (sRAGE) were measured. Peripheral neuropathy was assessed by the neuropathy disability score and by the monofilament test and defined as either an abnormal monofilament test and/or a neuropathy disability score ≥6. Multivariate regression analyses were performed adjusting for potential confounding factors for neuropathy: age, gender, diabetes duration, current smoking, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, height, peripheral arterial occlusive disease, glycated haemoglobin, estimated glomerular filtration rate and lipid profile. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was 20.7%. sRAGE and carboxymethyllysine were independently and positively associated with the presence of peripheral neuropathy. No significant association was found between peripheral neuropathy and methyl-glyoxal-hydroimidazolone-1 or pentosidine. Waist circumference, height and peripheral arterial occlusive disease were independently associated with peripheral neuropathy. Carboxymethyllysine and sRAGE were independently associated with peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Although the conclusions are limited by the absence of a healthy control population, this study confirms the relationship between advanced glycoxidation and diabetic peripheral neuropathy, independently of other risk factors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beijing K. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies.

  16. Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) Decontamination of VX, GD, and HD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, George W; Sorrick, David C; Procell, Lawrence R; Hess, Zoe A; Brickhouse, Mark D; McVey, Iain F; Schwartz, Lewis I

    2003-01-01

    Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) has been utilized for more than a decade to sterilize clean rooms and pharmaceutical processing equipment and, quite recently, to decontaminate anthrax-ridden buildings...

  17. Gold-catalyzed oxidation of substituted phenols by hydrogen peroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Cheneviere, Yohan; Caps, Valerie; Tuel, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on inorganic supports are efficient catalysts for the oxidation of various substituted phenols (2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol and 2,3,6-trimethyl phenol) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. By contrast to more conventional

  18. Free standing graphene oxide film for hydrogen peroxide sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Pranay; Balakrishnan, Jayakumar; Thakur, Ajay D.

    2018-05-01

    We report hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)sensing using free standing graphene oxide thin films prepared using a cost effective scalable approach. Such sensors may find application in pharmaceutical and food processing industries.

  19. the effects of vitamin e supplementation on serum lipid peroxidation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. C.O.NWAIGWE

    The effects of dietary supplementation of vitamin E on feed intake and serum lipid peroxidation formation were ... belongs to the family Birnaviridae and of the genus Birnavirus ... diseases, Alzheimer's disease and increased resistance to ...

  20. Lab-scale hydrogen peroxide data from ECBC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from small lab scale tests conducted at ECBC. It contains efficacy data as well as data on env conditions such as temperature, RH, and hydrogen peroxide vapor...

  1. Potentiometric Titration Method for Quantitative Determination of Hydrogen Peroxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bessette, Russell R

    2005-01-01

    An electrochemical potentiometric titration method that entails titration of a known volume of a catholyte containing an unknown amount of hydrogen peroxide in a titration cell having two electrodes...

  2. Efficacy of Mouthwashes Containing Hydrogen Peroxide on Tooth Whitening

    OpenAIRE

    Karadas, Muhammet; Hatipoglu, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mouthwashes containing hydrogen peroxide compared with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel. Fifty enamel-dentin samples were obtained from bovine incisors and then stained in a tea solution. The stained samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening product applied (n = 10): AS: no whitening (negative control), with the samples stored in artificial saliva; CR: Crest 3D White mouthwash; LS: Listerine Whitening mouthwas...

  3. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  4. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, we found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking all eight thiol peroxidases were viable and withstood redox stresses. They transcriptionally responded to various redox treatments, but were unable to activate and repress gene expression in response to H2O2. Further studies involving redox transcription factors suggested that thiol peroxidases are major regulators of global gene expression in response to H2O2. The data suggest that thiol peroxidases sense and transfer oxidative signals to the signaling proteins and regulate transcription, whereas a direct interaction between H2O2 and other cellular proteins plays a secondary role. PMID:21282621

  5. Physico Chemical Characteristic of Kappa Carrageenan Degraded Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky Febriansyah Siregar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractKappa carrageenan is polysaccharide that widely used in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile and printing industries as coagulate agent, stabilizer and gelling agent. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is strong oxidator to degrade polysaccharide. Hydrogen peroxide has some advantades such as cheap, easy to get and savety environment. Degradation method using hydrogen peroxide is a technology based on establishment radical hydoxile reactive that attack the glycosidic of polysaccharides as a result reducing in molecular weight of polysaccharide. The aims of this study were to analyze the effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature and degradation time to molecular weight of refined kappa carrageenan. Structural changes on kappa carrageenan degradation were characterized by viscometer, SEM and FTIR. Hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature and degradation time were significantly reducing molecular weight and changes in the structural function of refined kappa carrageenan. The lowest molecular weight of refined kappa carrageenan degraded was obtained from the treatment 3% of hydrogen peroxide at temperature 80°C and degradation time for 4 hours.

  6. Bacillus pumilus KatX2 confers enhanced hydrogen peroxide resistance to a Bacillus subtilis PkatA::katX2 mutant strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handtke, Stefan; Albrecht, Dirk; Zühlke, Daniela; Otto, Andreas; Becher, Dörte; Schweder, Thomas; Riedel, Kathrin; Hecker, Michael; Voigt, Birgit

    2017-04-26

    Bacillus pumilus cells exhibit a significantly higher resistance to hydrogen peroxide compared to closely related Bacilli like Bacillus subtilis. In this study we analyzed features of the catalase KatX2 of B. pumilus as one of the most important parts of the cellular response to hydrogen peroxide. KatX2, the vegetative catalase expressed in B. pumilus, was compared to the vegetative catalase KatA of B. subtilis. Data of our study demonstrate that B. pumilus can degrade toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide faster than B. subtilis. By replacing B. subtilis katA gene by katX2 we could significantly enhance its resistance to H 2 O 2 and its potential to eliminate this toxic compound. Mutant cells showed a 1.5- to 2-fold higher survival to toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide compared to wild type cells. Furthermore, we found reversible but also irreversible oxidations of the KatX2 protein which, in contrast to KatA, contains several cysteine residues. Our study indicates that the catalase KatX2 plays a major role in the increased resistance of B. pumilus to oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide. Resistance to hydrogen peroxide of other Bacilli can be enhanced by exchanging the native catalase in the cells with katX2.

  7. [Therapeutically active dressings--biomaterials in a study of collagen glycation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Paluch, Jadwiga

    2012-01-01

    Active dressings (biomaterials, hydrogels) are cross-linked three-dimensional macromolecular networks. One of the most important properties of active dressings, is their ability for controlled uptake, release and retention of molecules. The formation of advanced glycation end products AGEs progressively increases with normal aging. However, AGE products are formed at accelerated rates in age and stress-related diseases (burns, in wound healing) and also in vitro. The aim will be also to develop a series of gels showing ability of controlled uptake, release and retention of molecules. The hydrogels can be used as biologically and therapeutically (antibacterial and anticancer) active biomaterials. The following materials and reagents were used in the examination: dried plants: Equisetum arvense L., Pulmonaria officinalis L., Agropyron repens. Non-defatted films were extracted from the dried plants. The suspension was stirred and extracted. Temperature was controlled using a water bath. The filtrate was vacuum condensed. The gelling precipitate was poured onto Petri plates and dried. The swelling ratio and the percent loading were calculated. The released amount of CaCl2 at different time intervals was determined by measuring the conductivity. The extent of glycation in collagen was measured. Novel types of swelling hydrogels have been prepared from dried plants and alginic acid. The active dressings showed swelling in aqueous medium, swelling characteristics were dependent on the chemical composition of hydrogel. The hydrogels were also loaded with CaCl2 and their potential for release was judged by measuring conductivity. The activity of hydrogels--active dressings on collagen incubated with glucose showed an decrease in glycation. So, hydrogels--active dressings, a known antiglycating agent which have therapeutic role in wound healing.

  8. Effects of photobleaching on selected advanced glycation end products in the human lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Thomas; Raghavan, Cibin T; Nahomi, Rooban

    2015-01-01

    at examining the optical and biochemical effects of the proposed treatment.MethodsHuman donor lenses were photobleaced using a 445 nm cw laser. Lens optical quality was assessed before and after photobleaching by light transmission and scattering. The concentration of the advanced glycation end products (AGEs...... of the photobleaching treatment on lens optical parameters but we could not associate the optical findings to a change in the concentration of the AGEs we measured. This finding suggests that other AGEs were responsible for the observed photobleaching of the human lens after laser treatment. The biochemical nature...

  9. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillebrands Jan-Luuk

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs.

  10. Association of glycated hemoglobin with carotid intimal medial thickness in Asian Indians with normal glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Vijayachandrika; Amutha, Anandakumar; Anbalagan, Viknesh Prabu; Deepa, Mohan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Vamsi, Mamilla; Mohan, Viswananthan

    2012-01-01

    To assess the association of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels with carotid intimal medial thickness (CIMT) in Asian Indians with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Subjects with NGT were recruited from the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study carried out on a representative population of Chennai, South India. All subjects had fasting plasma glucose right common carotid artery using high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. The study group included 1383 NGT subjects, of whom 760 (54.9%) were women. The mean CIMT value in the 1st quartile of HbA1c (5.8) (prights reserved.

  11. Linoleic Acid-Induced Ultra-Weak Photon Emission from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a Tool for Monitoring of Lipid Peroxidation in the Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ankush; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species formed as a response to various abiotic and biotic stresses cause an oxidative damage of cellular component such are lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Lipid peroxidation is considered as one of the major processes responsible for the oxidative damage of the polyunsaturated fatty acid in the cell membranes. Various methods such as a loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids, amount of the primary and the secondary products are used to monitor the level of lipid peroxidation. To investigate the use of ultra-weak photon emission as a non-invasive tool for monitoring of lipid peroxidation, the involvement of lipid peroxidation in ultra-weak photon emission was studied in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Lipid peroxidation initiated by addition of exogenous linoleic acid to the cells was monitored by ultra-weak photon emission measured with the employment of highly sensitive charged couple device camera and photomultiplier tube. It was found that the addition of linoleic acid to the cells significantly increased the ultra-weak photon emission that correlates with the accumulation of lipid peroxidation product as measured using thiobarbituric acid assay. Scavenging of hydroxyl radical by mannitol, inhibition of intrinsic lipoxygenase by catechol and removal of molecular oxygen considerably suppressed ultra-weak photon emission measured after the addition of linoleic acid. The photon emission dominated at the red region of the spectrum with emission maximum at 680 nm. These observations reveal that the oxidation of linoleic acid by hydroxyl radical and intrinsic lipoxygenase results in the ultra-weak photon emission. Electronically excited species such as excited triplet carbonyls are the likely candidates for the primary excited species formed during the lipid peroxidation, whereas chlorophylls are the final emitters of photons. We propose here that the ultra-weak photon emission can be used as a non-invasive tool for the

  12. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid-induced generation of liver lipid peroxides is not suppressed further by elevated levels of glutathione in ODS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Seiji; Kubo, Kazuhiro; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Saito, Morio

    2006-04-01

    We examined the effects of ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH; experiment 1) and of GSH in acetaminophen-fed rats (experiment 2) on dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced tissue lipid peroxidation. In experiment 1, AsA-requiring Osteogenic Disorder Shionogi/Shi-od/od (ODS) rats were fed soybean protein diets containing DHA (10.0% total energy) and AsA at 50 (low) or 300 (normal) mg/kg without (low) or with (normal) methionine at 2 g/kg for 32 d. In experiment 2, ODS rats were fed diets containing DHA (7.8% total energy) and acetaminophen (4 g/kg) with different levels of dietary methionine (low, moderate, high, and excessive at 0, 3, 6, and 9 g/kg, respectively) for 30 d. Tissue lipid peroxides and antioxidant levels were determined. In experiment 1, liver lipid peroxide levels in the low-AsA group were lower than those in the normal-AsA group, but kidney and testis lipid peroxide levels in the low-AsA group were higher than those in the normal-AsA group. Dietary methionine tended to decrease tissue lipid peroxide levels but did not decrease vitamin E (VE) consumption. In experiment 2, a high level of methionine (6 g/kg) decreased liver lipid peroxide levels and VE consumption. However, generation of tissue lipid peroxides and VE consumption were not decreased further by a higher dose of methionine (9 g/kg). Higher than normal levels of dietary methionine are not necessarily associated with decreased dietary DHA-induced generation of tissue lipid peroxides and VE consumption except that the GSH requirement is increased in a condition such as acetaminophen feeding.

  13. Linoleic acid-induced ultra-weak photon emission from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a tool for monitoring of lipid peroxidation in the cell membranes.

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    Ankush Prasad

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species formed as a response to various abiotic and biotic stresses cause an oxidative damage of cellular component such are lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Lipid peroxidation is considered as one of the major processes responsible for the oxidative damage of the polyunsaturated fatty acid in the cell membranes. Various methods such as a loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids, amount of the primary and the secondary products are used to monitor the level of lipid peroxidation. To investigate the use of ultra-weak photon emission as a non-invasive tool for monitoring of lipid peroxidation, the involvement of lipid peroxidation in ultra-weak photon emission was studied in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Lipid peroxidation initiated by addition of exogenous linoleic acid to the cells was monitored by ultra-weak photon emission measured with the employment of highly sensitive charged couple device camera and photomultiplier tube. It was found that the addition of linoleic acid to the cells significantly increased the ultra-weak photon emission that correlates with the accumulation of lipid peroxidation product as measured using thiobarbituric acid assay. Scavenging of hydroxyl radical by mannitol, inhibition of intrinsic lipoxygenase by catechol and removal of molecular oxygen considerably suppressed ultra-weak photon emission measured after the addition of linoleic acid. The photon emission dominated at the red region of the spectrum with emission maximum at 680 nm. These observations reveal that the oxidation of linoleic acid by hydroxyl radical and intrinsic lipoxygenase results in the ultra-weak photon emission. Electronically excited species such as excited triplet carbonyls are the likely candidates for the primary excited species formed during the lipid peroxidation, whereas chlorophylls are the final emitters of photons. We propose here that the ultra-weak photon emission can be used as a non

  14. Characterizing harmful advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and ribosylated aggregates of yellow mustard seed phytocystatin: Effects of different monosaccharides

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    Ahmed, Azaj; Shamsi, Anas; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are at the core of variety of diseases ranging from diabetes to renal failure and hence gaining wide consideration. This study was aimed at characterizing the AGEs of phytocystatin isolated from mustard seeds (YMP) when incubated with different monosaccharides (glucose, ribose and mannose) using fluorescence, ultraviolet, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and microscopy. Ribose was found to be the most potent glycating agent as evident by AGEs specific fluorescence and absorbance. YMP exists as a molten globule like structure on day 24 as depicted by high ANS fluorescence and altered intrinsic fluorescence. Glycated YMP as AGEs and ribose induced aggregates were observed at day 28 and 32 respectively. In our study we have also examined the anti-aggregative potential of polyphenol, resveratrol. Our results suggested the anti-aggregative behavior of resveratrol as it prevented the in vitro aggregation of YMP, although further studies are required to decode the mechanism by which resveratrol prevents the aggregation.

  15. Accumulation of carbonyls accelerates the formation of pentosidine, an advanced glycation end product: carbonyl stress in uremia.

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    Miyata, T; Ueda, Y; Yamada, Y; Izuhara, Y; Wada, T; Jadoul, M; Saito, A; Kurokawa, K; van Ypersele de Strihou, C

    1998-12-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation is related to hyperglycemia in diabetes but not in uremia, because plasma AGE levels do not differ between diabetic and nondiabetic hemodialysis patients. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains elusive. Previously, it was suggested that elevation of AGE levels in uremia might result from the accumulation of unknown AGE precursors. The present study evaluates the in vitro generation of pentosidine, a well identified AGE structure. Plasma samples from healthy subjects and nondiabetic hemodialysis patients were incubated under air for several weeks. Pentosidine levels were determined at intervals by HPLC assay. Pentosidine rose to a much larger extent in uremic than in control plasma. Pentosidine yield, i.e., the change in pentosidine level between 0 and 4 wk divided by 28 d, averaged 0.172 nmol/ml per d in uremic versus 0.072 nmol/ml per d in control plasma (P aminoguanidine and OPB-9195, which inhibit the Maillard reaction, lowered pentosidine yield in both uremic and control plasma. When ultrafiltrated plasma was exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, the yield of hydrazones, formed by interaction with carbonyl groups, was markedly higher in uremic than in control plasma. These observations strongly suggest that the pentosidine precursors accumulated in uremic plasma are carbonyl compounds. These precursors are unrelated to glucose or ascorbic acid, whose concentration is either normal or lowered in uremic plasma. They are also unrelated to 3-deoxyglucosone, a glucose-derived dicarbonyl compound whose level is raised in uremic plasma: Its addition to normal plasma fails to increase pentosidine yield. This study reports an elevated level of reactive carbonyl compounds ("carbonyl stress") in uremic plasma. Most have a lower than 5000 Da molecular weight and are thus partly removed by hemodialysis. Their effect on pentosidine generation can be inhibited by aminoguanidine or OPB-9195. Carbonyl stress might contribute to

  16. Effects of Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor L-mimosine on Dental Pulp in the Presence of Advanced Glycation End Products.

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    Müller, Heinz-Dieter; Cvikl, Barbara; Janjić, Klara; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Moritz, Andreas; Gruber, Reinhard; Agis, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Proangiogenic prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibitors represent a novel approach to stimulate tissue regeneration. Diabetes mellitus involves the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Here we evaluated the impact of AGEs on the response of human pulp tissue to the PHD inhibitor L-mimosine (L-MIM) in monolayer cultures of dental pulp-derived cells (DPCs) and tooth slice organ cultures. In monolayer cultures, DPCs were incubated with L-MIM and AGEs. Viability was assessed based on formazan formation, live-dead staining, annexin V/propidium iodide, and trypan blue exclusion assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 production was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoassays. Furthermore, expression levels of odontoblast markers were assessed, and alizarin red staining was performed. Tooth slice organ cultures were performed, and VEGF, IL-6, and IL8 levels in their supernatants were measured by immunoassays. Pulp tissue vitality and morphology were assessed by MTT assay and histology. In monolayer cultures of DPCs, L-MIM at nontoxic concentrations increased the production of VEGF and IL-8 in the presence of AGEs. Stimulation with L-MIM decreased alkaline phosphatase levels and matrix mineralization also in the presence of AGEs, whereas no significant changes in dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialophosphoprotein expression were observed. In tooth slice organ cultures, L-MIM increased VEGF but not IL-6 and IL-8 production in the presence of AGEs. The pulp tissue was vital, and no signs of apoptosis or necrosis were observed. Overall, in the presence of AGEs, L-MIM increases the proangiogenic capacity, but decreases alkaline phosphatase expression and matrix mineralization. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced Glycation End Products Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Inhibiting Cathepsin D

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    Yuan Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the effect of advanced glycation end products (AGEs on the proliferation and migration ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Cell proliferation was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay, real-time cell analyzer and 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU staining. Cell migration was detected by wound-healing and transwell assay. AGEs significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of HUVECs in a time-and dose-dependent way. Western blotting revealed that AGEs dramatically increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3 II/I and p62. Immunofluorescence of p62 and acridine orange staining revealed that AGEs significantly increased the expression of p62 and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, respectively. Chloroquine (CQ could further promote the expression of LC3 II/I and p62, increase the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and promote cell injury induced by AGEs. In addition, AGEs reduced cathepsin D (CTSD expression in a time-dependent way. Overexpression of wild-type CTSD significantly decreased the ratio of LC 3 II/I as well as p62 accumulation induced by AGEs, but overexpression of catalytically inactive mutant CTSD had no such effects. Only overexpression of wild-type CTSD could restore the proliferation of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. However, overexpression of both wild-type CTSD and catalytically inactive mutant CTSD could promote the migration of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. Collectively, our study found that AGEs inhibited the proliferation and migration in HUVECs and promoted autophagic flux, which in turn played a protective role against AGEs-induced cell injury. CTSD, in need of its catalytic activity, may promote proliferation in AGEs-treated HUVECs independent of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Meanwhile, CTSD could improve the migration of AGEs-treated HUVECs regardless of its enzymatic activity.

  18. Advanced Glycation End Products Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Inhibiting Cathepsin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Chang, Ye; Ye, Ning; Dai, Dongxue; Chen, Yintao; Zhang, Naijin; Sun, Guozhe; Sun, Yingxian

    2017-02-17

    We aimed to investigate the effect of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on the proliferation and migration ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Cell proliferation was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, real-time cell analyzer and 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. Cell migration was detected by wound-healing and transwell assay. AGEs significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of HUVECs in a time-and dose-dependent way. Western blotting revealed that AGEs dramatically increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) II/I and p62. Immunofluorescence of p62 and acridine orange staining revealed that AGEs significantly increased the expression of p62 and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, respectively. Chloroquine (CQ) could further promote the expression of LC3 II/I and p62, increase the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and promote cell injury induced by AGEs. In addition, AGEs reduced cathepsin D (CTSD) expression in a time-dependent way. Overexpression of wild-type CTSD significantly decreased the ratio of LC 3 II/I as well as p62 accumulation induced by AGEs, but overexpression of catalytically inactive mutant CTSD had no such effects. Only overexpression of wild-type CTSD could restore the proliferation of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. However, overexpression of both wild-type CTSD and catalytically inactive mutant CTSD could promote the migration of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. Collectively, our study found that AGEs inhibited the proliferation and migration in HUVECs and promoted autophagic flux, which in turn played a protective role against AGEs-induced cell injury. CTSD, in need of its catalytic activity, may promote proliferation in AGEs-treated HUVECs independent of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Meanwhile, CTSD could improve the migration of AGEs-treated HUVECs regardless of its enzymatic activity.

  19. Hepatic microvascular dysfunction and increased advanced glycation end products are components of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

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    Pereira, Evelyn Nunes Goulart da Silva; Silvares, Raquel Rangel; Flores, Edgar Eduardo Ilaquita; Rodrigues, Karine Lino; Ramos, Isalira Peroba; da Silva, Igor José; Machado, Marcelo Pelajo; Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Pazos-Moura, Carmen Cabanelas; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano F; Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire de Castro; Tibiriça, Eduardo; Daliry, Anissa

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pathophysiology of hepatic microcirculatory dysfunction in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In Wistar rats, NAFLD model was induced by 20 weeks of high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Rolling and adhesion of leukocytes and tissue perfusion in hepatic microcirculation were examined using in vivo microscopic and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), respectively. Oxidative stress and inflamatory parameters were analysed by TBARs, catalase enzyme activity, RT-PCR and ELISA. The participation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and its receptor RAGE was evaluated by the measurement of gene and protein expression of RAGE by RT-PCR and Western-blot, respectively and by liver and serum quantification of fluorescent AGEs. Wistar rats fed high-fat diet (HFD) showed increase in epididymal and abdominal fat content, systolic arterial blood pressure, fasting blood glucose levels, hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol, and impairment of glucose and insulin metabolisms. Liver histology confirmed the presence of steatosis and ultrasound analysis revealed increased liver size and parenchymal echogenicity in HFD-fed rats. HFD causes significant increases in leukocyte rolling and adhesion on hepatic microcirculation and decrease in liver microvascular blood flow. Liver tissue presented increase in oxidative stress and inflammtion. At 20 weeks, there was a significantly increase in AGE content in the liver and serum of HFD-fed rats and an increase in RAGE gene expression in the liver. The increase in liver AGE levels and microcirculatory disturbances could play a role in the pathogenesis of liver injury and are key components of NAFLD.

  20. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: A Mechanism for Vascular Calcification

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    Sayo Koike

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification, especially medial artery calcification, is associated with cardiovascular death in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD. To determine the underlying mechanism of vascular calcification, we have demonstrated in our previous report that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs stimulated calcium deposition in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through excessive oxidative stress and phenotypic transition into osteoblastic cells. Since AGEs can induce apoptosis, in this study we investigated its role on VSMC apoptosis, focusing mainly on the underlying mechanisms. A rat VSMC line (A7r5 was cultured, and treated with glycolaldehyde-derived AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE3-BSA. Apoptotic cells were identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. To quantify apoptosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for histone-complexed DNA fragments was employed. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels. Treatment of A7r5 cells with AGE3-BSA from 100 µg/mL concentration markedly increased apoptosis, which was suppressed by Nox inhibitors. AGE3-BSA significantly increased the mRNA expression of NAD(PH oxidase components including Nox4 and p22phox, and these findings were confirmed by protein levels using immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidisum assay showed that compared with cBSA, AGE3-BSA increased reactive oxygen species level in A7r5 cells. Furthermore, AGE3-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nox4 or p22phox. Double knockdown of Nox4 and p22phox showed a similar inhibitory effect on apoptosis as single gene silencing. Thus, our results demonstrated that NAD(PH oxidase-derived oxidative stress are involved in AGEs-induced apoptosis of VSMCs. These findings might be important to understand the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in diabetes and CKD.

  1. Utility of glycated albumin for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in a Japanese population study: results from the Kyushu and Okinawa Populaiton Study (KOPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glycated albumin is a measure of the mean plasma glucose concentration over approximately 2-3 weeks. We determined reference values for glycated albumin, and assessed its utility for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the general population. We studied 1,575 men and women (mean age, 49.9 y...

  2. Spectroscopic studies of europium-tetracyclines complexes and their applications in detection of hydrogen peroxide and urea peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, Andrea Nastri

    2010-01-01

    In this work were studied the spectroscopic properties of trivalent europium ion complexed with components of tetracycline family, chlorotetracycline, oxytetracycline and metacycline, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and urea peroxide. Optical parameters were obtained such as absorption, emission, lifetime and calibration curves were constructed for luminescence spectra. Experiments were carried out with both inorganic compounds and europium-tetracyclines complexes in order to verify possible interferences. Studies for glucose determination were also described using europium-tetracyclines complexes as biosensors. Results show that europium tetracyclines complexes emit a narrow band in the visible region and, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide or urea peroxide there is a greater enhancement in their luminescence and lifetime. Thus, europium-tetracyclines complexes studied can be used as biosensors for hydrogen and urea peroxides determination as a low cost and room temperature method. An indirect method for glucose determination was studied by adding glucose oxidase enzyme in europium-tetracyclines complex in the presence of glucose promoting as product hydrogen peroxide. (author)

  3. Lower concentrations of receptor for advanced glycation end products and epiregulin in amniotic fluid correlate to chemically induced cleft palate in mice.

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    Wang, Xinhuan; Zhu, Jingjing; Fang, Yanjun; Bian, Zhuan; Meng, Liuyan

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the correlation between differentially expressed proteins in amniotic fluid (AF) and cleft palate induced by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in mice. Seven proteins were differentially expressed at embryonic day (E) 16.5 in atRA and control groups as revealed by label-based mouse antibody array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was further used to detect the expression levels of these proteins in AF from E13.5 to E16.5 in atRA, TCDD, and control groups. The cleft palate groups showed lower concentrations of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and epiregulin at E16.5. RAGE immunostaining obviously decreased in palatal tissue sections obtained from E14.5 to E16.5 in the cleft palate groups as revealed by immunohistochemistry. These findings indicate that reduced levels of RAGE and epiregulin in AF are correlated to chemically induced cleft palate in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Advanced glycation end products promote ChREBP expression and cell proliferation in liver cancer cells by increasing reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanbei; Li, Yakui; Zhu, Yemin; Wu, Lifang; Meng, Jian; Lin, Ning; Yang, Dianqiang; Li, Minle; Ding, WenJin; Tong, Xuemei; Su, Qing

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the mechanism by which advanced glycation end products (AGEs) promote cell proliferation in liver cancer cells.We treated liver cancer HepG2 cells with 200 mg/L AGEs or bovine serum albumin (BSA) and assayed for cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis. We performed real-time PCR and Western blot analysis for RNA and protein levels of carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in AGEs- or BSA-treated HepG2 cells. We analyzed the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells treated with AGEs or BSA.We found that increased S-phase cell percentage and decreased apoptosis contributed to AGEs-induced liver cancer cell proliferation. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that AGEs stimulated RNA and protein levels of ChREBP, a transcription factor promoting glycolysis and maintaining cell proliferation in liver cancer cells. Intriguingly, the level of ROS was higher in AGEs-treated liver cancer cells. Treating liver cancer cells with antioxidant N-acetyl cystein (NAC) partly blocked AGEs-induced ChREBP expression and cell proliferation.Our results suggest that the AGEs-ROS-ChREBP pathway plays a critical role in promoting ChREBP expression and liver cancer cell proliferation.

  5. The Amoebicidal Effect of Ergosterol Peroxide Isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Suárez-Medellín, Jorge; Del Ángel-Piña, Christian; Trigos, Ángel

    2015-12-01

    Dysentery is an inflammation of the intestine caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica and is a recurrent health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. Because of the magnitude of this disease, finding novel strategies for treatment that does not affect human cells is necessary. Ergosterol peroxide is a sterol particularly known as a major cytotoxic agent with a wide spectrum of biological activities produced by edible and medicinal mushrooms. The aim of this report is to evaluate the amoebicidal activity of ergosterol peroxide (5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol isolated from 5α, 8α-epidioxy-22E-ergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol) (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida. Our results show that ergosterol peroxide produced a strong cytotoxic effect against amoebic growth. The inhibitory concentration IC50 of ergosterol peroxide was evaluated. The interaction between E. histolytica and ergosterol peroxide in vitro resulted in strong amoebicidal activity (IC50  = 4.23 nM) that may be due to the oxidatory effect on the parasitic membrane. We also tested selective toxicity of ergosterol peroxide using a cell line CCL-241, a human epithelial cell line isolated from normal human fetal intestinal tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the cytotoxicity of ergosterol peroxide against E. histolytica, which uncovers a new biological property of the lipidic compound isolated from Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm. f. sp. Florida. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Different modes of hydrogen peroxide action during seed germination

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    Łukasz eWojtyla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide was initially recognized as a toxic molecule that causes damage at different levels of cell organization and thus losses in cell viability. From the 1990s, the role of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule in plants has also been discussed. The beneficial role of H2O2 as a central hub integrating signaling network in response to biotic and abiotic stress and during developmental processes is now well established. Seed germination is the most pivotal phase of the plant life cycle, affecting plant growth and productivity. The function of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and seed aging has been illustrated in numerous studies; however, the exact role of this molecule remains unknown. This review evaluates evidence that shows that H2O2 functions as a signaling molecule in seed physiology in accordance with the known biology and biochemistry of H2O2. The importance of crosstalk between hydrogen peroxide and a number of signaling molecules, including plant phytohormones such as abscisic acid, gibberellins and ethylene and reactive molecules such as nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide acting on cell communication and signaling during seed germination, is highlighted. The current study also focuses on the detrimental effects of H2O2 on seed biology, i.e., seed aging that leads to a loss of germination efficiency. The dual nature of hydrogen peroxide as a toxic molecule on one hand and as a signal molecule on the other is made possible through the precise spatial and temporal control of its production and degradation. Levels of hydrogen peroxide in germinating seeds and young seedlings can be modulated via pre-sowing seed priming/conditioning. This rather simple method is shown to be a valuable tool for improving seed quality and for enhancing seed stress tolerance during post-priming germination. In this review, we outline how seed priming/conditioning affects the integrative role of hydrogen peroxide in seed germination and

  7. Lipid Peroxidation: Pathophysiology and Pharmacological Implications in the Eye

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    Ya Fatou eNjie-Mbye

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen-derived free radicals such as hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl species have been shown to oxidize phospholipids and other membrane lipid components leading to lipid peroxidation. In the eye, lipid peroxidation has been reported to play an important role in degenerative ocular diseases (age-related macular degeneration, cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy. Indeed, ocular tissues are prone to damage from reactive oxygen species due to stress from constant exposure of the eye to sunlight, atmospheric oxygen and environmental chemicals. Furthermore, free radical catalyzed peroxidation of long chain polyunsaturated acids (LCPUFAs such as arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid leads to generation of LCPUFA metabolites including isoprostanes and neuroprostanes that may further exert pharmacological/toxicological actions in ocular tissues. Evidence from literature supports the presence of endogenous defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species in the eye, thereby presenting new avenues for the prevention and treatment of ocular degeneration. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and synthetic peroxides can exert pharmacological and toxicological effects on tissues of the anterior uvea of several mammalian species. There is evidence suggesting that the retina, especially retinal ganglion cells can exhibit unique characteristics of antioxidant defense mechanisms. In the posterior segment of the eye, H2O2 and synthetic peroxides produce an inhibitory action on glutamate release (using [3H]-D-aspartate as a marker, in vitro and on the endogenous glutamate and glycine concentrations in vivo. In addition to peroxides, isoprostanes can elicit both excitatory and inhibitory effects on norepinephrine (NE release from sympathetic nerves in isolated mammalian iris ciliary bodies. Whereas isoprostanes attenuate dopamine release from mammalian neural retina, in vitro, these novel arachidonic acid metabolites exhibit a biphasic regulatory effect on glutamate release

  8. Longitudinal associations of nutritional factors with glycated hemoglobin in youth with type 1 diabetes: the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Archana P; Crandell, Jamie L; Jaacks, Lindsay M; Couch, Sarah C; Lawrence, Jean M; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-06-01

    Improved glycated hemoglobin (Hb A1c) delays the progression of microvascular and macrovascular complications in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D). We previously showed that higher baseline intakes of n-3 (ω-3) fatty acids and leucine are associated with preserved β cell function 2 y later in youth with T1D. In the current study, we extend this work to explore the longitudinal associations of nutritional factors with Hb A1c in youth with T1D. We included 908 T1D youth with baseline and follow-up Hb A1c measurements. Nutritional factors assessed at baseline were as follows: breastfeeding status and timing of complimentary food introduction; intakes of leucine, carbohydrates, protein, fat, and fiber estimated from a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ); and plasma biomarkers for vitamins D and E, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid. We fit linear regression models adjusted for baseline Hb A1c, sociodemographic variables, diabetes-related variables, time between baseline and follow-up visits, saturated fat, physical activity, and for FFQ-derived nutrients, total calories. The vitamin D model was further adjusted for season and body mass index z score. The mean ± SD age and diabetes duration at baseline was 10.8 ± 3.9 y and 10.1 ± 5.8 mo, respectively. A total of 9.3% of participants had poor Hb A1c (value ≥9.5%) at baseline, which increased to 18.3% during follow-up (P 1). Intakes of EPA (β = -0.045, P = 0.046), leucine (β = -0.031, P = 0.0004), and protein (β = -0.003, P = 0.0002) were significantly negatively associated with follow-up Hb A1c after adjustment for confounders. Intake of carbohydrates was significantly positively (β = 0.001, P = 0.003) associated with follow-up Hb A1c after adjustment for confounders. Several nutritional factors may be associated with Hb A1c during early stages of disease progression in youth recently diagnosed with T1D. In addition to the overall role of major macronutrients such as carbohydrates and

  9. Soft-tissue wound healing by anti-advanced glycation end-products agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P-C; Tsai, S-C; Jheng, Y-H; Lin, Y-F; Chen, C-C

    2014-04-01

    The blocking of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) has been shown to reduce diabetic complications and control periodontitis. This study investigated the pattern of palatal wound-healing after graft harvesting under the administration of aminoguanidine (AG), an AGE inhibitor, or N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB), a glycated cross-link breaker. Full-thickness palatal excisional wounds (5.0 x 1.5 mm(2)) were created in 72 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats received daily intraperitoneal injections of normal saline (control), AG, or PTB and were euthanized after 4 to 28 days. The wound-healing pattern was assessed by histology, histochemistry for collagen matrix deposition, immunohistochemistry for AGE and the AGE receptor (RAGE), and the expression of RAGE, as well as inflammation- and recovery-associated genes. In the first 14 days following AG or PTB treatments, wound closure, re-epithelialization, and collagen m