WorldWideScience

Sample records for permitting conditions imposed

  1. Effects of the imposed pressure differential conditions on duoplasmatron performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztarhan, A.

    1988-01-01

    The duoplasmatron plasma source (D.P.T.) was modified to allow access to the arc discharge (to measure the discharge properties) and to vary independently the pressures in different volumes of the arc with the aim of seeing if this freedom would help in optimising the output. The duoplasmatron plasma source was operated under normal running condition (N.R.C.), positive imposed pressure differential condition (P.I.P.D.C.) and negative imposed pressure differential condition (N.I.P.D.C.) and the corresponding properties of the plasma output were measured. Running the duoplasmatron under P.I.P.D. condition did not seem to improve the output as compared to that under N.R.C. However, running the duoplasmatron under N.I.P.D. condition seemed to be advantageous as the output increased by about 30%. It was observed that the back pressure was critical in maintaining the arc and the gap pressure could be lowered much below the normal minimum (while the arc was on) if back pressure was kept above a critical value. The results showed that the effects of varying the dimensions of the intermediate electrode nozzle on the output could be understood in terms of the effect of changes in these dimensions on the relative pressures. An empirical expression for the effect of the pressure ratio was developed from the observations and compared with the experimental results. The reasons for various results can be related to the plasma emission mechanism. (author). 8 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  2. 40 CFR 144.51 - Conditions applicable to all permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Permit Conditions § 144.51 Conditions applicable... permit. Any permit noncompliance constitutes a violation of the Safe Drinking Water Act and is grounds... denial of a permit renewal application; except that the permittee need not comply with the provisions of...

  3. Achieving Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Imposed Conditions in the Ammonia Formation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Under conditions of constant temperature T and pressure P, chemical equilibrium occurs in a closed system (fixed mass) when the Gibbs free energy G of the reaction mixture is minimized. However, when chemical reactions occur under other conditions, other thermodynamic functions are minimized or maximized. For processes at constant T and volume V,…

  4. Creep and Environmental Durability of EBC/CMCs Under Imposed Thermal Gradient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    Interest in SiC fiber-reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for use in high temperature structural applications has prompted the need for characterization of material strength and creep performance under complex aerospace turbine engine environments. Stress-rupture tests have been performed on SiC/SiC composites systems, with varying fiber types and coating schemes to demonstrate material behavior under isothermal conditions. Further testing was conducted under exposure to thermal stress gradients to determine the effect on creep resistance and material durability. In order to understand the associated damage mechanisms, emphasis is placed on experimental techniques as well as implementation of non-destructive evaluation; including electrical resistivity monitoring. The influence of environmental and loading conditions on life-limiting material properties is shown.

  5. Evaluation of the conditions imposed by the fracture surface geometry on water seepage through fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, Nestor O.; Faybishenko, B.

    2003-01-01

    In order to determine the geometric patterns of the fracture surfaces that imposes conditions on the fluid flow through fractured porous media, a series a fracture models have been analyzed using the RIMAPS technique and the variogram method. Results confirm that the main paths followed by the fluid channels are determined by the surface topography and remain constant during water seepage evolution. Characteristics scale lengths of both situations: fracture surface and the flow of water, are also found. There exists a relationship between the scale lengths corresponding to each situation. (author)

  6. 7 CFR 330.203 - Action on applications for permits to move plant pests; form of and conditions in permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Action on applications for permits to move plant pests... PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Plant Pests § 330.203 Action on applications for permits to move plant pests; form of and conditions in...

  7. 32 CFR 767.7 - Conditions of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GUIDELINES FOR ARCHEOLOGICAL RESEARCH PERMITS ON SHIP AND AIRCRAFT WRECKS UNDER THE JURISDICATION OF THE... to submit to NHC a working and diving log listing days spent in field research, activities pursued... protect all sensitive information regarding the location and character of the wreck site that could...

  8. HANDBOOK: GUIDANCE ON SETTING PERMIT CONDITIONS AND REPORTING TRIAL BURN RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Handbook provides guidance for establishing operational conditions for incinerators. he document provides a means for state and local agencies to achieve a level of consistency in setting permit conditions that will result in establishment of more uniform permit conditions n...

  9. Hanford facility RCRA permit condition II.U.1 report: mapping of underground piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, C.B.

    1996-09-27

    The purpose of this report is to fulfill Condition Il.U.1. of the Hanford Facility (HF) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit. The HF RCRA Permit, Number WA7890008967, became effective on September 28, 1994 (Ecology 1994). Permit Conditions Il.U. (mapping) and II.V. (marking) of the HF RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste (OW) Portion, require the mapping and marking of dangerous waste underground pipelines subject to the provisions of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-303. Permit Condition Il.U.I. requires the submittal of a report describing the methodology used to generate pipeline maps and to assure their quality. Though not required by the Permit, this report also documents the approach used for the field marking of dangerous waste underground pipelines.

  10. 10 CFR 50.55 - Conditions of construction permits, early site permits, combined licenses, and manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... construction or manufacture, or any defect found in the final design of a facility as approved and released for..., combined licenses, and manufacturing licenses. 50.55 Section 50.55 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Issuance, Limitations, and Conditions of...

  11. 40 CFR 147.2925 - Standard permit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... measurement; (ii) Individual(s) who preformed the measurements; (iii) Date(s) analyses were performed; (iv) Individual(s) who performed the analyses; (v) Analytical techniques or methods used, including quality... conditions. Proper operation and maintenance also includes adequate operator staffing and training, adequate...

  12. 77 FR 31302 - Review of Federal Permit Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    .... Intention To Work With Other Agencies It is the Federal Coordinator's intention to work closely with other... conditions early and either avoid a formal review process or conclude it expeditiously. B. Definitions (1..., right-of-way or other authorization. It was the Office of the Federal Coordinator's intention to include...

  13. Wind turbine blade vibration at standstill conditions — the effect of imposing lag on the aerodynamic response of an elastically mounted airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzypinski, Witold Robert; Gaunaa, Mac

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated physical phenomena related to stall-induced vibrations potentially existing on wind turbine blades at standstill conditions. The study considered two-dimensional airfoil sections while it omitted three-dimensional effects. In the study, a new engineering-type...... computational model for the aeroelastic response of an elastically mounted airfoil was used to investigate the influence of temporal lag in the aerodynamic response on the aeroelastic stability in deep stall. The study indicated that even a relatively low lag significantly increases the damping of the model....... A comparison between the results from a model with lag imposed on all force components with the results from a model with lag imposed exclusively on the lift showed only marginal difference between the damping in the two cases. A parameter study involving positions of the elastic hinge point and the center...

  14. 50 CFR 665.249 - Lobster size and condition restrictions in Permit Area 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lobster size and condition restrictions in... WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.249 Lobster size and condition restrictions in Permit Area 2. (a) Only spiny lobsters with a carapace length of 8.26 cm or greater may be retained (see Figure 1 to this...

  15. Effects of the conditions imposed by the environment and by utilities on the design of process engineering plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernecker, G

    1976-09-01

    Conditions of environment and utilities have a great influence on the investment and operation costs of process engineering plants. If these conditions are taken into consideration in preliminary process engineering, the considerable amount of time spent in planning subsequent modifications could be saved. This publication from the seminar held with the topic 'planning and construction of process engineering systems' by the VDI-Bildungswerk shows how to facilitate problems of waste products already 'in statu nascendi'. The second part which will be published in the next edition will summarize the possibilities and the determining restrictions in the use of the available media for heating and cooling. Both essays are extended presentations of a chapter from a book in preparation by the VDI with the same title as the seminar.

  16. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance

  17. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auluck, S. K. H., E-mail: skhauluck@gmail.com, E-mail: skauluck@barc.gov.in [Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and “wind pressure” resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional “drive parameter,” is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  18. 78 FR 64905 - Carriage of Conditionally Permitted Shale Gas Extraction Waste Water in Bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ...-ZA31 Carriage of Conditionally Permitted Shale Gas Extraction Waste Water in Bulk AGENCY: Coast Guard... availability of a proposed policy letter concerning the carriage of shale gas extraction waste water in bulk... transport shale gas extraction waste water in bulk. The policy letter also defines the information the Coast...

  19. A Numerical Handling of the Boundary Conditions Imposed by the Skull on an Inhomogeneous Diffusion-Reaction Model of Glioblastoma Invasion Into the Brain: Clinical Validation Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S Stamatakos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel explicit triscale reaction-diffusion numerical model of glioblastoma multiforme tumor growth is presented. The model incorporates the handling of Neumann boundary conditions imposed by the cranium and takes into account both the inhomogeneous nature of human brain and the complexity of the skull geometry. The finite-difference time-domain method is adopted. To demonstrate the workflow of a possible clinical validation procedure, a clinical case/scenario is addressed. A good agreement of the in silico calculated value of the doubling time (ie, the time for tumor volume to double with the value of the same quantity based on tomographic imaging data has been observed. A theoretical exploration suggests that a rough but still quite informative value of the doubling time may be calculated based on a homogeneous brain model. The model could serve as the main component of a continuous mathematics-based glioblastoma oncosimulator aiming at supporting the clinician in the optimal patient-individualized design of treatment using the patient’s multiscale data and experimenting in silico (ie, on the computer.

  20. 21 CFR 530.20 - Conditions for permitted extralabel animal and human drug use in food-producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... consumption: (1) Such use must be accomplished in accordance with an appropriate medical rationale; and (2) If... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conditions for permitted extralabel animal and human drug use in food-producing animals. 530.20 Section 530.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  1. Reservoir simulation with imposed flux continuity conditions on heterogeneous and anisotropic media for general geometries, and the inclusion of hysteresis in forward modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigestad, Geir Terje

    2003-04-01

    The thesis is divided into two main parts. Part I gives an overview and summary of the theory that lies behind the flow equations and the discretization principles used in the work. Part II is a collection of research papers that have been written by the candidate (in collaboration with others). The main objective of this thesis is the discretization of an elliptic PDE which describes the pressure in a porous medium. The porous medium will in general be described by permeability tensors which are heterogeneous and anisotropic. In addition, the geometry is often complex for practical applications. This requires discretization approaches that are suited for the problems in mind. The discretization approaches used here are based on imposed flux and potential continuity, and will be discussed in detail in Chapter 3 of Part I. These methods are called Multi Point Flux Approximation Methods, and the acronym MPFA will be used for them. Issues related to these methods will be the main issue of this thesis. The rest of this thesis is organised as follows: Part I: Chapter 1 gives a brief overview of the physics and mathematics behind reservoir simulation. The standard mass balance equations are presented, and we try to explain what reservoir simulation is. Some standard discretization s methods are briefly discussed in Chapter 2. The main focus in Part I is on the MPFA discretization approach for various geometries, and is given in Chapter 3. Some details may have been left out in the papers of Part II, and the section serves both as a summary of the discretization method(s), as well as a more detailed description than what is found in the papers. In Chapter 4, extensions to handle time dependent and nonlinear problems are discussed. Some of the numerical examples presented in Part II deal with two phase flow, and are based on the extension given in this chapter. Chapter 5 discusses numerical results that have been obtained for the MPFA methods for elliptic problems, and

  2. Paternal care decreases foraging activity and body condition, but does not impose survival costs to caring males in a Neotropical arachnid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Gustavo S; Buzatto, Bruno A; Martins, Eduardo G; Machado, Glauco

    2012-01-01

    Exclusive paternal care is the rarest form of parental investment in nature and theory predicts that the maintenance of this behavior depends on the balance between costs and benefits to males. Our goal was to assess costs of paternal care in the harvestman Iporangaia pustulosa, for which the benefits of this behavior in terms of egg survival have already been demonstrated. We evaluated energetic costs and mortality risks associated to paternal egg-guarding in the field. We quantified foraging activity of males and estimated how their body condition is influenced by the duration of the caring period. Additionally, we conducted a one-year capture-mark-recapture study and estimated apparent survival probabilities of caring and non-caring males to assess potential survival costs of paternal care. Our results indicate that caring males forage less frequently than non-caring individuals (males and females) and that their body condition deteriorates over the course of the caring period. Thus, males willing to guard eggs may provide to females a fitness-enhancing gift of cost-free care of their offspring. Caring males, however, did not show lower survival probabilities when compared to both non-caring males and females. Reduction in mortality risks as a result of remaining stationary, combined with the benefits of improving egg survival, may have played an important and previously unsuspected role favoring the evolution of paternal care. Moreover, males exhibiting paternal care could also provide an honest signal of their quality as offspring defenders, and thus female preference for caring males could be responsible for maintaining the trait.

  3. Paternal care decreases foraging activity and body condition, but does not impose survival costs to caring males in a Neotropical arachnid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S Requena

    Full Text Available Exclusive paternal care is the rarest form of parental investment in nature and theory predicts that the maintenance of this behavior depends on the balance between costs and benefits to males. Our goal was to assess costs of paternal care in the harvestman Iporangaia pustulosa, for which the benefits of this behavior in terms of egg survival have already been demonstrated. We evaluated energetic costs and mortality risks associated to paternal egg-guarding in the field. We quantified foraging activity of males and estimated how their body condition is influenced by the duration of the caring period. Additionally, we conducted a one-year capture-mark-recapture study and estimated apparent survival probabilities of caring and non-caring males to assess potential survival costs of paternal care. Our results indicate that caring males forage less frequently than non-caring individuals (males and females and that their body condition deteriorates over the course of the caring period. Thus, males willing to guard eggs may provide to females a fitness-enhancing gift of cost-free care of their offspring. Caring males, however, did not show lower survival probabilities when compared to both non-caring males and females. Reduction in mortality risks as a result of remaining stationary, combined with the benefits of improving egg survival, may have played an important and previously unsuspected role favoring the evolution of paternal care. Moreover, males exhibiting paternal care could also provide an honest signal of their quality as offspring defenders, and thus female preference for caring males could be responsible for maintaining the trait.

  4. Legal theology in imposed constitutionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abat Ninet, Antoni

    2018-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the question of legitimacy, and how can we consider legitimate an imposed constitution and the subsequent constitutional principles, practices and values that go hand-in-hand with the legal and political acculturation. Constitutional texts around the world are good...

  5. Self-Imposed Creativity Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biskjaer, Michael Mose

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This dissertation epitomizes three years of research guided by the research question: how can we conceptualize creative self-binding as a resource in art and design processes? Concretely, the dissertation seeks to offer insight into the puzzling observation that highly skilled creative...... practitioners sometimes freely and intentionally impose rigid rules, peculiar principles, and other kinds of creative obstructions on themselves as a means to spur momentum in the process and reach a distinctly original outcome. To investigate this the dissertation is composed of four papers (Part II) framed...... of analysis. Informed by the insight that constraints both enable and restrain creative agency, the dissertation’s main contention is that creative self- binding may profitably be conceptualized as the exercise of self-imposed creativity constraints. Thus, the dissertation marks an analytical move from vague...

  6. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  7. Imposed currents in galvanic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Soestbergen, M. van; Bazant, M.Z.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the steady-state behavior of a general mathematical model for reversible galvanic cells, such as redox flow cells, reversible solid oxide fuel cells, and rechargeable batteries. We consider not only operation in the galvanic discharging mode, spontaneously generating a positive current against an external load, but also operation in two modes which require a net input of electrical energy: (i) the electrolytic charging mode, where a negative current is imposed to generate a voltage exceeding the open-circuit voltage, and (ii) the 'super-galvanic' discharging mode, where a positive current exceeding the short-circuit current is imposed to generate a negative voltage. Analysis of the various (dis-)charging modes of galvanic cells is important to predict the efficiency of electrical to chemical energy conversion and to provide sensitive tests for experimental validation of fuel cell models. In the model, we consider effects of diffuse charge on electrochemical charge-transfer rates by combining a generalized Frumkin-Butler-Volmer equation for reaction kinetics across the compact Stern layer with the full Poisson-Nernst-Planck transport theory, without assuming local electroneutrality. Since this approach is rare in the literature, we provide a brief historical review. To illustrate the general theory, we present results for a monovalent binary electrolyte, consisting of cations, which react at the electrodes, and non-reactive anions, which are either fixed in space (as in a solid electrolyte) or are mobile (as in a liquid electrolyte). The full model is solved numerically and compared to analytical results in the limit of thin diffuse layers, relative to the membrane thickness. The spatial profiles of the ion concentrations and electrostatic potential reveal a complex dependence on the kinetic parameters and the imposed current, in which the diffuse charge at each electrode and the total membrane charge can have either sign, contrary perhaps to intuition

  8. 40 CFR 122.41 - Conditions applicable to all permits (applicable to State programs, see § 123.25).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disposal in violation of this permit which has a reasonable likelihood of adversely affecting human health... noncompliance which may endanger health or the environment. Any information shall be provided orally within 24... not satisfied if adequate back-up equipment should have been installed in the exercise of reasonable...

  9. 34 CFR 99.38 - What conditions apply to disclosure of information as permitted by State statute adopted after...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... permitted by State statute adopted after November 19, 1974, concerning the juvenile justice system? 99.38 Section 99.38 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY May an Educational Agency or Institution Disclose Personally Identifiable Information From...

  10. Imposing limits on autonomous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, P A

    2017-02-01

    Our present era is witnessing the genesis of a sea-change in the way that advanced technologies operate. Amongst this burgeoning wave of untrammelled automation there is now beginning to arise a cadre of ever-more independent, autonomous systems. The degree of interaction between these latter systems with any form of human controller is becoming progressively more diminished and remote; and this perhaps necessarily so. Here, I advocate for human-centred and human favouring constraints to be designed, programmed, promulgated and imposed upon these nascent forms of independent entity. I am not sanguine about the collective response of modern society to this call. Nevertheless, the warning must be voiced and the issue debated, especially among those who most look to mediate between people and technology. Practitioner Summary: Practitioners are witnessing the penetration of progressively more independent technical orthotics into virtually all systems' operations. This work enjoins them to advocate for sentient, rational and mindful human-centred approaches towards such innovations. Practitioners need to place user-centred concerns above either the technical or the financial imperatives which motivate this line of progress.

  11. Imposing resolved turbulence in CFD simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, L.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    In large‐eddy simulations, the inflow velocity field should contain resolved turbulence. This paper describes and analyzes two methods for imposing resolved turbulence in the interior of the domain in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. The intended application of the methods is to impose...

  12. Ci PERMIT

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Permanent Mission to the International Organisations at Geneva recalls that only the spouses and children of members of personnel resident in Switzerland and in possession of a legitimation card of types 'B', 'C', 'D' or 'E' issued by the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs are entitled to benefit from a Ci Permit.The 'demande d'attestation de permis Ci' (request for a Ci permit attestation) can be sent to the Mission only through Personnel Division (Administrative Services, Office 33/1-025).Additional information on access by family members of CERN officials to the Swiss labour market are available to you on the Web site of the Relations with the Host States Service (cf. document entitled 'Employment in Switzerland for spouses and children of CERN officials' dated March 1996).Relations with the Host States Servicehttp://www.cern.ch/relations/Tel. 72848

  13. 42 CFR 23.34 - What other conditions are imposed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... during normal working hours to accounts, documents, and records for the purposes of audit or evaluation... repayment and allow the Secretary or his or her designee access, during normal working hours, to those... the accounting principles identified by the Secretary in the loan agreement. (g) The borrower must...

  14. Permit application modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  15. Permit application modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils

  16. DOCUMENT IMAGE REGISTRATION FOR IMPOSED LAYER EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Narayan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of filled-in information from document images in the presence of template poses challenges due to geometrical distortion. Filled-in document image consists of null background, general information foreground and vital information imposed layer. Template document image consists of null background and general information foreground layer. In this paper a novel document image registration technique has been proposed to extract imposed layer from input document image. A convex polygon is constructed around the content of the input and the template image using convex hull. The vertices of the convex polygons of input and template are paired based on minimum Euclidean distance. Each vertex of the input convex polygon is subjected to transformation for the permutable combinations of rotation and scaling. Translation is handled by tight crop. For every transformation of the input vertices, Minimum Hausdorff distance (MHD is computed. Minimum Hausdorff distance identifies the rotation and scaling values by which the input image should be transformed to align it to the template. Since transformation is an estimation process, the components in the input image do not overlay exactly on the components in the template, therefore connected component technique is applied to extract contour boxes at word level to identify partially overlapping components. Geometrical features such as density, area and degree of overlapping are extracted and compared between partially overlapping components to identify and eliminate components common to input image and template image. The residue constitutes imposed layer. Experimental results indicate the efficacy of the proposed model with computational complexity. Experiment has been conducted on variety of filled-in forms, applications and bank cheques. Data sets have been generated as test sets for comparative analysis.

  17. Arc Motion in an Obliquely Imposed Alternating Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiho, R; Takeda, K; Sugimoto, M

    2012-01-01

    The arc motion is theoretically investigated under an alternating magnetic field imposed obliquely to the arc. The arc is known to oscillate on a 2-D plane when the alternating magnetic field is imposed perpendicularly to the arc. If the alternating magnetic field is imposed obliquely to the arc, then it is expected that the arc oscillates not on the 2-D plane but in a 3-D space. For this study, 3-D simulation was performed on the motion of the plasma gas under an alternating magnetic field crossing obliquely to the arc. It was also assumed that a stream line of the plasma gas represented the arc profile. The momentum equation for the plasma gas was solved together with the continuity equation. Governing parameters for the gas motion are θ (crossing angle), v 0 (initial velocity of the plasma gas), and λ. Parameter λ is defined as λ = (I a B 0 )/Q 0 . Numerical results are reported under different operating conditions such as magnetic flux densities and the angles between the arc and the magnetic flux. If the crossing angle is larger than 4/π, the arc might be extinguished because of the drastic increase of the arc length.

  18. Is imposing risk awareness cultural imperialism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Førde, O H

    1998-11-01

    Epidemiology is the main supplier of "bases of action" for preventive medicine and health promotion. Epidemiology and epidemiologists therefore have a responsibility not only for the quality and soundness of the risk estimates they deliver and for the way they are interpreted and used, but also for their consequences. In the industrialised world, the value of, and fascination with health is greater than ever, and the revelation from epidemiological research of new hazards and risks, conveyed to the public by the media, has become almost an every-day phenomenon. This "risk epidemic" in the modern media is paralleled in professional medical journals. It is in general endorsed by health promoters as a necessary foundation for increased health awareness and a desirable impetus for people to take responsibility for their own health through behavioural changes. Epidemiologists and health promoters, however, have in general not taken the possible side effects of increased risk awareness seriously enough. By increasing anxiety regarding disease, accidents and other adverse events, the risk epidemic enhances both health care dependence and health care consumption. More profoundly, and perhaps even more seriously, it changes the way people think about health, disease and death--and ultimately and at least potentially, their perspective on life more generally. The message from the odds ratios from epidemiological research advocates a rationalistic, individualistic, prospective life perspective where maximising control and minimising uncertainty is seen as a superior goal. The inconsistency between applying an expanded health concept, comprising elements of coping, self-realisation and psycho-physical functioning, and imposing intolerance to risk and uncertainty, is regularly overlooked. Acceptance and tolerance of risk and uncertainty, which are inherent elements of human life, is a prerequisite for coping and self-realisation. A further shift away from traditional working

  19. ACID SPLASH: QISAS PUNISHMENT TO BE IMPOSED AGAINST THE OFFENDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Farid Huzaimi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In Islamic countries, there are cases where a court has given punishment to an acid splasher to be punished by acid as well. In 2004, an Iranian woman was blinded with acid by her suitor for turning down his marriage proposal. Four years later, the Iranian court sentenced the offender to be blinded in both eyes for taking away the woman’s sight under the retribution principle permitted under Iran’s Islamic law. This case’s decision has regularly been objected as the punishment seems inhuman. This paper will discuss in detail the nature of the offence and the punishment imposed in Islamic perspective. Terdapat beberapa kasus di negara-negara Islam di mana pengadilan memberikan hukuman pembalasan terhadap terdakwa yang menyiram cairan asam ke tubuh orang lain. Pada tahun 2004, seorang perempuan Iran dibutakan dengan asam oleh peminangnya setelah si perempuan menolak lamaran pria tersebut. Empat tahun setelahnya, pengadilan di Iran memutuskan untuk menghukum pria tersebut dengan hukuman yang sama, yaitu dibutakan dengan asam. Hukuman ini dijatuhkan dengan dasar asas retribusi menurut hukum Islam di Iran. Putusan hakim dalam kasus ini telah menuai kritik karena hukuman tersebut dianggap tidak berperikemanusiaan. Artikel ini akan membahas lebih dalam tentang perbuatan menyiram cairan asam dan hukuman pembalasan menurut perspektif Islam.

  20. Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SONNICHSEN, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W further specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of this Permit Condition, ''best efforts'' mean submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies

  1. Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOMAN, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. This status report also addresses Permit Condition I.E.22, as interpreted in Section 12.1.25 of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Rev. 4), that states this report will be prepared annually and a copy of this report will be placed in the Facility Operating Record, General Information file by October 1 of each year

  2. Experimental investigation of exercise-related hedonic responses to preferred and imposed media content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Emily; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2018-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the differential influence of preferred versus imposed media selections on distinct hedonic responses to an acute bout of treadmill walking. Methods: Twenty university students were recruited for this [160 person-visit] laboratory experiment, which employed a within-subject, counter-balanced design. Participants were exposed to 8 experimental conditions, including (1) Exercise Only, (2) Texting Only, (3) Preferred Phone Call, (4) Imposed Phone Call, (5) Preferred Music Playlist, (6) Imposed Music Playlist, (7)Preferred Video and (8) Imposed Video. During each visit (except Texting Only), participants completed a 10-minute bout of walking on the treadmill at a self-selected pace. Walking speed was identical for all experimental conditions. Before, at the midpoint of exercise, and post-exercise, participants completed the Feeling Scale (FS) and the Felt Arousal Scale (FAS) to measure acute hedonic response. The Affective Circumplex Scale was administered pre-exercise and post-exercise. Results: Significant pre-post change scores were observed for happy (Imposed Call: P=0.05;Preferred Music: P=0.02; Imposed Video: P=0.03), excited (Exercise Only: P=0.001; PreferredVideo: P=0.01; Imposed Video: P=0.03), sad (Preferred Music: P=0.05), anxious (ExerciseOnly: P=0.05; Preferred Video: P=0.01), and fatigue (Exercise Only: P=0.03; Imposed Video:P=0.002). For the FS all change scores were statistically significant from pre-to-mid and pre-topost (Pmedia platforms substantively influences hedonic responses to exercise. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Federal Fisheries Permit (FFP)/ Federal Processor Permit (FPP) Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Federal Fisheries Permit (FFP) is required for vessels of the United States which are used to fish for groundfish in the Gulf of Alaska or Bering Sea and...

  4. RPP Environmental Permits and Related Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEXTER, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    This document contains the current list of environmental permits and related documentation for RPP facilities and activities. Copies of these permits and related approvals are maintained by RPP Environmental. In addition, notices of Correction and Notices of Violation are issued by State and Federal Regulators which are tracked by RPP Environmental to resolve any recently identified deficiencies. A listing of these recent Notices is provided as an attachment to this document. These permits, approval conditions, and recent regulatory agency notices, constitute an important element of the RPP Authorization Envelope. Permits are issued frequently and the reader is advised to check with RPP environmental for new permits or approval conditions. Interpretation of permit or approval conditions should be coordinated with RPP Environmental. This document is updated on a quarterly basis

  5. RPP Environmental Permits and Related Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEXTER, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the current list of environmental permits and related documentation for RPP facilities and activities. Copies of these permits and related approvals are maintained by RPP Environmental. In addition, Notices of Correction and Notices of Violation are issued by State and Federal Regulators which are tracked by RPP Environmental to resolve any recently identified deficiencies. A listing of these recent Notices is provided as an attachment to this document. These permits, approval conditions, and recent regulatory agency notices, constitute an important element of the RPP Authorization Envelope. Permits are issued frequently and the reader is advised to check with RPP environmental for new permits or approval conditions. Interpretation of permit or approval conditions should be coordinated with RPP Environmental. This document will be updated on a quarterly basis

  6. Permit.LOA table

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table includes the effective dates by vessel and permit number for each issued letter of authorization (LOA) by the Permit Office (APSD)

  7. State Licenses & Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Starting a business? Confused about whether you need a business license or permit? Virtually every business needs some form of license or permit to operate legally....

  8. Microaerophilic conditions permit to mimic in vitro events occurring during in vivo Helicobacter pylori infection and to identify Rho/Ras-associated proteins in cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Sandra; Corthésy-Theulaz, Irène; Spertini, François; Corthésy, Blaise

    2002-09-13

    Molecular dissection of the mechanisms underlying Helicobacter pylori infection suffers from the lack of in vitro systems mimicking in vivo observations. A system was developed whereby human epithelial cells (Caco-2) grown as polarized monolayers and bacteria can communicate with each other under culture conditions optimal for each partner. Caco-2 cells grown on filter supports were inserted in a vertical position into diffusion chambers equilibrated with air and 5% CO(2) at their basolateral surface (aerophilic conditions) and 5% CO(2), 5% O(2), 90% N(2) (microaerophilic conditions) in the apical compartment. Remarkably, the epithelial polarized layer was stable under these asymmetric culture conditions for at least 24 h, and the presence of Caco-2 cells was necessary to maintain H. pylori growth. In contrast to previous studies conducted with non-polarized Caco-2 cells and other cell lines kept under aerophilic conditions, we found H. pylori-dependent stimulation of cytokine secretion (MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), GRO-alpha (growth-regulated oncogene-alpha), RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)). This correlated with nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p50 and p65 subunits. Tyrosine phosphorylation of nine cellular proteins was induced or enhanced; we identified p120(RasGAP), p190(RhoGAP), p62dok (downstream of tyrosine kinases), and cortactin as H. pylori-inducible targets. Moreover, reduction of H. pylori urease expression was observed in adherent bacteria as compared with bacteria in suspension. In addition to mimicking several observations seen in the inflamed gastric mucosa, the novel in vitro system was allowed to underscore complex cellular events not seen in classical in vitro analyses of microaerophilic bacteria-epithelial cell cross-talk.

  9. Are the force characteristics of synchronous handcycling affected by speed and the method to impose power?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnet, U.; van Drongelen, S.V.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of exercise conditions (speed and method to impose power) on the applied force, force effectiveness and distribution of work during handcycling. Method: Ten able-bodied men performed handcycling on a treadmill. To test the effect of speed, subjects propelled

  10. Are the force characteristics of synchronous handcycling affected by speed and the method to impose power?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnet, Ursina; van Drongelen, Stefan; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    Objective: To investigate the influence of exercise conditions (speed and method to impose power) on the applied force, force effectiveness and distribution of work during handcycling. Method: Ten able-bodied men performed handcycling on a treadmill. To test the effect of speed, subjects propelled

  11. Constraints on effective interactions imposed by antisymmetry and charge independence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringari, S [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica; Brink, D M [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1978-07-24

    Restrictions on the form of the energy functional following antisymmetry and charge independence have been investigated for a Hartree-Fock theory based on effective interactions. These restrictions impose severe constraints on density dependent effective interactions.

  12. Tradeable carbon permits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutstaal, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    The research project on tradeable carbon permits has focused on three elements. First of all, the practical implications of designing a system of tradeable emission permits for reducing CO2 has been studied. In the second part, the consequences of introducing a system of tradeable carbon permits for entry barriers have been considered. Finally, the institutional requirements and welfare effects of coordination of CO2 abatement in a second-best world have been examined

  13. "For Their Own Good": A Response to Popular Arguments Against Permitting Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) where Mental Illness Is the Sole Underlying Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Justine; Schuklenk, Udo; Reggler, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Canada is approaching its federal government's review of whether patients should be eligible for medical assistance in dying (MAID) where mental illness is the sole underlying medical condition, and when "natural death" is not "reasonably foreseeable". For those opposed, arguments involve the following themes: capacity, value of life, vulnerability, stigma, irremediability, and the role of physicians. It has also been suggested that those who are able-bodied should have to kill themselves, even though suicide may be painful, lonely, and violent. Opponents of MAID for severe, refractory suffering due to mental illness imply that it is acceptable to remove agency from such patients on paternalistic grounds. After years of efforts to destigmatise mental illness, these kinds of arguments effectively declare all patients with mental illness, regardless of capacity, unable to make considered choices for themselves. The current paper argues that decisions about capacity must be made on an individual-patient basis. Given the rightful importance granted to respect for patient autonomy in liberal democracies, the wholesale removal of agency advocated by opponents of a permissive MAID regime is difficult to reconcile with Canadian constitutional values.

  14. Using tradeable permits to achieve sustainability in the world`s large cities. Policy design issues and efficiency conditions for controlling vehicle emissions, congestion and urban decentralization with an application to Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, H.C. [Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Many large cities in the world have serious ground level ozone problems, largely the product of vehicular emissions and thus the argued unsustainability of current urban growth patterns is frequently blamed on unrestricted private vehicle use. This article reviews Mexico City`s experience with vehicle use restrictions as an emissions control program and develops the conditions for optimal quantitative restrictions on vehicle use and for complementary abatement technologies. The stochastic nature of air pollution outcomes is modelled explicitly in both the static and dynamic formulations of the control problem, in which for the first time in the literature the use of tradeable vehicle use permits is proposed as a cost-effective complement to technological abatement for mobile emissions control. This control regime gives the authorities a broader and more flexible set of instruments with which to deal more effectively with vehicle emissions, and with seasonal and stochastic variation of air quality outcomes. The market in tradeable vehicle use permits would be very competitive with low transactions costs. This control policy would have very favorable impacts on air quality, vehicle congestion and on urban form and development. Given the general political resistance to environmental taxes, this program could constitute a workable and politically palatable set of policies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector. 7 figs., 1 appendix, 23 refs.

  15. Using tradeable permits to achieve sustainability in the world's large cities. Policy design issues and efficiency conditions for controlling vehicle emissions, congestion and urban decentralization with an application to Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Many large cities in the world have serious ground level ozone problems, largely the product of vehicular emissions and thus the argued unsustainability of current urban growth patterns is frequently blamed on unrestricted private vehicle use. This article reviews Mexico City's experience with vehicle use restrictions as an emissions control program and develops the conditions for optimal quantitative restrictions on vehicle use and for complementary abatement technologies. The stochastic nature of air pollution outcomes is modelled explicitly in both the static and dynamic formulations of the control problem, in which for the first time in the literature the use of tradeable vehicle use permits is proposed as a cost-effective complement to technological abatement for mobile emissions control. This control regime gives the authorities a broader and more flexible set of instruments with which to deal more effectively with vehicle emissions, and with seasonal and stochastic variation of air quality outcomes. The market in tradeable vehicle use permits would be very competitive with low transactions costs. This control policy would have very favorable impacts on air quality, vehicle congestion and on urban form and development. Given the general political resistance to environmental taxes, this program could constitute a workable and politically palatable set of policies for controlling greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector. 7 figs., 1 appendix, 23 refs

  16. 40 CFR 233.21 - General permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ensure compliance with existing permit conditions an any reporting monitoring, or prenotification... apply for an individual permit. This discretionary authority will be based on concerns for the aquatic environment including compliance with paragraph (b) of this section and the 404(b)(1) Guidelines (40 CFR part...

  17. Automatic Commercial Permit Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grana, Paul [Folsom Labs, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Final report for Folsom Labs’ Solar Permit Generator project, which has successfully completed, resulting in the development and commercialization of a software toolkit within the cloud-based HelioScope software environment that enables solar engineers to automatically generate and manage draft documents for permit submission.

  18. 40 CFR 233.23 - Permit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (7) Monitoring, reporting and recordkeeping requirements as needed to safeguard the aquatic environment. (Such requirements will be determined on a case-by-case basis, but at a minimum shall include monitoring and reporting of any expected leachates, reporting of noncompliance, planned changes or transfer...

  19. Permissible state permit/fee systems for radioactive materials transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friel, L.

    1987-01-01

    Many state permit/fee systems for radioactive materials transportation have been ruled inconsistent with federal law invalidated by the courts. As the date for repository operation, and its associated transportation, draws near, more states can be expected to adopt permit/fee systems. Examination of the U.S. Department of Transportation's advisory rulings and federal court cases on previous permit/fee systems gives general guidance on the type of permit/fee systems most likely to withstand challenges. Such a system would: have a simplified permit application with minimal information requirements; address a federally-defined class of hazardous or radioactive materials; allow access to all shipments conducted in compliance with federal law; charge a fee reasonably related to the costs imposed on the state by the transportation; and minimize the potential for re-directing shipments to other jurisdictions

  20. Annual Hanford Site environmental permitting status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The information contained and/or referenced in this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report (Status Report) addresses the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) of 1971 and Condition II.W. of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion (DW Portion). Condition II.W. of the RCRA Permit specifies the Permittees are responsible for all other applicable federal, state, and local permits for the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W. of the RCRA Permit specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of permit condition, 'best efforts' means submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies. This Status Report includes information on all existing and anticipated environmental permitting. Environmental permitting required by RCRA, the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of 1984, and non-RCRA permitting (solid waste handling, Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Clean Water Act Amendments of 1987, Washington State waste discharge, and onsite sewage system) is addressed. Information on RCRA and non-RCRA is current as of July 31, 1998. For the purposes of RCRA and the State of Washington Hazardous Waste Management Act of 1976 [as administered through the Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Active Code (WAC) 173-303], the Hanford Facility is considered a single facility. As such, the Hanford Facility has been issued one US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/State Identification Number (WA7890008967). This EPA/State identification number encompasses over 60 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) units. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) has been delegated authority by the EPA to administer the RCRA, including mixed waste authority. The RCRA permitting approach for

  1. Permitted Marine Hydrokinetic Projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data represents pending or issued preliminary permits or issued licenses for marine hydrokinetic projects that produce energy from waves or directly from the...

  2. BCDC Minor Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — An administrative permit can be issued for an activity that qualifies as a minor repair or improvement in a relatively short period of time and without a public...

  3. Allegheny County Asbestos Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Current asbestos permit data issued by the County for commercial building demolitions and renovations as required by the EPA. This file is updated daily and can be...

  4. Floodplain District Permit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — The purpose of a Floodplain District Permit (FPDP) is to control floodplain development in order to protect persons and property from danger and destruction and to...

  5. Coal Mine Permit Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — ESRI ArcView shapefile depicting New Mexico coal mines permitted under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), by either the NM Mining these...

  6. Effects of imposed monitoring and blunting strategies on emotional reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, Peter; Jong, de Peter; Merckelbach, Harald; van Zuuren, Florence J.

    1994-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of imposed monitoring and blunting coping strategies on emotional reactivity in 40 subjects who prepared themselves for upcoming neutral and aversive slides. Besides subjective indices, electrodermal measures and eye blink startle responses were used to

  7. Pure culture response of ectomycorrhizal fungi to imposed water stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Coleman; Caroline S. Bledsoe; William Lopushinsky

    1989-01-01

    The ability of ectomycorrhizal fungal isolates to tolerate imposed water stress in pure culture was examined in 55 isolates of 18 species. Water potential treatments, adjusted with polyethylene glycol, were applied to Petri dish units. These units allowed colony diameter measurements of fungi grown on liquid media. Delayed growth initiation and inhibition of growth...

  8. Alignment to natural and imposed mismatches between the senses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, K.; Brenner, E.; van Beers, R.J.; Schot, W.D.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Does the nervous system continuously realign the senses so that objects are seen and felt in the same place? Conflicting answers to this question have been given. Research imposing a sensory mismatch has provided evidence that the nervous system realigns the senses to reduce the mismatch. Other

  9. Title V Permitting Statistics Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Title V Permitting Statistics Inventory contains measured and estimated nationwide statistical data, consisting of counts of permitted sources, types of permits...

  10. 40 CFR 52.2184 - Operating permits for minor sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operating permits for minor sources. 52... permits for minor sources. Emission limitations and related provisions established in South Dakota minor... right to deem permit conditions not federally enforceable. Such a determination will be made according...

  11. Cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Provide history of cyber attacks targeting at nuclear facilities. • Provide cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants. • Provide possible countermeasures for protecting nuclear power plants. - Abstract: With the introduction of new technology based on the increasing digitalization of control systems, the potential of cyber attacks has escalated into a serious threat for nuclear facilities, resulting in the advent of the Stuxnet. In this regard, the nuclear industry needs to consider several cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants, including regulatory guidelines and standards for cyber security, the possibility of Stuxnet-inherited malware attacks in the future, and countermeasures for protecting nuclear power plants against possible cyber attacks

  12. Cracking in reinforced concrete structures due to imposed deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, A.

    1997-04-01

    This thesis is concerned with modeling of the cracking process in reinforced concrete due to imposed deformations. Cracking is investigated both at early ages, during hydration, and at mature age when the final properties of the concrete are reached. One of the most important material characteristics of the concrete at early ages, the Young`s modulus is determined by means of a dynamic method called the resonance frequency method. 40 refs

  13. Distortions Imposed By Inflation on Historical-Cost Depreciation

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.

    1983-01-01

    The use of historical-cost depreciation in periods of persistent inflation decreases the present value of depreciation deductions, thus understating the true economic cost of capital and increasing the real after-tax rate of return required by potential investors. Efforts to correct these problems by adopting depreciation methods that allow for artificially short recovery periods or accelerated rates do not provide an adequate solution. Distortions imposed by inflation on historical-cost depr...

  14. PERMITTING HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This publication is a compilation of information presented at a seminar series designed to address the issues that affect the issuance of hazardous waste incineration permits and to improve the overall understanding of trial burn testing. pecifically, the document provides guidan...

  15. Permitting issues in Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    As background, LG and E Development Corporation (formerly Hadson) has successfully put 16 Qualifying Facilities in the ground over the past 9 years in California, Maine, Virginia, and North Carolina. Each of these qualifying facilities has had some environmental innovative first, so there is no apology for the authors' environmental credentials. In Virginia, there are four identical 60 MW stoker coal cogeneration projects in Southampton County, Altavista, Hopewell, and -lastly-Buena Vista. The Buena Vista cogeneration project becomes the exception that proves the permitting rules. It has been in the permitting process for over 4 years; and despite being the cleanest coal project ever considered east of the Mississippi (design at 0.1 lbs/MMBtu for both So 2 and NO x ), it has suffered serous consequences from permitting delays and BACT ratcheting. As a simple comparison of importance, the Virginia Power Mt. Storm coal power facility emits approximately 150,000 tons of So 2 per year, while the Buena Vista project will actually emit approximately 150 tons of SO 2 per year (not including 1,500' tons of purchased SO 2 offsets). Both are similar distances from the Shenandoah National Park which has been the primary environmental point of concern in Virginia

  16. Arthropod Borne Diseases in Imposed War during 1980-88

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khoobdel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personnel of military forces have close contact with natural habitat and usually encounter with bite of arthropods and prone to be infected with arthropod borne diseases. The imposed war against Iran was one of the most important and the longest war in the Middle East and even in the world and military people faced various diseases. The aim of this study was to review prevalence of arthropod borne diseases and to collect relevant information and valuable experiences during the imposed war.Methods: The present survey is a historical research and cross-sectional study, focused on arthropod fauna, situation of different arthropod borne diseases and also the ways which military personnel used to protect themselves against them. The information was adopted from valid military health files and also interviewing people who participated in the war.Results: Scabies, cutaneous leishmaniasis, sandfly fever and pediculosis were more prevalent among other arthropod -borne diseases in Iran-Iraq war. Measures to control arthropods and diseases at wartime mainly included: scheduled spraying of pesticides, leishmanization and treatment of patients.Conclusion: Although measures used during the war to control arthropods were proper, however, due to needs and importance of military forces to new equipment and technologies, it is recommended to use deltamethrin-impreg­nated bed net, permethrin treated military uniforms and various insect repellents in future.

  17. Arthropod Borne Diseases in Imposed War during 1980-88

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Khoobdel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personnel of military forces have close contact with natural habitat and usually encounter with bite of arthropods and prone to be infected with arthropod borne diseases. The imposed war against Iran was one of the most important and the longest war in the Middle East and even in the world and military people faced various diseases. The aim of this study was to review prevalence of arthropod borne diseases and to collect relevant information and valuable experiences during the imposed war. Methods: The present survey is a historical research and cross-sectional study, focused on arthropod fauna, situation of different arthropod borne diseases and also the ways which military personnel used to protect themselves against them. The information was adopted from valid military health files and also interviewing people who participated in the war. Results: Scabies, cutaneous leishmaniasis, sandfly fever and pediculosis were more prevalent among other arthropod -borne diseases in Iran-Iraq war. Measures to control arthropods and diseases at wartime mainly included: scheduled spraying of pesticides, leishmanization and treatment of patients. Conclusion: Although measures used during the war to control arthropods were proper, however, due to needs and importance of military forces to new equipment and technologies, it is recommended to use deltamethrin-impreg­nated bed net, permethrin treated military uniforms and various insect repellents in future.

  18. Banking and back-loading emission permits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaton, Corinne; Creti, Anna; Peluchon, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    In this article we focus on the so-called back-loading policy adopted by the European Commission to increase the carbon market price. This environmental measure consists of removing a share of the allowances allocated for a given period in order to reallocate some or all of them later on. To analyze the impact of the permits back-loading, we determine the CO 2 price equilibrium with and without the policy measure, considering not only the market for permits but also the output market of regulated sectors. We propose a two-period model, where the market for permits is perfectly competitive, and the output market can be either competitive or oligopolistic. First, we define the condition under which banking from one period to another is optimal. This condition, that is the absence of arbitrage opportunities (AOA), depends not only from the period initial allocation but also on production market fundamentals. When this condition is satisfied, the market for emission is shown intertemporally efficient. Second, we point out that the back-loading measure may create inefficiencies or leave unaffected the permits price, if it alters the AOA. -- Highlights: •Relationship between the market for permits and the output market of regulated sectors. •Analysis of CO 2 prices and banking. •Impact of a recent environmental policy measure (backloading) on CO 2 prices

  19. Coping with EPA's new petroleum industry storm water permits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veal, S.C.; Whitescarver, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency has just released for public comment its so-called multi-sector industry specific storm water permit. This permit -- developed in response to the 730 group storm water permit applications submitted in 1992 to EPA -- proposes the establishment of specific runoff sampling and facility design requirements for at least two petroleum industry sectors. This proposed permit establishes specific conditions for the oil and gas extraction section (SIC group 13) and for lubricant manufacturers (SIC 2992). Permit conditions are also established for allied industrial sectors such as the chemical, transportation and asphalt materials industries. By most standards, the proposed permit is much tougher than EPA's baseline general permit for storm water discharges which was released in September of 1992. For example, under the proposal, most industries are required to perform periodic storm water sampling. EPA has also established storm water effluent and performance standards for several industrial categories. This paper will discuss the petroleum industry specific conditions of the new permit. The paper will also discuss the results of the industry-wide storm water sampling efforts undertaken by more than 300 oil patch facilities across the country. In particular, sampling results will be discussed in the context to the permit conditions proposed by EPA. The paper will also discuss strategies for dealing with the new permits

  20. Propulsion efficiency and imposed flow fields of a copepod jump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, H.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Pelagic copepods jump to relocate, to attack prey and to escape predators. However, there is a price to be paid for these jumps in terms of their energy costs and the hydrodynamic signals they generate to rheotactic predators. Using observed kinematics of various types of jumps, we computed...... the imposed flow fields and associated energetics of jumps by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations by modeling the copepod as a self-propelled body. The computational fluid dynamics simulation was validated by particle image velocimetry data. The flow field generated by a repositioning jump...... the flow structure. The flow field associated with an escape jump sequence also includes two dominant vortex structures: one leading wake vortex generated as a result of the first jump and one around the body, but between these two vortex structures is an elongated, long-lasting flow trail with flow...

  1. Self-imposed length limits in recreational fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Martin, Dustin R.; Hurley, Keith L.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    A primary motivating factor on the decision to harvest a fish among consumptive-orientated anglers is the size of the fish. There is likely a cost-benefit trade-off for harvest of individual fish that is size and species dependent, which should produce a logistic-type response of fish fate (release or harvest) as a function of fish size and species. We define the self-imposed length limit as the length at which a captured fish had a 50% probability of being harvested, which was selected because it marks the length of the fish where the probability of harvest becomes greater than the probability of release. We assessed the influences of fish size, catch per unit effort, size distribution of caught fish, and creel limit on the self-imposed length limits for bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white crappie Pomoxis annularis combined, white bass Morone chrysops, and yellow perch Perca flavescens at six lakes in Nebraska, USA. As we predicted, the probability of harvest increased with increasing size for all species harvested, which supported the concept of a size-dependent trade-off in costs and benefits of harvesting individual fish. It was also clear that probability of harvest was not simply defined by fish length, but rather was likely influenced to various degrees by interactions between species, catch rate, size distribution, creel-limit regulation and fish size. A greater understanding of harvest decisions within the context of perceived likelihood that a creel limit will be realized by a given angler party, which is a function of fish availability, harvest regulation and angler skill and orientation, is needed to predict the influence that anglers have on fish communities and to allow managers to sustainable manage exploited fish populations in recreational fisheries.

  2. Lean in Air Permitting Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Lean in Air Permitting Guide is designed to help air program managers at public agencies better understand the potential value and results that can be achieved by applying Lean improvement methods to air permitting processes.

  3. Pacific Islands Region Fishing Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sustainable Fisheries Division Permits Program issues around 300 permits annually for pelagic longline and troll & handline, bottomfish, crustacean (lobster...

  4. Vessel Permit System Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GARFO issues federal fishing permits annually to owners of fishing vessels who fish in the Greater Atlantic region, as required by federal regulation. These permits...

  5. WIPP's Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Renewal Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most, W.A.; Kehrman, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    Hazardous waste permits issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) have a maximum term of 10-years from the permit's effective date. The permit condition in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) governing renewal applications, directs the Permittees to submit a permit application 180 days prior to expiration of the Permit. On October 27, 1999, the Secretary of the NMED issued to the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the owner and operator of WIPP, and to Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS), the Management and Operating Contractor and the cooperator of WIPP, a HWFP to manage, store, and dispose hazardous waste at WIPP. The DOE and WTS are collectively known as the Permittees. The HWFP is effective for a fixed term not to exceed ten years from the effective date of the Permit. The Permittees may renew the HWFP by submitting a new permit application at least 180 calendar days before the expiration date, of the HWFP. The Permittees are not proposing any substantial changes in the Renewal Application. First, the Permittees are seeking the authority to dispose of Contact-Handled and Remote-Handled TRU mixed waste in Panel 8. Panels 4 through 7 have been approved in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit as it currently exists. No other change to the facility or to the manner in which hazardous waste is characterized, managed, stored, or disposed is being requested. Second, the Permittees also seek to include the Mine Ventilation Rate Monitoring Plan, as Attachment Q in the HWFP. This Plan has existed as a separate document since May 2000. The NMED has requested that the Plan be submitted as part of the Renewal Application. The Permittees have been operating to the Mine Ventilation Rate Monitoring Plan since the Plan was submitted. Third, some information submitted in the original WIPP RCRA Part B Application has been updated, such as demographic information. The Permittees will submit this information in the

  6. The corporation and the community: Credibility, legitimacy, and imposed risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, C.; Rosenthal, I.

    1991-10-01

    In this age of rapid changes, large segments of society no longer trust any institution or authority in regard to pronouncements on what is safe. Because of this distrust, the public has demanded and obtained increased rights for individuals to intervene directly in decisions affecting them. Rosenthal warns that an organization that just fulfills its legal requirements for safety is no longer doing enough. Industry leaders must work toward re-establishing credibility by identifying persons who are potentially at risk as a result of industry activities, involving them in the communication process, and justifying the firm's social benefits. Seeking social legitimacy, chemical manufacturers have formed self-assessment groups and community councils, which have reaped unexpected benefits but have forced them to deal with issues they would have preferred to avoid. To industry leaders who contend that these types of activities are not worth the effort, Rosenthal presents a timely warning. Government and business must reduce public concerns significantly and make stakeholders more willing to tolerate imposed risk because of perceived benefits. It the public's concern is not reduced, we will all be required to make greater and greater investments in an inefficient and largely fruitless pursuit of absolute safety. 16 refs

  7. Challenges imposed by International Environmental Law to Classical International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Augusto Cárdenas Castañeda

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of international environmental law has produced important challenges to the very foundations of public international law. Traditional concepts such as state sovereignty, subjects of international law, and the early perspectives of national security are being transformed. The needs of the contemporary international society differ from the ones of the Wesphalian conception, situations which clearly explains the raise of alternative views for the understanding of the current dynamics of international law, where concepts like res communis, common concerns and simply “commons” take a privileged place in the study of international law. The foregoing has been strengthened by the international development of the so called erga ommnes obligations, label which is being used by international environmental law as the perfect explanation of its own existence. This academic article presents and studies the abovementioned concepts trying to compare what international law used to be before the emergence of international environmental law and what it is and what it should be in order to attend the developments and challenges imposed by the contemporary international society, particularly by international environmental law, a new fi eld of the corpus juris of public international law.

  8. The corporation and the community: Credibility, legitimacy, and imposed risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, C. (ed.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Rosenthal, I. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Center for Risk and Decision Processes)

    1991-10-01

    In this age of rapid changes, large segments of society no longer trust any institution or authority in regard to pronouncements on what is safe. Because of this distrust, the public has demanded and obtained increased rights for individuals to intervene directly in decisions affecting them. Rosenthal warns that an organization that just fulfills its legal requirements for safety is no longer doing enough. Industry leaders must work toward re-establishing credibility by identifying persons who are potentially at risk as a result of industry activities, involving them in the communication process, and justifying the firm's social benefits. Seeking social legitimacy, chemical manufacturers have formed self-assessment groups and community councils, which have reaped unexpected benefits but have forced them to deal with issues they would have preferred to avoid. To industry leaders who contend that these types of activities are not worth the effort, Rosenthal presents a timely warning. Government and business must reduce public concerns significantly and make stakeholders more willing to tolerate imposed risk because of perceived benefits. It the public's concern is not reduced, we will all be required to make greater and greater investments in an inefficient and largely fruitless pursuit of absolute safety. 16 refs.

  9. Body size, swimming speed, or thermal sensitivity? Predator-imposed selection on amphibian larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvoždík, Lumír; Smolinský, Radovan

    2015-11-02

    Many animals rely on their escape performance during predator encounters. Because of its dependence on body size and temperature, escape velocity is fully characterized by three measures, absolute value, size-corrected value, and its response to temperature (thermal sensitivity). The primary target of the selection imposed by predators is poorly understood. We examined predator (dragonfly larva)-imposed selection on prey (newt larvae) body size and characteristics of escape velocity using replicated and controlled predation experiments under seminatural conditions. Specifically, because these species experience a wide range of temperatures throughout their larval phases, we predict that larvae achieving high swimming velocities across temperatures will have a selective advantage over more thermally sensitive individuals. Nonzero selection differentials indicated that predators selected for prey body size and both absolute and size-corrected maximum swimming velocity. Comparison of selection differentials with control confirmed selection only on body size, i.e., dragonfly larvae preferably preyed on small newt larvae. Maximum swimming velocity and its thermal sensitivity showed low group repeatability, which contributed to non-detectable selection on both characteristics of escape performance. In the newt-dragonfly larvae interaction, body size plays a more important role than maximum values and thermal sensitivity of swimming velocity during predator escape. This corroborates the general importance of body size in predator-prey interactions. The absence of an appropriate control in predation experiments may lead to potentially misleading conclusions about the primary target of predator-imposed selection. Insights from predation experiments contribute to our understanding of the link between performance and fitness, and further improve mechanistic models of predator-prey interactions and food web dynamics.

  10. A critical role of lateral hypothalamus in context-induced relapse to alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Nathan J; Rabei, Rana; Kaganovsky, Konstantin; Caprioli, Daniele; Bossert, Jennifer M; Bonci, Antonello; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-05-28

    In human alcoholics, abstinence is often self-imposed, despite alcohol availability, because of the negative consequences of excessive use. During abstinence, relapse is often triggered by exposure to contexts associated with alcohol use. We recently developed a rat model that captures some features of this human condition: exposure to the alcohol self-administration environment (context A), after punishment-imposed suppression of alcohol self-administration in a different environment (context B), provoked renewal of alcohol seeking in alcohol-preferring P rats. The mechanisms underlying context-induced renewal of alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence are unknown. Here, we studied the role of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and its forebrain projections in this effect. We first determined the effect of context-induced renewal of alcohol seeking on Fos (a neuronal activity marker) expression in LH. We next determined the effect of LH reversible inactivation by GABAA + GABAB receptor agonists (muscimol + baclofen) on this effect. Finally, we determined neuronal activation in brain areas projecting to LH during context-induced renewal tests by measuring double labeling of the retrograde tracer cholera toxin subunit B (CTb; injected in LH) with Fos. Context-induced renewal of alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence was associated with increased Fos expression in LH. Additionally, renewal was blocked by muscimol + baclofen injections into LH. Finally, double-labeling analysis of CTb + Fos showed that context-induced renewal of alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence was associated with selective activation of accumbens shell neurons projecting to LH. The results demonstrate an important role of LH in renewal of alcohol seeking after punishment-imposed abstinence and suggest a role of accumbens shell projections to LH in this form of relapse. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/347447-11$15.00/0.

  11. Corrective shoeing in horses: analysis of the adaptation period to the new condition imposed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel M. Albernaz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Corrective shoeing is a method commonly used to alter the locomotion pattern in animals or as therapy for various disorders of the locomotive system of horses. However, to date, there have been no scientific studies discussing the period during which animals adapt to this type of intervention. The goal of this study was to evaluate the horseshoe adaptation period with the toe or heel elevated by six degrees at 0, 48, and 96 hours after each type of shoeing. For this analysis, the horses were recorded while walking on a treadmill. Stride length and gait qualitative analyzes were performed using Dvideow software. The level of significance adopted was 5%. In the present study, there was no significant difference between the evaluation times; elevating the toe or heel by six degrees do not generates discomfort during locomotion, therefore, horses are able to return to a regular exercise or training routine immediately after shoeing.

  12. ROMANIAN INDUSTRIAL ENGINES IN THE CONDITIONS IMPOSED BY THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDA GABRIEL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the number and structure of employees by main branches of the economy, with few exceptions, is atypical in terms of paths up the economy of a modern, competitive, able to sustain employment and income security of employment. Private sector development in Romania, especially in the services market (trade, catering, services rendered, tourism and release staff in the industry as a result of its restructuring will however during the employment growth in services. In developed countries, the service sector, which includes tourism, knows the high level of employment of staff, the tourist industry is the strongest absorber of community labor. Regarding the competitiveness of Romanian tourism, according to the World Economic Forum in 2011, Romania ranked 63 in the world (in 139 countries and 34th in Europe (42 countries, with an index of competitiveness in travel and tourism 4.17 (compared to 5.99 Swiss value, which is the first place .

  13. Effect Of Imposed Anaerobic Conditions On Metals Release From Acid-Mine Drainage Contaminated Streambed Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remediation of streams influenced by mine-drainage may require removal and burial of metal-containing bed sediments. Burial of aerobic sediments into an anaerobic environment may release metals, such as through reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides. Mining-impacted aerob...

  14. 42 CFR 460.40 - Violations for which CMS may impose sanctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations for which CMS may impose sanctions. 460... for which CMS may impose sanctions. In addition to other remedies authorized by law, CMS may impose any of the sanctions specified in §§ 460.42 and 460.46 if CMS determines that a PACE organization...

  15. 42 CFR 488.430 - Civil money penalties: Basis for imposing penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties: Basis for imposing penalty... PROCEDURES Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.430 Civil money penalties: Basis for imposing penalty. (a) CMS or the State may impose a civil money penalty for either the...

  16. Hidden power system inflexibilities imposed by traditional unit commitment formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-España, Germán; Ramírez-Elizondo, Laura; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Quality and accuracy of traditional-energy- and power-based UCs are evaluated. • Real-time performance evaluation simulating “perfect” stochastic UCs. • Ideal energy-based stochastic UC formulations impose hidden system inflexibilities. • A deterministic power-based UC may outperform an ideal energy-based stochastic UC. • Power-based UC overcomes flaws of energy-based UC: lower cost and wind curtailment. - Abstract: Approximations made in traditional day-ahead unit commitment model formulations can result in suboptimal or even infeasible schedules for slow-start units and inaccurate predictions of actual costs and wind curtailment. With increasing wind penetration, these errors will become economically more significant. Here, we consider inaccuracies from three approximations: the use of hourly intervals in which energy production from each generator is modeled as being constant; the disregarding of startup and shutdown energy trajectories; and optimization based on expected wind profiles. The results of unit commitment formulations with those assumptions are compared to models that: (1) use a piecewise-linear power profiles of generation, load and wind, instead of the traditional stepwise energy profiles; (2) consider startup/shutdown trajectories; and (3) include many possible wind trajectories in a stochastic framework. The day-ahead hourly schedules of slow-start generators are then evaluated against actual wind and load profiles using a model real-time dispatch and quick-start unit commitment with a 5 min time step. We find that each simplification usually causes expected generation costs to increase by several percentage points, and results in significant understatement of expected wind curtailment and, in some cases, load interruptions. The inclusion of startup and shutdown trajectories often yielded the largest improvements in schedule performance.

  17. Propulsion efficiency and imposed flow fields of a copepod jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Houshuo; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Pelagic copepods jump to relocate, to attack prey and to escape predators. However, there is a price to be paid for these jumps in terms of their energy costs and the hydrodynamic signals they generate to rheotactic predators. Using observed kinematics of various types of jumps, we computed the imposed flow fields and associated energetics of jumps by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations by modeling the copepod as a self-propelled body. The computational fluid dynamics simulation was validated by particle image velocimetry data. The flow field generated by a repositioning jump quickly evolves into two counter-rotating viscous vortex rings that are near mirror image of one another, one in the wake and one around the body of the copepod; this near symmetrical flow may provide hydrodynamic camouflage because it contains no information about the position of the copepod prey within the flow structure. The flow field associated with an escape jump sequence also includes two dominant vortex structures: one leading wake vortex generated as a result of the first jump and one around the body, but between these two vortex structures is an elongated, long-lasting flow trail with flow velocity vectors pointing towards the copepod; such a flow field may inform the predator of the whereabouts of the escaping copepod prey. High Froude propulsion efficiency (0.94-0.98) was obtained for individual power stroke durations of all simulated jumps. This is unusual for small aquatic organisms but is caused by the rapidity and impulsiveness of the jump that allows only a low-cost viscous wake vortex to travel backwards.

  18. Game theoretic analysis for carbon emission permits trading among multiple world regions with an optimizing global energy model; Saitekikagata sekai energy model ni motozuku tachiikikan CO2 haishutsu kyokasho torihiki no game ronteki bunseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimoto, K.; Matsunaga, A.; Fujii, Y. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan); Yamaji, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    Carbon emissions which would cause global warming were agreed to be constrained at COP3 in Kyoto. In addition, carton emission permits trading was also approved to be introduced. The emission permits trading is expected to achieve efficient carbon emission reduction, equalizing the marginal costs of the emission reduction for the participating countries. In other words, the permits trading allows participants to reduce emissions where it is least expensive to do so. However, the inadequate introduction of the trading systems may impose unfairly greater burden on some countries, and therefore careful evaluation of the system would be indispensable for its implementation. In this paper, we attempt to analyze the emission permits trading. using the theory of cooperative games with a global energy model of optimization type. We assumed that seven world regions as players participate the permits trading system under the condition of the emission reduction target presented at COP3 and so on, and show the nucleolus of the grand coalition games, and the computational results of primary energy supplies and CO2 shadow prices. The insights of this research indicate that in order to stabilize the grand coalition, a noticeable amount of additional transfer of money would be needed besides the payments associated with the emission permits trading. 10 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. A simple method to impose rotations and concentrated moments on ANC beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Ignacio; Arribas, Juan J.

    2009-01-01

    Recently introduced ANC beam elements furnish a simple formulation that allows to solve nonlinear problems of beams, including those with large displacements and strains, as well as complex nonlinear (inelastic) materials. The success and simplicity of these finite elements is mainly due to the fact that the only nodal degrees of freedom that they employ are displacements, and rotations are thus completely avoided. This in turn makes it very difficult to apply concentrated moments or to impose rotations at specific nodes of a finite element mesh. In this article, we present a simple enhancement to this beam formulation that allows to apply these two types of boundary conditions in a simple manner, making ANC beam elements more versatile for both multibody and structural applications

  20. Remark on Trautman's Radiation Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.

    1979-01-01

    The confusion about the boundary conditions for radiating systems formulated by Trautman are discussed. The confusion has mainly to do with where in space-time the conditions are to be imposed but also with what is it that the conditions are intended to guarantee. Imposing Trautman's conditions near future null infinity allows the existence of outgoing radiation; in order to exclude incoming radiation, they must be imposed near (or at) past null infinity. Since receding to infinity in spacelike directions means that one crosses all radiation, whether in- or outgoing, it makes no sense to impose the conditions at spatial infinity. If one were to impose fall-off of the electromagnetic field in flat space-time of 1/n at spatial infinity, then the field would contain finite energy. (Auth.)

  1. 9 CFR 72.13 - Permitted dips and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... proprietary brands of permitted dips—as well the use of compressed air, vat management techniques, and other... maintained and that under actual field conditions the dipping of cattle with a solution of definite strength...

  2. 2008 Contruction General Permits & Multi-Sector General Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — View stormwater notices of intent (NOIs) for construction projects under EPA's 2008 Construction General Permit (CGP), for Low Erosivity Waivers (LEWs) submitted...

  3. Noncooperative models of permit markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godal, Odd

    2011-07-15

    The applicability of some popular and basic permit market theories has been questioned. Drawing on noncooperative equilibrium theory for pure exchange economies, this article adapts several well-established alternative models to permit exchange. Some qualitative properties of the associated equilibria are provided, including two games with equilibria that in a sense coincide. Nevertheless, as there exist quite a few models potentially applicable to emissions trading, with equilibria that range from autarky to Pareto optimality, it seems that economics lacks a broadly accepted basic theory for permit markets. (Author)

  4. Tribal communities and coal in Northeast India: The politics of imposing and resisting mining bans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDuie-Ra, Duncan; Kikon, Dolly

    2016-01-01

    Bans on coal mining have been implemented in two tribal majority states in India's north-east frontier; Nagaland and Meghalaya. In Nagaland the state government imposed the ban in an attempt to capture control of coal extraction and trade, while in Meghalaya India's National Green Commission imposed the ban over concern for the environment and labour conditions. In both cases local communities have opposed the bans, and in some areas resumed mining under the authority of tribal councils and powerful civil society actors. In this paper we explore the politics of coal extraction that resulted in these bans and the response of communities and authorities. In doing so we made three main arguments that contribute to understanding of coal and communities in frontier regions where state control is partial and the legacy of armed conflict is powerful. First, in both locations the majority of the coal mining activity has been initiated and managed by members of tribal communities rather than profit-driven outsiders. Second, in contrast to other contexts in India (notably Orissa and Jharkhand) where large state or private enterprises seek to modify the law to enable coal extraction, in Nagaland and Meghalaya it has been communities that resent and challenge state and national laws being applied to their lands. Third, the right to extract coal is connected to the right of tribal communities to determine what happens on their lands. - Highlights: • Tribal communities initiate and manage coal mining in Nagaland and Meghalaya. • Laws banning coal extraction have been challenged and resisted by local communities. • The right to extract coal is tied to protecting tribal land rights. • Tribal autonomy in coal policy is progressive, yet enables capture by local elites. • Where there has been regulation of coal mining it has come from unexpected sources.

  5. Permit trading and credit trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boom, Jan-Tjeerd; R. Dijstra, Bouwe

    This paper compares emissions trading based on a cap on total emissions (permit trading) and on relative standards per unit of output (credit trading). Two types of market structure are considered: perfect competition and Cournot oligopoly. We find that output, abatement costs and the number...... of firms are higher under credit trading. Allowing trade between permit-trading and credit-trading sectors may increase in welfare. With perfect competition, permit trading always leads to higher welfare than credit trading. With imperfect competition, credit trading may outperform permit trading....... Environmental policy can lead to exit, but also to entry of firms. Entry and exit have a profound impact on the performance of the schemes, especially under imperfect competition. We find that it may be impossible to implement certain levels of total industry emissions. Under credit trading several levels...

  6. Factors Influencing Learner Permit Duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathon P. Ehsani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of countries are requiring an extended learner permit prior to independent driving. The question of when drivers begin the learner permit period, and how long they hold the permit before advancing to independent licensure has received little research attention. Licensure timing is likely to be related to “push” and “pull” factors which may encourage or inhibit the process. To examine this question, we recruited a sample of 90 novice drivers (49 females and 41 males, average age of 15.6 years soon after they obtained a learner permit and instrumented their vehicles to collect a range of driving data. Participants completed a series of surveys at recruitment related to factors that may influence licensure timing. Two distinct findings emerged from the time-to-event analysis that tested these push and pull factors in relation to licensure timing. The first can be conceptualized as teens’ motivation to drive (push, reflected in a younger age when obtaining a learner permit and extensive pre-permit driving experience. The second finding was teens’ perceptions of their parents’ knowledge of their activities (pull; a proxy for a parents’ attentiveness to their teens’ lives. Teens who reported higher levels of their parents’ knowledge of their activities took longer to advance to independent driving. These findings suggest time-to-licensure may be related to teens’ internal motivation to drive, and the ability of parents to facilitate or impede early licensure.

  7. The National Solar Permitting Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-08-31

    "The soft costs of solar — costs not associated with hardware — remain stubbornly high. Among the biggest soft costs are those associated with inefficiencies in local permitting and inspection. A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory estimates that these costs add an average of $0.22/W per residential installation. This project helps reduce non-hardware/balance of system (BOS) costs by creating and maintaining a free and available site of permitting requirements and solar system verification software that installers can use to reduce time, capital, and resource investments in tracking permitting requirements. Software tools to identify best permitting practices can enable government stakeholders to optimize their permitting process and remove superfluous costs and requirements. Like ""a Wikipedia for solar permitting"", users can add, edit, delete, and update information for a given jurisdiction. We incentivize this crowdsourcing approach by recognizing users for their contributions in the form of SEO benefits to their company or organization by linking back to users' websites."

  8. 50 CFR 679.4 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... this section, with the exception that an IFQ hired master permit or a CDQ hired master permit need not... program permit or card type is: Permit is in effect from issue date through the end of: For more... section (C) Halibut & sablefish hired master permits Specified fishing year Paragraph (d)(2) of this...

  9. Market Power in Laboratory Emission Permit Markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godby, R.

    2002-01-01

    Many proposals suggesting the use of markets to control pollution assume markets will be competitive. When markets do not exhibit competitive characteristics, however, should they still be expected to result in efficiency improvement relative to traditional approaches? This paper employs experimental economic methods to examine the effect of market structure on the use of marketable emissions permits. Results indicate that in a market with one dominant firm and a number of fringe firms, strategic manipulation occurs repeatedly in the laboratory as predicted by market power models, undermining the allocative and dynamic efficiency benefits such markets offer. When firms compete in a downstream product market dominated by the same single firm, market efficiency can actually be reduced with the implementation of permit markets. Final market efficiencies reflect initial endowments and are influenced by competitive conditions elsewhere in the economy, indicating that policy-makers should carefully consider whether markets are appropriate in such circumstances

  10. Waste water pilot plant research, development, and demonstration permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This permit application has been prepared to obtain a research, development, and demonstration permit to perform pilot-scale treatability testing on the 242-A Evaporator process condensate waste water effluent stream. It provides the management framework, and controls all the testing conducted in the waste water pilot plant using dangerous waste. It also provides a waste acceptance envelope (upper limits for selected constituents) and details the safety and environmental protection requirements for waste water pilot plant testing. This permit application describes the overall approach to testing and the various components or requirements that are common to all tests. This permit application has been prepared at a sufficient level of detail to establish permit conditions for all waste water pilot plant tests to be conducted

  11. 42 CFR 423.758 - Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS... Intermediate Sanctions § 423.758 Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS. (a) When a Part D plan sponsor does not request a hearing CMS initiates collection of the civil money penalty following the...

  12. 42 CFR 422.758 - Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS... § 422.758 Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS. (a) When an MA organization does not request a hearing, CMS initiates collection of the civil money penalty following the expiration of the...

  13. 42 CFR 423.756 - Procedures for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... BENEFIT Intermediate Sanctions § 423.756 Procedures for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money... civil money penalties. 423.756 Section 423.756 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... sanctions have been imposed, CMS may require a Part D plan sponsor to market or to accept enrollments or...

  14. Damage Characterization of EBC-SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Imposed Thermal Gradient Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high temperature capabilities, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components are being developed for use in hot-section aerospace engine applications. Harsh engine environments have led to the development of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for silicon-based CMCs to further increase thermal and environmental capabilities. This study aims at understanding the damage mechanisms associated with these materials under simulated operating conditions. A high heat-flux laser testing rig capable of imposing large through-thickness thermal gradients by means of controlled laser beam heating and back-side air cooling is used. Tests are performed on uncoated composites, as well as CMC substrates that have been coated with state-of-the-art ceramic EBC systems. Results show that the use of the EBCs may help increase temperature capability and creep resistance by reducing the effects of stressed oxidation and environmental degradation. Also, the ability of electrical resistance (ER) and acoustic emission (AE) measurements to monitor material condition and damage state during high temperature testing is shown; suggesting their usefulness as a valuable health monitoring technique. Micromechanics models are used to describe the localized stress state of the composite system, which is utilized along with ER modeling concepts to develop an electromechanical model capable of characterizing material behavior.

  15. Life history trade-offs imposed by dragline use in two money spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, Dries; Verduyn, Lieselot; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-01-01

    Trade-offs among life history traits are central to understanding the limits of adaptations to stress. In animals, virtually all decisions taken during life are expected to have downstream consequences. To what degree rare, but energy-demanding, decisions carry over to individual performance is rarely studied in arthropods. We used spiders as a model system to test how single investments in silk use - for dispersal or predator escape - affect individual performance. Silk produced for safe lines and as threads for ballooning is of the strongest kind and is energetically costly, especially when resources are limited. We induced dragline spinning in two species of money spider at similar quantities to that under natural conditions and tested trade-offs with lifespan and egg sac production under unlimited prey availability and a dietary restriction treatment. We demonstrate strong trade-offs between dragline spinning and survival and fecundity. Survival trade-offs were additive to those imposed by the dietary treatment, but a reduction in eggs produced after silk use was only prevalent under conditions where food was restricted during the spider's life. Because draglines are not recycled after their use for dispersal or predator escape, their spinning incurs substantial fitness costs in dispersal, especially in environments with prey limitation. Rare but energetically costly decisions related to dispersal or predator escape may thus carry over to adult performance and explain phenotypic heterogeneity in natural populations. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Legal Review: Issuance of Separate Permits for a Nuclear Reactor for Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Gun-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Wwon; Koh, Jae-Dong; Kim, Chang-Bum; Ahn, Sang-kyu

    2006-01-01

    With regard to the nuclear reactor permission system under the Atomic Energy Act of the Republic of Korea, two types of permits must be obtained for nuclear power reactors under Article 11 and Article 21 of the Atomic Energy Act: construction permits and operation permits. Concerning nuclear reactors for research, however, only one permit is required: a dual permit that authorizes both construction and operation, under Article 33 of said act. This permit can be obtained by submitting an application for a dual construction and operation permit to the regulatory authority. The question is whether a dual permit can be issued for nuclear reactors for research under any circumstances. If the literal provisions of the Atomic Energy Act are applied rigorously even in cases where it is realistically difficult to submit a dual permit application or issue a dual permit for construction and operation considering the power output, usage, and design complexity of nuclear reactors for research, separate permits for construction or operation shall never be issued, with only dual permits for construction and operation issued. For the Hanaro research reactor, a dual permit was issued with a condition attached thereto based on the literal provisions of the Atomic Energy Act at the time of its construction, although an application for and issuance of a dual permit for its construction and operation were impossible at the time. This is in violation of the purport of the law that provides for a dual permit

  17. FIRE PERMIT NOW ON EDH!

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS General Safety Group or

    2001-01-01

    The electronic version of the Fire Permit form is now active. The aim of the Fire Permit procedure is to reduce the risk of fire or explosion. It is mandatory when performing 'hot work' (mainly activities which involve the use of naked flames or other heat sources - e.g. welding, brazing, cutting, grinding, etc.). Its use is explained in the CERN Fire Protection Code E. (Fire Protection) The new electronic form, which is substantially unchanged from the previous authorizing procedure, will be available on the Electronic Document Handling system (https://edh.cern.ch/) as of 1st September 2001. From this date use of the paper version should be discontinued.

  18. Unilateral regulation of bilateral trade in greenhouse gas emission permits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehdanz, Katrin; Tol, Richard S.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers the coordination of domestic markets for tradable emission permits where countries determine their own emission reduction targets, using a two-country model. Linking such schemes is beneficial to both countries but may cause the exporting country to decrease its emission reduction target and export more permits. This in turn would not only reduce the costs for both countries as less emissions have to be reduced, but it also lowers the environmental benefits of the importing country. One price instrument (tariff) and two quantity instruments (discount, quota) to prevent the exporting country from issuing more permits are examined. Each instrument restricts trade and alters the terms of trade for the two countries. The importing country (and regulator) prefers an import tariff and an import quota to a carbon discount. If the exporting country releases additional permits, the importing country should not try to keep total emissions constant, as that would be ineffective and maybe even counterproductive. Instead, the importing country should aim to keep the total import constant; this would impose costs on the exporting country that are independent of the policy instrument; an import quota would be the cheapest option for the importing country. An import quota would also stress the idea of supplementary of the flexible mechanism as it increases the share of emissions reduced domestically. Compliance and liability issues constrain the market further. However, both the importing and the exporting country would prefer that the permit seller is liable in case of non-compliance, as sellers' liability would less constrain the market

  19. INVESTIGATION OF MATERIAL RESISTANCE TO PLASTIC DEFORMATION AT PROCESSING METALS BY PRESSURE WITH IMPOSING ULTRASONIC OSCILLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klubovich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains substantiation for application of experimental technique in order to investigate material resistance to plastic deformation at processing metals by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations while proceeding from laws of similarity. It is shown that at modeling any metal processing by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations it is possible to consider that actual elastic and plastic metal properties remain constant during processing under ultrasound action. The second aspect that requires a special attention at modeling is pulse or vibration-shock deformation at processing metals by pressure with imposing ultrasonic oscillations.

  20. Tradeable CO2 emission permits for cost-effective control of global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosobud, R.F.; South, D.W.; Daly, T.A.; Quinn, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    Many current global warming mitigation policy proposals call for large, near-term reductions in CO 2 emissions, thereby entailing high initial carbon emission tax rates or permit prices. This paper claims that these high initial tax rates or permit prices are not cost-effective in achieving the desired degree of climate change control. A cost-effective permit system is proposed and described that, under certain assumptions, would allow markets to optimally lead permit prices along a gradually increasing trajectory over tie. This price path presents the Hotelling result and would ease the abrupt, inefficient, and costly adjustments imposed on the fossil fuel and other industries in current proposals. This finding is demonstrated using the Argonne Model, a linear programming energy- environmental-economic model that allows for intertemporal optimization of consumer energy well-being. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. The influence of an interfacial heat release on nonlinear convective regimes under the action of an imposed temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simanovskii, Ilya B, E-mail: cesima@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Mathematics, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 32000 Haifa (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    The influence of an interfacial heat release on nonlinear convective regimes, developed under the action of an imposed temperature gradient in the 47v2 silicone oil–water system, has been studied. Two types of boundary conditions—periodic boundary conditions and rigid heat-insulated lateral walls—have been considered. Transitions between the flows with different spatial structures have been investigated. It is shown that the presence of an interfacial heat release can change the sequence of bifurcations and can lead to the appearance of new oscillatory regimes. The period-three phase trajectory has been found. (paper)

  2. Hydroelectric Generating Facilities General Permit ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    The Notice of Availability of the Final NPDES General Permits (HYDROGP) for Discharges at Hydroelectric Generating Facilities in Massachusetts (MAG360000) and New Hampshire (NHG360000) and Tribal Lands in the State of Massachusetts was published in the Federal Register on December 7, 2009 (see 74 Fed. Reg. No. 233, pages 64074 - 64075).

  3. Experimental verification of the imposing principle for maximum permissible levels of multicolor laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivashin V.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The study presents the results of experimental research to verify the principle overlay for maximum permissible levels (MPL of multicolor laser radiation single exposure on eyes. This principle of the independence of the effects of radiation with each wavelength (the imposing principle, was founded and generalized to a wide range of exposure conditions. Experimental verification of this approach in relation to the impact of laser radiation on tissue fundus of an eye, as shows the analysis of the literature was not carried out. Material and methods. Was used in the experimental laser generating radiation with wavelengths: Л1 =0,532 microns, A2=0,556to 0,562 microns and A3=0,619to 0,621 urn. Experiments were carried out on eyes of rabbits with evenly pigmented eye bottom. Results. At comparison of results of processing of the experimental data with the calculated data it is shown that these levels are close by their parameters. Conclusions. For the first time in the Russian Federation had been performed experimental studies on the validity of multi-colored laser radiation on the organ of vision. In view of the objective coincidence of the experimental data with the calculated data, we can conclude that the mathematical formulas work.

  4. Effects of salt stress imposed during two growth phases on cauliflower production and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Francesco; Cassaniti, Carla; Malvuccio, Angelo; Leonardi, Cherubino

    2017-03-01

    Cultivation of cauliflower is diffused in Mediterranean areas where water salinity results in the need to identify alternative irrigation sources or management strategies. Using saline water during two growth phases (from transplanting to visible appearance of inflorescence or from appearance of inflorescence to head harvest), the present study aimed to identify the growth period that is more suitable for irrigation with low quality water in relation to cauliflower production and quality. Salinity affected cauliflower growth mainly when imposed in the first growth phase. The growth reduction depended mainly on ion-specific effects, although slight nutrient imbalances as a result of Na + and Cl - antagonisms were observed. The use of non-saline water in the first or second growth period reduced both the osmotic and toxic effects of salinity. When salinity was applied during inflorescence growth, yield was reduced because of a restriction of water accumulation in the head. The results of the present study demonstrate the possibility of producing marketable cauliflower heads under conditions of salinity by timing the application of the best quality water during the first growth phase to improve fruit quality and during the second phase to reduce the negative effects of salinity on yield. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. 50 CFR 660.25 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... change and the reasons for the request. If the permit requested to be changed to the base permit is..., vessel owner, or permit owner for any reason. The sablefish at-sea processing exemption will expire upon... ownership. (G) For a request to change a permit's ownership that is necessitated by divorce, the individual...

  6. 10 CFR 50.23 - Construction permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Construction permits. 50.23 Section 50.23 Energy NUCLEAR... Description of Licenses § 50.23 Construction permits. A construction permit for the construction of a... part 52 of this chapter, the construction permit and operating license are deemed to be combined in a...

  7. Imposed Hispanicity: How the Imposition of Racialized and Gendered Identities in Texas Affects Mexican Women in Romantic Relationships with White Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. Guillén

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Intimate, romantic spaces are important sites for the examination of self-identification and perceived identification, especially with regard to gender and racial power. In this article I examine how white men in romantic relationships or marriages with Mexican women and residing in Texas, impose “Hispanic” as a racial identity as a discursive tactic that reinforces the hegemonic power of being white and being a man in order to define the situation, impose ideals that distance Mexican partners from being “too ethnic” or “threatening” in order to achieve closer proximity to “honorary whiteness” and acceptability of racial others, and creates a romantic space that is coercive instead of loving and safe. This study thus finds that white men used their hegemony to not only employ imposed Hispanicity, which I define as an institutionally created but culturally and institutionally imposed label, and an action based on the use of direct and indirect coercion and force by others, in this case, white romantic partners, for the purpose of establishing power and determining the situation in which racial definitions are made. Therefore, “Hispanic” becomes an identity that is chosen by others and while participants of Mexican descent do employ agency, the socially imposed conditions and expectations associated with “Hispanic” serve to police the identities, bodies, lives, and actions of people of Latin American descent.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.; Carnes, R.; Kinker, J.; Loehr, C.; Lyon, W.

    1996-01-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are ''functionally equivalent.'' The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements. The incinerator's carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. In performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent. In this case, the key performance data included gas residence time and distribution of flow over the activated carbon. Because both units were custom designed and fabricated, a simple comparison of manufacturers' specifications was impossible. Therefore, numerical simulation of each unit design was performed using the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulic computer code to model isothermal hydrodynamic performance under steady-state conditions. The results of residence time calculations from the model were coupled with flow proportion and sampled using a Monte Carlo-style simulation to derive distributions that describe the predicted residence times

  9. NPDES permits and water analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojasek, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Provisions of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended by P. L. 92-500, including an explanation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), and EPA's criteria for the analysis of pollutants are discussed. The need for a revision of current restrictive variance procedures is pointed out. References for the comparison of analytical methods for water pollutants under permits, including radioactive parameters, are tabulated. (U.S.)

  10. Waste-to-energy permitting sourcebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longwell, D.; Wegrecki, A.; Williams, D.

    1992-10-01

    Environmental issues, regulatory processes and approvals important in obtaining a permit to construct and/or operate a waste-to-energy (WTE) facility are identified and discussed. Environmental issues include: (1) air emission levels, their control and potential impacts, (2) ash leachability, treatment, and disposal, (3) potential health risks from emissions, and (4) other issues such as need/benefit and public perception of WTE. Laws, regulations and approvals that can affect project development are identified and listed, and potential regulatory trends are discussed. A general permit acquisition plan is also presented. An analysis of environmental and regulatory data obtained from the literature, regulatory agencies, and specific projects is presented. California and Massachusetts, both with regulations generally more stringent than federal regulations and considered environmentally conservative, were selected for detailed state regulatory review. Two project case histories (Commerce Refuse-to-Energy (RTE) Project in California and SEMASS WTE Project in Massachusetts) were selected to illustrate: (1) how regulations are actually applied to a project, (2) project-specific permit and operating conditions, and (3) project-specific environmental issues. Modern WTE plots employ state-of-the-art air emission control technologies and strategies to reduce air emission is to levels below regulatory requirements and to reduce estimated health risks to within EPA's acceptable risk range. WTE ash leachate can exhibit hazardous waste characteristics, primarily lead and cadmium. However, modern landfills utilize liners and leachate collection systems to prevent infiltration of leachate into the groundwater supply. Modern WTE plants employ dry systems and have zero process wastewater discharge

  11. Pleistocene corals of the Florida keys: Architects of imposing reefs - Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidz, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    Five asymmetrical, discontinuous, stratigraphically successive Pleistocene reef tracts rim the windward platform margin off the Florida Keys. Built of large head corals, the reefs are imposing in relief (???30 m high by 1 km wide), as measured from seismic profiles. Well dated to marine oxygen isotope substages 5c, 5b, and 5a, corals at depth are inferred to date to the Stage 6/5 transition. The size of these reefs attests to late Pleistocene conditions that repeatedly induced vigorous and sustained coral growth. In contrast, the setting today, linked to Florida Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, is generally deemed marginal for reef accretion. Incursion onto the reef tract of waters that contain seasonally inconsistent temperature, salinity, turbidity, and nutrient content impedes coral growth. Fluctuating sea level and consequent settings controlled deposition. The primary dynamic was position of eustatic zeniths relative to regional topographic elevations. Sea level during the past 150 ka reached a maximum of ???10.6 m higher than at present ???125 ka, which gave rise to an inland coral reef (Key Largo Limestone) and ooid complex (Miami Limestone) during isotope substage 5e. These formations now form the Florida Keys and a bedrock ridge beneath The Quicksands (Gulf of Mexico). High-precision radiometric ages and depths of dated corals indicate subsequent apices remained ???15 to 9 m, respectively, below present sea level. Those peaks provided accommodation space sufficient for vertical reef growth yet exposed a broad landmass landward of the reefs for >100 ka. With time, space, lack of bay waters, and protection from the Gulf of Mexico, corals thrived in clear oceanic waters of the Gulf Stream, the only waters to reach them.

  12. 42 CFR 422.760 - Determinations regarding the amount of civil money penalties and assessment imposed by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... penalties and assessment imposed by CMS. 422.760 Section 422.760 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... assessment imposed by CMS. (a) Determining the appropriate amount of any penalty. In determining the amount of penalty imposed under 422.752(c)(1), CMS will consider as appropriate: (1) The nature of the...

  13. 42 CFR 423.760 - Determinations regarding the amount of civil money penalties and assessment imposed by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... penalties and assessment imposed by CMS. 423.760 Section 423.760 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... penalties and assessment imposed by CMS. (a) Determining the appropriate amount of any penalty. In determining the amount of penalty imposed under 423.752(c)(1), CMS will consider as appropriate: (1) The...

  14. Forest Products Industry Permitting Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  15. The run permit protection system for GTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, W.H.; Jones, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    A Run Permit system has been designed for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The system implements mode-dependent software interlocks to ensure proper operation of the accelerator, enabling the ion source extractor and RF systems when proper conditions are met. The system is implemented using the GTA control system; thus all information available to the control system is also available for use in interlock logic. The logic is defined in terms of control system channels, which reflect accelerator parameters such as actuator positions, power supply values, temperatures, etc. A mode switch in the control room selects the accelerator operating mode, for example i njector only . The Run Permit software selects interlock logic as appropriate operating mode. This implementation easily accommodates logic changes as requirements evolve. To ensure reliable operation of a software-based system, a special circuit with a watch-dog timer is employed to produce the system's output signals. The software must periodically address the circuit, or the output signals are forced to a disabled state. For additional protection, there are self-test provisions for detecting and reacting to failures of the control system. (Author) 4 figs., ref

  16. Economic Impact of Imposing Excise Tax on Plastic Bottles of Drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Mardanugraha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research simulates the effect of imposing excise tax on plastic container of drinks towards economic performance of beverage industry in Indonesia and governmentâ˘A ´Zs tax revenue. The results showed that by imposing excise tax on plastic cups and plastic bottles the government would lose tax revenue from value added tax (PPN and corporate income tax (PPh badan more than they gain additional revenue from excise tax. Hence, imposing excise tax on drink containers should serve a clear purpose and an undeniable reason. This paper recommends the government to develop proper excise infrastructure to extend the goods or services to be taxed. This paper also recommends the required stages for extending the excise tax.

  17. Tributes imposed on tourists as a new-old source of local governments income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin BURZEC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth in a number of tourists and, consequently, a larger income obtained from tourism by the state led to the situation when the previously marginalized tributes imposed on tourists by local governments have assumed greater significance. Additional revenues to local units’ budgets, gained from the above-mentioned tributes, are often allotted for better infrastructure and tourist promotion, thereby contributing to the increased tourist competitiveness. The present paper discusses the construction of levies imposed on tourists by local governments in various European states. Besides, the issues of how local governments can influence the construction of the tax within the frames of the granted tax autonomy are examined. Due to the fact that in many European countries burdens imposed on tourists by local units can be called taxes, fees or other levies, the term „tribute”, as a broader one including all statutory charges, is intentionally used in the present paper.

  18. 5 CFR 734.202 - Permitted activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Permitted Activities § 734.202 Permitted activities. Employees may take an active part in political activities, including political management and political campaigns, to the extent not expressly prohibited by law and this part. ...

  19. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease

  20. Rosebud Casino and Hotel NPDES Proposed Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indian Country, Minor Permit, proposed permit SD-0034584, Rosebud Casino and Hotel, South Dakota, is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility in Todd County, South Dakota to an unnamed drainageway(s) tributary to Rock Creek.

  1. 300 area TEDF permit compliance monitoring plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERNESKI, L.D.

    1998-11-20

    This document presents the permit compliance monitoring plan for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). It addresses the compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and Department of Natural Resources Aquatic Lands Sewer Outfall Lease.

  2. Militarised violence in the service of state-imposed emergencies over Palestine and Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Pfingst

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available States of Emergency are declared against the disorder-ing of state sovereign power by acts of resistance, rebellion and revolt and are characterised by the technologies of control, containment and punishment. Through spatial, archival and visual encounters with emergency landscapes and the geographies of resistance, the essay considers the historic and contemporary operations, provisions, regulations and practices authorised under state-imposed emergencies. It does so in order firstly, to bring attention to the practices authorised through state-imposed emergencies and the currency and saliency of their ongoing effects, and secondly to re-frame the militarised violence of settlement/occupation as an integral part of state-imposed emergencies in which all that is necessary will be done to protect the sovereign state from the resistance of the colonised/occupied and to effect a return to ‘order’.     Through encounters with the archival record, and the architectures, remnants and territorial arrangements found in post-colonial Kenya and across the multiple geographies of Palestine, the essay draws out seven clusters of state imposed emergency practices and effects. The work grapples with a number of questions: what is it that a declared state of emergency performs for the state? Does a state of emergency enable particular forms of militarised violence? Are there common practices to be found across different modes of state-imposed emergencies? What is the genealogy to the states of emergency across Palestine and Kenya? Does our excavation of the practices of state-imposed emergency shed light on the ways we apprehend state violence in colonial, post-colonial and neo-colonial geographies?

  3. Air permitting of IGCC plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitikela, S.R.

    2007-07-01

    The IGCC process is, currently, the preferred choice over conventional thermal power production in regard to cleanup of fuel and significantly reduced contaminant emissions. The air permitting requirements include the review of: feed preparation and PM emissions; feed gasification and contaminant emissions; elemental sulfur recovery and SO{sub 2} emissions; options for carbon-dioxide recovery; syngas characteristics for combustion; CT design and combustion mechanisms; air contaminant emissions of CT; controlled CT emissions of nitrogen-oxides and carbon-monoxide gases using the SCR and oxidation catalysts, respectively; and, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). However, the IGCC processes are being rigorously reviewed for the system integration and reliability, and significant reduction of air contaminant emissions (including the greenhouse gases). This paper included a review of IGCC air contaminant emission rates, and various applicable regulatory requirements, such as NSR (New Source Review), NSPS (New Source Performance Standards), and MACT (Maximum Achievable Control Technology). The IGCC facility's NOX, CO, SO{sub 2}, PM, VOCs, and HAPs emission rates would be significantly low. Thus, effective, construction and installation, and operation air permits would be necessary for IGCC facilities.

  4. 7 CFR 319.75-3 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine, Port Operations, Permit Unit... article may be imported only after issuance of a written permit by Plant Protection and Quarantine. (b) An application for a written permit should be submitted to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant...

  5. 77 FR 25082 - Picture Permit Imprint Indicia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 111 Picture Permit Imprint Indicia AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION... Service, Domestic Mail Manual (DMM[supreg]) 604.5 to add picture permit imprint indicia standards allowing...: The use of picture permit imprint indicia is designed to improve the effectiveness of a mailpiece by...

  6. 40 CFR 70.6 - Permit content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 70.5(d) of this part. (B) Prompt reporting of deviations from permit requirements, including those... corrective actions or preventive measures taken. The permitting authority shall define “prompt” in relation... and air pollution control equipment), practices, or operations regulated or required under the permit...

  7. Permitted and forbidden sets in symmetric threshold-linear networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnloser, Richard H R; Seung, H Sebastian; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2003-03-01

    The richness and complexity of recurrent cortical circuits is an inexhaustible source of inspiration for thinking about high-level biological computation. In past theoretical studies, constraints on the synaptic connection patterns of threshold-linear networks were found that guaranteed bounded network dynamics, convergence to attractive fixed points, and multistability, all fundamental aspects of cortical information processing. However, these conditions were only sufficient, and it remained unclear which were the minimal (necessary) conditions for convergence and multistability. We show that symmetric threshold-linear networks converge to a set of attractive fixed points if and only if the network matrix is copositive. Furthermore, the set of attractive fixed points is nonconnected (the network is multiattractive) if and only if the network matrix is not positive semidefinite. There are permitted sets of neurons that can be coactive at a stable steady state and forbidden sets that cannot. Permitted sets are clustered in the sense that subsets of permitted sets are permitted and supersets of forbidden sets are forbidden. By viewing permitted sets as memories stored in the synaptic connections, we provide a formulation of long-term memory that is more general than the traditional perspective of fixed-point attractor networks. There is a close correspondence between threshold-linear networks and networks defined by the generalized Lotka-Volterra equations.

  8. Requirements for permitting a mixed waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trichon, M.; Feldman, J.; Serne, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The consideration, design, selection and operation of any incinerator depends primarily on characteristic quality (ultimate and proximate analyses) and quantity to the waste to be incinerated. In the case of burning any combination of mixed hazardous, biomedical and radioactive low level waste, specific federal and generic state environmental regulatory requirements are outlined. Combustion chamber temperature and waste residence time requirements will provide the rest of the envelope for consideration. Performance requirements must be balanced between the effects of time and temperature on destruction of the organic waste and the vaporization and possible emission of the inorganic waste components (e.g., toxic metals, radioactive inorganics) as operating conditions and emission levels will be set in state and federal regulatory permits. To this end the complete characterization of the subject waste stream must be determined if an accurate assessment of incineration effectiveness and impact are to be performed

  9. Potable Water Treatment Facility General Permit (PWTF GP) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    The Final PWTF GP establishes permit eligibility conditions, Notice of Intent (NOI) requirements, effluent limitations, standards, prohibitions, and best management practices for facilities that discharge to waters in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (including both Commonwealth and Indian country lands) and the State of New Hampshire.

  10. 78 FR 42540 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... to the disadvantage of the listed species, and that the terms and conditions of the permit were... UNIVERSITY 207948 3/4/2013 12/31/2017 WESTERN ECOSYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY, INC 050706 10/1/2012 12/31/2015 WESTERN...

  11. 50 CFR 13.21 - Issuance of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... material information required, or has made false statements as to any material fact, in connection with his... disqualification has been expressly waived by the Director in response to a written petition. (2) The revocation of..., as well as any other conditions deemed appropriate and included on the face of the permit at the...

  12. CJEU rules on use of standards in imposing information duties on life insurance companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mańko, R.

    2015-01-01

    The EU Directive applicable to life insurance sets out what kind of information insurance companies must give to policyholders. It also allows Member States to impose broader information duties, provided that the information is necessary for the policyholder to understand the contract. In its ruling

  13. 24 CFR 266.120 - Actions for which sanctions may be imposed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AUTHORITIES HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY RISK-SHARING PROGRAM FOR INSURED AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY PROJECT LOANS Housing Finance Agency Requirements § 266.120 Actions for which sanctions may be imposed. Results of... provisions with respect to individual projects; (12) Maintain a default ratio acceptable to HUD relative to...

  14. 76 FR 74690 - Extension of Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological Material From Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... and Ethnological Material From Bolivia AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection; Department of... archaeological and ethnological material from Bolivia. The restrictions, which were originally imposed by... archaeological and ethnological material from Bolivia to which the restrictions apply. DATES: Effective Date...

  15. 13 CFR 127.700 - What penalties may be imposed under this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What penalties may be imposed under this part? 127.700 Section 127.700 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WOMEN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS FEDERAL CONTRACT ASSISTANCE PROCEDURES Penalties § 127.700 What penalties may...

  16. Adolescent Drug Use and the Deterrent Effect of School-Imposed Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, G. R.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of the effect of school-imposed penalties for drug use on a student's consumption of marijuana are biased if both are determined by unobservable school or individual attributes. Reverse causality is also a potential challenge to retrieving estimates of the causal relationship, as the severity of school sanctions may simply reflect the…

  17. 26 CFR 1.6664-3 - Ordering rules for determining the total amount of penalties imposed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Additions to the Tax, Additional... that the taxpayers made a timely estimated tax payment of $1,500 for 1989 which they failed to claim... imposed. (a) In general. This section provides rules for determining the order in which adjustments to a...

  18. Identification during imposed change: the roles of personal values, type of change, and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlik, Noga; Oreg, Shaul

    2015-06-01

    Using a person-situation perspective, we explain what happens to individuals' identification with a collective in the context of a change. We propose that given the anxiety that often emerges during change, individuals' personal values (conservation and openness to change) interact with type of change (imposed vs. voluntary) in predicting identification following change. In a pilot, longitudinal field study (N = 61, 67% female) of an imposed university campus relocation, we measured employees' values and identification with the university before and several months after the relocation. In two lab experiments (Study 1: N = 104, 91.3% female; Study 2: N = 113, 75.2% female), we manipulated a change to be either imposed or voluntary and compared the relationships between values and identification across types of change. In Study 2, we also measured anxiety from the change. When change was imposed (all three studies), but not when voluntary (Studies 1 and 2), individuals' conservation was positively, and openness negatively, related to individuals' post-change identification. The effects emerged only for individuals who experienced change-related anxiety (Study 2). Our findings demonstrate that individuals' identification with a changing collective depends on the amount of anxiety change elicits and on the particular combination of their values and type of change. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. 42 CFR 422.756 - Procedures for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... civil money penalties. 422.756 Section 422.756 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Sanctions § 422.756 Procedures for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties. (a) Notice of... money penalties—(1) CMS notice to OIG. If CMS determines that an MA organization has failed to comply...

  20. 42 CFR 422.752 - Basis for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... money penalties. 422.752 Section 422.752 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Sanctions § 422.752 Basis for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties. (a) All... sanctions at 422.750(a)(1) and (a)(3). (c) Civil Money Penalties. (1) CMS. In addition to, or in place of...

  1. 77 FR 33624 - Extension of Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological Materials From Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... and Ethnological Materials From Peru AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of... archaeological and ethnological material from Peru. The restrictions, which were originally imposed by Treasury... with the Republic of Peru on June 9, 1997, concerning the imposition of import restrictions on pre...

  2. 42 CFR 423.752 - Basis for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... money penalties. 423.752 Section 423.752 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... BENEFIT Intermediate Sanctions § 423.752 Basis for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money.... (iii) Medical social work. (iv) Administrative services. (b) Suspension of enrollment and marketing. If...

  3. Dress-Related Responses to the Columbine Shootings: Other-Imposed and Self-Designed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Jennifer Paff; Eckman, Molly

    2002-01-01

    An inductive content analysis approach was used to examine 155 dress-related newspaper articles following the Columbine High School shootings in 1999. Analysis revealed two dress-related responses: (1) other-imposed regulation to protect students and deter them from expressing hatred and (2) self-designed acts of resistance for grieving. (Contains…

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.500 - Can Federal agencies disapprove permit applications or cancel issued permits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can Federal agencies disapprove permit applications or cancel issued permits? 102-74.500 Section 102-74.500 Public Contracts and... cancel issued permits? Yes, Federal agencies may disapprove any permit application or cancel an issued...

  5. Adaptation of the tourism in Romania to the new economic context imposed by the global economic crisis (in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia IFTIME

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global economic crisis affected the tourist market from Romania since 2008. 2010 was for the Romanian tourism enterprises the year of successful attempts to respond to the economic and social stimuli imposed by the economic crisis. The way in which they managed to cope with the crisis shows that solutions are available to those who adapt to the conditions of fierce competition.The global economic crisis rippled its effects in all areas of activity, tourism included. Some field entrepreneurs consider that tourism will be the most affected sector of services by this crisis because the consumers will leave it at the bottom of the basket of consumption goods and services.

  6. Jump conditions in transonic equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.; Jardin, S. C.

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, the numerical calculation of transonic equilibria, first introduced with the FLOW code in Guazzotto et al.[Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)], is critically reviewed. In particular, the necessity and effect of imposing explicit jump conditions at the transonic discontinuity are investigated. It is found that “standard” (low-β, large aspect ratio) transonic equilibria satisfy the correct jump condition with very good approximation even if the jump condition is not explicitly imposed. On the other hand, it is also found that high-β, low aspect ratio equilibria require the correct jump condition to be explicitly imposed. Various numerical approaches are described to modify FLOW to include the jump condition. It is proved that the new methods converge to the correct solution even in extreme cases of very large β, while they agree with the results obtained with the old implementation of FLOW in lower-β equilibria.

  7. Self-interest without selfishness: the hedonic benefit of imposed self-interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jonathan Z; Small, Deborah A

    2012-10-01

    Despite commonsense appeal, the link between self-interest and happiness remains elusive. One reason why individuals may not feel satisfied with self-interest is that they feel uneasy about sacrificing the needs of others for their own gain. We propose that externally imposing self-interest allows individuals to enjoy self-benefiting outcomes that are untainted by self-reproach for failing to help others. Study 1 demonstrated that an imposed self-interested option (a reward) leads to greater happiness than does choosing between a self-interested option and a prosocial option (a charity donation). Study 2 demonstrated that this effect is not driven by choice in general; rather, it is the specific trade-off between benefiting the self and benefiting others that inhibits happiness gained from self-interest. We theorize that the agency inherent in choice reduces the hedonic value of self-interest. Results of Study 3 find support for this mechanism.

  8. Imposed Work of Breathing and Breathing Comfort of Nonintubated Volunteers Breathing with Three Portable Ventilators and a Critical Care Ventilator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Austin, Paul

    2001-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to assess the imposed inspiratory work of breathing and breathing comfort of nonintubated healthy volunteers breathing spontaneously through three portable ventilators...

  9. Age and sex differences in steadiness of elbow flexor muscles with imposed cognitive demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Hugo M.; Spears, Vincent C.; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Yoon, Tejin; Nielson, Kristy A.; Hunter, Sandra K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose These studies determined (1) age and sex-related differences in steadiness of isometric contractions when high cognitive demand was imposed across a range of forces with the elbow flexor muscles (study 1) and, (2) sex differences in steadiness among older adults when low cognitive demand was imposed (study 2). Methods 36 young adults (18–25 years; 18 women) and 30 older adults (60–82 years; 17 women) performed isometric contractions at 5%, 30% and 40% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Study 1 involved a high-cognitive demand session (serial subtractions by 13 during the contraction) and a control session (no mental math). Study 2 (older adults only) involved a low-cognitive demand session (subtracting by 1s). Results Older individuals exhibited greater increases in force fluctuations (coefficient of variation of force, CV) with high cognitive demand than young adults, with the largest age difference at 5% MVC (P = 0.01). Older adults had greater agonist EMG activity with high-cognitive demand and women had greater coactivation than men (Pdemand for the older women but not for the older men (P = 0.03). Conclusion Older adults had reduced steadiness and increased muscle activation when high cognitive demand was imposed while low cognitive demand induced increased force fluctuations in older women but not older men. These findings have implications for daily and work-related tasks that involve cognitive demand performed simultaneously during submaximal isometric contractions in an aging workforce. PMID:25633070

  10. 9 CFR 82.24 - Other interstate movements and special permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... issued, and the special conditions under which the interstate movement, or cleaning and disinfection, may...; and (iv) The reason for the interstate movement. (2) For cleaning and disinfection, the special permit... prescribed by this subpart. A special permit is required for the disinfection of vehicles, premises, cages...

  11. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993

  12. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

  13. 40 CFR 71.6 - Permit content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 71.5(d). (B) Prompt reporting of deviations from permit requirements, including those attributable to... prompt or otherwise specifies a time frame for reporting deviations, that definition or time frame shall... and air pollution control equipment), practices, or operations regulated or required under the permit...

  14. 40 CFR 71.25 - Permit content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... such reports; and (ii) Prompt reporting of any deviations from permit requirements, including those... “prompt” in the permit for each situation and will do so in relation to the degree and type of deviation... reasonable times any facilities, equipment (including monitoring and air pollution control equipment...

  15. Review and revision of overload permit classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) allows trucks that exceed their legal loads to cross : bridges if they apply and are approved for a permit. More than 30,000 permits have been processed each : year since 2002, providing a vital servic...

  16. 7 CFR 330.208 - Courtesy permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Courtesy permits. 330.208 Section 330.208 Agriculture... PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Plant Pests § 330.208 Courtesy permits. The Deputy Administrator may issue... subject to regulation under the Plant Protection Actor any other act, as a courtesy to facilitate movement...

  17. 32 CFR 552.90 - Permit office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Permit office. 552.90 Section 552.90 National... CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.90 Permit office... non-training acess to the range complex. The office is open 0700-1900 hours, seven days a week, for...

  18. 50 CFR 21.31 - Rehabilitation permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., foster parenting, research projects, or other permitted activities with persons permitted or otherwise... Response Coordinator or other designated Service representative and obtain permission from the On-Scene Coordinator. All activities within the location of the spill are subject to the authority of the On-Scene...

  19. 77 FR 10183 - Reissuance of Nationwide Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Civil Works Program (Engineer Circular 1165- 2-211). The current Engineer Circular applies to Corps..., Corps of Engineers Reissuance of Nationwide Permits; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 34..., Corps of Engineers RIN 0710-AA71 Reissuance of Nationwide Permits AGENCY: Army Corps of Engineers, DoD...

  20. 75 FR 2560 - Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R9-IA-2010-N006] [96300-1671-0000-P5] Issuance of Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of issuance of permits..., 2009 PH.D, Department of 16, 2009. Cardiology Children's Hospital. Dated: January 8, 2010. Brenda Tapia...

  1. 50 CFR 21.41 - Depredation permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.41... control purposes. No permit is required merely to scare or herd depredating migratory birds other than... other means of concealment, decoys, duck calls, or other devices to lure or entice birds within gun...

  2. EPA Region 2 Discharge Pipes for Facilites with NPDES Permits from the Permit Compliance GIS Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Permit and Compliance System (PCS) contains data on the National Pollution Discharge Elimination Systems (NPDES) permit-holding facilities. This includes...

  3. G.M. counter and pre-determined dead time; Compteur G.M. et temps mort impose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamotte, R; Le Baud, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    This paper is divided into two main parts. - The first section recalls the principle on which a G.M. counter works, and examines the factors which lead to inaccuracies in counting. The concept of dead time, although simple risen associated with the counter alone, becomes complicated as soon as an electronic dead time is introduced to meet the demands of a measurement or an experiment. The resulting dead time, due to the coexistence of these dead times created by a single motivating factor, shows up as a function of certain laws of probability. From the analysis of the various cases of possible combinations, the conditions which must be fulfilled by a system with pre-determined dead time may be determined. This leads to a method for measuring the dead time of a G.M. counter, and the possibility of studying the latter under the utilisation conditions foreseen. - In the second part the principle, construction and characteristics of two systems with pre-determined dead time are discussed. To conclude, a comparison of several experimental results justifies an extension of the possibilities of a G.M. counter used in conjunction with such a system. (author) [French] Deux parties essentielles scindent cet expose. - La premiere partie rappelle le principe de fonctionnement d'un compteur G.M. et examine les facteurs d'imprecisions affectant les comptages. La notion de temps mort, simple quand elle est associee au compteur seul, se complique des qu'intervient un temps mort electronique introduit pour les besoins d'une mesure ou d'une experience. Le temps mort resultant, du a la coexistence de ces temps morts engendres par une meme cause, se manifeste en fonction de certaines lois de probabilites. L'analyse des differents cas de combinaisons possibles permet de preciser les imperatifs auxquels doit repondre un systeme a temps mort impose. Il en decoule une methode de mesure du temps mort d'un compteur G.M. et la possibilite d'etudier celui-ci dans les conditions d

  4. HANFORD SITE AIR OPERATING PERMIT SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 07/01/2004 THRU 12/31/2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2005-01-19

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and September 15th each year, which are certified for truth, accuracy, and completeness by a Responsible Official. This semiannual report contains information from July 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004. Copies of semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, as amended in August 2002 and December 2002, identifies the following. (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5. ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period. (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2. 1.3, and 2.1, each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting period. Data derived from that monitoring will be reported in the Annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Report (AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions

  5. HANFORD SITE AIR OPERATING PERMIT SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 07/01/2004 THRU 12/31/2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and September 15th each year, which are certified for truth, accuracy, and completeness by a Responsible Official. This semiannual report contains information from July 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004. Copies of semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, as amended in August 2002 and December 2002, identifies the following. (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5. ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period. (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2. 1.3, and 2.1, each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting period. Data derived from that monitoring will be reported in the Annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Report (AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.1). AOP requirement is for annual monitoring (e.g., four 1 week samples

  6. 28 CFR 522.13 - Relationship between existing civil contempt commitment orders and new criminal sentences imposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contempt commitment orders and new criminal sentences imposed under the U.S. or D.C. Code. 522.13 Section..., CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.13 Relationship between existing civil contempt commitment orders and new criminal sentences imposed under the U.S. or D.C...

  7. 36 CFR 1280.34 - What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the types of corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior? 1280.34 Section 1280.34 Parks, Forests, and Public... corrective action NARA imposes for prohibited behavior? (a) Individuals who violate the provisions of this...

  8. 25 CFR 170.916 - May tribes impose taxes or fees on those performing IRR Program services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Indian Preference § 170.916 May tribes impose taxes or fees on those performing IRR Program services? Yes... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May tribes impose taxes or fees on those performing IRR Program services? 170.916 Section 170.916 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  9. 77 FR 22267 - Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... with rotating wind turbines. Permit Duration and Transferability In February 2011, we published draft... permit applicants, because of the known risk to eagles from collisions with wind turbines and electric... change does not affect the tenure of any other migratory bird or eagle permit type. DATES: Electronic...

  10. Market microstructure matters when imposing a Tobin tax—Evidence from the lab☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchler, Michael; Huber, Jürgen; Kleinlercher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Trading in FX markets is dominated by two microstructures: exchanges with market makers and OTC-markets without market makers. Using laboratory experiments we test whether the impact of a Tobin tax is different in these two market microstructures. We find that (i) in markets without market makers an unilaterally imposed Tobin tax (i.e. a tax haven exists) increases volatility. (ii) In contrast, in markets with market makers we observe a decrease in volatility in unilaterally taxed markets. (iii) An encompassing Tobin tax has no impact on volatility in either setting. Efficiency does not vary significantly across tax regimes. PMID:22210970

  11. Market microstructure matters when imposing a Tobin tax-Evidence from the lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchler, Michael; Huber, Jürgen; Kleinlercher, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    TRADING IN FX MARKETS IS DOMINATED BY TWO MICROSTRUCTURES: exchanges with market makers and OTC-markets without market makers. Using laboratory experiments we test whether the impact of a Tobin tax is different in these two market microstructures. We find that (i) in markets without market makers an unilaterally imposed Tobin tax (i.e. a tax haven exists) increases volatility. (ii) In contrast, in markets with market makers we observe a decrease in volatility in unilaterally taxed markets. (iii) An encompassing Tobin tax has no impact on volatility in either setting. Efficiency does not vary significantly across tax regimes.

  12. Challenges Imposed by User's Mobility in Future HetNet: Offloading and Mobility Management

    OpenAIRE

    Mahbas, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The users' mobility imposes challenges to mobility management and, the offloading process, which hinder the conventional heterogeneous networks (HetNets) in meeting the huge data traffic requirements of the future. In this thesis, a trio-connectivity (TC), which includes a control-plane (C-plane), a user-plane (U-plane) and an indication-plane (I-plane), is proposed to tackle these challenges. Especially, the I-plane is created as an indicator to help the user equipment (UE) identify and...

  13. Permit to Work System in Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyen, A.K.S.; Azwafarina Zarmira Aznan; Md Derus Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    A Permit-To-Work System is an essential part of the job risk assessment process. An effective Permit-To-Work System would help to prevent accident that usually involves maintenance and construction activities. In Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Radiation Safety and Health Division (BKS) has been given the responsibility to implement the system in order to fulfill the requirement of providing a safe and healthy workplace and environment for its employees as pledged in the Occupational Safety, Health and Environmental Policy. This paper presents the roles and functions of Permit-To-Work System, together with the process flow and challenges ahead. (author)

  14. Transition to magnetorotational turbulence in Taylor–Couette flow with imposed azimuthal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Guseva; Avila, M; Willis, A P; Hollerbach, R

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to be a powerful source of turbulence and momentum transport in astrophysical accretion discs, but obtaining observational evidence of its operation is challenging. Recently, laboratory experiments of Taylor–Couette flow with externally imposed axial and azimuthal magnetic fields have revealed the kinematic and dynamic properties of the MRI close to the instability onset. While good agreement was found with linear stability analyses, little is known about the transition to turbulence and transport properties of the MRI. We here report on a numerical investigation of the MRI with an imposed azimuthal magnetic field. We show that the laminar Taylor–Couette flow becomes unstable to a wave rotating in the azimuthal direction and standing in the axial direction via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. Subsequently, the flow features a catastrophic transition to spatio-temporal defects which is mediated by a subcritical subharmonic Hopf bifurcation. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the PROMISE experiment and dramatically extend their realizable parameter range. We find that as the Reynolds number increases defects accumulate and grow into turbulence, yet the momentum transport scales weakly. (paper)

  15. 7 CFR 301.86-5 - Issuance and cancellation of certificates and limited permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... prohibited from being moved interstate from the quarantined area. (ii) Nursery stock of other host crops. An... article must be moved in compliance with any additional emergency conditions the Administrator may impose... any plant, plant pest, plant product, article, or means of conveyance that is moving, or has moved...

  16. 78 FR 36822 - Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... lithium battery that exceeds the net quantity weight restriction when transported by motor vehicle and... Dassault Falcon Jet Corp. Little Ferry, NJ May 13, 2013. To modify the special permit to add an additional...

  17. 32 CFR 935.11 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be issued under other authority that is inconsistent with this part. The Commander may issue.... (b) To the extent it is not inconsistent with this part, any permit or registration issued pursuant...

  18. Storm Water General Permit 2 for Construction

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #2 for storm water discharges associated with industrial activity for Construction Activities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination...

  19. 50 CFR 660.707 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or downloaded from the Southwest Region home page (http://swr.nmfs.noaa.gov/permits.htm) to apply for... the vessel is fishing for, taking, retaining, possessing, or landing HMS shoreward of the outer...

  20. 77 FR 4271 - Special Permit Marking Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... the logistical and cost concerns regarding the ability of the railroad industry to comply with the... incorporating the applicable GRL Special Permits into the HMR (and FRA's subsequent approval notice) those...

  1. Web Air Permits (WAP R7)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — THIS DATA ASSET NO LONGER ACTIVE: This is metadata documentation for Web Air Permits in Region 7 (WAP R7), a Lotus Notes application that once tracked comment...

  2. 2013 EPA Vessels General Permit (VGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Information for any vessel that submitted a Notice of Intent (NOI), Notice of Termination (NOT), or annual report under EPA's 2013 Vessel General Permit (VGP)....

  3. Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Permit Gear Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data set contains annual vessel gear characterization of permit holders shrimp vessel. Data includes net type, TED type, BRD type, etc.

  4. 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP) covers discharges of biological pesticides, and chemical pesticides that leave a residue, in areas where EPA is the NPDES...

  5. RCRA permit modifications and the functional equivalency demonstration: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinker, J.; Lyon, W.; Carnes, R.; Loehr, C.; Elsberry, K.; Garcia, P.

    1996-01-01

    Hazardous waste operating permits issued under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) often impose requirements, typically by reference to the original permit application, that specific components and equipment be used. Consequently, changing these items, even for the purpose of routine maintenance, may first require that the owner/operator request a potentially time-consuming and costly permit modification. However, the owner/operator may demonstrate that a modification is not required because the planned changes are functionally equivalent, as defined by RCRA, to the original specifications embodied by the permit. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is scheduled for maintenance and improvements that involve replacement of components. The incinerator's carbon adsorption unit/high efficiency particulate air filtration system, in particular, was redesigned to improve reliability and minimize maintenance. A study was performed to determine whether the redesigned unit would qualify as functionally equivalent to the original component. in performing this study, the following steps were taken: (a) the key performance factors were identified; (b) performance data describing the existing unit were obtained; (c) performance of both the existing and redesigned units was simulated; and (d) the performance data were compared to ascertain whether the components could qualify as functionally equivalent

  6. Relationships between climate at origin and seedling traits in eight Panafrican provenances of Vitellaria paradoxa C.F. Gaertn. under imposed drought stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayala, J.; Sanon, Z.; Bazié, P.

    2018-01-01

    The morphological responses of seedlings of eight African provenances of Vitellaria paradoxa (Shea tree or Karité) to imposed draught stress were compared under nursery experimental conditions. The potted seedlings were subjected to three different watering regimes (87 days after sowing): no water...... stress (100% of the field capacity, C), moderate water stress (75% of C) and severe water stress (50% of C). Before the application of the stress, we observed genotypical differences in the morphological variables at the scale of leaves and of above-ground parts. The six-month water stress affected...

  7. Contact transmission of influenza virus between ferrets imposes a looser bottleneck than respiratory droplet transmission allowing propagation of antiviral resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frise, Rebecca; Bradley, Konrad; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Galiano, Monica; Elderfield, Ruth A.; Stilwell, Peter; Ashcroft, Jonathan W.; Fernandez-Alonso, Mirian; Miah, Shahjahan; Lackenby, Angie; Roberts, Kim L.; Donnelly, Christl A.; Barclay, Wendy S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. It is important to elucidate the stringency of bottlenecks during transmission to shed light on mechanisms that underlie the evolution and propagation of antigenic drift, host range switching or drug resistance. The virus spreads between people by different routes, including through the air in droplets and aerosols, and by direct contact. By housing ferrets under different conditions, it is possible to mimic various routes of transmission. Here, we inoculated donor animals with a mixture of two viruses whose genomes differed by one or two reverse engineered synonymous mutations, and measured the transmission of the mixture to exposed sentinel animals. Transmission through the air imposed a tight bottleneck since most recipient animals became infected by only one virus. In contrast, a direct contact transmission chain propagated a mixture of viruses suggesting the dose transferred by this route was higher. From animals with a mixed infection of viruses that were resistant and sensitive to the antiviral drug oseltamivir, resistance was propagated through contact transmission but not by air. These data imply that transmission events with a looser bottleneck can propagate minority variants and may be an important route for influenza evolution. PMID:27430528

  8. Application of a tablet film coating model to define a process-imposed transition boundary for robust film coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ban, Sander; Pitt, Kendal G; Whiteman, Marshall

    2018-02-01

    A scientific understanding of interaction of product, film coat, film coating process, and equipment is important to enable design and operation of industrial scale pharmaceutical film coating processes that are robust and provide the level of control required to consistently deliver quality film coated product. Thermodynamic film coating conditions provided in the tablet film coating process impact film coat formation and subsequent product quality. A thermodynamic film coating model was used to evaluate film coating process performance over a wide range of film coating equipment from pilot to industrial scale (2.5-400 kg). An approximate process-imposed transition boundary, from operating in a dry to a wet environment, was derived, for relative humidity and exhaust temperature, and used to understand the impact of the film coating process on product formulation and process control requirements. This approximate transition boundary may aid in an enhanced understanding of risk to product quality, application of modern Quality by Design (QbD) based product development, technology transfer and scale-up, and support the science-based justification of critical process parameters (CPPs).

  9. 40 CFR 270.62 - Hazardous waste incinerator permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... WASTES (CONTINUED) EPA ADMINISTERED PERMIT PROGRAMS: THE HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Special Forms of Permits § 270.62 Hazardous waste incinerator permits. When an owner or operator of a hazardous waste... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous waste incinerator permits...

  10. 30 CFR 773.10 - Review of permit history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review of permit history. 773.10 Section 773.10... REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMITS AND PERMIT PROCESSING § 773.10 Review of permit history. (a) We, the regulatory authority, will rely upon the permit history information you, the applicant, submit under § 778.12 of this...

  11. 40 CFR 60.4124 - Hg budget permit revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hg budget permit revisions. 60.4124... Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Permits § 60.4124 Hg budget permit revisions. Except as provided in § 60.4123(b), the permitting authority will revise the Hg Budget permit, as necessary, in...

  12. How Are Distributed Groups Affected by an Imposed Structuring of their Decision-Making Process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Anders Lorentz; Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Groups often suffer from ineffective communication and decision making. This experimental study compares distributed groups solving a preference task with support from either a communication system or a system providing both communication and a structuring of the decision-making process. Results...... show that groups using the latter system spend more time solving the task, spend more of their time on solution analysis, spend less of their time on disorganized activity, and arrive at task solutions with less extreme preferences. Thus, the type of system affects the decision-making process as well...... as its outcome. Notably, the task solutions arrived at by the groups using the system that imposes a structuring of the decision-making process show limited correlation with the task solutions suggested by the system on the basis of the groups’ explicitly stated criteria. We find no differences in group...

  13. Imposed Stories: Prisoner Self-narratives in the Criminal Justice System in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Hall

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the ways in which offenders are required to provide very particular accounts of themselves and to self-narrate in confined ways. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork and interviews conducted in the New South Wales justice system, it explores how the stories that offenders are made to accept and tell about themselves often bear little relationship to their own reflections. It analyses how, despite the expectations of judges and prison authorities, these self-narratives are not products of an offender’s soul-searching concerning his past actions and experience; rather they are products of an official legal narrative being imposed on an offender whose capacity to own and enact such a narrative is already seriously compromised.

  14. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershtein, Shimon; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Manhart, Michael; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Mu, Wanmeng; Zhou, Jingwen; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90%) in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM), correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the intracellular

  15. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon Bershtein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90% in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM, correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the

  16. 9 CFR 78.2 - Handling of certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... âSâ brand permits for interstate movement of animals. 78.2 Section 78.2 Animals and Animal Products... certificates, permits, and “S” brand permits for interstate movement of animals. (a) Any certificate, permit, or “S” brand permit required by this part for the interstate movement of animals shall be delivered...

  17. Vulnerability imposed by diet and brain trauma for anxiety-like phenotype: implications for post-traumatic stress disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ethika; Agrawal, Rahul; Zhuang, Yumei; Abad, Catalina; Waschek, James A; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI, cerebral concussion) is a risk factor for the development of psychiatric illness such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We sought to evaluate how omega-3 fatty acids during brain maturation can influence challenges incurred during adulthood (transitioning to unhealthy diet and mTBI) and predispose the brain to a PTSD-like pathobiology. Rats exposed to diets enriched or deficient in omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) during their brain maturation period, were transitioned to a western diet (WD) when becoming adult and then subjected to mTBI. TBI resulted in an increase in anxiety-like behavior and its molecular counterpart NPY1R, a hallmark of PTSD, but these effects were more pronounced in the animals exposed to n-3 deficient diet and switched to WD. The n-3 deficiency followed by WD disrupted BDNF signaling and the activation of elements of BDNF signaling pathway (TrkB, CaMKII, Akt and CREB) in frontal cortex. TBI worsened these effects and more prominently in combination with the n-3 deficiency condition. Moreover, the n-3 deficiency primed the immune system to the challenges imposed by the WD and brain trauma as evidenced by results showing that the WD or mTBI affected brain IL1β levels and peripheral Th17 and Treg subsets only in animals previously conditioned to the n-3 deficient diet. These results provide novel evidence for the capacity of maladaptive dietary habits to lower the threshold for neurological disorders in response to challenges.

  18. 77 FR 71818 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... following permit requests. Applicant Permit No. TE-78622A Applicant: William J. Mautz, Hilo, Hawaii The...-179036 Applicant: Cullen A. Wilkerson, Richmond, California The applicant requests a permit renewal to...

  19. State Waste Discharge Permit ST-4502 Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN, M.J.; LECLAIR, M.D.

    2000-09-27

    Plan has been developed to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements set forth in Permit ST-3502 and as a line management tool for use in maintaining configuration control of permit as well as documentation used to implement permit requirements.

  20. State Waste Discharge Permit ST-4502 Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, M.J.; LECLAIR, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    Plan has been developed to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements set forth in Permit ST-3502 and as a line management tool for use in maintaining configuration control of permit as well as documentation used to implement permit requirements

  1. IFQ Halibut/Sablefish and CDQ Halibut Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Under the IFQ Halibut/Sablefish Permit Program and CDQ Halibut Permit Program permits are issued for harvesting and receiving/processing halibut, and non-trawl...

  2. Environmental Restoration Contractor Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document contains the revised Environmental Restoration Contractor (ERC) Implementation Plan for compliance with the Dangerous Waste and Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendment portions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste (hereafter referred to as the open-quotes Permitclose quotes). The Permit became effective on September 28, 1994. The ERC has developed the Permit Implementation Plan to ensure that the Permit is properly implemented within the ERC project and functions. The plan contains a list of applicable permit conditions, descriptions, responsible organizations, and the status of compliance. The ERC's responsibilities for Permit implementation are identified within both project and functional organizations. Project Managers are responsible for complying with conditions specific to a particular treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) unit. TSD-specific compliance in include items such as closure plan deliverables, reporting and record keeping requirements, or compliance with non-unit-specific tasks such as spill reporting and emergency response. Functional organizations are responsible for sitewide activities, such as coordinating Permit modifications and developing personnel training programs

  3. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document, Set 2, the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part B Permit Application, consists of 15 chapters that address the content of the Part B checklists prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 270), with additional information requirements mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and revisions of WAC 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow the chapter headings and subheadings. This permit application contains ''umbrella- type'' documentation with overall application to the Hanford Facility. This documentation is broad in nature and applies to all TSD units that have final status under the Hanford Facility Permit

  4. 75 FR 19987 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... applied for scientific research permits to conduct certain activities with endangered species under the...) within Arizona. Permit TE-178778 Applicant: Marks Lab of Aquatic Ecology, Flagstaff, Arizona. Applicant...

  5. Environmental permits in Arab Gulf countries - local government perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczynski, L.

    2002-01-01

    The legacy of past environmentally careless oil and gas exploration practices is becoming more apparent as time goes by and our understanding of causes and results increase. In many petroleum producing countries and in Arab Gulf countries in particular, this understanding has resulted in greater social demand for environmental protection and responsible exploitation of limited resources. In response to this demand, governments of the Gulf Region are paying increasingly more attention to the responsible management of environmental impacts of new developments. As a result, most of them require developers to obtain environmental permits supported by a variety of environmental baseline studies, Environmental Impact Assessments and comprehensive Environmental Management Plans. These local environmental requirements are similar to those in North America and Europe, although there are some important differences on account of local environmental, historical and socioeconomic conditions. Developers, who choose to ignore them, often find their projects caught in a web of unfamiliar environmental regulations or administrative procedures that may cause costly and unnecessary delays. Based on the author's Canadian and Arab Gulf regulatory experience, this paper describes some common causes that may delay obtaining environmental permits or cause cancellation of a project, and provides ideas to assist companies in securing necessary permits and licenses. (author)

  6. 50 CFR 18.31 - Scientific research permits and public display permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the population stock and the marine ecosystem. In determining whether to issue a public display permit... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific research permits and public..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER...

  7. Ion confinement and transport in a toroidal plasma with externally imposed radial electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, H. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Strong electric fields were imposed along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma by biasing it with electrodes maintained at kilovolt potentials. Coherent, low-frequency disturbances characteristic of various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were absent in the high-density, well-confined regime. High, direct-current radial electric fields with magnitudes up to 135 volts per centimeter penetrated inward to at least one-half the plasma radius. When the electric field pointed radially toward, the ion transport was inward against a strong local density gradient; and the plasma density and confinement time were significantly enhanced. The radial transport along the electric field appeared to be consistent with fluctuation-induced transport. With negative electrode polarity the particle confinement was consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions, in those sectors of the plasma not containing electrodes, that resulted from the radially inward fields; and ion losses to the electrodes, each of the which acted as a sink and drew ions out of the plasma. A simple model of particle confinement was proposed in which the particle confinement time is proportional to the plasma volume. The scaling predicted by this model was consistent with experimental measurements.

  8. Heterología. La ciencia (imposible de los residuos violentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Tonkonoft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available EI presente trabajo busca mostrar que en la obra de Bataille existe una teoría social general, articulada en torno a la noción de lo sagrado. Nuestra hipótesis es que Bataille profundizó y generalizó d movimiento iniciado por Durkheim, quien postula la sintaxis de lo sagrado arcaico como la parte fundamental de la gramática social, pero interpretando este legado a la luz del concepto de multitud, entendido como el otro nombre de la economía general de las pasiones colectivas. Para dlo, se sirvió de dementos deI psicoanálisis y la fenomenología alemana, produciendo la teoría original dd lazo social, su estructuración y sus dinâmicas, con las que reformuló la idea durkheimniana de lo sagrado y procedió a analizar los malestares de su época. Dada la antropología trágica que enmarcó esta empresa intelectual, resultó de ello la teoría social transgredida o imposible que lleva eI nombre de heterología.

  9. Indecibles e imposibles de la escritura: Armonía Somers y Clarice Lispector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Girona

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Desde el psicoanálisis, el grito nos habilita una vía para abordar nuestro silencio, ese que no tiene que ver con lo audible o lo inaudible. No se trata de aislar lo no-verbal para elevar la gestualidad a un poder de paralenguaje, ni tan sólo de detectar en la presencia de ciertos elementos textuales la ausencia de lo no dicho (el socorrido blanco del papel que se maneja tipográficamente en la poesía, por ejemplo. Oponer de esta forma el silencio a la palabra respira cierta ingenuidad, como si la palabra fuera plena en sí misma. De últimas, si a la compleja madeja de lo no-dicho, lo indecible y lo inefable le añadimos “mujer”, ¿en dónde queda el silencio? Así, la extrañeza fálica puede llevar a las mujeres a inscribirse en el orden social con una eficacia distante. Armonía Somers y Clarice Lispector escenifican esta inscripción a través de una “escritura abyecta”, que busca el imposible de una realidad fuera del significado.

  10. Association between the training loads imposed to amateur rugby sevens players and burnout syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Sarly Coutinho Sobral

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Burnout syndrome has been shown to be increasingly prevalent in athletes, since it is related to factors that influence levels of stress during the preparation of sports. Therefore, it has been studied in several sports, but not in Rugby Seven. The aim of this study was to correlate the effects of training loads imposed on amateur Rugby Sevens players with the burnout questionnaire. Nine players (25 ± 5 years-old were evaluated before the preparatory period. Assessment included the measurement of the % fat percentage; nutritional status, stress, and aerobic power. During the preparatory period, once again, it was assessed the state of stress, aerobic power, and intensity of the training program. It was observed that there is no significant correlation between the intensity of the workout and Burnout scores (p> 0.05, nor between Burnout scores and aerobic capacity. However, there was significant a correlation between the intensity of training performed with aerobic power (p< 0.01. Therefore, it is concluded that a training program prescribed properly, prevents the onset of burnout syndrome in Rugby Sevens players.

  11. Effect of PEG-6000 Imposed Water Deficit on Chlorophyll Metabolism in Maize Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Gadre

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is one of the major abiotic constraint limiting plant growth and productivity world wide. The current study was undertaken with the aim to investigate the effect of water deficit imposed by PEG-6000, on chlorophyll metabolism in maize leaves to work out the mechanistic details. Leaf segments prepared from primary leaves of etiolated maize seedlings were treated with varying concentrations of polyethylene glycol-6000 (PEG-6000; w/v- 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% in continuous light of intensity 40 Wm-2 at 26±2 °C for 24 h in light chamber. The results demonstrate a concentration dependent decline in chlorophyll content with increasing concentration of polyethylene glycol-6000 (PEG-6000. Reduction in chlorophyll ‘a’ level was to a greater extent than the chlorophyll ‘b’. The RNA content decreased in a concentration dependent manner with PEG, however, proline content increased significantly. Relative water content decreased significantly with the supply of 30% PEG only. A substantial decrease in chlorophyll synthesis due to significant reduction in ALA content and ALAD activity, with no change in chlorophyllase activity with the supply of PEG suggests that water deficit affects chlorophyll formation rather than its degradation.

  12. Heat load imposed on reactor vessels during in-vessel retention of core melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su-Hyeon; Chung, Bum-Jin, E-mail: bjchung@khu.ac.kr

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Angular heat load on reactor vessel by natural convection of oxide pool was measured. • High Ra was achieved by using mass transfer experiments based on analogy concept. • Measured Nusselt numbers agreed reasonably with the other existing studies. • Three different types of volumetric heat sources were compared. • They didn’t affect the heat flux of the top plate but affected those of the reactor vessel. - Abstract: We measured the heat load imposed on reactor vessels by natural convection of the oxide pool in severe accidents. Based on the analogy between heat and mass transfer, mass transfer experiments were performed using a copper sulfate electroplating system. A modified Rayleigh number of the order 10{sup 14} was achieved in a small facility with a height of 0.1 m. Three different types of volumetric heat sources were compared and the average Nusselt number of the curved surface was 39% lower, whereas in the case of the top plate was 6% higher than in previous studies with a two-dimensional geometry due to the high Sc value of this study. Reliable experimental data on the angular heat flux ratios were reported compared to those of the BALI and SIGMA CP facilities in terms of fluctuations and consistency.

  13. Plasma membrane NADH oxidase of maize roots responds to gravity and imposed centrifugal forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, E.; Morre, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    NADH oxidase activities measured with excised roots of dark-grown maize (Zea mays) seedlings and with isolated plasma membrane vesicles from roots of dark-grown maize oscillated with a regular period length of 24 min and were inhibited by the synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic [correction of dichorophenoxyacetic] acid. The activities also responded to orientation with respect to gravity and to imposed centrifugal forces. Turning the roots upside down resulted in stimulation of the activity with a lag of about 10 min. Returning the sections to the normal upright position resulted in a return to initial rates. The activity was stimulated reversibly to a maximum of about 2-fold with isolated plasma membrane vesicles, when subjected to centrifugal forces of 25 to 250 x g for 1 to 4 min duration. These findings are the first report of a gravity-responsive enzymatic activity of plant roots inhibited by auxin and potentially related to the gravity-induced growth response. c2001 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.

  14. Optimal Placement of Actors in WSANs Based on Imposed Delay Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxi Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks (WSANs refer to a group of sensors and actors linked by wireless medium to probe environment and perform specific actions. Such certain actions should always be taken before a deadline when an event of interest is detected. In order to provide such services, the whole monitor area is divided into several virtual areas and nodes in the same area form a cluster. Clustering of the WSANs is often pursued to give that each actor acts as a cluster-head. The number of actors is related to the size and the deployment of WSANs cluster. In this paper, we find a method to determine the accurate number of actors which enables them to receive data and take actions in an imposed time-delay. The k-MinTE and the k-MaxTE clustering algorithm are proposed to form the minimum and maximum size of cluster, respectively. In those clustering algorithms, actors are deployed in such a way that sensors could route data to actors within k hops. Then, clusters are arranged by the regular hexagon. At last, we evaluate the placement of actors and results show that our approach is effective.

  15. Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NWCC Siting Work Group

    2002-08-01

    This handbook has been written for individuals and groups involved in evaluating wind projects: decision-makers and agency staff at all levels of government, wind developers, interested parties and the public. Its purpose is to help stakeholders make permitting wind facility decisions in a manner which assures necessary environmental protection and responds to public needs.

  16. 27 CFR 19.157 - Operating permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Qualification of Distilled Spirits Plants § 19.157... file an application for registration under § 19.151 shall make application for and obtain an operating permit before commencing any of the following operations: (1) Distilling for industrial use. (2...

  17. 75 FR 54649 - Endangered Wildlife; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ...-02997A Applicant: University of Hawaii, Hilo, Hawaii. The applicant requests a permit to take (capture...-listed Drosophila species on the island of Kauai in the State of Hawaii for the purpose of enhancing its... in the State of Hawaii: Astelia waialealae (painiu), Canavalia napaliensis (awikiwiki), Chamaesyce...

  18. 15 CFR 5.4 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... standards relating to appearance, safety, sanitation, maintenance, and efficiency of operation. Due regard... the Government and prospective patrons of the stand. (f) The permit shall describe the location of the stand proper and the location of any vending machines which are operated in conjunction with it. ...

  19. 9 CFR 93.802 - Import permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Elephants, Hippopotami, Rhinoceroses, and Tapirs § 93.802 Import permit. (a) An elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir shall not be imported into the United States... export an elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, or tapir to the United States; (2) The name and address of...

  20. 19 CFR 12.107 - Importations permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Pre-Columbian Monumental and Architectural Sculpture and Murals § 12.107 Importations permitted. Pre-Columbian monumental or architectural sculpture or mural for which... sculpture or mural, in a form acceptable to the Secretary, certifying that such exportation was not in...

  1. 78 FR 43268 - Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... an amount qualifying as hazardous material. (modes 1, 2, 3, 4) 15860-N......... Apple Inc. 49 CFR To... strength stiffness. 13581-M......... Bengal Products 49 CFR To modify the Inc. Baton 173.306(a)(3). special............ Carleton 49 CFR 173.302a To modify the Technologies special permit to Inc. (Former change a drawing Grantee...

  2. 50 CFR 648.4 - Vessel permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... carrying passengers for hire. (8) Atlantic bluefish vessels. (i) Commercial. Any vessel of the United... lands Atlantic bluefish in or from the EEZ in excess of the recreational possession limit specified at § 648.164 must have been issued and carry on board a valid commercial bluefish vessel permit. (ii) Party...

  3. 40 CFR 70.5 - Permit applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... establish. Where an existing part 70 permit would prohibit such construction or change in operation, the... information only if it is related to the proposed change. Information required under paragraph (c) of this... part shall state that, based on information and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, the statements...

  4. Effect of day-night cycle on distribution of food intake and economic choice among imposed food opportunities in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaya, Dulce M; Rowland, Neil E; Robertson, Kimberly L

    2016-10-01

    We have shown previously that mice given access to four discrete feeding opportunities (FOs) per day show a characteristic sequence of sizes across ordinal FOs. The purpose of the present experiments was to determine the relative contributions of external and internal factors on the sequencing of FO size. The external factors were the light:dark Zeitgeber and the cost of food, imposed via different fixed unit prices (FUP) in a closed operant economy, and the internal factors were signals relating to energy status including time since last food and weight loss. In the first experiment, mice were given 4 FOs spaced 4-h apart, but with the timing of the FOs relative to the Zeitgeber altered by a 4-h Zeitgeber advance or delay of the cycle. Food intake, and associated body weight, declined as price increased, but the temporal order of FO size was invariant within a Zeitgeber condition. The Zeitgeber advanced group showed clear evidence of a shift in meal sequence relating to the light:dark cycle. Thus, external factors seem to be a more important determinant of total intake and sequencing than internal factors. In the second experiment, mice were given the choice between continuous costly (CC) and intermittent inexpensive (II) food. II food was available for four-15min intervals every 4-h, and the timing of the 15min intervals was varied relative to the Zeitgeber cycle. In spite of a 20-fold difference in price between CC and II food, mice took approximately equal amounts from each, and all food intake took place during the dark phase. Mice consumed II food only if it was available during the dark phase. Food intake was strongly linked to the light:dark cycle, largely independent of food cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Seated Inactivity Trial (SIT): Physical Activity and Dietary Outcomes Associated With 8 Weeks of Imposed Sedentary Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, Brooke J; Haub, Mark D; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Lawler, Thomas; Rosenkranz, Sara K

    2016-03-01

    Sedentary time is an independent risk factor for chronic diseases and mortality. It is unknown whether active adults alter their dietary and/or physical activity behaviors in response to imposed sedentary time, possibly modifying risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether imposed sedentary time would alter typical behaviors of active adults. Sixteen physically active, young adults were randomized to the no-intervention control (CON, n = 8) group or the sedentary-intervention (SIT, n = 8) group. SIT participants attended monitored sedentary sessions (8 wk, 10 h/wk). Assessments including diet and physical activity occurred at baseline, week 4, and week 9. There were no differences (P > .05) between CON and SIT groups for step counts or time spent in sedentary, light, moderate, or vigorous physical activity when comparing a week during imposed sedentary time (week 4) to baseline and week 9. At week 4, caloric intake was not different from baseline (P > .05) in either group. Caloric intake decreased significantly (P > .05) in SIT from baseline to week 9. Active adults did not alter physical activity or dietary behaviors during the imposed sedentary intervention. However, SIT reduced caloric intake from baseline to week 9, indicating a possible compensatory response to imposed sitting in active adults.

  6. 50 CFR 648.88 - Multispecies open access permit restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multispecies open access permit... Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.88 Multispecies open access permit restrictions. (a) Handgear permit. A vessel issued a valid open access NE multispecies Handgear permit is...

  7. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  8. 50 CFR 21.21 - Import and export permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Import and export permits. 21.21 Section... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Specific Permit Provisions § 21.21 Import and export... must have a permit to import or export migratory birds, their parts, nests, or eggs. You must meet the...

  9. Crop yield response to water stress imposed at different growth stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Mahmood Shah, M.; Wisal, M.

    1995-01-01

    Potato requires sufficient soil moisture and fertilization to produce high yields but the present water resoures are limited compared to the cultivable land, field experiments were conduced from 1991 to 1995 to study relationship between yield and crop water use as a function of water stress imposed at different growth stages. The irrigation treatments involved application of full and stress watering s selectively at four growth stages : Establishment , Flowering Tuber formation and ripening. In full watering, full water requirements of the crop were met, i.e., ET sub a = ET sub m whereas in stress watering about half the amount of full watering was applied, i.e., ET sub a < ET sub m. Changes in moisture content of the soil pre files after irrigation were monitored with the help of neutron moisture probe in order to compute ET sub a by the water balance method. The results obtained showed that the tuber yield was produced by full watering ( T 1) and the lowest by continuous stress watering (T 2). A plot of relative yield against relative evapotranspiration deficit revealed that ripening was the lest sensitive whereas early development followed by flowering the most sensitive growth stage to water stress. The crop water use efficiencies were generally higher in the treatments where a combination of normal and stress watering was applied compared to where all - normal watering s were applied. The traditional irrigation practice resulted in wasteful water application with relatively lower yields, hence the results from this project will have high value for the farming community to get this higher yields with scarce water resources. The studies with labelled fertilizer showed that planting and earthing - up were equally important growth stages of potato for applying fertilizer for its efficient utilization. 3 figs; 25 tabs; 12 refs (Author)

  10. Assessment of the sensory and physical limitations imposed by leprosy in a Brazilian Amazon Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Yolette Urbano Pauxis Aben-Athar

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION Leprosy often results in sensory and physical limitations. This study aimed to evaluate these limitations using a quantitative approach in leprosy patients in Belém (Pará, Brazil. METHODS This epidemiological, cross-sectional study measured the sensory impairment of smell and taste through the use of a questionnaire and evaluated activity limitations of daily life imposed by leprosy through the Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA Scale. Data were collected from 84 patients and associations between the degree of disability and clinical and epidemiological characteristics were assessed. RESULTS The majority of patients were men (64.3%, married (52.4%, age 31-40 years old (26.2%, had primary education (50%, and were independent laborers (36.9%. The multibacillary operational classification (81%, borderline clinical form (57.1%, and 0 degrees of physical disability (41.7% were predominant. SALSA scores ranged from 17 to 59 points, and being without limitations was predominant (53.6%. The risk awareness score ranged from 0 to 8, with a score of 0 (no awareness of risk being the most common (56%. Evaluation of smell and taste sensory sensitivities revealed that 70.2% did not experience these sensory changes. Patients with leprosy reactions were 7 times more likely to develop activity limitations, and those who had physical disabilities were approximately four times more likely to develop a clinical picture of activity limitations. CONCLUSIONS Most patients showed no sensory changes, but patients with leprosy reactions were significantly more likely to develop activity limitations. Finally, further studies should be performed, assessing a higher number of patients to confirm the present results.

  11. Human health safety evaluation of cosmetics in the EU: A legally imposed challenge to science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, M.; Rogiers, V.

    2010-01-01

    As stated in the European legislation, cosmetic products present on the European market must be safe for the consumer. Safety evaluation of the products is carried out by a qualified safety assessor who needs to consider potential exposure scenarios next to the physicochemical and toxicological profiles of all composing ingredients. Whereas, until recently, the tools to determine the toxicological profile of cosmetic ingredients mainly consisted of animal experiments, they have now been narrowed down substantially by the legally imposed animal testing ban on cosmetic ingredients, taken up in the Cosmetic Products Directive (76/768/EEC). This Directive, however, is not a stand-alone piece of European legislation, since as well directly as indirectly it is influenced by a complex web of related legislations. Vertical legislations deal with different categories of chemicals, including dangerous substances, biocides, plant protection products, food additives, medicinal products, and of course also cosmetics. Horizontal legislative texts, on the contrary, cover more general fields such as protection of experimental animals, consumer product safety, misleading of consumers, specific provisions for aerosols, and others. Experience has learnt that having a general overview of these related legislations is necessary to understand their impact on the cosmetic world in general terms and on cosmetic safety evaluation in particular. This goes for a variety of concerned parties, including national and European regulators/agencies, contract laboratories, raw material suppliers, cosmetic companies, research and educational centers. They all deal with a number of aspects important for the quality and toxicity of cosmetics and their ingredients. This review summarises the most relevant points of the legislative texts of different types of product categories and emphasises their impact on the safety evaluation of cosmetics.

  12. Risk preferences impose a hidden distortion on measures of choice impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konova, Anna B.; Louie, Kenway; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2018-01-01

    Measuring temporal discounting through the use of intertemporal choice tasks is now the gold standard method for quantifying human choice impulsivity (impatience) in neuroscience, psychology, behavioral economics, public health and computational psychiatry. A recent area of growing interest is individual differences in discounting levels, as these may predispose to (or protect from) mental health disorders, addictive behaviors, and other diseases. At the same time, more and more studies have been dedicated to the quantification of individual attitudes towards risk, which have been measured in many clinical and non-clinical populations using closely related techniques. Economists have pointed to interactions between measurements of time preferences and risk preferences that may distort estimations of the discount rate. However, although becoming standard practice in economics, discount rates and risk preferences are rarely measured simultaneously in the same subjects in other fields, and the magnitude of the imposed distortion is unknown in the assessment of individual differences. Here, we show that standard models of temporal discounting —such as a hyperbolic discounting model widely present in the literature which fails to account for risk attitudes in the estimation of discount rates— result in a large and systematic pattern of bias in estimated discounting parameters. This can lead to the spurious attribution of differences in impulsivity between individuals when in fact differences in risk attitudes account for observed behavioral differences. We advance a model which, when applied to standard choice tasks typically used in psychology and neuroscience, provides both a better fit to the data and successfully de-correlates risk and impulsivity parameters. This results in measures that are more accurate and thus of greater utility to the many fields interested in individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:29373590

  13. Risk preferences impose a hidden distortion on measures of choice impulsivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Lopez-Guzman

    Full Text Available Measuring temporal discounting through the use of intertemporal choice tasks is now the gold standard method for quantifying human choice impulsivity (impatience in neuroscience, psychology, behavioral economics, public health and computational psychiatry. A recent area of growing interest is individual differences in discounting levels, as these may predispose to (or protect from mental health disorders, addictive behaviors, and other diseases. At the same time, more and more studies have been dedicated to the quantification of individual attitudes towards risk, which have been measured in many clinical and non-clinical populations using closely related techniques. Economists have pointed to interactions between measurements of time preferences and risk preferences that may distort estimations of the discount rate. However, although becoming standard practice in economics, discount rates and risk preferences are rarely measured simultaneously in the same subjects in other fields, and the magnitude of the imposed distortion is unknown in the assessment of individual differences. Here, we show that standard models of temporal discounting -such as a hyperbolic discounting model widely present in the literature which fails to account for risk attitudes in the estimation of discount rates- result in a large and systematic pattern of bias in estimated discounting parameters. This can lead to the spurious attribution of differences in impulsivity between individuals when in fact differences in risk attitudes account for observed behavioral differences. We advance a model which, when applied to standard choice tasks typically used in psychology and neuroscience, provides both a better fit to the data and successfully de-correlates risk and impulsivity parameters. This results in measures that are more accurate and thus of greater utility to the many fields interested in individual differences in impulsivity.

  14. Risk preferences impose a hidden distortion on measures of choice impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Guzman, Silvia; Konova, Anna B; Louie, Kenway; Glimcher, Paul W

    2018-01-01

    Measuring temporal discounting through the use of intertemporal choice tasks is now the gold standard method for quantifying human choice impulsivity (impatience) in neuroscience, psychology, behavioral economics, public health and computational psychiatry. A recent area of growing interest is individual differences in discounting levels, as these may predispose to (or protect from) mental health disorders, addictive behaviors, and other diseases. At the same time, more and more studies have been dedicated to the quantification of individual attitudes towards risk, which have been measured in many clinical and non-clinical populations using closely related techniques. Economists have pointed to interactions between measurements of time preferences and risk preferences that may distort estimations of the discount rate. However, although becoming standard practice in economics, discount rates and risk preferences are rarely measured simultaneously in the same subjects in other fields, and the magnitude of the imposed distortion is unknown in the assessment of individual differences. Here, we show that standard models of temporal discounting -such as a hyperbolic discounting model widely present in the literature which fails to account for risk attitudes in the estimation of discount rates- result in a large and systematic pattern of bias in estimated discounting parameters. This can lead to the spurious attribution of differences in impulsivity between individuals when in fact differences in risk attitudes account for observed behavioral differences. We advance a model which, when applied to standard choice tasks typically used in psychology and neuroscience, provides both a better fit to the data and successfully de-correlates risk and impulsivity parameters. This results in measures that are more accurate and thus of greater utility to the many fields interested in individual differences in impulsivity.

  15. Crop yield response to deficit irrigation imposed at different plant growth stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovaks, T.; Kovaks, G.; Szito, J.

    1995-01-01

    A series of field experiments were conducted between 1991 - 1994 using 7 irrigation treatments at two fertilizer levels. Nitrogen fertilizers used were labelled with 15 N stable isotope to examine the effect of irrigation on the fertilizer N use efficiency by isotope technique. The irrigation were maintained at four different growth stages of maize, soybean and potato( vegetative, flowering, yield formation and ripening ) in 4 replicates. The aim of study was to compare deficit irrigation( i.e. the water stress imposed, during one growth stage ) with normal irrigation practice included the traditional one. Two watering regimes were established : (1) normal watering when available water was within the range of 60 - 90 %, and (2) deficit irrigation, when the AW was at 30 to 60 %. Neutron probe was used for measuring the soil water status and evaporation data were recorded to determine the amount of irrigation water demand. Reference evapotranspiration ( ETo) was calculated according to Penman - Monteith. Crop water requirement ( ETm) were determined in every year. Actual evapotranspiration ( ETa) was computed using CROPWAT: FAO computer program for irrigation planning and management (1992). Every irrigation treatment was equipped with neutron access tubes in two replicates at a depth from 10 to 130 cm. tensiometers were installed at depths of 30, 50, 60 and 80 cm in one replicate of treatments and were measured on a daily basis while neutron probe measurements were used to monitor the soil water table fluctuations. The irrigation method used was a special type of low pressure drop irrigation. There were measured the amount of rainfall with irrigation water supplied and the moisture distribution profiles were drown for the different treatments. Relationships between relative yield decrease and evapotranspiration and also between the crop yield and water use were determined. 9 tabs, 9 refs, ( Author )

  16. Amino acid substrates impose polyamine, eIF5A, or hypusine requirement for peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Katoh, Takayuki; Gutierrez, Erik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Suga, Hiroaki; Dever, Thomas E

    2017-08-21

    Whereas ribosomes efficiently catalyze peptide bond synthesis by most amino acids, the imino acid proline is a poor substrate for protein synthesis. Previous studies have shown that the translation factor eIF5A and its bacterial ortholog EF-P bind in the E site of the ribosome where they contact the peptidyl-tRNA in the P site and play a critical role in promoting the synthesis of polyproline peptides. Using misacylated Pro-tRNAPhe and Phe-tRNAPro, we show that the imino acid proline and not tRNAPro imposes the primary eIF5A requirement for polyproline synthesis. Though most proline analogs require eIF5A for efficient peptide synthesis, azetidine-2-caboxylic acid, a more flexible four-membered ring derivative of proline, shows relaxed eIF5A dependency, indicating that the structural rigidity of proline might contribute to the requirement for eIF5A. Finally, we examine the interplay between eIF5A and polyamines in promoting translation elongation. We show that eIF5A can obviate the polyamine requirement for general translation elongation, and that this activity is independent of the conserved hypusine modification on eIF5A. Thus, we propose that the body of eIF5A functionally substitutes for polyamines to promote general protein synthesis and that the hypusine modification on eIF5A is critically important for poor substrates like proline. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2017.

  17. Human health safety evaluation of cosmetics in the EU: a legally imposed challenge to science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, M; Rogiers, V

    2010-03-01

    As stated in the European legislation, cosmetic products present on the European market must be safe for the consumer. Safety evaluation of the products is carried out by a qualified safety assessor who needs to consider potential exposure scenarios next to the physicochemical and toxicological profiles of all composing ingredients. Whereas, until recently, the tools to determine the toxicological profile of cosmetic ingredients mainly consisted of animal experiments, they have now been narrowed down substantially by the legally imposed animal testing ban on cosmetic ingredients, taken up in the Cosmetic Products Directive (76/768/EEC). This Directive, however, is not a stand-alone piece of European legislation, since as well directly as indirectly it is influenced by a complex web of related legislations. Vertical legislations deal with different categories of chemicals, including dangerous substances, biocides, plant protection products, food additives, medicinal products, and of course also cosmetics. Horizontal legislative texts, on the contrary, cover more general fields such as protection of experimental animals, consumer product safety, misleading of consumers, specific provisions for aerosols, and others. Experience has learnt that having a general overview of these related legislations is necessary to understand their impact on the cosmetic world in general terms and on cosmetic safety evaluation in particular. This goes for a variety of concerned parties, including national and European regulators/agencies, contract laboratories, raw material suppliers, cosmetic companies, research and educational centers. They all deal with a number of aspects important for the quality and toxicity of cosmetics and their ingredients. This review summarises the most relevant points of the legislative texts of different types of product categories and emphasises their impact on the safety evaluation of cosmetics.

  18. Metabolic costs imposed by hydrostatic pressure constrain bathymetric range in the lithodid crab Lithodes maja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alastair; Thatje, Sven; Morris, James P; Oliphant, Andrew; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Hauton, Chris; Jones, Daniel O B; Pond, David W

    2017-11-01

    The changing climate is shifting the distributions of marine species, yet the potential for shifts in depth distributions is virtually unexplored. Hydrostatic pressure is proposed to contribute to a physiological bottleneck constraining depth range extension in shallow-water taxa. However, bathymetric limitation by hydrostatic pressure remains undemonstrated, and the mechanism limiting hyperbaric tolerance remains hypothetical. Here, we assess the effects of hydrostatic pressure in the lithodid crab Lithodes maja (bathymetric range 4-790 m depth, approximately equivalent to 0.1 to 7.9 MPa hydrostatic pressure). Heart rate decreased with increasing hydrostatic pressure, and was significantly lower at ≥10.0 MPa than at 0.1 MPa. Oxygen consumption increased with increasing hydrostatic pressure to 12.5 MPa, before decreasing as hydrostatic pressure increased to 20.0 MPa; oxygen consumption was significantly higher at 7.5-17.5 MPa than at 0.1 MPa. Increases in expression of genes associated with neurotransmission, metabolism and stress were observed between 7.5 and 12.5 MPa. We suggest that hyperbaric tolerance in L maja may be oxygen-limited by hyperbaric effects on heart rate and metabolic rate, but that L maja 's bathymetric range is limited by metabolic costs imposed by the effects of high hydrostatic pressure. These results advocate including hydrostatic pressure in a complex model of environmental tolerance, where energy limitation constrains biogeographic range, and facilitate the incorporation of hydrostatic pressure into the broader metabolic framework for ecology and evolution. Such an approach is crucial for accurately projecting biogeographic responses to changing climate, and for understanding the ecology and evolution of life at depth. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Should advertising by aesthetic surgeons be permitted?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Nagpal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opinion in their favour. However, these saloons and spas lack basic medical facilities in terms of staff or equipment to handle any complication or medical emergency. To have a level playing field ethical advertising should be permitted to qualified aesthetic surgeons as is permitted in the US and UK by their respective organisations.

  20. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report is part of a dangerous waste permit application for the storage of wastes from the Purex process at Hanford. Appendices are presented on the following: construction drawings; HSW-5638, specifications for disposal facility for failed equipment, Project CA-1513-A; HWS-8262, specification for Purex equipment disposal, Project CGC 964; storage tunnel checklist; classification of residual tank heels in Purex storage tunnels; emergency plan for Purex facility; training course descriptions; and the Purex storage tunnels engineering study

  1. Hanford Site air operating permit application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

  2. Hanford Site air operating permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ''regulated'' pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ''criteria'' pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ''Hazardous'' Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995

  3. Grout Treatment Facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) is an existing treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit located in the 200 East Area and the adjacent 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid mixed waste (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. The GTF consists of the following: The 241-AP-02D and 241-AP-04D waste pump pits and transfer piping; Dry Materials Facility (DMF); Grout Disposal Facility (GDF), consisting of the disposal vault and support and monitoring equipment; and Grout Processing Facility (GPF) and Westinghouse Hanford Company on the draft Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit and may not be read to conflict with those comments. The Grout Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application consists of both a Part A and a Part B permit application. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this TSD unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The Part B consists of 15 chapters addressing the organization and content of the Part B checklist prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987). For ease of reference, the checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow chapter headings and subheadings

  4. Impact of imposed exercise on energy intake in children at risk for overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnbach, S Nicole; Masterson, Travis D; Schlechter, Haley A; Ross, Amanda J; Rykaczewski, Michael J; Loken, Eric; Downs, Danielle S; Thivel, David; Keller, Kathleen L

    2016-10-21

    Exercise not only has a direct effect on energy balance through energy expenditure (EE), but also has an indirect effect through its impact on energy intake (EI). This study examined the effects of acute exercise on daily ad libitum EI in children at risk for becoming overweight due to family history. Twenty healthy-weight children (ages 9-12 years, 12 male/8 female) with at least one overweight biological parent (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m 2 ) participated. Children reported to the laboratory for one baseline and two experimental visits (EX = exercise, SED = sedentary) each separated by 1 week in a randomized crossover design. Two hours into the EX day session, children exercised at 70 % estimated VO 2max for 30 min on a cycle ergometer. Objective EI (kcal) was measured at a standard breakfast (~285 kcal) and ad libitum lunch, snack and dinner. Meals were identical on the EX and SED days. Activity-related EE (kcal) was estimated with accelerometers worn on the non-dominant wrist and ankle. Relative EI (kcal) was computed as the difference between Total EI and Activity-related EE for each testing day. Paired t-tests were performed to test differences in Total EI, Activity-related EE and Relative EI between the EX and SED days. Across all meals, Total EI was not statistically different between the EX and SED days (t = 1.8, p = 0.09). Activity-related EE was greater on the EX day compared to the SED day (t = 10.1, p kcal on each day, but had greater Activity-related EE on the EX day, Relative EI was lower (t = -5.15, p kcal) relative to the SED day (1862 ± 426 kcal). Imposed exercise was effective in reducing Relative EI compared to being sedentary. Morning exercise may help children at risk for becoming overweight to better regulate their energy balance within the course of a day.

  5. Imposed Environmental Stresses Facilitate Cell-Free Nanoparticle Formation by Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Angela; Contreras, Lydia M; Keitz, Benjamin K

    2017-09-15

    The biological synthesis of metal nanoparticles has been examined in a wide range of organisms, due to increased interest in green synthesis and environmental remediation applications involving heavy metal ion contamination. Deinococcus radiodurans is particularly attractive for environmental remediation involving metal reduction, due to its high levels of resistance to radiation and other environmental stresses. However, few studies have thoroughly examined the relationships between environmental stresses and the resulting effects on nanoparticle biosynthesis. In this work, we demonstrate cell-free nanoparticle production and study the effects of metal stressor concentrations and identity, temperature, pH, and oxygenation on the production of extracellular silver nanoparticles by D. radiodurans R1. We also report the synthesis of bimetallic silver and gold nanoparticles following the addition of a metal stressor (silver or gold), highlighting how production of these particles is enabled through the application of environmental stresses. Additionally, we found that both the morphology and size of monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles were dependent on the environmental stresses imposed on the cells. The nanoparticles produced by D. radiodurans exhibited antimicrobial activity comparable to that of pure silver nanoparticles and displayed catalytic activity comparable to that of pure gold nanoparticles. Overall, we demonstrate that biosynthesized nanoparticle properties can be partially controlled through the tuning of applied environmental stresses, and we provide insight into how their application may affect nanoparticle production in D. radiodurans during bioremediation. IMPORTANCE Biosynthetic production of nanoparticles has recently gained prominence as a solution to rising concerns regarding increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics and a desire for environmentally friendly methods of bioremediation and chemical synthesis. To date, a range of organisms

  6. 12 CFR 19.135 - Applications for stay or review of disciplinary actions imposed by registered clearing agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Involving the Federal Securities Laws § 19.135 Applications for stay or review of disciplinary actions... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications for stay or review of disciplinary actions imposed by registered clearing agencies. 19.135 Section 19.135 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF...

  7. Public opinion on imposing restrictions to people with an alcohol- or drug addiction : A cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boekel, L.C.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; van Weeghel, J.; Garretsen, H.F.L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Alcohol- and drug addiction tends to evoke disapproval and rejection among people. This study provides insight into the origin of people’s negative attitudes towards these people. Corrigan’s attribution model is used to examine intentions of the Dutch public to impose restrictions to people

  8. 45 CFR 264.72 - What requirements are imposed on a State if it receives contingency funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... receives contingency funds? 264.72 Section 264.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Contingency Fund? § 264.72 What requirements are imposed on a State if it receives contingency funds? (a)(1) A State must meet a Contingency Fund MOE level of 100 percent of historic State expenditures for FY 1994...

  9. Effects of Experimentally Imposed Noise on Task Performance of Black Children Attending Day Care Centers Near Elevated Subway Trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrick-Dixon, Priscilla Janet

    1986-01-01

    Investigates whether an experimentally imposed 80dB (A) noise affected psychomotor, serial memory words and pictures, incidental memory, visual recall, paired associates, perceptual learning, and coding performance of five-year-old Black children attending day care centers near and far from elevated subways. (HOD)

  10. 25 CFR 900.46 - What requirements are imposed upon the Secretary for financial management by these standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... financial management by these standards? 900.46 Section 900.46 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... Management Systems Standards for Financial Management Systems § 900.46 What requirements are imposed upon the Secretary for financial management by these standards? The Secretary shall establish procedures, consistent...

  11. 42 CFR 411.12 - Charges imposed by an immediate relative or member of the beneficiary's household.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Natural or adoptive parent, child, or sibling. (3) Stepparent, stepchild, stepbrother, or stepsister. (4... if the physician who ordered or supervised the services has an excluded relationship to the... provider or supplier if the owner has an excluded relationship to the beneficiary; and (ii) Charges imposed...

  12. The Redistributive Impact of Restrictive Measures on EU Members: Winners and Losers from Imposing Sanctions on Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giumelli, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    EU sanctions on Russia created concerns among its members. It is well known that sanctions impose a cost on their targets as well as on the senders, as lamented by European governments, but the costs of EU sanctions on its members have not been fully explored. This article intends to fill this gap

  13. 29 CFR 471.14 - What sanctions and penalties may be imposed for noncompliance, and what procedures will the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LABOR NOTIFICATION OF EMPLOYEE RIGHTS UNDER FEDERAL LABOR LAWS OBLIGATIONS OF FEDERAL CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS; NOTIFICATION OF EMPLOYEE RIGHTS UNDER FEDERAL LABOR LAWS General Enforcement; Compliance Review... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What sanctions and penalties may be imposed for...

  14. Compositeness condition in the renormalization group equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Masako; Kugo, Taichiro; Maekawa, Nobuhiro; Sasakura, Naoki; Watabiki, Yoshiyuki; Suehiro, Kazuhiko

    1990-01-01

    The problems in imposing compositeness conditions as boundary conditions in renormalization group equations are discussed. It is pointed out that one has to use the renormalization group equation directly in cutoff theory. In some cases, however, it can be approximated by the renormalization group equation in continuum theory if the mass dependent renormalization scheme is adopted. (orig.)

  15. Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Semiannual Report for the period July 21 2001 Thru December 31 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2002-02-01

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and August 15th each year, which are certified for truth and accuracy by a Responsible Official. This first semiannual report contains information for the period from July 2, 2001 through December 31, 2001. Hereafter, the March 15th semiannual report will contain information for the period from July 1 through December 31. The semiannual report submitted by August 15th will contain information for the period from January 1 through June 30. Copies of the semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, identifies the following: (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5, ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring that were submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2, 1.3 and 2.1. each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting

  16. Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Semiannual Report for the period July 21 2001 Thru December 31 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREEN, W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and August 15th each year, which are certified for truth and accuracy by a Responsible Official. This first semiannual report contains information for the period from July 2, 2001 through December 31, 2001. Hereafter, the March 15th semiannual report will contain information for the period from July 1 through December 31. The semiannual report submitted by August 15th will contain information for the period from January 1 through June 30. Copies of the semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, identifies the following: (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5, ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring that were submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2, 1.3 and 2.1. each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting period. The data derived from that monitoring will be reported

  17. Permit processes for nuclear power. International lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaahlin, Emil; Nilsson, Isabelle; Pettersson, Maria; Soederholm, Patrik

    2010-01-01

    The overall objective of this report is to analyze and compare the legal permitting and planning process for (first and foremost) new nuclear power stations in a number of selected countries. In this way the report provides relevant knowledge that could form the basis for discussing the efficiency of various national licensing processes (include the Swedish one). The study builds heavily on the analysis of legal documents and regulations, and addresses both the formal requirements for licensing and territorial planning procedures as well as the issues of public participation and access to justice in the respective countries. In addition to this legal approach, however, we also adopt an investor's perspective on the legislation, i.e., an analysis of the legal rules can influence investment decisions in practice. Furthermore, the study relies largely on a synthesis of previous studies as well as interviews with researchers, electricity companies and government officials in Sweden and abroad. The countries that are compared include Sweden, Finland, France, Canada, Switzerland, Great Britain, USA and South Korea. These include those that currently invest in new nuclear power as well as those who have recently reformed their plant permitting processes. The analysis highlights important differences among the various countries, including issues such as the political influence on the licensing process, the allocation of political power between the national and local levels, means of interacting with regular citizens, and the overall transparency and predictability of the legislation. Some selected practical experiences of the current legislation are also presented. The report first provides a short background to the role and the status of nuclear power in the global energy system, and we then present a rather comprehensive comparison of the permitting processes in the above countries. Each country section comprises a short background, a presentation of the existing

  18. PERMITTING LEADERSHIP IN THE UNITED STATES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken Nemeth

    2002-01-01

    In accordance with the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) proposal, as incorporated into NETL/DE-FC26-97FT34199, the objective of this agreement is to streamline the environmental technology permitting process site-to-site, state-to-state, and industry-to-industry to achieve remediation and waste processing faster, better and cheaper. SSEB is working with member Governors, legislators and regulators to build consensus on streamlining the permitting process for new and innovative technologies for addressing the legacy of environmental problems from 50 years of weapons research, development and production. This report reviews mechanisms whereby industry consortiums and the Department of Energy (DOE) have been working with State regulators and other officials in technology deployment decisions within the DOE complex. The historic development of relationships with State regulators is reviewed and the current nature of the relationships examined. The report contains observations from internal DOE reviews as well as recommendations from the General Accounting Office (GAO) and other external organizations. The report discusses reorganization initiatives leading up to a DOE Top-to-Bottom review of the Environmental Management (EM) Program and highlights points of consideration for maintaining effective linkages with State regulators. It notes how the proposed changes will place new demands upon the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and how NETL can leverage its resources by refocusing existing EM efforts specifically to states that have DOE facilities within their borders (host-states). Finally, the report discusses how SSEB's Permitting Leadership in the United States (PLUS) program can provide the foundation for elements of NETL's technical assistance program that are delivered to regulators and other decision- makers in host-states. As a regional compact commission, SSEB provides important direct linkages to regulators and stakeholders who need technical

  19. Reaction kinetics of hydrazine neutralization in steam generator wet lay-up solution: Identifying optimal degradation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schildermans, Kim; Lecocq, Raphael; Girasa, Emmanuel

    2012-09-01

    During a nuclear power plant outage, hydrazine is used as an oxygen scavenger in the steam generator lay-up solution. However, due to the carcinogenic effects of hydrazine, more stringent discharge limits are or will be imposed in the environmental permits. Hydrazine discharge could even be prohibited. Consequently, hydrazine alternatives or hydrazine degradation before discharge is needed. This paper presents the laboratory tests performed to characterize the reaction kinetics of hydrazine neutralization using bleach or hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed with either copper sulfate (CuSO 4 ) or potassium permanganate (KMnO 4 ). The tests are performed on two standard steam generator lay-up solutions based on different pH control agents: ammonia or ethanolamine. Different neutralization conditions are tested by varying temperature, oxidant addition, and catalyst concentration, among others, in order to identify the optimal parameters for hydrazine neutralization in a steam generator wet lay-up solution. (authors)

  20. Tradable permit allocations and sequential choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, Ian A. [Centre for Economic Research, ETH Zuerich, Zurichbergstrasse 18, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    This paper investigates initial allocation choices in an international tradable pollution permit market. For two sovereign governments, we compare allocation choices that are either simultaneously or sequentially announced. We show sequential allocation announcements result in higher (lower) aggregate emissions when announcements are strategic substitutes (complements). Whether allocation announcements are strategic substitutes or complements depends on the relationship between the follower's damage function and governments' abatement costs. When the marginal damage function is relatively steep (flat), allocation announcements are strategic substitutes (complements). For quadratic abatement costs and damages, sequential announcements provide a higher level of aggregate emissions. (author)

  1. PSD Permit for the Marblehead Lime Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Honda Permits to Install 1 Year Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. Restrictions of Non Associated Plastic Flow Laws Imposed by Thermodynamics and Uniqueness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-20

    loading. Difficulties in using constitutive relations which violate the continuity condition have been reported in the past (Nelson and Baladi , 1977...of Thermodynamics in Mechanics of Materials," Energy. 5. 771. Nelson, I., and G. Y. Baladi (1977). "Outrunning Ground Shock Computed with Different

  4. 75 FR 27814 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... permit to export one female captive bred giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) born at the zoo in 2005 and... education. The permit numbers and animals are: 070854, Bimbo Jr.; 079868, Vickie; 079870, Jenny; 079871...

  5. A Framework for Building Efficient Environmental Permitting Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Ulibarri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance as a tool for protecting air and water quality, and for mitigating impacts to protected species and ecosystems, the environmental permitting process is widely recognized to be inefficient and marked by delays. This article draws on a literature review and interviews with permitting practitioners to identify factors that contribute to delayed permit decisions. The sociopolitical context, projects that are complex or use novel technology, a fragmented and bureaucratic regulatory regime, serial permit applications and reviews, and applicant and permitting agency knowledge and resources each contribute to permitting inefficiency when they foster uncertainty, increase transaction costs, and allow divergent interests to multiply, yet remain unresolved. We then use the interviews to consider the potential of a collaborative dialogue between permitting agencies and applicants to mitigate these challenges, and argue that collaboration is well positioned to lessen permitting inefficiency.

  6. 34 CFR 395.35 - Terms of permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., periodicals, publications, confections, tobacco products, foods, beverages, chances for any lottery authorized... PROPERTY Federal Property Management § 395.35 Terms of permit. Every permit shall describe the location of...

  7. 78 FR 27249 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... purpose of enhancing the species' survival. Permit No. TE-99477A Applicant: Benjamin S. Wallace, Fairfield...-99473A Applicant: Joseph D. Henry, San Diego, California The applicant requests a permit to take (capture...

  8. 76 FR 75897 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ...: EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Lewisville, Texas. Applicant requests a new permit for... atricapilla) within Texas. Permit TE-37047A Applicant: Sea World Parks and Entertainment, San Antonio, Texas...

  9. 76 FR 35235 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... chub (Gila intermedia), Gila topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis occidentalis), humpback chub (Gila... intermedia) within Arizona. Permit TE-43777A Applicant: Sea Life US, LLC, Grapevine, Texas. Applicant...), and Gila chub (Gila intermedia) within Arizona. Permit TE-118414 Applicant: Cherokee Nation, Tahlequah...

  10. Storm water permitting for oil and gas facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Blanc, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    After several false starts, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published new federal storm water regulations in the November 16, 1990 Federal Register. These regulations identify facilities which must apply for a storm water permit and detail permit application requirements. The regulations appear at 40 CFR 122 Subpart B and became effective December 17, 1990. An outline of these regulations and their applicability to oil and gas facilities is presented. They are: facilities which require a storm water permit; types of storm water permits; permit application deadlines; permit application forms; facilities with existing storm water permits; storm water permit application data requirements; storm water sampling and analysis requirements; and EPA contacts for additional information

  11. Remediation General Permit (RGP) for Massachusetts & New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents, links & contacts for the Notice of Availability of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) General Permit for Remediation Activity Discharges – the Remediation General Permit in MA (MAG910000) and NH (NHG910000).

  12. LcrQ and SycH function together at the Ysc type III secretion system in Yersinia pestis to impose a hierarchy of secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff-Strobel, Christine R; Williams, Andrew W; Straley, Susan C

    2002-01-01

    LcrQ is a regulatory protein unique to Yersinia. Previous study in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica prompted the model in which LcrQ negatively regulates the expression of a set of virulence proteins called Yops, and its secretion upon activation of the Yop secretion (Ysc) type III secretion system permits full induction of Yops expression. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that LcrQ's effects on Yops expression might be indirect. Excess LcrQ was found to exert an inhibitory effect specifically at the level of Yops secretion, independent of production, and a normal inner Ysc gate protein LcrG was required for this activity. However, overexpression of LcrQ did not prevent YopH secretion, suggesting that LcrQ's effects at the Ysc discriminate among the Yops. We tested this idea by determining the effects of deletion or overexpression of LcrQ, YopH and their common chaperone SycH on early Yop secretion through the Ysc. Together, our findings indicated that LcrQ is not a negative regulator directly, but it acts in partnership with SycH at the Ysc gate to control the entry of a set of Ysc secretion substrates. A hierarchy of YopH secretion before YopE appears to be imposed by SycH in conjunction with both LcrQ and YopH. LcrQ and SycH in addition influenced the deployment of LcrV, a component of the Yops delivery mechanism. Accordingly, LcrQ appears to be a central player in determining the substrate specificity of the Ysc.

  13. The Use of Transferable Permits in Transport Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Raux, Charles

    2004-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trd.2004.01.001; International audience; This paper considers potential use of domestic transferable, or tradable, permit systems for the purposes of travel management, especially reducing environmental nuisances. The main arguments for and against the use of permits are analyzed. Secondly two case studies of existing permit systems are examined. The main conclusions are that tradable permits can address greenhouse gas and regional atmospheric pollutant emissions, ...

  14. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This section briefly describes the Hanford Site, provides a general description of the site operations and administration, provides an overview of the contents of this Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) Permit Application, and gives a list of acronyms and abbreviations used in the document. The decision was made to use the checklist as a locator reference instead of using the checklist section numbers as paragraph section numbers because several different types of waste management units, some of which are not addressed in the checklists, are part of the GTF. The GTF is a waste management unit within the Hanford Site facility. In May 1988, permit application was filed that identified the GTF as an existing facility. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid mixed wastes (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. In addition to the design and operating features of the GTF that are intended to meet the requirements of dangerous waste regulations, many additional design and operating features are necessary to comply with radioactive waste management practices. The GTF design features and practices are intended to keep operational exposure to radionuclides and dangerous substances ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) and to provide a disposal system that protects the environment for at least 10,000 yr. In some instances, ALARA practices present difficulties when complying with requirements of dangerous waste regulations

  15. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This section briefly describes the Hanford Site, provides a general description of the site operations and administration, provides an overview of the contents of this Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) Permit Application, and gives a list of acronyms and abbreviations used in the document. The decision was made to use the checklist as a locator reference instead of using the checklist section numbers as paragraph section numbers because several different types of waste management units, some of which are not addressed in the checklists, are part of the GTF. The GTF is a waste management unit within the Hanford Site facility. In May 1988, a permit application was filed that identified the GTF as an existing facility. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid mixed wastes (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. In addition to the design and operating features of the GTF that are intended to meet the requirements of dangerous waste regulations, many additional design and operating features are necessary to comply with radioactive waste management practices. The GTF design features and practices are intended to keep operational exposure to radionuclides and dangerous substances ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) and to provide a disposal system that protects the environment for at least 10,000 yr. In some instances, ALARA practices present difficulties when complying with requirements of dangerous waste regulations. This volume contains 2 appendices covering engineering drawings and operating procedures

  16. Are LMFBR permits unconstitutional. [German Feferal Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, H; Ziegler, E

    1977-12-01

    The August 18, 1977 decision by the Muenster Higher Administrative Court to have the Federal Constitutional Court investigate the constitutionality of permits granted for fast breeder power plants has aroused much attention, both in the FRG and in other countries. This is the first time that the German Atomic Energy Act is being questioned with respect to the separation of powers between legislative and executive authorities and also with respect to the principle of a constitutional state. As a result of their analysis of the first information available about the court decision the authors have some doubts as to whether the views held by the court about the consequences of the development of fast breeder reactors and of the permit granted for the SNR 300 demonstration nuclear power station are essentially correct. In view of the wording of and the official comments on the incriminated Section 7 of the Atomic Energy Act and the large number of subsequent leading decisions by the Federal Diet about fast breeder reactors also the concern about the constitutionality of that reactor line appears to be unfounded.

  17. Grout treatment facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This section briefly describes the Hanford Site, provides a general description of the site operations and administration, provides an overview of the contents of this Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) Permit Application, and gives a list of acronyms and abbreviations used in the document. The decision was made to use the checklist as a locator reference instead of using the checklist section numbers as paragraph section numbers because several different types of waste management units, some of which are not addressed in the checklists, are part of the GTF. The GTF is a waste management unit within the Hanford Site facility. In May 1988, a permit application was filed that identified the GTF as an existing facility. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid mixed wastes (containing both dangerous and radioactive constitutents) produced by Hanford Site operations. In addition to the design and operating features of the GTF that are intended to meet the requirements of dangerous waste regulations, many additional design and operating features are necessary to comply with radioactive waste management practices. The GTF design features and practices are intended to keep operational exposure to radionuclides and dangerous substances ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) and to provide a disposal system that protects the environment for at least 10,000 yr. In some instances, ALARA practices present difficulties when complying with requirements of dangerous waste regulations. This volume contains 2 Appendices covering engineering drawings and operating procedures

  18. Grout Treatment Facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This section briefly describes the Hanford Site, provides a general description of the site operations and administration, provides an overview of the contents of this Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) Permit Application, and gives a list of acronyms and abbreviations used in the document. The decision was made to use the checklist as a locator reference instead of using the checklist section numbers as paragraph section numbers because several different types of waste management units, some of which are not addressed in the checklists, are part of the GTF. The GTF is a waste management unit within the Hanford Site facility. In May 1988, a permit application was filed that identified the GTF as an existing facility. The GTF mixes dry cementitious solids with liquid wastes (containing both dangerous and radioactive constituents) produced by Hanford Site operations. In addition to the design and operating features of the GTF that are intended to meet the requirements of dangerous waste regulations, many additional design and operating features are necessary to comply with radioactive waste management practices. The GTF design features and practices are intended to keep operational exposure to radionuclides and dangerous substances ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) and to provide a disposal system that protects the environment for at least 10,000 yr. In some instances, ALARA practices present difficulties when complying with requirements of dangerous waste regulations. This volume contains 14 Appendices. Topics include Engineering Drawings, Maps, Roads, Toxicity Testing, and Pilot-Scale Testing

  19. 76 FR 67650 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... and suggestions on migratory bird permit regulations for a permit to use raptors (birds of prey) in abatement activities. Abatement means the use of trained raptors to flush, scare (haze), or take birds or... for a specific permit authorizing the use of raptors in abatement activities (76 FR 39368). The...

  20. 75 FR 20622 - Endangered Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    .... Permit No. TE-02997A Applicant: University of Hawaii, Hilo, Hawaii. The applicant requests a permit to... scientific research including genetic, morphological and behavioral research on the island of Hawaii in the State of Hawaii for the purpose of enhancing its survival. The applicant also requests a permit to take...

  1. 25 CFR 211.56 - Geological and geophysical permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Geological and geophysical permits. 211.56 Section 211.56... FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Rents, Royalties, Cancellations and Appeals § 211.56 Geological and geophysical permits. Permits to conduct geological and geophysical operations on Indian lands which do not...

  2. 25 CFR 212.56 - Geological and geophysical permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Geological and geophysical permits. 212.56 Section 212.56... FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Rents, Royalties, Cancellations, and Appeals § 212.56 Geological and geophysical permits. (a) Permits to conduct geological and geophysical operations on Indian lands which do not...

  3. 40 CFR 270.65 - Research, development, and demonstration permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Research, development, and... Special Forms of Permits § 270.65 Research, development, and demonstration permits. (a) The Administrator may issue a research, development, and demonstration permit for any hazardous waste treatment facility...

  4. 77 FR 34061 - Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ...-FF09A30000] Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... following permits to conduct certain activities with endangered species. We issue these permits under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). ADDRESSES: Brenda Tapia, Division of Management Authority, U.S. Fish and...

  5. 78 FR 27255 - Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ...-FF09A30000] Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... following permits to conduct certain activities with endangered species. We issue these permits under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). ADDRESSES: Brenda Tapia, Division of Management Authority, U.S. Fish and...

  6. 78 FR 56922 - Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ...-FF09A30000] Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... following permits to conduct certain activities with endangered species. We issue these permits under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). ADDRESSES: Brenda Tapia, Division of Management Authority, U.S. Fish and...

  7. 76 FR 40338 - Marine Mammals; Photography Permit No. 16360

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... Mammals; Photography Permit No. 16360 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic... photography of cetaceans off Hawaii. ADDRESSES: The permit and related documents are available for review upon... photography on 12 cetacean species had been submitted by the above-named applicant. The requested permit has...

  8. 78 FR 24305 - Actions on Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... special permit Lincoln, NE. to authorize an alternative fire protection system. 11624-M Clean Harbors 49... Special Permit Applications AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of actions on Special Permit Applications. SUMMARY: In accordance with the procedures...

  9. 40 CFR 96.323 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 96.323 Section 96.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... the permitting authority, as necessary to facilitate coordination of the renewal of the CAIR permit...

  10. 21 CFR 1312.23 - Issuance of export permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuance of export permit. 1312.23 Section 1312.23... CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exportation of Controlled Substances § 1312.23 Issuance of export permit. (a) The... regulation in § 1312.30 of this part be exported only pursuant to the issuance of an export permit. The...

  11. 50 CFR 20.64 - Foreign export permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foreign export permits. 20.64 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Importations § 20.64 Foreign export permits. No... such birds are accompanied by export permits, tags, or other documentation required by applicable...

  12. 21 CFR 1312.22 - Application for export permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application for export permit. 1312.22 Section... EXPORTATION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Exportation of Controlled Substances § 1312.22 Application for export permit. (a) An application for a permit to export controlled substances shall be made on DEA Form 161...

  13. Quasi-discrete particle motion in an externally imposed, ordered structure in a dusty plasma at high magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Edward, E-mail: etjr@auburn.edu; Konopka, Uwe; Lynch, Brian; Adams, Stephen; LeBlanc, Spencer [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Merlino, Robert L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, Marlene [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Dusty plasmas have been studied in argon, radio frequency (rf) glow discharge plasmas at magnetic fields up to 2.5 T where the electrons and ions are strongly magnetized. Plasmas are generated between two parallel plate electrodes where the lower, powered electrode is solid and the upper electrode supports a dual mesh consisting of #24 brass and #30 aluminum wire cloth. In this experiment, we study the formation of imposed ordered structures and particle dynamics as a function of magnetic field. Through observations of trapped particles and the quasi-discrete (i.e., “hopping”) motion of particles between the trapping locations, it is possible to make a preliminary estimate of the potential structure that confines the particles to a grid structure in the plasma. This information is used to gain insight into the formation of the imposed grid pattern of the dust particles in the plasma.

  14. Athletes' perceptions of anti-doping sanctions: the ban from sport versus social, financial and self-imposed sanctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overbye, Marie Birch; Elbe, Anne-Marie; Knudsen, Mette Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Today the main doping deterrence strategy is to ban athletes from sport if caught. This study examines whether Danish elite athletes perceive the ban as a deterrent and how they evaluate social, self-imposed and financial sanctions compared with the ban. Questionnaires were emailed to elite...... athletes from 40 sports (N = 645; response rate, 43%). Results showed that 78% of athletes regarded the ban as a deterrent. Older male athletes, however, did so to a lesser degree. Seventy-seven per cent, regardless of gender, age, sport type and previous experience of doping testing, viewed social...... sanctions as a greater deterrent than the ban. Many also considered self-imposed sanctions (54%) and financial consequences (47%) a greater deterrent. Four per cent considered neither the ban nor the presented alternatives a deterrent. The findings indicate that the ban from sport deters doping...

  15. Joint stiffness and running economy during imposed forefoot strike before and after a long run in rearfoot strike runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Daniel A; Paquette, Max R; Schilling, Brian K; Bloomer, Richard J

    2017-12-01

    Research has focused on the effects of acute strike pattern modifications on lower extremity joint stiffness and running economy (RE). Strike pattern modifications on running biomechanics have mostly been studied while runners complete short running bouts. This study examined the effects of an imposed forefoot strike (FFS) on RE and ankle and knee joint stiffness before and after a long run in habitual rearfoot strike (RFS) runners. Joint kinetics and RE were collected before and after a long run. Sagittal joint kinetics were computed from kinematic and ground reaction force data that were collected during over-ground running trials in 13 male runners. RE was measured during treadmill running. Knee flexion range of motion, knee extensor moment and ankle joint stiffness were lower while plantarflexor moment and knee joint stiffness were greater during imposed FFS compared with RFS. The long run did not influence the difference in ankle and knee joint stiffness between strike patterns. Runners were more economical during RFS than imposed FFS and RE was not influenced by the long run. These findings suggest that using a FFS pattern towards the end of a long run may not be mechanically or metabolically beneficial for well-trained male RFS runners.

  16. 77 FR 55168 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Virginia; Permits for Major...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... Pollution Control Board or by the permittee. Actions to combine permit terms and conditions must include a... submitted by VADEQ for approval into the SIP were adopted by the State Air Pollution Control Board on June 8... prompt and appropriate measures to remedy the violations. Virginia's Voluntary Environmental Assessment...

  17. 30 CFR 773.19 - Permit issuance and right of renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... each party to an informal conference. (2) The local governmental officials in the local political subdivision in which the land to be affected is located within 10 days after the issuance of a permit... economic loss to the permittee; or (ii) There are conditions beyond the control and without the fault or...

  18. 40 CFR 158.2174 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides nontarget organisms and environmental fate data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Experimental use permit microbial... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS... controls the target insect pest by a mechanism of infectivity; i.e., may create an epizootic condition in...

  19. 9 CFR 95.12 - Bones, horns, and hoofs; importations permitted subject to restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bones, horns, and hoofs; importations... ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES § 95.12 Bones, horns, and hoofs; importations permitted subject to restrictions. Bones, horns, and hoofs offered for importation which do not meet the conditions or requirements...

  20. 28 CFR 29.6 - Limited participation by states and localities permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limited participation by states and localities permitted. 29.6 Section 29.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT... locality need not authorize the stopping of motor vehicles under all sets of conditions specified under the...

  1. 75 FR 47583 - Application to Rescind Presidential Permit; Joint Application for Presidential Permit; British...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Presidential Permit No. PP-22, as amended, to BC Hydro. The application requested that the Department of Energy... the transmission of electric energy between the United States and a foreign country is prohibited in... law pursuant to British Columbia's Clean Energy Act. Since restructuring of the electric power...

  2. 21 CFR 108.12 - Manufacturing, processing, or packing without a permit, or in violation of a permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manufacturing, processing, or packing without a permit, or in violation of a permit. 108.12 Section 108.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... General Provisions § 108.12 Manufacturing, processing, or packing without a permit, or in violation of a...

  3. Cogeneration : A Regulatory Guide to Leasing, Permitting, and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshaye, Joyce; Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1992-12-01

    This guidebook focuses on cogeneration development. It is one of a series of four guidebooks recently prepared to introduce the energy developer to the federal, state and local agencies that regulate energy facilities in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington (the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory). It was prepared specifically to help cogeneration developers obtain the permits, licenses and approvals necessary to construct and operate a cogeneration facility. The regulations, agencies and policies described herein are subject to change. Changes are likely to occur whenever energy or a project becomes a political issue, a state legislature meets, a preexisting popular or valuable land use is thought threatened, elected and appointed officials change, and new directions are imposed on states and local governments by the federal government. Accordingly, cogeneration developers should verify and continuously monitor the status of laws and rules that might affect their plans. Developers are cautioned that the regulations described herein may only be a starting point on the road to obtaining all the necessary permits.

  4. Evaluation of environmental stress imposed by a coal-ash effluent: Wisconsin power plant impact study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, K.E.; Forbes, A.M.; Magnuson, J.L.

    1985-06-01

    Effluent discharged from the coal-ash settling basin of the Columbia Generating Station (Wisconsin) modified water chemistry (increased trace metal concentrations, suspended solids and dissolved materials) and substrate quality (precipitation of chemical floc) in the receiving stream, the ash pit drain. To test the hypothesis that habitat avoidance could account for declines in macroinvertebrate density observed after discharge began, drift rates of two species were measured in laboratory streams containing combinations of reference and coal-ash-modified substrate and water. Contrary to the hypothesis, drift was uniformly lower in laboratory streams containing modified substrate and/or water compared to the reference condition for Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and Asellus racovitzai.

  5. Comparison of Psychological and Physiological Responses to Imposed vs. Self-selected High-Intensity Interval Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Erin; Cantacessi, Cheyann; McNamer, Olivia; Holmes, Heather; von Bargen, Robert; Ramirez, Richard; Gallagher, Daren; Vargas, Stacy; Santia, Ben; Rodriguez, Karen; Astorino, Todd A

    2018-05-08

    Kellogg, E, Cantacessi, C, McNamer, O, Holmes, H, von Bargen, R, Ramirez, R, Gallagher, D, Vargas, S, Santia, B, Rodriguez, K, and Astorino, TA. Comparison of psychological and physiological responses to imposed vs. self-selected high-intensity interval training. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-High-intensity interval training elicits similar physiological adaptations as moderate intensity continuous training (MICT). Some studies report greater enjoyment to a bout of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) vs. MICT, which is surprising considering that HIIE is more intense and typically imposed on the participant. This study compared physiological and perceptual responses between imposed and self-selected HIIE. Fourteen adults (age = 24 ± 3 years) unfamiliar with HIIE initially performed ramp exercise to exhaustion to measure maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max) followed by 2 subsequent sessions whose order was randomized. Imposed HIIE consisted of eight 60 seconds bouts at 80 percent peak power output (%PPO) separated by 60 seconds recovery at 10 %PPO. Self-selected HIIE (HIIESS) followed the same structure, but participants freely selected intensity in increments of 10 %PPO to achieve a rating of perceived exertion (RPE) ≥7. During exercise, heart rate, V[Combining Dot Above]O2, blood lactate concentration (BLa), affect (+5 to -5), and RPE were assessed. Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale was measured after exercise. Results showed higher V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (+10%, p = 0.013), BLa (p = 0.001), and RPE (p = 0.001) in HIIESS vs. HIIEIMP, and lower affect (p = 0.01), and enjoyment (87.6 ± 15.7 vs. 95.7 ± 11.7, p = 0.04). There was a significantly higher power output in self-selected vs. imposed HIIE (263.9 ± 81.4 W vs. 225.2 ± 59.6 W, p < 0.001). Data suggest that intensity mediates affective responses rather than the mode of HIIE performed by the participant.

  6. Regulatory Review of Early Site Permit Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received and is reviewing three applications for early site permits (ESPs). The ESP process allows early resolution of site-related issues affecting possible construction and operation of a new nuclear power plant. The nuclear industry views a successful and predictable ESP process as an important step in assessing whether to seek authorization to construct and operate a new generation of nuclear power reactors in the United States. Because consideration of ESP applications is a first-of-a-kind activity, a number of issues have emerged prior to and during the reviews of the first three applications. Issues have included the need for design information at the ESP stage, accident analyses, quality assurance, and seismic analyses. The NRC has been working to resolve identified issues to support a Commission decision on whether to issue an ESP approximately 33-37 months after receipt of each ESP application. (authors)

  7. Control of seed dormancy in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia: post-imbibition abscisic acid synthesis imposes dormancy maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grappin, P; Bouinot, D; Sotta, B; Miginiac, E; Jullien, M

    2000-01-01

    The physiological characteristics of seed dormancy in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Viv. are described. The level of seed dormancy is defined by the delay in seed germination (i.e the time required prior to germination) under favourable environmental conditions. A wild-type line shows a clear primary dormancy, which is suppressed by afterripening, whereas an abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient mutant shows a non-dormant phenotype. We have investigated the role of ABA and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) in the control of dormancy maintenance or breakage during imbibition in suitable conditions. It was found that fluridone, a carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor, is almost as efficient as GA(3) in breaking dormancy. Dry dormant seeds contained more ABA than dry afterripened seeds and, during early imbibition, there was an accumulation of ABA in dormant seeds, but not in afterripened seeds. In addition, fluridone and exogenous GA(3) inhibited the accumulation of ABA in imbibed dormant seeds. This reveals an important role for ABA synthesis in dormancy maintenance in imbibed seeds.

  8. Pictorial enhancement of text memory: limitations imposed by picture type and comprehension skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddill, P J; McDaniel, M A

    1992-09-01

    We examined the kinds of information in a prose passage that is better remembered when depictive illustrations are embedded in the passage than when the passage contains no illustrations. Experiment 1 showed that (1) pictures depicting details effectively increased recall of those details and (2) pictures depicting relationships effectively increased recall of that relational information (relative to a no-picture control condition). In Experiment 2, comprehension skill was found to modulate the general effects obtained in Experiment 1. Detail pictures enhanced the recall of targeted details for all skill levels. Relational pictures enhanced recall of pictured relational information for highly skilled and moderately skilled comprehenders, but not for less skilled comprehenders. Because there were no recall differences across the different skill levels in the no-picture control condition, it is suggested that pictures may serve to enable processing in which readers would not necessarily engage under ordinary circumstances. Pictures, however, did not appear to compensate for limitations reflected in lower scores on a standardized test of reading comprehension.

  9. Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Daily activities at the Hanford Site generate sanitary solid waste (nonhazardous and nonradioactive) that is transported to and permanently disposed of at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill. This permit application describes the manner in which the solid Waste Landfill will be operated under Washington State Department of Ecology Minimum Functional Standards for Solid Waste Handling, Washington Administrative Code 173-304. The solid Waste Landfill is owned by the US Department of Energy -- Richland Operations Office and is used for disposal of solid waste generated at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The jurisdictional health department's permit application form for the Solid Waste Landfill is provided in Chapter 1.0. Chapter 2.0 provides a description of the Hanford Site and the Solid Waste Landfill and reviews applicable locational, general facility, and landfilling standards. Chapter 3.0 discusses the characteristics and quantity of the waste disposed of in the Solid Waste Landfill. Chapter 4.0 reviews the regional and site geology and hydrology and the groundwater and vadose zone quality beneath the landfill. Chapters 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 contain the plan of operation, closure plan, and postclosure plan, respectively. The plan of operation describes the routine operation and maintenance of the Solid Waste Landfill, the environmental monitoring program, and the safety and emergency plans. Chapter 5.0 also addresses the operational cover, environmental controls, personnel requirements, inspections, recordkeeping, reporting, and site security. The postclosure plan describes requirements for final cover maintenance and environmental monitoring equipment following final closure. Chapter 8.0 discusses the integration of closure and postclosure activities between the Solid Waste Landfill and adjacent Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 76 refs., 48 figs, 15 tabs

  10. Making Conditional Cash Transfer Programs More Efficient : Designing for Maximum Effect of the Conditionality

    OpenAIRE

    de Janvry, Alain; Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Conditional cash transfer programs are now used extensively to encourage poor parents to increase investments in their children's human capital. These programs can be large and expensive, motivating a quest for greater efficiency through increased impact of the programs' imposed conditions on human capital formation. This requires designing the programs' targeting and calibration rules spe...

  11. Reproduction of nearby sources by imposing true interaural differences on a sound field control approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badajoz, Javier; Chang, Ji-ho; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2015-01-01

    In anechoic conditions, the Interaural Level Difference (ILD) is the most significant auditory cue to judge the distance to a sound source located within 1 m of the listener's head. This is due to the unique characteristics of a point source in its near field, which result in exceptionally high...... as Pressure Matching (PM), and a binaural control technique. While PM aims at reproducing the incident sound field, the objective of the binaural control technique is to ensure a correct reproduction of interaural differences. The combination of these two approaches gives rise to the following features: (i......, distance dependent ILDs. When reproducing the sound field of sources located near the head with line or circular arrays of loudspeakers, the reproduced ILDs are generally lower than expected, due to physical limitations. This study presents an approach that combines a sound field reproduction method, known...

  12. Regulation imposed to nuclear facility operators for the elaboration of 'waste studies' and 'waste statuses'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This decision from the French authority of nuclear safety (ASN) aims at validating the new versions of the guidebook for the elaboration of 'waste studies' for nuclear facilities and of the specifications for the elaboration of 'waste statuses' for nuclear facilities. This paper includes two documents. The first one is a guidebook devoted to nuclear facility operators which fixes the rules of production of waste studies according to the articles 20 to 26 of the inter-ministry by-law from December 31, 1999 (waste zoning conditions and ASN's control modalities). The second document concerns the specifications for the establishment of annual waste statuses according to article 27 of the inter-ministry by-law from December 31, 1999 (rational management of nuclear wastes). (J.S.)

  13. 28 CFR 522.12 - Relationship between existing criminal sentences imposed under the U.S. or D.C. Code and new...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sentences imposed under the U.S. or D.C. Code and new civil contempt commitment orders. 522.12 Section 522..., AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.12 Relationship between existing criminal sentences imposed under the U.S. or D.C. Code and new civil contempt commitment...

  14. 17 CFR 270.6c-10 - Exemption for certain open-end management investment companies to impose deferred sales loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... management investment companies to impose deferred sales loads. 270.6c-10 Section 270.6c-10 Commodity and... ACT OF 1940 § 270.6c-10 Exemption for certain open-end management investment companies to impose... purposes of this section: (1) Company means a registered open-end management investment company, other than...

  15. 26 CFR 1.857-4 - Tax imposed by reason of the failure to meet certain source-of-income requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.857-4 Tax imposed by reason of the failure to meet certain source-of-income requirements. Section 857... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax imposed by reason of the failure to meet...

  16. A review on regional convection permitting climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lipzig, Nicole; Prein, Andreas; Brisson, Erwan; Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Demuzere, Matthias; Saeed, Sajjad; Stengel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    With the increase of computational resources, it has recently become possible to perform climate model integrations where at least part the of convection is resolved. Since convection-permitting models (CPMs) are performing better than models where convection is parameterized, especially for high-impact weather like extreme precipitation, there is currently strong scientific progress in this research domain (Prein et al., 2015). Another advantage of CPMs, that have a horizontal grid spacing climate model COSMO-CLM is frequently applied for CPM simulations, due to its non-hydrostatic dynamics and open international network of scientists. This presentation consists of an overview of the recent progress in CPM, with a focus on COSMO-CLM. It consists of three parts, namely the discussion of i) critical components of CPM, ii) the added value of CPM in the present-day climate and iii) the difference in climate sensitivity in CPM compared to coarser scale models. In terms of added value, the CPMs especially improve the representation of precipitation's, diurnal cycle, intensity and spatial distribution. However, an in depth-evaluation of cloud properties with CCLM over Belgium indicates a strong underestimation of the cloud fraction, causing an overestimation of high temperature extremes (Brisson et al., 2016). In terms of climate sensitivity, the CPMs indicate a stronger increase in flash floods, changes in hail storm characteristics, and reductions in the snowpack over mountains compared to coarser scale models. In conclusion, CPMs are a very promising tool for future climate research. However, additional efforts are necessary to overcome remaining deficiencies, like improving the cloud characteristics. This will be a challenging task due to compensating deficiencies that currently exist in `state-of-the-art' models, yielding a good representation of average climate conditions. In the light of using CPMs to study climate change it is necessary that these deficiencies

  17. Bending stresses: imposed on underground small diameter lines in city streets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottmann, A

    1975-05-01

    Die Technischen Werke der Stadt Stuttgart AG (TWS, Stuttgart) investigated the accuracy of available bending stress calculations to represent the actual stress exerted on underground pipelines, the effective bending intervals, and the pipe diameter required to effectively resist the expected stress. The investigation covers steel, cast iron, ductile cast iron, asbestos cement, and PVC 100. The theoretical stresses were determined by the Boussinesgne method from the effects of SLW60 vehicles on pipes buried 3.28 ft (1 m) underground. The cumulative load on the pipe was obtained as the total of the vehicle load, soil load, pipe load, and water load. Results indicate that the tensile stress from internal pipe pressure can be omitted, and that welded steel and sealed PVC pipes should account for longitudinal tensile stresses. Steel pipes are generally so oversized that they need not account for these stresses. The calculations also considered the interaction between the pipe and pipe joint as the pipe emerges from the trench for the 3 possible conditions: an overhang beam, a beam encased at one end and jointed at the other, and a beam, encased at both ends. The curves of the resisting moments varied according to the type of material and pipe diameter, with the greatest rate increase reported for asbestos cement, followed by PVC 100, cast iron, ductile cast iron, and steel. Operating data of a cast-iron underground TWS system in Stuttgart indicated that pipes with less than or equal to 4 in. ( less than or equal to 100 mm) nominal diameter were quite fragile while those with diameters >6 in. (>105 mm) sustained considerably less damage. The degree of damage was found to decrease with increasing diameters. The effect of temperature also proved important. Since it is not economically possible to reinstall the distribution lines with 8-in. (200-mm) pipes, elastic support systems such as crossing troughs are recommended to support the pipes in stress areas.

  18. Plutonium titration by controlled potential coulometry; Dosage du plutonium par coulometrie a potentiel impose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguay, N.

    2011-07-01

    The LAMMAN (Nuclear Materials Metrology Laboratory) is the support laboratory of the CETAMA (Analytical Method Committee), whose two main activities are developing analytic methods, and making and characterizing reference materials. The LAMMAN chose to develop the controlled potential coulometry because it is a very accurate analytical technique which allows the connection between the quantity of element electrolysed to the quantity of electricity measured thanks to the Faraday's law: it does not require the use of a chemical standard. This method was first used for the plutonium titration and was developed in the Materials Analysis and Metrology Laboratory (LAMM), for upgrading its performances and developing it to the titration of other actinides. The equipment and the material used were developed to allow the work in confined atmosphere (in a glove box), with all the restrictions involved. Plutonium standard solutions are used to qualify the method, and in particular to do titrations with an uncertainty better than 0.1 %. The present study allowed making a bibliographic research about controlled potential coulometry applied to the actinides (plutonium, uranium, neptunium, americium and curium). A full procedure was written to set all the steps of plutonium titration, from the preparation of samples to equipments storage. A method validation was done to check the full procedure, and the experimental conditions: working range, uncertainty, performance... Coulometric titration of the plutonium from pure solution (without interfering elements) was developed to the coulometric titration of the plutonium in presence of uranium, which allows to do accurate analyses for the analyses of some parts of the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of developing this method to other actinides than plutonium was highlighted thanks to voltammetric studies, like the coulometric titration of uranium with a working carbon electrode in sulphuric medium. (author)

  19. Watershed-based point sources permitting strategy and dynamic permit-trading analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Shu-Kuang; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2007-09-01

    Permit-trading policy in a total maximum daily load (TMDL) program may provide an additional avenue to produce environmental benefit, which closely approximates what would be achieved through a command and control approach, with relatively lower costs. One of the important considerations that might affect the effective trading mechanism is to determine the dynamic transaction prices and trading ratios in response to seasonal changes of assimilative capacity in the river. Advanced studies associated with multi-temporal spatially varied trading ratios among point sources to manage water pollution hold considerable potential for industries and policy makers alike. This paper aims to present an integrated simulation and optimization analysis for generating spatially varied trading ratios and evaluating seasonal transaction prices accordingly. It is designed to configure a permit-trading structure basin-wide and provide decision makers with a wealth of cost-effective, technology-oriented, risk-informed, and community-based management strategies. The case study, seamlessly integrating a QUAL2E simulation model with an optimal waste load allocation (WLA) scheme in a designated TMDL study area, helps understand the complexity of varying environmental resources values over space and time. The pollutants of concern in this region, which are eligible for trading, mainly include both biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N). The problem solution, as a consequence, suggests an array of waste load reduction targets in a well-defined WLA scheme and exhibits a dynamic permit-trading framework among different sub-watersheds in the study area. Research findings gained in this paper may extend to any transferable dynamic-discharge permit (TDDP) program worldwide.

  20. Magnitude of Increased Infliximab Clearance Imposed by Anti-infliximab Antibodies in Crohn's Disease Is Determined by Their Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Helena; Steenholdt, Casper; Ainsworth, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    in IFX clearance imposed by anti-IFX Abs has generally been evaluated using a binary classification, i.e., positive or negative. This analysis aimed to investigate if anti-IFX Ab concentrations provide a more adequate prediction of alterations in clearance. Data originated from a clinical trial on Crohn......'s disease patients with IFX treatment failure. The trial was not originally designed for pharmacokinetic analysis. Therefore, published pharmacokinetic models were utilized as priors to enable covariate investigation. The impact of anti-IFX Abs on clearance was assessed using different mathematical...

  1. Educación, subjetividades y culturas juveniles: ¿una relación imposible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available ÉDUCATION, SUBJECTIVITE ET CULTURES JUVENILES, UNE RELATION IMPOSSIBLE? Le travail aborde la relation entre éducation, subjectivité et cultures juvéniles dans ses dimensions d'opposition et de conflit, en réaffirmant le caractère civilisateur et culturellement excluant du projet de l'éducation occidentale depuis ses origines. Dans un contexte actuel où les sujets et les sociétés traversent ce que Castoriadis appelle une “crise des processus d'identification”, le fait que l'éducation s'oriente vers les problèmes de subjectivités est essentiel. L'article propose une critique des conceptions dominantes de la jeunesse et de la faible importance donnée aux conditions socio-culturelles dans lesquelles se constituent les cultures et les identités propres aux jeunes. L'imaginaire social définit la jeunesse par un ensemble de caractéristiques qui s'opposent à celles de lâge adulte, incluant tant les notions d'immaturité, d'incomplet, de minorité et d'irresponsabilité que celles de beauté et de perfection. Dans l'environnement scolaire, et afin de se distancier des canons établis par l'institution, les jeunes construisent un rituel qui les fait passer pour des inadaptés. La violence dans les écoles devient le moyen extrême d'expression des conflits entre les jeunes, la subjectivité et l'éducation. Cette violence est plus forte que les dimensions symboliques propres aux expressions culturelles juvéniles des décennies antérieures et acquiert une réalité qui inclut la mort et un processus de déculturation plus que de construction culturelle parmi les jeunes. Enfin, l'article souligne des éléments propres à la crise de l'éducation comme faisant partie des crises institutionnelles, et incorpore certains défis de l'éducation face aux demandes des sujets et de la culture contemporaine. El trabajo aborda la relación entre educación, subjetividad y culturas juveniles en sus dimensiones de oposición y conflictividad

  2. Conference report : PERM-IT '97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, V.; Yeabsley, A.

    1997-01-01

    The PERM-IT conference (Physics Engineering Radiation Medicine with a special emphasis on Information Technology) which was held in Adelaide with an attendance of about 250, was the joint annual meeting of the Australasian Radiation Protection Society, the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine, the College of Biomedical Engineers of the Institution of Engineers Australia and the Society for Medical and Biological Engineering. The program was organised with three parallel sessions running most of the time, with plenary sessions for items of particular interest featuring keynote speakers from around the world. Attendance at this conference allowed the opportunity to meet with colleagues in other regulatory agencies, and Australia has a number of these. But what should be done about radioactive waste? A universal groan is raised by radiation protection regulatory authority staff at this question. Plans are afoot to develop a whole of Australia radioactive waste repository with both burial and above ground facilities. An announcement on the suitability of various sites in order of preference is expected, but in the meantime, facilities are fragemented. Discussions were held with staff from the radiation standards section of the Australian Radiation Laboratory who face similar problems to NRL including reducing funding, the move to cost recovery, and working towards quality managment accreditation. Plans for a further intercomparison between the Australian and NZ primary standards are being made. (author)

  3. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a mixed waste storage unit consisting of two underground railroad tunnels: Tunnel Number 1 designated 218-E-14 and Tunnel Number 2 designated 218-E-15. The two tunnels are connected by rail to the PUREX Plant and combine to provide storage space for 48 railroad cars (railcars). The PUREX Storage Tunnels provide a long-term storage location for equipment removed from the PUREX Plant. Transfers into the PUREX Storage Tunnels are made on an as-needed basis. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railcars and remotely transferred by rail into the PUREX Storage Tunnels. Railcars act as both a transport means and a storage platform for equipment placed into the tunnels. This report consists of part A and part B. Part A reports on amounts and locations of the mixed water. Part B permit application consists of the following: Facility Description and General Provisions; Waste Characteristics; Process Information; Groundwater Monitoring; Procedures to Prevent Hazards; Contingency Plan; Personnel Training; Exposure Information Report

  4. Moral concerns on tradable pollution permits in international environmental agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyckmans, Johan [Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel - HUB, Stormstraat 2, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studien Naamsestraat 69, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Kverndokk, Snorre [Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research, Gaustadalleen 21, 0349 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-07-15

    We investigate how moral concerns about permit trading affect an endogenous pollution permit trading equilibrium, where governments choose non-cooperatively the amount of permits they allocate to domestic industries. Politicians may feel reluctant to allow permit trading and/or may prefer that abatement is undertaken domestically because of moral concerns. This will have an effect on the initial permit allocations, and, therefore, on global emissions. The impact on global emissions depends on the precise formulation of the moral concerns, but under reasonable assumptions, we show that global emissions may increase. Thus, doing what is perceived as good does not always yield the desired outcome. However, this can be offset by restrictions on permit trading when governments have moral concerns about this trade. (author)

  5. Tradable CO2 permits in Danish and European energy policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varming, S.; Eriksen, P.B.; Grohnheit, Poul Erik

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of the project "Tradable CO2 permits in Danish and European energy policy". The project was financed by a grant from the Danish Energy Research Programme 1998 (Grant 1753/98-0002). The project was conducted in co-operationbetween Elsamprojekt A/S (project manager...... for a tradable CO_2 permit market for the energy sector in the EU. Experience from the tradable SO_2 permit market in the US is taken into consideration as well. Topresent an overview of price estimates of CO_2 and greenhouse gas permits in different models as well as discussing the assumptions leading...... to the different outcomes. Furthermore, the special role of backstop technologies in relation to permit prices isanalysed. To analyse the connection between CO_2 permit prices and technology choice in the energy sector in the medium and longer term (i.e., 2010 and 2020) with a special emphasis on combined heat...

  6. Marketable pollution permits with uncertainty and transaction costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    1998-01-01

    Increasing interest in the use of marketable permits for pollution control has become evident in recent years. Concern regarding their performance still remains because empirical evidence has shown transaction costs and uncertainty to be significant in past and existing marketable permits programs. In this paper we develop theoretical and numerical models that include transaction costs and uncertainty (in trade approval) to show their effects on market performance (i.e., equilibrium price of permits and trading volume) and aggregate control costs. We also show that in the presence of transaction costs and uncertainty the initial allocation of permits may not be neutral in terms of efficiency. Furthermore, using a numerical model for a hypothetical NO x trading program in which participants have discrete control technology choices, we find that aggregate control costs and the equilibrium price of permits are sensitive to the initial allocation of permits, even for constant marginal transaction costs and certainty

  7. Moral concerns on tradable pollution permits in international environmental agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyckmans, Johan; Kverndokk, Snorre

    2010-01-01

    We investigate how moral concerns about permit trading affect an endogenous pollution permit trading equilibrium, where governments choose non-cooperatively the amount of permits they allocate to domestic industries. Politicians may feel reluctant to allow permit trading and/or may prefer that abatement is undertaken domestically because of moral concerns. This will have an effect on the initial permit allocations, and, therefore, on global emissions. The impact on global emissions depends on the precise formulation of the moral concerns, but under reasonable assumptions, we show that global emissions may increase. Thus, doing what is perceived as good does not always yield the desired outcome. However, this can be offset by restrictions on permit trading when governments have moral concerns about this trade. (author)

  8. The Effect of Water Deficit Imposing Methods on Quantitative and Qualitative Traits of New Potato Cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh Parvizi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Water deficiency is the main factor that limits crop production in arid and semiarid regions. Due to limitation in water resources, low efficiency of water in surface irrigation method and irregular rainfall application of sprinkle and triple irrigation methods is inevitable in more regions of Iran. In this respect, it is crucial to employ methods that can improve water use efficiency and do not damage the sustainable production of potato in these regions. Introduction of some potato cultivars that have good capability of yield in deficit irrigation is anopportunity in this case. In previous study new released potato cultivar (Savalan and three other promising clones had more yield and growing potential compared with Agriacultivar. Therefore, it was necessary to evaluate new cultivar (Savalan and promising clones in water deficit irrigation. In this respect, as is expected, if cultivars or clones have more tolerance to water deficit they canbe suitable cultivar candidate and germplasms in water critical water conditions in many regions of Iran. Material and Methods This experiment has been conducted in Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center of Hamedanin split plot design based on Randomized Complete Block in three replications with two factors, including: 1. Water deficit irrigation treatment, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100% of regular potato irrigation requirement. 2. Three clones accompanied with Savalan and Sante Cultivars. Irrigation system was tape method. Irrigation treatments were established immediately after cultivation of tubers. Water requirement was calculated through corrected vapotranspiration (ETo determined by Penman-Monteith equation considering 90% water use efficiency. During the growing season, fewgrowing indices including, flowering longevity and harvesting time were recorded along with measurement of dry and fresh root weights. Total yield was measured by selecting randomly of 2 m2in every plot

  9. Issues in third party attacks on SMCRA permits. [USA - Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, G.D. Jr. (Ice Miller Donadio Ryan, Indianapolis, IN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Legal issues which have occurred in third party attacks on SMCRA (Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act) permit, mainly in Indiana, are discussed. Problems that can occur with the interrelationship of common law nuisance/injunction actions, the permit process, enforcement proceedings and collateral estoppel from administrative agency action, as well as finality issues in the permit process as related to other provisions of SMCRA. 37 refs.

  10. 10 CFR 725.23 - Terms and conditions of access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... warranty or other representation, expressed or implied, (1) with respect to the accuracy, completeness or... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms and conditions of access. 725.23 Section 725.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Permits § 725.23 Terms and conditions...

  11. 7 CFR 319.37-3 - Permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; (2) Articles subject to the postentry quarantine conditions of § 319.37-7; (3) Bulbs of Allium sativum (garlic), Crocosmia spp. (montebretia), Gladiolus spp. (gladiolus), and Watsonia spp. (bugle lily...

  12. Temporary Authorizations at Permitted Waste Management Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This rule under the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) provides EPA with the authority to grant a permittee temporary authorization, without prior public notice and comment, to conduct activities necessary to respond promptly to changing conditions.

  13. New Private Housing Building Permits in 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Variable was created as part of a set of indicators that demonstrate links between the condition of natural areas and human concerns and that quantify dependencies...

  14. Liquid effluent retention facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This appendix to the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application contains pumps, piping, leak detection systems, geomembranes, leachate collection systems, earthworks and floating cover systems

  15. Proposed Issuance of NPDES Permit for NTUA Kayenta WWTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Notice of proposed Issuance of National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit (NPDES No. NN0020281) for Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (“NTUA”) Kayenta Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  16. Tradeable emission permits in Dutch environmental policy. A utopia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuurman, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the lack of experience with permits in the Netherlands, and in view of the similarities between various other tradeable permit systems, the functioning of Dutch systems of tradeable fish, milk and manure quotas is discussed. Evaluation of these systems is based on criteria of effectiveness, target-group efficiency and government efficiency. These systems of tradeable permits appear to constitute a successful addition to the Dutch policy of direct regulation. Considering this, and the favorable American experience with the Emissions Trading Program, tradeable emission permits deserve a chance to be implemented in Dutch environmental policy. The question remains, however, whether the Dutch government is ready for such a step. 28 refs

  17. 75 FR 66123 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... enhancing their survival. Permit No. TE-24582A Applicant: Russell C. Croel, Folsom, California. The..., Contra Costa, Fresno, Glenn, Kings, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Shasta, Solano, Stanislaus...

  18. 78 FR 9067 - Receipt of Applications for Endangered Species Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... County, Alabama. Permit Application Number: TE-91366A Applicant: Dr. Paul Stewart, Troy, Alabama...: TE-91373A Applicant: Jonathan Miller, Troy, Alabama. Applicant requests authorization to take...

  19. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program: environmental permit compliance plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodamer, Jr., James W.; Bocchino, Robert M.

    1979-11-01

    This Environmental Permit Compliance Plan is intended to assist the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division in acquiring the necessary environmental permits for their proposed Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant in a time frame consistent with the construction schedule. Permits included are those required for installation and/or operation of gaseous, liquid and solid waste sources and disposal areas. Only those permits presently established by final regulations are described. The compliance plan describes procedures for obtaining each permit from identified federal, state and local agencies. The information needed for the permit application is presented, and the stepwise procedure to follow when filing the permit application is described. Information given in this plan was obtained by reviewing applicable laws and regulations and from telephone conversations with agency personnel on the federal, state and local levels. This Plan also presents a recommended schedule for beginning the work necessary to obtain the required environmental permits in order to begin dredging operations in October, 1980 and construction of the plant in September, 1981. Activity for several key permits should begin as soon as possible.

  20. Guide to Permitting Hydrogen Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, Carl [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-28

    The purpose of this guide is to assist project developers, permitting officials, code enforcement officials, and other parties involved in developing permit applications and approving the implementation of hydrogen motor fuel dispensing facilities. The guide facilitates the identification of the elements to be addressed in the permitting of a project as it progresses through the approval process; the specific requirements associated with those elements; and the applicable (or potentially applicable) codes and standards by which to determine whether the specific requirements have been met. The guide attempts to identify all applicable codes and standards relevant to the permitting requirements.

  1. Plasma response to sustainment with imposed-dynamo current drive in HIT-SI and HIT-SI3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, A. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Chandra, R. N.; Morgan, K. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Penna, J. M.; Everson, C. J.; Nelson, B. A.

    2017-07-01

    The helicity injected torus—steady inductive (HIT-SI) program studies efficient, steady-state current drive for magnetic confinement plasmas using a novel experimental method. Stable, high-beta spheromaks have been sustained using steady, inductive current drive. Externally induced loop voltage and magnetic flux are oscillated together so that helicity and power injection are always positive, sustaining the edge plasma current indefinitely. Imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) theory further shows that the entire plasma current is sustained. The method is ideal for low aspect ratio, toroidal geometries with closed flux surfaces. Experimental studies of spheromak plasmas sustained with IDCD have shown stable magnetic profiles with evidence of pressure confinement. New measurements show coherent motion of a stable spheromak in response to the imposed perturbations. On the original device two helicity injectors were mounted on either side of the spheromak and the injected mode spectrum was predominantly n  =  1. Coherent, rigid motion indicates that the spheromak is stable and a lack of plasma-generated n  =  1 energy indicates that the maximum q is maintained below 1 during sustainment. Results from the HIT-SI3 device are also presented. Three inductive helicity injectors are mounted on one side of the spheromak flux conserver. Varying the relative injector phasing changes the injected mode spectrum which includes n  =  2, 3, and higher modes.

  2. 50 CFR 22.23 - What are the requirements for permits to take depredating eagles and eagles that pose a risk to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the following conditions: (1) Bald or golden eagles may be taken under permit by firearms, traps, or other suitable means except by poison or from aircraft; (2) The taking of eagles under permit may be... take bald or golden eagles unless the Director has determined that such taking is compatible with the...

  3. Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication, Environmental Protection Agency Number ID4890008952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzemer, Michael J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hart, Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication for the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Partial Permit, PER-116. This Permit Reapplication is required by the PER-116 Permit Conditions I.G. and I.H., and must be submitted to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with IDAPA 58.01.05.012 [40 CFR §§ 270.10 and 270.13 through 270.29].

  4. Hazardous waste incinerator permitting in Texas from inception to operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, M.D.; McDonnell, R.G. III

    1991-01-01

    The regulatory permitting process for hazardous waste incinerators i a long and arduous proposition requiring a well-developed overall strategy. In Texas, RCRA permits for the operation of hazardous waste incinerator facilities are issued through the federally delegated Texas Water Commission (TWC). While the TWC has primacy in the issuance of RCRA permits for hazardous waste incinerators, the Texas Air Control Board (TACB) provides a significant portion of the Part B application review and provides much of the permit language. In addition to dealing with regulatory agencies, RCRA permitting provides by significant public involvement. Often the lack of public support becomes a major roadblock for an incinerator project. In order to establish an effective strategy which addresses the concerns of regulatory agencies and the public, it is important to have an understanding of the steps involved in obtaining a permit. A permit applicant seeking to construct a new hazardous waste incinerator can expect to go through a preapplication meeting with government regulators, a site selection process, file an application, respond to calls for additional technical information from both the TACB and the TWC, defend the application in a hearing, have a recommendation from a TWC hearing examiner and, finally, receive a determination from the TWC's Commissioners. Presuming a favorable response from the Commission, the permittee will be granted a trial burn permit and may proceed with the construction, certification and execution of a trial burn at the facility. Subsequent to publication of the trial burn results and approval by the TWC, the permittee will possess an operational hazardous waste incinerator permit. The paper describes the major steps required to receive an operational permit for a hazardous waste incinerator in the State of Texas. Important issues involved in each step will be discussed including insights gained from recent incinerator permitting efforts

  5. Cooperative Emissions Trading Game: International Permit Market Dominated by Buyers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Keita

    2015-01-01

    Rapid reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is required to mitigate disastrous impacts of climate change. The Kyoto Protocol introduced international emissions trading (IET) to accelerate the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The IET controls CO2 emissions through the allocation of marketable emission permits to sovereign countries. The costs for acquiring additional permits provide buyers with an incentive to reduce their CO2 emissions. However, permit price has declined to a low level during the first commitment period (CP1). The downward trend in permit price is attributed to deficiencies of the Kyoto Protocol: weak compliance enforcement, the generous allocation of permits to transition economies (hot air), and the withdrawal of the US. These deficiencies created a buyer's market dominated by price-making buyers. In this paper, I develop a coalitional game of the IET, and demonstrate that permit buyers have dominant bargaining power. In my model, called cooperative emissions trading (CET) game, a buyer purchases permits from sellers only if the buyer forms a coalition with the sellers. Permit price is determined by bargaining among the coalition members. I evaluated the demand-side and supply-side bargaining power (DBP and SBP) using Shapley value, and obtained the following results: (1) Permit price is given by the product of the buyer's willingness-to-pay and the SBP (= 1 - DBP). (2) The DBP is greater than or equal to the SBP. These results indicate that buyers can suppress permit price to low levels through bargaining. The deficiencies of the Kyoto Protocol enhance the DBP, and contribute to the demand-side dominance in the international permit market.

  6. Developing the laminar MHD forced convection flow of water/FMWNT carbon nanotubes in a microchannel imposed the uniform heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimipour, Arash; Taghipour, Abdolmajid [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malvandi, Amir, E-mail: amirmalvandi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Neyshabur Branch, Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to investigate magnetic field and slip effects on developing laminar forced convection of nanofluids in the microchannels. A novel mixture of water and FMWNT carbon nanotubes is used as the working fluid. To do this, fluid flow and heat transfer through a microchannel is simulated by a computer code in FORTRAN language. The mixture of FMWNT carbon nanotubes suspended in water is considered as the nanofluid. Slip velocity is supposed as the hydrodynamic boundary condition while the microchannel's lower wall is insulated and the top wall is under the effect of a constant heat flux. Moreover, the flow field is subjected to a magnetic field with a constant strength. The results are presented as the velocity, temperature and Nusselt number profiles. It is observed that nanofluid composed of water and carbon nanotubes (FMWNT) can work well to increase the heat transfer rate along the microchannel walls. Furthermore, it is indicated that imposing the magnetic field is very effective at the thermally developing region. In contrast, the magnetic field effect at fully developed region is insignificant, especially at low values of Reynolds number. - Highlights: • Simulation of water/FMWNT carbon nanotubes flow in a microchannel. • The effects of magnetic field strength on nanofluid's slip velocity. • The effects of Ha, Re, ϕ and slip coefficient on averaged Nusselt number. • Magnetic field effect at developing flow region is significant.

  7. Waste Feed Delivery Environmental Permits and Approvals Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOLLEFSON, K.S.

    2000-01-18

    This plan describes the environmental permits approvals, and other requirements that may affect establishment of a waste feed delivery system for the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This plan identifies and screens environmental standards for potential applicability, outlines alternatives for satisfying applicable standards, and describes preferred permitting and approval approaches.

  8. Quantifying the CO{sub 2} permit price sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruell, Georg; Kiesel, Ruediger [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Inst. of Energy Trading and Financial Services

    2012-06-15

    Equilibrium models have been widely used in the literature with the aim of showing theoretical properties of emissions trading schemes. This paper applies equilibrium models to empirically study permit prices and to quantify the permit price sensitivity. In particular, we demonstrate that emission trading schemes both with and without banking are inherently prone to price jumps. (orig.)

  9. 36 CFR 228.54 - Single entry sales or permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Single entry sales or permits... MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials General Provisions § 228.54 Single entry sales or permits. The... plan which describes operating procedures and reclamation measures, unless the requirement is waived by...

  10. Waste Feed Delivery Environmental Permits and Approvals Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOLLEFSON, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    This plan describes the environmental permits approvals, and other requirements that may affect establishment of a waste feed delivery system for the Hanford Site's River Protection Project. This plan identifies and screens environmental standards for potential applicability, outlines alternatives for satisfying applicable standards, and describes preferred permitting and approval approaches

  11. 46 CFR 78.40-10 - No smoking permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... § 78.40-10 No smoking permitted. (a) The master shall have appropriate “No Smoking” signs posted and shall take all necessary precautions to prevent smoking or carrying of lighted or smoldering cigars... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false No smoking permitted. 78.40-10 Section 78.40-10 Shipping...

  12. 77 FR 74507 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... not operate to the disadvantage of the endangered species, and (3) the granted permit would be.... Zoological Park. 2012. 82880A Big Game Studio 77 FR 54604; September 5, October 17, 2012. 2012. 83520A Donald...; fax (703) 358-2280. Brenda Tapia, Program Analyst/Data Administrator, Branch of Permits, Division of...

  13. 76 FR 39368 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... promulgating migratory bird permit regulations for a permit to use raptors (birds of prey) in abatement activities. Abatement means the use of trained raptors to flush, scare (haze), or take birds or other...). Background In response to public interest in the use of trained raptors to haze (scare) depredating and other...

  14. Wilderness Management... A Computerized System for Summarizing Permit Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary H. Elsner

    1972-01-01

    Permits were first needed for visits to wilderness areas in California during summer 1971. A computerized system for analyzing these permits and summarizing information from them has been developed. It produces four types of summary tables: point-of-origin of visitors; daily variation in total number of persons present; variations in group size; and variations in...

  15. 19 CFR 12.99 - Procedures for permitted entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for permitted entry. 12.99 Section 12.99 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Switchblade Knives § 12.99 Procedures for permitted entry...

  16. 76 FR 74070 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Dated: November 21, 2011. Lynn M. Lewis...-FF03E00000] Endangered and Threatened Species; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... permits to conduct certain activities with endangered species under the authority of the Endangered...

  17. 78 FR 9415 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ...). Authority: The authority for this notice is the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531...-FF03E00000] Endangered and Threatened Species; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... permits to conduct certain activities with endangered species under the authority of the Endangered...

  18. 78 FR 57410 - Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... permits to conduct certain activities with endangered species under the authority of the Endangered Species Act, as amended (Act). ADDRESSES: Endangered Species Program Manager, Ecological Services, U.S...-FF01E00000] Endangered Species; Issuance of Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION...

  19. 75 FR 45650 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2010-N149; 60120-1113-0000-D2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of applications for permits. SUMMARY: We announce our receipt of an application to...

  20. 76 FR 8374 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2011-N021; 60120-1113-0000-D2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of applications for permits. SUMMARY: We announce our receipt of applications to...

  1. 75 FR 28278 - Endangered Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R1-ES-2010-N092; 10120-1113-0000-F5] Endangered Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of permit applications; request for comments. SUMMARY: In accordance with the requirements of the...

  2. 76 FR 33334 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2011-N112; 60120-1113-0000-D2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of applications for permits. SUMMARY: We announce our receipt of applications to...

  3. 75 FR 52012 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2010-N181; 60120-1113-0000-D2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of applications for permits. SUMMARY: We announce our receipt of applications to...

  4. 75 FR 5101 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2010-N010; 60120-1113-0000-D2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of applications for permits. SUMMARY: We announce our receipt of applications to...

  5. 76 FR 18576 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2011-N056; 60120-1113-0000-D2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of applications for permits. SUMMARY: We announce our receipt of applications to...

  6. 76 FR 10063 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2011-N026; 60120-1113-0000-D2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of applications for permits. SUMMARY: We announce our receipt of applications to...

  7. 75 FR 27361 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R6-ES-2010-N095; 60120-1113-0000-D2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of applications for permits. SUMMARY: We announce our receipt of applications to...

  8. 75 FR 20621 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R3-ES-2009-N0054]; [30120-1113-0000-F6] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of permit applications; request for comments. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and...

  9. 43 CFR 13.4 - Terms of permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... § 13.4 Terms of permit. Every permit shall describe the location of the vending facilities and shall be... Interior bureau or office for each location. The head of the Interior bureau or office may require... efficiency as may be prescribed by the head of the Interior bureau or office. Such standards shall conform...

  10. 50 CFR 300.182 - HMS international trade permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false HMS international trade permit. 300.182... FISHERIES REGULATIONS International Trade Documentation and Tracking Programs for Highly Migratory Species § 300.182 HMS international trade permit. (a) General. An importer, entering for consumption fish or...

  11. Permits for coal-fired power plants under scrutiny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, B.

    2011-01-01

    The attorney-general of the European Court of Justice offered advice to the European Judge on the prejudicial questions of the Department of Administrative Law of the Council of State in the framework of appeal cases against environmental permits of three planned power plants in the Netherlands. The advice may have large consequences for these permits. [nl

  12. 77 FR 49483 - Actions on Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... modify the special permit Town, South Africa. 178.277(b)(1). to increase the water capacity from 17000... prevent leakage during transportation. (mode 1). 15667-N Volga Dnepr--UNIQUE AIR 49 CFR 172.101 Column To...). NEW SPECIAL PERMIT WITHDRAWN 15494-N Johnson Controls Battery 49 CFR 173.159 To authorize the Group...

  13. 76 FR 6490 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... permit to take (trap, seine, capture, handle, fin clip, release, collect, transport, and captive breed... requests a permit to take (capture, handle, collect, transport, and kill) the Lost River sucker (Deltistes... Service, invite the public to comment on the following applications to conduct certain activities with...

  14. 48 CFR 52.247-2 - Permits, Authorities, or Franchises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Franchises. 52.247-2 Section 52.247-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....247-2 Permits, Authorities, or Franchises. As prescribed in 47.207-1(a), insert the following clause: Permits, Authorities, or Franchises (JAN 1997) (a) The offeror does □, does not □, hold authorization from...

  15. 75 FR 4136 - Pipeline Safety: Request To Modify Special Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2009-0377] Pipeline Safety: Request To Modify Special Permit AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous... coating on its gas pipeline. DATES: Submit any comments regarding this special permit modification request...

  16. 76 FR 11853 - Pipeline Safety: Request for Special Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA-2011-0027] Pipeline Safety: Request for Special Permit AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... a 24-inch mainline natural gas pipeline, 595 feet in length. The first segment of the special permit...

  17. 29 CFR 1910.146 - Permit-required confined spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... any failure of hazard control or monitoring equipment) or event internal or external to the permit... could be trapped or asphyxiated by inwardly converging walls or by a floor which slopes downward and... complying with the permit space requirements that apply to all employers, each contractor who is retained to...

  18. 75 FR 52965 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... appointment only, during normal business hours at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 500 Gold Ave., SW., Room... permit for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys for American burying beetle...., Round Rock, Texas. Applicant requests an amendment to a current permit for research and recovery...

  19. 50 CFR 21.27 - Special purpose permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... certification required by part 13 and makes a sufficient showing of benefit to the migratory bird resource..., salvage, otherwise acquire, transport, or possess migratory birds, their parts, nests, or eggs for any... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Specific Permit Provisions § 21.27 Special purpose...

  20. 9 CFR 73.10 - Permitted dips; substances allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permitted dips; substances allowed. 73.10 Section 73.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... flowers of sulphur or sulphur flour to 100 gallons of water; or a specifically permitted proprietary brand...

  1. 77 FR 54604 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... applicant requests a permit to export sport hunted trophies of one male addax (Addax nasomaculatus), one.... Applicant: John Fry, Carson City, NV; PRT-82592A The applicant requests a permit to import a sport-hunted...

  2. 78 FR 76171 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and...: Geoffrey Ridder; Utopia, TX; PRT-00030B The applicant requests a permit to export the sport-hunted trophy... period. Multiple Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted...

  3. 40 CFR 68.85 - Hot work permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Program 3 Prevention Program § 68.85 Hot work permit. (a) The owner or operator shall issue a hot work permit for hot work operations conducted on or near a covered process. (b...

  4. 40 CFR 123.25 - Requirements for permitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MS4, may I share the responsibility to implement the minimum control measures with other entities... held prior to issuing any permit while reducing the amount of advance notice of such a hearing. State... individual, including the Director, who has or shares authority to approve all or portions of permits either...

  5. 29 CFR 2.12 - Audiovisual coverage permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audiovisual coverage permitted. 2.12 Section 2.12 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GENERAL REGULATIONS Audiovisual Coverage of Administrative Hearings § 2.12 Audiovisual coverage permitted. The following are the types of hearings where the Department...

  6. 76 FR 63322 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... from Helianthus paradoxus (Pecos sunflower) from plants in Texas. Permit TE-829761 Applicant: Bureau of... for endangered plant species, and 50 CFR 17.72 for threatened plant species. Applications Available...: Texas A & M University, Galveston, Texas. Applicant requests a new permit for husbandry and holding of...

  7. 75 FR 67765 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... collect leaf tissue and seeds from the following endangered plants: South Texas ambrosia (Ambrosia... transportation, at the Miller Park Zoo. Permit TE-24625A Applicant: Wendy Leonard, San Antonio, Texas. Applicant...-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) and black-capped vireo (Vireo atricapilla) within Texas. Permit TE...

  8. 78 FR 14110 - Emergency Issuance of Endangered Species Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... issued an endangered species permit to address emergency veterinary care for an injured green sea turtle...] Emergency Issuance of Endangered Species Permit AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... endangered and threatened species under section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended...

  9. 21 CFR 1312.13 - Issuance of import permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... drug listed in Schedule III, IV, or V if he finds: (1) That the substance is crude opium, poppy straw... shall render it void and of no effect. Permits are not transferable. Each copy of the permit shall have... the Act (21 U.S.C. 952(a)(1) or (a)(2)(A)), the importation of approved narcotic raw material (opium...

  10. 23 CFR 650.807 - Bridges requiring a USCG permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... engineering, social, economic and environmental benefit and impacts. (e) The HA shall consider hydraulic... permit. (a) The USCG has the responsibility (1) to determine whether a USCG permit is required for the... the USCG to be involved throughout the environmental review process in accordance with 23 CFR part 771...

  11. 78 FR 12776 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... and recovery purposes to conduct pollination on 36 individual adult Arizona hedgehog cactus.... Permit TE-43777A Applicant: Sea Life US, LLC, Grapevine, Texas. Applicant requests an amendment to a... Aquarium, Grapevine, Texas. Permit TE-92366A Applicant: Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc., Dallas, Texas...

  12. 75 FR 53708 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ...] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also requires that we...

  13. 78 FR 57650 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ...-FF08E00000] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also...

  14. 77 FR 12611 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ...-FF08E00000] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also...

  15. 75 FR 69699 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ...] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also requires that we...

  16. 75 FR 79387 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ...] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also requires that we...

  17. 76 FR 14424 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ...] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also requires that we...

  18. 77 FR 5045 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ...-FF08E00000] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... certain activities with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity...

  19. 78 FR 16703 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ...-FF08E00000] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also...

  20. 76 FR 70160 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ...] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also requires that we...

  1. 78 FR 55287 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ...-FF08E00000] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... with endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also...

  2. 76 FR 20004 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ...] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also requires that we...

  3. 75 FR 20857 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ...] Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... endangered species. With some exceptions, the Endangered Species Act (Act) prohibits activities with endangered and threatened species unless a Federal permit allows such activity. The Act also requires that we...

  4. 33 CFR 325.1 - Applications for permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process. Whenever the district engineer becomes aware of planning for work which may require a DA permit... in the basic timing sequence used by the Corps of Engineers in processing applications for DA permits.... Upon receipt of such request, the district engineer will assure the conduct of an orderly process which...

  5. 40 CFR 76.9 - Permit application and compliance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit application and compliance plans. 76.9 Section 76.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.9 Permit application and...

  6. 40 CFR 97.223 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 97.223 Section 97.223 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... facilitate coordination of the renewal of the CAIR permit with issuance, revision, or renewal of the CAIR SO2...

  7. 40 CFR 96.223 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 96.223 Section 96.223 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... necessary to facilitate coordination of the renewal of the CAIR permit with issuance, revision, or renewal...

  8. 40 CFR 96.123 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 96.123 Section 96.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... necessary to facilitate coordination of the renewal of the CAIR permit with issuance, revision, or renewal...

  9. 40 CFR 97.123 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 97.123 Section 97.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... facilitate coordination of the renewal of the CAIR permit with issuance, revision, or renewal of the CAIR NOX...

  10. 40 CFR 97.323 - CAIR permit contents and term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CAIR permit contents and term. 97.323 Section 97.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... authority, as necessary to facilitate coordination of the renewal of the CAIR permit with issuance, revision...

  11. 27 CFR 555.45 - Original license or permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Original license or permit. 555.45 Section 555.45 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... Original license or permit. (a) Licenses issued prior to May 24, 2003. Any person who intends to engage in...

  12. 25 CFR 166.223 - Can I use a permit as collateral for a loan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can I use a permit as collateral for a loan? 166.223... PERMITS Permit Requirements Permit (leasehold) Mortgage § 166.223 Can I use a permit as collateral for a loan? We may approve a permit containing a provision that authorizes the permittee to encumber the...

  13. 76 FR 65976 - Controlled Import Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ..., regulated articles may be imported under conditions ``modified to be less stringent'' than those contained... under 7 CFR part 330, genetically engineered plant material regulated under 7 CFR part 340, noxious... plants, noxious weed seeds, soil, living organisms such as parasitic plants, pathogens, insects, snails...

  14. 40 CFR 51.165 - Permit requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; and (2) Shall include emissions associated with startups, shutdowns, and malfunctions; and, for an... data acquisition and availability requirements of this section, to sample, condition (if applicable... the equipment necessary to meet the data acquisition and availability requirements of this section, to...

  15. Self-Imposed Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrington, Mary Lynne; Sharratt, Gene C.

    2009-01-01

    Anne is a natural-born leader. Told as a child she could do anything she set her mind to, she fulfilled that prophesy growing up, including being elected student body president of her high school. As an adult, she enjoyed a happy home life and professional success in education, assuming several leadership positions in her 2,600-student school…

  16. Air quality permits in Texas and New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusselman, D.K.; Hofmann, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Permitting gas processing equipment ranges from fairly simple procedures under the Texas Air Control Board (TACB) Standard Exemption List and the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Division (NMEID) Registration Regulations to an extremely complicated procedure requiring a federal Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and/or non-attainment review. The following topics relating to obtaining air permits for gas plants will be addressed in this paper: Type of permit/exemption necessary for construction, Specific permit/exemption requirements, New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Subparts KKK, LLL, GG, K, Ka and Kb, Potential effects of the Federal Clean Air Act Amendments (FCAA). This paper only addresses specific permitting concerns and requirements that apply to the natural gas production industry. The same requirements apply to other industries, with possible additional requirements of National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), NSPS other than Subparts KKK, LLL, GG, K, Ka and Kb, and non-attainment review for pollutants other than ozone

  17. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  18. Imposing motion constraints to a force reflecting tele-robot through real-time simulation of a virtual mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joly, L.; Andriot, C.

    1995-01-01

    In a tele-operation system, assistance can be given to the operator by constraining the tele-robot position to remain within a restricted subspace of its workspace. A new approach to motion constraint is presented in this paper. The control law is established simulating a virtual ideal mechanism acting as a jig, and connected to the master and slave arms via springs and dampers. Using this approach, it is possible to impose any (sufficiently smooth) motion constraint to the system, including non linear constraints (complex surfaces) involving coupling between translations and rotations and physical equivalence ensures that the controller is passive. Experimental results obtained with a 6-DOF tele-operation system are given. Other applications of the virtual mechanism concept include hybrid position-force control and haptic interfaces. (authors). 11 refs., 7 figs

  19. Imposing motion constraints to a force reflecting tele-robot through real-time simulation of a virtual mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, L.; Andriot, C.

    1995-12-31

    In a tele-operation system, assistance can be given to the operator by constraining the tele-robot position to remain within a restricted subspace of its workspace. A new approach to motion constraint is presented in this paper. The control law is established simulating a virtual ideal mechanism acting as a jig, and connected to the master and slave arms via springs and dampers. Using this approach, it is possible to impose any (sufficiently smooth) motion constraint to the system, including non linear constraints (complex surfaces) involving coupling between translations and rotations and physical equivalence ensures that the controller is passive. Experimental results obtained with a 6-DOF tele-operation system are given. Other applications of the virtual mechanism concept include hybrid position-force control and haptic interfaces. (authors). 11 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Evaluation of cognitive loads imposed by traditional paper-based and innovative computer-based instructional strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Mansour, Mahmoud M; Wilhite, Dewey R

    2010-01-01

    Strategies of presenting instructional information affect the type of cognitive load imposed on the learner's working memory. Effective instruction reduces extraneous (ineffective) cognitive load and promotes germane (effective) cognitive load. Eighty first-year students from two veterinary schools completed a two-section questionnaire that evaluated their perspectives on the educational value of a computer-based instructional program. They compared the difference between cognitive loads imposed by paper-based and computer-based instructional strategies used to teach the anatomy of the canine skeleton. Section I included 17 closed-ended items, rated on a five-point Likert scale, that assessed the use of graphics, content, and the learning process. Section II included a nine-point mental effort rating scale to measure the level of difficulty of instruction; students were asked to indicate the amount of mental effort invested in the learning task using both paper-based and computer-based presentation formats. The closed-ended data were expressed as means and standard deviations. A paired t test with an alpha level of 0.05 was used to determine the overall mean difference between the two presentation formats. Students positively evaluated their experience with the computer-based instructional program with a mean score of 4.69 (SD=0.53) for use of graphics, 4.70 (SD=0.56) for instructional content, and 4.45 (SD=0.67) for the learning process. The mean difference of mental effort (1.50) between the two presentation formats was significant, t=8.26, p≤.0001, df=76, for two-tailed distribution. Consistent with cognitive load theory, innovative computer-based instructional strategies decrease extraneous cognitive load compared with traditional paper-based instructional strategies.

  1. Imposed Work of Breathing for Flow Meters with In-Line versus Flow-Through Technique during Simulated Neonatal Breathing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snorri Donaldsson

    Full Text Available The ability to determine airflow during nasal CPAP (NCPAP treatment without adding dead space or resistance would be useful when investigating the physiologic effects of different NCPAP systems on breathing. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on pressure stability of different flow measuring devices at the in-line and flow-through position, using simulated neonatal breathing.Six different flow measure devices were evaluated by recording pressure changes and imposed work of breathing for breaths with 16 and 32 ml tidal volumes. The tests were performed initially with the devices in an in line position and with 5 and 10 L/min using flow through technique, without CPAP. The flow meters were then subsequently tested with an Infant Flow CPAP system at 3, 5 and 8 cm H2O pressure using flow through technique. The quality of the recorded signals was compared graphically.The resistance of the measuring devices generated pressure swings and imposed work of breathing. With bias flow, the resistance also generated CPAP pressure. Three of the devices had low resistance and generated no changes in pressure stability or CPAP pressure. The two devices intended for neonatal use had the highest measured resistance.The importance of pressure stability and increased work of breathing during non-invasive respiratory support are insufficiently studied. Clinical trials using flow-through technique have not focused on pressure stability. Our results indicate that a flow-through technique might be a way forward in obtaining a sufficiently high signal quality without the added effects of rebreathing and increased work of breathing. The results should stimulate further research and the development of equipment for dynamic flow measurements in neonates.

  2. Imposed Work of Breathing for Flow Meters with In-Line versus Flow-Through Technique during Simulated Neonatal Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldsson, Snorri; Falk, Markus; Jonsson, Baldvin; Drevhammar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The ability to determine airflow during nasal CPAP (NCPAP) treatment without adding dead space or resistance would be useful when investigating the physiologic effects of different NCPAP systems on breathing. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on pressure stability of different flow measuring devices at the in-line and flow-through position, using simulated neonatal breathing. Six different flow measure devices were evaluated by recording pressure changes and imposed work of breathing for breaths with 16 and 32 ml tidal volumes. The tests were performed initially with the devices in an in line position and with 5 and 10 L/min using flow through technique, without CPAP. The flow meters were then subsequently tested with an Infant Flow CPAP system at 3, 5 and 8 cm H2O pressure using flow through technique. The quality of the recorded signals was compared graphically. The resistance of the measuring devices generated pressure swings and imposed work of breathing. With bias flow, the resistance also generated CPAP pressure. Three of the devices had low resistance and generated no changes in pressure stability or CPAP pressure. The two devices intended for neonatal use had the highest measured resistance. The importance of pressure stability and increased work of breathing during non-invasive respiratory support are insufficiently studied. Clinical trials using flow-through technique have not focused on pressure stability. Our results indicate that a flow-through technique might be a way forward in obtaining a sufficiently high signal quality without the added effects of rebreathing and increased work of breathing. The results should stimulate further research and the development of equipment for dynamic flow measurements in neonates.

  3. 78 FR 6817 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Wisconsin Public Service Corporation--JP Pulliam Plant. Pursuant to section 505(b)(2) of the Act, a... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL 9774-6] Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for Wisconsin Public Service Corporation--JP Pulliam Plant AGENCY...

  4. 75 FR 22400 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition To Object to Title V Permit for Wheelabrator...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... ENVIROMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9142-6] Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition To Object to Title V Permit for Wheelabrator Baltimore, L.P., Baltimore City, MD AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of final action. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 505(b)(2) of the Clean...

  5. 76 FR 53452 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Response to Petition To Reopen the 2001 Title V Permit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... ENVIROMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9457-3 ] Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Response to Petition To Reopen the 2001 Title V Permit for Reliant Portland Generating Station, Upper Mount Bethel Township, Northampton County, PA AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of action...

  6. 75 FR 75463 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition To Object to Title V Permit for Luke Paper...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... ENVIROMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9234-9] Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition To Object to Title V Permit for Luke Paper Company, Luke, MD AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of final action. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 505(b)(2) of the Clean Air Act (CAA), the...

  7. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) section 270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below

  8. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  9. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    For purposes of the Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, the US Department of Energy's contractors are identified as ''co-operators'' and sign in that capacity (refer to Condition I.A.2. of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit). Any identification of these contractors as an ''operator'' elsewhere in the application is not meant to conflict with the contractors' designation as co-operators but rather is based on the contractors' contractual status with the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. The Dangerous Waste Portion of the initial Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit, which incorporated five treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, was based on information submitted in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application and in closure plan and closure/postclosure plan documentation. During 1995, the Dangerous Waste Portion was modified twice to incorporate another eight treatment, storage, and/or disposal units; during 1996, the Dangerous Waste Portion was modified once to incorporate another five treatment, storage, and/or disposal units. The permit modification process will be used at least annually to incorporate additional treatment, storage, and/or disposal units as permitting documentation for these units is finalized. The units to be included in annual modifications are specified in a schedule contained in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit. Treatment, storage, and/or disposal units will remain in interim status until incorporated into the Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (this document, DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to individual operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units for which

  10. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1997-08-21

    For purposes of the Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, the US Department of Energy`s contractors are identified as ``co-operators`` and sign in that capacity (refer to Condition I.A.2. of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit). Any identification of these contractors as an ``operator`` elsewhere in the application is not meant to conflict with the contractors` designation as co-operators but rather is based on the contractors` contractual status with the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. The Dangerous Waste Portion of the initial Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit, which incorporated five treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, was based on information submitted in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application and in closure plan and closure/postclosure plan documentation. During 1995, the Dangerous Waste Portion was modified twice to incorporate another eight treatment, storage, and/or disposal units; during 1996, the Dangerous Waste Portion was modified once to incorporate another five treatment, storage, and/or disposal units. The permit modification process will be used at least annually to incorporate additional treatment, storage, and/or disposal units as permitting documentation for these units is finalized. The units to be included in annual modifications are specified in a schedule contained in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit. Treatment, storage, and/or disposal units will remain in interim status until incorporated into the Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (this document, DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to individual operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units for which

  11. Guidance for writing permits for the use or disposal of sewage sludge. Draft report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) directs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop regulations containing guidelines for the use and disposal of sewage sludge. On February 19th, 1993, EPA published final regulations at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 as the culmination of a major effort to develop technical standards in response to Section 405(d). These regulations govern three sewage sludge use and disposal practices: land application, surface disposal, and incineration. A key element in EPA's implementation of the Part 503 regulations is educating Agency and State personnel about these new requirements. Although the regulations are generally directly enforceable against all persons involved in the use and disposal of sewage sludge, they will also be implemented through permits issued to treatment works treating domestic sewage as defined in 40 CFR 122.22. Thus, the primary focus of the manual is to assist permit writers in incorporating the Part 503 requirements into permits; it serves as an update to the Guidance for Writing Case-by-Case Permit Conditions for Municipal Sewage Sludge (PB91-145508/HDM).

  12. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 222-S Laboratory Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLIAMS, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the 222-S Laboratory Complex (this document, DOE/RL-91-27). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the 222-S Laboratory Complex permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this 222-S Laboratory Complex permit application documentation is current as of August 2000

  13. Project W-314 phase I environmental permits and approvals plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOLLEFSON, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the range of environmental actions, including required permits and other agency approvals, for Project W-314 activities in the Hanford Site's Tank Waste Remediation System. This document outlines alternative approaches to satisfying applicable environmental standards, and describes selected strategies for acquiring permits and other approvals needed for waste feed delivery to proceed. This document also includes estimated costs and schedule to obtain the required permits and approvals based on the selected strategy. It also provides estimated costs for environmental support during design and construction based on the preliminary project schedule provided

  14. Permitting plan for project W-236B, initial pretreatment module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System pretreatment process mission is to separate high-level and low-level waste fractions. A comprehensive review of environmental regulations has indicated that several environmental reviews, permits, and approvals are required before construction and operation of the facility. This revised document provides a summary of permit application data requirements, alternative strategies for permit completion and approval, as well as the probability of success for each alternative for the Initial Pretreatment Module resulting from recent revisions to the Tri-Party Agreement

  15. Political and Economic Scope for Permit Markets in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    (organized polluters) due to the possibility of a free, initial distribution (grand-fathering). As such, a mix of green taxes (in relation to non-organized interests) and grandfathered permit markets (in relation to organized interests) should be considered in the search for cost-effective and politically...... of permit markets in the US. Therefore, the policy recommendation for e.g. CO2 reduction in Europe is to apply taxation in relation to large and non-organized groups only, such as households and the transportation sector. A permit market, on the other hand, is politically more attrac-tive to the industry...

  16. Pricing emission permits in the absence of abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintermann, Beat

    2012-01-01

    If emissions are stochastic and firms are unable to control them through abatement, the cap in a permit market may be exceeded, or not be reached. I derive a binary options pricing formula that expresses the permit price as a function of the penalty for noncompliance and the probability of an exceeded cap under the assumption of no abatement. I apply my model to the EU ETS, where the rapid introduction of the market made it difficult for firms to adjust their production technology in time for the first phase. The model fits the data well, implying that the permit price may have been driven by firms hedging against stochastic emissions.

  17. Enforcing Transferable Permit Systems in the Presence of Market Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, C.A.; Stanlund, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    We derive an enforcement strategy for a transferable permit system in the presence of market power that achieves complete compliance in a cost-effective manner. We show that the presence of a firm with market influence makes designing an enforcement strategy more difficult than enforcing a perfectly competitive system. We also re-consider the suggestion that a firm with market influence should be allocated permits so that it chooses to not participate in the permit market. When enforcement and its costs are taken into account, that suggestion does not hold except in a very special case

  18. ¿PERMITE SER FELIZ LA MORAL CRISTIANA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldo Romo P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available La pregunta que encabeza el artículo ya es desafiante: "¿Permite ser feliz la moral cristiana?". Existe la posibilidad de responder negativamente. El autor, después de analizar algunos pensadores (Nietzsche, entre ellos que han negado a la moral cristiana la posibilidad de hacer feliz al ser humano, presenta las condiciones de posibilidad para que dicha moral se encauce a ser un camino de felicidad. Entre esas condiciones se destaca: el paso de una moral heterónama a una moral de autonomía teónoma, una moral centrada en la persona más que una moral centrada en la ley, una moral de discipulado que pone primero el amor y luego el cumplimiento normativo. Profundiza, al respecto, en el logion de Jesucristo: "El que me ama, cumple mis mandamientos". Esta enseñanza plantea el orden secuencial de toda moral cristiana: porque se ama a Jesús, se entiende el cumplimiento de las normas. Estas se transforman, entonces, en el "test" verificador del amor. De lo contrario, se permanece en un ritualismo normativo, que en defintiva hastía y no lleva a la felicidad. Por ello, el artículo profundiza en una moral de opción fundamental expresada en actitudes y actos morales coherentes con esa opción. Si las condiciones de posibilidad propuestas se llegan a dar, la interrogante que organiza el artículo tendrá una respuesta positivaThe question that heads this article is already challenging: "Does Christian morality permit one to be happy?" The possibility of responding negatively exists. The author, after analyzing the contributions of some thinkers (Nietszche among them who have denied the possibility that Christian morality could make human beings happy, presents the conditions that would orient said morality towards the possibility of becoming a path to happiness. Among those conditions, the author highlights: the passage from a "heteronomous" morality to a morality of "theonomous" autonomy, a morality centered on the person rather than a morality

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B, Permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the permit application for the WIPP facility. Information is presented on solid waste management; personnel safety; emergency plans; site characterization; applicable regulations; decommissioning; and ground water monitoring requirements

  20. Storm Water General Permit 3 for Rock and Asphalt

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #3 for storm water discharges associated with industrial activity for Asphalt Plants, Concrete Batch Plants, Rock Crushing Plants and Construction...

  1. 77 FR 49453 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... citations to, and analyses of, the applicable laws and regulations. We will not consider or include in our... period. Applicant: Alexandria Rosati, Cambridge, MA; PRT-72061A The applicant requests a permit to...

  2. 75 FR 34766 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... permit to export one female captive bred giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) born at the zoo in 2007and.... Applicant: United States Department of Agriculture/Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Wildlife...

  3. 50 CFR 25.55 - Refuge admission permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-specific permits, at Fish and Wildlife Service Regional and Washington, DC Offices, and at other locations....55 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... the holder on the front. ...

  4. Oversize/overweight vehicle unified permitting process (UPP) : phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Multiple jurisdictions within Minnesota process oversize/overweight (OSOW) permits for the movement of freight on state roadways, county roads, and municipal and township streets. Movement of freight has increased in recent years to help support econ...

  5. Oversize/overweight permitting practices review : phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    This study explores a more detailed analysis of the permitting process in the Mid-Atlantic Region and : delves into operational practice, and theory and history of the practice among states. The states : practices examined in greater detail include C...

  6. Hydroelectric Generating Facilities General Permit (HYDROGP) for Massachusetts & New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents, links & contacts for the Notice of Availability of the Final NPDES General Permits (HYDROGP) for Discharges at Hydroelectric Generating Facilities in Massachusetts (MAG360000) and New Hampshire (NHG360000) and Tribal Lands in the State of MA.

  7. 36 CFR 296.10 - Suspension and revocation of permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES: UNIFORM REGULATIONS § 296.10 Suspension and revocation of... correct the situation which led to suspension of the permit. (b) Suspension or revocation for management...

  8. 78 FR 75369 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... into the wild in Oklahoma. Permit TE-833851 Applicant: City of Austin Watershed Protection Department... reddelli) Black-capped vireo (Vireo atricapilla) Bone Cave harvestman (Texella reyesi) Braken Bat Cave...

  9. Storm Water General Permit 1 for Industrial Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — General permit #1 for storm water discharges associated with industrial facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program.

  10. 48 CFR 52.236-7 - Permits and Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... obtaining any necessary licenses and permits, and for complying with any Federal, State, and municipal laws... negligence. The Contractor shall also be responsible for all materials delivered and work performed until...

  11. NPDES Permit for Crow Nation Water Treatment Plants in Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030538, the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs is authorized to discharge from the Crow Agency water treatment plants via the wastewater treatment facility located in Bighorn County, Montana to the Little Bighorn River.

  12. 75 FR 30428 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... (Oreonax flavicauda) from Peru for the purpose of enhancement of the species through scientific research... be conducted under the remainder of the 5-year period of the permit. Applicant: Natural History...

  13. RHIC beam permit and quench detection communications system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conkling, C.R. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    A beam permit module has been developed to concentrate RHIC, subsystem sensor outputs, permit beam, and initiate emergency shutdowns. The modules accept inputs from the vacuum, cryogenic, power supply, beam loss, and superconducting magnet quench detection systems. Modules are located at equipment locations around the RHIC ring. The modules are connected by three fiberoptic communications links; a beam permit link, and two magnet power supply interlock links. During operation, carrier presence allows beam. If a RHIC subsystem detects a fault, the beam permit carrier terminates - initiating a beam dump. If the fault was a superconducting magnet quench, a power supply interlock carrier terminates - initiating an emergency magnet power dump. In addition, the master module triggers an event to cause remote sensors to log and hold data at the time-of-failure

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This permit application (Vol. 7) for the WIPP facility contains appendices related to the following information: Ground water protection; personnel; solid waste management; and memorandums concerning environmental protection standards

  15. 77 FR 3493 - Endangered Species Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ..., Moseley, VA; PRT-57466A. The applicant requests a permit to import 6 female captive-born cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus) from De Wildt Cheetah Breeding Centre, De Wildt, South Africa for the purpose of...

  16. 76 FR 27660 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... decisions are: (1) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include... applicant requests a permit to import a sport-hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus...

  17. 76 FR 20705 - Endangered Species Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable.... Multiple Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of...

  18. 78 FR 59052 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and.... Multiple Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of...

  19. 78 FR 45954 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male...

  20. 76 FR 52965 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable... permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled from...

  1. 75 FR 63196 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... a permit to import a sport-hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled...

  2. 75 FR 76022 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... public display. Multiple Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport...

  3. 76 FR 39432 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and.... Multiple Applicants (New Applications) The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport...

  4. 78 FR 112 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus...

  5. 78 FR 62647 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled from...

  6. 77 FR 72882 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok...

  7. 75 FR 41235 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable... the species. Multiple Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport...

  8. 78 FR 21627 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... decisions are: (1) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include... Tapiridae Applicant: Michael Tomb, Jackson, LA; PRT-01602B The applicant requests a permit to import a sport...

  9. 75 FR 44986 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable... requests a permit to import a sport-hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus...

  10. 76 FR 51051 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable... request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus...

  11. 76 FR 32223 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable laws and regulations. We... Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male...

  12. 76 FR 80384 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... a permit to import a sport-hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus) culled...

  13. 76 FR 60862 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable... The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok...

  14. 75 FR 19656 - Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... agency decisions are: (1) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that... following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok...

  15. 76 FR 72434 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and... following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok...

  16. 76 FR 65207 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable... applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus...

  17. 76 FR 71069 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and analyses of, the applicable... request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male bontebok (Damaliscus pygargus pygargus...

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report, Part B (Vol. 3) of the permit application for the WIPP facility, contains information related to the site characterization of the facility, including geology, design, rock salt evaluations, maps, drawings, and shaft excavations

  19. 77 FR 7175 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ...: Wildlife World Zoo, Litchfield Park, Arizona. Applicant requests an amendment to a current permit for... following species within Texas: Bee Creek Cave harvestman (Texella reddelli) Bone Cave harvestman (Texella...

  20. EPA Office of Water (OW): Pollutant Discharge Permit Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — U.S. States (Generalized) represents the 50 states and the District of Columbia of the United States joined with data from the NPDES Permit Backlog Report for the...