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Sample records for permeabilization assays showed

  1. Permeabilization assay for antimicrobial peptides based on pore-spanning lipid membranes on nanoporous alumina.

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    Neubacher, Henrik; Mey, Ingo; Carnarius, Christian; Lazzara, Thomas D; Steinem, Claudia

    2014-04-29

    Screening tools to study antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with the aim to optimize therapeutic delivery vectors require automated and parallelized sampling based on chip technology. Here, we present the development of a chip-based assay that allows for the investigation of the action of AMPs on planar lipid membranes in a time-resolved manner by fluorescence readout. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) composed of cylindrical pores with a diameter of 70 nm and a thickness of up to 10 μm was used as a support to generate pore-spanning lipid bilayers from giant unilamellar vesicle spreading, which resulted in large continuous membrane patches sealing the pores. Because AAO is optically transparent, fluid single lipid bilayers and the underlying pore cavities can be readily observed by three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To assay the membrane permeabilizing activity of the AMPs, the translocation of the water-soluble dyes into the AAO cavities and the fluorescence of the sulforhodamine 101 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanol-l-amine triethylammonium salt (Texas Red DHPE)-labeled lipid membrane were observed by CLSM in a time-resolved manner as a function of the AMP concentration. The effect of two different AMPs, magainin-2 and melittin, was investigated, showing that the concentrations required for membrane permeabilization and the kinetics of the dye entrance differ significantly. Our results are discussed in light of the proposed permeabilization models of the two AMPs. The presented data demonstrate the potential of this setup for the development of an on-chip screening platform for AMPs.

  2. An easy and efficient permeabilization protocol for in vivo enzyme activity assays in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Randi Engelberth; Erstad, Simon Matthé; Ramos Martinez, Erick Miguel

    2016-01-01

    microbial cell factories. Better understanding of the activities of enzymes involved in the central carbon metabolism would lead to increasing product yields. Currently cell-free lysates are the most widely used method for determination of intracellular enzyme activities. However, due to thick cell walls...... used directly in the assays, the permeabilized cells exhibited the enzyme activities that are comparable or even higher than those detected for cell-free lysates. Moreover, the permeabilized cells could be stored at -20 °C without losing the enzyme activities. The permeabilization process...... for permeabilization of the cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and determination of two intracellular enzymes, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/decarboxylase (Rubisco) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), that play pivotal roles in the central carbon metabolism...

  3. Development of a sensitive chemiluminometric assay for the detection of beta-galactosidase in permeabilized coliform bacteria and comparison with fluorometry and colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poucke, S O; Nelis, H J

    1995-01-01

    We developed a chemiluminometric assay of beta-galactosidase in coliform bacteria, using a phenylgalactose-substituted 1,2-dioxetane derivative as a substrate. Permeabilization of cells is required to ensure the efficient cellular uptake of this compound. By this method, one coliform seeded in 100 ml of sterile water can be detected after a 6- to 9-h propagation phase followed by a 45-min enzyme assay in the presence of polymyxin B. Compared with fluorometry and colorimetry, chemiluminometry afforded 4- and 1,000-fold increases in sensitivity and 1- and 6-h increases in the speed of detection, respectively. PMID:8534120

  4. Vector-free intracellular delivery by reversible permeabilization.

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    Shirley O'Dea

    Full Text Available Despite advances in intracellular delivery technologies, efficient methods are still required that are vector-free, can address a wide range of cargo types and can be applied to cells that are difficult to transfect whilst maintaining cell viability. We have developed a novel vector-free method that uses reversible permeabilization to achieve rapid intracellular delivery of cargos with varying composition, properties and size. A permeabilizing delivery solution was developed that contains a low level of ethanol as the permeabilizing agent. Reversal of cell permeabilization is achieved by temporally and volumetrically controlling the contact of the target cells with this solution. Cells are seeded in conventional multi-well plates. Following removal of the supernatant, the cargo is mixed with the delivery solution and applied directly to the cells using an atomizer. After a short incubation period, permeabilization is halted by incubating the cells in a phosphate buffer saline solution that dilutes the ethanol and is non-toxic to the permeabilized cells. Normal culture medium is then added. The procedure lasts less than 5 min. With this method, proteins, mRNA, plasmid DNA and other molecules have been delivered to a variety of cell types, including primary cells, with low toxicity and cargo functionality has been confirmed in proof-of-principle studies. Co-delivery of different cargo types has also been demonstrated. Importantly, delivery occurs by diffusion directly into the cytoplasm in an endocytic-independent manner. Unlike some other vector-free methods, adherent cells are addressed in situ without the need for detachment from their substratum. The method has also been adapted to address suspension cells. This delivery method is gentle yet highly reproducible, compatible with high throughput and automated cell-based assays and has the potential to enable a broad range of research, drug discovery and clinical applications.

  5. Vascular permeabilization by intravenous arachidonate in the rat peritoneal cavity: antagonism by ethamsylate.

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    Hannaert, Patrick; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; Hider, Hamida; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Garay, Ricardo P

    2003-04-11

    The hemostatic agent, ethamsylate, inhibits arachidonic acid metabolism by a mechanism independent of cyclooxygenase activity and blocks carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Here, ethamsylate was investigated for (i) in vivo actions on the free radical-dependent, permeabilizing responses to arachidonic acid and (ii) its antioxidant potential in vitro. Vascular permeability was equated to the extravasation rate of Evans blue from plasma into the rat peritoneal cavity. Antioxidant potential was investigated by classical in vitro tests for superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals (OH(.)), and nitric oxide. Intravenous ethamsylate induced a very important and significant reduction of permeability responses to arachidonate, both when given preventively and cumulatively. Thus, (i) ethamsylate significantly reversed arachidonate-induced permeabilization, even at the lowest dose tested (44+/-5% at 10 mg/kg) and (ii) a maximal reversal (about 70%) was reached between 50 and 200 mg/kg ethamsylate. In contrast, ethamsylate (100 mg/kg) was unable to antagonize the vascular permeabilization induced by serotonin (5-HT). In antioxidant assays, ethamsylate showed scavenging properties against hydroxyl radicals generated by the Fenton reaction (H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+)) even at 0.1 microM (-20+/-3%). OH(.) scavenging by ethamsylate reached 42+/-8% at 10 microM and 57+/-7% at 1 mM and was comparable to that of reference compounds (vitamin E, troxerutin, and mannitol). Conversely, ethamsylate was a poor scavenger of superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. In conclusion, intravenous ethamsylate potently antagonized the peritoneal vascular permeabilization induced by arachidonate, an action likely due to its antioxidant properties, particularly against hydroxyl radical. Such a mechanism can explain previous observations that ethamsylate inhibits carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Whether it also participates in the hemostatic action of ethamsylate deserves further investigation.

  6. Protein thiophosphorylation associated with secretory inhibition in permeabilized chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.C.; Brooks, M.

    1985-01-01

    Permeabilized cells treated with the adenosine triphosphate analog, ( 35 S)adenosine-5'-0-3(3-thiotriphosphate) ((γ- 35 S)ATP), showed thiophosphorylation of a small number of cellular proteins. A 54 kilodalton (kDa) protein was heavily thiophosphorylated in unstimulated control cells and a 43 kilodalton protein was more heavily thiophosphorylated in calcium stimulated cells. Intact cells incorporated 35 S into a series of higher molecular weight proteins. Stimulation of prelabelled, permeabilized cells resulted in a loss of 35 S from the cells over a 20 min period. Treatment of permeabilized cells with ATPγS inhibited secretion and 35 S incorporation into the cells. Pretreatment with ATPγS resulted in subsequent inhibition of both secretion and the ability of the cells to incorporate 35 S from (γ- 35 S)ATP. These results indicate that the sites normally available for phosphorylation were inactivated by thiophosphorylation and were unavailable to participate in the secretory process. The inhibition of secretion associated with thiophosphorylation of these proteins suggests that they may play a role in the control of secretion by chromaffin cells. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  7. A urine midmolecule osteocalcin assay shows higher discriminatory power than a serum midmolecule osteocalcin assay during short-term alendronate treatment of osteoporotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A K; Mohan, S; Singer, F R; Baylink, D J

    2002-07-01

    We isolated and characterized a peptide fragment corresponding to amino acid sequence 14-28 of human osteocalcin in urine from Paget's disease, and developed a polyclonal antibody reactive to this peptide in urine. We used this antibody to measure urinary fragments of osteocalcin and compared to efficacy of the urinary osteocalcin assay with a serum osteocalcin (sOC) assay (ELISA-Osteo, Cis-Bio International) to monitor the short-term changes in bone turnover in response to alendronate treatment. The synthetic peptide-based urinary osteocalcin (uOC) radioimmunoassay (RIA) showed an analytical sensitivity of 6.25 ng/mL, standard curve range of 3.12-400 ng/mL, and mean intra- (n = 20) and interassay (n = 30) coefficient of variation (CV) of sALP) (Alkphose-B, Metra Biosystems) in serum samples. The percent change data obtained between baseline and 30 days (n = 18) posttreatment suggested a rapid decline in uOC concentration (-27%, p sALP (-3.4%, p = 0.689), two specific markers of bone formation. As expected, due to the coupling of bone formation and bone resorption, the concentration of all markers showed a 30%-45% decline compared with baseline values after 90 days (n = 16) of treatment. Correlation of markers after a 30 day treatment with alendronate revealed a higher correlation (r = 0.61, p sALP (r = -0.14, p = 0.295) with uNTx. Similarly, correlation coefficients with r values between 0.48 and 0.55 (p < 0.05) were observed between uOC, sNTx, and sCTx, whereas no significant correlation was observed between sOC and sNTx or sCTx. These results provide indirect evidence that fragments measured by the urine assay probably originated from bone resorption, and suggest that the uOC assay could be used to assess short-term changes in bone metabolism with regard to osteocalcin.

  8. The Antifungal Plant Defensin HsAFP1 Is a Phosphatidic Acid-Interacting Peptide Inducing Membrane Permeabilization

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    Tanne L. Cools

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available HsAFP1, a plant defensin isolated from coral bells (Heuchera sanguinea, is characterized by broad-spectrum antifungal activity. Previous studies indicated that HsAFP1 binds to specific fungal membrane components, which had hitherto not been identified, and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we show that HsAFP1 reversibly interacts with the membrane phospholipid phosphatidic acid (PA, which is a precursor for the biosynthesis of other phospholipids, and to a lesser extent with various phosphatidyl inositol phosphates (PtdInsP’s. Moreover, via reverse ELISA assays we identified two basic amino acids in HsAFP1, namely histidine at position 32 and arginine at position 52, as well as the phosphate group in PA as important features enabling this interaction. Using a HsAFP1 variant, lacking both amino acids (HsAFP1[H32A][R52A], we showed that, as compared to the native peptide, the ability of this variant to bind to PA and PtdInsP’s is reduced (≥74% and the antifungal activity of the variant is reduced (≥2-fold, highlighting the link between PA/PtdInsP binding and antifungal activity. Using fluorescently labelled HsAFP1 in confocal microscopy and flow cytometry assays, we showed that HsAFP1 accumulates at the cell surface of yeast cells with intact membranes, most notably at the buds and septa. The resulting HsAFP1-induced membrane permeabilization is likely to occur after HsAFP1’s internalization. These data provide novel mechanistic insights in the mode of action of the HsAFP1 plant defensin.

  9. Measuring Mitochondrial Function in Permeabilized Cells Using the Seahorse XF Analyzer or a Clark-Type Oxygen Electrode.

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    Divakaruni, Ajit S; Rogers, George W; Murphy, Anne N

    2014-05-27

    Measurements of mitochondrial respiration in intact cells can help define metabolism and its dysregulation in fields such as cancer, metabolic disease, immunology, and neurodegeneration. Although cells can be offered various substrates in the assay medium, many cell types can oxidize stored pools of energy substrates. A general bioenergetic profile can therefore be obtained using intact cells, but the inability to control substrate provision to the mitochondria can restrict an in-depth, mechanistic understanding. Mitochondria can be isolated from intact cells, but the yield and quality of the end product is often poor and prone to subselection during isolation. Plasma membrane permeabilization of cells provides a solution to this challenge, allowing experimental control of the medium surrounding the mitochondria. This unit describes techniques to measure respiration in permeabilized adherent cells using a Seahorse XF Analyzer or permeabilized suspended cells in a Hansatech Oxygraph. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Riccardin D-N induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization by inhibiting acid sphingomyelinase and interfering with sphingomyelin metabolism in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lin [Department of Natural Product Chemistry, Key Lab of Chemical Biology of MOE (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Niu, Huanmin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Sun, Bin [Department of Natural Product Chemistry, Key Lab of Chemical Biology of MOE (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Xiao, Yanan [School of Pharmaceutical Science, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Wei [Department of Natural Product Chemistry, Key Lab of Chemical Biology of MOE (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Yuan, Huiqing [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Lou, Hongxiang, E-mail: louhongxiang@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Natural Product Chemistry, Key Lab of Chemical Biology of MOE (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Lysosomes are important targets for anticancer drug discovery. Our previous study showed that Riccardin D-N (RD-N), a natural macrocylic bisbibenzyl derivative produced by Mannich reaction, induced cell death by accumulating in lysosomes. Experiments were performed on human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue from left inferior lobar bronchus of patient xenografts and H460 cells. RD-N was administrated for 25 days. The specimens of xenografts in Balb/c athymic (nu +/nu +) male mice were removed for immunohistochemistry, subcellular fractionation, enzyme activities and Western blotting analysis. mRFP-GFP-LC3 reporter was used to examine autophagy in H460 cells. Sphingomyelin assay was evaluated by thin-layer chromatography and assay kit. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) caused by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition and subsequent changes of sphingomyelin (SM) metabolism selectively destabilized the cancer cell lysosomes in RD-N-treated H460 cells in vitro and tumor xenograft model in vivo. The destabilized lysosomes induced the release of cathepsins from the lysosomes into the cytosol and further triggered cell death. These results explain the underlying mechanism of RD-N induced LMP. It can be concluded that a more lysosomotropic derivative was synthesized by introduction of an amine group, which could have more potential applications in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Riccardin D-N (RD-N) significantly downregulated LAMP1 expressions. • RD-N inhibited the acid sphingomyelinase activity. • RD-N induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization in vivo. • RD-N induced SM accumulation in the lysosomal membranes. • RD-N also induced the release of cathepsins from destabilized lysosomes.

  11. Riccardin D-N induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization by inhibiting acid sphingomyelinase and interfering with sphingomyelin metabolism in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lin; Niu, Huanmin; Sun, Bin; Xiao, Yanan; Li, Wei; Yuan, Huiqing; Lou, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are important targets for anticancer drug discovery. Our previous study showed that Riccardin D-N (RD-N), a natural macrocylic bisbibenzyl derivative produced by Mannich reaction, induced cell death by accumulating in lysosomes. Experiments were performed on human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue from left inferior lobar bronchus of patient xenografts and H460 cells. RD-N was administrated for 25 days. The specimens of xenografts in Balb/c athymic (nu +/nu +) male mice were removed for immunohistochemistry, subcellular fractionation, enzyme activities and Western blotting analysis. mRFP-GFP-LC3 reporter was used to examine autophagy in H460 cells. Sphingomyelin assay was evaluated by thin-layer chromatography and assay kit. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) caused by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition and subsequent changes of sphingomyelin (SM) metabolism selectively destabilized the cancer cell lysosomes in RD-N-treated H460 cells in vitro and tumor xenograft model in vivo. The destabilized lysosomes induced the release of cathepsins from the lysosomes into the cytosol and further triggered cell death. These results explain the underlying mechanism of RD-N induced LMP. It can be concluded that a more lysosomotropic derivative was synthesized by introduction of an amine group, which could have more potential applications in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Riccardin D-N (RD-N) significantly downregulated LAMP1 expressions. • RD-N inhibited the acid sphingomyelinase activity. • RD-N induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization in vivo. • RD-N induced SM accumulation in the lysosomal membranes. • RD-N also induced the release of cathepsins from destabilized lysosomes.

  12. Permeabilization of the nuclear envelope following nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Gary L., E-mail: gary.l.thompson.3@gmail.com [Oak Ridge Institute for Science & Education, Joint Base San Antonio Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234 (United States); Roth, Caleb C. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX, 78234 (United States); Kuipers, Marjorie A. [Radio Frequency Radiation Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, 711th Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory, Joint Base San Antonio Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234 (United States); Tolstykh, Gleb P. [General Dynamics IT, Joint Base San Antonio Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234 (United States); Beier, Hope T. [Optical Radiation Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, 711th Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory, Joint Base San Antonio Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234 (United States); Ibey, Bennett L. [Radio Frequency Radiation Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, 711th Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory, Joint Base San Antonio Fort Sam Houston, TX, 78234 (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Permeabilization of cell membranes occurs upon exposure to a threshold absorbed dose (AD) of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). The ultimate, physiological bioeffect of this exposure depends on the type of cultured cell and environment, indicating that cell-specific pathways and structures are stimulated. Here we investigate 10 and 600 ns duration PEF effects on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell nuclei, where our hypothesis is that pulse disruption of the nuclear envelope membrane leads to observed cell death and decreased viability 24 h post-exposure. To observe short-term responses to nsPEF exposure, CHO cells have been stably transfected with two fluorescently-labeled proteins known to be sequestered for cellular chromosomal function within the nucleus – histone-2b (H2B) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). H2B remains associated with chromatin after nsPEF exposure, whereas PCNA leaks out of nuclei permeabilized by a threshold AD of 10 and 600 ns PEF. A downturn in 24 h viability, measured by MTT assay, is observed at the number of pulses required to induce permeabilization of the nucleus. - Highlights: • The ability of nsPEF to damage nuclear structures within cells is investigated. • Leakage of proliferating nuclear antigen from nuclei is induced by nsPEF. • High doses of nsPEF disrupt cortical lamin and cause chromatin decompaction. • Histone H2B remains attached to chromatin following nsPEF exposure. • DNA does not leak out of nsPEF-permeabilized nuclei.

  13. The antifungal properties of a 2S albumin-homologous protein from passion fruit seeds involve plasma membrane permeabilization and ultrastructural alterations in yeast cells.

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    Agizzio, Ana Paula; Da Cunha, Maura; Carvalho, André O; Oliveira, Marco Antônio; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2006-10-01

    Different types of antimicrobial proteins were purified from plant seeds, including chitinases, β-1,3-glucanases, defensins, thionins, lipid transfer proteins and 2S albumins. It has become clear that these groups of proteins play an important role in the protection of plants from microbial infection. Recent results from our laboratory have shown that the defense-related proteins from passion fruit seeds, named Pf1 and Pf2 (which show sequence homology with 2S albumins), inhibit fungal growth and glucose-stimulated acidification of the medium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether 2S albumins from passion fruit seeds induce plasma membrane permeabilization and cause morphological alterations in yeast cells. Initially, we used an assay based on the uptake of SYTOX Green, an organic compound that fluoresces upon interaction with nucleic acids and penetrates cells with compromised plasma membranes, to investigate membrane permeabilization in S. cerevisiae cells. When viewed with a confocal laser microscope, S. cervisiae cells showed strong SYTOX Green fluorescence in the cytosol, especially in the nuclei. 2S albumins also inhibited glucose-stimulated acidification of the medium by S. cerevisiae cells, which indicates a probable impairment of fungal metabolism. The microscopical analysis of the yeast cells treated with 2S albumins demonstrated several morphological alterations in cell shape, cell surface, cell wall and bud formation, as well as in the organization of intracellular organelles. Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unsaturated fatty acids show clear elicitation responses in a modified local lymph node assay with an elicitation phase, and test positive in the direct peptide reactivity assay.

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    Yamashita, Kunihiko; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Test Guidelines (TG) adopted the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) as stand-alone skin sensitization test methods. However, unsaturated carbon-carbon double-bond and/or lipid acids afforded false-positive results more frequently in the LLNA compared to those in the GPMT and/or in human subjects. In the current study, oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, fumaric, maleic, and succinic acid and squalene were tested in a modified LLNA with an elicitation phase (LLNA:DAE), and in a direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) to evaluate their skin-sensitizing potential. Oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic and maleic acid were positive in the LLNA:DAE, of which three, linoleic, linolenic, and maleic acid were positive in the DPRA. Furthermore, the results of the cross-sensitizing tests using four LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals were negative, indicating a chemical-specific elicitation response. In a previous report, the estimated concentration needed to produce a stimulation index of 3 (EC3) of linolenic acid, squalene, and maleic acid in the LLNA was LLNA. However, the skin-sensitizing potential of all LLNA:DAE-positive chemicals was estimated as weak. These results suggested that oleic, linoleic, linolenic, undecylenic, and maleic acid had skin-sensitizing potential, and that the LLNA overestimated the skin-sensitizing potential compared to that estimated by the LLNA:DAE.

  15. DRAM Triggers Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization and Cell Death in CD4+ T Cells Infected with HIV

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    Laforge, Mireille; Limou, Sophie; Harper, Francis; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Rodrigues, Vasco; Silvestre, Ricardo; Haloui, Houda; Zagury, Jean-Francois; Senik, Anna; Estaquier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Productive HIV infection of CD4+ T cells leads to a caspase-independent cell death pathway associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cathepsin release, resulting in mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Herein, we demonstrate that HIV infection induces damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM) expression in a p53-dependent manner. Knocking down the expression of DRAM and p53 genes with specific siRNAs inhibited autophagy and LMP. However, inhibition of Atg5 and Beclin genes that prevents autophagy had a minor effect on LMP and cell death. The knock down of DRAM gene inhibited cytochrome C release, MOMP and cell death. However, knocking down DRAM, we increased viral infection and production. Our study shows for the first time the involvement of DRAM in host-pathogen interactions, which may represent a mechanism of defense via the elimination of infected cells. PMID:23658518

  16. DRAM triggers lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death in CD4(+ T cells infected with HIV.

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    Mireille Laforge

    Full Text Available Productive HIV infection of CD4(+ T cells leads to a caspase-independent cell death pathway associated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and cathepsin release, resulting in mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP. Herein, we demonstrate that HIV infection induces damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM expression in a p53-dependent manner. Knocking down the expression of DRAM and p53 genes with specific siRNAs inhibited autophagy and LMP. However, inhibition of Atg5 and Beclin genes that prevents autophagy had a minor effect on LMP and cell death. The knock down of DRAM gene inhibited cytochrome C release, MOMP and cell death. However, knocking down DRAM, we increased viral infection and production. Our study shows for the first time the involvement of DRAM in host-pathogen interactions, which may represent a mechanism of defense via the elimination of infected cells.

  17. Osmotically sensitive renin release from permeabilized juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Skøtt, O

    1993-01-01

    Renin secretion from juxtaglomerular (JG) cells is sensitive to external osmolality in a way that has been suggested to depend either on cellular volume or on effects on secretory granules. To distinguish between these possibilities, a technique for permeabilization of JG cell membranes was devel...

  18. Mitochondrial shape governs BAX-induced membrane permeabilization and apoptosis.

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    Renault, Thibaud T; Floros, Konstantinos V; Elkholi, Rana; Corrigan, Kelly-Ann; Kushnareva, Yulia; Wieder, Shira Y; Lindtner, Claudia; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Asciolla, James J; Buettner, Christoph; Newmeyer, Donald D; Chipuk, Jerry E

    2015-01-08

    Proapoptotic BCL-2 proteins converge upon the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) to promote mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) and apoptosis. Here we investigated the mechanistic relationship between mitochondrial shape and MOMP and provide evidence that BAX requires a distinct mitochondrial size to induce MOMP. We utilized the terminal unfolded protein response pathway to systematically define proapoptotic BCL-2 protein composition after stress and then directly interrogated their requirement for a productive mitochondrial size. Complementary biochemical, cellular, in vivo, and ex vivo studies reveal that Mfn1, a GTPase involved in mitochondrial fusion, establishes a mitochondrial size that is permissive for proapoptotic BCL-2 family function. Cells with hyperfragmented mitochondria, along with size-restricted OMM model systems, fail to support BAX-dependent membrane association and permeabilization due to an inability to stabilize BAXα9·membrane interactions. This work identifies a mechanistic contribution of mitochondrial size in dictating BAX activation, MOMP, and apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanoelectropulse-driven membrane perturbation and small molecule permeabilization

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    Sun Yinghua

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter pulsed electric fields scramble membrane phospholipids, release intracellular calcium, and induce apoptosis. Flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopy evidence has associated phospholipid rearrangement directly with nanoelectropulse exposure and supports the hypothesis that the potential that develops across the lipid bilayer during an electric pulse drives phosphatidylserine (PS externalization. Results In this work we extend observations of cells exposed to electric pulses with 30 ns and 7 ns durations to still narrower pulse widths, and we find that even 3 ns pulses are sufficient to produce responses similar to those reported previously. We show here that in contrast to unipolar pulses, which perturb membrane phospholipid order, tracked with FM1-43 fluorescence, only at the anode side of the cell, bipolar pulses redistribute phospholipids at both the anode and cathode poles, consistent with migration of the anionic PS head group in the transmembrane field. In addition, we demonstrate that, as predicted by the membrane charging hypothesis, a train of shorter pulses requires higher fields to produce phospholipid scrambling comparable to that produced by a time-equivalent train of longer pulses (for a given applied field, 30, 4 ns pulses produce a weaker response than 4, 30 ns pulses. Finally, we show that influx of YO-PRO-1, a fluorescent dye used to detect early apoptosis and activation of the purinergic P2X7 receptor channels, is observed after exposure of Jurkat T lymphoblasts to sufficiently large numbers of pulses, suggesting that membrane poration occurs even with nanosecond pulses when the electric field is high enough. Propidium iodide entry, a traditional indicator of electroporation, occurs with even higher pulse counts. Conclusion Megavolt-per-meter electric pulses as short as 3 ns alter the structure of the plasma membrane and permeabilize the cell to small molecules. The dose

  20. Membrane Disordering is not Sufficient for Membrane Permeabilization by Islet Amyloidogenic Polypeptide: Studies of IAPP(20-29) Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brender, Jeffrey R.; Heyl, Deborah L.; Samisetti, Shyamprasad; Kotler, Samuel A.; Osborne, Joshua M.; Pesaru, Ranadheer R.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-01-01

    A key factor in the development of type II diabetes is the loss of insulin-producing beta-cells. Human islet amyloid polypeptide protein (human-IAPP) is believed to play a crucial role in this process by forming small aggregates that exhibit toxicity by disrupting the cell membrane. The actual mechanism of membrane disruption is complex and appears to involve an early component before fiber formation and later component associated with fiber formation on the membrane. By comparing the peptide-lipid interactions derived from solid-state NMR experiments of two IAPP fragments that bind the membrane and cause membrane disordering to IAPP derived peptides known to cause significant early membrane permeabilization, we show here that membrane disordering is not likely to be sufficient by itself to cause the early membrane permeabilization observed by IAPP, and may play a lesser role in IAPP membrane disruption than expected. PMID:23493863

  1. Membrane permeabilization in relation to inactivation kinetics of Lactobacillus species due to pulsed electric fields.

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    Wouters, P C; Bos, A P; Ueckert, J

    2001-07-01

    Membrane permeabilization due to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment of gram-positive Lactobacillus cells was investigated by using propidium iodide uptake and single-cell analysis with flow cytometry. Electric field strength, energy input, treatment time, and growth phase affected membrane permeabilization of Lactobacillus plantarum during PEF treatment. A correlation between PEF inactivation and membrane permeabilization of L. plantarum cells was demonstrated, whereas no relationship was observed between membrane permeabilization and heat inactivation. The same results were obtained with a Lactobacillus fermentum strain, but the latter organism was more PEF resistant and exhibited less membrane permeabilization, indicating that various bacteria have different responses to PEF treatment. While membrane permeabilization was the main factor involved in the mechanism of inactivation, the growth phase and the acidity of the environment also influenced inactivation. By using flow cytometry it was possible to sort cells in the L. plantarum population based on different cell sizes and shapes, and the results were confirmed by image analysis. An apparent effect of morphology on membrane permeabilization was observed, and larger cells were more easily permeabilized than smaller cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the ability of PEF treatment to cause membrane permeabilization is an important factor in determining inactivation. This finding should have an effect on the final choice of the processing parameters used so that all microorganisms can be inactivated and, consequently, on the use of PEF treatment as an alternative method for preserving food products.

  2. Membrane Permeabilization in Relation to Inactivation Kinetics of Lactobacillus Species due to Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Patrick C.; Bos, Ad P.; Ueckert, Joerg

    2001-01-01

    Membrane permeabilization due to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment of gram-positive Lactobacillus cells was investigated by using propidium iodide uptake and single-cell analysis with flow cytometry. Electric field strength, energy input, treatment time, and growth phase affected membrane permeabilization of Lactobacillus plantarum during PEF treatment. A correlation between PEF inactivation and membrane permeabilization of L. plantarum cells was demonstrated, whereas no relationship was observed between membrane permeabilization and heat inactivation. The same results were obtained with a Lactobacillus fermentum strain, but the latter organism was more PEF resistant and exhibited less membrane permeabilization, indicating that various bacteria have different responses to PEF treatment. While membrane permeabilization was the main factor involved in the mechanism of inactivation, the growth phase and the acidity of the environment also influenced inactivation. By using flow cytometry it was possible to sort cells in the L. plantarum population based on different cell sizes and shapes, and the results were confirmed by image analysis. An apparent effect of morphology on membrane permeabilization was observed, and larger cells were more easily permeabilized than smaller cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the ability of PEF treatment to cause membrane permeabilization is an important factor in determining inactivation. This finding should have an effect on the final choice of the processing parameters used so that all microorganisms can be inactivated and, consequently, on the use of PEF treatment as an alternative method for preserving food products. PMID:11425727

  3. Glucose and carbachol activate phospholipase C in digitonin-permeabilized islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, B.A.; Florholmen, J.; Turk, J.; McDaniel, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Stimulation of intact islets with D-glucose, the major insulin secretagogue, or with carbachol, a muscarinic agonist, results in the accumulation of inositoltrisphosphate (IP 3 ) suggesting that activation of phospholipase C (PLC) has a major role in stimulus-secretion coupling. Carbachol activation of PLC is an example of receptor-mediated activation in islets, whereas, the mechanism of glucose activation of PLC is controversial since a glucose receptor has not been identified. They have measured PLC activity in digitonin-permeabilized islets. Islets were labeled with 3 H-inositol, permeabilized and IP 3 accumulation measured by HPLC. Carbachol, in the presence of ATP, GTP and 1 μM free Ca 2+ released two-fold more Ins 1,3,4-P 3 than control in a time-dependent manner. Glucose, under the same conditions also significantly released more Ins 1,3,4-P 3 than control. This effect was not due to metabolism of glucose nor to an effect on the IP 3 -phosphomonoesterase. Preliminary Ca 2+ -dependency studies indicate that PLC is not activated by Ca 2+ in the submicromolar range. In conclusion, these studies show that Ca 2+ does not activate PLC, and furthermore, that D-glucose may be recognized directly by PLC

  4. Kinetic partitioning between aggregation and vesicle permeabilization by modified ADan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesgaard, Lise W.; Vad, Brian; Christiansen, Gunna

    2009-01-01

    The neurodegenerative illness Familial Danish Dementia (FDD) is linked to formation and aggregation of the 34-residue ADan peptide, whose cytotoxicity may be mediated by membrane interactions. Here we characterize the derived peptide SerADan, in which the two cysteines found in ADan have been....... Aggregation is prevented at neutral/acidic pH and low ionic strength by anionic lipid vesicles. These vesicles are permeabilized by monomeric SerADan assembling on the membrane to form stable beta-sheet structures which are different from the solution aggregates. In contrast, solution ageing of SerADan first...

  5. Mechanisms of bacterial membrane permeabilization by crotalicidin (Ctn) and its fragment Ctn(15-34), antimicrobial peptides from rattlesnake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Peinado, Clara; Dias, Susana Almeida; Domingues, Marco M; Benfield, Aurélie H; Freire, João Miguel; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; Gaspar, Diana; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Craik, David J; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David

    2018-02-02

    Crotalicidin (Ctn), a cathelicidin-related peptide from the venom of a South American rattlesnake, possesses potent antimicrobial, antitumor, and antifungal properties. Previously, we have shown that its C-terminal fragment, Ctn(15-34), retains the antimicrobial and antitumor activities but is less toxic to healthy cells and has improved serum stability. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of action of Ctn and Ctn(15-34) against Gram-negative bacteria. Both peptides were bactericidal, killing ∼90% of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells within 90-120 and 5-30 min, respectively. Studies of ζ potential at the bacterial cell membrane suggested that both peptides accumulate at and neutralize negative charges on the bacterial surface. Flow cytometry experiments confirmed that both peptides permeabilize the bacterial cell membrane but suggested slightly different mechanisms of action. Ctn(15-34) permeabilized the membrane immediately upon addition to the cells, whereas Ctn had a lag phase before inducing membrane damage and exhibited more complex cell-killing activity, probably because of two different modes of membrane permeabilization. Using surface plasmon resonance and leakage assays with model vesicles, we confirmed that Ctn(15-34) binds to and disrupts lipid membranes and also observed that Ctn(15-34) has a preference for vesicles that mimic bacterial or tumor cell membranes. Atomic force microscopy visualized the effect of these peptides on bacterial cells, and confocal microscopy confirmed their localization on the bacterial surface. Our studies shed light onto the antimicrobial mechanisms of Ctn and Ctn(15-34), suggesting Ctn(15-34) as a promising lead for development as an antibacterial/antitumor agent. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Detection of electroporation-induced membrane permeabilization states in the brain using diffusion-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Hansen, Rasmus H; Agerholm-Larsen, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue permeabilization by electroporation (EP) is a promising technique to treat certain cancers. Non-invasive methods for verification of induced permeabilization are important, especially in deep-seated cancers. In this study we evaluated diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging...... (NP), transient membrane permeabilization (TMP), and permanent membrane permeabilization (PMP), respectively. DW-MRI was acquired 5 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours after EP. Histology was performed for validation of the permeabilization states. Tissue content of water, Na+, K+, Ca2...... minutes after EP, compared to NP. Kurtosis was also significantly higher at 24 hours (pstates, supporting the DW-MRI findings. We conclude that DW-MRI is capable of detecting EP...

  7. Oxidation and reduction of pyridine nucleotides in alamethicin-permeabilized plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, F.I.; Michalecka, A.M.; Møller, I.M.

    2004-01-01

    method to permearbilize mitochondria and study the highly branched electron-transport chain in potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) and pea leaf (Pisum sativum) mitochondria. We show that AlaM permeabilized the inner membrane of plant mitochondria to NAD(P)H, allowing the quantification of internal NAD......M-treated mitochondria was much higher than what has been previously measured by other techniques. Our results also show a difference in substrate specificities for complex I in mitochondria as compared with inside-out submitochondrial particles. AlaM facilitated the passage of cofactors to and from the mitochondrial...... environment not only in plant mitochondria but also in other membrane-enclosed compartments, such as intact cells, chloroplasts and peroxisomes....

  8. Leishmania promastigotes lack phosphatidylserine but bind annexin V upon permeabilization or miltefosine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Weingärtner

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Leishmania is an intracellular pathogen infecting and replicating inside vertebrate host macrophages. A recent model suggests that promastigote and amastigote forms of the parasite mimic mammalian apoptotic cells by exposing phosphatidylserine (PS at the cell surface to trigger their phagocytic uptake into host macrophages. PS presentation at the cell surface is typically analyzed using fluorescence-labeled annexin V. Here we show that Leishmania promastigotes can be stained by fluorescence-labeled annexin V upon permeabilization or miltefosine treatment. However, combined lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry and (31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy revealed that Leishmania promastigotes lack any detectable amount of PS. Instead, we identified several other phospholipid classes such phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylethanolamine; phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol as candidate lipids enabling annexin V staining.

  9. Renin secretion from permeabilized juxtaglomerular cells requires a permeant cation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Ellekvist, Peter; Skøtt, O

    1999-01-01

    The cytosolic concentration of chloride correlates directly with renin secretion from renal juxtaglomerular granular (JG) cells. In the present study, the mechanism by which chloride stimulates renin release was investigated in a preparation of permeabilized rat glomeruli with attached JG cells....... An isosmotic increase in the concentration of chloride by 129 mM stimulated renin release 16- to 20-fold. Substitution of K+ by the impermeant cation N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG) abolished this response, while substitution with Na+ caused marginal inhibition. Substitution with Cs+ had no effect. Addition...... of sucrose, which permeates the secretory granules poorly, also abolished the stimulation of renin secretion by KCl. The response to KCl was not affected by K+-channel antagonists or by agonists of K+ channels. Chloride channel blockers were also without effect on the secretory response to KCl. When the ATP...

  10. Metabolic remodeling precedes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization in human glioma xenograft cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnala, Shivani; Chetty, Chandramu; Veeravalli, Krishna Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D; Rao, Jasti S

    2012-02-01

    Glioma cancer cells adapt to changing microenvironment and shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis for their metabolic needs irrespective of oxygen availability. In the present study, we show that silencing MMP-9 in combination with uPAR/cathepsin B switch the glycolytic metabolism of glioma cells to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) to predispose glioma cells to mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. shRNA for MMP-9 and uPAR (pMU) as well as shRNA for MMP-9 and cathepsin B (pMC) activated complexes of mitochondria involved in OXPHOS and inhibited glycolytic hexokinase expression. The decreased interaction of hexokinase 2 with mitochondria in the treated cells indicated the inhibition of glycolysis activation. Overexpression of Akt reversed the pMU- and pMC-mediated OXPHOS to glycolysis switch. The OXPHOS un-coupler oligomycin A altered the expression levels of the Bcl-2 family of proteins; treatment with pMU or pMC reversed this effect and induced mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. In addition, our results show changes in mitochondrial pore transition to release cytochrome c due to changes in the VDAC-Bcl-XL and BAX-BAK interaction with pMU and pMC treatments. Taken together, our results suggest that pMU and pMC treatments switch glioma cells from the glycolytic to the OXPHOS pathway through an inhibitory effect on Akt, ROS induction and an increase of cytosolic cytochrome c accumulation. These results demonstrate the potential of pMU and pMC as therapeutic candidates for the treatment of glioma.

  11. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization increases reactive oxygen species production and decreases mean sperm velocity but is not associated with DNA fragmentation in human sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treulen, F; Uribe, P; Boguen, R; Villegas, J V

    2016-02-01

    Does induction of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) in vitro affect specific functional parameters of human spermatozoa? Our findings show that MOMP induction increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreases mean sperm velocity but does not alter DNA integrity. MOMP in somatic cells is related to a variety of apoptotic traits, such as alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and increase in ROS production and DNA fragmentation. Although the presence of these apoptotic features has been reported in spermatozoa, to date the effects of MOMP on sperm function and DNA integrity have not been analysed. The study included spermatozoa from fertile donors. Motile sperm were obtained using the swim-up method. The highly motile sperm were collected and diluted with human tubal fluid to a final cell concentration of 5 × 10(6) ml(-1). To induce MOMP, selected sperm were treated at 37°C for 4 h with a mimetic of a Bcl-2 pro-apoptotic protein, ABT-737. MOMP was evaluated by relocating of cytochrome c. In addition, the effect of ABT-737 on mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization was assessed using the calcein-AM/cobalt chloride method. In turn, ΔΨm was evaluated with JC-1 staining, intracellular ROS production with dihydroethidium, sperm motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis and DNA fragmentation by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay. Measurements were performed by flow cytometry. MOMP was associated with ΔΨm dissipation (P < 0.05), increased ROS production (P < 0.05) and decreased mean sperm velocity (P < 0.05), but it was not associated with DNA fragmentation. MOMP did not induce a large increase in ROS, which could explain the negligible effect of MOMP on sperm DNA fragmentation under our experimental conditions. The study was carried out in vitro using highly motile sperm, selected by swim-up, from healthy donors. The results obtained in this

  12. Comprehensive genotyping for 18 blood group systems using a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay shows a high degree of accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Ji, Yanli; Lodén, Martin; de Haas, Masja; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Veldhuisen, Barbera

    2013-01-01

    In recent years genotyping methods have been implemented in blood banks as alternative to comprehensive serologic typing. We evaluated a newly developed assay for convenient and comprehensive genotyping of blood group alleles based on multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA)

  13. Membrane and Nuclear Permeabilization by Polymeric pDNA Vehicles: Efficient Method for Gene Delivery or Mechanism of Cytotoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinetti, Giovanna; Smith, Adam E.; Reineke, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the cytotoxicity mechanisms of linear PEI to two analogous polymers synthesized by our group: a hydroxyl-containing poly(L-tartaramidoamine) (T4) and a version containing an alkyl chain spacer poly(adipamidopentaethylenetetramine) (A4) by studying the cellular responses to polymer transfection. We have also synthesized analogues of T4 with different molecular weights (degrees of polymerization of 6, 12, and 43) to examine the role of molecular weight on the cytotoxicity mechanisms. Several mechanisms of polymer-induced cytotoxicity are investigated, including plasma membrane permeabilization, the formation of potentially harmful polymer degradation products during transfection including reactive oxygen species, and nuclear membrane permeabilization. We hypothesized that since cationic polymers are capable of disrupting the plasma membrane, they may also be capable of disrupting the nuclear envelope, which could be a potential mechanism of how the pDNA is delivered into the nucleus (other than nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis). Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we show that the polycations with the highest amount of protein expression and toxicity, PEI and T443, are capable of inducing nuclear membrane permeability. This finding is important for the field of nucleic acid delivery in that not only could direct nucleus permeabilization be a mechanism for pDNA nuclear import but also a potential mechanism of cytotoxicity and cell death. We also show that the production of reactive oxygen species is not a main mechanism of cytotoxicity, and that the presence or absence of hydroxyl groups as well as polymer length plays a role in polyplex size and charge in addition to protein expression efficiency and toxicity. PMID:22175236

  14. EXPERIMENTAL SUBSTANTIATION OF PERMEABILIZED HEPATOCYTES MODEL FOR INVESTIGATION OF MITOCHONDRIA IN SITU RESPIRATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlavsky, V M; Manko, B O; Ikkert, O V; Manko, V V

    2015-01-01

    To verify experimentally the model of permeabilized hepatocytes, the degree of cell permeability was assessed using trypan blue and polarographycally determined cell respiration rate upon succinate (0.35 mM) and a-ketoglutarate (1 mM) oxidation. Oxidative phosphorylation was stimulated by ADP (750 μM). Hepatocyte permeabilization depends on digitonin concentraion in medium and on the number of cells in suspension. Thus, the permeabilization of 0.9-1.7 million cells/ml was completed by 25 μg/ml of digitonin, permeabilization of 2.0-3.0 million cells/ml--by 50 μg/ml of digitonin and permeabilization of 4.0-5.6 million cells/ml--by 100 μg/ml. Thus, the higher is the suspension density, the higher digitonin concentration is required. Treatment of hepatocytes with digitonin resulted in a decrease of endogenous respiration rate to a minimum upon 20-22 μg of digitonin per 1 million cells. Supplementation of permeabilized hepatocytes with α-ketoglutarate maintained stable respiration rate, on the level higher than endogenous respiration at the corresponding digitonin concentration, unlike the intact cells. Respiration rate of permeabilized hepatocytes at the simultaneous addition of α-ketoglutarate and ADP increased to the level of intact cell respiration, irrespective of digitonin concentration. Addition of solely succinate and especially succinate plus ADP markedly intensified the respiration of permeabilized hepatocytes to the level higher than that of intact cells. The dependence of succinate-stimulated respiration on digitonin concentration reached maximum at 20-22 αg of digitonin per 1 million cells. Optimal ratio of digitonin amount and the cell number in suspension is expected to be different in various tissues.

  15. Mechanisms of ER Stress-Mediated Mitochondrial Membrane Permeabilization.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gupta, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    During apoptosis, the process of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) represents a point-of-no-return as it commits the cell to death. Here we have assessed the role of caspases, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore on ER stress-induced MOMP and subsequent cell death. Induction of ER stress leads to upregulation of several genes such as Grp78, Edem1, Erp72, Atf4, Wars, Herp, p58ipk, and ERdj4 and leads to caspase activation, release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins and dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from caspase-9, -2 and, -3 knock-out mice were resistant to ER stress-induced apoptosis which correlated with decreased processing of pro-caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with caspase inhibitors (Boc-D.fmk and DEVD.fmk) attenuated ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. However, only deficiency of caspase-9 and -2 could prevent ER stress-mediated loss of DeltaPsim. Bcl-2 overexpression or pretreatment of cells with the cell permeable BH4 domain (BH4-Tat) or the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors, bongkrekic acid or cyclosporine A, attenuated the ER stress-induced loss of DeltaPsim. These data suggest a role for caspase-9 and -2, Bcl-2 family members and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential during ER stress-induced apoptosis.

  16. Specific receptor for inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate in permeabilized rabbit neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, P.G.; Spat, A.; Rubin, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Neutrophil chemotaxis and degranulation are resultant, in part, from the mobilization of intracellular calcium by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [(1,4,5)IP 3 ], one of the products of chemoattractant-stimulated phospholipase C activity. High specific activity (ca. 40 Ci/mmol) [ 32 P](1,4,5)IP 3 was prepared from [γ- 32 P]ATP-labeled human erythrocyte ghosts and was used in binding assays with saponin-permeabilized rabbit peritoneal neutrophils. At 4 0 C and in the presence of inhibitors of the IP 3 5-phosphomonoesterase, [ 32 P](1,4,5)IP 3 rapidly associated with a specific binding component which saturated within 60s. Nonspecific binding, taken as the residual binding in the presence of 10 μM (1,4,5)IP 3 , was 15% of the total. No specific binding was detected using intact cells. The specific binding to permeable cells was reversible (t/sup 1/2/ ∼ 60s) and could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by (1,4,5)IP 3 (EC 50 = 30 nM) and by other calcium mobilizing inositol phosphates [(2,4,5)IP 3 ] but not by inactive analogs [(1,4)IP 2 , (4,5)IP 2 , (1)IP]. The dose-responses of (1,4,5)IP 3 and (2,4,5)IP 3 in inhibiting [ 32 P](1,4,5)IP 3 specific binding correlated well with their abilities to release Ca 2+ from nonmitochondrial vesicular stores in the same preparation of cells, suggesting that the authors have identified the physiological receptor for (1,4,5)IP 3

  17. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kaneko, Toshiro; Kanzaki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor( s ), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OH aq ), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (<1 mm), and the plasma-produced OH aq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OH aq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OH aq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool. (paper)

  18. Investigation of Mitochondrial Dysfunction by Sequential Microplate-Based Respiration Measurements from Intact and Permeabilized Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria. PMID:22496810

  19. Statistical investigation of Kluyveromyces lactis cells permeabilization with ethanol by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Janaína T; Rocha, Pollyana F; Converti, Attilio; Passos, Flávia M L; Minim, Luis A; Sampaio, Fábio C

    2013-12-01

    The aim of our study was to select the optimal operating conditions to permeabilize Kluyveromyces lactis cells using ethanol as a solvent as an alternative to cell disruption and extraction. Cell permeabilization was carried out by a non-mechanical method consisting of chemical treatment with ethanol, and the results were expressed as β-galactosidase activity. Experiments were conducted under different conditions of ethanol concentration, treatment time and temperature according to a central composite rotatable design (CCRD), and the collected results were then worked out by response surface methodology (RSM). Cell permeabilization was improved by an increase in ethanol concentration and simultaneous decreases in the incubation temperature and treatment time. Such an approach allowed us to identify an optimal range of the independent variables within which the β-galactosidase activity was optimized. A maximum permeabilization of 2,816 mmol L(-1) oNP min(-1) g(-1) was obtained by treating cells with 75.0% v/v of ethanol at 20.0 °C for 15.0 min. The proposed methodology resulted to be effective and suited for K. lactis cells permeabilization at a lab-scale and promises to be of possible interest for future applications mainly in the food industry.

  20. Cell Fragmentation and Permeabilization by a 1 ns Pulse Driven Triple-Point Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enbo Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrashort electric pulses (ns-ps are useful in gaining understanding as to how pulsed electric fields act upon biological cells, but the electric field intensity to induce biological responses is typically higher than longer pulses and therefore a high voltage ultrashort pulse generator is required. To deliver 1 ns pulses with sufficient electric field but at a relatively low voltage, we used a glass-encapsulated tungsten wire triple-point electrode (TPE at the interface among glass, tungsten wire, and water when it is immersed in water. A high electric field (2 MV/cm can be created when pulses are applied. However, such a high electric field was found to cause bubble emission and temperature rise in the water near the electrode. They can be attributed to Joule heating near the electrode. Adherent cells on a cover slip treated by the combination of these stimuli showed two major effects: (1 cells in a crater (<100 μm from electrode were fragmented and the debris was blown away. The principal mechanism for the damage is presumed to be shear forces due to bubble collapse; and (2 cells in the periphery of the crater were permeabilized, which was due to the combination of bubble movement and microstreaming as well as pulsed electric fields. These results show that ultrashort electric fields assisted by microbubbles can cause significant cell response and therefore a triple-point electrode is a useful ablation tool for applications that require submillimeter precision.

  1. Improved ethanol production from whey Saccharomyces cerevisiae using permeabilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology; Tomaska, M [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology; Kanuch, J [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology; Sturdik, E [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia). Dept. of Biochemical Technology

    1996-12-31

    Permeabilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus CCY eSY2 were tested as the source of lactase in the ethanol fermentation of concentrated deproteinized whey (65-70 g/l lactose) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCY 10-13-14. Rapid lactose hydrolysis by small amounts of permeabilized cells following the fermentation of released glucose and galactose by S. cerevisiae resulted in a twofold enhancement of the overall volumetric productivity (1.03 g/lxh), compared to the fermentation in which the lactose was directly fermented by K. marxianus. (orig.)

  2. Permeabilization of Saccharomyces fragilis IZ 275 cells with ethanol to obtain a biocatalyst with lactose hydrolysis capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Rodrigo Ito Morioka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The permeabilization was used to transform microorganisms in cell biocatalysts with high enzymatic activity. The Saccharomyces fragilis IZ 275 yeast cells were permeabilized with ethanol, as permeabilizing agent. To optimize the permeabilization conditions were used the design of Box-Behnken 15 trials (3 central points. The independent variables and their levels were ethanol (29, 32 and 35%, temperature (15, 20 and 25°C and time (15, 20 and 25 min. The answer (Y function has beta-galactosidase activity (U mg-1. The optimum conditions for obtaining a high enzymatic activity were observed in 35% ethanol concentration, temperature 15ºC and 20 min. treatment time. The maximum activity of the enzyme beta-galactosidase obtained was 10.59 U mg-1. The permeabilization of the S. fragilis IZ 275 cells was efficient.

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Antimalarial Activity Assays of Seeds from Balanites aegyptiaca: Compounds of the Extract Show Growth Inhibition and Activity against Plasmodial Aminopeptidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kusch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Balanites aegyptiaca (Balanitaceae is a widely grown desert plant with multiuse potential. In the present paper, a crude extract from B. aegyptiaca seeds equivalent to a ratio of 1 : 2000 seeds to the extract was screened for antiplasmodial activity. The determined IC50 value for the chloroquine-susceptible Plasmodium falciparum NF54 strain was 68.26 g/L±3.5. Analysis of the extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 6-phenyl-2(H-1,2,4-triazin-5-one oxime, an inhibitor of the parasitic M18 Aspartyl Aminopeptidase as one of the compounds which is responsible for the in vitro antiplasmodial activity. The crude plant extract had a of 2.35 g/L and showed a dose-dependent response. After depletion of the compound, a significantly lower inhibition was determined with a of 4.8 g/L. Moreover, two phenolic compounds, that is, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-phenol and 2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenol, with determined IC50 values of 50.29 M±3 and 47.82 M±2.5, respectively, were detected. These compounds may contribute to the in vitro antimalarial activity due to their antioxidative properties. In an in vivo experiment, treatment of BALB/c mice with the aqueous Balanite extract did not lead to eradication of the parasites, although a reduced parasitemia at day 12 p.i. was observed.

  4. Protamine-induced permeabilization of cell envelopes of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Verheul, A.; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    carboxyfluorescein and ATP after 2 to 5 min. Maximum antibacterial activity was reached at alkaline pH and in the absence of divalent cations. The efficient permeabilization of cell envelopes of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria suggests that protamine causes a general disruption of the cell envelope...

  5. Osmotic and thermal effects on in situ ATPase activity in permeabilized gill epithelial cells of the fish Gillichthys mirabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    KÜLtz; Somero

    1995-01-01

    Long-jawed mudsuckers (Gillichthys mirabilis) were acclimated to sea water (SW) at 7 °C, SW at 26 °C or dilute sea water (DSW) at 26 °C for 5 months. Gill cells were isolated and the proportion of mitochondria-rich (MR) cells was determined. The number of cells harvested amounted to 4.7x10(7)±0.6x10(7) to 10.6x10(7)±1.1x10(7) and the yield was between 7.1x10(8)±0.6x10(8) and 10.7x10(8)±1.4x10(8) cells g-1 gill epithelial mass. Cell viability was 96.8±0.4 to 97.8±0.6 %. The number, size and volume of MR cells decreased significantly during DSW acclimation, but did not change during thermal acclimation. The protein content was not influenced by osmotic or thermal acclimation and ranged between 20.0±1.6 and 22.1±1.5 pg cell-1. Using a new method, which is based on the formation of plasma membrane channels by alamethicin, we were able to permeabilize gill cells. For the first time, the Na+/K+-ATPase and H+-ATPase activities of fish gills were determined in intact cells in situ. The activity of both ATPases was dependent on alamethicin concentration (optimum 100 µg mg-1 protein) and on preincubation time (optimum 10 min). The in situ activity of both ATPases was influenced by osmotic, but not thermal, acclimation. A positive linear correlation was found between in situ Na+/K+-ATPase activity and total MR cell volume. However, we show, for the first time, that a negative linear correlation exists between H+-ATPase activity and total MR cell volume, suggesting a localization of H+-ATPase in pavement cells. In permeabilized cells, the activity of both ATPases was 2.6­3.9 times higher than that of crude homogenates and 1.6­2.1 times higher than that of permeabilized homogenate vesicles. We hypothesize that in crude homogenates three-quarters of Na+/K+-ATPase and two-thirds of H+-ATPase activity are not detectable both because of a mixture of inside-out and right-side-out vesicles and because of the disruption of membrane and enzyme integrity.

  6. D-malate production by permeabilized Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes; optimization of conversion and biocatalyst productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, M J; Frielink, C; Wijffels, R H; Tramper, J; Beeftink, H H

    2000-04-14

    For the development of a continuous process for the production of solid D-malate from a Ca-maleate suspension by permeabilized Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, it is important to understand the effect of appropriate process parameters on the stability and activity of the biocatalyst. Previously, we quantified the effect of product (D-malate2 -) concentration on both the first-order biocatalyst inactivation rate and on the biocatalytic conversion rate. The effects of the remaining process parameters (ionic strength, and substrate and Ca2 + concentration) on biocatalyst activity are reported here. At (common) ionic strengths below 2 M, biocatalyst activity was unaffected. At high substrate concentrations, inhibition occurred. Ca2+ concentration did not affect biocatalyst activity. The kinetic parameters (both for conversion and inactivation) were determined as a function of temperature by fitting the complete kinetic model, featuring substrate inhibition, competitive product inhibition and first-order irreversible biocatalyst inactivation, at different temperatures simultaneously through three extended data sets of substrate concentration versus time. Temperature affected both the conversion and inactivation parameters. The final model was used to calculate the substrate and biocatalyst costs per mmol of product in a continuous system with biocatalyst replenishment and biocatalyst recycling. Despite the effect of temperature on each kinetic parameter separately, the overall effect of temperature on the costs was found to be negligible (between 293 and 308 K). Within pertinent ranges, the sum of the substrate and biocatalyst costs per mmol of product was calculated to decrease with the influent substrate concentration and the residence time. The sum of the costs showed a minimum as a function of the influent biocatalyst concentration.

  7. Ethambutol-induced toxicity is mediated by zinc and lysosomal membrane permeabilization in cultured retinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyewon; Yoon, Young Hee; Hwang, Jung Jin; Cho, Kyung Sook; Koh, Jae Young; Kim, June-Gone

    2009-01-01

    Ethambutol, an efficacious antituberculosis agent, can cause irreversible visual loss in a small but significant fraction of patients. However, the mechanism of ocular toxicity remains to be established. We previously reported that ethambutol caused severe vacuole formation in cultured retinal cells, and that the addition of zinc along with ethambutol aggravated vacuole formation whereas addition of the cell-permeable zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), reduced vacuole formation. To investigate the origin of vacuoles and to obtain an understanding of drug toxicity, we used cultured primary retinal cells from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats and imaged ethambutol-treated cells stained with FluoZin-3, zinc-specific fluorescent dye, under a confocal microscope. Almost all ethambutol-induced vacuoles contained high levels of labile zinc. Double staining with LysoTracker or MitoTracker revealed that almost all zinc-containing vacuoles were lysosomes and not mitochondria. Intracellular zinc chelation with TPEN markedly blocked both vacuole formation and zinc accumulation in the vacuole. Immunocytochemistry with antibodies to lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) and cathepsin D, an acid lysosomal hydrolase, disclosed lysosomal activation after exposure to ethambutol. Immunoblotting after 12 h exposure to ethambutol showed that cathepsin D was released into the cytosol. In addition, cathepsin inhibitors attenuated retinal cell toxicity induced by ethambutol. This is consistent with characteristics of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). TPEN also inhibited both lysosomal activation and LMP. Thus, accumulation of zinc in lysosomes, and eventual LMP, may be a key mechanism of ethambutol-induced retinal cell death

  8. Induction of Highly Curved Structures in Relation to Membrane Permeabilization and Budding by the Triterpenoid Saponins, α- and δ-Hederin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorent, Joseph; Le Duff, Cécile S.; Quetin-Leclercq, Joelle; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of triterpenoid monodesmosidic saponins, α-hederin and δ-hederin, with lipid membranes are involved in their permeabilizing effect. Unfortunately, the interactions of these saponins with lipid membranes are largely unknown, as are the roles of cholesterol or the branched sugar moieties (two for α-hederin and one for δ-hederin) on the aglycone backbone, hederagenin. The differences in sugar moieties are responsible for differences in the molecular shape of the saponins and the effects on membrane curvature that should be the most positive for α-hederin in a transbilayer direction. In large unilamellar vesicles and monocyte cells, we showed that membrane permeabilization was dependent on the presence of membrane cholesterol and saponin sugar chains, being largest for α-hederin and smallest for hederagenin. In the presence of cholesterol, α-hederin induced the formation of nonbilayer phases with a higher rate of Brownian tumbling or lateral diffusion. A reduction of Laurdan's generalized polarization in relation to change in order of the polar heads of phospholipids was observed. Using giant unilamellar vesicles, we visualized the formation of wrinkled borders, the decrease in liposome size, budding, and the formation of macroscopic pores. All these processes are highly dependent on the sugars linked to the aglycone, with α-hederin showing a greater ability to induce pore formation and δ-hederin being more efficient in inducing budding. Hederagenin induced intravesicular budding but no pore formation. Based on these results, a curvature-driven permeabilization mechanism dependent on the interaction between saponin and sterols and on the molecular shape of the saponin and its ability to induce local spontaneous curvature is proposed. PMID:23530040

  9. Reconstitution of proapoptotic BAK function in liposomes reveals a dual role for mitochondrial lipids in the BAK-driven membrane permeabilization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeta, Olatz; Landajuela, Ane; Gil, David; Taneva, Stefka; Di Primo, Carmelo; Sot, Begoña; Valle, Mikel; Frolov, Vadim A; Basañez, Gorka

    2011-03-11

    BAK is a key effector of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) whose molecular mechanism of action remains to be fully dissected in intact cells, mainly due to the inherent complexity of the intracellular apoptotic machinery. Here we show that the core features of the BAK-driven MOMP pathway can be reproduced in a highly simplified in vitro system consisting of recombinant human BAK lacking the carboxyl-terminal 21 residues (BAKΔC) and tBID in combination with liposomes bearing an appropriate lipid environment. Using this minimalist reconstituted system we established that tBID suffices to trigger BAKΔC membrane insertion, oligomerization, and pore formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that tBID-activated BAKΔC permeabilizes the membrane by forming structurally dynamic pores rather than a large proteinaceous channel of fixed size. We also identified two distinct roles played by mitochondrial lipids along the molecular pathway of BAKΔC-induced membrane permeabilization. First, using several independent approaches, we showed that cardiolipin directly interacts with BAKΔC, leading to a localized structural rearrangement in the protein that "primes" BAKΔC for interaction with tBID. Second, we provide evidence that selected curvature-inducing lipids present in mitochondrial membranes specifically modulate the energetic expenditure required to create the BAKΔC pore. Collectively, our results support the notion that BAK functions as a direct effector of MOMP akin to BAX and also adds significantly to the growing evidence indicating that mitochondrial membrane lipids are actively implicated in BCL-2 protein family function.

  10. Compact Electro-Permeabilization System for Controlled Treatment of Biological Cells and Cell Medium Conductivity Change Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novickij Vitalij

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Subjection of biological cells to high intensity pulsed electric field results in the permeabilization of the cell membrane. Measurement of the electrical conductivity change allows an analysis of the dynamics of the process, determination of the permeabilization thresholds, and ion efflux influence. In this work a compact electro-permeabilization system for controlled treatment of biological cells is presented. The system is capable of delivering 5 μs - 5 ms repetitive square wave electric field pulses with amplitude up to 1 kV. Evaluation of the cell medium conductivity change is implemented in the setup, allowing indirect measurement of the ion concentration changes occurring due to the cell membrane permeabilization. The simulation model using SPICE and the experimental data of the proposed system are presented in this work. Experimental data with biological cells is also overviewed

  11. Plasma membrane temperature gradients and multiple cell permeabilization induced by low peak power density femtosecond lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen L. Garner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Calculations indicate that selectively heating the extracellular media induces membrane temperature gradients that combine with electric fields and a temperature-induced reduction in the electropermeabilization threshold to potentially facilitate exogenous molecular delivery. Experiments by a wide-field, pulsed femtosecond laser with peak power density far below typical single cell optical delivery systems confirmed this hypothesis. Operating this laser in continuous wave mode at the same average power permeabilized many fewer cells, suggesting that bulk heating alone is insufficient and temperature gradients are crucial for permeabilization. This work suggests promising opportunities for a high throughput, low cost, contactless method for laser mediated exogenous molecule delivery without the complex optics of typical single cell optoinjection, for potential integration into microscope imaging and microfluidic systems.

  12. A Novel Protocol for Decoating and Permeabilizing Bacterial Spores for Epifluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuc, Myron T.; Mohapatra, Bidyut

    2014-01-01

    Based on previously reported procedures for permeabilizing vegetative bacterial cells, and numerous trial-and-error attempts with bacterial endospores, a protocol was developed for effectively permeabilizing bacterial spores, which facilitated the applicability of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy. Bacterial endospores were first purified from overgrown, sporulated suspensions of B. pumilus SAFR-032. Purified spores at a concentration of approx equals 10 million spores/mL then underwent proteinase-K treatment, in a solution of 468.5 µL of 100 mM Tris-HCl, 30 µL of 10% SDS, and 1.5 microL of 20 mg/mL proteinase-K for ten minutes at 35 ºC. Spores were then harvested by centrifugation (15,000 g for 15 minutes) and washed twice with sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution. This washing process consisted of resuspending the spore pellets in 0.5 mL of PBS, vortexing momentarily, and harvesting again by centrifugation. Treated and washed spore pellets were then resuspended in 0.5 mL of decoating solution, which consisted of 4.8 g urea, 3 mL Milli-Q water, 1 mL 0.5M Tris, 1 mL 1M dithiothreitol (DTT), and 2 mL 10% sodium-dodecylsulfate (SDS), and were incubated at 65 ºC for 15 minutes while being shaken at 165 rpm. Decoated spores were then, once again, washed twice with sterile PBS, and subjected to lysozyme/mutanolysin treatment (7 mg/mL lysozyme and 7U mutanolysin) for 15 minutes at 35 C. Spores were again washed twice with sterile PBS, and spore pellets were resuspended in 1-mL of 2% SDS. This treatment, facilitating inner membrane permeabilization, lasted for ten minutes at room temperature. Permeabilized spores were washed two final times with PBS, and were resuspended in 200 mkcroL of sterile PBS. At this point, the spores were permeable and ready for downstream processing, such as oligonucleotideprobe infiltration, hybridization, and microscopic evaluation. FISH-microscopic imagery confirmed the effective and efficient (˜50

  13. Delivery of Optical Contrast Agents using Triton-X100, Part 1: Reversible permeabilization of live cells for intracellular labeling

    OpenAIRE

    van de Ven, Anne L; Adler-Storthz, Karen; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Effective delivery of optical contrast agents into live cells remains a significant challenge. We sought to determine whether Triton-X100, a detergent commonly used for membrane isolation and protein purification, could be used to effectively and reversibly permeabilize live cells for delivery of targeted optical contrast agents. Although Triton-X100 is widely recognized as a good cell permeabilization agent, no systematic study has evaluated the efficiency, reproducibility, and reversibility...

  14. Effects of alterations of the E. coli lipopolysaccharide layer on membrane permeabilization events induced by Cecropin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anurag; Weisshaar, James C

    2018-04-22

    The outermost layer of Gram negative bacteria is composed of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) network that forms a dense protective hydrophilic barrier against entry of hydrophobic drugs. At low μM concentrations, a large family of cationic polypeptides known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are able to penetrate the LPS layer and permeabilize the outer membrane (OM) and the cytoplasmic membrane (CM), causing cell death. Cecropin A is a well-studied cationic AMP from moth. Here a battery of time-resolved, single-cell microscopy experiments explores how deletion of sugar layers and/or phosphoryl negative charges from the core oligosaccharide layer (core OS) of K12 E. coli alters the timing of OM and CM permeabilization induced by Cecropin A. Deletion of sugar layers, or phosphoryl charges, or both from the core OS shortens the time to the onset of OM permeabilization to periplasmic GFP and also the lag time between OM permeabilization and CM permeabilization. Meanwhile, the 12-h minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) changes only twofold with core OS alterations. The results suggest a two-step model in which the core oligosaccharide layers act as a kinetic barrier to penetration of Cecropin A to the lipid A outer leaflet of the OM. Once a threshold concentration has built up at the lipid A leaflet, nucleation occurs and the OM is locally permeabilized to GFP and, by inference, to Cecropin A. Whenever Cecropin A permeabilizes the OM, CM permeabilization always follows, and cell growth subsequently halts and never recovers on the 45 min observation timescale. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of inositol trisphosphate on calcium mobilization in high-voltage and saponin-permeabilized platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gear, A.R.L.; Hallam, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Interest in phosphatidylinositol metabolism has been greatly stimulated by the findings that diglyceride and inositol phosphates may serve as second messengers in modulating cellular function. Formation of 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ), in particular, has been linked to mobilization of intracellular calcium in a number of cell types. The authors have examined the ability of IP 3 to mobilize calcium in human platelets permeabilized by either saponin or high-voltage discharge. Saponin at 15 μg/ml effectively permeabilized platelets to exogenous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate which released bound [ 45 Ca] within 1 min and with a Ka of 7.4 +/- 4.1 μM. A small (25%) azide-sensitive pool was also responsive to inositol trisphosphate. The calcium pools were completely discharged by A-23187 and the ATP-dependent uptake was prevented by dinitrophenol. In contrast to the result with saponin, platelets accessed by high-voltage discharge were insensitive to challenge by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The data suggest that while inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate can rapidly mobilize platelet calcium, the ability to demonstrate this depends on the method of permeabilization

  16. A new technique for reversible permeabilization of live cells for intracellular delivery of quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medepalli, Krishnakiran; Alphenaar, Bruce W; Keynton, Robert S; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge with the use of quantum dots (QDs) for cellular imaging and biomolecular delivery is the attainment of QDs freely dispersed inside the cells. Conventional methods such as endocytosis, lipids based delivery and electroporation are associated with delivery of QDs in vesicles and/or as aggregates that are not monodispersed. In this study, we demonstrate a new technique for reversible permeabilization of cells to enable the introduction of freely dispersed QDs within the cytoplasm. Our approach combines osmosis driven fluid transport into cells achieved by creating a hypotonic environment and reversible permeabilization using low concentrations of cell permeabilization agents like Saponin. Our results confirm that highly efficient endocytosis-free intracellular delivery of QDs can be accomplished using this method. The best results were obtained when the cells were treated with 50 μg ml −1 Saponin in a hypotonic buffer at a 3:2 physiological buffer:DI water ratio for 5 min at 4 ° C. (paper)

  17. Angiotensin II potentiates prostaglandin stimulation of cyclic AMP levels in intact bovine adrenal medulla cells but not adenylate cyclase in permeabilized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, M R; Plevin, R; Marriott, D B

    1988-10-25

    The level of cyclic AMP in primary cultures of bovine adrenal medulla cells is elevated by prostaglandin E1. Angiotensin II is commonly reported to act on receptors linked to phosphoinositide metabolism or to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. We have investigated the effect of angiotensin II on prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP levels in these primary cultures. Rather than reducing cyclic AMP levels, we have found that angiotensin II powerfully potentiates prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, both in the presence and absence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The 50% maximal response was similar to that for stimulation of phosphoinositide breakdown by angiotensin II in these cultures. The potentiation of stimulated cyclic AMP levels was seen, although to a smaller maximum, with the protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme) activating phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbolacetate and with the synthetic diacylglycerol 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; pretreatment (24 h) with active phorbol ester, which would be expected to diminish protein kinase C levels, attenuated the angiotensin II potentiation of cyclic AMP. Using digitonin-permeabilized cells we showed that adenylate cyclase activity was stimulated by prostaglandin E1 with the same dose-response relationship as was cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, but the permeabilized cells showed no response to angiotensin II. The results are discussed with respect to the hypothesis that the angiotensin II influence on cyclic AMP levels is mediated, in part, by diacylglycerol stimulation of protein kinase C.

  18. DNA synthesis in permeabilized WI38 and MRC5 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, T.D.; Carpenter, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    DNA synthesis was examined in cultures of growing WI38 and MRC5 cells made permeable to deoxyribonucleotides. Cells from late passage cultures showed a reduced rate of deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) uptake as compared to cells from early- to mid-passage cultures. This reduction became evident earlier in WI38 cultures (passage 33) than in MRC5 cultures (passage 41). Although this reduced rate of incorporation appeared to be primarily due to a reduced percentage of replicating (S phase) cells in later passage cultures, some effect on the rate of DNA synthesis in replicating cells was also evident

  19. Importance of association between permeabilization and electrophoretic forces for intramuscular DNA electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bureau, M F; Gehl, J; Deleuze, V

    2000-01-01

    is largely open. We have evaluated the effects of various combinations of square wave electric pulses of variable field strength and duration, on cell permeabilization and on DNA transfection in the skeletal muscle in vivo. One high voltage pulse of 800 V/cm, 0.1 ms duration (short high pulse) or a series......Gene transfer using electrical pulses is a rapidly expanding field. Many studies have been performed in vitro to elucidate the mechanism of DNA electrotransfer. In vivo, the use of efficient procedures for DNA electrotransfer in tissues is recent, and the question of the implied mechanisms...

  20. Use of digitonin permeabilization for characterization of calcium incorporated into. beta. cells in response to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesslen, N [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    ..beta.. cell-rich pancreatic islets were used to characterize /sup 45/Ca uptake into pools with different sensitivities to permeabilization with digitonin. The plasma and secretory granule membranes were among the membranes most sensitive to digitonin treatment whereas the mitochondria were more resistant. Most of the /sup 45/Ca incorporated in response to glucose was found in a fraction released after exposure to a high concentration of digitonin. The results suggest that glucose promotes active sequestration of calcium in mitochondria and that the uptake of /sup 45/Ca in the secretory granules in secondary to a raised cytosolic Ca/sup 2 +/ activity.

  1. Lipotoxicity Mediated Cell Dysfunction and Death Involves Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization and Cathepsin L Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguel, Frankis G.; Liu, Jo-Wen; Pacheco, Fabio J.; De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A.; De Leon, Marino

    2010-01-01

    Lipotoxicity, which is triggered when cells are exposed to elevated levels of free fatty acids, involves cell dysfunction and apoptosis and is emerging as an underlying factor contributing to various pathological conditions including disorders of the central nervous system and diabetes. We have shown that palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipotoxicity (PA-LTx) in nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 (NGFDPC12) cells is linked to an augmented state of cellular oxidative stress (ASCOS) and apoptosis, and that these events are inhibited by docosahexanoic acid (DHA). The mechanisms of PA-LTx in nerve cells are not well understood, but our previous findings indicate that it involves ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), and caspase activation. The present study used nerve growth factor differentiated PC12 cells (NGFDPC12 cells) and found that lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is an early event during PA-induced lipotoxicity that precedes MMP and apoptosis. Cathepsin L, but not cathepsin B, is an important contributor in this process since its pharmacological inhibition significantly attenuated LMP, MMP, and apoptosis. In addition, co-treatment of NGFDPC12 cells undergoing lipotoxicity with DHA significantly reduced LMP, suggesting that DHA acts by antagonizing upstream signals leading to lysosomal dysfunction. These results suggest that LMP is a key early mediator of lipotoxicity, and underscore the value of interventions targeting upstream signals leading to LMP for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with lipotoxicity. PMID:20043885

  2. The Octyl Ester of Ginsenoside Rh2 Induces Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization via Bax Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rh2 is a potential pharmacologically active metabolite of ginseng. Previously, we have reported that an octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O, has been confirmed to possess higher bioavailability and anticancer effect than Rh2 in vitro. In order to better assess the possibility that Rh2-O could be used as an anticancer compound, the underlying mechanism was investigated in this study. The present results revealed that lysosomal destabilization was involved in the early stage of cell apoptosis in HepG2 cells induced by Rh2-O. Rh2-O could induce an early lysosomal membrane permeabilization with the release of lysosomal protease cathepsins to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. The Cat B inhibitor (leu and Cat D inhibitor (pepA inhibited Rh2-O-induced HepG2 apoptosis as well as tBid production and Δφm depolarization, indicating that lysosomal permeabilization occurred upstream of mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, Rh2-O induced a significant increase in the protein levels of DRAM1 and Bax (p < 0.05 in lysosomes of HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Bax partially inhibited Rh2-O-induced Cat D release from lysosomes. Thus it was concluded that Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through activation of the lysosomal-mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involving the translocation of Bax to the lysosome.

  3. Regulation of mitochondrial respiration by inorganic phosphate; comparing permeabilized muscle fibers and isolated mitochondria prepared from type-1 and type-2 rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    ADP is generally accepted as a key regulator of oxygen consumption both in isolated mitochondria and in permeabilized fibers from skeletal muscle. The present study explored inorganic phosphate in a similar regulatory role. Saponin permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria from type-I and type...

  4. Reliability of maximal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in permeabilized fibers from the vastus lateralis employing high-resolution respirometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardinale, Daniele A; Gejl, Kasper D; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2018-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the impact of various factors on methodological errors associated with measurement of maximal oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in human skeletal muscle determined by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized fibers. Biopsies were collected from 25 men...

  5. Permeabilization of fungal hyphae by the plant defensin NaD1 occurs through a cell wall-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weerden, Nicole L; Hancock, Robert E W; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2010-11-26

    The antifungal activity of the plant defensin NaD1 involves specific interaction with the fungal cell wall, followed by permeabilization of the plasma membrane and entry of NaD1 into the cytoplasm. Prior to this study, the role of membrane permeabilization in the activity of NaD1, as well as the relevance of cell wall binding, had not been investigated. To address this, the permeabilization of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum hyphae by NaD1 was investigated and compared with that by other antimicrobial peptides, including the cecropin-melittin hybrid peptide CP-29, the bovine peptide BMAP-28, and the human peptide LL-37, which are believed to act largely through membrane disruption. NaD1 appeared to permeabilize cells via a novel mechanism that required the presence of the fungal cell wall. NaD1 and Bac2A, a linear variant of the bovine peptide bactenecin, were able to enter the cytoplasm of treated hyphae, indicating that cell death is accelerated by interaction with intracellular targets.

  6. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization in cell death: new evidence and implications for health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Puebla, Ana; Boya, Patricia

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that, in addition to their central role in cellular catabolic reactions, lysosomes are implicated in many cellular processes, including metabolism, membrane repair, and cell death. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) has emerged as a pathway by which cell demise is regulated under physiological conditions and contributes to cell death in many pathological situations. Here, we review the latest evidence on LMP-mediated cell death, the upstream and downstream signals involved, and the role of LMP in the normal physiology of organisms. We also discuss the contributions of lysosomal damage and LMP to the pathogenic features of several disease states, such as lysosomal storage disorders and other neurodegenerative conditions. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Purification of alpha-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus and application to cell permeabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, I.; Ahnert-Hilger, G.; Fuchs, G.; Gratzl, M.

    1987-01-01

    Crude alpha-toxin was produced by Staphylococcus aureus, strain Wood 46. The amount of exotoxin was monitored during growth and all subsequent purification steps by determination of its hemolytic activity against rabbit erythrocytes. The culture supernatant was treated with ammonium sulfate (75% saturation). The resulting precipitate was dialyzed and subjected to cation-exchange chromatography. The fractions containing the hemolytic activity were further purified by gel chromatography. The final product was enriched by a factor of 8.5 compared to the crude toxin. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the purified toxin exhibited one major band. It caused the release of 86 Rb+ and ATP from rat insulinoma (RIN A2) as well as pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) in culture, indicating efficient permeabilization of their plasma membranes for small molecules

  8. Rigor force responses of permeabilized fibres from fast and slow skeletal muscles of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, D R; Lynch, G S

    2001-09-01

    1. Ageing is generally associated with a decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength and a slowing of muscle contraction, factors that impact upon the quality of life for the elderly. The mechanisms underlying this age-related muscle weakness have not been fully resolved. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the decrease in muscle force as a consequence of age could be attributed partly to a decrease in the number of cross-bridges participating during contraction. 2. Given that the rigor force is proportional to the approximate total number of interacting sites between the actin and myosin filaments, we tested the null hypothesis that the rigor force of permeabilized muscle fibres from young and old rats would not be different. 3. Permeabilized fibres from the extensor digitorum longus (fast-twitch; EDL) and soleus (predominantly slow-twitch) muscles of young (6 months of age) and old (27 months of age) male F344 rats were activated in Ca2+-buffered solutions to determine force-pCa characteristics (where pCa = -log(10)[Ca2+]) and then in solutions lacking ATP and Ca2+ to determine rigor force levels. 4. The rigor forces for EDL and soleus muscle fibres were not different between young and old rats, indicating that the approximate total number of cross-bridges that can be formed between filaments did not decline with age. We conclude that the age-related decrease in force output is more likely attributed to a decrease in the force per cross-bridge and/or decreases in the efficiency of excitation-contraction coupling.

  9. Important factors for cell-membrane permeabilization by gold nanoparticles activated by nanosecond-laser irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao CP

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cuiping Yao,1,2,* Florian Rudnitzki,2,* Gereon Hüttmann,2,3 Zhenxi Zhang,1 Ramtin Rahmanzadeh2 1Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, Institute of Biomedical Analytical Technology and Instrumentation, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China; 2Institute of Biomedical Optics, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, 3Airway Research Center North (ARCN, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL, Kiel, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Pulsed-laser irradiation of light-absorbing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs attached to cells transiently increases cell membrane permeability for targeted molecule delivery. Here, we targeted EGFR on the ovarian carcinoma cell line OVCAR-3 with AuNPs. In order to optimize membrane permeability and to demonstrate molecule delivery into adherent OVCAR-3 cells, we systematically investigated different experimental conditions. Materials and methods: AuNPs (30 nm were functionalized by conjugation of the antibody cetuximab against EGFR. Selective binding of the particles was demonstrated by silver staining, multiphoton imaging, and fluorescence-lifetime imaging. After laser irradiation, membrane permeability of OVCAR-3 cells was studied under different conditions of AuNP concentration, cell-incubation medium, and cell–AuNP incubation time. Membrane permeability and cell viability were evaluated by flow cytometry, measuring propidium iodide and fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran uptake. Results: Adherently growing OVCAR-3 cells can be effectively targeted with EGFR-AuNP. Laser irradiation led to successful permeabilization, and 150 kDa dextran was successfully delivered into cells with about 70% efficiency. Conclusion: Antibody-targeted and laser-irradiated AuNPs can be used to deliver molecules into adherent cells. Efficacy depends not only on laser parameters but also on AuNP:cell ratio, cell-incubation medium

  10. Histograms showing variations in oil yield, water yield, and specific gravity of oil from Fischer assay analyses of oil-shale drill cores and cuttings from the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, John D.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado contains over 1.5 trillion barrels of oil in place, making the basin the largest known oil-shale deposit in the world. Previously published histograms display oil-yield variations with depth and widely correlate rich and lean oil-shale beds and zones throughout the basin. Histograms in this report display oil-yield data plotted alongside either water-yield or oil specific-gravity data. Fischer assay analyses of core and cutting samples collected from exploration drill holes penetrating the Eocene Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin can aid in determining the origins of those deposits, as well as estimating the amount of organic matter, halite, nahcolite, and water-bearing minerals. This report focuses only on the oil yield plotted against water yield and oil specific gravity.

  11. Synergistic effect of enterocin AS-48 in combination with outer membrane permeabilizing treatments against Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananou, S; Gálvez, A; Martínez-Bueno, M; Maqueda, M; Valdivia, E

    2005-01-01

    To determine the effects of outer membrane (OM) permeabilizing agents on the antimicrobial activity of enterocin AS-48 against Escherichia coli O157:H7 CECT 4783 strain in buffer and apple juice. We determined the influence of pH, EDTA, sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) and heat on E. coli O157:H7 CECT 4783 sensitivity to enterocin AS-48 in buffer and in apple juice. Enterocin AS-48 was not active against intact cells of E. coli O157:H7 CECT 4783 at neutral pH. However, cells sublethally injured by OM permeabilizing agents (EDTA, STPP, pH 5, pH 8.6 and heat) became sensitive to AS-48, decreasing the amount of bacteriocin required for inhibition of E. coli O157:H7 CECT 4783. The results presented indicate that enterocin AS-48 could potentially be applied with a considerably wider range of protective agents, such as OM permeabilizing agents, with increased efficacy in inhibiting E. coli O157:H7. Results from this study support the potential use of enterocin AS-48 to control E. coli O157:H7 in combination with other hurdles.

  12. Biocatalytic Production of Trehalose from Maltose by Using Whole Cells of Permeabilized Recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojuan Zheng

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide, which can protect proteins, lipid membranes, and cells from desiccation, refrigeration, dehydration, and other harsh environments. Trehalose can be produced by different pathways and trehalose synthase pathway is a convenient, practical, and low-cost pathway for the industrial production of trehalose. In this study, 3 candidate treS genes were screened from genomic databases of Pseudomonas and expressed in Escherichia coli. One of them from P. stutzeri A1501 exhibited the best transformation ability from maltose into trehalose and the least byproduct. Thus, whole cells of this recombinant E. coli were used as biocatalyst for trehalose production. In order to improve the conversion rate of maltose to trehalose, optimization of the permeabilization and biotransformation were carried out. Under optimal conditions, 92.2 g/l trehalose was produced with a high productivity of 23.1 g/(l h. No increase of glucose was detected during the whole course. The biocatalytic process developed in this study might serve as a candidate for the large scale production of trehalose.

  13. d-Tagatose production by permeabilized and immobilized Lactobacillus plantarum using whey permeate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamuthunagai, J; Srisowmeya, G; Chakravarthy, M; Gautam, P

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the work is to produce d-Tagatose by direct addition of alginate immobilized Lactobacillus plantarum cells to lactose hydrolysed whey permeate. The cells were untreated and immobilized (UIC), permeabilized and immobilized (PIC) and the relative activities were compared with purified l-arabinose isomerase (l-AI) for d-galactose isomerization. Successive lactose hydrolysis by β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli and d-galactose isomerization using l-AI from Lactobacillus plantarum was performed to investigate the in vivo production of d-tagatose in whey permeate. In whey permeate, maximum conversion of 38% and 33% (w/w) d-galactose isomerization by PIC and UIC has been obtained. 162mg/g and 141mg/g of d-tagatose production was recorded in a 48h reaction time at 50°C, pH 7.0 with 5mM Mn 2+ ion concentration in the initial substrate mixture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Menadione (vitamin K enhances the antibiotic activity of drugs by cell membrane permeabilization mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline C. Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Menadione, vitamin K3, belongs to the class of lipid-soluble vitamins and lipophilic substances as menadione cause disturbances in the bacterial membrane, resulting in damage to the fundamental elements for the integrity of the membrane, thus allowing increased permeability. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the antibiotic-modifying activity of menadione in multiresistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, with a gradual increase in its subinhibitory concentration. In addition, menadione was compared with cholesterol and ergosterol for similarity in mechanism of drug modulatory action. Antibiotic-modifying activity and antibacterial effect were determined by the broth microdilution assay. Menadione, cholesterol and ergosterol showed modulatory activity at clinically relevant concentrations, characterizing them as modifiers of bacterial drug resistance, since they lowered the MIC of the antibiotics tested. This is the first report of the antibacterial activity of menadione and its potentiation of aminoglycosides against multiresistant bacteria.

  15. Increased Production of Food-Grade d-Tagatose from d-Galactose by Permeabilized and Immobilized Cells of Corynebacterium glutamicum, a GRAS Host, Expressing d-Galactose Isomerase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Chul; Sim, Dong-Hyun; Seo, Min-Ju; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2016-11-02

    The generally recognized as safe microorganism Corynebacterium glutamicum expressing Geobacillus thermodenitrificans d-galactose isomerase (d-GaI) was an efficient host for the production of d-tagatose, a functional sweetener. The d-tagatose production at 500 g/L d-galactose by the host was 1.4-fold higher than that by Escherichia coli expressing d-GaI. The d-tagatose-producing activity of permeabilized C. glutamicum (PCG) cells treated with 1% (w/v) Triton X-100 was 2.1-fold higher than that of untreated cells. Permeabilized and immobilized C. glutamicum (PICG) cells in 3% (w/v) alginate showed a 3.1-fold longer half-life at 50 °C and 3.1-fold higher total d-tagatose concentration in repeated batch reactions than PCG cells. PICG cells, which produced 165 g/L d-tagatose after 3 h, with a conversion of 55% (w/w) and a productivity of 55 g/L/h, showed significantly higher d-tagatose productivity than that reported for other cells. Thus, d-tagatose production by PICG cells may be an economical process to produce food-grade d-tagatose.

  16. Characteristics of inositol trisphosphate mediated Ca2+ release from permeabilized hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, S.K.; Williamson, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Ca 2+ release triggered by inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ) has been measured in saponin-permeabilized hepatocytes with 45 Ca 2+ or Quin 2. The initial rate of Ca 2+ release was not markedly affected by the incubation temperature (175 +/- 40 pmol/s/mg at 30 0 C versus 133 +/- 24 pmol/s/mg at 4 0 C). This result is consistent with the membrane translocation of Ca 2+ occurring through an ion-channel rather than an ion-carrier. The amount of Ca 2+ released by IP 3 was not affected by pH (6.5-8.0) or by compounds that inhibit voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels. La 3+ (100 μM) markedly inhibits the effect of 1 μM IP 3 . The possibility that La 3+ chelates IP 3 cannot be excluded since the effect of La 3+ can be overcome by increasing the IP 3 concentration. IP 3 -mediated Ca 2+ release displays a requirement for a permeant cation in the incubation medium. Optimal release is observed with K + gluconate. Other monovalent cations, with the exception of Li + , can substitute for K + . Permeant anions, at concentrations above 40 mM, inhibit Ca 2+ release produced by IP 3 . Cl - , Br - , I - , and SO 4 2- were equally effective. Ca 2+ release was not inhibited by DIDS or Furosemide. 85 Sr 2+ and 54 Mn 2+ fluxes were also stimulated by IP 3 . These results suggest that IP 3 acts to gate a divalent cation channel. The translocation of positive charge through this channel is balanced by ancillary movements of monovalent cations and anions across the reticular membrane

  17. Hydrogen peroxide modulates Ca2+-activation of single permeabilized fibres from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, D R; Lynch, G S; Williams, D A

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of redox modulation on single membrane-permeabilized fibre segments from the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of adult rats to determine whether the contractile apparatus was the redox target responsible for the increased contractility of muscles exposed to low concentrations of H2O2. The effects of H2O2 on maximum Ca2+-activated force were dose-dependent with 30 min exposure to 5 mM H2O2 causing a progressive decrease by 22+/-3 and 13+/-2% in soleus and EDL permeabilized muscle fibres, respectively. Lower concentrations of exogenous H2O2 (100 microM and 1 mM) had no effect on maximum Ca2+-activated force. Subsequent exposure to the reductant dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mM, 10 min) fully reversed the H2O2-induced depression of force in EDL, but not in soleus muscle fibres. Incubation with DTT alone for 10 min did not alter Ca2+-activated force in either soleus or EDL muscle fibres. The sensitivity of the contractile filaments to Ca2+ (pCa50) was not altered by exposure to any concentration of exogenous H2O2. However, all concentrations of H2O2 diminished the Hill coefficient in permeabilized fibres from the EDL muscle, indicating that the cooperativity of Ca2+ binding to troponin is altered. H2O2 (5 mM) did not affect rigor force, which indicates that the number of crossbridges participating in contraction was not reduced. In conclusion, H2O2 may reduce the maximum Ca2+ activated force production in skinned muscle fibres by decreasing the force per crossbridge.

  18. (--Epicatechin protects the intestinal barrier from high fat diet-induced permeabilization: Implications for steatosis and insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Cremonini

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased permeability of the intestinal barrier is proposed as an underlying factor for obesity-associated pathologies. Consumption of high fat diets (HFD is associated with increased intestinal permeabilization and increased paracellular transport of endotoxins which can promote steatosis and insulin resistance. This study investigated whether dietary (--epicatechin (EC supplementation can protect the intestinal barrier against HFD-induced permeabilization and endotoxemia, and mitigate liver damage and insulin resistance. Mechanisms leading to loss of integrity and function of the tight junction (TJ were characterized. Consumption of a HFD for 15 weeks caused obesity, steatosis, and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice. This was associated with increased intestinal permeability, decreased expression of ileal TJ proteins, and endotoxemia. Supplementation with EC (2–20 mg/kg body weight mitigated all these adverse effects. EC acted modulating cell signals and the gut hormone GLP-2, which are central to the regulation of intestinal permeability. Thus, EC prevented HFD-induced ileum NOX1/NOX4 upregulation, protein oxidation, and the activation of the redox-sensitive NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways. Supporting NADPH oxidase as a target of EC actions, in Caco-2 cells EC and apocynin inhibited tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα-induced NOX1/NOX4 overexpression, protein oxidation and monolayer permeabilization. Together, our findings demonstrate protective effects of EC against HFD-induced increased intestinal permeability and endotoxemia. This can in part underlie EC capacity to prevent steatosis and insulin resistance occurring as a consequence of HFD consumption. Keywords: Intestinal permeability, (--Epicatechin, Steatosis, Insulin resistance, Endotoxemia, NADPH oxidase

  19. Application and bioactive properties of CaTI, a trypsin inhibitor from Capsicum annuum seeds: membrane permeabilization, oxidative stress and intracellular target in phytopathogenic fungi cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marciele S; Ribeiro, Suzanna Ff; Taveira, Gabriel B; Rodrigues, Rosana; Fernandes, Katia Vs; Carvalho, André O; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Mello, Erica Oliveira; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2017-08-01

    During the last few years, a growing number of antimicrobial peptides have been isolated from plants and particularly from seeds. Recent results from our laboratory have shown the purification of a new trypsin inhibitor, named CaTI, from chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) seeds. This study aims to evaluate the antifungal activity and mechanism of action of CaTI on phytopathogenic fungi and detect the presence of protease inhibitors in other species of this genus. Our results show that CaTI can inhibit the growth of the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and C. lindemuthianum. CaTI can also permeabilize the membrane of all tested fungi. When testing the inhibitor on its ability to induce reactive oxygen species, an induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) particularly in Fusarium species was observed. Using CaTI coupled to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), it was possible to determine the presence of the inhibitor inside the hyphae of the Fusarium oxysporum fungus. The search for protease inhibitors in other Capsicum species revealed their presence in all tested species. This paper shows the antifungal activity of protease inhibitors such as CaTI against phytopathogenic fungi. Antimicrobial peptides, among which the trypsin protease inhibitor family stands out, are present in different species of the genus Capsicum and are part of the chemical arsenal that plants use to defend themselves against pathogens. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Theoretical Study of Molecular Transport Through a Permeabilized Cell Membrane in a Microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Masoumeh; Movahed, Saeid; Hosseini Abardeh, Reza; Hoshyargar, Vahid

    2017-06-01

    A two-dimensional model is developed to study the molecular transport into an immersed cell in a microchannel and to investigate the effects of finite boundary (a cell is suspended in a microchannel), amplitude of electric pulse, and geometrical parameter (microchannel height and size of electrodes) on cell uptake. Embedded electrodes on the walls of the microchannel generate the required electric pulse to permeabilize the cell membrane, pass the ions through the membrane, and transport them into the cell. The shape of electric pulses is square with the time span of 6 ms; their intensities are in the range of 2.2, 2.4, 2.6, 3 V. Numerical simulations have been performed to comprehensively investigate the molecular uptake into the cell. The obtained results of the current study demonstrate that calcium ions enter the cell from the anodic side (the side near positive electrode); after a while, the cell faces depletion of the calcium ions on a positive electrode-facing side within the microchannel; the duration of depletion depends on the amplitude of electric pulse and geometry that lasts from microseconds to milliseconds. By keeping geometrical parameters and time span constant, increment of a pulse intensity enhances molecular uptake and rate of propagation inside the cell. If a ratio of electrode size to cell diameter is larger than 1, the transported amount of Ca 2+ into the cell, as well as the rate of propagation, will be significantly increased. By increasing the height of the microchannel, the rate of uptake is decreased. In an infinite domain, the peak concentration becomes constant after reaching the maximum value; this value depends on the intra-extracellular conductivity and diffusion coefficient of interior and exterior domains of the cell. In comparison, the maximum concentration is changed by geometrical parameters in the microchannel. After reaching the maximum value, the peak concentration reduces due to the depletion of Ca 2+ ions within the

  1. Hormone assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisentraut, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved radioimmunoassay is described for measuring total triiodothyronine or total thyroxine levels in a sample of serum containing free endogenous thyroid hormone and endogenous thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein. The thyroid hormone is released from the protein by adding hydrochloric acid to the serum. The pH of the separated thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone binding protein is raised in the absence of a blocking agent without interference from the endogenous protein. 125 I-labelled thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone antibodies are added to the mixture, allowing the labelled and unlabelled thyroid hormone and the thyroid hormone antibody to bind competitively. This results in free thyroid hormone being separated from antibody bound thyroid hormone and thus the unknown quantity of thyroid hormone may be determined. A thyroid hormone test assay kit is described for this radioimmunoassay. It provides a 'single tube' assay which does not require blocking agents for endogenous protein interference nor an external solid phase sorption step for the separation of bound and free hormone after the competitive binding step; it also requires a minimum number of manipulative steps. Examples of the assay are given to illustrate the reproducibility, linearity and specificity of the assay. (UK)

  2. Assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzke, J.B.; Rosenberg, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of assays for monitoring concentrations of basic drugs in biological fluids containing a 1 -acid glycoproteins, such as blood (serum or plasma), is improved by the addition of certain organic phosphate compounds to minimize the ''protein effect.'' Kits containing the elements of the invention are also disclosed

  3. Bovine lactoferricin causes apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells by sequential permeabilization of the cell membrane and targeting of mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mader, Jamie S.; Richardson, Angela; Salsman, Jayme; Top, Deniz; Antueno, Roberto de; Duncan, Roy; Hoskin, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that kills Jurkat T-leukemia cells by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. However, the process by which LfcinB triggers mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is not well understood. Here, we show that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells was preceded by LfcinB binding to, and progressive permeabilization of the cell membrane. Colloidal gold electron microscopy revealed that LfcinB entered the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells prior to the onset of mitochondrial depolarization. LfcinB was not internalized by endocytosis because endocytosis inhibitors did not prevent LfcinB-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, intracellular delivery of LfcinB via fusogenic liposomes caused the death of Jurkat T-leukemia cells, as well as normal human fibroblasts. Collectively, these findings suggest that LfcinB caused damage to the cell membrane that allowed LfcinB to enter the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells and mediate cytotoxicity. In addition, confocal microscopy showed that intracellular LfcinB co-localized with mitochondria in Jurkat T-leukemia cells, while flow cytometry and colloidal gold electron microscopy showed that LfcinB rapidly associated with purified mitochondria. Furthermore, purified mitochondria treated with LfcinB rapidly lost transmembrane potential and released cytochrome c. We conclude that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells resulted from cell membrane damage and the subsequent disruption of mitochondrial membranes by internalized LfcinB

  4. A mechanism for overcoming P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance: novel combination therapy that releases stored doxorubicin from lysosomes via lysosomal permeabilization using Dp44mT or DpC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Nicole A; Richardson, Des R; Jansson, Patric J

    2016-12-01

    The intracellular distribution of a drug can cause significant variability in both activity and selectivity. Herein, we investigate the mechanism by which the anti-cancer agents, di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) and the clinically trialed, di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (DpC), re-instate the efficacy of doxorubicin (DOX), in drug-resistant P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-expressing cells. Both Dp44mT and DpC potently target and kill Pgp-expressing tumors, while DOX effectively kills non-Pgp-expressing cancers. Thus, the combination of these agents should be considered as an effective rationalized therapy for potently treating advanced and resistant tumors that are often heterogeneous in terms of Pgp-expression. These studies demonstrate that both Dp44mT and DpC are transported into lysosomes via Pgp transport activity, where they induce lysosomal-membrane permeabilization to release DOX trapped within lysosomes. This novel strategy of loading lysosomes with DOX, followed by permeabilization with Dp44mT or DpC, results in the relocalization of stored DOX from its lysosomal 'safe house' to its nuclear targets, markedly enhancing cellular toxicity against resistant tumor cells. Notably, the combination of Dp44mT or DpC with DOX showed a very high level of synergism in multiple Pgp-expressing cell types, for example, cervical, breast and colorectal cancer cells. These studies revealed that the level of drug synergy was proportional to Pgp activity. Interestingly, synergism was ablated by inhibiting Pgp using the pharmacological inhibitor, Elacridar, or by inhibiting Pgp-expression using Pgp-silencing, demonstrating the importance of Pgp in the synergistic interaction. Furthermore, lysosomal-membrane stabilization inhibited the relocalization of DOX from lysosomes to the nucleus upon combination with Dp44mT or DpC, preventing synergism. This latter observation demonstrated the importance of lysosomal

  5. Guanine nucleotide regulation of muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol phosphate formation in permeabilized 1321N1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, S.A.; Trilivas, I.; Brown, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbachol and guanine nucleotides stimulate formation of the ( 3 H)inositol phosphates IP, IP2, and IP3 in saponin-permeabilized monolayers labelled with ( 3 H) inositol. Carbachol alone has little effect on formation of the ( 3 H) inositol phosphates (IPs), but GTPγS causes synergistic accumulation of ( 3 H)IPs to levels similar to those seen in intact cells. GTP, GppNHp, and GTPγS all support formation of the ( 3 H)IPs, with or without hormone, but GTPγS is the most effective. In the presence of GTPγS, the effect of carbachol is dose-dependent. Half-maximal and maximal accumulation of the ( 3 H)IPs occur at ∼ 5 μM and ∼ 100 μM carbachol, respectively; values close to those seen in intact cells. GTPγS alone stimulates formation of the ( 3 H)IPs after a brief lag time. The combination of GTPγS and carbachol both increases the rate of, and decreases the lag in, formation of the ( 3 H)IPs. LiCl increases ( 3 H)IP and IP2, but not IP3, accumulation; while 2,3-diphosphoglycerate substantially increases that of ( 3 H)IP3. GTPγS and carbachol cause formation of ( 3 H)IPs in the absence of Ca ++ , but formation induced by GTPγS with or without carbachol is Ca ++ -sensitive over a range of physiological concentrations. Although carbachol, Ca ++ , and GTPγS all have effects on formation of ( 3 H)IPs, GTPγS appears to be a primary and obligatory regulator of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the permeabilized 1321N1 astrocytoma cell

  6. Differential Permeabilization Effects of Ca2+ and Valinomycin on the Inner and Outer Mitochondrial Membranes as Revealed by Proteomics Analysis of Proteins Released from Mitochondria*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Akiko; Yamamoto, Takenori; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Yamashita, Kikuji; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Nagata, Toshihiko; Terada, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that cytochrome c is released from mitochondria when the permeability transition (PT) of this organelle is induced by Ca2+. Our previous study showed that valinomycin also caused the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria but without inducing this PT (Shinohara, Y., Almofti, M. R., Yamamoto, T., Ishida, T., Kita, F., Kanzaki, H., Ohnishi, M., Yamashita, K., Shimizu, S., and Terada, H. (2002) Permeability transition-independent release of mitochondrial cytochrome c induced by valinomycin. Eur. J. Biochem. 269, 5224–5230). These results indicate that cytochrome c may be released from mitochondria with or without the induction of PT. In the present study, we examined the protein species released from valinomycin- and Ca2+-treated mitochondria by LC-MS/MS analysis. As a result, the proteins located in the intermembrane space were found to be specifically released from valinomycin-treated mitochondria, whereas those in the intermembrane space and in the matrix were released from Ca2+-treated mitochondria. These results were confirmed by Western analysis. Furthermore to examine how the protein release occurred, we examined the correlation between the species of released proteins and those of the abundant proteins in mitochondria. Consequently most of the proteins released from mitochondria treated with either agent were highly expressed proteins in mitochondria, indicating that the release occurred not selectively but in a manner dependent on the concentration of the proteins. Based on these results, the permeabilization effects of Ca2+ and valinomycin on the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes are discussed. PMID:19218587

  7. Single-vesicle detection and analysis of peptide-induced membrane permeabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2015-01-01

    The capability of membrane-active peptides to disrupt phospholipid membranes is often studied by investigating peptide-induced leakage of quenched fluorescent molecules from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. In this article, we explore two fluorescence microscopy-based single-vesicle detection...... methods as alternatives to the quenching-based assays for studying peptide-induced leakage from large unilamellar lipid vesicles. Specifically, we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles...... dispersed in aqueous solution, and we use confocal imaging of surface-immobilized large unilamellar lipid vesicles to investigate whether there are heterogeneities in leakage between individual vesicles. Of importance, we design an experimental protocol that allows us to quantitatively correlate the results...

  8. Phenotypic assays for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ok-Ryul; Deboosere, Nathalie; Delorme, Vincent; Queval, Christophe J; Deloison, Gaspard; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Lafont, Frank; Baulard, Alain; Iantomasi, Raffaella; Brodin, Priscille

    2017-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major global threat, killing more than one million persons each year. With the constant increase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to first- and second-line drugs, there is an urgent need for the development of new drugs to control the propagation of TB. Although screenings of small molecules on axenic M. tuberculosis cultures were successful for the identification of novel putative anti-TB drugs, new drugs in the development pipeline remains scarce. Host-directed therapy may represent an alternative for drug development against TB. Indeed, M. tuberculosis has multiple specific interactions within host phagocytes, which may be targeted by small molecules. In order to enable drug discovery strategies against microbes residing within host macrophages, we developed multiple fluorescence-based HT/CS phenotypic assays monitoring the intracellular replication of M. tuberculosis as well as its intracellular trafficking. What we propose here is a population-based, multi-parametric analysis pipeline that can be used to monitor the intracellular fate of M. tuberculosis and the dynamics of cellular events such as phagosomal maturation (acidification and permeabilization), zinc poisoning system or lipid body accumulation. Such analysis allows the quantification of biological events considering the host-pathogen interplay and may thus be derived to other intracellular pathogens. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  9. Alamethicin permeabilizes the plasma membrane and mitochondria but not the tonoplast in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) suspension cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matic, S.; Geisler, D.A.; Møller, I.M.

    2005-01-01

    remained intact, as indicated by an unaffected tonoplast proton gradient. Low-flux permeabilization of plasma membranes and mitochondria at moderate AlaM concentrations was reversible and did not affect cell vigour. Higher AlaM concentrations induced cell death. After the addition of catalase that removes...... concentrations. Possible uses and limitations of this method for plant cell research are discussed.......The ion channel-forming peptide AlaM (alamethicin) is known to permeabilize isolated mitochondria as well as animal cells. When intact tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) Bright Yellow-2 cells were treated with AlaM, the cells became permeable for low-molecular-mass molecules as shown by induced leakage...

  10. Improvement on D-xylose to Xylitol Biotransformation by Candida guilliermondii Using Cells Permeabilized with Triton X-100 and Selected Process Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Daniela Vieira; Mussatto, Solange I; Roberto, Inês Conceição

    2016-11-01

    Cells of Candida guilliermondii permeabilized with Triton X-100 were able to efficiently produce xylitol from a medium composed only by D-xylose and MgCl 2 ·6H 2 O in potassium phosphate buffer, at 35 °C and pH 6.5. Under these conditions, the results were similar to those obtained when cofactor and co-substrate or nutrients were added to the medium (about 95 % D-xylose was assimilated producing 42 g/L of xylitol, corresponding to 0.80 g/g yield and 2.65 g/L h volumetric productivity). Furthermore, the permeabilized cells kept the D-xylose assimilation in about 90 % and the xylitol production in approx. 40 g/L during three bioconversion cycles of 16 h each. These values are highly relevant when compared to others reported in the literature using enzyme technology and fermentative process, thereby demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study reveals that the use of permeabilized cells is an interesting alternative to obtain high xylitol productivity using low cost medium formulation. This approach may allow the future development of xylitol production from xylose present in lignocellulosic biomass, with additional potential for implementation in biorefinery strategies.

  11. Phagolysosome acidification is required for silica and engineered nanoparticle-induced lysosome membrane permeabilization and resultant NLRP3 inflammasome activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Rhoderick, Joseph F.; Fletcher, Paige; Holian, Andrij, E-mail: andrij.holian@umontana.edu

    2017-03-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome activation occurs in response to hazardous particle exposures and is critical for the development of particle-induced lung disease. Mechanisms of Lysosome Membrane Permeabilization (LMP), a central pathway for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhaled particles, are not fully understood. We demonstrate that the lysosomal vATPases inhibitor Bafilomycin A1 blocked LMP in vitro and ex vivo in primary murine macrophages following exposure to silica, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and titanium nanobelts. Bafilomycin A1 treatment of particle-exposed macrophages also resulted in decreased active cathepsin L in the cytosol, a surrogate measure for leaked cathepsin B, which was associated with less NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Silica-induced LMP was partially dependent upon lysosomal cathepsins B and L, whereas nanoparticle-induced LMP occurred independent of cathepsin activity. Furthermore, inhibition of lysosomal cathepsin activity with CA-074-Me decreased the release of High Mobility Group Box 1. Together, these data support the notion that lysosome acidification is a prerequisite for particle-induced LMP, and the resultant leak of lysosome cathepsins is a primary regulator of ongoing NLRP3 inflammasome activity and release of HMGB1. - Highlights: • Silica and nanoparticles cause LMP in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. • Phagolysosome acidification is required for particle-induced LMP. • Cathepsin B and L are not required for nanoparticle-induced LMP. • Cathepsin B/L regulate the secretion of HMGB1 with particle exposure.

  12. Azadirachtin-induced apoptosis involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L release in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Xingan; Meng, Qianqian; Wang, Peidan; Shu, Benshui; Hu, Qiongbo; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-07-01

    Azadirachtin as a kind of botanical insecticide has been widely used in pest control. We previously reported that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis of Spodoptera litura cultured cell line Sl-1, which involves in the up-regulation of P53 protein. However, the detailed mechanism of azadirachtin-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood in insect cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to address the involvement of lysosome and lysosomal protease in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. The result confirmed that azadirachtin indeed inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis. The lysosomes were divided into different types as time-dependent manner, which suggested that changes of lysosomes were necessarily physiological processes in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Interestingly, we noticed that azadirachtin could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L releasing to cytosol. Z-FF-FMK (a cathepsin L inhibitor), but not CA-074me (a cathepsin B inhibitor), could effectively hinder the apoptosis induced by azadirachtin in Sf9 cells. Meanwhile, the activity of caspase-3 could also be inactivated by the inhibition of cathepsin L enzymatic activity induced by Z-FF-FMK. Taken together, our findings suggest that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells in a lysosomal pathway, and cathepsin L plays a pro-apoptosis role in this process through releasing to cytosol and activating caspase-3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD. As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD.

  14. Cardenolide-Induced Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization Demonstrates Therapeutic Benefits in Experimental Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs are the leading cause of cancer deaths in most developed countries. Targeting heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 expression and function, together with the induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP, could overcome the multiple anti-cell death mechanisms evidenced in NSCLCs that are responsible for the failure of currently used chemotherapeutic drugs. Because cardenolides bind to the sodium pump, they affect multiple signaling pathways and thus have a number of marked effects on tumor cell behavior. The aim of the present study was to characterize in vitro and in vivo the antitumor effects of a new cardenolide (UNBS1450 on experimental human NSCLCs. UNBS1450 is a potent source of in vivo antitumor activity in the case of paclitaxeland oxaliplatin-resistant subcutaneous human NCIH727 and orthotopic A549 xenografts in nude mice. In vitro UNBS1450-mediated antitumor activity results from the induction of nonapoptotic cell death. UNBS1450 mediates the decrease of Hsp70 at both mRNA and protein levels, and this is at least partly due to UNBS1450-induced downregulation of NFAT5/ TonEBP (a factor responsible for the transcriptional control of Hsp70. These effects were paralleled by the induction of LMP, as evidenced by acridine orange staining and immunofluorescence analysis for cathepsin B accumulation.

  15. Transient permeabilization of cell membranes by ultrasound-exposed microbubbles is related to formation of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffermans, L J M; Dijkmans, P A; Musters, R J P; Visser, C A; Kamp, O

    2006-10-01

    In the present study, we addressed the interactions among ultrasound, microbubbles, and living cells as well as consequent arising bioeffects. We specifically investigated whether hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is involved in transient permeabilization of cell membranes in vitro after ultrasound exposure at low diagnostic power, in the presence of stable oscillating microbubbles, by measuring the generation of H(2)O(2) and Ca(2+) influx. Ultrasound, in the absence or presence of SonoVue microbubbles, was applied to H9c2 cells at 1.8 MHz with a mechanical index (MI) of 0.1 or 0.5 during 10 s. This was repeated every minute, for a total of five times. The production of H(2)O(2) was measured intracellularly with CM-H(2)DCFDA. Cell membrane permeability was assessed by measuring real-time changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration with fluo-4 using live-cell fluorescence microscopy. Ultrasound, in the presence of microbubbles, caused a significant increase in intracellular H(2)O(2) at MI 0.1 of 50% and MI 0.5 of 110% compared with control (P ultrasound exposure was completely blocked at MI 0.1 (P ultrasound-exposed microbubbles.

  16. Phagolysosome acidification is required for silica and engineered nanoparticle-induced lysosome membrane permeabilization and resultant NLRP3 inflammasome activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jessop, Forrest; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Rhoderick, Joseph F.; Fletcher, Paige; Holian, Andrij

    2017-01-01

    NLRP3 inflammasome activation occurs in response to hazardous particle exposures and is critical for the development of particle-induced lung disease. Mechanisms of Lysosome Membrane Permeabilization (LMP), a central pathway for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhaled particles, are not fully understood. We demonstrate that the lysosomal vATPases inhibitor Bafilomycin A1 blocked LMP in vitro and ex vivo in primary murine macrophages following exposure to silica, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and titanium nanobelts. Bafilomycin A1 treatment of particle-exposed macrophages also resulted in decreased active cathepsin L in the cytosol, a surrogate measure for leaked cathepsin B, which was associated with less NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Silica-induced LMP was partially dependent upon lysosomal cathepsins B and L, whereas nanoparticle-induced LMP occurred independent of cathepsin activity. Furthermore, inhibition of lysosomal cathepsin activity with CA-074-Me decreased the release of High Mobility Group Box 1. Together, these data support the notion that lysosome acidification is a prerequisite for particle-induced LMP, and the resultant leak of lysosome cathepsins is a primary regulator of ongoing NLRP3 inflammasome activity and release of HMGB1. - Highlights: • Silica and nanoparticles cause LMP in macrophages in vitro and in vivo. • Phagolysosome acidification is required for particle-induced LMP. • Cathepsin B and L are not required for nanoparticle-induced LMP. • Cathepsin B/L regulate the secretion of HMGB1 with particle exposure.

  17. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization: Carbon nanohorn-induced reactive oxygen species generation and toxicity by this neglected mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mei, E-mail: happy_deercn@163.com [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Zhang, Minfang; Tahara, Yoshio; Chechetka, Svetlana; Miyako, Eijiro [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Iijima, Sumio [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tenpaku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Yudasaka, Masako, E-mail: m-yudasaka@aist.go.jp [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology 5-2, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxic effects of carbon nanomaterials is important for their future biomedical applications. Carbon nanotubular materials induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which causes cell death; however, the exact details of this process are still unclear. Here, we identify a mechanism of ROS generation that is involved in the apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages caused by excess uptake of carbon nanohorns (CNHs), a typical type of carbon nanotubule. CNH accumulated in the lysosomes, where they induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and the subsequent release of lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsins, which in turn caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered the generation of ROS in the mitochondria. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase was not directly involved in CNH-related ROS production, and the ROS generation cannot be regulated by mitochondrial electron transport chain. ROS fed back to amplify the mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to the subsequent activation of caspases and cell apoptosis. Carbon nanotubules commonly accumulate in the lysosomes after internalization in cells; however, lysosomal dysfunction has not attracted much attention in toxicity studies of these materials. These results suggest that LMP, a neglected mechanism, may be the primary reason for carbon nanotubule toxicity. - Highlights: • We clarify an apoptotic mechanism of RAW264.7 cells caused by carbon nanohorns. • In the meantime, the mechanism of CNH-induced ROS generation is identified. • LMP is the initial factor of CNH-induced ROS generation and cell death. • Cathepsins work as mediators that connect LMP and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Pardaxin permeabilizes vesicles more efficiently by pore formation than by disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Brian S; Bertelsen, Kresten; Johansen, Charlotte Hau

    2010-01-01

    Pardaxin is a 33-amino-acid neurotoxin from the Red Sea Moses sole Pardachirus marmoratus, whose mode of action shows remarkable sensitivity to lipid chain length and charge, although the effect of pH is unclear. Here we combine optical spectroscopy and dye release experiments with laser scanning...... is more efficient than lysis of anionic vesicles, suggesting that electrostatic interactions may trap pardaxin in several suboptimal interconverting conformations on the membrane surface....

  19. Rapid membrane permeabilization and inhibition of vital functions of gram-negative bacteria by bactenecins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerlavaj, B; Romeo, D; Gennaro, R

    1990-11-01

    Bactenecins are a class of arginine-rich antibacterial peptides of bovine neutrophil granules. Two bactenecins with approximate molecular weights of 5,000 and 7,000 designated Bac5 and Bac7, respectively, exert in vitro a potent bactericidal activity toward several gram-negative bacteria (R. Gennaro, B. Skerlavaj, and D. Romeo, Infect. Immun. 57:3142-3146, 1989). We have now found that this activity shows an inverse relationship to the ionic strength of the medium and is inhibited by divalent cations and greatly potentiated by lactoferrin. Under conditions supporting marked bactericidal activity, the two peptides cause a rapid increase in the permeability of both the outer and inner membranes of Escherichia coli, as shown by unmasking of periplasmic beta-lactamase and of cytoplasmic beta-galactosidase. In addition, the two bactenecins inhibit the respiration of E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae but not of Bac5- and Bac7-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, they induce a drop in ATP content in E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and Salmonella typhimurium and a marked decrease in the rates of transport and incorporation of [3H]leucine and [3H]uridine into E. coli protein and RNA, respectively. In general, all these effects become evident within 1 to 2 min and reach their maximal expression within about 5 min. Overall, these data strongly suggest that the decrease in bacterial viability is causally related to the increase in membrane permeability and the subsequent fall in respiration-linked proton motive force, with the attendant loss of cellular metabolites and macromolecular biosynthesis ability.

  20. Radiorespirometic assay device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, G.V.; Straat, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    A radiorespirometic assay device is described in which the presence of microorganisms in a sample is determined by placing the sample in contact with a metabolisable radioactive labelled substrate, collecting any gas evolved, exposing a photosensitive material to the gas and determining if a spot is produced on the material. A spot indicates the presence of radioactivity showing that the substrate has been metabolized by a microorganism. Bacteria may be detected in body fluids, hospital operating rooms, water, food, cosmetics and drugs. (U.K.)

  1. Show-Bix &

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The anti-reenactment 'Show-Bix &' consists of 5 dias projectors, a dial phone, quintophonic sound, and interactive elements. A responsive interface will enable the Dias projectors to show copies of original dias slides from the Show-Bix piece ”March på Stedet”, 265 images in total. The copies are...

  2. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization is an early event in Sigma-2 receptor ligand mediated cell death in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornick, John R; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Spitzer, Dirk; Abate, Carmen; Berardi, Francesco; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mach, Robert H; Hawkins, William G

    2012-05-02

    Sigma-2 receptor ligands have been studied for treatment of pancreatic cancer because they are preferentially internalized by proliferating cells and induce apoptosis. This mechanism of apoptosis is poorly understood, with varying reports of caspase-3 dependence. We evaluated multiple sigma-2 receptor ligands in this study, each shown to decrease tumor burden in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Fluorescently labeled sigma-2 receptor ligands of two classes (derivatives of SW43 and PB282) localize to cell membrane components in Bxpc3 and Aspc1 pancreatic cancer cells and accumulate in lysosomes. We found that interactions in the lysosome are critical for cell death following sigma-2 ligand treatment because selective inhibition of a protective lysosomal membrane glycoprotein, LAMP1, with shRNA greatly reduced the viability of cells following treatment. Sigma-2 ligands induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and protease translocation triggering downstream effectors of apoptosis. Subsequently, cellular oxidative stress was greatly increased following treatment with SW43, and the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) gave greater protection against this than a lipophilic antioxidant, α-tocopherol (α-toco). Conversely, PB282-mediated cytotoxicity relied less on cellular oxidation, even though α-toco did provide protection from this ligand. In addition, we found that caspase-3 induction was not as significantly inhibited by cathepsin inhibitors as by antioxidants. Both NAC and α-toco protected against caspase-3 induction following PB282 treatment, while only NAC offered protection following SW43 treatment. The caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-FMK offered significant protection from PB282, but not SW43. Sigma-2 ligand SW43 commits pancreatic cancer cells to death by a caspase-independent process involving LMP and oxidative stress which is protected from by NAC. PB282 however undergoes a caspase-dependent death following LMP protected by DEVD

  3. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization is an Early Event in Sigma-2 Receptor Ligand Mediated Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornick John R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sigma-2 receptor ligands have been studied for treatment of pancreatic cancer because they are preferentially internalized by proliferating cells and induce apoptosis. This mechanism of apoptosis is poorly understood, with varying reports of caspase-3 dependence. We evaluated multiple sigma-2 receptor ligands in this study, each shown to decrease tumor burden in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Results Fluorescently labeled sigma-2 receptor ligands of two classes (derivatives of SW43 and PB282 localize to cell membrane components in Bxpc3 and Aspc1 pancreatic cancer cells and accumulate in lysosomes. We found that interactions in the lysosome are critical for cell death following sigma-2 ligand treatment because selective inhibition of a protective lysosomal membrane glycoprotein, LAMP1, with shRNA greatly reduced the viability of cells following treatment. Sigma-2 ligands induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and protease translocation triggering downstream effectors of apoptosis. Subsequently, cellular oxidative stress was greatly increased following treatment with SW43, and the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC gave greater protection against this than a lipophilic antioxidant, α-tocopherol (α-toco. Conversely, PB282-mediated cytotoxicity relied less on cellular oxidation, even though α-toco did provide protection from this ligand. In addition, we found that caspase-3 induction was not as significantly inhibited by cathepsin inhibitors as by antioxidants. Both NAC and α-toco protected against caspase-3 induction following PB282 treatment, while only NAC offered protection following SW43 treatment. The caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-FMK offered significant protection from PB282, but not SW43. Conclusions Sigma-2 ligand SW43 commits pancreatic cancer cells to death by a caspase-independent process involving LMP and oxidative stress which is protected from by NAC. PB282 however undergoes a

  4. The vascular permeabilizing factors histamine and serotonin induce angiogenesis through TR3/Nur77 and subsequently truncate it through thrombospondin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liuliang; Zhao, Dezheng; Xu, Jianfeng; Ren, Xianghui; Terwilliger, Ernest F.; Parangi, Sareh; Lawler, Jack; Dvorak, Harold F.

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer and in many other human diseases. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), the best known angiogenic factor, was originally discovered as a potent vascular permeability factor (VPF), suggesting that other vascular permeabilizing agents, such as histamine and serotonin, might also have angiogenic activity. We recently demonstrated that, like VEGF-A, histamine and serotonin up-regulate the orphan nuclear receptor and transcription factor TR3 (mouse homolog Nur77) and that TR3/Nur77 is essential for their vascular permeabilizing activities. We now report that histamine and serotonin are also angiogenic factors that, at low micromolar concentrations, induce endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation in vitro, and angiogenesis in vivo. All of these responses are mediated through specific histamine and serotonin receptors, are independent of VEGF-A, and are directly dependent on TR3/Nur77. Initially, the angiogenic response closely resembled that induced by VEGF-A, with generation of “mother” vessels. However, after ∼10 days, mother vessels began to regress as histamine and serotonin, unlike VEGF-A, up-regulated the potent angiogenesis inhibitor thrombospondin-1, thereby triggering a negative feedback loop. Thus, histamine and serotonin induce an angiogenic response that fits the time scale of acute inflammation. PMID:23315169

  5. Talking with TV shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Laursen, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    User interaction with radio and television programmes is not a new thing. However, with new cross-media production concepts such as X Factor and Voice, this is changing dramatically. The second-screen logic of these productions encourages viewers, along with TV’s traditional one-way communication...... mode, to communicate on interactive (dialogue-enabling) devices such as laptops, smartphones and tablets. Using the TV show Voice as our example, this article shows how the technological and situational set-up of the production invites viewers to engage in new ways of interaction and communication...

  6. Talk Show Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  7. Obesity in show cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbee, R J

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is an important disease with a high prevalence in cats. Because obesity is related to several other diseases, it is important to identify the population at risk. Several risk factors for obesity have been described in the literature. A higher incidence of obesity in certain cat breeds has been suggested. The aim of this study was to determine whether obesity occurs more often in certain breeds. The second aim was to relate the increased prevalence of obesity in certain breeds to the official standards of that breed. To this end, 268 cats of 22 different breeds investigated by determining their body condition score (BCS) on a nine-point scale by inspection and palpation, at two different cat shows. Overall, 45.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 5, and 4.5% of the show cats had a BCS > 7. There were significant differences between breeds, which could be related to the breed standards. Most overweight and obese cats were in the neutered group. It warrants firm discussions with breeders and cat show judges to come to different interpretations of the standards in order to prevent overweight conditions in certain breeds from being the standard of beauty. Neutering predisposes for obesity and requires early nutritional intervention to prevent obese conditions. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  9. The energy show

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Energy Show is a new look at the problems of world energy, where our supplies come from, now and in the future. The programme looks at how we need energy to maintain our standards of living. Energy supply is shown as the complicated set of problems it is - that Fossil Fuels are both raw materials and energy sources, that some 'alternatives' so readily suggested as practical options are in reality a long way from being effective. (author)

  10. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  11. Showing Value (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available When Su Cleyle and I first decided to start Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, one of the things we agreed upon immediately was that the journal be open access. We knew that a major obstacle to librarians using the research literature was that they did not have access to the research literature. Although Su and I are both academic librarians who can access a wide variety of library and information literature from our institutions, we belong to a profession where not everyone has equal access to the research in our field. Without such access to our own body of literature, how can we ever hope for practitioners to use research evidence in their decision making? It would have been contradictory to the principles of evidence based library and information practice to do otherwise.One of the specific groups we thought could use such an open access venue for discovering research literature was school librarians. School librarians are often isolated and lacking access to the research literature that may help them prove to stakeholders the importance of their libraries and their role within schools. Certainly, school libraries have been in decline and the use of evidence to show value is needed. As Ken Haycock noted in his 2003 report, The Crisis in Canada’s School Libraries: The Case for Reform and Reinvestment, “Across the country, teacher-librarians are losing their jobs or being reassigned. Collections are becoming depleted owing to budget cuts. Some principals believe that in the age of the Internet and the classroom workstation, the school library is an artifact” (9. Within this context, school librarians are looking to our research literature for evidence of the impact that school library programs have on learning outcomes and student success. They are integrating that evidence into their practice, and reflecting upon what can be improved locally. They are focusing on students and showing the impact of school libraries and

  12. The importance of Foxp3 antibody and fixation/permeabilization buffer combinations in identifying CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jacqueline P; Hirschkorn, Dale F; Owen, Rachel E; Biswas, Hope H; Norris, Philip J; Lanteri, Marion C

    2009-12-01

    Foxp3 is a key marker for CD4(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) and was used in developing a multiparameter flow cytometric panel to identify T(regs). Achieving reproducible staining and analysis first required optimization of Foxp3 staining. We present a comparative study of PCH101, 236A/E7, 3G3, 206D, 150D, and 259D/C7 clones of anti-human-Foxp3 antibodies used in combination with five different fixation/permeabilization buffers. Staining for CD25, CD152, and CD127 was also compared between fixation/permeabilization treatments. Promising antibody/buffer combinations were tested in a panel of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 10 individuals, and then on fresh versus frozen cells from four individuals. Finally, different fluorochromes coupled to two representative antibodies were compared to optimize separation of Foxp3(+) from Foxp3(-) events. Foxp3 gates were set using two gating strategies based on CD127(+)CD25(-) "non-T(regs)" or based on isotype controls. For Foxp3 staining, the best conditions for fixation/permeabilization were obtained using the eBioscience Foxp3, Imgenex, BioLegend, and BD Foxp3 buffers. Comparing results from 10 subjects, 259D/C7, PCH101, 236A/E7, and 206D antibodies yielded statistically higher levels of Foxp3 cells than those by 150D and 3G3 antibodies (mean = 6.9, 5.1, 4.7, and 3.7% compared with 1.7, and 0.3% of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) events within CD4(+) cells, respectively). Importantly, the "nonspecificity" of some antibodies observed with a Foxp3 gate based on isotype controls could be eliminated by setting the Foxp3 gate on "non-T(regs)". Better separation of Foxp3(+) and Foxp3(-) populations was observed using the PCH101 clone coupled to Alexa647 compared with FITC or the 259D/C7 clone coupled to PE compared with Alexa488 fluorochrome. Foxp3 staining can be highly variable and depends on the choice of antibody/buffer pair and the fluorochrome used. Selecting the correct population for setting the Foxp3 gate is critical to avoid

  13. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.J.; Chang, K.-J.

    1981-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  14. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  15. The acidic transformed nano-VO2 causes macrophage cell death by the induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization and Ca2+ efflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohai Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of its outstanding thermochromic characteristics and metal-insulator transition (MIT property, nano-vanadium dioxide (abbreviated as nano-VO2 or nVO2 has been applied widely in electrical/optical devices and design of intelligent window. However, the biological effect of nVO2 is not well understood, especially when affected by environmental factors or living organisms. For VO2 is an amphoteric oxide, we simulated pH's influence to nVO2’s physicochemical properties by exposure nVO2 in water of different pH values. We found that nVO2 transformed to a new product after exposure in acidic water for two weeks, as revealed by physicochemical characterization such as SEM, TEM, XRD, and DLS. This transformation product formed in acidic water was referred as (acidic transformed nVO2. Both pristine/untransformed and transformed nVO2 displayed no obvious toxicity to common epithelial cells; however, the acidic transformed nVO2 rapidly induced macrophage cell death. Further investigation demonstrated that transformed nVO2 caused macrophage apoptosis by the induction of Ca2+ efflux and the following mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP process. And a more detailed time course study indicated that transformed nVO2 caused lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP at the earlier stage, indicating LMP could be chosen as an earlier and sensitive end point for nanotoxicological study. We conclude that although nVO2 displays no acute toxicity, its acidic transformation product induces macrophage apoptosis by the induction of LMP and Ca2+ efflux. This report suggests that the interplay with environmental factors or living organisms can results in physicochemical transformation of nanomaterials and the ensuing distinctive biological effects.

  16. Endogenous Locus Reporter Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaping; Hermes, Jeffrey; Li, Jing; Tudor, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Reporter gene assays are widely used in high-throughput screening (HTS) to identify compounds that modulate gene expression. Traditionally a reporter gene assay is built by cloning an endogenous promoter sequence or synthetic response elements in the regulatory region of a reporter gene to monitor transcriptional activity of a specific biological process (exogenous reporter assay). In contrast, an endogenous locus reporter has a reporter gene inserted in the endogenous gene locus that allows the reporter gene to be expressed under the control of the same regulatory elements as the endogenous gene, thus more accurately reflecting the changes seen in the regulation of the actual gene. In this chapter, we introduce some of the considerations behind building a reporter gene assay for high-throughput compound screening and describe the methods we have utilized to establish 1536-well format endogenous locus reporter and exogenous reporter assays for the screening of compounds that modulate Myc pathway activity.

  17. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shackleton, D.R.; Hulmes, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a [4,5-3H]-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware

  18. Solid phase assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, M.G.; Johnson, L.R.; Ransom, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    In a solid phase assay for quantitative determination of biological and other analytes, a sample such as serum is contacted with a receptor for the analyte being assayed, the receptor being supported on a solid support. No tracer for the analyte is added to the sample before contacting with the receptor; instead the tracer is contacted with the receptor after unbound analyte has been removed from the receptor. The assay can be otherwise performed in a conventional manner but can give greater sensitivity. (author)

  19. Comparison of Batch Assay and Random Assay Using Automatic Dispenser in Radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Seung Hwan; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Ji Yeon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Young; Shin, Sun Young; Min, Gyeong Sun; Lee, Hyun Joo [Seoul National University college of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was usually performed by the batch assay. To improve the efficiency of RIA without increase of the cost and time, random assay could be a choice. We investigated the possibility of the random assay using automatic dispenser by assessing the agreement between batch assay and random assay. The experiments were performed with four items; Triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (fT4), Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In each item, the sera of twenty patients, the standard, and the control samples were used. The measurements were done 4 times with 3 hour time intervals by random assay and batch assay. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the standard samples and patients' data in T3, fT4, PSA, and CEA were assessed. ICC (Intraclass correlation coefficient) and coefficient of correlation were measured to assessing the agreement between two methods. The CVs (%) of T3, fT4, PSA, and CEA measured by batch assay were 3.2+-1.7%, 3.9+-2.1%, 7.1+-6.2%, 11.2+-7.2%. The CVs by random assay were 2.1+-1.7%, 4.8+-3.1%, 3.6+-4.8%, and 7.4+-6.2%. The ICC between the batch assay and random assay were 0.9968 (T3), 0.9973 (fT4), 0.9996 (PSA), and 0.9901 (CEA). The coefficient of correlation between the batch assay and random assay were 0.9924(T3), 0.9974 (fT4), 0.9994 (PSA), and 0.9989 (CEA) (p<0.05). The results of random assay showed strong agreement with the batch assay in a day. These results suggest that random assay using automatic dispenser could be used in radioimmunoassay

  20. Comparison of Batch Assay and Random Assay Using Automatic Dispenser in Radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Seung Hwan; Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Ji Yeon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Ho Young; Shin, Sun Young; Min, Gyeong Sun; Lee, Hyun Joo

    2009-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was usually performed by the batch assay. To improve the efficiency of RIA without increase of the cost and time, random assay could be a choice. We investigated the possibility of the random assay using automatic dispenser by assessing the agreement between batch assay and random assay. The experiments were performed with four items; Triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (fT4), Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In each item, the sera of twenty patients, the standard, and the control samples were used. The measurements were done 4 times with 3 hour time intervals by random assay and batch assay. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the standard samples and patients' data in T3, fT4, PSA, and CEA were assessed. ICC (Intraclass correlation coefficient) and coefficient of correlation were measured to assessing the agreement between two methods. The CVs (%) of T3, fT4, PSA, and CEA measured by batch assay were 3.2±1.7%, 3.9±2.1%, 7.1±6.2%, 11.2±7.2%. The CVs by random assay were 2.1±1.7%, 4.8±3.1%, 3.6±4.8%, and 7.4±6.2%. The ICC between the batch assay and random assay were 0.9968 (T3), 0.9973 (fT4), 0.9996 (PSA), and 0.9901 (CEA). The coefficient of correlation between the batch assay and random assay were 0.9924(T3), 0.9974 (fT4), 0.9994 (PSA), and 0.9989 (CEA) (p<0.05). The results of random assay showed strong agreement with the batch assay in a day. These results suggest that random assay using automatic dispenser could be used in radioimmunoassay

  1. Factor IX assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003679.htm Factor IX assay To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  2. Factor VIII assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003678.htm Factor VIII assay To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  3. Factor II assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003674.htm Factor II assay To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Factor VII assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003676.htm Factor VII assay To use the sharing features on ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  5. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas; Castro, David; Foulds, Ian G.; Parameswaran, Ash M.; Sumanpreet, K. Chhina

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling

  6. Succinate Dehydrogenase Activity Assay in situ with Blue Tetrazolium Salt in Crabtree-Positive Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Berlowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A spectrophotometric method for determining succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity assay in azide-sensitive yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been developed. The permeabilization of yeast cells by 0.05 % digitonin permitted to study yeast enzymatic activity in situ. The reduction of blue tetrazolium salt (BT to blue tetrazolium formazan (BTf was conducted in the presence of phenazine methosulphate (PMS as an exogenous electron carrier, and sodium azide (SA as an inhibitor of cytochrome oxidase (Cyt pathway. Various factors such as type of substrate, BT concentration, cell number, temperature and time of incubation, and different Cyt pathway blockers were optimized. In earlier studies, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO had been selected as the best solvent for extraction of BTf from yeast cells. The linear correlation between permeabilized yeast cell density and amount of formed formazan was evidenced in the range from 9·10^7 to 5·10^8 cells per sample solution. Below the yeast cell concentration of 10^7 the absorbance values were too low to detect formazans with good precision. This standarized procedure allows the estimation of SDH activity in whole cells, depending on vitality level of yeast populations. Significant increases of succinate dehydrogenase activities were observed in sequential passages as the result of the increase of activity of the strain and adaptation to cultivation conditions.

  7. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  8. Assay method and compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Methods are described for measuring catecholamine levels in human and animal body fluids and tissues using the catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) radioassay. The assay involves incubating the biological sample with COMT and the tritiated methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine( 3 H)-methyl. The O-methylated ( 3 H) epinephrine and/or norepinephrine are extracted and oxidised to vanillin- 3 H which in turn is extracted and its radioactivity counted. When analysing dopamine levels the assay is extended by vanillin- 3 H and raising the pH of the aqueous periodate phase from which O-methylated ( 3 H) dopamine is extracted and counted. The assay may be modified depending on whether measurements of undifferentiated total endogenous catecholamine levels or differential analyses of the catecholamine levels are being performed. The sensitivity of the assay can be as low as 5 picograms for norepinephrine and epinephrine and 12 picograms for dopamine. The assemblance of the essential components of the assay into a kit for use in laboratories is also described. (U.K.)

  9. Nondestructive assay of sale materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenburg, W.W.; Fleissner, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper covers three primary areas: (1) reasons for performing nondestructive assay on SALE materials; (2) techniques used; and (3) discussion of investigators' revised results. The study shows that nondestructive calorimetric assay of plutonium offers a viable alternative to traditional wet chemical techniques. For these samples, the precision ranged from 0.4 to 0.6% with biases less than 0.2%. Thus, for those materials where sampling errors are the predominant source of uncertainty, this technique can provide improved accuracy and precision while saving time and money as well as reducing the amount of liquid wastes to be handled. In addition, high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of solids can provide isotopic analysis data in a cost effective and timely manner. The timeliness of the method can be especially useful to the plant operator for production control and quality control measurements

  10. Radioreceptor assay for somatomedin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, K [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1975-04-01

    Measurement method of somatomedian A by radioreceptor assay using the human placenta membrane was described and discussed. Binding rate of /sup 125/I-somatomedin A to its receptors was studied under various conditions of time and temperature of the incubation, and pH of the system. The influence of somatomedin A, porcine insulin, and porcine calcitonin, on /sup 125/I-somatomedin A bound receptors was studied, and these hormones showed the competitive binding to somatomedin A receptors in some level. The specificity, recovery rate, and clinical applications of somatomedin A were also discussed. Radioreceptor assay for somatomedine A provided easier, faster, and more accurate measurements than conventional bioassay. This technique would be very useful to study somatomedin A receptor and functions of insulin.

  11. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Rover waste assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched 235 U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for 137 Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Radioreceptor assay for insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazuo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-04-01

    Radioreceptor assay of insulin was discussed from the aspects of the measuring method, its merits and problems to be solved, and its clinical application. Rat liver 10 x g pellet was used as receptor site, and enzymatic degradation of insulin by the system contained in this fraction was inhibited by adding 1 mM p-CMB. /sup 125/I-labelled porcine insulin was made by lactoperoxidase method under overnight incubation at 4/sup 0/C and later purification by Sephadex G-25 column and Whatman CF-11 cellulose powder. Dog pancreatic vein serum insulin during and after the glucose load was determined by radioreceptor assay and radioimmunoassay resulting that both measurements accorded considerably. Radioreceptor assay would clarify the pathology of disorders of glucose metabolism including diabetes.

  14. Clonogenic assay: adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafehi, Haloom; Orlowski, Christian; Georgiadis, George T; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-03-13

    The clonogenic (or colony forming) assay has been established for more than 50 years; the original paper describing the technique was published in 1956. Apart from documenting the method, the initial landmark study generated the first radiation-dose response curve for X-ray irradiated mammalian (HeLa) cells in culture. Basically, the clonogenic assay enables an assessment of the differences in reproductive viability (capacity of cells to produce progeny; i.e. a single cell to form a colony of 50 or more cells) between control untreated cells and cells that have undergone various treatments such as exposure to ionising radiation, various chemical compounds (e.g. cytotoxic agents) or in other cases genetic manipulation. The assay has become the most widely accepted technique in radiation biology and has been widely used for evaluating the radiation sensitivity of different cell lines. Further, the clonogenic assay is commonly used for monitoring the efficacy of radiation modifying compounds and for determining the effects of cytotoxic agents and other anti-cancer therapeutics on colony forming ability, in different cell lines. A typical clonogenic survival experiment using adherent cells lines involves three distinct components, 1) treatment of the cell monolayer in tissue culture flasks, 2) preparation of single cell suspensions and plating an appropriate number of cells in petri dishes and 3) fixing and staining colonies following a relevant incubation period, which could range from 1-3 weeks, depending on the cell line. Here we demonstrate the general procedure for performing the clonogenic assay with adherent cell lines with the use of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (FEP-1811). Also, our aims are to describe common features of clonogenic assays including calculation of the plating efficiency and survival fractions after exposure of cells to radiation, and to exemplify modification of radiation-response with the use of a natural antioxidant

  15. Scintillation proximity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, H.

    1980-01-01

    In a method of immunological assay two different classes of particles which interact at short distances to produce characteristic detectable signals are employed in a modification of the usual latex fixation test. In one embodiment an aqueous suspension of antigen coated tritiated latex particles (LH) and antigen coated polystyrene scintillant particles (L*) is employed to assay antibody in the aqueous medium. The amount of (LH) (L*) dimer formation and higher order aggregation induced and therefore the concentration of antibody (or antigen) present which caused the aggregation can be determined by using standard liquid scintillation counting equipment. (author)

  16. Assays for calcitonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teitelbaum, A.P.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The assays for calcitonin receptors described focus on their use in the study of the well-established target organs for calcitonin, bone and kidney. The radioligand used in virtually all calcitonin binding studies is 125 I-labelled salmon calcitonin. The lack of methionine residues in this peptide permits the use of chloramine-T for the iodination reaction. Binding assays are described for intact bone, skeletal plasma membranes, renal plasma membranes, and primary kidney cell cultures of rats. Studies on calcitonin metabolism in laboratory animals and regulation of calcitonin receptors are reviewed

  17. Biomonitoring of genotoxic risk in radar facility workers: comparison of the comet assay with micronucleus assay and chromatid breakage assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Kopjar, N.

    2003-01-01

    Genotoxic risks of occupational exposure in a radar facility were evaluated by using alkaline comet assay, micronucleus assay and chromatid breakage assay on peripheral blood leukocytes in exposed subjects and corresponding controls. Results show that occupational exposure to microwave radiation correlates with an increase of genome damage in somatic cells. The levels of DNA damage in exposed subjects determined by using alkaline comet assay were increased compared to control and showed interindividual variations. Incidence of micronuclei was also significantly increased compared to baseline control values. After short exposure of cultured lymphocytes to bleomycin, cells of occupationally exposed subjects responded with high numbers of chromatid breaks. Although the level of chromosome damage generated by bleomycin varied greatly between individuals, in exposed subjects a significantly elevated number of chromatid breaks was observed. Our results support data reported in literature indicating that microwave radiation represents a potential DNA-damaging hazard. Alkaline comet assay is confirmed as a sensitive and highly reproducible technique for detection of primary DNA damage inflicted in somatic cells. Micronucleus assay was confirmed as reliable bio-markers of effect and chromatid breakage assay as sensitive bio-marker of individual cancer susceptibility. The results obtained also confirm the necessity to improve measures and to perform accurate health surveillance of individuals occupationally exposed to microwave radiation

  18. Remodeling pathway control of mitochondrial respiratory capacity by temperature in mouse heart: electron flow through the Q-junction in permeabilized fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Hélène; Blier, Pierre U; Gnaiger, Erich

    2017-06-06

    Fuel substrate supply and oxidative phosphorylation are key determinants of muscle performance. Numerous studies of mammalian mitochondria are carried out (i) with substrate supply that limits electron flow, and (ii) far below physiological temperature. To analyze potentially implicated biases, we studied mitochondrial respiratory control in permeabilized mouse myocardial fibers using high-resolution respirometry. The capacity of oxidative phosphorylation at 37 °C was nearly two-fold higher when fueled by physiological substrate combinations reconstituting tricarboxylic acid cycle function, compared with electron flow measured separately through NADH to Complex I or succinate to Complex II. The relative contribution of the NADH pathway to physiological respiratory capacity increased with a decrease in temperature from 37 to 25 °C. The apparent excess capacity of cytochrome c oxidase above physiological pathway capacity increased sharply under hypothermia due to limitation by NADH-linked dehydrogenases. This mechanism of mitochondrial respiratory control in the hypothermic mammalian heart is comparable to the pattern in ectotherm species, pointing towards NADH-linked mt-matrix dehydrogenases and the phosphorylation system rather than electron transfer complexes as the primary drivers of thermal sensitivity at low temperature. Delineating the link between stress and remodeling of oxidative phosphorylation is important for understanding metabolic perturbations in disease evolution and cardiac protection.

  19. Determinants for membrane association and permeabilization of the coxsackievirus 2B protein and the identification of the Golgi complex as the target organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Arjan S; Wessels, Els; Dijkman, Henri B P M; Galama, Jochem M D; Melchers, Willem J G; Willems, Peter H G M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2003-01-10

    The 2B protein of enterovirus is responsible for the alterations in the permeability of secretory membranes and the plasma membrane in infected cells. The structural requirements for the membrane association and the subcellular localization of this essential virus protein, however, have not been defined. Here, we provide evidence that the 2B protein is an integral membrane protein in vivo that is predominantly localized at the Golgi complex upon individual expression. Addition of organelle-specific targeting signals to the 2B protein revealed that the Golgi localization is an absolute prerequisite for the ability of the protein to modify plasma membrane permeability. Expression of deletion mutants and heterologous proteins containing specific domains of the 2B protein demonstrated that each of the two hydrophobic regions could mediate membrane binding individually. However, the presence of both hydrophobic regions was required for the correct membrane association, efficient Golgi targeting, and the membrane-permeabilizing activity of the 2B protein, suggesting that the two hydrophobic regions are cooperatively involved in the formation of a membrane-integral complex. The formation of membrane-integral pores by the 2B protein in the Golgi complex and the possible mechanism by which a Golgi-localized virus protein modifies plasma membrane permeability are discussed.

  20. A steady-state mechanism can account for the properties of inositol 2,4,5-trisphosphate-stimulated Ca2+ release from permeabilized L1210 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis-Husselbee, J W; Dawson, A P

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of sub-maximal Ins(2,4,5)P3 concentrations on the Ca2+ permeability of the residual undischarged Ca2+ stores in electroporated or digitonin-permeabilized L1210 cells by measuring Ca(2+)-efflux rate after addition of the ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin. Low concentrations of Ins(2,4,5)P3, causing rapid discharge of a small proportion of the releasable Ca2+, result in a substantial stimulation of Ca2+ efflux after thapsigargin addition. This indicates firstly that in the absence of thapsigargin there must have been a substantial, counterbalancing, increase in rate of Ca2+ pumping, and secondly that the increased Ca2+ permeability is more consistent with a steady state than with a quantal model of Ca2+ release. Similar increases in passive Ca2+ permeability are produced by addition of concentrations of ionomycin which produce equivalent changes in Ca2+ loading to those produced by Ins(2,4,5)P3, although the time course and initial rate of Ca2+ release are very much slower. In the presence of a Ca(2+)-buffering system, the time course of Ca2+ release by Ins(2,4,5)P3 becomes superimposable on that of ionomycin, indicating that the initial rapid phase of Ins(2,4,5)P3-stimulated Ca2+ is at least partially due to positive feedback from extravesicular Ca2+. PMID:8382056

  1. Lateral flow assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Amerongen, van A.

    2012-01-01

    A simple version of immunochemical-based methods is the Lateral Flow Assay (LFA). It is a dry chemistry technique (reagents are included); the fluid from the sample runs through a porous membrane (often nitrocellulose) by capillary force. Typically the membrane is cut as a strip of 0.5*5 cm. In most

  2. Microchemiluminescent assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiel, J.L.

    1986-04-09

    The patent concerns a microchemiluminescent assay system, which can be used to detect ionizing radiation, heat or specific substances. The method involves the use of a complex formed from serum albumin and a luminescer which, in the presence of ionizing radiation (heat, or a specific analyte), will emit light in an amount proportional to the amount of radiation, etc. (U.K.).

  3. (MTT) dye reduction assay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells was determined using the 3443- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye reduction assay. Extracts from roots of Agathisanthemum bojeri, Synaptolepis kirkii and Zanha africana and the leaf extract of Physalis peruviana at a concentration of 10 pg/ml inhibited cell ...

  4. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  5. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a...

  6. Radioreceptor assay for oxyphenonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensing, K.; Zeeuw, R.A. de

    1984-01-01

    The development of a radioreceptor assay for the quaternary anticholinergic drug, oxyphenonium, in plasma is reported. It is based on competition between this drug and 3 H-dexetimide for binding to muscarinic receptors. After ion pair extraction and reextraction, the drug can be determined in plasma at concentrations down to a value of 100 pg/ml. This permits pharmacokinetic studies to be made after inhalation of oxyphenonium. (author)

  7. Dual isotope assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.F.W.; Stevens, R.A.J.; Jacoby, B.

    1980-01-01

    Dual isotope assays for thyroid function are performed by carrying out a radio-immunoassay for two of thyroxine (T4), tri-iodothyronine (T3), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), by a method wherein a version of one of the thyroid components, preferably T4 or T3 is labelled with Selenium-75 and the version of the other thyroid component is labelled with a different radionuclide, preferably Iodine-125. (author)

  8. A multiwell format assay for heparanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Farhad; Brenchley, Paul E C

    2003-09-15

    This assay employs a biotinylated heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (HSGAG) substrate that is covalently linked to the surface of 96-well immunoassay plates. The ratio of biotin:HSGAG and the coating concentration of substrate bound to the wells have been optimized and allow removal of biotin HSGAG within 60 min of incubation at 37 degrees C in assay buffer with a standard dilution of bacterial heparitinase or platelet heparanase. Loss of biotin signal from the well surface is detected on incubation with peroxidase-streptavidin followed by color development using 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine as the peroxidase substrate. The new assay allows specific detection of heparanase activity in multiple samples in a total time of 3 h including a 1-h substrate digestion step and is a significant improvement with regard to sensitivity, specificity, and ease of handling of multiple samples compared to other described assays. Heparanase specifically degrades the biotinylated HSGAG substrate, when used with an optimized assay buffer. A range of enzymes including collagenase, trypsin, plasmin, pepsin, chondroitinases, hyaluronidase, and neuraminidase show no effect on the substrate under optimized assay conditions. The covalent linkage of the substrate to the well prevents leaching of substrate and allows preparation and long-term storage of substrate-coated plates. The assay can be used to detect heparanase levels in clinical samples and cell culture supernatants and is ideal as a screening method for antagonists of enzyme activity.

  9. A Comparative Study on the Effects of Millisecond- and Microsecond-Pulsed Electric Field Treatments on the Permeabilization and Extraction of Pigments from Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo, Elisa; Martínez, Juan Manuel; Coustets, Mathilde; Álvarez, Ignacio; Teissié, Justin; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Raso, Javier

    2015-10-01

    The interdependencies of the two main processing parameters affecting "electroporation" (electric field strength and pulse duration) while using pulse duration in the range of milliseconds and microseconds on the permeabilization, inactivation, and extraction of pigments from Chlorella vulgaris was compared. While irreversible "electroporation" was observed above 4 kV/cm in the millisecond range, electric field strengths of ≥10 kV/cm were required in the microseconds range. However, to cause the electroporation of most of the 90 % of the population of C. vulgaris in the millisecond (5 kV/cm, 20 pulses) or microsecond (15 kV/cm, 25 pulses) range, the specific energy that was delivered was lower for microsecond treatments (16.87 kJ/L) than in millisecond treatments (150 kJ/L). In terms of the specific energy required to cause microalgae inactivation, treatments in the microsecond range also resulted in greater energy efficiency. The comparison of extraction yields in the range of milliseconds (5 kV, 20 ms) and microseconds (20, 25 pulses) under the conditions in which the maximum extraction was observed revealed that the improvement in the carotenoid extraction was similar and chlorophyll a and b extraction was slightly higher for treatments in the microsecond range. The specific energy that was required for the treatment in the millisecond range (150 kJ/L) was much higher than those required in the microsecond range (30 kJ/L). The comparison of the efficacy of both types of pulses on the extraction enhancement just after the treatment and after a post-pulse incubation period seemed to indicate that PEF in the millisecond range created irreversible alterations while, in the microsecond range, the defects were a dynamic structure along the post-pulse time that caused a subsequent increment in the extraction yield.

  10. Performance of a Multiplex Serological Helicobacter pylori Assay on a Novel Microfluidic Assay Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Filomena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori occurs in 50% of the world population, and is associated with the development of ulcer and gastric cancer. Serological diagnostic tests indicate an H. pylori infection by detecting antibodies directed against H. pylori proteins. In addition to line blots, multiplex assay platforms provide smart solutions for the simultaneous analysis of antibody responses towards several H. pylori proteins. We used seven H. pylori proteins (FliD, gGT, GroEL, HpaA, CagA, VacA, and HP0231 and an H. pylori lysate for the development of a multiplex serological assay on a novel microfluidic platform. The reaction limited binding regime in the microfluidic channels allows for a short incubation time of 35 min. The developed assay showed very high sensitivity (99% and specificity (100%. Besides sensitivity and specificity, the technical validation (intra-assay CV = 3.7 ± 1.2% and inter-assay CV = 5.5 ± 1.2% demonstrates that our assay is also a robust tool for the analysis of the H. pylori-specific antibody response. The integration of the virulence factors CagA and VacA allow for the assessment of the risk for gastric cancer development. The short assay time and the performance of the platform shows the potential for implementation of such assays in a clinical setting.

  11. Random assay in radioimmunoassay: Feasibility and application compared with batch assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Hwan Hee; Park, Sohyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki [Dept. of Nuclear MedicineNational Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The batch assay has been conventionally used for radioimmunoassay (RIA) because of its technical robustness and practical convenience. However, it has limitations in terms of the relative lag of report time due to the necessity of multiple assays in a small number of samples compared with the random assay technique. In this study, we aimed to verify whether the random assay technique can be applied in RIA and is feasible in daily practice. The coefficients of variation (CVs) of eight standard curves within a single kit were calculated in a CA-125 immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the reference of the practically ideal CV of the CA-125 kit. Ten standard curves of 10 kits from 2 prospectively collected lots (pLot) and 85 standard curves of 85 kits from 3 retrospectively collected lots (Lot) were obtained. Additionally, the raw measurement data of both 170 control references and 1123 patients' sera were collected retrospectively between December 2015 and January 2016. A standard curve of the first kit of each lot was used as a master standard curve for a random assay. The CVs of inter-kits were analyzed in each lot, respectively. All raw measurements were normalized by decay and radioactivity. The CA-125 values from control samples and patients' sera were compared using the original batch assay and random assay. In standard curve analysis, the CVs of inter-kits in pLots and Lots were comparable to those within a single kit. The CVs from the random assay with normalization were similar to those from the batch assay in the control samples (CVs % of low/high concentration; Lot1 2.71/1.91, Lot2 2.35/1.83, Lot3 2.83/2.08 vs. Lot1 2.05/1.21, Lot2 1.66/1.48, Lot3 2.41/2.14). The ICCs between the batch assay and random assay using patients' sera were satisfactory (Lot1 1.00, Lot2 0.999, Lot3 1.00). The random assay technique could be successfully applied to the conventional CA-125 IRMA kits. The random assay showed strong agreement with the batch assay. The

  12. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  13. RAS - Screens & Assays - Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    The RAS Drug Discovery group aims to develop assays that will reveal aspects of RAS biology upon which cancer cells depend. Successful assay formats are made available for high-throughput screening programs to yield potentially effective drug compounds.

  14. Improving shuffler assay accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinard, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Drums of uranium waste should be disposed of in an economical and environmentally sound manner. The most accurate possible assays of the uranium masses in the drums are required for proper disposal. The accuracies of assays from a shuffler are affected by the type of matrix material in the drums. Non-hydrogenous matrices have little effect on neutron transport and accuracies are very good. If self-shielding is known to be a minor problem, good accuracies are also obtained with hydrogenous matrices when a polyethylene sleeve is placed around the drums. But for those cases where self-shielding may be a problem, matrices are hydrogenous, and uranium distributions are non-uniform throughout the drums, the accuracies are degraded. They can be greatly improved by determining the distributions of the uranium and then applying correction factors based on the distributions. This paper describes a technique for determining uranium distributions by using the neutron count rates in detector banks around the waste drum and solving a set of overdetermined linear equations. Other approaches were studied to determine the distributions and are described briefly. Implementation of this correction is anticipated on an existing shuffler next year

  15. Competitive protein binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Toshio; Oka, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of cyclic GMP (cGMP) by competitive protein binding assay was described and discussed. The principle of binding assay was represented briefly. Procedures of our method by binding protein consisted of preparation of cGMP binding protein, selection of 3 H-cyclic GMP on market, and measurement procedures. In our method, binding protein was isolated from the chrysalis of silk worm. This method was discussed from the points of incubation medium, specificity of binding protein, the separation of bound cGMP from free cGMP, and treatment of tissue from which cGMP was extracted. cGMP existing in the tissue was only one tenth or one scores of cGMP, and in addition, cGMP competed with cGMP in binding with binding protein. Therefore, Murad's technique was applied to the isolation of cGMP. This method provided the measurement with sufficient accuracy; the contamination by cAMP was within several per cent. (Kanao, N.)

  16. Relationship between the radioisotopic footpad assay and other immunological assays in tumor bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizushima, Yutaka; Takeichi, Noritoshi; Minami, Akio; Kasai, Masaharu; Itaya, Toshiyuki

    1981-01-01

    KMT-17, a fibrosarcoma induced by 3-methylcholanthrene in a WKA rat, is a sensitive tumor to various kinds of immunological assays and is a suitable model tumor for the study of the immune status in tumor bearing hosts. The antitumor immune response of KMT-17 bearing rats was studied by a radioisotopic footpad assay (FPA) in comparison with other in vivo and in vitro assays. Delayed hypersensitivity to tumor antigens measured by the FPA was observed from the 8th day after transplantation of KMT-17 cells, reached a peak on the 12 - 15th day, and then declined in the late stage on the 17th day. The kinetics of the FPA correlated well with those of an in vivo Winn assay and of an in vitro lymphocyte cytotoxicity assay ( 51 Cr-release assay). The appearance of an antitumor antibody detected by a complement dependent cytotoxicity test also correlated well with the kinetics of the FPA. A growth inhibition assay (GIA) for non-specific cell-mediated immunity also showed similar kinetics to that of the FPA. The delayed hypersensitivity footpad reaction to tumor cell extracts measured by this FPA was tumor-specific. These results suggest that the FPA is a simple and reliable in vivo assay for evaluating antitumor immunity in tumor bearing hosts. (author)

  17. Antioxidants and the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemeli, Eduardo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Anderson, Diana

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that antioxidants, either endogenous or from the diet, play a key role in preserving health. They are able to quench radical species generated in situations of oxidative stress, either triggered by pathologies or xenobiotics, and they protect the integrity of DNA from genotoxicants. Nevertheless, there are still many compounds with unclear or unidentified prooxidant/antioxidant activities. This is of concern since there is an increase in the number of compounds synthesized or extracted from vegetables to which humans might be exposed. Despite the well-established protective effects of fruit and vegetables, the antioxidant(s) responsible have not all been clearly identified. There might also be alternative mechanisms contributing to the protective effects for which a comprehensive description is lacking. In the last two decades, the Comet assay has been extensively used for the investigation of the effects of antioxidants and many reports can be found in the literature. The Comet assay, a relatively fast, simple, and sensitive technique for the analysis of DNA damage in all cell types, has been applied for the screening of chemicals, biomonitoring and intervention studies. In the present review, several of the most well-known antioxidants are considered. These include: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, selenium, iron chelators, melatonin, melanin, vitamins (A, B, C and E), carotenes, flavonoids, isoflavones, tea polyphenols, wine polyphenols and synthetic antioxidants. Investigations showing beneficial as well as non-beneficial properties of the antioxidants selected, either at the in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo level are discussed.

  18. An acoustic prion assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Hayward

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic prion assay has been demonstrated for sheep brain samples. Only five false positives and no false negatives were observed in a test of 45 positive and 45 negative samples. The acoustic prion sensor was constructed using a thickness shear mode quartz resonator coated with a covalently bound recombinant prion protein. The characteristic indicator of a scrapie infected sheep brain sample was an observed shoulder in the frequency decrease in response to a sample.The response of the sensor aligns with a conformational shift in the surface protein and with the propagation mechanism of the disease. This alignment is evident in the response timing and shape, dependence on concentration, cross species behaviour and impact of blood plasma. This alignment is far from sufficient to prove the mechanism of the sensor but it does offer the possibility of a rapid and inexpensive additional tool to explore prion disease. Keywords: Prions, Thickness shear mode quartz sensor

  19. Assay of oestrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    A particular problem with the direct radioimmunoassay of unconjugated oestriol in pregnancy is caused by the increased amount of steroid-binding proteins present in pregnancy serum and plasma. The steroid-binding proteins react with oestriol and 125 I-labelled oestriol during the assay procedure and the steroid-protein bound 125 I-labelled oestriol is precipitated along with the antibody-bound 125 I-labelled oestriol by the ammonium sulphate solution separation system. A novel method is described whereby progesterone (1-20 μg/ml) is used to block the action of steroid-binding proteins in pregnancy serum and plasma samples, thus minimizing interference in a direct radioimmunoassay for unconjugated oestriol using a specific anti-oestriol serum. (U.K.)

  20. The narrow therapeutic window of glycated hemoglobin and assay variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S S; Bibler, I; Charles, M A

    1999-12-01

    Glycated hemoglobin is measured by a variety of assays, each of which has a unique normal level. Our purpose is to show that among the different assays available in the United States, using the same patient's blood sample, assay results may vary widely and may more or less easily achieve a glycated hemoglobin value within the normal range. The following assays were compared using the same patient's blood sample for each pair of assays: glycohemoglobin affinity assay (GHB Reader; Isolab, Akron, OH) versus gel electrophoresis assay (n = 76); Isolab versus ion capture assay (IMX; Abbott Laboratories, Irving, TX) (n = 57); monoclonal antibody assay (DCA2000; Bayer Diagnostics, Pittsburgh, PA) versus IMX (n = 100); and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay (Bio-Rad Variant A1c; Bio-Rad Laboratories, Richmond, CA) versus IMX assay (n = 55). Our analyses indicate that a relative ranking can be established for the ease of achieving a normal glycated hemoglobin level. The ranking indicates that the most stringent or difficult assays for achieving a normal level are the Isolab and DCA2000 assays. The intermediate assays are the IMX and Bio-Rad Variant, and the easiest method for achieving a normal value is the gel electrophoresis assay. Our results indicate that various glycated hemoglobin assays vary widely and are associated with more or less difficulty for an individual patient to achieve a glycated hemoglobin level within the normal range. These results are especially significant with respect to (1) the clinically narrow therapeutic window of glycated hemoglobin values in type 1 diabetes to avoid rapidly advancing severe hypoglycemia rates and chronic microvascular complication rates, and (2) the glycated hemoglobin threshold for rapidly advancing macrovascular disease in both type 1 and type 2 patients.

  1. Meta-Analysis of Quantification Methods Shows that Archaea and Bacteria Have Similar Abundances in the Subseafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Megan K.; Kevorkian, Richard T.; Steen, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    There is no universally accepted method to quantify bacteria and archaea in seawater and marine sediments, and different methods have produced conflicting results with the same samples. To identify best practices, we compiled data from 65 studies, plus our own measurements, in which bacteria and archaea were quantified with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), catalyzed reporter deposition FISH (CARD-FISH), polyribonucleotide FISH, or quantitative PCR (qPCR). To estimate efficiency, we defined “yield” to be the sum of bacteria and archaea counted by these techniques divided by the total number of cells. In seawater, the yield was high (median, 71%) and was similar for FISH, CARD-FISH, and polyribonucleotide FISH. In sediments, only measurements by CARD-FISH in which archaeal cells were permeabilized with proteinase K showed high yields (median, 84%). Therefore, the majority of cells in both environments appear to be alive, since they contain intact ribosomes. In sediments, the sum of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene qPCR counts was not closely related to cell counts, even after accounting for variations in copy numbers per genome. However, qPCR measurements were precise relative to other qPCR measurements made on the same samples. qPCR is therefore a reliable relative quantification method. Inconsistent results for the relative abundance of bacteria versus archaea in deep subsurface sediments were resolved by the removal of CARD-FISH measurements in which lysozyme was used to permeabilize archaeal cells and qPCR measurements which used ARCH516 as an archaeal primer or TaqMan probe. Data from best-practice methods showed that archaea and bacteria decreased as the depth in seawater and marine sediments increased, although archaea decreased more slowly. PMID:24096423

  2. Development of an integrated assay facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molesworth, T.V.; Bailey, M.; Findlay, D.J.S.; Parsons, T.V.; Sene, M.R.; Swinhoe, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    The I.R.I.S. concept proposed the use of passive examination and active interrogation techniques in an integrated assay facility. A linac would generate the interrogating gamma and neutron beams. Insufficiently detailed knowledge about active neutron and gamma interrogation of 500 litre drums of cement immobilised intermediate level waste led to a research programme which is now in its main experimental stage. Measurements of interrogation responses are being made using simulated waste drums containing actinide samples and calibration sources, in an experimental assay assembly. Results show that responses are generally consistent with theory, but that improvements are needed in some areas. A preliminary appraisal of the engineering and economic aspects of integrated assay shows that correct operational sequencing is required to achieve the short cycle time needed for high throughput. The main engineering features of a facility have been identified

  3. Modulating lysosomal function through lysosome membrane permeabilization or autophagy suppression restores sensitivity to cisplatin in refractory non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circu, Magdalena; Cardelli, James; Barr, Martin; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Mills, Glenn; El-Osta, Hazem

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Most patients develop resistance to platinum within several months of treatment. We investigated whether triggering lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) or suppressing autophagy can restore cisplatin susceptibility in lung cancer with acquired chemoresistance. Cisplatin IC50 in A549Pt (parental) and A549cisR (cisplatin resistant) cells was 13 μM and 47 μM, respectively. Following cisplatin exposure, A549cisR cells failed to elicit an apoptotic response. This was manifested by diminished Annexin-V staining, caspase 3 and 9, BAX and BAK activation in resistant but not in parental cells. Chloroquine preferentially promoted LMP in A549cisR cells, revealed by leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosol as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. This was confirmed by increased cytosolic cathepsin D signal on Immunoblot. Cell viability of cisplatin-treated A549cisR cells was decreased when co-treated with chloroquine, corresponding to a combination index below 0.8, suggesting synergism between the two drugs. Notably, chloroquine activated the mitochondrial cell death pathway as indicated by increase in caspase 9 activity. Interestingly, inhibition of lysosomal proteases using E64 conferred cytoprotection against cisplatin and chloroquine co-treatment, suggesting that chloroquine-induced cell death occurred in a cathepsin-mediated mechanism. Likewise, blockage of caspases partially rescued A549cisR cells against the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and chloroquine combination. Cisplatin promoted a dose-dependent autophagic flux induction preferentially in A549cisR cells, as evidenced by a surge in LC3-II/α-tubulin following pre-treatment with E64 and increase in p62 degradation. Compared to untreated cells, cisplatin induced an increase in cyto-ID-loaded autophagosomes in A549cisR cells that was further amplified by chloroquine, pointing toward autophagic flux activation by cisplatin. Interestingly, this effect

  4. Modulating lysosomal function through lysosome membrane permeabilization or autophagy suppression restores sensitivity to cisplatin in refractory non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Circu

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Most patients develop resistance to platinum within several months of treatment. We investigated whether triggering lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP or suppressing autophagy can restore cisplatin susceptibility in lung cancer with acquired chemoresistance. Cisplatin IC50 in A549Pt (parental and A549cisR (cisplatin resistant cells was 13 μM and 47 μM, respectively. Following cisplatin exposure, A549cisR cells failed to elicit an apoptotic response. This was manifested by diminished Annexin-V staining, caspase 3 and 9, BAX and BAK activation in resistant but not in parental cells. Chloroquine preferentially promoted LMP in A549cisR cells, revealed by leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosol as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. This was confirmed by increased cytosolic cathepsin D signal on Immunoblot. Cell viability of cisplatin-treated A549cisR cells was decreased when co-treated with chloroquine, corresponding to a combination index below 0.8, suggesting synergism between the two drugs. Notably, chloroquine activated the mitochondrial cell death pathway as indicated by increase in caspase 9 activity. Interestingly, inhibition of lysosomal proteases using E64 conferred cytoprotection against cisplatin and chloroquine co-treatment, suggesting that chloroquine-induced cell death occurred in a cathepsin-mediated mechanism. Likewise, blockage of caspases partially rescued A549cisR cells against the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and chloroquine combination. Cisplatin promoted a dose-dependent autophagic flux induction preferentially in A549cisR cells, as evidenced by a surge in LC3-II/α-tubulin following pre-treatment with E64 and increase in p62 degradation. Compared to untreated cells, cisplatin induced an increase in cyto-ID-loaded autophagosomes in A549cisR cells that was further amplified by chloroquine, pointing toward autophagic flux activation by cisplatin

  5. Risk Aversion in Game Shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten I.

    2008-01-01

    We review the use of behavior from television game shows to infer risk attitudes. These shows provide evidence when contestants are making decisions over very large stakes, and in a replicated, structured way. Inferences are generally confounded by the subjective assessment of skill in some games......, and the dynamic nature of the task in most games. We consider the game shows Card Sharks, Jeopardy!, Lingo, and finally Deal Or No Deal. We provide a detailed case study of the analyses of Deal Or No Deal, since it is suitable for inference about risk attitudes and has attracted considerable attention....

  6. Measuring performance at trade shows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kåre

    2004-01-01

    Trade shows is an increasingly important marketing activity to many companies, but current measures of trade show performance do not adequately capture dimensions important to exhibitors. Based on the marketing literature's outcome and behavior-based control system taxonomy, a model is built...... that captures a outcome-based sales dimension and four behavior-based dimensions (i.e. information-gathering, relationship building, image building, and motivation activities). A 16-item instrument is developed for assessing exhibitors perceptions of their trade show performance. The paper presents evidence...

  7. Global optimization in the adaptive assay of subterranean uranium nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulkan, U.; Ben-Haim, Y.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive assay is one in which the design of the assay system is modified during operation in response to measurements obtained on-line. The present work has two aims: to design an adaptive system for borehole assay of isolated subterranean uranium nodules, and to investigate globality of optimal design in adaptive assay. It is shown experimentally that reasonably accurate estimates of uranium mass are obtained for a wide range of nodule shapes, on the basis of an adaptive assay system based on a simple geomorphological model. Furthermore, two concepts are identified which underlie the optimal design of the assay system. The adaptive assay approach shows promise for successful measurement of spatially random material in many geophysical applications. (author)

  8. Tokyo Motor Show 2003; Tokyo Motor Show 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, E.

    2004-01-01

    The text which follows present the different techniques exposed during the 37. Tokyo Motor Show. The report points out the great tendencies of developments of the Japanese automobile industry. The hybrid electric-powered vehicles or those equipped with fuel cells have been highlighted by the Japanese manufacturers which allow considerable budgets in the research of less polluting vehicles. The exposed models, although being all different according to the manufacturer, use always a hybrid system: fuel cell/battery. The manufacturers have stressed too on the intelligent systems for navigation and safety as well as on the design and comfort. (O.M.)

  9. Evaluation of total PSA assay on vitros ECi and correlation with Kryptor-PSA assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinat, B; Wacquet, M; Toubert, M E; Rain, J D; Schlageter, M H

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of multiparametric immuno-analysers for PSA assays are available. As different immuno-assays may vary in their analytical quality and their accuracy for the follow-up of patients, expertise is necessary for each new assay. The PSA assay on the Vitros-ECi analyser has been evaluated and compared with the PSA assay from the Kryptor analyser. Variation coefficients were 0.91 to 1.98% for within-run assays, and 4.2% to 5.4% for interassay (PSA levels = 0.8 microgram/L to 33.6 micrograms/L). Dilution tests showed 93 to 136% recovery until 70 micrograms/L PSA. Functional sensitivity was estimated at 0.03 microgram/L. Equimolarity of the test was confirmed. Correlation of PSA levels measured with Vitros-ECi and Kryptor analysers displayed a correlation coefficient r2 of 0.9716. The half-lives and doubling times of PSA were similar using both methods. Vitros-ECi PSA assay meets the major criteria for the management of prostate cancer patients.

  10. Reality show: um paradoxo nietzschiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Feldman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    O fenômeno dos reality shows - e a subseqüente relação entre imagem e verdade - assenta-se sobre uma série de paradoxos. Tais paradoxos podem ser compreendidos à luz do pensamento do filósofo alemão Friedrich Nietzsche, que, através dos usos de formulações paradoxais, concebia a realidade como um mundo de pura aparência e a verdade como um acréscimo ficcional, como um efeito. A ficção é então tomada, na filosofia de Nietzsche, não em seu aspecto falsificante e desrealizador - como sempre pleiteou nossa tradição metafísica -, mas como condição necessária para que certa espécie de invenção possa operar como verdade. Sendo assim, a própria expressão reality show, através de sua formulação paradoxal, engendra explicitamente um mundo de pura aparência, em que a verdade, a parte reality da proposição, é da ordem do suplemento, daquilo que se acrescenta ficcionalmente - como um adjetivo - a show. O ornamento, nesse caso, passa a ocupar o lugar central, apontando para o efeito produzido: o efeito-de-verdade. Seguindo, então, o pensamento nietzschiano e sua atualização na contemporaneidade, investigaremos de que forma os televisivos “shows de realidade” operam paradoxalmente, em consonância com nossas paradoxais práticas culturais.

  11. Determination of antipsychotic drug in human serum by radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jinchang; Jiang Yimin

    1989-01-01

    Serum antipsychotic drug in 50 psychosis cases were measured by radioreceptor assay (RRA) and the values were compared in parallel with that by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The results showed that the RRA values were lower than the RIA values, but both assays gave significant correlation between the serum drug level and antipsychotic dose

  12. Assaying Cellular Viability Using the Neutral Red Uptake Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Gamze; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera; Rodrigues, Robim M

    2017-01-01

    The neutral red uptake assay is a cell viability assay that allows in vitro quantification of xenobiotic-induced cytotoxicity. The assay relies on the ability of living cells to incorporate and bind neutral red, a weak cationic dye, in lysosomes. As such, cytotoxicity is expressed as a concentration-dependent reduction of the uptake of neutral red after exposure to the xenobiotic under investigation. The neutral red uptake assay is mainly used for hazard assessment in in vitro toxicology applications. This method has also been introduced in regulatory recommendations as part of 3T3-NRU-phototoxicity-assay, which was regulatory accepted in all EU member states in 2000 and in the OECD member states in 2004 as a test guideline (TG 432). The present protocol describes the neutral red uptake assay using the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, which is often employed as an alternative in vitro model for human hepatocytes. As an example, the cytotoxicity of acetaminophen and acetyl salicylic acid is assessed.

  13. Micronucleus assay for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasem, A.N.; Ali, A.S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Micronucleus assay was performed on 49 radiation workers and 22 healthy volunteers. Radiation workers were subdivided into two groups according to their employments durations in the radiation field. Group a consisted of 18 radiation workers who have been in this work between 5 and 22 years. Group b included 31 employees who have been classified as radiation workers for 1 to 4.5 years. Statistical analysis showed significant variations between the yields of micronuclei in groups A and B as well as between group A and a group of healthy controls. Meanwhile no significant difference was noticed between the yields of micronuclei in group B and the corresponding values in the healthy controls. The possible effect of age in the induction of micronuclei was discussed and a comparison with the yield of chromosomal aberrations was described. It seems that cytokinesis- blocking method may be used to detect the radiation-induced micronuclei in workers exposed occupationally to ionizing radiation in levels below the maximum permissible limit of 0.05 Sv per year

  14. PAME: plasmonic assay modeling environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hughes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic assays are an important class of optical sensors that measure biomolecular interactions in real-time without the need for labeling agents, making them especially well-suited for clinical applications. Through the incorporation of nanoparticles and fiberoptics, these sensing systems have been successfully miniaturized and show great promise for in-situ probing and implantable devices, yet it remains challenging to derive meaningful, quantitative information from plasmonic responses. This is in part due to a lack of dedicated modeling tools, and therefore we introduce PAME, an open-source Python application for modeling plasmonic systems of bulk and nanoparticle-embedded metallic films. PAME combines aspects of thin-film solvers, nanomaterials and fiber-optics into an intuitive graphical interface. Some of PAME’s features include a simulation mode, a database of hundreds of materials, and an object-oriented framework for designing complex nanomaterials, such as a gold nanoparticles encased in a protein shell. An overview of PAME’s theory and design is presented, followed by example simulations of a fiberoptic refractometer, as well as protein binding to a multiplexed sensor composed of a mixed layer of gold and silver colloids. These results provide new insights into observed responses in reflectance biosensors.

  15. Comparative analysis of selected methods for the assessment of antimicrobial and membrane-permeabilizing activity: a case study for lactoferricin derived peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohner Karl

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing concerns about bacterial resistance to antibiotics have prompted the development of alternative therapies like those based on cationic antimicrobial peptides (APs. These compounds not only are bactericidal by themselves but also enhance the activity of antibiotics. Studies focused on the systematic characterization of APs are hampered by the lack of standard guidelines for testing these compounds. We investigated whether the information provided by methods commonly used for the biological characterization of APs is comparable, as it is often assumed. For this purpose, we determined the bacteriostatic, bactericidal, and permeability-increasing activity of synthetic peptides (n = 57; 9–13 amino acid residues in length analogous to the lipopolysaccharide-binding region of human lactoferricin by a number of the most frequently used methods and carried out a comparative analysis. Results While the minimum inhibitory concentration determined by an automated turbidimetry-based system (Bioscreen or by conventional broth microdilution methods did not differ significantly, bactericidal activity measured under static conditions in a low-ionic strength solvent resulted in a vast overestimation of antimicrobial activity. Under these conditions the degree of antagonism between the peptides and the divalent cations differed greatly depending on the bacterial strain tested. In contrast, the bioactivity of peptides was not affected by the type of plasticware (polypropylene vs. polystyrene. Susceptibility testing of APs using cation adjusted Mueller-Hinton was the most stringent screening method, although it may overlook potentially interesting peptides. Permeability assays based on sensitization to hydrophobic antibiotics provided overall information analogous – though not quantitatively comparable- to that of tests based on the uptake of hydrophobic fluorescent probes. Conclusion We demonstrate that subtle changes in methods for

  16. Assessment and reduction of comet assay variation in relation to DNA damage: studies from the European Comet Assay Validation Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Möller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W L

    2010-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay has become a widely used method for the detection of DNA damage and repair in cells and tissues. Still, it has been difficult to compare results from different investigators because of differences in assay conditions and because the data...... are reported in different units. The European Comet Assay Validation Group (ECVAG) was established for the purpose of validation of the comet assay with respect to measures of DNA damage formation and its repair. The results from this inter-laboratory validation trail showed a large variation in measured level...... reliability for the measurement of DNA damage by the comet assay but there is still a need for further validation to reduce both assay and inter-laboratory variation....

  17. The fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhagen, Elin; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) is a nonclonogenic microplate-based cell viability assay used for measurement of the cytotoxic and/or cytostatic effect of different compounds in vitro. The assay is based on hydrolysis of the probe, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) by esterases in cells with intact plasma membranes. The assay is available as both a semiautomated 96-well plate setup and a 384-well plate version fully adaptable to robotics. Experimental plates are prepared with a small amount of drug solution and can be stored frozen. Cells are seeded on the plates and cell viability is evaluated after 72 h. The protocol described here is applicable both for cell lines and freshly prepared tumor cells from patients and is suitable both for screening in drug development and as a basis for a predictive test for individualization of anticancer drug therapy.

  18. Solution assay instrument operations manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.K.; Marks, T.; Parker, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    An at-line solution assay instrument (SAI) has been developed and installed in a plutonium purification and americium recovery process area in the Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility. The instrument was designed for accurate, timely, and simultaneous nondestructive analysis of plutonium and americium in process solutions that have a wide range of concentrations and americium/plutonium ratios and for routine operation by process technicians who lack instrumentation background. The SAI, based on transmission-corrected, high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, has two measurement stations attached to a single multichannel analyzer/computer system. To ensure the quality of assay results, the SAI has an internal measurement control program, which requires daily and weekly check runs and monitors key aspects of all assay runs. For a 25-ml sample, the assay precision is 5 g/l within a 2000-s count time

  19. Nondestructive assay of HTGR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.

    1974-01-01

    Performance characteristics of three different radioactive source NDA systems are compared for the assay of HTGR fuel rods and stacks of rods. These systems include the fast neutron Sb-Be assay system, the 252 Cf ''Shuffler,'' and the thermal neutron PAPAS assay system. Studies have been made to determinethe perturbation on the measurements from particle size, kernel Th/U ratio, thorium content, and hydrogen content. In addition to the total 235 U determination, the pellet-to-pellet or rod-to-rod uniformity of HTGR fuel rod stacks has been measured by counting the delayed gamma rays with a NaI through-hole in the PAPAS system. These measurements showed that rod substitutions can be detected easily in a fuel stack, and that detailed information is available on the loading variations in a uniform stack. Using a 1.0 mg 252 Cf source, assay rates of 2 to 4 rods/s are possible, thus facilitating measurement of 100 percent of a plant's throughput. (U.S.)

  20. Radioligand assay in reproductive biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenman, S.G.; Sherman, B.M.

    1975-01-01

    Radioligand assays have been developed for the principal reproductive steroids and peptide hormones. Specific binding reagents have included antibodies, plasma binders, and intracellular receptors. In each assay, problems of specificity, sensitivity, and nonspecific inhibitors were encountered. Many features of the endocrine physiology in childhood, during puberty, and in adulthood have been characterized. Hormonal evaluations of endocrine disorders of reproduction are characterized on the basis of their characteristic pathophysiologic alterations. (U.S.)

  1. Bax-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), distinct from the mitochondrial permeability transition, is a key mechanism in diclofenac-induced hepatocyte injury: Multiple protective roles of cyclosporin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Woen Ping; Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Boelsterli, Urs A

    2008-03-15

    Diclofenac, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been associated with rare but severe cases of clinical hepatotoxicity. Diclofenac causes concentration-dependent cell death in human hepatocytes (after 24-48 h) by mitochondrial permeabilization via poorly defined mechanisms. To explore whether the cyclophilin D (CyD)-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) and/or the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) was primarily involved in mediating cell death, we exposed immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to apoptogenic concentrations of diclofenac (>500 microM) in the presence or absence of inhibitors of upstream mediators. The CyD inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, 2 microM) fully inhibited diclofenac-induced cell injury, suggesting that mPT was involved. However, CyD gene silencing using siRNA left the cells susceptible to diclofenac toxicity, and CsA still protected the CyD-negative cells from lethal injury. Diclofenac induced early (9 h) activation of Bax and Bak and caused mitochondrial translocation of Bax, indicating that MOMP was involved in cell death. Inhibition of Bax protein expression by using siRNA significantly protected HC-04 from diclofenac-induced cell injury. Diclofenac also induced early Bid activation (tBid formation, 6 h), which is an upstream mechanism that initiates Bax activation and mitochondrial translocation. Bid activation was sensitive to the Ca2+ chelator, BAPTA. In conclusion, we found that Bax/Bak-mediated MOMP is a key mechanism of diclofenac-induced lethal cell injury in human hepatocytes, and that CsA can prevent MOMP through inhibition of Bax activation. These data support our concept that the Ca2+-Bid-Bax-MOMP axis is a critical pathway in diclofenac (metabolite)-induced hepatocyte injury.

  2. Bax-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), distinct from the mitochondrial permeability transition, is a key mechanism in diclofenac-induced hepatocyte injury: Multiple protective roles of cyclosporin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siu, W.P.; Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2008-01-01

    Diclofenac, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been associated with rare but severe cases of clinical hepatotoxicity. Diclofenac causes concentration-dependent cell death in human hepatocytes (after 24-48 h) by mitochondrial permeabilization via poorly defined mechanisms. To explore whether the cyclophilin D (CyD)-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) and/or the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) was primarily involved in mediating cell death, we exposed immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to apoptogenic concentrations of diclofenac (> 500 μM) in the presence or absence of inhibitors of upstream mediators. The CyD inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, 2 μM) fully inhibited diclofenac-induced cell injury, suggesting that mPT was involved. However, CyD gene silencing using siRNA left the cells susceptible to diclofenac toxicity, and CsA still protected the CyD-negative cells from lethal injury. Diclofenac induced early (9 h) activation of Bax and Bak and caused mitochondrial translocation of Bax, indicating that MOMP was involved in cell death. Inhibition of Bax protein expression by using siRNA significantly protected HC-04 from diclofenac-induced cell injury. Diclofenac also induced early Bid activation (tBid formation, 6 h), which is an upstream mechanism that initiates Bax activation and mitochondrial translocation. Bid activation was sensitive to the Ca 2+ chelator, BAPTA. In conclusion, we found that Bax/Bak-mediated MOMP is a key mechanism of diclofenac-induced lethal cell injury in human hepatocytes, and that CsA can prevent MOMP through inhibition of Bax activation. These data support our concept that the Ca 2+ -Bid-Bax-MOMP axis is a critical pathway in diclofenac (metabolite)-induced hepatocyte injury

  3. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  4. Assays for mammalian tyrosinase: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jara, J.R.; Solano, F.; Lozano, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    This work describes a comparative study of the tyrosinase activity determined using three methods which are the most extensively employed; two radiometric assays using L-tyrosine as substrate (tyrosine hydroxylase and melanin formation activities) and one spectrophotometric assay using L-dopa (dopa oxidase activity). The three methods were simultaneously employed to measure the activities of the soluble, melanosomal, and microsomal tyrosinase isozymes from Harding-Passey mouse melanoma through their purification processes. The aim of this study was to find any correlation among the tyrosinase activities measured by the three different assays and to determine whether that correlation varied with the isozyme and its degree of purification. The results show that mammalian tyrosinase has a greater turnover number for L-dopa than for L-tyrosine. Thus, enzyme activity, expressed as mumol of substrate transformed per min, is higher in assays using L-dopa as substrate than those using L-tyrosine. Moreover, the percentage of hydroxylated L-tyrosine that is converted into melanin is low and is affected by several factors, apparently decreasing the tyrosinase activity measured by the melanin formation assay. Bearing these considerations in mind, average interassay factors are proposed. Their values are 10 to transform melanin formation into tyrosine hydroxylase activity, 100 to transform tyrosine hydroxylase into dopa oxidase activity, and 1,000 to transform melanin formation into dopa oxidase activity. Variations in these values due to the presence in the tyrosinase preparations of either inhibitors or regulatory factors in melanogenesis independent of tyrosinase are also discussed

  5. A European multicientre study on the comparison of HIV-1 viral loads between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and Roche COBAS® TAQMAN® HIV-1 test, Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Hofmann, Jörg; Izopet, Jacques; Kühn, Sebastian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Mancon, Alessandro; Marcos, Mª Angeles; Mileto, Davide; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Viral load monitoring is essential for patients under treatment for HIV. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the novel, automated DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. ¥ OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the clinical performance of the new quantitative VERIS HIV-1 Assay at multiple EU laboratories. Method comparison with the VERIS HIV-1 Assay was performed with 415 specimens at 5 sites tested with COBAS ® AmpliPrep/COBAS ® TaqMan ® HIV-1 Test, v2.0, 169 specimens at 3 sites tested with RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and 202 specimens from 2 sites tested with VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Patient monitoring sample results from 4 sites were also compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed the average bias between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay to be 0.28, 0.39, and 0.61 log 10 cp/mL, respectively. Bias at low end levels below 1000cp/mL showed predicted bias to be <0.3 log 10 cp/mL for VERIS HIV-1 Assay versus COBAS HIV-1 Test and RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and <0.5 log 10 cp/mL versus VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Analysis on 174 specimens tested with the 0.175mL volume VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test showed average bias of 0.39 log 10 cp/mL. Patient monitoring results using VERIS HIV-1 Assay demonstrated similar viral load trends over time to all comparators. The VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the DxN VERIS System demonstrated comparable clinical performance to COBAS ® HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. First results with a radioreceptor-assay (TRAK-Assay) for TSH-receptor-autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Reiners, C.; Boerner, W.

    1983-01-01

    A new radioreceptor-assay (TRAK-assay) for autoantibodies against TSH-receptors was tested in 48 untreated thyrotoxic patients (26 regional autonomies, 22 toxic diffuse goiters). None of the 26 patients with regional autonomy showed positive autoantibody-titers. 4 patients with toxic diffuse goiter and thyrotoxic exophthalmos were TRAK-positive. Positive titers of microsomal and thyreoglobulin autoantibodies could be seen in 8 of 9 patients with positive TRAK-titers. In accordance with the conventional methods for detecting thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins the new TRAK-assay seems to be suited for differentiating between immunogenic toxic diffuse goiter (Graves' disease) and goiter with disseminated autonomy as well as for prediction of relapse. (orig.) [de

  7. Evaluation of Presto(plus) assay and LightMix kit Trichomonas vaginalis assay for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis in dry vaginal swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waaij, Dewi J; Ouburg, Sander; Dubbink, Jan Henk; Peters, Remco P H; Morré, Servaas A

    2016-08-01

    This is an evaluation study of the Presto(plus) Assay for T. vaginalis by comparing to the TIB MOLBIOL LightMix Kit Trichomonas vaginalis Assay using 615 dry collected vaginal and rectal swabs. Discordant samples were analyzed by the Qiagen® Microbial DNA qPCR for TV Assay. Both assays showed comparable performances (McNemar p>0.05). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of irradiated pepper with comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique Fco.; Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Carro Palacio, Sandra; Iglesia Enriquez, Isora

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing radiations is a technological process utilized in order to increase the hygienic quality and the storage time of the foods. Several methods of detection of irradiated foods have been recommended. The comet assay of DNA is one fast and economical technique for the qualitative identification of irradiated foods. The objective of the present paper was to identify with the comet assay technique the modifications of the DNA molecule of irradiated pepper storage at environment and refrigeration temperatures and different post-irradiation times for different absorbed dose values, (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 kGy). It was demonstrated that for the high absorbed dose values was observed a greater break into fragments of the DNA molecule, which shows the application of this technique for the identification of irradiated foods. (author)

  9. Barcoded microchips for biomolecular assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Jiashu; Zou, Yu; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Jianzhong Jeff; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-20

    Multiplexed assay of analytes is of great importance for clinical diagnostics and other analytical applications. Barcode-based bioassays with the ability to encode and decode may realize this goal in a straightforward and consistent manner. We present here a microfluidic barcoded chip containing several sets of microchannels with different widths, imitating the commonly used barcode. A single barcoded microchip can carry out tens of individual protein/nucleic acid assays (encode) and immediately yield all assay results by a portable barcode reader or a smartphone (decode). The applicability of a barcoded microchip is demonstrated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoassays for simultaneous detection of three targets (anti-gp41 antibody, anti-gp120 antibody, and anti-gp36 antibody) from six human serum samples. We can also determine seven pathogen-specific oligonucleotides by a single chip containing both positive and negative controls.

  10. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  11. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.D.; Hwang, T.; Hsieh, C.; Thames, H.

    1985-01-01

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  12. New Application of the Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Fernández, José Luís; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálbez, Altea; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    The comet assay is a well-established, simple, versatile, visual, rapid, and sensitive tool used extensively to assess DNA damage and DNA repair quantitatively and qualitatively in single cells. The comet assay is most frequently used to analyze white blood cells or lymphocytes in human biomonitoring studies, although other cell types have been examined, including buccal, nasal, epithelial, and placental cells and even spermatozoa. This study was conducted to design a protocol that can be used to generate comets in subnuclear units, such as chromosomes. The new technique is based on the chromosome isolation protocols currently used for whole chromosome mounting in electron microscopy, coupled to the alkaline variant of the comet assay, to detect DNA damage. The results show that migrant DNA fragments can be visualized in whole nuclei and isolated chromosomes and that they exhibit patterns of DNA migration that depend on the level of DNA damage produced. This protocol has great potential for the highly reproducible study of DNA damage and repair in specific chromosomal domains. PMID:21540337

  13. Automation of the dicentric chromosome assay and related assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) is considered to be the 'gold standard' for personalized dose assessment in humans after accidental or incidental radiation exposure. Although this technique is superior to other cytogenetic assays in terms of specificity and sensitivity, its potential application to radiation mass casualty scenarios is highly restricted because DCA is time consuming and labor intensive when performed manually. Therefore, it is imperative to develop high throughput automation techniques to make DCA suitable for radiological triage scenarios. At the Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory in Oak Ridge, efforts are underway to develop high throughput automation of DCA. Current status on development of various automated cytogenetic techniques in meeting the biodosimetry needs of radiological/nuclear incident(s) will be discussed

  14. Assay strategies and methods for phospholipases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, L.J.; Washburn, W.N.; Deems, R.A.; Dennis, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Of the general considerations discussed, the two issues which are most important in choosing an assay are (1) what sensitivity is required to assay a particular enzyme and (2) whether the assay must be continuous. One can narrow the options further by considering substrate availability, enzyme specificity, assay convenience, or the presence of incompatible side reactions. In addition, the specific preference of a particular phospholipase for polar head group, micellar versus vesicular substrates, and anionic versus nonionic detergents may further restrict the options. Of the many assays described in this chapter, several have limited applicability or serious drawbacks and are not commonly employed. The most commonly used phospholipase assays are the radioactive TLC assay and the pH-stat assay. The TLC assay is probably the most accurate, sensitive assay available. These aspects often outweigh the disadvantages of being discontinuous, tedious, and expensive. The radioactive E. coli assay has become popular recently as an alternative to the TLC assay for the purification of the mammalian nonpancreatic phospholipases. The assay is less time consuming and less expensive than the TLC assay, but it is not appropriate when careful kinetics are required. Where less sensitivity is needed, or when a continuous assay is necessary, the pH-stat assay is often employed. With purified enzymes, when free thiol groups are not present, a spectrophotometric thiol assay can be used. This assay is ∼ as sensitive as the pH-stat assay but is more convenient and more reproducible, although the substrate is not available commercially. Despite the many assay choices available, the search continues for a convenient, generally applicable assay that is both sensitive and continuous

  15. Independency of Fe ions in hemoglobin on immunomagnetic reduction assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.Y. [MagQu Co. Ltd., Sindian City, Taipei County 231, Taiwan (China); Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Lan, C.B.; Chen, C.H. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Horng, H.E. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: phyfv001@scc.ntnu.edu.tw; Hong, Chin-Yih [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nan-Kai University of Technology, Nantau County, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: cyhong@nkut.edu.tw; Yang, H.C. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hcyang@phys.ntu.edu.tw; Lai, Y.K. [College of Life Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Bioresources, Da-Yeh University, Changhua 515, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.H.; Teng, K.S. [Apex Biotechnology Co. Ltd., Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China)

    2009-10-15

    Immunomagnetic reduction (IMR), which involves measuring the reduction in the ac magnetic susceptibility of magnetic reagents, is due to the association between bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and target bio-molecules. This has been demonstrated for assaying proteins in solutions free of Fe ions, such as serum. In this work, the validity of IMR assay for samples rich in Fe ions like hemoglobin (Hb) is investigated. According to the results, there is no magnetic signal contributed by Fe-ion-rich Hb. Furthermore, the results show a high sensitivity in assaying hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by using IMR.

  16. A Sensitive Chemotaxis Assay Using a Novel Microfluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing chemotaxis assays do not generate stable chemotactic gradients and thus—over time—functionally measure only nonspecific random motion (chemokinesis. In comparison, microfluidic technology has the capacity to generate a tightly controlled microenvironment that can be stably maintained for extended periods of time and is, therefore, amenable to adaptation for assaying chemotaxis. We describe here a novel microfluidic device for sensitive assay of cellular migration and show its application for evaluating the chemotaxis of smooth muscle cells in a chemokine gradient.

  17. Independency of Fe ions in hemoglobin on immunomagnetic reduction assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.Y.; Lan, C.B.; Chen, C.H.; Horng, H.E.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, H.C.; Lai, Y.K.; Lin, Y.H.; Teng, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Immunomagnetic reduction (IMR), which involves measuring the reduction in the ac magnetic susceptibility of magnetic reagents, is due to the association between bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and target bio-molecules. This has been demonstrated for assaying proteins in solutions free of Fe ions, such as serum. In this work, the validity of IMR assay for samples rich in Fe ions like hemoglobin (Hb) is investigated. According to the results, there is no magnetic signal contributed by Fe-ion-rich Hb. Furthermore, the results show a high sensitivity in assaying hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by using IMR.

  18. Radioimmunoassay and radioenzymatic assay of a new aminoglycoside antibiotic, netilmicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, A.; Strong, J.E.; Pickering, L.K.; Knight, J.; Bodey, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay and a radioenzymatic assay for netilmicin, a new aminoglycoside, were developed in our laboratories to assist in the study of the pharmacology of the drug and establish values for use in its monitoring. The assays are sensitive, precise, and rapid, giving results that correlate (r = 0.90) with each other and with those of a microbiological assay in which Klebsiella pneumoniae is used as the test organism. Preliminary pharmacological studies show the drug to have a biological half-life of 135 min, which is comparable to that for other aminoglycosides

  19. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    OpenAIRE

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.; Carolyn ROWLAND; Renato BAUDO; Monica BELTRAMI

    2001-01-01

    An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists ...

  20. Nondestructive assay instrument for measurement of plutonium in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirk, D.G.; Hsue, F.; Li, T.K.; Canada, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    A nondestructive assay (NDA) instrument that measures the 239 Pu content in solutions, using a passive gamma-ray spectroscopy technique, has been developed and installed in the LASL Plutonium Processing Facility. A detailed evaluation of this instrument has been performed. The results show that the instrument can routinely determine 239 Pu concentrations of 1 to 500 g/l with accuracies of 1 to 5% and assay times of 1 to 2 x 10 3 s

  1. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  2. Assay of vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovey, K.C.; Carrick, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    A radioassay is described for vitamin B12 which involves denaturing serum protein binding proteins with alkali. In the denaturation step a dithiopolyol and cyanide are used and in the intrinsic factor assay step a vitamin B12 analogue such as cobinamide is used to bind with any remaining serum proteins. The invention also includes a kit in which the dithiopolyol is provided in admixture with the alkali. The dithiopolyol may be dithiothreitol or dithioerythritol. (author)

  3. Assay of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, C.; Berry, J.

    1987-01-01

    Assays of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) can be used to illustrate many properties of photosynthetic systems. Many different leaves have been assayed with this standard procedure. The tissue is ground with a mortar and pestle in extraction buffer. The supernatant after centrifugation is used as the source of enzyme. Buffer, RuBP, [ 14 C]-NaHCO 3 , and enzyme are combined in a scintillation vial; the reaction is run for 1 min at 30 0 . The acid-stable products are counted. Reproducibility in student experiments has been excellent. The assay data can be combined with analyses of leaf properties such as fresh and dry weight, chlorophyll and protein content, etc. Students have done projects such as the response of enzyme to temperature and to various inhibitors. They also report on the use of a transition state analog, carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate, to titrate the molar concentration of rubisco molecules (active sites) in an enzyme sample. Thus, using crude extracts the catalytic activity of a sample can be compared to the absolute quantity of enzyme or to the turnover number

  4. A passive-active neutron device for assaying remote-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estep, R.J.; Coop, K.L.; Deane, T.M.; Lujan, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A combined passive-active neutron assay device was constructed for assaying remote-handled transuranic waste. A study of matrix and source position effects in active assays showed that a knowledge of the source position alone is not sufficient to correct for position-related errors in highly moderating or absorbing matrices. An alternate function for the active assay of solid fuel pellets was derived, although the efficacy of this approach remains to be established

  5. Integrated bioassays in microfluidic devices: botulinum toxin assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangru, Shakuntala; Bentz, Bryan L; Davis, Timothy J; Desai, Nitin; Stabile, Paul J; Schmidt, James J; Millard, Charles B; Bavari, Sina; Kodukula, Krishna

    2005-12-01

    A microfluidic assay was developed for screening botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT-A) by using a fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. Molded silicone microdevices with integral valves, pumps, and reagent reservoirs were designed and fabricated. Electrical and pneumatic control hardware were constructed, and software was written to automate the assay protocol and data acquisition. Detection was accomplished by fluorescence microscopy. The system was validated with a peptide inhibitor, running 2 parallel assays, as a feasibility demonstration. The small footprint of each bioreactor cell (0.5 cm2) and scalable fluidic architecture enabled many parallel assays on a single chip. The chip is programmable to run a dilution series in each lane, generating concentration-response data for multiple inhibitors. The assay results showed good agreement with the corresponding experiments done at a macroscale level. Although the system has been developed for BoNT-A screening, a wide variety of assays can be performed on the microfluidic chip with little or no modification.

  6. Performance characteristics of the ARCHITECT anti-HCV assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Gesa; Pelzer, Claudia; Beckert, Christian; Hausmann, Michael; Kapprell, Hans-Peter

    2005-10-01

    The ARCHITECT Anti-HCV assay is a fully automated high throughput chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA) for the detection of antibodies to structural and nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). To further enhance the performance of this test, the assay was modified to improve the specificity for blood donor specimens. The specificity of the enhanced ARCHITECT Anti-HCV assay was evaluated by screening blood donor samples randomly collected from various German blood banks, as well as hospitalized patient samples derived from Germany and the US. Additionally, antibody sensitivity was determined on commercially available anti-HCV seroconversion panels and on a commercially available worldwide anti-HCV genotype performance panel. Apparent specificity of the modified ARCHITECT Anti-HCV assay in a blood donor population consisting of 3811 specimens was 99.92%, compared to 99.76% for the current on-market assay. Additionally, antibody sensitivity was determined on commercially available anti-HCV seroconversion panels. Seroconversion sensitivity equivalent to or better than the current on-market product was observed by testing 33 seroconversion panels. This study demonstrates that the modified version of the ARCHITECT Anti-HCV assay shows improved specificity for blood donor specimens compared to the current assay on market without compromising sensitivity. With the availability of the improved ARCHITECT Anti-HCV assay and the recent launch of the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay, the ARCHITECT system now offers a full hepatitis/retrovirus menu with excellent performance on a high throughput, random access, automated analyzer, ideally suited for blood screening and diagnostic applications.

  7. Study on quantification of HBs-antibody by immunoradiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Yuichi; Itoi, Yoshihiro; Kajiyama, Shizuo

    1989-01-01

    Quantification of HBs-antibody assay was carried out using a commercialized assay kit and standard solutions of HBs-antibody recognised as 1 st reference preparation of hepatitis B immunogloblin by WHO. Standard curve of HBs-antibody was drawn with the function of 3D-spline and the correlation factor was obtained as r = 0.999. Coefficient of intra-assay variance was 3.8 % and that of inter-assay variance was 7.8 %. Dilution tests showed satisfactory results in the range of 2-16 times. Correlation between value of cut-off indices and concentration of HBs-antibody was obtained as the formula of y = 2.599 x-3.894 (r = 0.992) and 2.1 of cut-off index corresponded to about 5 mIU/ml of HBs-antibody concentration. (author)

  8. Radiosotopic assay and binder therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caston, J.D.; Kamen, B.A.

    1976-01-01

    A rapid and less costly radioisotopic assay for measuring the concentration of folate in blood serum is described. This procedure utilizes 3 H-pteroylmonoglutamate, unlabeled 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, and a partially purified folate binder, such as for example a folate binder extracted from hog kidney. The procedure involves radioisotopically relating the bound amounts of a labeled folate and a known folate at various concentrations of the known folate in a system containing a predetermined amount of the labeled folate, a predetermined amount of the binder factor for the folates, and a predetermined amount of defolated test serum. 16 claims, 8 drawing figures

  9. Biobarcode assay for the oral anticoagulant acenocoumarol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broto, Marta; Salvador, J Pablo; Galve, Roger; Marco, M Pilar

    2018-02-01

    A novel approach for therapeutic drug monitoring of oral anticoagulants (OA) in clinical samples is reported, based on a NP-based biobarcode assay. The proposed strategy uses specific antibodies for acenocumarol (ACL) covalently bound to magnetic particles (pAb236-MP) and a bioconjugate competitor (hACL-BSA) linked to encoded polystyrene probes (hACL-BSA-ePSP) on a classical competitive immunochemical format. By using this scheme ACL can be detected in low nM range (LOD, 0.96 ± 0.26, N = 3, in buffer) even in complex samples such as serum or plasma (LOD 4 ± 1). The assay shows a high reproducibility (%CV 1.1 day-to-day) and is robust, as it is demonstrated by the fact that ACL can be quantified in complex biological samples with a very good accuracy (slope = 0.97 and R 2 = 0.91, of the linear regression obtained when analyzing spiked vs measured values). Moreover, we have demonstrated that the biobarcode approach has the potential to overcome one of the main challenges of the multiplexed diagnostic, which is the possibility to measure in a single run biomarker targets present at different concentration ranges. Thus, it has been proven that the signal and the detectability can be modulated by just modifying the oligonucleotide load of the encoded probes. This fact opens the door for combining in the same assay encoded probes with the necessary oligonucleotide load to achieve the detectability required for each biomarker target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rotor assembly and assay method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1993-09-07

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor. 34 figures.

  11. Data transformation methods for multiplexed assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2013-07-23

    Methods to improve the performance of an array assay are described. A correlation between fluorescence intensity-related parameters and negative control values of the assay is determined. The parameters are then adjusted as a function of the correlation. As a result, sensitivity of the assay is improved without changes in its specificity.

  12. Multicentre comparison of a diagnostic assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waters, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Saiz, Albert

    2016-01-01

    ) assays in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). METHODS: Coded samples from patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or NMOSD (101) and controls (92) were tested at 15 European diagnostic centres using 21 assays including live (n=3) or fixed cell-based assays (n=10), flow cytometry (n=4...

  13. Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis of Conventional Splicing Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida

    2014-01-01

    of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical...

  14. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rudel

    Full Text Available Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water, we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  15. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegansand P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  16. Determination of Nitrate Reductase Assay Depending on the Microbial Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kabbany, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid micro-dilution assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibility of different bacterial isolates was developed. This assay is based on the ability of the most of viable organisms to reduce nitrates. The MIC or MBC could be determined by nitrate reductase (NR) only after 30 to 90 min of incubation depending on the behaviour of microbial growth. Bacterial viability is detected by a positive nitrite reduction rather than visible turbidity. The nitrate reduction assay was compared with standard micro-assay using 250 isolates of different taxa against 10 antibiotics belonging to different classes. An excellent agreement of 82.5 % was found between the two methods and only 17.5 % of 1794 trials showed difference in the determined MIC by tow-dilution interval above or below the MIC determined by the turbidimetric method under the same test conditions. However, the nitrate reduction assay was more rapid and sensitive in detecting viable bacteria and so, established an accurate estimate of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) or the minimal bacterial concentration (MBC). The nitrate reduction assay offers the additional advantage that it could be used to determine the MBC without having to subculture the broth. 232 cases of resistance were detected by NR and 4 different media were tested for susceptibility test. The bacterial isolates were exposed to ultra violet (UV) light for different period

  17. Making transuranic assay measurements using modern controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckertz, T.H.; Caldwell, J.T.; Medvick, P.A.; Kunz, W.E.; Hastings, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes methodology and computer-controlled instrumentation developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that accurately performs nondestructive assays of large containers bearing transuranic wastes and nonradioactive matrix materials. These assay systems can measure fissile isotopes with 1-mg sensitivity and spontaneous neutron-emitting isotopes at a 10-mg sensitivity. The assays are performed by neutron interrogation, detection, and counting in a custom assay chamber. An International Business Machines Personal Computer (IBM-PC) is used to control the CAMAC-based instrumentation system that acquires the assay data. 6 refs., 7 figs

  18. Non destructive assay (NDA) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafra Guidicini, Olga; Llacer, Carlos D.; Rojo, Marcelo

    2001-01-01

    In the IAEA Safeguards System the basic verification method used is nuclear material accountancy, with containment and surveillance as important complementary measures. If nuclear material accountancy is to be effective, IAEA inspectors have to make independent measurements to verify declared material quantities. Most of the equipment available to the inspectors is designed to measure gamma rays and/or neutrons emitted by various nuclear materials. Equipment is also available to measure the gross weight of an item containing nuclear material. These types of measurement techniques are generally grouped under the title of nondestructive assay (NDA). The paper describes the NDA techniques and instruments used to verify the total amount of nuclear material held at a nuclear facility. (author)

  19. Assay of cysteine dioxygenase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, P.J.; Stipanuk, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that rat liver contains two cysteine dioxygenase enzymes which convert cysteine to cysteinesulfinic acid, one which is stimulated by NAD + and has a pH optimum of 6.8 and one which is not stimulated by NAD + and has a pH optimum of 9.0. This led the authors to reinvestigate assay conditions for measuring cysteine dioxygenase activity in rat liver homogenate. An HPLC method, using an anion exchange column (Dionex Amino-Pac trademark PA1 (4x250 mm)) was used to separate the [ 35 S]cysteinesulfinic acid produced from [ 35 S]cysteine in the incubation mixture. They demonstrated that inclusion of hydroxylamine prevented further metabolism of cysteinesulfinic acid. which occurred rapidly in the absence of hydroxylamine

  20. Pi overlapping ring systems contained in a homogeneous assay: a novel homogeneous assay for antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, David A.

    1993-05-01

    A novel immunoassay, Pi overlapping ring systems contained in a homogeneous assay (PORSCHA), is described. This assay relies upon the change in fluorescent spectral properties that pyrene and its derivatives show with varying concentration. Because antibodies and other biomolecules can bind two molecules simultaneously, they can change the local concentration of the molecules that they bind. This concentration change may be detected spectrally as a change in the fluorescence emission wavelength of an appropriately labeled biomolecule. Several tests of PORSCHA have been performed which demonstrate this principle. For example: with streptavidin as the binding biomolecule and a biotin labeled pyrene derivative, the production of the excimer emitting at 470 nm is observed. Without the streptavidin present, only the monomer emitting at 378 and 390 nm is observed. The ratio of monomer to excimer provides the concentration of unlabeled biotin in the sample. Approximately 1 ng/mL of biotin may be detected with this system using a 50 (mu) l sample (2 X 10-16 moles biotin). The principles behind PORSCHA, the results with the streptavidin/biotin system are discussed and extensions of the PORSCHA concept to antibodies as the binding partner and DNA in homogeneous assays are suggested.

  1. Systematic random sampling of the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArt, Darragh G; Wasson, Gillian R; McKerr, George; Saetzler, Kurt; Reed, Matt; Howard, C Vyvyan

    2009-07-01

    The comet assay is a technique used to quantify DNA damage and repair at a cellular level. In the assay, cells are embedded in agarose and the cellular content is stripped away leaving only the DNA trapped in an agarose cavity which can then be electrophoresed. The damaged DNA can enter the agarose and migrate while the undamaged DNA cannot and is retained. DNA damage is measured as the proportion of the migratory 'tail' DNA compared to the total DNA in the cell. The fundamental basis of these arbitrary values is obtained in the comet acquisition phase using fluorescence microscopy with a stoichiometric stain in tandem with image analysis software. Current methods deployed in such an acquisition are expected to be both objectively and randomly obtained. In this paper we examine the 'randomness' of the acquisition phase and suggest an alternative method that offers both objective and unbiased comet selection. In order to achieve this, we have adopted a survey sampling approach widely used in stereology, which offers a method of systematic random sampling (SRS). This is desirable as it offers an impartial and reproducible method of comet analysis that can be used both manually or automated. By making use of an unbiased sampling frame and using microscope verniers, we are able to increase the precision of estimates of DNA damage. Results obtained from a multiple-user pooled variation experiment showed that the SRS technique attained a lower variability than that of the traditional approach. The analysis of a single user with repetition experiment showed greater individual variances while not being detrimental to overall averages. This would suggest that the SRS method offers a better reflection of DNA damage for a given slide and also offers better user reproducibility.

  2. Expert system for transuranic waste assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoolalian, M.L.; Gibbs, A.; Kuhns, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Transuranic wastes are generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of routine production of nuclear materials. These wastes contain Pu-238 and Pu-239 and are placed into lined 55-gallon waste drums. The drums are placed on monitored storage pads pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. A passive-active neutron (PAN) assay system is used to determine the mass of the radioactive material within the waste drums. Assay results are used to classify the wastes as either low-level or transuranic (TRU). During assays, the PAN assay system communicates with an IBM-AT computer. A Fortran computer program, called NEUT, controls and performs all data analyses. Unassisted, the NEUT program cannot adequately interpret assay results. To eliminate this limitation, an expert system shell was used to write a new algorithm, called the Transuranic Expert System (TRUX), to drive the NEUT program and add decision making capabilities for analysis of the assay results. The TRUX knowledge base was formulated by consulting with human experts in the field of neutron assay, by direct experimentation on the PAN assay system, and by observing operations on a daily basis. TRUX, with its improved ability to interpret assay results, has eliminated the need for close supervision by a human expert, allowing skilled technicians to operate the PAN assay system. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. Expert system for transuranic waste assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoolalian, M.L.; Gibbs, A.; Kuhns, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Transuranic wastes are generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of routine production of nuclear materials. These wastes contain Pu-238 and Pu-239 and are placed into lined 55-gallon waste drums. The drums are placed on monitored storage pads pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. A passive-active neutron (PAN) assay system is used to determine the mass of the radioactive material within the waste drums. Assay results are used to classify the wastes as either low-level or transuranic (TRU). During assays, the PAN assay system communicates with an IBM-AT computer. A Fortran computer program, called NEUT, controls and performs all data analyses. Unassisted, the NEUT program cannot adequately interpret assay results. To eliminate this limitation, an expert system shell was used to write a new algorithm, called the Transuranic Expert System (TRUX), to drive the NEUT program and add decision making capabilities for analysis of the assay results. The TRUX knowledge base was formulated by consulting with human experts in the field of neutron assay, by direct experimentation on the PAN assay system, and by observing operations on a daily basis. TRUX, with its improved ability to interpret assay results, has eliminated the need for close supervision by a human expert, allowing skilled technicians to operate the PAN assay system. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  4. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.C.; Kaslow, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with [32P]ATP and glycerokinase, residual [32P]ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free [32P]phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays

  5. Harmonization of radiobiological assays: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasanna, Pataje G.

    2014-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has made available a technical manual for cytogenetic biodosimetry assays (dicentric chromosome aberration (DCA) and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assays) used for radiation dose assessment in radiation accidents. The International Standardization Organization, which develops standards and guidelines, also provides an avenue for laboratory accreditation, has developed guidelines and recommendations for performing cytogenetic biodosimetry assays. Harmonization of DCA and CBMN assays, has improved their accuracy. Double-blinded inter-laboratory comparison studies involving several networks have further validated DCA and CBMN assays and improved the confidence in their potential use for radiation dose assessment in mass casualties. This kind of international harmonization is lacking for pre-clinical radiobiology assays. The widely used pre-clinical assays that are relatively important to set stage for clinical trials include clonogenic assays, flow-cytometry assays, apoptotic assays, and tumor regression and growth delay assays. However, significant inter-laboratory variations occur with respect to data among laboratories. This raises concerns on the reliability and reproducibility of preclinical data that drives further development and translation. Lack of reproducibility may stem from a variety of factors such as poor scientist training, less than optimal experimental design, inadequate description of methodology, and impulse to publish only the positive data etc. Availability of technical manuals, standard operating procedures, accreditation avenues for laboratories performing such assays, inter-laboratory comparisons, and use of standardized protocols are necessary to enhance reliability and reproducibility. Thus, it is important that radiobiological assays are harmonized for laboratory protocols to ensure successful translation of pre-clinical research on radiation effect modulators to help design clinic trials with

  6. Qualification of standard membrane-feeding assay with Plasmodium falciparum malaria and potential improvements for future assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoyo Miura

    Full Text Available Vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission are of increasing interest and a robust functional assay to measure this activity would promote their development by providing a biologically relevant means of evaluating potential vaccine candidates. Therefore, we aimed to qualify the standard membrane-feeding assay (SMFA. The assay measures the transmission-blocking activity of antibodies by feeding cultured P. falciparum gametocytes to Anopheles mosquitoes in the presence of the test antibodies and measuring subsequent mosquito infection. The International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH Harmonised Tripartite Guideline Q2(R1 details characteristics considered in assay validation. Of these characteristics, we decided to qualify the SMFA for Precision, Linearity, Range and Specificity. The transmission-blocking 4B7 monoclonal antibody was tested over 6 feeding experiments at several concentrations to determine four suitable concentrations that were tested in triplicate in the qualification experiments (3 additional feeds to evaluate Precision, Linearity and Range. For Specificity, 4B7 was tested in the presence of normal mouse IgG. We determined intra- and inter-assay variability of % inhibition of mean oocyst intensity at each concentration of 4B7 (lower concentrations showed higher variability. We also showed that % inhibition was dependent on 4B7 concentration and the activity is specific to 4B7. Since obtaining empirical data is time-consuming, we generated a model using data from all 9 feeds and simulated the effects of different parameters on final readouts to improve the assay procedure and analytical methods for future studies. For example, we estimated the effect of number of mosquitoes dissected on variability of % inhibition, and simulated the relationship between % inhibition in oocyst intensity and % inhibition of prevalence of infected mosquitos at different mean oocysts in the control. SMFA is one of the few biological assays used in

  7. Performance evaluation of new automated hepatitis B viral markers in the clinical laboratory: two quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen assays and an HBV core-related antigen assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongjung; Hong, Duck Jin; Shin, Saeam; Cho, Yonggeun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) assays and a hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) assay. A total of 529 serum samples from patients with hepatitis B were tested. HBsAg levels were determined by using the Elecsys (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) and Architect (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) qHBsAg assays. HBcrAg was measured by using Lumipulse HBcrAg assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan). Serum aminotransferases and HBV DNA were respectively quantified by using the Hitachi 7600 analyzer (Hitachi High-Technologies, Tokyo, Japan) and the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan test (Roche). Precision of the qHBsAg and HBcrAg assays was assessed, and linearity of the qHBsAg assays was verified. All assays showed good precision performance with coefficients of variation between 4.5% and 5.3% except for some levels. Both qHBsAg assays showed linearity from 0.1 to 12,000.0 IU/mL and correlated well (r = 0.9934). HBsAg levels correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.3373) and with HBcrAg (r = 0.5164), and HBcrAg also correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.5198; P < .0001). This observation could provide impetus for further research to elucidate the clinical usefulness of the qHBsAg and HBcrAg assays.

  8. Automated amperometric plutonium assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burt, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The amperometric titration for plutonium assay has been used in the nuclear industry for over twenty years and has been in routine use at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory since 1976 for the analysis of plutonium oxide and mixed oxide fuel material for the Fast Flux Test Facility. It has proven itself to be an accurate and reliable method. The method may be used as a direct end point titration or an excess of titrant may be added and a back titration performed to aid in determination of the end point. Due to the slowness of the PuVI-FeII reaction it is difficult to recognize when the end point is being approached and is very time consuming if the current is allowed to decay to the residual value after each titrant addition. For this reason the back titration in which the rapid FeII-CrVI reaction occurs is used by most laboratories. The back titration is performed by the addition of excess ferrous solution followed by two measured aliquots of standard dichromate with measurement of cell current after each addition

  9. TRU assay system and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodzinski, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    The measurement of the transuranic content of nuclear products or process residues has become increasingly important for the recovery of fissionable material from spent fuel elements, the identification of commercial fuel elements which have not yet reached full burnup, the measurement and recovery of transuranics from discarded or stored waste materials, the determination of the transuranic content in high gamma activity waste material scheduled for disposal, compliance with 10CFR61 by land burial operators/shippers, and the satisfaction of accountability requirements. Active neutron interrogation techniques measure either the prompt neutrons or the beta delayed neutrons from fission products following induced fission. These techniques normally only measure fissile transuranics ( 235 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Pu) and are commonly applied only to contact handleable waste. Passive neutron interrogation techniques, on the other hand, are capable of measuring all transuranics except 235 U with adequate sensitivity and will work on both contact handleable and high gamma activity wastes. Since the passive techniques are senstitive to a wider spectrum of transuranic isotopes than the active techniques, substantially less complex and less expensive than the active systems, and they have proven techniques for measuring small quantities of TRU in high gamma activity packages, the passive neutron TRU assay technology was chosen for development into the instruments discussed in this paper

  10. Linoleic Acid Permeabilizes Gastric Epithelial Cells by Increasing Connexin43 Levels in the Cell Membrane Via a GPR40- and Akt-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A.; Salas, Daniela P.; Delgado-López, Fernando; Lampe, Paul D.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is known to activate G-protein coupled receptors and connexin hemichannels (Cx HCs) but possible interlinks between these two responses remain unexplored. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of action of LA on the membrane permeability mediated by Cx HCs in MKN28 cells. These cells were found to express connexins, GPR40, GPR120, and CD36 receptors. The Cx HC activity of these cells increased after 5 min of treatment with LA or GW9508, an agonist of GPR40/GPR120; or exposure to extracellular divalent cation-free solution (DCFS), known to increase the open probability of Cx HCs, yields an immediate increase in Cx HC of similar intensity and additive with LA-induced change. Treatment with a CD36 blocker or transfection with siRNA-GPR120 maintain the LA-induced Cx HC activity. However, cells transfected with siRNA-GPR40 did not show LA-induced Cx HC activity but activity was increased upon exposure to DCFS, confirming the presence of activatable Cx HCs in the cell membrane. Treatment with AKTi (Akt inhibitor) abrogated the LA-induced Cx HC activity. In HeLa cells transfected with Cx43 (HeLa-Cx43), LA induced phosphorylation of surface Cx43 at serine 373 (S373), site for Akt phosphorylation. HeLa-Cx43 but not HeLa-Cx43 cells with a S373A mutation showed a LA-induced Cx HC activity directly related to an increase in cell surface Cx43 levels. Thus, the increase in membrane permeability induced by LA is mediated by an intracellular signaling pathway activated by GPR40 that leads to an increase in membrane levels of Cx43 phosphorylated at serine 373 via Akt. PMID:26869446

  11. Assay development status report for total cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.C.; Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-02-01

    A validated cyanide assay that is applicable to a variety of tank waste matrices is necessary to resolve certain waste tank safety issues and for purposes of overall waste characterization. The target for this effort is an assay with an applicable range of greater than 1,000 ppM (0.10 wt%) total cyanide and a confidence level greater than 80%. Figure 1 illustrates the operating regime of the proposed cyanide assay method. The Assay Development Status Report for Total Cyanide will summarize the past experience with cyanide analyses on-tank waste matrices and will rate the status of the analytical methods used to assay total cyanide (CN - ion) in the tank waste matrices as acceptable or unacceptable. This paper will also briefly describe the current efforts for improving analytical resolution of the assays and the attempts at speciation

  12. Linearization of the Bradford Protein Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, Orna; Zor, Tsaffrir

    2010-01-01

    Determination of microgram quantities of protein in the Bradford Coomassie brilliant blue assay is accomplished by measurement of absorbance at 590 nm. This most common assay enables rapid and simple protein quantification in cell lysates, cellular fractions, or recombinant protein samples, for the purpose of normalization of biochemical measurements. However, an intrinsic nonlinearity compromises the sensitivity and accuracy of this method. It is shown that under standard assay conditions, t...

  13. New automated pellet/powder assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, R.N.

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses an automated, high precision, pellet/ powder assay system. The system is an active assay system using a small isotopic neutron source and a coincidence detection system. The handling of the pellet powder samples has been automated and a programmable calculator has been integrated into the system to provide control and data analysis. The versatile system can assay uranium or plutonium in either active or passive modes

  14. Matrix effects of TRU [transuranic] assays using the SWEPP PAN assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.

    1990-08-01

    The Drum Assay System (DAS) at the Stored Waste Experimental Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is a second-generation active-passive neutron assay system. It has been used to assay over 5000 208-liter drums of transuranic waste from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Data from these assays have been examined and compared with the assays performed at Rocky Flats, mainly utilize counting of 239 Pu gamma rays. For the most part the passive assays are in very good agreement with the Rocky Flats assays. The active assays are strongly correlated with the results of the other two methods, but require matrix-dependent correction factors beyond those provided by the system itself. A set of matrix-dependent correction factors has been developed from the study of the assay results. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  15. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 233U Assay A Neutron NDA System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, D.C.; Lucero, A.J.; Pierce, L.

    1998-11-17

    The assay of highly enriched {sup 233}U material presents some unique challenges. Techniques which apply to the assay of materials of Pu or enriched {sup 235}U do not convert easily over to the assay of {sup 233}U. A specialized neutron assay device is being fabricated to exploit the singles neutron signal, the weak correlated neutron signal, and an active correlated signal. These pieces of information when combined with {gamma} ray isotopics information should give a good overall determination of {sup 233}U material now stored in bldg. 3019 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  17. 233U Assay A Neutron NDA System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, D.C.; Lucero, A.J.; Pierce, L.

    1998-01-01

    The assay of highly enriched 233 U material presents some unique challenges. Techniques which apply to the assay of materials of Pu or enriched 235 U do not convert easily over to the assay of 233 U. A specialized neutron assay device is being fabricated to exploit the singles neutron signal, the weak correlated neutron signal, and an active correlated signal. These pieces of information when combined with γ ray isotopics information should give a good overall determination of 233 U material now stored in bldg. 3019 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  18. Safeguards and Non-destructive Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.; Bruggeman, M.

    2001-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on safeguards and non-destructive assay includes: (1) various activities to assure nuclear materials accountancy; (2) contributes to the implementation of Integrated Safeguards measures in Belgium and to assist the IAEA through the Belgian Support Programme; (3) renders services to internal and external customers in the field of safeguards; (4) improves passive neutron coincidence counting techniques for waste assay and safeguards verification measurements by R and D on correlation algorithms implemented via software or dedicated hardware; (5) improves gamma assay techniques for waste assay by implementing advanced scanning techniques and different correlation algorithms; and (6) develops numerical calibration techniques. Major achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  19. Assay-specific decision limits for two new automated parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Fayol, Véronique; Sault, Corinne; Lawson-Body, Ethel; Kahan, André; Cormier, Catherine

    2005-02-01

    The recent development of nonradioactive automated assays for serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) has made measurement of these two hormones possible in many laboratories. In this study, we compared two new assays for PTH and 25OHD adapted on an automated analyzer, the LIAISON, with two manual immunoassays used worldwide. We studied 228 osteoporotic patients, 927 healthy individuals, 38 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, and 167 hemodialyzed patients. Serum PTH was measured with the Allegro and the LIAISON assays, and 25OHD was measured with DiaSorin RIA and the LIAISON assay. Regression analysis was used to calculate decision thresholds for the LIAISON assays that were equivalent to those of the Allegro PTH and DiaSorin 25OHD assays. The 25OHD concentrations obtained with the LIAISON assay and the RIA in osteoporotic patients were well correlated (r = 0.83; P 50 nmol/L as eligible for the reference population for the LIAISON PTH assay. In this group, the 3rd-97th percentile interval for LIAISON PTH was 3-51 ng/L. Considering upper reference limits of 46 and 51 ng/L for the Allegro and LIAISON assays, respectively, the frequency of above-normal PTH concentrations in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism was similar in both assays. Regression analysis between serum PTH measured by the Allegro and LIAISON assays in 167 hemodialyzed patients and the corresponding Bland-Altman analysis of these data suggest that the LIAISON PTH assay tends to read higher than the Allegro assay at low concentrations but lower at high concentrations (>300 ng/L). Because clinical decision limits for both PTH and 25OHD should be assay specific, we propose equivalences between these assays and two manual assays used worldwide. These assay-specific decision limits should help potential users of the LIAISON PTH and 25OHD assays.

  20. Application of radioreceptor assay of benzodiazepines for toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, L.; Scheinin, M.

    1982-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay (RRA) for determining benzodiazepines (BZ) has been developed and applied to toxicological analysis of serum samples from 21 patients with acute BZ overdosage. The method was sensitive (e.g., lorazepam 17 nM, diazepam 41 nM), and specific for pharmacologically active BZ derivatives. The reproducibility of the results was good (intra-assay variation < 8%, inter-assay variation < 10%). Concentrations measured by the RRA showed a good correlation with those obtained by gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the same samples. The quantitative results represent the sum of one or several parent substances and all biologically active metabolites, in proportion to their receptor binding affinities. (author)

  1. Interference of magnesium corrosion with tetrazolium-based cytotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Janine; Prosenc, Marc H; Wolff, Martin; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are promising materials for the development of biodegradable implants. However, the current in vitro test procedures for cytotoxicity, cell viability and proliferation are not always suitable for this class of materials. In this paper we show that tetrazolium-salt-based assays, which are widely used in practice, are influenced by the corrosion products of Mg-based alloys. Corroded Mg converts tetrazolium salts to formazan, leading to a higher background and falsifying the results of cell viability. Tetrazolium-based assays are therefore not a useful tool for testing the cytotoxicity of Mg in static in vitro assays. Copyright (c) 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A highly scalable peptide-based assay system for proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A Kozlov

    Full Text Available We report a scalable and cost-effective technology for generating and screening high-complexity customizable peptide sets. The peptides are made as peptide-cDNA fusions by in vitro transcription/translation from pools of DNA templates generated by microarray-based synthesis. This approach enables large custom sets of peptides to be designed in silico, manufactured cost-effectively in parallel, and assayed efficiently in a multiplexed fashion. The utility of our peptide-cDNA fusion pools was demonstrated in two activity-based assays designed to discover protease and kinase substrates. In the protease assay, cleaved peptide substrates were separated from uncleaved and identified by digital sequencing of their cognate cDNAs. We screened the 3,011 amino acid HCV proteome for susceptibility to cleavage by the HCV NS3/4A protease and identified all 3 known trans cleavage sites with high specificity. In the kinase assay, peptide substrates phosphorylated by tyrosine kinases were captured and identified by sequencing of their cDNAs. We screened a pool of 3,243 peptides against Abl kinase and showed that phosphorylation events detected were specific and consistent with the known substrate preferences of Abl kinase. Our approach is scalable and adaptable to other protein-based assays.

  3. Competitive binding assay for fructose 2,6-bisphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, H.; Uyeda, K.

    1986-01-01

    A new direct assay method for fructose 2,6-bisphosphate has been developed based on competitive binding of labeled and unlabeled fructose 2,6-P 2 to phosphofructokinase. Phosphofructokinase (0.5-1.3 pmol promoter) is incubated with saturating concentrations (5.0-5.5 pmol) of fructose 2,6[2- 32 P]P 2 and samples containing varying concentrations of fructose 2,6-P 2 . The resulting stable binary complex is retained on nitrocellulose filters with a binding efficiency of up to 70%. Standard curves obtained with this assay show strict linearity with varying fructose 2,6-P 2 in the range of 0.5 to 45 pmol, which exceeds the sensitivity of most of the previously described assay methods. Fructose 2,6-P 2 , ATP, and high concentrations of phosphate interfere with this assay. However, the extent of this inhibition is negligible since their tissue contents are one-half to one-tenth that examined. The new assay is simple, direct, rapid, and does not require pretreatment

  4. A radiochemical assay for biotin in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radiochemical assay for biotin is described. The assay was sensitive to one nanogram and simple enough for routine biotin analyses. The assay yielded results which were comparable to those obtained from a microbiological assay using Lactobacillus plantarum. (author)

  5. Comparison of gull-specific assays targeting 16S rRNA gene of Catellicoccus marimammalium and Streptococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulls have been implicated as a source of fecal contamination in inland and coastal waters. Only one gull-specific assay is currently available (i.e., gull2 qPCR assay). This assay is based on the 16S rRNA gene of Catellicocclls marimammalium and has showed a high level of host-s...

  6. UV Photography Shows Hidden Sun Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c UV photography shows hidden sun damage A UV photograph gives ... developing skin cancer and prematurely aged skin. Normal photography UV photography 18 months of age: This boy's ...

  7. Radioreceptor assay: theory and applications to pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret, G.; Simon, P.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the first part of this work is to present the theory of the radioreceptor assay and to compare it to the other techniques of radioanalysis (radioimmunoassay, competitive protein binding assays). The technology of the radioreceptor assay is then presented and its components (preparation of the receptors, radioligand, incubation medium) are described. The analytical characteristics of the radioreceptor assay (specificity, sensitivity, reproductibility, accuracy) and the pharmacological significance of the results are discussed. The second part is devoted to the description of the radioreceptor assays of some pharmacological classes (neuroleptics, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines, β-blockers, anticholinergic drugs) and to their use in therapeutic drug monitoring. In conclusion, by their nature, radioreceptor assays are highly sensitive, reliable, precise, accurate and simple to perform. Their chief disadvantage relates to specificity, since any substance having an appreciable affinity to the receptor site will displace the specifically bound radioligand. Paradoxically in some cases, this lack of specificity may be advantageous in that it allows for the detection of not only the apparent compound but of active metabolites and endogenous receptor agonists as well and in that radioreceptors assays can be devised for a whole pharmacological class and not only for one drug as it is the case for classical physico-chemical techniques. For all these reasons future of radioreceptor assay in pharmacology appears promising [fr

  8. A Continuous, Fluorogenic Sirtuin 2 Deacylase Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galleano, Iacopo; Schiedel, Matthias; Jung, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    and kinetic insight regarding sirtuin inhibitors, it is important to have access to efficient assays. In this work, we report readily synthesized fluorogenic substrates enabling enzyme-economical evaluation of SIRT2 inhibitors in a continuous assay format as well as evaluation of the properties of SIRT2...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification. A...

  10. The optimal condition of performing MTT assay for the determination of radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Semie; Kim, Il Han

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of radiation survival using a clonogenic assay, the established standard, can be difficult and time consuming. In this study, We have used the MTT assay, based on the reduction of a tetrazolium salt to a purple formazan precipitate by living cells, as a substitution for clonogenic assay and have examined the optimal condition for performing this assay in determination of radiation sensitivity. Four human cancer cell lines - PCI-1, SNU-1066, NCI-H63O and RKO cells have been used. For each cell line, a clonogenic assay and a MTT assay using Premix WST-1 solution, which is one of the tetrazolium salts and does not require washing or solubilization of the precipitate were carried out after irradiation of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Gy, For clonogenic assay, cells in 25 cm 2 flasks were irradiated after overnight incubation and the resultant colonies containing more than 50 cells were scored after culturing the cells for 10-14 days, For MTT assay, the relationship between absorbance and cell number, optimal seeding cell number, and optimal timing of assay was determined. Then, MTT assay was performed when the irradiated cells had regained exponential growth or when the non-irradiated cells had undergone four or more doubling times. There was minimal variation in the values gained from these two methods with the standard deviation generally less than 5%, and there were no statistically significant differences between two methods according to t-test in low radiation dose (below 6 Gy). The regression analyses showed high linear correlation with the R 2 value of 0.975-0.992 between data from the two different methods. The optimal cell numbers for MTT assay were found to be dependent on plating efficiency of used cell line. Less than 300 cells/well were appropriate for cells with high plating efficiency (more than 30%). For cells with low plating efficiency (less than 30%), 500 cells/well or more were appropriate for assay. The optimal time for MTT assay was alter 6

  11. Educational Outreach: The Space Science Road Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N. L. J.

    2002-01-01

    The poster presented will give an overview of a study towards a "Space Road Show". The topic of this show is space science. The target group is adolescents, aged 12 to 15, at Dutch high schools. The show and its accompanying experiments would be supported with suitable educational material. Science teachers at schools can decide for themselves if they want to use this material in advance, afterwards or not at all. The aims of this outreach effort are: to motivate students for space science and engineering, to help them understand the importance of (space) research, to give them a positive feeling about the possibilities offered by space and in the process give them useful knowledge on space basics. The show revolves around three main themes: applications, science and society. First the students will get some historical background on the importance of space/astronomy to civilization. Secondly they will learn more about novel uses of space. On the one hand they will learn of "Views on Earth" involving technologies like Remote Sensing (or Spying), Communication, Broadcasting, GPS and Telemedicine. On the other hand they will experience "Views on Space" illustrated by past, present and future space research missions, like the space exploration missions (Cassini/Huygens, Mars Express and Rosetta) and the astronomy missions (Soho and XMM). Meanwhile, the students will learn more about the technology of launchers and satellites needed to accomplish these space missions. Throughout the show and especially towards the end attention will be paid to the third theme "Why go to space"? Other reasons for people to get into space will be explored. An important question in this is the commercial (manned) exploration of space. Thus, the questions of benefit of space to society are integrated in the entire show. It raises some fundamental questions about the effects of space travel on our environment, poverty and other moral issues. The show attempts to connect scientific with

  12. 2008 LHC Open Days Physics: the show

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    A host of events and activities await visitors to the LHC Open Days on 5 and 6 April. A highlight will be the physics shows funded by the European Physical Society (EPS), which are set to surprise and challenge children and adults alike! School children use their experience of riding a bicycle to understand how planets move around the sun (Copyright : Circus Naturally) Participating in the Circus Naturally show could leave a strange taste in your mouth! (Copyright : Circus Naturally) The Rino Foundation’s experiments with liquid nitrogen can be pretty exciting! (Copyright: The Rino Foundation)What does a bicycle have in common with the solar system? Have you ever tried to weigh air or visualise sound? Ever heard of a vacuum bazooka? If you want to discover the answers to these questions and more then come to the Physics Shows taking place at the CERN O...

  13. Online Italian fandoms of American TV shows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Benecchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has changed media fandom in two main ways: it helps fans connect with each other despite physical distance, leading to the formation of international fan communities; and it helps fans connect with the creators of the TV show, deepening the relationship between TV producers and international fandoms. To assess whether Italian fan communities active online are indeed part of transnational online communities and whether the Internet has actually altered their relationship with the creators of the original text they are devoted to, qualitative analysis and narrative interviews of 26 Italian fans of American TV shows were conducted to explore the fan-producer relationship. Results indicated that the online Italian fans surveyed preferred to stay local, rather than using geography-leveling online tools. Further, the sampled Italian fans' relationships with the show runners were mediated or even absent.

  14. Characterization of a yeast sporulation-specific P450 family protein, Dit2, using an in vitro assay to crosslink formyl tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemena, Leo D; Mukama, Omar; Wang, Ning; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2018-02-01

    The outermost layer of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae spore, termed the dityrosine layer, is primarily composed of bisformyl dityrosine. Bisformyl dityrosine is produced in the spore cytosol by crosslinking of two formyl tyrosine molecules, after which it is transported to the nascent spore wall and assembled into the dityrosine layer by an unknown mechanism. A P450 family protein, Dit2, is believed to mediate the crosslinking of bisformyl dityrosine molecules. To characterize Dit2 and gain insight into the biological process of dityrosine layer formation, we performed an in vitro assay to crosslink formyl tyrosine with using permeabilized cells. For an unknown reason, the production of bisformyl dityrosine could not be confirmed under our experimental conditions, but dityrosine was detected in acid hydrolysates of the reaction mixtures in a Dit2 dependent manner. Thus, Dit2 mediated the crosslinking of formyl tyrosine in vitro. Dityrosine was detected when formyl tyrosine, but not tyrosine, was used as a substrate and the reaction required NADPH as a cofactor. Intriguingly, apart from Dit2, we found that the spore wall, but not the vegetative cell wall, contains bisformyl dityrosine crosslinking activity. This activity may be involved in the assembly of the dityrosine layer. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Repair replication in permeabilized Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masker, W.E.; Simon, T.J.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    We have examined the modes of DNA synthesis in Escherichia coli strains made permeable to nucleoside triphosphates by treatment with toluene. In this quasi in vitro system, polymerase-I-deficient mutants exhibit a nonconservative mode of synthesis with properties expected for the resynthesis step of excision-repair. This uv-stimulated DNA synthesis can be performed by either DNA polymerase II or III and it also requires the uvrA gene product. It requires the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates; but, in contrast to the semiconservative mode, the ATP requirement can be partially satisfied by other nucleoside triphosphates. The ATP-dependent recBC nuclease is not involved. The observed uv-stimulated mode of DNA synthesis may be part of an alternate excision-repair mechanism which supplements or complements DNA-polymerase-I-dependent repair in vivo

  16. Evaluation of multiplex assay platforms for detection of influenza hemagglutinin subtype specific antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu-Nan; Weber, Kimberly M; Limmer, Rebecca A; Horne, Bobbi J; Stevens, James; Schwerzmann, Joy; Wrammert, Jens; McCausland, Megan; Phipps, Andrew J; Hancock, Kathy; Jernigan, Daniel B; Levine, Min; Katz, Jacqueline M; Miller, Joseph D

    2017-05-01

    Influenza hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralization assays (MN) are widely used for seroprevalence studies. However, these assays have limited field portability and are difficult to fully automate for high throughput laboratory testing. To address these issues, three multiplex influenza subtype-specific antibody detection assays were developed using recombinant hemagglutinin antigens in combination with Chembio, Luminex ® , and ForteBio ® platforms. Assay sensitivity, specificity, and subtype cross-reactivity were evaluated using a panel of well characterized human sera. Compared to the traditional HI, assay sensitivity ranged from 87% to 92% and assay specificity in sera collected from unexposed persons ranged from 65% to 100% across the platforms. High assay specificity (86-100%) for A(H5N1) rHA was achieved for sera from exposed or unexposed to hetorosubtype influenza HAs. In contrast, assay specificity for A(H1N1)pdm09 rHA using sera collected from A/Vietnam/1204/2004 (H5N1) vaccinees in 2008 was low (22-30%) in all platforms. Although cross-reactivity against rHA subtype proteins was observed in each assay platform, the correct subtype specific responses were identified 78%-94% of the time when paired samples were available for analysis. These results show that high throughput and portable multiplex assays that incorporate rHA can be used to identify influenza subtype specific infections. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Duchenne muscular dystrophy models show their age

    OpenAIRE

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    The lack of appropriate animal models has hampered efforts to develop therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A new mouse model lacking both dystrophin and telomerase (Sacco et al., 2010) closely mimics the pathological progression of human DMD and shows that muscle stem cell activity is a key determinant of disease severity.

  18. Show Them You Really Want the Job

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Showing that one really "wants" the job entails more than just really wanting the job. An interview is part Broadway casting call, part intellectual dating game, part personality test, and part, well, job interview. When there are 300 applicants for a position, many of them will "fit" the required (and even the preferred) skills listed in the job…

  19. A Talk Show from the Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Arlene F.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a two-day activity in which elementary students examine voting rights, the right to assemble, and women's suffrage. Explains the game, "Assemble, Reassemble," and a student-produced talk show with five students playing the roles of leaders of the women's suffrage movement. Profiles Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Susan…

  20. Laser entertainment and light shows in education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaratnam, Andrew T.; Symons, Charles

    2002-05-01

    Laser shows and beam effects have been a source of entertainment since its first public performance May 9, 1969, at Mills College in Oakland, California. Since 1997, the Photonics Center, NgeeAnn Polytechnic, Singapore, has been using laser shows as a teaching tool. Students are able to exhibit their creative skills and learn at the same time how lasers are used in the entertainment industry. Students will acquire a number of skills including handling three- phase power supply, operation of cooling system, and laser alignment. Students also acquire an appreciation of the arts, learning about shapes and contours as they develop graphics for the shows. After holography, laser show animation provides a combination of the arts and technology. This paper aims to briefly describe how a krypton-argon laser, galvanometer scanners, a polychromatic acousto-optic modulator and related electronics are put together to develop a laser projector. The paper also describes how students are trained to make their own laser animation and beam effects with music, and at the same time have an appreciation of the operation of a Class IV laser and the handling of optical components.

  1. The Last Great American Picture Show

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, Thomas; King, Noel; Horwath, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The Last Great American Picture Show brings together essays by scholars and writers who chart the changing evaluations of the American cinema of the 1970s, sometimes referred to as the decade of the lost generation, but now more and more recognized as the first New Hollywood, without which the

  2. Individual response to ionising radiation: What predictive assay(s) to choose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granzotto, A.; Viau, M.; Devic, C.; Maalouf, M.; Thomas, Ch.; Vogin, G.; Foray, N.; Granzotto, A.; Vogin, G.; Balosso, J.; Joubert, A.; Maalouf, M.; Vogin, G.; Colin, C.; Malek, K.; Balosso, J.; Colin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Individual response to ionizing radiation is an important information required to apply an efficient radiotherapy treatment against tumour and to avoid any adverse effects in normal tissues. In 1981, Fertil and Malaise have demonstrated that the post-irradiation local tumor control determined in vivo is correlated with clonogenic cell survival assessed in vitro. Furthermore, these authors have reminded the relevance of the concept of intrinsic radiosensitivity that is specific to each individual organ (Fertil and Malaise, 1981) [1]. To date, since clonogenicity assays are too time-consuming and do not provide any other molecular information, a plethora of research groups have attempted to determine the molecular bases of intrinsic radiosensitivity in order to propose reliable and faster predictive assays. To this aim, several approaches have been developed. Notably, the recent revolution in genomic and proteomics technologies is providing a considerable number of data but their link with radiosensitivity still remains to be elucidated. On another hand, the systematic screening of some candidate genes potentially involved in the radiation response is highlighting the complexity of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of DNA damage sensing and signalling and shows that an abnormal radiation response is not necessarily due to the impairment of one single protein. Finally, more modest approaches consisting in focusing some specific functions of DNA repair seem to provide more reliable clues to predict over-acute reactions caused by radiotherapy. In this review, we endeavored to analyse the contributions of these major approaches to predict human radiosensitivity. (authors)

  3. Optimized candidal biofilm microtiter assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krom, Bastiaan P.; Cohen, Jesse B.; Feser, Gail E. McElhaney; Cihlar, Ronald L.

    Microtiter based candidal biofilm formation is commonly being used. Here we describe the analysis of factors influencing the development of candidal biofilms such as the coating with serum, growth medium and pH. The data reported here show that optimal candidal biofilm formation is obtained when

  4. Eccentric muscle challenge shows osteopontin polymorphism modulation of muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Whitney L; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Wu, Chung-Sheih; Lin, Stephen; Chen, Yue; Wang, Paul C; Kanaan, Yasmine; Bond, Vernon; Hoffman, Eric P

    2014-08-01

    A promoter polymorphism of the osteopontin (OPN) gene (rs28357094) has been associated with multiple inflammatory states, severity of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and muscle size in healthy young adults. We sought to define the mechanism of action of the polymorphism, using allele-specific in vitro reporter assays in muscle cells, and a genotype-stratified intervention in healthy controls. In vitro reporter constructs showed the G allele to respond to estrogen treatment, whereas the T allele showed no transcriptional response. Young adult volunteers (n = 187) were enrolled into a baseline study, and subjects with specific rs28357094 genotypes enrolled into an eccentric muscle challenge intervention [n = 3 TT; n = 3 GG/GT (dominant inheritance model)]. Female volunteers carrying the G allele showed significantly greater inflammation and increased muscle volume change as determined by magnetic resonance imaging T1- and T2-weighted images after eccentric challenge, as well as greater decrement in biceps muscle force. Our data suggest a model where the G allele enables enhanced activities of upstream enhancer elements due to loss of Sp1 binding at the polymorphic site. This results in significantly greater expression of the pro-inflammatory OPN cytokine during tissue remodeling in response to challenge in G allele carriers, promoting muscle hypertrophy in normal females, but increased damage in DMD patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Detection of hepatitis B surface antigen by solid phase radioimmunoassay and immunometric assay (using enhanced luminescence)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, S.; Efandis, T.; Gust, I.

    1991-01-01

    A study was performed to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the amerlite monoclonal immunoassay for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG) by comparison with the Abbott Ausria II radioimmunoassay (RI). Serial bleeds from 34 patients with acute or chronic hepatitis B were tested by both assays. The Abbott Ausria II assay detected HBsAG longer than the Amersham Amerlite assay on two occasions and earlier on one occasion. Twelve patients with low HBsAg positive results (confirmed by Ausria II) were tested by the Amerlite assay, four were repeatably positive, five repeatably negative and three gave borderline results (which on repeat testing were negative). A similar trend was seen when a panel of sera containing known concentrations of HBsAG was tested. Replicate testing of 10 specimens eight times showed very good reproducibility by the Amerlite assay. Overall, the specificity of both assays was comparable, however differences in sensitivity were observed. 3 tabs

  6. Nano-immunosafety: issues in assay validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, Diana; Italiani, Paola; Oostingh, Gertie J; Duschl, Albert; Casals, Eudald; Puntes, Victor F; Nelissen, Inge

    2011-01-01

    Assessing the safety of engineered nanomaterials for human health must include a thorough evaluation of their effects on the immune system, which is responsible for defending the integrity of our body from damage and disease. An array of robust and representative assays should be set up and validated, which could be predictive of the effects of nanomaterials on immune responses. In a trans-European collaborative work, in vitro assays have been developed to this end. In vitro tests have been preferred for their suitability to standardisation and easier applicability. Adapting classical assays to testing the immunotoxicological effects of nanoparticulate materials has raised a series of issues that needed to be appropriately addressed in order to ensure reliability of results. Besides the exquisitely immunological problem of selecting representative endpoints predictive of the risk of developing disease, assay results turned out to be significantly biased by artefactual interference of the nanomaterials or contaminating agents with the assay protocol. Having addressed such problems, a series of robust and representative assays have been developed that describe the effects of engineered nanoparticles on professional and non-professional human defence cells. Two of such assays are described here, one based on primary human monocytes and the other employing human lung epithelial cells transfected with a reporter gene.

  7. Radioactive wastes assay technique and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. M.; Hong, D. S; Kim, T. K.; Bae, S. M.; Shon, J. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2004-12-01

    The waste inventory records such as the activities and radio- nuclides contained in the waste packages are to be submitted with the radioactive wastes packages for the final disposal. The nearly around 10,000 drums of waste stocked in KAERI now should be assayed for the preparation of the waste inventory records too. For the successive execution of the waste assay, the investigation into the present waste assay techniques and equipment are to be taken first. Also the installation of the waste assay equipment through the comprehensive design, manufacturing and procurement should be proceeded timely. As the characteristics of the KAERI-stocked wastes are very different from that of the nuclear power plant and those have no regular waste streams, the application of the in-direct waste assay method using the scaling factors are not effective for the KAERI-generated wastes. Considering for the versal conveniency including the accuracy over the wide range of waste forms and the combination of assay time and sensitivity, the TGS(Tomographic Gamma Scanner) is appropriate as for the KAERI -generated radioactive waste assay equipment

  8. A study on the toxicity of three radiosensitizers on retinoblastoma cells by MTT assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Xianjin; Jin Yizun; Ding Li; Ni Zhou; Wang Wenji

    1994-01-01

    The toxicity of three radiosensitizers BSO, CM and RSU-1069 on retinoblastoma cells was determined and the efficiency of in vitro MTT assay on drug-screening for retinoblastoma was also evaluated. The results showed that the MTT assay is very useful. The toxicity of radiosensitizers on retinoblastoma cells is dependent on cell line characteristics, drug concentration and time of exposure to it

  9. Clinical performance of a new hepatitis B surface antigen quantitative assay with automatic dilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Wei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg levels reflect disease status and can predict the clinical response to antiviral treatment; however, the emergence of HBsAg mutant strains has become a challenge. The Abbott HBsAg quantification assay provides enhanced detection of HBsAg and HBsAg mutants. We aimed to evaluate the performance of the Abbott HBsAg quantification assay with automatic sample dilutions (shortened as automatic Architect assay, compared with the Abbott HBsAg quantification assay with manual sample dilutions (shortened as manual Architect assay and the Roche HBsAg quantification assay with automatic sample dilutions (shortened as Elecsys. A total of 130 sera samples obtained from 87 hepatitis B virus (HBV-infected patients were collected to assess the correlation between the automatic and manual Architect assays. Among the 87 patients, 41 provided 42 sera samples to confirm the linearity and reproducibility of the automatic Architect assay, and find out the correlation among the Elecsys and two Architect assays. The coefficients of variation (0.44–9.53% and R2 = 0.996–1, which were both determined using values obtained from the automatic Architect assay, showed good reproducibility and linearity. Results of the two Architect assays demonstrated a feasible correlation (n = 130 samples; R = 0.898, p  0.93 in all cases. In conclusion, the correlation between the automatic and manual dilution Architect assays was feasible, particularly in the HBeAg-negative and low DNA groups. With lower labor costs and less human error than the manual version, the Abbott automatic dilution Architect assay provided a good clinical performance with regard to the HBsAg levels.

  10. Reality, ficción o show

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ruíz Moreno

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Para tener un punto de vista claro y objetivo frente a la polémica establecida en torno al programa “Protagonistas de novela” y la tendiente proliferación de los reality show en las parrillas de programación de la televisión colombiana, se realizó un análisis de texto y contenido de dicho programa, intentando definirlo desde sus posibilidades de realidad, ficción y show. Las unidades de análisis y el estudio de su tratamiento arrojaron un alto contenido que gira en torno a las emociones del ser humano relacionadas con la convivencia, tratadas a manera de show y con algunos aportes textuales de ficción, pero sin su elemento mediador básico, el actor, quitándole toda la posibilidad de tener un tratamiento con la profundidad, distancia y ética que requieren los temas de esta índole. El resultado es un formato que sólo busca altos índices de sintonía y que pertenece más a la denominada televisión “trash”, que a una búsqueda de realidad del hombre y mucho menos de sociedad.

  11. Comparative evaluation of two radioenzymatic procedures designed to determine noradrenaline in the plasma (COMT assay and PNMT assay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, A.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of two radioenzymatic procedures to determine the concentration of noradrenaline in the plasma - with linearity, sensitivity, specifity and accuracy serving as test criteria - led to the following results: In view of a probability of error in the order of 2% both methods were judged to show a satisfactory sensitivity. The specific of the COMT assay, by contrast with that of the PNMT assay, was found to be wanting, as the noradrenaline measurements in the presence of other biogenic amines were biassed in such a way that the values determined were higher than the actual concentrations. During antihypertensive treatment even minimal changes in the noradrenaline concentration can be ascertained on a quantitative basis. If suitable hardware is available, the COMT assay permits up to 25 single determinations to be carried out per day, while the number of double determinations is restricted to 7 per day. One advantage, however, lies in the fact that several catecholamines in the plasma can be detected simultaneously, if required. In cases where the noradrenaline concentration alone is to be determined for clinical purposes, preference should be given to the PNMT assay, as both tests showed equal linearity and sensitivity. (TRV) [de

  12. Nondestructive assay measurements applied to reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, Wayne D.; Lee, R. Stephen; Ottmar, Herbert; Guardini, Sergio

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive assay for reprocessing plants relies on passive gamma-ray spectrometry for plutonium isotopic and plutonium mass values of medium-to-low-density samples and holdup deposits; on active x-ray fluorescence and densitometry techniques for uranium and plutonium concentrations in solutions; on calorimetry for plutonium mass in product; and passive neutron techniques for plutonium mass in spent fuel, product, and waste. This paper will describe the radiation-based nondestructive assay techniques used to perform materials accounting measurements. The paper will also discuss nondestructive assay measurements used in inspections of reprocessing plants [ru

  13. Thermometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay: TELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiasson, B; Borrebaeck, C; Sanfridson, B; Mosbach, K

    1977-08-11

    A new method, thermometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (TELISA), for the assay of endogenous and exogenous compounds in biological fluids is described. It is based on the previously described enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technique, ELISA, but utilizes enzymic heat formation which is measured in an enzyme thermistor unit. In the model system studied determination of human serum albumin down to a concentration of 10(-10) M (5 ng/ml) was achieved, with both normal and catalase labelled human serum albumin competing for the binding sites on the immunosorbent, which was rabbit antihuman serum albumin immobilized onto Sepharose CL-4B.

  14. Multisite analytical evaluation of the Abbott ARCHITECT cyclosporine assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallemacq, Pierre; Maine, Gregory T; Berg, Keith; Rosiere, Thomas; Marquet, Pierre; Aimo, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Young, Julianna; Wonigeit, Kurt; Kretschmer, Robert; Wermuth, Bendicht; Schmid, Rainer W

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the analytical performance of the Abbott ARCHITECT Cyclosporine (CsA) immunoassay in 7 clinical laboratories in comparison to liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), Abbott TDx, Cobas Integra 800, and the Dade Dimension Xpand immunoassay. The ARCHITECT assay uses a whole blood specimen, a pretreatment step with organic reagents to precipitate proteins and extract the drug, followed by a 2-step automated immunoassay with magnetic microparticles coated with anti-CsA antibody and an acridinium-CsA tracer. Imprecision testing at the 7 evaluation sites gave a range of total % coefficient of variations of 7.5%-12.2% at 87.5 ng/mL, 6.6%-14.3% at 411 ng/mL, and 5.2%-10.7% at 916 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification ranged from 12 to 20 ng/mL. Purified CsA metabolites AM1, AM1c, AM4N, AM9, and AM19 were tested in whole blood by the ARCHITECT assay and showed minimal cross-reactivity at all 7 sites. In particular, AM1 and AM9 cross-reactivity in the ARCHITECT assay, ranged from -2.5% to 0.2% and -0.8% to 2.2%, respectively, and was significantly lower than for the TDx assay, in which the values were 3.2% and 16.1%, respectively. Comparable testing of metabolites in the Dade Dimension Xpand assay at 2 evaluation sites showed cross-reactivity to AM4N (6.4% and 6.8%) and AM9 (2.6% and 3.6%) and testing on the Roche Integra 800 showed cross-reactivity to AM1c (2.4%), AM9 (10.7%), and AM19 (2.8%). Cyclosporine International Proficiency Testing Scheme samples, consisting of both pooled specimens from patients receiving CsA therapy as well as whole-blood specimens supplemented with CsA, were tested by the ARCHITECT assay at 6 sites and showed an average bias of -24 to -58 ng/mL versus LC/MSMS CsA and -2 to -37 ng/mL versus AxSYM CsA. Studies were performed with the ARCHITECT CsA assay on patient specimens with the following results: ARCHITECT CsA assay versus LC/MSMS, average bias of 31 ng/mL; ARCHITECT versus the

  15. Neutron Assay System for Con?nement Vessel Disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I.; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-01-01

    Waste will be removed from confinement vessels remaining from 1970s-era experiments. Los Alamos has 9+ spherical confinement vessels remaining from experiments. Each vessel contains ∼ 500 lbs of radioactive debris such as actinide metals and oxides, metals, powdered silica, graphite, and wires and hardware. In order to dispose of the vessels, debris and contamination must be removed. Neutron assay system was designed to assay vessels before and after cleanout. System requirements are: (1) Modular and moveable; (2) Capable of detecting ∼100g 239 Pu equivalent in a 2-inch thick steel sphere with 6 foot diameter; and (3) Capable of safeguards-quality assays. Initial design parameters arethe use of 4-atm 3 He tubes with length of 6 feet, and 3 He tubes embedded in polyethelene for moderation. This paper describes the calibration of the Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) and quantification of its uncertainties. Assay uncertainty depends on five factors: (1) Statistical uncertainty in the assay measurement; (2) Statistical uncertainty in the background measurement; (3) Statistical uncertainty in the isotopics determination - This should be much smaller than the other uncertainties; (4) Systematic uncertainty due to position bias; and (5) Systematic uncertainty due to fluctuations in cosmic ray spallation. This one can be virtually eliminated by performing the background measurement with an empty vessel - but that may not be possible. We used modeling and experiments to quantify the systematic uncertainties. The calibration assumes a uniform distribution of material, but reality will be different. MCNPX modeling was used to quantify the positional bias. The model was benchmarked to build confidence in its results. Material at top of vessel is 44% greater than amount assayed, according to singles. Material near 19-tube detector is 38% less than amount assayed, according to singles. Cosmic ray spallation contributes significantly to the background. Comparing rates

  16. Prandiology of Drosophila and the CAFE assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ja, William W.; Carvalho, Gil B.; Mak, Elizabeth M.; de la Rosa, Noelle N.; Fang, Annie Y.; Liong, Jonathan C.; Brummel, Ted; Benzer, Seymour

    2007-01-01

    Studies of feeding behavior in genetically tractable invertebrate model systems have been limited by the lack of proper methodology. We introduce the Capillary Feeder (CAFE), a method allowing precise, real-time measurement of ingestion by individual or grouped fruit flies on the scale of minutes to days. Using this technique, we conducted the first quantitative analysis of prandial behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. Our results allow the dissection of feeding into discrete bouts of ingestion, defining two separate parameters, meal volume and frequency, that can be uncoupled and thus are likely to be independently regulated. In addition, our long-term measurements show that flies can ingest as much as 1.7× their body mass over 24 h. Besides the study of appetite, the CAFE can be used to monitor oral drug delivery. As an illustration, we used the CAFE to test the effects of dietary supplementation with two compounds, paraquat and ethanol, on food ingestion and preference. Paraquat, a prooxidant widely used in stress tests, had a strong anorexigenic effect. In contrast, in a feeding preference assay, ethanol-laced food, but not ethanol by itself, acted as an attractant. PMID:17494737

  17. Performance evaluation of a particle-enhanced turbidimetric cystatin C assay on the Abbott ci8200 analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodin, Mats; Larsson, Anders

    2009-06-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is widely accepted as the best overall measure of kidney function. Cystatin C is a novel endogenous GFR marker that has been shown to be superior to creatinine for estimation of GFR in several studies. There is a need for cystatin C assays adapted to routine chemistry instrument to minimize turnaround times and allowing 24 h/day availability. We have evaluated a new cystatin C assay developed for Architect cSystem (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USA). The cystatin C assay showed good agreement with the corresponding assay from Dade Behring (Deerfield, IL, USA). The assay has a very low total imprecision and a good linearity. The new cystatin C assay is an interesting alternative to current cystatin C assays. On an Architect cSystem the assay can be performed with the same turnaround times and availability as creatinine.

  18. Myopes show increased susceptibility to nearwork aftereffects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffreda, K J; Wallis, D M

    1998-09-01

    Some aspects of accommodation may be slightly abnormal (or different) in myopes, compared with accommodation in emmetropes and hyperopes. For example, the initial magnitude of accommodative adaptation in the dark after nearwork is greatest in myopes. However, the critical test is to assess this initial accommodative aftereffect and its subsequent decay in the light under more natural viewing conditions with blur-related visual feedback present, if a possible link between this phenomenon and clinical myopia is to be considered. Subjects consisted of adult late- (n = 11) and early-onset (n = 13) myopes, emmetropes (n = 11), and hyperopes (n = 9). The distance-refractive state was assessed objectively using an autorefractor immediately before and after a 10-minute binocular near task at 20 cm (5 diopters [D]). Group results showed that myopes were most susceptible to the nearwork aftereffect. It averaged 0.35 D in initial magnitude, with considerably faster posttask decay to baseline in the early-onset (35 seconds) versus late-onset (63 seconds) myopes. There was no myopic aftereffect in the remaining two refractive groups. The myopes showed particularly striking accommodatively related nearwork aftereffect susceptibility. As has been speculated and found by many others, transient pseudomyopia may cause or be a precursor to permanent myopia or myopic progression. Time-integrated increased retinal defocus causing axial elongation is proposed as a possible mechanism.

  19. Split Beta-Lactamase Complementation Assay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Search for the Molecular Better Half! Vaishali Verma ... These assays comprise of a protein molecule, ... ciferase, beta-galactosidase, GFP, g3p of M13 filamentous ph- .... sensors of protein–protein interactions, Nature Biotechnology, Vol.20,.

  20. Linearization of the bradford protein assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Orna; Zor, Tsaffrir

    2010-04-12

    Determination of microgram quantities of protein in the Bradford Coomassie brilliant blue assay is accomplished by measurement of absorbance at 590 nm. This most common assay enables rapid and simple protein quantification in cell lysates, cellular fractions, or recombinant protein samples, for the purpose of normalization of biochemical measurements. However, an intrinsic nonlinearity compromises the sensitivity and accuracy of this method. It is shown that under standard assay conditions, the ratio of the absorbance measurements at 590 nm and 450 nm is strictly linear with protein concentration. This simple procedure increases the accuracy and improves the sensitivity of the assay about 10-fold, permitting quantification down to 50 ng of bovine serum albumin. Furthermore, the interference commonly introduced by detergents that are used to create the cell lysates is greatly reduced by the new protocol. A linear equation developed on the basis of mass action and Beer's law perfectly fits the experimental data.

  1. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay. (a... intended for use in conjunction with other laboratory findings and clinical assessment of the patient to...

  2. Evaluation of environmental genotoxicity by comet assay in Columba livia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Acevedo, Anahi; García-Salas, Juan A; Gosálvez, Jaime; Fernández, José Luis; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Méndez-López, Luis F; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of recognized or suspected genotoxic and carcinogenic agents found in the air of large cities and, in particular, developing countries, have raised concerns about the potential for chronic health effects in the populations exposed to them. The biomonitoring of environmental genotoxicity requires the selection of representative organisms as "sentinels," as well as the development of suitable and sensitive assays, such as those aimed at assessing DNA damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate DNA damage levels in erythrocytes from Columba livia living in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico, compared with control animals via comet assay, and to confirm the results via Micronuclei test (MN) and DNA breakage detection-fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). Our results showed a significant increase in DNA migration in animals from the area assayed compared with that observed in control animals sampled in non-contaminated areas. These results were confirmed by MN test and DBD-FISH. In conclusion, these observations confirm that the examination of erythrocytes from Columba livia via alkaline comet assay provides a sensitive and reliable end point for the detection of environmental genotoxicants.

  3. Detection and removal of spatial bias in multiwell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Alexander; Giorgi, Federico M; Alvarez, Mariano J; Califano, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Multiplex readout assays are now increasingly being performed using microfluidic automation in multiwell format. For instance, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) has produced gene expression measurements for tens of thousands of distinct cell perturbations using a 384-well plate format. This dataset is by far the largest 384-well gene expression measurement assay ever performed. We investigated the gene expression profiles of a million samples from the LINCS dataset and found that the vast majority (96%) of the tested plates were affected by a significant 2D spatial bias. Using a novel algorithm combining spatial autocorrelation detection and principal component analysis, we could remove most of the spatial bias from the LINCS dataset and show in parallel a dramatic improvement of similarity between biological replicates assayed in different plates. The proposed methodology is fully general and can be applied to any highly multiplexed assay performed in multiwell format. ac2248@columbia.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B; Christensen, Torben R

    2007-01-01

    -term survival of bacteria sealed in frozen conditions for up to one million years. Our results show evidence of bacterial survival in samples up to half a million years in age, making this the oldest independently authenticated DNA to date obtained from viable cells. Additionally, we find strong evidence...... geological timescales. There has been no direct evidence in ancient microbes for the most likely mechanism, active DNA repair, or for the metabolic activity necessary to sustain it. In this paper, we couple PCR and enzymatic treatment of DNA with direct respiration measurements to investigate long...... that this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability....

  5. Microbiological and environmental issues in show caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2012-07-01

    Cultural tourism expanded in the last half of the twentieth century, and the interest of visitors has come to include caves containing archaeological remains. Some show caves attracted mass tourism, and economical interests prevailed over conservation, which led to a deterioration of the subterranean environment and the rock art. The presence and the role of microorganisms in caves is a topic that is often ignored in cave management. Knowledge of the colonisation patterns, the dispersion mechanisms, and the effect on human health and, when present, over rock art paintings of these microorganisms is of the utmost importance. In this review the most recent advances in the study of microorganisms in caves are presented, together with the environmental implications of the findings.

  6. Passive nondestructive assay of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, D.; Ensslin, N.; Smith, H. Jr.; Kreiner, S.

    1991-03-01

    The term nondestructive assay (NDA) is applied to a series of measurement techniques for nuclear fuel materials. The techniques measure radiation induced or emitted spontaneously from the nuclear material; the measurements are nondestructive in that they do not alter the physical or chemical state of the nuclear material. NDA techniques are characterized as passive or active depending on whether they measure radiation from the spontaneous decay of the nuclear material or radiation induced by an external source. This book emphasizes passive NDA techniques, although certain active techniques like gamma-ray absorption densitometry and x-ray fluorescence are discussed here because of their intimate relation to passive assay techniques. The principal NDA techniques are classified as gamma-ray assay, neutron assay, and calorimetry. Gamma-ray assay techniques are treated in Chapters 1--10. Neutron assay techniques are the subject of Chapters 11--17. Chapters 11--13 cover the origin of neutrons, neutron interactions, and neutron detectors. Chapters 14--17 cover the theory and applications of total and coincidence neutron counting. Chapter 18 deals with the assay of irradiated nuclear fuel, which uses both gamma-ray and neutron assay techniques. Chapter 19 covers perimeter monitoring, which uses gamma-ray and neutron detectors of high sensitivity to check that no unauthorized nuclear material crosses a facility boundary. The subject of Chapter 20 is attribute and semiquantitative measurements. The goal of these measurements is a rapid verification of the contents of nuclear material containers to assist physical inventory verifications. Waste and holdup measurements are also treated in this chapter. Chapters 21 and 22 cover calorimetry theory and application, and Chapter 23 is a brief application guide to illustrate which techniques can be used to solve certain measurement problems

  7. Optical assay for biotechnology and clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Ewa; Cauchi, Michael; Turner, Claire; Meglinski, Igor; Piletsky, Sergey

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we present an optical diagnostic assay consisting of a mixture of environmental-sensitive fluorescent dyes combined with multivariate data analysis for quantitative and qualitative examination of biological and clinical samples. The performance of the assay is based on the analysis of spectrum of the selected fluorescent dyes with the operational principle similar to electronic nose and electronic tongue systems. This approach has been successfully applied for monitoring of growing cell cultures and identification of gastrointestinal diseases in humans.

  8. Calibration method for a radwaste assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulama, C.; Dobrin, R.; Toma, Al.; Paunoiu, C.

    2004-01-01

    A waste assay system entirely designed and manufactured in the Institute for Nuclear Research is used in radwaste treatment and conditioning stream to ensure compliance with national repository radiological requirements. Usually, waste assay systems are calibrated by using various experimental arrangements including calibration phantoms. The paper presents a comparative study concerning the efficiency calibration performed by shell source method and a semiempirical, computational method based on a Monte Carlo algorithm. (authors)

  9. Molecular Identification, Enzyme Assay, and Metabolic Profiling of Trichoderma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soo-Jung; Park, Young-Hwan; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Jeon, Junhyun; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-06-28

    The goal of this study was to identify and characterize selected Trichoderma isolates by metabolic profiling and enzyme assay for evaluation of their potential as biocontrol agents against plant pathogens. Trichoderma isolates were obtained from the Rural Development Administration Genebank Information Center (Wanju, Republic of Korea). Eleven Trichoderma isolates were re-identified using ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. ITS sequence results showed new identification of Trichoderma isolates. In addition, metabolic profiling of the ethyl acetate extracts of the liquid cultures of five Trichoderma isolates that showed the best anti- Phytophthora activities was conducted using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Metabolic profiling revealed that Trichoderma isolates shared common metabolites with well-known antifungal activities. Enzyme assays indicated strong cell walldegrading enzyme activities of Trichoderma isolates. Overall, our results indicated that the selected Trichoderma isolates have great potential for use as biocontrol agents against plant pathogens.

  10. Evaluation of a Noncontact, Alternative Mosquito Repellent Assay System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisgratog, Rungarun; Kongmee, Monthathip; Sanguanpong, Unchalee; Prabaripai, Atchariya; Bangs, Michael J; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2016-09-01

    A novel noncontact repellency assay system (NCRAS) was designed and evaluated as a possible alternative method for testing compounds that repel or inhibit mosquitoes from blood feeding. Deet and Aedes aegypti were used in a controlled laboratory setting. Using 2 study designs, a highly significant difference were seen between deet-treated and untreated skin placed behind the protective screens, indicating that deet was detected and was acting as a deterrence to mosquito landing and probing behavior. However, a 2nd study showed significant differences between protected (behind a metal screen barrier) and unprotected (exposed) deet-treated forearms, indicating the screen mesh might restrict the detection of deet and thus influences landing/biting response. These findings indicate the prototype NCRAS shows good promise but requires further evaluation and possible modification in design and testing protocol to achieve more desirable operational attributes in comparison with direct skin-contact repellency mosquito assays.

  11. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH 2 from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and [ 125 I]-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the [ 125 I]antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10 9 platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency

  12. Nondestructive assay methods for irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsue, S.T.; Crane, T.W.; Talbert, W.L. Jr.; Lee, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    This report is a review of the status of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods used to determine burnup and fissile content of irradiated nuclear fuels. The gamma-spectroscopy method measures gamma activities of certain fission products that are proportional to the burnup. Problems associated with this method are migration of the fission products and gamma-ray attenuation through the relatively dense fuel material. The attenuation correction is complicated by generally unknown activity distributions within the assemblies. The neutron methods, which usually involve active interrogation and prompt or delayed signal counting, are designed to assay the fissile content of the spent-fuel elements. Systems to assay highly enriched spent-fuel assemblies have been tested extensively. Feasibility studies have been reported of systems to assay light-water reactor spent-fuel assemblies. The slowing-down spectrometer and neutron resonance absorption methods can distinguish between the uranium and plutonium fissile contents, but they are limited to the assay of individual rods. We have summarized the status of NDA techniques for spent-fuel assay and present some subjects in need of further investigation. Accuracy of the burnup calculations for power reactors is also reviewed

  13. Thermoluminescence authenticity assay of Chinese pottery in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The method used is similar to the dating of sherd samples with some modification to minimize the damage to the delicate pottery but still produce a reasonable accurate result. During the past year, the author has done 31 samples successfully. Most of them claimed to be 1100-4500 years of age. After testing, nineteen samples showed out to be compatible with the claimed age. The general procedures and the encountered problems for the assay are described

  14. Comparison of the Simplexa™ Flu A/B & RSV kit (nucleic acid extraction-dependent assay) and the Prodessa ProFlu+™ assay for detecting influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Bambach, Adrienne V; Leber, Amy L; Patru, Maria-Magdalena; Patel, Anami; Menegus, Marilyn A

    2014-09-01

    The relative performance of 2 widely used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, the Focus diagnostics Simplexa™ Flu A/B & RSV kit (nucleic acid extraction-dependent assay) and the Prodessa Proflu+™ assay, was evaluated using 735 prospectively and retrospectively collected nasopharyngeal swab specimens. Overall, the assays showed positive and negative agreements of 100% and 99.7% for influenza A, 98.1% and 99.9% for influenza B, and 99.3% and 99.5% for respiratory syncytial virus. The relative analytical sensitivity of the 2 assays was also similar. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. NASA GIBS Use in Live Planetarium Shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmart, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History's Hayden Planetarium was rebuilt in year 2000 as an immersive theater for scientific data visualization to show the universe in context to our planet. Specific astrophysical movie productions provide the main daily programming, but interactive control software, developed at AMNH allows immersive presentation within a data aggregation of astronomical catalogs called the Digital Universe 3D Atlas. Since 2006, WMS globe browsing capabilities have been built into a software development collaboration with Sweden's Linkoping University (LiU). The resulting Uniview software, now a product of the company SCISS, is operated by about fifty planetariums around that world with ability to network amongst the sites for global presentations. Public presentation of NASA GIBS has allowed authoritative narratives to be presented within the range of data available in context to other sources such as Science on a Sphere, NASA Earth Observatory and Google Earth KML resources. Specifically, the NOAA supported World Views Network conducted a series of presentations across the US that focused on local ecological issues that could then be expanded in the course of presentation to national and global scales of examination. NASA support of for GIBS resources in an easy access multi scale streaming format like WMS has tremendously enabled particularly facile presentations of global monitoring like never before. Global networking of theaters for distributed presentations broadens out the potential for impact of this medium. Archiving and refinement of these presentations has already begun to inform new types of documentary productions that examine pertinent, global interdependency topics.

  16. SWATH Mass Spectrometry Performance Using Extended Peptide MS/MS Assay Libraries*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jemma X.; Song, Xiaomin; Pascovici, Dana; Zaw, Thiri; Care, Natasha; Krisp, Christoph; Molloy, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    The use of data-independent acquisition methods such as SWATH for mass spectrometry based proteomics is usually performed with peptide MS/MS assay libraries which enable identification and quantitation of peptide peak areas. Reference assay libraries can be generated locally through information dependent acquisition, or obtained from community data repositories for commonly studied organisms. However, there have been no studies performed to systematically evaluate how locally generated or repository-based assay libraries affect SWATH performance for proteomic studies. To undertake this analysis, we developed a software workflow, SwathXtend, which generates extended peptide assay libraries by integration with a local seed library and delivers statistical analysis of SWATH-quantitative comparisons. We designed test samples using peptides from a yeast extract spiked into peptides from human K562 cell lysates at three different ratios to simulate protein abundance change comparisons. SWATH-MS performance was assessed using local and external assay libraries of varying complexities and proteome compositions. These experiments demonstrated that local seed libraries integrated with external assay libraries achieve better performance than local assay libraries alone, in terms of the number of identified peptides and proteins and the specificity to detect differentially abundant proteins. Our findings show that the performance of extended assay libraries is influenced by the MS/MS feature similarity of the seed and external libraries, while statistical analysis using multiple testing corrections increases the statistical rigor needed when searching against large extended assay libraries. PMID:27161445

  17. A Rapid Zika Diagnostic Assay to Measure Neutralizing Antibodies in Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential association of microcephaly and other congenital abnormalities with Zika virus (ZIKV infection during pregnancy underlines the critical need for a rapid and accurate diagnosis. Due to the short duration of ZIKV viremia in infected patients, a serologic assay that detects antibody responses to viral infection plays an essential role in diagnosing patient specimens. The current serologic diagnosis of ZIKV infection relies heavily on the labor-intensive Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT that requires more than one-week turnaround time and represents a major bottleneck for patient diagnosis. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a high-throughput assay for ZIKV and dengue virus (DENV diagnosis that can attain the “gold standard” of the current PRNT assay. The new assay is homogeneous and utilizes luciferase viruses to quantify the neutralizing antibody titers in a 96-well format. Using 91 human specimens, we showed that the reporter diagnostic assay has a higher dynamic range and maintains the relative specificity of the traditional PRNT assay. Besides the improvement of assay throughput, the reporter virus technology has also shortened the turnaround time to less than two days. Collectively, our results suggest that, along with the viral RT-PCR assay, the reporter virus-based serologic assay could be potentially used as the first-line test for clinical diagnosis of ZIKV infection as well as for vaccine clinical trials.

  18. Tungsten carbide-cobalt as a nanoparticulate reference positive control in in vitro genotoxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Hélène; Chevalier, Dany; Barois, Nicolas; Lorge, Elisabeth; Claude, Nancy; Nesslany, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing human exposure to nanoparticles (NP), the evaluation of their genotoxic potential is of significant importance. However, relevance for NP of the routinely used in vitro genotoxicity assays is often questioned, and a nanoparticulate reference positive control would therefore constitute an important step to a better testing of NP, ensuring that test systems are really appropriate. In this study, we investigated the possibility of using tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) NP as reference positive control in in vitro genotoxicity assays, including 2 regulatory assays, the mouse lymphoma assay and the micronucleus assay, and in the Comet assay, recommended for the toxicological evaluation of nanomedicines by the French Agency of Human Health Products (Afssaps). Through these assays, we were able to study different genetic endpoints in 2 cell types commonly used in regulatory genotoxicity assays: the L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell line and primary cultures of human lymphocytes. Our results showed that the use of WC-Co NP as positive control in in vitro genotoxicity assays was conceivable, but that different parameters have to be considered, such as cell type and treatment schedule. L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells did not provide satisfactory results in the 3 performed tests. However, human lymphocytes were more sensitive to genotoxic effects induced by WC-Co NP, particularly after a 24-h treatment in the in vitro micronucleus assay and after a 4-h treatment in the in vitro Comet assay. Under such conditions, WC-Co could be used as a nanoparticulate reference positive control in these assays.

  19. Geoscience is Important? Show Me Why

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    "The public" is not homogenous and no single message or form of messaging will connect the entire public with the geosciences. One approach to promoting trust in, and engagement with, the geosciences is to identify specific sectors of the public and then develop interactions and communication products that are immediately relevant to that sector's interests. If the content and delivery are appropriate, this approach empowers people to connect with the geosciences on their own terms and to understand the relevance of the geosciences to their own situation. Federal policy makers are a distinct and influential subgroup of the general public. In preparation for the 2016 presidential election, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) in collaboration with its 51 member societies prepared Geoscience for America's Critical Needs: Invitation to a National Dialogue, a document that identified major geoscience policy issues that should be addressed in a national policy platform. Following the election, AGI worked with eight other geoscience societies to develop Geoscience Policy Recommendations for the New Administration and the 115th Congress, which outlines specific policy actions to address national issues. State and local decision makers are another important subgroup of the public. AGI has developed online content, factsheets, and case studies with different levels of technical complexity so people can explore societally-relevant geoscience topics at their level of technical proficiency. A related webinar series is attracting a growing worldwide audience from many employment sectors. Partnering with government agencies and other scientific and professional societies has increased the visibility and credibility of these information products with our target audience. Surveys and other feedback show that these products are raising awareness of the geosciences and helping to build reciprocal relationships between geoscientists and decision makers. The core message of all

  20. Bacteriophages show promise as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisky, J; Iczkowski, K; Rapoport, A; Troitsky, N

    1998-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One possible option is to use bacteriophages (phage) as antimicrobial agents. We have conducted a literature review of all Medline citations from 1966-1996 that dealt with the therapeutic use of phage. There were 27 papers from Poland, the Soviet Union, Britain and the U.S.A. The Polish and Soviets administered phage orally, topically or systemically to treat a wide variety of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in both adults and children. Infections included suppurative wound infections, gastroenteritis, sepsis, osteomyelitis, dermatitis, empyemas and pneumonia; pathogens included Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Escherichia, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Shigella and Salmonella spp. Overall, the Polish and Soviets reported success rates of 80-95% for phage therapy, with rare, reversible gastrointestinal or allergic side effects. However, efficacy of phage was determined almost exclusively by qualitative clinical assessment of patients, and details of dosages and clinical criteria were very sketchy. There were also six British reports describing controlled trials of phage in animal models (mice, guinea pigs and livestock), measuring survival rates and other objective criteria. All of the British studies raised phage against specific pathogens then used to create experimental infections. Demonstrable efficacy against Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus spp. was noted in these model systems. Two U.S. papers dealt with improving the bioavailability of phage. Phage is sequestered in the spleen and removed from circulation. This can be overcome by serial passage of phage through mice to isolate mutants that resist sequestration. In conclusion, bacteriophages may show promise for treating antibiotic resistant pathogens. To facilitate further progress, directions for future research are discussed and a directory of authors from the reviewed

  1. Selection of non-destructive assay methods: Neutron counting or calorimetric assay?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremers, T.L.; Wachter, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The transition of DOE facilities from production to D ampersand D has lead to more measurements of product, waste, scrap, and other less attractive materials. Some of these materials are difficult to analyze by either neutron counting or calorimetric assay. To determine the most efficacious analysis method, variety of materials, impure salts and hydrofluorination residues have been assayed by both calorimetric assay and neutron counting. New data will be presented together with a review of published data. The precision and accuracy of these measurements are compared to chemistry values and are reported. The contribution of the gamma ray isotopic determination measurement to the overall error of the calorimetric assay or neutron assay is examined and discussed. Other factors affecting selection of the most appropriate non-destructive assay method are listed and considered

  2. Comparison of antibacterial activities of root-end filling materials by an agar diffusion assay and Alamar blue assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsui-Hsien Huang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that both the agar diffusion test and Alamar blue assay gave comparable findings of assessing the antimicrobial activity present in root-end filling materials. No antimicrobial activity was detected for mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium silicate cement, or amalgam after coming into contact with S. mutans, S. sanguinis and E. coli. IRM showed high antimicrobial activity against both S. sanguinis and E. coli.

  3. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Richard Collins

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardising the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, and electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature and voltage gradient are particularly important. Even when these are controlled, variation seems to be inevitable. It is helpful to include in experiments reference standards, i.e. cells with a known amount of specific damage to the DNA. They can be aliquots frozen from a single large batch of cells, either untreated (negative controls or treated with, for example, H2O2 or X-rays to induce strand breaks (positive control for the basic assay, or photosensitiser plus light to oxidise guanine (positive control for Fpg- or OGG1-sensitive sites. Reference standards are especially valuable when performing a series of experiments over a long period - for example, analysing samples of white blood cells from a large human biomonitoring trial - to check that the assay is performing consistently, and to identify anomalous results necessitating a repeat experiment. The reference values of tail intensity can also be used to iron out small variations occurring from day to day. We present examples of the use of reference standards in human trials, both within one laboratory and between different laboratories, and describe procedures that can be used to control variation.

  4. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  5. The Comet Assay: Tails of the (Unexpected. Use of the comet assay in pharmaceutical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas-jan Van Der Leede

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by regulatory guidance. In this presentation we want to give insight into the circumstances in vivo comet assay is deployed in a Genetic Toxicology Department of a pharmaceutical company. As the in vivo comet assay is a salvage assay, it means that some events have occurred in an in vitro assay and that the compound (or metabolite responsible for this signal is potentially deselected for further development. More than often the decision to perform an in vivo comet assay is at a very early stage in development and the first time that the compound will be tested in vivo at high/toxic dose levels. As almost no toxicokinetic data and tissue distribution data are available a careful design with maximizes the chances for successful mitigation is necessary. Decisions on acute or repeated dosing need to be made and arrangements for combining the in vivo comet assay with the in vivo micronucleus assay are to be considered. Often synthesis methods need to be scaled up fast to provide the required amount of compound and information on suitable formulations needs to be in place. As exposure data is crucial for interpretation of results, analytical methods need to be brought in place rapidly. An experienced multi skilled and communicative team needs to be available to deploy successfully this kind of assays at an early stage of development. We will present a few scenarios on study conduct and demonstrate how this assay can make a difference for the further development of a new drug.

  6. Precision and linearity targets for validation of an IFNγ ELISPOT, cytokine flow cytometry, and tetramer assay using CMV peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyerly Herbert K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell assays of immune function are increasingly used to monitor T cell responses in immunotherapy clinical trials. Standardization and validation of such assays are therefore important to interpretation of the clinical trial data. Here we assess the levels of intra-assay, inter-assay, and inter-operator precision, as well as linearity, of CD8+ T cell IFNγ-based ELISPOT and cytokine flow cytometry (CFC, as well as tetramer assays. Results Precision was measured in cryopreserved PBMC with a low, medium, or high response level to a CMV pp65 peptide or peptide mixture. Intra-assay precision was assessed using 6 replicates per assay; inter-assay precision was assessed by performing 8 assays on different days; and inter-operator precision was assessed using 3 different operators working on the same day. Percent CV values ranged from 4% to 133% depending upon the assay and response level. Linearity was measured by diluting PBMC from a high responder into PBMC from a non-responder, and yielded R2 values from 0.85 to 0.99 depending upon the assay and antigen. Conclusion These data provide target values for precision and linearity of single-cell assays for those wishing to validate these assays in their own laboratories. They also allow for comparison of the precision and linearity of ELISPOT, CFC, and tetramer across a range of response levels. There was a trend toward tetramer assays showing the highest precision, followed closely by CFC, and then ELISPOT; while all three assays had similar linearity. These findings are contingent upon the use of optimized protocols for each assay.

  7. Plasma catecholamine content using radioenzymatic assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Masaru; Togashi, Hiroko; Koike, Yuichi; Shimamura, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Noriko

    1980-01-01

    Catecholamine (CA) contents in blood plasma of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and human blood plasma were measured by radioenzymatic assay (REA) and trihydroxyindol (THI) fluorescent method using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and both measurement methods were compared. The standard curve of REA showed a good linear relationship between total CA contents and separated CA contents. Though there was a danger of exposure to β-ray when REA was performed, this method was useful for measurement of CA contents in blood of small animals and small quantity of blood because CA content of only 50 μg of blood plasma could be measured by this method. Norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) contents in men with normal blood pressure measured by REA was 250 +- 61 pg/ml and 37 +- 22 pg/ml, respectively. NE and E contents in patients with mild hypertension were 460 +- 128 pg/ml and 50 +- 20 pg/ml, respectively. There was not a significant difference between NE and E contents in men with normal blood pressure and those in patients with mild hypertension. Total CA content in blood plasma of SHR killed by decapitation was 5,000 +- 1,131 pg/ml, which was 5 times NE and E contents in blood plasma obtained from femoral vein of anesthetized SHR (816 +- 215 pg/ml and 209 +- 44 pg/ml). Total CA content in the same sample was measured by REA and HPLC. As a result, total CA content measured by REA was higher than that measured by HPLC, but there was a good relationship between total CA content measured by REA and that measured by HPLC. NE content in men with normal blood pressure measured by HPLC was elevated significantly according to an increase in their age, but this tendency was not observed in patients with hypertension. (Tsunoda, M.)

  8. Limonene hydroperoxide analogues show specific patch test reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensson, Johanna Bråred; Hellsén, Staffan; Börje, Anna; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2014-05-01

    The fragrance terpene R-limonene is a very weak sensitizer, but forms allergenic oxidation products upon contact with air. The primary oxidation products of oxidized limonene, the hydroperoxides, have an important impact on the sensitizing potency of the oxidation mixture. One analogue, limonene-1-hydroperoxide, was experimentally shown to be a significantly more potent sensitizer than limonene-2-hydroperoxide in the local lymph node assay with non-pooled lymph nodes. To investigate the pattern of reactivity among consecutive dermatitis patients to two structurally closely related limonene hydroperoxides, limonene-1-hydroperoxide and limonene-2-hydroperoxide. Limonene-1-hydroperoxide, limonene-2-hydroperoxide, at 0.5% in petrolatum, and oxidized limonene 3.0% pet. were tested in 763 consecutive dermatitis patients. Of the tested materials, limonene-1-hydroperoxide gave most reactions, with 2.4% of the patients showing positive patch test reactions. Limonene-2-hydroperoxide and oxidized R-limonene gave 1.7% and 1.2% positive patch test reactions, respectively. Concomitant positive patch test reactions to other fragrance markers in the baseline series were frequently noted. The results are in accordance with the experimental studies, as limonene-1-hydroperoxide gave more positive patch test reactions in the tested patients than limonene-2-hydroperoxide. Furthermore, the results support the specificity of the allergenic activity of the limonene hydroperoxide analogues and the importance of oxidized limonene as a cause of contact allergy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kumar Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heritable mutations may result in a variety of adverse outcomes including genetic disease in the offspring. In recent years the focus on germ cell mutagenicity has increased and the “Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS” has published classification criteria for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009. The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014. An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster scoring of randomly selected cells.

  10. Immune chromatography: a quantitative radioimmunological assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.W.; Demetriades, M.; Bowen, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Immune chromatography, a radioimmunological binding assay, employs paper chromatography to separate immune complexes from free antigen and antibodies. During chromatography free antigen and antibodies become distributed throughout the paper, while immune complexes remain near the bottoms of the strips. The chromatographic differences can be made quantitative by using either iodinated antigens or antibodies. Under these conditions nanogram quantities of antigen can be detected or antibodies in sera diluted several 1000-fold. The immune chromatography assay can also be performed as an indirect assay, since the paper strips are cut from nitrocellulose paper. In this case the immune components are absorbed by the paper during chromatography. Antigen is then detected with an iodinated second antibody. The indirect immune chromatography assay is particularly useful for identifying different sera that react with the same antigen. Reaction with the first serum before chromatography reduces the amount of antigen available to the second serum following chromatography. In addition to characterizing the immune chromatography procedure, we discuss the possible applications of chromatography assays for the quantitation of other types of molecular binding interactions. (Auth.)

  11. Evaluation of three gentamicin serum assay techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, G.R.; Gwizdala, C.; Wery, J.; Ferry, D.; Starnes, R.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation was designed to compare the enzyme-modified immunoassay (Syva--EMIT) with a radioimmunoassay (New England Nuclear--RIA) and the radiometric assay (Johnston--BACTEC) to determine the optimal assay for use in our aminoglycoside dosing service. The serum concentration determinations obtained via the three assay methods were analyzed by linear regression analysis. Significant positive correlations were noted between the three assay techniques (p less than 0.005) during both sample collection phases. The coefficients of determination for EMIT vs BACTEC and RIA vs BACTEC were 0.73 and 0.83 during phase 1, respectively, and 0.65 and 0.68 during phase 2, respectively. The slope of the regression lines also varied markedly during the two phases; 0.49 and 0.42 for EMIT and for RIA vs BACTEC, respectively, during phase 1 compound with 1.12 and 0.77, respectively, during phase 2. The differences noted in these relationships during phase 1 and 2 may be related to the alteration of the pH of the control sera utilized in the BACTEC assay. In contrast, RIA vs EMIT regression analysis indicated that existence of a highly significant relationship (p less than 0.0005 and r2 . 0.90). The EMIT technique was the easiest and most accurate for determination of serum gentamicin concentrations, whereas the BACTEC method was judged unacceptable for clinical use

  12. Assay Validation For Quantitation of Sn 2+ In Radiopharmaceutical Kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthalib, A; Ramli, Martalena; Herlina; Sarmini, Endang; Suharmadi; Besari, Canti

    1998-01-01

    An assay validation for quantitation of Sn2+ in radiopharmaceutical kits based on indirect iodometric titration is described. The method is based on the oxidation of sn2+ using a known excess of iodine and the excess unreacted iodine titrated with thiosulphate. Typical analytical parameters considered in this assay validation are precision, accuracy, selectivity or specificity, range, and linearity. The precision of the analytical method is quit good represented by coefficient of variance in range of 1.0% to 6.9 %, for 10 runs of analysis except one analysis shows the coefficient of 10.2 %. The method has an accuracy of 95.6 % - 99 % as percent recoveries at theoretical Sn2+ amounts of 463 μg to 2318μg

  13. A new semiquantitative radiometric opsonin assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, M.; Valdimarsson, H.

    1978-01-01

    A new semiquantitative radiometric opsonin assay is described. It was found that the opsonin activity generated by incubating brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in medium containing less than 5% human serum was exclusively complement dependent. In contrast, C.albicans was effectively opsonized in the absence of complement. Antibodies and the early classical complement pathway did not contribute to the opsonization of S.cerevisiae and neither did C5-9. The brewer's yeast assay can therefore be used for measuring selectively the opsonizing capacity of the alternative pathway. Sera from approximately 7% of apparently healthy adult controls consistently failed to generate significant opsonin activity while 8 out of 26 patients with suspected immune deficiency of unknown cause were defective in this assay. All opsonin deficient sera so far tested had haemolytically normal alternative pathway and Factor B activity. (author)

  14. Evaluation of a molybdenum assay canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizumi, T.T.; Keener, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a commercial molybdenum assay canister were evaluated. The geometrical variation of the technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc) activity reading was studied as a function of the elution volume for the standard vials. It was found that the /sup 99m/Tc canister activity reading was ∼ 5% lower than that of the standard method. This is due to attenuation by the canister wall. However, the effect of the geometric variation on the clinical dose preparation was found to be insignificant. The molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) contamination level was compared by two methods: (1) the commercial canister and (2) the standard assay kit. The 99 Mo contamination measurements with the canister indicated consistently lower readings than those with the standard 99 Mo assay kit. The authors conclude that the canister may be used in the clinical settings. However, the user must be aware of the problems and the limitations associated with this canister

  15. Elements of nondestructive assay (NDA) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This session provides an introduction to nondestructive assay methods and instruments as they are applied to nuclear safeguards. The purpose of the sessions is to enable participants to: (1) discuss the general principles and major applications of NDA; (2) describe situations in which NDA is particularly useful for nuclear safeguards purposes; (3) distinguish between various passive and active gamma-ray and neutron NDA methods; (4) describe several NDA instruments that measure gamma rays, and identify assay situations particularly suited to gamma-ray techniques; (5) describe several NDA instruments that measure neutrons, and identify assay situations particularly suited to neutron techniques; (6) discuss the role of calorimetry in the NDA of plutonium-bearing materials; and (7) compare the advantages and disadvantages of various NDA methods for different types of nuclear materials

  16. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall....... Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  17. Monitoring environmental exposures with semen assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Semen studies in humans and animals have yielded extensive and compelling evidence that sperm can be used to assess reproductive potential and diagnose pathology. More recent studies on mutagens and carcinogens both at this and other laboratories suggest that a combination of mouse and human assays can be an efficient, effective approach to monitoring for reproductive hazards in the environment. We are investigating the potential of using variability in sperm morphology and DNA content to quantify and monitor the effects of environmental agents on the human testes. Here we review the status of human and mouse assays for environmental surveillance, discuss the genetic and fertility implications of chemically induced semen changes, and describe the high-speed flow methods being developed to automate sperm assays

  18. Have you stress tested your assay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Cao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: When a clinical assay is stressed with extraordinarily high volume of specimens over a short period of time, extra caution may be needed to avoid systematic errors and biases. Here we report our experience with a HgbA1c assay used for high volume wellness screening purpose, to illustrate the importance of stress testing during assay validation. Design and Methods: Over 15,000 whole blood specimens were tested for HgbA1c in a period of 2 months. HgbA1c was tested by an immunoturbidimetric method on a high through-put automation line. The HgbA1c population distribution in our study was compared to that from the NHANES database. Daily distributions of HgbA1c values ≥6%, means and medians were plotted. Correlation studies were performed between the high through-put immunoturbidimetric assay and a medium through-put HPLC method. Results: We observed a shift of HgbA1c distribution to the higher values compared to the NHANES. A bias of 15–20% was noted from further stress testing where large number of samples were batched and tested using the immunoturbidimetric assay. A 5–7% higher bias remained after implementing a cuvette washing program after each HgbA1c sample. We hypothesized this bias was caused by build-up of blood cell fragments in the cuvettes when continuous whole blood samples are run through the system. Our experience suggests stress testing needs to be incorporated early in the test validation process for high volume batched screening applications. This seemingly extra validation step may save significant troubleshooting and retesting efforts down the road. Keywords: Hemoglobin A1c, Immunoturbidimetric assay, HPLC, Quality assurance, Systematic bias, High volume, Automation

  19. Rapid colorimetric assay for gentamicin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbutton, P

    1987-01-01

    A rapid colorimetric method for determining gentamicin concentration in commercial preparations of gentamicin sulfate injection was developed. Methods currently available for measuring gentamicin concentration via its colored complex with cupric ions in alkaline solution were modified to reduce the time required for a single analysis. The alkaline copper tartrate (ACT) reagent solution was prepared such that each milliliter contained 100 mumol cupric sulfate, 210 mumol potassium sodium tartrate, and 1.25 mmol sodium hydroxide. The assay involves mixing 0.3 mL gentamicin sulfate injection 40 mg/mL (of gentamicin), 1.0 mL ACT reagent, and 0.7 mL water; the absorbance of the resulting solution at 560 nm was used to calculate the gentamicin concentration in the sample. For injections containing 10 mg/mL of gentamicin, the amount of the injection was increased to 0.5 mL and water decreased to 0.5 mL. The concentration of gentamicin in samples representing 11 lots of gentamicin sulfate injection 40 mg/mL and 8 lots of gentamicin sulfate injection 10 mg/mL was determined. The specificity, reproducibility, and accuracy of the assay were assessed. The colored complex was stable for at least two hours. Gentamicin concentration ranged from 93.7 to 108% and from 95 to 109% of the stated label value of the 40 mg/mL and the 10 mg/mL injections, respectively. No components of the preservative system present in the injections interfered with the assay. Since other aminoglycosides produced a colored complex, the assay is not specific for gentamicin. The assay was accurate and reproducible over the range of 4-20 mg of gentamicin. This rapid and accurate assay can be easily applied in the hospital pharmacy setting.

  20. Immunological measurements on the disappearance of creatine kinase MM from the circulation. [Immunoradiometric assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wevers, R A; van Landeghem, A A.J.; Mul-Steinbusch, M W.F.J.; Bijdendijk, J G; Weerts, P; Kloeg, P; Soons, J B.J. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1983-07-15

    Both a two-site immunoradiometric assay and a two-site enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for creatine kinase MM are described. Linearity, reproducibility and cross-reactivity of the assays are satisfactory. Creatine kinase MM incubated in a pH-controlled serum matrix loses its activity, but has its antigenic determinants affected as well. Of all the techniques used, only the immunoradiometric assay is capable of measuring part of the inactivated enzyme. Measurements with this assay on the sera of patients after a myocardial infarction show identical results for enzyme activity and creatine kinase protein quantity. The in vitro disappearance rate of creatine kinase activity is slow compared with the in vivo half-life of the enzyme. These two observations lead to the conclusion that creatine kinase is removed from the circulation long before it is inactivated in the blood stream.

  1. Elements of nondestructive assay (NDA) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, C.R.; Smith, H.

    1984-01-01

    A thorough introduction to nondestructive assay methods and instruments as they are applied to nuclear safeguards is presented. The general principles and major applications of NDA are discussed and situations in which NDA is particularly useful for nuclear safeguards purposes are described. Various passive and active γ-ray and neutron methods are examined and assay situations particularly suited to γ-ray techniques, or to neutron techniques are identified. The role of calorimetry in the NDA of plutonium-bearing materials is also discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of various NDA methods for different types of nuclear materials are mentioned

  2. Assay of low-level plutonium effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsue, S.T.; Hsue, F.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    In the plutonium recovery section at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, an effluent solution is generated that contains low plutonium concentration and relatively high americium concentration. Nondestructive assay of this solution is demonstrated by measuring the passive L x-rays following alpha decay. Preliminary results indicate that an average deviation of 30% between L x-ray and alpha counting can be achieved for plutonium concentrations above 10 mg/L and Am/Pu ratios of up to 3; for plutonium concentrations less than 10 mg/L, the average deviation is 40%. The sensitivity of the L x-ray assay is approx. 1 mg Pu/L

  3. A sensitive assay for Staphylococcus aureus nucleases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, J K; Vakil, B V; Patil, M S; Pandey, V N; Pradhan, D S [Bhabha Atomic Reserach Centre, Bombay (India). Biochemistry Div.

    1989-10-01

    A sensitive assay for staphylococcal nuclease involving incubation of the enzyme sample with heat-denatured ({sup 3}H) thymidine labelled DNA from E.coli, precipitation with trichloroacetic acid and measurement of the radioactivity of acid-soluble nucleotides released has been developed. The assay is sensitive enough to be used for comparing the levels of nucleases elaborated by different strains of S. aureus as well as for determining the extent of contamination of S. aureus in food and water samples even at levels at which the conventional spectrophotometric and toluidine blue-DNA methods are totally inadequate. (author). 26 refs., 3 figs ., 3 tabs.

  4. Analytical and clinical evaluation of the Abbott RealTime hepatitis B sequencing assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Hee Jae; Kim, Ji-Youn; Lee, Myoung-Keun; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2016-12-01

    Long-term nucleoside analogue (NA) treatment leads to selection for drug-resistant mutations in patients undergoing hepatitis B virus (HBV) therapy. The Abbott RealTime HBV Sequencing assay (Abbott assay; Abbott Molecular Inc., Des Plaines, IL, USA) targets the reverse transcriptase region of the polymerase gene and as such has the ability to detect NA resistance-associated mutations in HBV. We evaluated the analytical performance of the Abbott assay and compared its diagnostic performance to that of a laboratory-developed nested-PCR and sequencing method. The analytical sensitivity of the Abbott assay was determined using a serially-diluted WHO International Standard. To validate the clinical performances of the Abbott assay and the laboratory-developed assay, 89 clinical plasma samples with various levels of HBV DNA were tested using both assays. The limit of detection of the Abbott assay, was 210IU/ml and it successfully detected mutations when the mutant types were present at levels ≥20%. Among 89 clinical specimens, 43 and 42 were amplification positive in the Abbott and laboratory-developed assays, respectively, with 87.6% overall agreement (78/89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 78.6-93.4). The Abbott assay failed to detect the minor mutant populations in two specimens, and therefore overall concordance was 85.3% (76/89), and the kappa value was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.67-0.90). The Abbott assay showed comparable diagnostic performance to laboratory-developed nested PCR followed by direct sequencing, and may be useful as a routine method for detecting HBV NA resistance-associated mutations in clinical laboratory settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated two-site immunofluorescent assay for the measurement of serum chromogranin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, Théodora; Moreira, Baptiste; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Bories, Phuong-Nhi

    2014-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is the best-characterized biological marker common to neuroendocrine tumours and is therefore recommended for their diagnosis. The measurement of serum CgA is of great importance for reaching an early diagnosis and thus reducing the delay before treatment is instigated. The Kryptor CgA assay is the first fully automated assay available. The aim of this study was to evaluate its analytical performance. The imprecision and linearity of the Kryptor CgA assay were evaluated. This assay was compared with the Cis Bio CgA RIA assay in 78 serum samples. Its clinical utility was assessed in serum from 229 patients. The study performed on imprecision of Kryptor measurements showed intra- and inter-run CVs ≤ 5%. The study of linearity showed a satisfactory recovery rate for CgA concentrations up to 1200 μg/L. The Kryptor and RIA assays agreed well on the basis of the cut-off values provided by the two manufacturers. The Bland and Altman plot of the values obtained (range: 20-5560 μg/L) provided a mean difference of -10.1 μg/L (SD: 116). The clinical sensitivities of Kryptor CgA for diagnosis of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (n 20) and gastroenteropancreatic NETs (n 17) were respectively 100 and 94%. The Kryptor assay for CgA shows reliable analytical and clinical characteristics and allows a fast delivery of results. © 2013.

  6. Fundamental and clinical evaluation of ''SCC RIABEAD'' kit for immunoradiometric assay of squamous cell carcinoma related antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Mitsuru; Endo, Keigo; Nakajima, Kotoko

    1987-01-01

    A commercial ''SCC RIABEAD'' kit for immunoradiometric assay of squamous cell carcinoma related antigen (SCC antigen) was fundamentally and clinically evaluated. Laboratory performance was satisfactory for intra-assay and inter-assay reproducibility, recovery, and dilution, with rapid and simple measurement techniques. Seropositivity for SCC antigen was significantly higher for squamous cell carcinoma of the liver and uterine cervix than the other histology types. In the case of cervical squamous cell carcinoma, it increased with progressing disease. Post-treatment serum levels of SCC antigen returned to negative. SCC antigen is considered to be a useful tumor marker for these diseases. There was a good correlation between the measurement values obtained from the present and conventional (SCC RIAKIT) assays. The present assay remarkably decreased false-positive cases of pulmonary benign diseases. The results showed a ''SCC RIABEAD'' to be a favorable kit for immunoradiometric assay of SSC antigen, as compared with conventional assay kit. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Liquor oligoclonal bands assay: interpretation, correlation with other laboratory assays and importance for diagnostics of neurological disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bagdonas, Dovydas

    2017-01-01

    Aim: to analyse the possible relationship between liquor IgG oligoclonal bands assay and other laboratory assays in neurological patients. Objectives: to determine the frequency of oligoclonal bands in neurological patients; to compare the results between serum and liquor laboratory assays in dependence of oligoclonal bands assay results; to evaluate the relationships between oligoclonal bands assay and serological-immunological assays for infectious diseases, gender, age and neurological ...

  8. Quantitative comparison of in house irma/ria methods using reagents supplied in bulk with assays based on commercial kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, K.M.; Jafri, S.R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Due to high cost of commercial kit assays, local trials were started to establish low cost immunoassay techniques at MINAR, Multan. First available alternate of commercial kits was the use of matched reagents supplied in bulk by NETRIA through INMOL, Lahore under IAEA assistance. As quality is crucial in RIA estimations this laboratory collected passive quality control data of 50, 51 and 52 in-house assay batches of T3,T4 and TSH to compare with the same number of last Amerlex RIAs(successive lots). A qualitative comparison based on computerized data analysis shows linear correlation between the results of two assay systems with low and acceptable precision in T3 and T4 assays. In TSH assays both systems show high imprecision although Amerlex RIA system is relatively more precise than in-house TSH- IRMA. T3 and T4 assays in both the systems show wide working ranges covering all clinical regions. In TSH, working ranges of both the techniques do not cover all clinical regions. In-house TSH assay excludes below 5.5 mulU/ml, whereas Amerlex excludes levels below 4.5 mulL/ml. This may reduce the clinical efficacy of these tests. Amerlex-M T3 and T4 assays show high negative drift with relatively less between variation, whereas in-house assays show low positive drift with high between batch variation. (author)

  9. Evaluation of the reliability of maize reference assays for GMO quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazova, Nina; Zhang, David; Gruden, Kristina; Vojvoda, Jana; Yang, Litao; Buh Gasparic, Meti; Blejec, Andrej; Fouilloux, Stephane; De Loose, Marc; Taverniers, Isabel

    2010-03-01

    A reliable PCR reference assay for relative genetically modified organism (GMO) quantification must be specific for the target taxon and amplify uniformly along the commercialised varieties within the considered taxon. Different reference assays for maize (Zea mays L.) are used in official methods for GMO quantification. In this study, we evaluated the reliability of eight existing maize reference assays, four of which are used in combination with an event-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay validated and published by the Community Reference Laboratory (CRL). We analysed the nucleotide sequence variation in the target genomic regions in a broad range of transgenic and conventional varieties and lines: MON 810 varieties cultivated in Spain and conventional varieties from various geographical origins and breeding history. In addition, the reliability of the assays was evaluated based on their PCR amplification performance. A single base pair substitution, corresponding to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reported in an earlier study, was observed in the forward primer of one of the studied alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) (70) assays in a large number of varieties. The SNP presence is consistent with a poor PCR performance observed for this assay along the tested varieties. The obtained data show that the Adh1 (70) assay used in the official CRL NK603 assay is unreliable. Based on our results from both the nucleotide stability study and the PCR performance test, we can conclude that the Adh1 (136) reference assay (T25 and Bt11 assays) as well as the tested high mobility group protein gene assay, which also form parts of CRL methods for quantification, are highly reliable. Despite the observed uniformity in the nucleotide sequence of the invertase gene assay, the PCR performance test reveals that this target sequence might occur in more than one copy. Finally, although currently not forming a part of official quantification methods, zein and SSIIb

  10. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  11. Performance of hepatitis B assays on the Bayer ADVIA Centaur Immunoassay System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, Josef; Denoyel, Gérard; Karwowska, Sylwia; Reamer, Randy; Schmalz, John; Wright, Ted; Preisel-Simmons, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Bayer HealthCare LLC, Diagnostics Division, has developed several new assays on the ADVIA Centaur immunoassay system for the detection of markers of hepatitis B virus infection in human serum and plasma. This panel includes assays for: hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), a confirmatory test method for HBsAg, antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs), IgM and IgG antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc Total) and IgM antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc IgM). These assays employ magnetic particle separation technology with direct chemiluminescence for optimal assay performance. All of the assays are fully automated, require sample volumes ranging from 15 microl to 100 microl (with the exception of the ADVIA Centaur HBsAg Confirmatory Assay, which requires 2 x 100 microl), and have throughputs of up to 240 tests per hour. The five ADVIA Centaur HBV assays were tested in extensive performance evaluations conducted at two sites in Europe. The performance evaluations, which included samples from HBV-infected individuals, blood donors, hospitalized/clinical patients, and HBV vaccinees (for Anti-HBs evaluation), generated performance data in support of obtaining the Communautés Européennes (CE) mark for European market distribution. The HBV performance evaluations resulted in an overall diagnostic specificity > 99%, i.e. 99.94% for the ADVIA Centaur HBsAg Assay, 100% for the ADVIA Centaur Anti-HBs Assay, 100% for the ADVIA Centaur HBc IgM Assay and 99.94% for the ADVIA Centaur HBc Total Assay. All of the ADVIA Centaur assays showed a very good diagnostic sensitivity on these populations with 100% for the ADVIA Centaur HBsAg Assay, 99.0% for the ADVIA Centaur Anti-HBs Assay, 98.53% for the ADVIA Centaur HBc IgM Assay and 100% for the ADVIA Centaur HBc Total Assay. The ADVIA Centaur HBsAg Confirmatory Test confirmed 100% of the positive HBsAg samples. Testing of interfering substances and potential cross-reacting samples for all ADVIA

  12. High throughput comet assay to study genotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naouale El Yamani

    2015-06-01

    per slide. Subsequent incubation with FPG revealed damage not seen with the basic assay for strand breaks (without FPG (Harris et al., 2015. Statistical evaluation showed that oleic acid coated Fe3O4 and TiO2 NMs are genotoxic, in the experimental conditions used. No differences were seen between cell lines representing a range of different tissues – demonstrating the general usefulness of in vitro models and the ability of cells to classify NMs as genotoxic and non-genotoxic (Cowie et al., 2015. We are currently studying the effects of 20 NMs in the NANoREG project using A549, BEAS B2 and TK6 cells - again demonstrating the usefulness of the HTP comet assay for nanogenotoxicity testing.

  13. Enzymatic assay for methotrexate in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H; Heinsvig, E M

    1985-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) accumulates in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients. We present a modified enzymatic assay measuring MTX concentrations between 10 and 60 nmol/l in erythrocytes, adapted for a centrifugal analyser (Cobas Bio). About 40 patient's samples could be analysed within 1 h. The detection...

  14. Comet assay. Pt.1. Theory and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszewski, M.; Wojewodzka, M.; Iwanenko, T.

    1996-01-01

    Comet assay is a new method for measuring DNA breakage in a single cell. The main applications of the method are estimation of DNA single and double strand breaks, oxidative damage, pyrimidine dimers and (6-4)photoproducts, DNA-DNA and DNA-protein crosslinks. The method is used for studying DNA damage and its repair. (author).19 refs, 9 figs

  15. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  16. The use of calorimetry for plutonium assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    Calorimetry is a technique for measuring the thermal power of heat-producing substances. The technique may be applied to the measurement of plutonium-bearing materials which evolve heat as a result of alpha and beta decay. A calorimetric measurement of the thermal power of a plutonium sample, combined with a knowledge or measurement of the plutonium isotopic mass ratios of the sample provides a convenient and accurate, non-destructive measure of the total plutonium mass of the sample. The present report provides a description, and an assessment of the calorimetry technique applied to the assay of plutonium-bearing materials. Types and characteristics of plutonium calorimeters are considered, as well as calibration and operating procedures. The instrumentation used with plutonium calorimeters is described and the use of computer control for calorimeter automation is discussed. A critical review and assessment of plutonium calorimetry literature since 1970 is presented. Both fuel element and plutonium-bearing material calorimeters are considered. The different types of plutonium calorimeters are evaluated and their relative merits are discussed. A combined calorimeter and gamma-ray measurement assay system is considered. The design principles of plutonium assay calorimeters are considered. An automatic, computer-based calorimeter control system is proposed in conjunction with a general plutonium assay calorimeter design. (author)

  17. Endoproteolytic activity assay in malting barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Gómez Guerrero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of barley proteins into peptides and amino acids is one of the most important processes during barley germination.The degradation of the endosperm stored proteins facilitates water and enzyme movements, enhances modification, liberates starch granules and increases soluble amino nitrogen. Protease activity is the result of the activities of a mixture of exo- and endo-proteases. The barley proteins are initially solubilized by endo-proteases and the further by exo-proteases. Four classes of endo-proteases have been described: serine-proteases, cysteine-proteases, aspartic-proteases and metallo-proteases. The objective of this work was to develop a rapid and colorimetric enzymatic assay to determine the endo-proteolytic activity of the four endo-protease classes using two different substrates: azo-gelatin and azo-casein. Optimum conditions for the assays such as: pH,reaction time and temperature and absorbance scale were determined. Azo-gelatin presented several difficulties in standardizing an “in solution” assay. On the other hand, azo-casein allowed standardization of the assay for the four enzyme classes to produce consistent results. The endo-proteoteolytic method developed was applied to determine the endo-protease activity in barley, malt and wort.

  18. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7425 Carboxyhemoglobin...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250 Erythropoietin...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7490 - Sulfhemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfhemoglobin assay. 864.7490 Section 864.7490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7490 Sulfhemoglobin...

  1. Radioligand assay for biotin in liver tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettenmaier, R.

    1979-01-01

    A radioligand assay for biotin in liver tissue is described. 3 H-biotin is used as tracer and avidin as binder. The biotin-loaded avidin is separated from free biotin on dextran-coated charcoal, which leaves the avidin-biotin complex in the supernatant liquid. Thus, the avidin-biotin complex can easily be utilized for determination of the radioactivity. Calibration with known additions of biotin in the range 0.25-8.0 ng per assay sample yields a linear logit-log plot. The biotin is extracted from liver tissues by enzymatic proteolysis with papain. This treatment is optimized to liberate the bound forms of the vitamin. Microbiological parallel assays with Lactobacillus plantarum were in good agreement with the radioligand assay giving a regression coefficient of 0.974(n=44). The coefficient of variation was found to be 4.2% in the range 500-1200 ng of biotin per g of liver tissue (n=46). The method is simple and reliable and allows the simultaneous analysis of a considerable number of samples. (Auth.)

  2. Relationships between ytterbium precipitation assay, colorimetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    digestion and metabolism of protein (Komolong et al., 2001). ... room temperature (25 °C) pending chemical analyses and in vitro ... assayed without sodium sulphite but with a heat-stable α-amylase due to the high ... of starch in the tree fruits.

  3. Nondestructive assay of boxed radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles, W.P.; Roberts, R.J.; Jasen, W.G.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the problems related to the nondestructive assay (NDA) of boxed radioactive waste at the Hanford Site and how Westinghouse Hanford company (WHC) is solving the problems. The waste form and radionuclide content are described. The characteristics of the combined neutron and gamma-based measurement system are described

  4. Production and assay of forskolin antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, L.T.; Ho, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Forskolin (Fo), a cardiovascular active diterpene of plant origin, has been widely used as a research tool in regulation of the catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase (AC). A linear relationship of Fo binding to plasma membrane with activation of AC has been reported. The present abstract describes the production and assay of Fo antibodies (AB). 7-0-Hemisuccinyl-7-deacetyl Fo, coupled to either human serum albumin or goat IgG, was injected into goats to elicit AB to Fo haptan. AB to Fo in antiserum or an isolated IgG fraction was tested by two assay methods, a radioimmunoassay using 3 H-Fo as a tracer and a colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using horse radish peroxidase-rabbit anti goat IgG as indicator. The titers for Fo antiserum were 4000-10,000. In the defined assay condition, approximately 20-25% of the added 3 H-Fo was found to bind to AB. The bound radioactivity was displaced by Fo-HSA or Fo-goat IgG or free unlabelled Fo ranging from 0.5-50 pmol/tube, or 5-500 nM. The IC 50 was approximately 8-10 pmol/tube or 80-100 nM. The binding of HRP-rabbit anti goat IgG in the ELISA was inhibited by proper Fo conjugate. The development of methods for production and assay for Fo AB may be useful in the study of mechanism of activation of AC by Fo and Fo-like compound

  5. A multiparametric assay for quantitative nerve regeneration evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyn, B; van Remoortere, M; Nuydens, R; Meert, T; van de Wouwer, G

    2005-08-01

    We introduce an assay for the semi-automated quantification of nerve regeneration by image analysis. Digital images of histological sections of regenerated nerves are recorded using an automated inverted microscope and merged into high-resolution mosaic images representing the entire nerve. These are analysed by a dedicated image-processing package that computes nerve-specific features (e.g. nerve area, fibre count, myelinated area) and fibre-specific features (area, perimeter, myelin sheet thickness). The assay's performance and correlation of the automatically computed data with visually obtained data are determined on a set of 140 semithin sections from the distal part of a rat tibial nerve from four different experimental treatment groups (control, sham, sutured, cut) taken at seven different time points after surgery. Results show a high correlation between the manually and automatically derived data, and a high discriminative power towards treatment. Extra value is added by the large feature set. In conclusion, the assay is fast and offers data that currently can be obtained only by a combination of laborious and time-consuming tests.

  6. Development of a lion-specific interferon-gamma assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, M; van Kooten, P J S; Schreuder, J; Morar, D; Tijhaar, E; Michel, A L; Rutten, V P M G

    2012-10-15

    The ongoing spread of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in African free-ranging lion populations, for example in the Kruger National Park, raises the need for diagnostic assays for BTB in lions. These, in addition, would be highly relevant for zoological gardens worldwide that want to determine the BTB status of their lions, e.g. for translocations. The present study concerns the development of a lion-specific IFN-γ assay, following the production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for lion interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Recombinant lion IFN-γ (rLIFN-γ) was produced in mammalian cells and used to immunize mice to establish hybridoma cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies. These were used to develop a sensitive, lion IFN-γ-specific capture ELISA, able to detect rLIFN-γ to the level of 160 pg/ml. Recognition of native lion IFN-γ was shown in an initial assessment of supernatants of mitogen stimulated whole blood cultures of 11 known BTB-negative lions. In conclusion, the capture ELISA shows potential as a diagnostic assay for bovine tuberculosis in lions. Preliminary results also indicate the possible use of the test for other (feline) species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vivo Nanotoxicity Testing using the Zebrafish Embryo Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Larissa Y; Golombek, Susanne K; Mertens, Marianne E; Pan, Yu; Laaf, Dominic; Broda, Janine; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Möckel, Diana; Subr, Vladimir; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Simon, Ulrich; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-06-10

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used for biomedical purposes. Many different diagnostic and therapeutic applications are envisioned for nanoparticles, but there are often also serious concerns regarding their safety. Given the fact that numerous new nanomaterials are being developed every day, and that not much is known about the long-term toxicological impact of exposure to nanoparticles, there is an urgent need to establish efficient methods for nanotoxicity testing. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo assay has recently emerged as an interesting 'intermediate' method for in vivo nanotoxicity screening, enabling (semi-) high-throughput analyses in a system significantly more complex than cultured cells, but at the same time also less 'invasive' and less expensive than large-scale biocompatibility studies in mice or rats. The zebrafish embryo assay is relatively well-established in the environmental sciences, but it has not yet gained wide notice in the nanomedicine field. Using prototypic polymeric drug carriers, gold-based nanodiagnostics and nanotherapeutics, and iron oxide-based nanodiagnostics, we here show that toxicity testing using zebrafish embryos is easy, efficient and informative, and faithfully reflects, yet significantly extends, cell-based toxicity testing. We therefore expect that the zebrafish embryo assay will become a popular future tool for in vivo nanotoxicity screening.

  8. Comparison of Six Automated Treponema-Specific Antibody Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Borae G; Yoon, Jihoon G; Rim, John Hoon; Lee, Anna; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Six different Treponema (TP)-specific immunoassays were compared to the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) test. A total of 615 samples were tested. The overall percent agreement, analytical sensitivity, and analytical specificity of each assay compared to the FTA-ABS test were as follows: Architect Syphilis TP, 99.2%, 96.8%, and 100%; Cobas Syphilis, 99.8%, 99.4%, and 100%; ADVIA Centaur Syphilis, 99.8%, 99.4%, and 100%; HISCL Anti-TP assay kit, 99.7%, 98.7%, and 100%; Immunoticles Auto3 TP, 99.0%, 97.5%, and 99.6%; Mediace TPLA, 98.0%, 98.1%, and 98.0%. All results that were discrepant between the TP-specific assays were associated with samples from noninfectious cases (11 immunoassay false positives and 7 from previous syphilis cases). Our study demonstrated that TP-specific immunoassays generally showed high sensitivities, specificities, and percentages of agreement compared to FTA-ABS, with rare cases of false-positive or false-negative results. Therefore, most TP-specific immunoassays are acceptable for use in screening for syphilis. However, it is important to perform a thorough review of a patient's clinical and treatment history for interpreting the results of syphilis serology. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Show Horse Welfare: Horse Show Competitors' Understanding, Awareness, and Perceptions of Equine Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Melissa A; Hiney, Kristina; Richardson, Jennifer C; Waite, Karen; Borron, Abigail; Brady, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of stock-type horse show competitors' understanding of welfare and level of concern for stock-type show horses' welfare. Data were collected through an online questionnaire that included questions relating to (a) interest and general understanding of horse welfare, (b) welfare concerns of the horse show industry and specifically the stock-type horse show industry, (c) decision-making influences, and (d) level of empathic characteristics. The majority of respondents indicated they agree or strongly agree that physical metrics should be a factor when assessing horse welfare, while fewer agreed that behavioral and mental metrics should be a factor. Respondent empathy levels were moderate to high and were positively correlated with the belief that mental and behavioral metrics should be a factor in assessing horse welfare. Respondents indicated the inhumane practices that most often occur at stock-type shows include excessive jerking on reins, excessive spurring, and induced excessive unnatural movement. Additionally, respondents indicated association rules, hired trainers, and hired riding instructors are the most influential regarding the decisions they make related to their horses' care and treatment.

  10. Direct 125I-radioligand assays for serum progesterone compared with assays involving extraction of serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratcliffe, W.A.; Corrie, J.E.T.; Dalziel, A.H.; Macpherson, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    Two direct radioimmunoassays for progesterone in 50 μL of unextracted serum or plasma with assays involving extraction of serum were compared. The direct assays include the use of either danazol at pH 7.4 or 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid at pH 4.0 to displace progesterone from serum binding-proteins. Progesterone is then assayed by using an antiserum to a progesterone 11α-hemisuccinyl conjugate and the radioligand 125 I-labeled progesterone 11α-glucuronyl tyramine, with separation by double-antibody techniques. Direct assays with either displacing agent gave good analytical recovery of progesterone added to human serum, and progesterone values for patients' specimens correlated well (r > 0.96) with results of assays involving extraction of serum. Precision was similar with each displacing agent over the working range 2.5-100 nmol/L and superior to that of extraction assays. We conclude that these direct assays of progesterone are analytically valid and more robust, precise, and technically convenient than many conventional methods involving extraction of serum

  11. Automation of the anthrone assay for carbohydrate concentration determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turula, Vincent E; Gore, Thomas; Singh, Suddham; Arumugham, Rasappa G

    2010-03-01

    Reported is the adaptation of a manual polysaccharide assay applicable for glycoconjugate vaccines such as Prevenar to an automated liquid handling system (LHS) for improved performance. The anthrone assay is used for carbohydrate concentration determinations and was scaled to the microtiter plate format with appropriate mixing, dispensing, and measuring operations. Adaptation and development of the LHS platform was performed with both dextran polysaccharides of various sizes and pneumococcal serotype 6A polysaccharide (PnPs 6A). A standard plate configuration was programmed such that the LHS diluted both calibration standards and a test sample multiple times with six replicate preparations per dilution. This extent of replication minimized the effect of any single deviation or delivery error that might have occurred. Analysis of the dextran polymers ranging in size from 214 kDa to 3.755 MDa showed that regardless of polymer chain length the hydrolysis was complete, as evident by uniform concentration measurements. No plate positional absorbance bias was observed; of 12 plates analyzed to examine positional bias the largest deviation observed was 0.02% percent relative standard deviation (%RSD). The high purity dextran also afforded the opportunity to assess LHS accuracy; nine replicate analyses of dextran yielded a mean accuracy of 101% recovery. As for precision, a total of 22 unique analyses were performed on a single lot of PnPs 6A, and the resulting variability was 2.5% RSD. This work demonstrated the capability of a LHS to perform the anthrone assay consistently and a reduced assay cycle time for greater laboratory capacity.

  12. Multicenter Evaluation of Cystatin C Measurement after Assay Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Piéroni, Laurence; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Kuster, Nils; Delanaye, Pierre; Carlier, Marie-Christine; Fellahi, Soraya; Boutten, Anne; Lombard, Christine; González-Antuña, Ana; Delatour, Vincent; Cavalier, Etienne

    2017-04-01

    Since 2010, a certified reference material ERM-DA471/IFCC has been available for cystatin C (CysC). This study aimed to assess the sources of uncertainty in results for clinical samples measured using standardized assays. This evaluation was performed in 2015 and involved 7 clinical laboratories located in France and Belgium. CysC was measured in a panel of 4 serum pools using 8 automated assays and a candidate isotope dilution mass spectrometry reference measurement procedure. Sources of uncertainty (imprecision and bias) were evaluated to calculate the relative expanded combined uncertainty for each CysC assay. Uncertainty was judged against the performance specifications derived from the biological variation model. Only Siemens reagents on the Siemens systems and, to a lesser extent, DiaSys reagents on the Cobas system, provided results that met the minimum performance criterion calculated according to the intraindividual and interindividual biological variations. Although the imprecision was acceptable for almost all assays, an increase in the bias with concentration was observed for Gentian reagents, and unacceptably high biases were observed for Abbott and Roche reagents on their own systems. This comprehensive picture of the market situation since the release of ERM-DA471/IFCC shows that bias remains the major component of the combined uncertainty because of possible problems associated with the implementation of traceability. Although some manufacturers have clearly improved their calibration protocols relative to ERM-DA471, most of them failed to meet the criteria for acceptable CysC measurements. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  13. Assay optimization for molecular detection of Zika virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corman, Victor M.; Rasche, Andrea; Baronti, Cecile; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Cadar, Daniel; Reusken, Chantal Bem; Pas, Suzan D.; Goorhuis, Abraham; Schinkel, Janke; Molenkamp, Richard; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Bleicker, Tobias; Brünink, Sebastian; Eschbach-Bludau, Monika; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M.; Koopmans, Marion P.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Grobusch, Martin P.; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix

    2016-01-01

    To examine the diagnostic performance of real-time reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for Zika virus detection. We compared seven published real-time RT-PCR assays and two new assays that we have developed. To determine the analytical sensitivity of each assay, we

  14. Short communication. Microculture syncytia assay for bovine leukemia virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, P.S.; Castro, A.E.; Pomeroy, K.A.; Johnson, D.W.; Muscoplat, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    A microculture syncytia assay for the detection of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) has been described and compared with the conventional macroculture assay. The microculture assay required fewer indicator cells, was as sensitive as the macroculture assay and provided a reproducible test for the detection and titration of BLV.

  15. Nondestructive assay of subassemblies of various spent or fresh fuels by active neutron interrogation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragan, G.L.; Ricker, C.W.; Chiles, M.M.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Slaughter, G.G.

    1979-01-01

    Recent studies show that subassemblies containing various spent fuels could be assayed rapidly and accurately by a nondestructive assay system using active neutron interrogation and prompt-neutron detection. Subassembly penetration is achieved by 24-keV (Sb--Be) interrogation neutrons; the spent-fuel neutron background is overridden by using strong interrogating sources and prompt-neutron signals, and background gammas are absorbed by lead. Experiments have demonstrated the potential for assaying with better than 5% accuracy, three spent plutonium-fueled subassemblies per hour. Calculations, validated by experiments, predict even better performance for fresh or uranium-fueled subassemblies; several performance estimates are given

  16. A duplex endpoint PCR assay for rapid detection and differentiation of Leptospira strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benacer, Douadi; Zain, Siti Nursheena Mohd; Lewis, John W; Khalid, Mohd Khairul Nizam Mohd; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a duplex endpoint PCR assay for rapid detection and differentiation of Leptospira strains. Primers were designed to target the rrs (LG1/LG2) and ligB (LP1/LP2) genes to confirm the presence of the Leptospira genus and the pathogenic species, respectively. The assay showed 100% specificity against 17 Leptospira strains with a limit of detection of 23.1pg/µl of leptospiral DNA and sensitivity of 103 leptospires/ml in both spiked urine and water. Our duplex endpoint PCR assay is suitable for rapid early detection of Leptospira with high sensitivity and specificity.

  17. The influence of the number of cells scored on the sensitivity in the comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Soussaline, Françoise; Sallette, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    The impact on the sensitivity of the in vitro comet assay by increasing the number of cells scored has only been addressed in a few studies. The present study investigated whether the sensitivity of the assay could be improved by scoring more than 100 cells. Two cell lines and three different che...... of the assay. A two-way ANOVA analysis of variance showed that the contribution from the two variables “the number of cells scored” and “concentration” on the total variation in the coefficients of variance dataset was statistically significant (p...

  18. Comparison of three multiplex PCR assays for the detection of respiratory viral infections: evaluation of xTAG respiratory virus panel fast assay, RespiFinder 19 assay and RespiFinder SMART 22 assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabisch-Ruthe Mareike

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A broad spectrum of pathogens is causative for respiratory tract infections, but symptoms are mostly similar. Therefore, the identification of the causative viruses and bacteria is only feasible using multiplex PCR or several monoplex PCR tests in parallel. Methods The analytical sensitivity of three multiplex PCR assays, RespiFinder-19, RespiFinder-SMART-22 and xTAG-Respiratory-Virus-Panel-Fast-Assay (RVP, were compared to monoplex real-time PCR with quantified standardized control material. All assays include the most common respiratory pathogens. Results To compare the analytical sensitivity of the multiplex assays, samples were inoculated with 13 different quantified viruses in the range of 101 to 105 copies/ml. Concordant results were received for rhinovirus, whereas the RVP detected influenzavirus, RSV and hMPV more frequently in low concentrations. The RespiFinder-19 and the RespiFinder-SMART-22 showed a higher analytical sensitivity for adenoviruses and coronaviruses, whereas the RVP was incapable to detect adenovirus and coronavirus in concentrations of 104 copies/ml. The RespiFinder-19 and RespiFinder-SMART-22A did not detect influenzaviruses (104 copies/ml and RSV (103 copies/ml. The detection of all 13 viruses in one sample was only achieved using monoplex PCR. To analyze possible competitive amplification reactions between the different viruses, samples were further inoculated with only 4 different viruses in one sample. Compared to the detection of 13 viruses in parallel, only a few differences were found. The incidence of respiratory viruses was compared in tracheal secretion (TS samples (n = 100 of mechanically ventilated patients in winter (n = 50 and summer (n = 50. In winter, respiratory viruses were detected in 32 TS samples (64% by RespiFinder-19, whereas the detection rate with RVP was only 22%. The most frequent viruses were adenovirus (32% and PIV-2 (20%. Multiple infections were detected

  19. Best in show but not best shape: a photographic assessment of show dog body condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Such, Z R; German, A J

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that owners often wrongly perceive overweight dogs to be in normal condition. The body shape of dogs attending shows might influence owners' perceptions, with online images of overweight show winners having a negative effect. This was an observational in silico study of canine body condition. 14 obese-prone breeds and 14 matched non-obese-probe breeds were first selected, and one operator then used an online search engine to identify 40 images, per breed, of dogs that had appeared at a major national UK show (Crufts). After images were anonymised and coded, a second observer subjectively assessed body condition, in a single sitting, using a previously validated method. Of 1120 photographs initially identified, 960 were suitable for assessing body condition, with all unsuitable images being from longhaired breeds. None of the dogs (0 per cent) were underweight, 708 (74 per cent) were in ideal condition and 252 (26 per cent) were overweight. Pugs, basset hounds and Labrador retrievers were most likely to be overweight, while standard poodles, Rhodesian ridgebacks, Hungarian vizslas and Dobermanns were least likely to be overweight. Given the proportion of show dogs from some breeds that are overweight, breed standards should be redefined to be consistent with a dog in optimal body condition. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremastinou, J; Polymerou, V; Lavranos, D; Aranda Arrufat, A; Harwood, J; Martínez Lorenzo, M J; Ng, K P; Queiros, L; Vereb, I; Cusini, M

    2016-09-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. Copyright © 2016 Kremastinou et al.

  1. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremastinou, J.; Polymerou, V.; Lavranos, D.; Aranda Arrufat, A.; Harwood, J.; Martínez Lorenzo, M. J.; Ng, K. P.; Queiros, L.; Vereb, I.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum. The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  2. Detection of thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb) by radioreceptor assay (RRA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumrongpisutikul, S.; Tuchinda, S.

    1990-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb) were determined in 100 patients using radioreceptor assay (RRA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivity of RRA and ELISA were found to be 70.6% and 88.2% respectively (n=51). The specificity of both assays were 100% (n=16). With RRA as the standard test the sensitivity and specificity of ELISA were 75.8% and 86.8%. In the untreated hyperthyroid the RRA result which expressed as % specific 125 I-TSH inhibition was 33.6% (n=51), decline to 26.9% in the treated hyperthyroid (n=33) and 14.1% in the euthyroid (n=16). The mean 0.D 492nm of TRAb-ELISA were 0.861 in untreated hyperthyroid, 0.437 in treated hyperthyroid and 0.135 in euthyroid Phi coefficient analysis show that the RRA was 60.4% correlated to hyperthyroidism where as TRAb-ELISA was 80.1%

  3. Evaluation of Myc Gene Amplification in Prostate Cancer Using a Dual Color Chromogenic in-Situ Hybridization (Dual CISH) Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Lerda; Marta Cabrera; Jorge Flores; Luis Gutierrez; Armando Chierichetti; Martin Revol; Hernan Garcia Onto

    2013-01-01

    Objetive: The overall purpose of the study was to demonstrate applicability of the Dako dual-color chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) assay (DAKO Denmark, Glostrup) with respect to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes MYC-C. Methods: MYC gene amplification by FISH and Dako dual-color CISH Results: The study showed that the dual-color CISH assay can convert Texas red and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) signals into chromogenic signals. The dual –color CISH assay was p...

  4. Neutral Red versus MTT assay of cell viability in the presence of copper compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Perez, Mariela; Fourcade, Lyvia; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru; Paquin, Joanne

    2017-10-15

    Copper is essential for numerous physiological functions, and copper compounds may display therapeutic as well as cytotoxic effects. The MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay is a standard test largely used in cytotoxicity studies. This report shows that low micromolar levels of copper compounds such as Cu(II)Urea 2 , Cu(II)Ser 2 and CuCl 2 can interfere with the MTT assay making improper the detection of formazan product of MTT reduction. Comparatively, the Neutral Red assay appears to be sensitive and showing no interference with these compounds. The lactate dehydrogenase alternative assay cannot be used because of inhibitory effect of these copper compounds on the enzyme activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of different in vitro assays of inherent sensitivity as predictors of radiotherapy response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Chicago Univ., IL; Beckett, M.A.; Mustafi, R.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The inherent sensitivity of cells within a tumor plays an important role in the response of the tumor to radiotherapy. Clonogenic assays show that cells established from in-field radiotherapy failures are significantly more resistant to radiation than cell lines established from pre-treatment samples. Clonogenic assays fail to predict tumor response to radiotherapy, however. The failure might be due to the small sample size in this study, or the complicating factors of staging, surgery, and chemotherapy, and/or in vivo selection by radiotherapy for resistant tumor cells. In vitro selection for resistant cell lines does not appear to be a complicating factor. Nonclonogenic assays such as those that measure DNA strand break rejoining rates (filter elution, pulse-field gel electrophoresis) or chromosome structure (flow cytometric analysis) show promise as alternative rapid assays of radiation sensitivity and possibly tumor response. 16 refs., 2 figs

  6. C14 Assays and Autoradiographic Studies on the Rooster Comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, Endre A.; Szirmai, John A.; Bergendahl, Gudrun

    1959-01-01

    The distribution of C14 was studied in various parts of the rooster comb following treatment with testosterone. The value of gas-phase assay of C14 in tissue has been demonstrated and the results compared with those of autoradiographic studies on the same tissue. The results of these experiments showed that androgen treatment significantly increases the rate of incorporation of C14 in various parts of the comb. The specific activity of carbon in the comb, cornea, and liver differed, depending on which precursor, viz. glucose-6-C14, glucose-1-C14, and glucuronolactone-U-C14, was administered. The highest values were obtained after the administration of glucose-6-C14; glucuronolactone-U-C14 gave the lowest specific activity. The specific activity of carbon in different parts of the comb showed considerable variation. Carbon assay of serial sections of the comb cut at various planes showed that the specific activity of carbon was highest in the mucoid layer. Both C14 assays and autoradiograms indicate that C14 is also present in other parts of the comb. As seen in autoradiography, the concentration of C14 was highest in the epithelium, in the blood vessel walls, and in the avascular collagenous tissue. These results, and indications from previous studies, suggest that the high specific activity of carbon in the mucoid layer is due mainly to the presence of C14-labelled hyaluronic acid. Autoradiograms and PAS staining suggest that a significant amount of C14 is also incorporated into the glycoproteins associated with the collagen fibers. PMID:13654453

  7. Use of the Brucella IgM and IgG flow assays in the serodiagnosis of human brucellosis in an area endemic for brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irmak, Hasan; Buzgan, Turan; Evirgen, Omer; Akdeniz, Hayrettin; Demiroz, A. Pekcan; Abdoel, Theresia H.; Smits, Henk L.

    2004-01-01

    The clinical utility of two complementary tests for brucellosis, the Brucella IgM and IgG flow assays, was evaluated in a hospital in eastern Turkey. The results show that the flow assays are convenient diagnostic tests for use in endemic areas. A positive result in the flow assays was obtained in

  8. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on three sex steroids in two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and in the H295R cell assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Nellemann, Christine

    2015-01-01

    shown to inhibit the aromatase enzyme in both types of aromatase assays. The IC50 values ranged from 3 to 600μM. All five SSRIs, were further investigated in the H295R cell line. All compounds altered the steroid secretion from the cells, the lowest observed effect levels were 0.9μM and 3.1μ....... In this study we investigated whether the endocrine effect due to SSRI exposure could be detected in well adopted in vitro steroidogenesis assays, two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and the H295R cell assay. The five drugs citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline, were......M for sertraline and fluvoxamine, respectively. In general the H295R cell assay was more sensitive to SSRI exposure than the two aromatase assays, up to 20 times more sensitive. This indicates that the H295R cell line is a better tool for screening endocrine disrupting effects. Our findings show that the endocrine...

  9. The microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay: the role of a drug-induced apoptosis assay in drug development and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosserman, Linda; Prendergast, Franklyn; Herbst, Roy; Fleisher, Martin; Salom, Emery; Strickland, Steven; Raptis, Anastasios; Hallquist, Allan; Perree, Mathieu; Rajurkar, Swapnil; Karimi, Misagh; Rogers, Karl; Davidson, Dirk; Willis, Carl; Penalver, Manuel; Homesley, Howard; Burrell, Matthew; Garrett, Audrey; Rutledge, James; Chernick, Michael; Presant, Cary A

    2012-08-15

    A drug-induced apoptosis assay, termed the microculture-kinetic (MiCK) assay, has been developed. Blinded clinical trials have shown higher response rates and longer survival in groups of patients with acute myelocytic leukemia and epithelial ovarian cancer who have been treated with drugs that show high apoptosis in the MiCK assay. Unblinded clinical trials in multiple tumor types have shown that the assay will be used frequently by clinicians to determine treatment, and when used, results in higher response rates, longer times to relapse, and longer survivals. Model economic analyses suggest possible cost savings in clinical use based on increased generic drug use and single-agent substitution for combination therapies. Two initial studies with drugs in development are promising. The assay may help reduce costs and speed time to drug approval. Correlative studies with molecular biomarkers are planned. This assay may have a role both in personalized clinical therapy and in more efficient drug development. ©2012 AACR.

  10. Improvement of a real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of enterovirus RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruynseels Peggy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe an improvement of an earlier reported real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of enterovirus RNA, based on the 5' exonuclease digestion of a dual-labeled fluorogenic probe by Taq DNA polymerase. A different extraction method, real-time RT-PCR instrument and primer set were evaluated. Our data show that the optimized assay yields a higher sensitivity and reproducibility and resulted in a significant reduced hands-on time per sample.

  11. Enhancing Protease Activity Assay in Droplet-Based Microfluidics Using a Biomolecule Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hung; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Song, Yong-Ak; Miller, Miles A.; Kim, Sung Jae; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Han, Jongyoon

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an integrated microfluidic device consisting of a biomolecule concentrator and a microdroplet generator, which enhances the limited sensitivity of low-abundance enzyme assays by concentrating biomolecules before encapsulating them into droplet microreactors. We used this platform to detect ultra low levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) from diluted cellular supernatant and showed that it significantly (∼10-fold) reduced the time required to complete the assay and the sample volume used. PMID:21671557

  12. Storage and Assay of Tritium in STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, Glen R.; Anderl, Robert A.; Pawelko, Robert J.; Stoots, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is currently being commissioned to investigate tritium-related safety questions for fusion and other technologies. The tritium inventory for the STAR facility will be maintained below 1.5 g to avoid the need for STAR to be classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. A key capability in successful operation of the STAR facility is the ability to receive, inventory, and dispense tritium to the various experiments underway there. The system central to that function is the Tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS).The SAS has four major functions: (1) receiving and holding tritium, (2) assaying, (3) dispensing, and (4) purifying hydrogen isotopes from non-hydrogen species.This paper describes the design and operation of the STAR SAS and the procedures used for tritium accountancy in the STAR facility

  13. Radioligand purification prior to routine receptor assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Goff, J.-M.; Berthois, Y.; Martin, P.-M.

    1988-01-01

    The need to repurify the commercially available radioligands [ 3 H]estradiol and [ 3 H]testosterone before use in routine assays was investigated. Storage of these products for 2 months after delivery led to appreciable degradation of [ 3 H]estradiol compared to [ 3 H]testosterone. Unexpectedly, TLC and even HPLC procedures were ineffective in completely restoring the purity of [ 3 H]-estradiol and the unremoved polar products induced important variations in our estrogen receptor assays. An increase in non-specific binding and a concomitant decrease in total binding were observed resulting in an underestimation of specific binding sites and of the affinity constant. In some cases Scatchard analysis was not possible. The authors therefore strongly recommend the repurification of low-stability radioligands and propose an economic time-saving procedure for the purification of [ 3 H]estradiol by solvent differential partition which requires no high-cost investment in apparatus. (author)

  14. Assay of 25-OH vitamin D3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayer, P. de; Thalasso, M.; Beckers, C.

    1977-01-01

    A simplified version of the competitive protein binding assay for 25-OH vit D3 derived from the method of Belsey et al. is presented. The procedure does not include a chromatography step, and is performed on an alcoolic extract of 0.1 ml plasma or serum. Normal rat serum (1:20,000) was used as binding protein. No β-lipoproteins were added to the assay buffer. A 10% displacement of the tracer was observed at 0.04 ng/tube, and 50% at 0.15 ng/tube, allowing for the measurement of 25-OH vit D3 concentrations between 2 ng/ml and 200 ng/ml. Mean values in a normal group was 23.1 +- 6.5 ng/ml (range 16-37 ng/ml, n = 11). (orig.) [de

  15. Developments in plutonium waste assay at AWE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T J

    2009-01-01

    In 2002 a paper was presented at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) on the assay of low level plutonium (Pu) in soft drummed waste (Miller 2002 INMM Ann. Meeting (Orlando, FL, 23-27 July 2002)). The technique described enabled the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), at Aldermaston in the UK, to meet the stringent Low Level Waste Repository at Drigg (LLWRD) conditions for acceptance for the first time. However, it was initially applied to only low density waste streams because it relied on measuring the relatively low energy (60 keV) photon yield from Am-241 during growth. This paper reviews the results achieved when using the technique to assay over 10 000 waste packages and presents the case for extending the range of application to denser waste streams.

  16. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I.; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of (le)100-g 239 Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

  17. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Lipase Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Lomolino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An easy and fast gel diffusion assay for detecting and monitoring lipase activity by quantification of fluorescein is described. By measuring the intensity of fluorescein, it is possible to obtain a calibration curve with a regression coefficient better than by using the radius of fluorescent haloes. Through the quantification of fluorescence intensity of fluorescein released after the hydrolysis of a fluorescent ester, fluorescein dibutyrate, used as substrate in agar plates, commercial and skimmed milk lipase activity were studied. Moreover, with this method, lipase activity can be monitored in reaction medium that contains compounds which are affected by turbidity or cause measurement interference for UV-spectrophotometer and fluorimeter. In this experiment, boiled skimmed milk was dispersed in the agar gel with fluorescein dibutyrate, and it was used as a reaction medium to mimic natural conditions. The development of such an assay has a potential for applications in industries ranging from pharmaceuticals to food production and monitoring.

  18. Expert system technology for nondestructive waste assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.K.; Determan, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Nondestructive assay waste characterization data generated for use in the National TRU Program must be of known and demonstrable quality. Each measurement is required to receive an independent technical review by a qualified expert. An expert system prototype has been developed to automate waste NDA data review of a passive/active neutron drum counter system. The expert system is designed to yield a confidence rating regarding measurement validity. Expert system rules are derived from data in a process involving data clustering, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms. Expert system performance is assessed against confidence assignments elicited from waste NDA domain experts. Performance levels varied for the active, passive shielded, and passive system assay modes of the drum counter system, ranging from 78% to 94% correct classifications

  19. Quantitative relationship between the local lymph node assay and human skin sensitization assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Akkan, Z

    2004-06-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is a new test method which allows for the quantitative assessment of sensitizing potency in the mouse. Here, we investigate the quantitative correlation between results from the LLNA and two human sensitization tests--specifically, human repeat insult patch tests (HRIPTs) and human maximization tests (HMTs). Data for 57 substances were evaluated, of which 46 showed skin sensitizing properties in human tests, whereas 11 yielded negative results in humans. For better comparability data from mouse and human tests were transformed to applied doses per skin area, which ranged over four orders of magnitude for the substances considered. Regression analysis for the 46 human sensitizing substances revealed a significant positive correlation between the LLNA and human tests. The correlation was better between LLNA and HRIPT data (n=23; r=0.77) than between LLNA and HMT data (n=38; r=0.65). The observed scattering of data points is related to various uncertainties, in part associated with insufficiencies of data from older HMT studies. Predominantly negative results in the LLNA for another 11 substances which showed no skin sensitizing activity in human maximization tests further corroborate the correspondence between LLNA and human tests. Based on this analysis, the LLNA can be considered a reliable basis for relative potency assessments for skin sensitizers. Proposals are made for the regulatory exploitation of the LLNA: four potency groups can be established, and assignment of substances to these groups according to the outcome of the LLNA can be used to characterize skin sensitizing potency in substance-specific assessments. Moreover, based on these potency groups, a more adequate consideration of sensitizing substances in preparations becomes possible. It is proposed to replace the current single concentration limit for skin sensitizers in preparations, which leads to an all or nothing classification of a preparation as sensitizing to

  20. LDLCHOLESTEROLEXAMINATION (LDL-C USINGHOMOGENEOUS ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made DwiAmbara Putra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous method describe as a method that does not require separation of free and bound label. This method has the ability tofully automate the determination of LDL-C directly small sample volume sand short examination time. In addition this method use automated pipette and control of time and temperature more accurate. There are 5 methods i.e. Solubilization homogeneous LDL-C assay (SOL from KyowaMedex, Surfactant LDL-C assay (SUR from Daiichi Pure Chemicals, Protecting LDL-assay reagent (PRO from Wako Chemicals, LDL-C assaycatalase (CAT Denka Seiken and Calixarene of LDL-C assay (CAL from International Reagents Corporation. All method is to use a variety of detergents and other chemicals that cause blocking or dissolution of specific lipoprotein classes to achieve specificity for LDL. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  1. Assaying the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabb, D.W.; Minth, C.D.; Dixon, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    These experiments document the presence of enzymatic activities in extracts of commonly used cell lines which interfere with the determination of CAT activity. We suspect that the deacetylase activity is the most important, as the extract of the H4IIE C3 cells was capable of completely deacetylating the mono- and diacetylchloramphenicol formed during a 2-hr incubation of CAT with chloramphenicol and acetyl-CoA. The results of the inhibitor experiments are consistent with the presence of proteases which degrade CAT, or a serine carboxylesterase. The interference was also reduced by about half by EDTA; a metalloenzyme (either a protease or esterase) may therefore be involved. This interference appears to be a common phenomenon. We have surveyed 23 different cell types for the presence of the interfering activity and found it in 15. The interference was particularly prominent in several neuroendocrine and hepatoma cells. We took advantage of the effect of EDTA and the heat stability of CAT to eliminate the interference. Addition of 5 mM EDTA and a 10-min incubation of the sonicated cell suspension at 60 degrees prior to centrifugation abolished the interference in all cell lines tested. It is important to note that in order to reveal any CAT activity in some of the extracts (e.g., PC-12 or Hep3B), it was necessary to run the CAT assay for 2 hr. The control assays were therefore run almost to completion, and were well beyond the linear range of the assay. Therefore, the small differences which we observed between the heat-treated and control samples in some instances (e.g., rice, corn, or HeLa cells) will be dramatically amplified when the CAT assay is performed under conditions in which only a small percentage of the substrate is converted to product

  2. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), also known as “gel shift assay”, is used to examine the binding parameters and relative affinities of protein and DNA interactions. We produced recombinant CCA1 protein and tested its binding affinity for the promoter fragments that contain CBS (AAAAATCT) or evening element (EE, AAAATATCT) (1) using a modified procedure adopted from published protocols (2,3).

  3. Nondestructive assay methodologies in nuclear forensics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomar, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    In the present chapter, the nondestructive assay (NDA) methodologies used for analysis of nuclear materials as a part of nuclear forensic investigation have been described. These NDA methodologies are based on (i) measurement of passive gamma and neutrons emitted by the radioisotopes present in the nuclear materials, (ii) measurement of gamma rays and neutrons emitted after the active interrogation of the nuclear materials with a source of X-rays, gamma rays or neutrons

  4. Methods and devices for protein assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Swapnil [San Jose, CA; Cintron, Jose M [Indianapolis, IN; Shediac, Renee [Oakland, CA

    2009-11-03

    Methods and devices for protein assays based on Edman degradation in microfluidic channels are disclosed herein. As disclosed, the cleaved amino acid residues may be immobilized in an array format and identified by detectable labels, such as antibodies, which specifically bind given amino acid residues. Alternatively, the antibodies are immobilized in an array format and the cleaved amino acids are labeled identified by being bound by the antibodies in the array.

  5. Quality control of estrogen receptor assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godolphin, W; Jacobson, B

    1980-01-01

    Four types of material have been used for the quality control of routine assays of estrogen receptors in human breast tumors. Pieces of hormone-dependent Nb rat mammary tumors gave a precision about 40%. Rat uteri and rat tumors pulverized at liquid nitrogen temperature and stored as powder yielded precision about 30%. Powdered and lyophilised human tumors appear the best with precision as good as 17%.

  6. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments.

  7. Chromosome aberration assays in barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, M J [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville; Nilan, R A

    1982-01-01

    Barley is an exceellent organism for studies of induced chromosome aberrations because of its few (2n = 2x = 14) relatively large chromosomes. Root-tip and shoot-tip cells have been used extensively for the study of ionizing radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. The general procedures are well known, the technology is simple and easy to learn, and the assays are relatively quick and inexpensive. Both root tips and shoot tips can be used for the study of chemical mutagens as well as ionizing radiations. Pollen mother cells are well suited for studying the effects of mutagens on meiotic chromosomes. The literature review for the Gene-Tox Program reported on 61 chemicals tested for their effects on barley chromosomes. Of these, 90% were reported to be either positive or positive dose-related, while 7% were negative and 3% were questionable. Barley assays based on chromosomal aberrations are useful to detect the clastogenic potency of chemicals under laboratory conditions. Indications are that the data from barley can be used to corroborate data obtained from other organisms. Among the classes of chemicals assayed were: alcohols and phenols; alkaloids; epoxides; alkyl sulfates; amides and sulfonamides; aromatic amines; aryl halides; aziridines; alkenes; carbamates; hydroazides; nitroaromatics; nitrosamides; nitrosources; phenothiazines; and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  8. Radioreceptor assays: plasma membrane receptors and assays for polypeptide and glycoprotein hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulster, D.

    1977-01-01

    Receptors for peptide, protein and glycoprotein hormones, and the catecholamines are located on the plasma membranes of their target cells. Preparations of the receptors may be used as specific, high-affinity binding agents for these hormones in assay methodology akin to that for radioimmunoassay. A particular advantage of the radioreceptor assay is that it has a specificity directed towards the biologically active region of the hormone, rather than to some immunologically active region that may have little (or no) involvement in the expression of hormonal activity. Methods for hormone receptor preparation vary greatly, and range from the use of intact cells (as the source of hormone receptor) to the use of purified or solubilized membrane receptors. Receptors isolated from plasma membranes have proved to be of variable stability, and may be damaged during preparation and/or storage. Moreover, since they are present in relatively low concentration in the cell, their preparation in sufficient quantity for use in a radioreceptor assay may present technical problems. In general, there is good correlation between radioreceptor assays and in-vitro bioassays; differences between results from radioreceptor assays and radioimmunoassays are similar to those noted between in-vitro bioassays and radioimmunoassays. The sensitivity of the method is such that normal plasma concentrations of various hormones have been assayed by this technique. (author)

  9. A European multicenter study on the analytical performance of the VERIS HBV assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Izopet, Jacques; Lombardi, Alessandra; Mancon, Alessandro; Marcos, Maria Angeles; Sauné, Karine; O Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    Hepatitis B viral load monitoring is an essential part of managing patients with chronic Hepatits B infection. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HBV Assay for use on the fully automated Beckman Coulter DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. 1 OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the analytical performance of the VERIS HBV Assay at multiple European virology laboratories. Precision, analytical sensitivity, negative sample performance, linearity and performance with major HBV genotypes/subtypes for the VERIS HBV Assay was evaluated. Precision showed an SD of 0.15 log 10 IU/mL or less for each level tested. Analytical sensitivity determined by probit analysis was between 6.8-8.0 IU/mL. Clinical specificity on 90 unique patient samples was 100.0%. Performance with 754 negative samples demonstrated 100.0% not detected results, and a carryover study showed no cross contamination. Linearity using clinical samples was shown from 1.23-8.23 log 10 IU/mL and the assay detected and showed linearity with major HBV genotypes/subtypes. The VERIS HBV Assay demonstrated comparable analytical performance to other currently marketed assays for HBV DNA monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Data showing the circumvention of oxaliplatin resistance by vatalanib in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kenneth K W; Poon, Daniel C; Wei, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Lin, Ge; Fu, Li-Wu

    2016-06-01

    We have recently reported that vatalanib, an orally active small molecule multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Hess-Stumpp et al., 2005 [1]), can sensitize multidrug resistant (MDR) colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia by inhibiting two MDR transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 (To et al., 2015 [2]). This data article describes the possible circumvention of resistance to specifically platinum (Pt)-based anticancer drugs by vatalanib via inhibition of two other efflux transporters ABCC2 and ATP7A. Data from the flow cytometric transporter efflux assay showed specific inhibition of ABCC2 activity by vatalanib in stable transfected cells and ABCC2-overexpressing oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells HCT116/Oxa. We also performed the transporter ABCC2 ATPase assay and showed an increase in ATP hydrolysis by ABCC2 in the presence of vatalanib. ATP7A mRNA expression was also shown to be upregulated in HCT116/Oxa cells. Vatalanib was shown to suppress this upregulated ATP7A expression. Data from the cellular Pt accumulation assay showed a lower Pt accumulation in HCT116/Oxa cells than the parental sensitive HCT116 cells. Vatalanib was shown to increase cellular Pt accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination of oxaliplatin and vatalanib was shown to restore the suppressed apoptosis in HCT116/Oxa cells.

  11. Data showing the circumvention of oxaliplatin resistance by vatalanib in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K.W. To

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that vatalanib, an orally active small molecule multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Hess-Stumpp et al., 2005 [1], can sensitize multidrug resistant (MDR colon cancer cells to chemotherapy under hypoxia by inhibiting two MDR transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 (To et al., 2015 [2]. This data article describes the possible circumvention of resistance to specifically platinum (Pt-based anticancer drugs by vatalanib via inhibition of two other efflux transporters ABCC2 and ATP7A. Data from the flow cytometric transporter efflux assay showed specific inhibition of ABCC2 activity by vatalanib in stable transfected cells and ABCC2-overexpressing oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells HCT116/Oxa. We also performed the transporter ABCC2 ATPase assay and showed an increase in ATP hydrolysis by ABCC2 in the presence of vatalanib. ATP7A mRNA expression was also shown to be upregulated in HCT116/Oxa cells. Vatalanib was shown to suppress this upregulated ATP7A expression. Data from the cellular Pt accumulation assay showed a lower Pt accumulation in HCT116/Oxa cells than the parental sensitive HCT116 cells. Vatalanib was shown to increase cellular Pt accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination of oxaliplatin and vatalanib was shown to restore the suppressed apoptosis in HCT116/Oxa cells.

  12. Tomato Fruits Show Wide Phenomic Diversity but Fruit Developmental Genes Show Low Genomic Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijee Mohan

    Full Text Available Domestication of tomato has resulted in large diversity in fruit phenotypes. An intensive phenotyping of 127 tomato accessions from 20 countries revealed extensive morphological diversity in fruit traits. The diversity in fruit traits clustered the accessions into nine classes and identified certain promising lines having desirable traits pertaining to total soluble salts (TSS, carotenoids, ripening index, weight and shape. Factor analysis of the morphometric data from Tomato Analyzer showed that the fruit shape is a complex trait shared by several factors. The 100% variance between round and flat fruit shapes was explained by one discriminant function having a canonical correlation of 0.874 by stepwise discriminant analysis. A set of 10 genes (ACS2, COP1, CYC-B, RIN, MSH2, NAC-NOR, PHOT1, PHYA, PHYB and PSY1 involved in various plant developmental processes were screened for SNP polymorphism by EcoTILLING. The genetic diversity in these genes revealed a total of 36 non-synonymous and 18 synonymous changes leading to the identification of 28 haplotypes. The average frequency of polymorphism across the genes was 0.038/Kb. Significant negative Tajima'D statistic in two of the genes, ACS2 and PHOT1 indicated the presence of rare alleles in low frequency. Our study indicates that while there is low polymorphic diversity in the genes regulating plant development, the population shows wider phenotype diversity. Nonetheless, morphological and genetic diversity of the present collection can be further exploited as potential resources in future.

  13. Development of an opioid self-administration assay to study drug seeking in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Gabriel D; Peterson, Randall T

    2017-09-29

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become an excellent tool to study mental health disorders, due to its physiological and genetic similarity to humans, ease of genetic manipulation, and feasibility of small molecule screening. Zebrafish have been shown to exhibit characteristics of addiction to drugs of abuse in non-contingent assays, including conditioned place preference, but contingent assays have been limited to a single assay for alcohol consumption. Using inexpensive electronic, mechanical, and optical components, we developed an automated opioid self-administration assay for zebrafish, enabling us to measure drug seeking and gain insight into the underlying biological pathways. Zebrafish trained in the assay for five days exhibited robust self-administration, which was dependent on the function of the μ-opioid receptor. In addition, a progressive ratio protocol was used to test conditioned animals for motivation. Furthermore, conditioned fish continued to seek the drug despite an adverse consequence and showed signs of stress and anxiety upon withdrawal of the drug. Finally, we validated our assay by confirming that self-administration in zebrafish is dependent on several of the same molecular pathways as in other animal models. Given the ease and throughput of this assay, it will enable identification of important biological pathways regulating drug seeking and could lead to the development of new therapeutic molecules to treat addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A rapid enzymatic assay for high-throughput screening of adenosine-producing strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huina; Zu, Xin; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a major local regulator of tissue function and industrially useful as precursor for the production of medicinal nucleoside substances. High-throughput screening of adenosine overproducers is important for industrial microorganism breeding. An enzymatic assay of adenosine was developed by combined adenosine deaminase (ADA) with indophenol method. The ADA catalyzes the cleavage of adenosine to inosine and NH3, the latter can be accurately determined by indophenol method. The assay system was optimized to deliver a good performance and could tolerate the addition of inorganic salts and many nutrition components to the assay mixtures. Adenosine could be accurately determined by this assay using 96-well microplates. Spike and recovery tests showed that this assay can accurately and reproducibly determine increases in adenosine in fermentation broth without any pretreatment to remove proteins and potentially interfering low-molecular-weight molecules. This assay was also applied to high-throughput screening for high adenosine-producing strains. The high selectivity and accuracy of the ADA assay provides rapid and high-throughput analysis of adenosine in large numbers of samples. PMID:25580842

  15. Amelioration of oxidative stress by anthraquinones in various in vitro assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The use of natural phytoconstituents for food and as nutritional supplements is an easiest way to be healthier. Anthraquinone pigments have been traditionally used for various purposes viz. food colorants, textile staining, color paints and medicines. Rubia cordifolia L. is a perennial, herbaceous climbing plant belonging to family Rubiaceae. This plant contain substantial amounts of anthraquinones, especially in the roots. The present study deals with the bioactivity evaluation of phytoconstituents viz. alizarin and purpurin from Rubia cordifolia. Methods: The DNA protective and antioxidant potential of alizarin and purpurin was evaluated using different in vitro assays viz. DNA protection assay, ABTS assay, DPPH assay, Ferric ion reduction potential and Phosphomolybdenum assay. Results: Alizarin and purpurin exhibited good free radical scavenging activity in various assays. In DNA protection assay, alizarin showed more DNA protection against hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton ’s reagent in comparison to purpurin. Conclusions: Being potent antioxidants, these natural coloring compounds can be boon to the food industry as nutraceuticals. Further, these phytochemicals can be explored for their anticancer activity and may serve as potent cancer chemopreventive molecules.

  16. A Highly Sensitive Telomerase Activity Assay that Eliminates False-Negative Results Caused by PCR Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenobu Yaku

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR on magnetic beads (MBs and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGGn-3' of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity.

  17. Assaying locomotor, learning, and memory deficits in Drosophila models of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Yousuf O; Escala, Wilfredo; Ruan, Kai; Zhai, R Grace

    2011-03-11

    Advances in genetic methods have enabled the study of genes involved in human neurodegenerative diseases using Drosophila as a model system. Most of these diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease are characterized by age-dependent deterioration in learning and memory functions and movement coordination. Here we use behavioral assays, including the negative geotaxis assay and the aversive phototaxic suppression assay (APS assay), to show that some of the behavior characteristics associated with human neurodegeneration can be recapitulated in flies. In the negative geotaxis assay, the natural tendency of flies to move against gravity when agitated is utilized to study genes or conditions that may hinder locomotor capacities. In the APS assay, the learning and memory functions are tested in positively-phototactic flies trained to associate light with aversive bitter taste and hence avoid this otherwise natural tendency to move toward light. Testing these trained flies 6 hours post-training is used to assess memory functions. Using these assays, the contribution of any genetic or environmental factors toward developing neurodegeneration can be easily studied in flies.

  18. Simultaneous Multiple MS Binding Assays Addressing D1 and D2 Dopamine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Marion; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T

    2017-10-09

    MS Binding Assays are a label-free alternative to radioligand binding assays. They provide basically the same capabilities as the latter, but use a non-labeled reporter ligand instead of a radioligand. In contrast to radioligand binding assays, MS Binding Assays offer-owing to the selectivity of mass spectrometric detection-the opportunity to monitor the binding of different reporter ligands at different targets simultaneously. The present study shows a proof of concept for this strategy as exemplified for MS Binding Assays selectively addressing D 1 and D 2 dopamine receptors in a single binding experiment. A highly sensitive, rapid and robust LC-ESI-MS/MS quantification method capable of quantifying both SCH23390 and raclopride, selectively addressing D 1 and D 2 receptors, respectively, was established and validated for this purpose. Based thereon, simultaneous saturation and competition experiments with SCH23390 and raclopride in the presence of both D 1 and D 2 receptors were performed and analyzed by LC-MS/MS within a single chromatographic cycle. The present study thus demonstrates the feasibility of this strategy and the high versatility of MS Binding Assays that appears to surpass that common for conventional radioligand binding assays. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. European Multicenter Study on Analytical Performance of Veris HIV-1 Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Hofmann, Jörg; Izopet, Jacques; Kalus, Ulrich; Lombardi, Alessandra; Marcos, Maria Angeles; Mileto, Davide; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel W

    2017-07-01

    The analytical performance of the Veris HIV-1 assay for use on the new, fully automated Beckman Coulter DxN Veris molecular diagnostics system was evaluated at 10 European virology laboratories. The precision, analytical sensitivity, performance with negative samples, linearity, and performance with HIV-1 groups/subtypes were evaluated. The precision for the 1-ml assay showed a standard deviation (SD) of 0.14 log 10 copies/ml or less and a coefficient of variation (CV) of ≤6.1% for each level tested. The 0.175-ml assay showed an SD of 0.17 log 10 copies/ml or less and a CV of ≤5.2% for each level tested. The analytical sensitivities determined by probit analysis were 19.3 copies/ml for the 1-ml assay and 126 copies/ml for the 0.175-ml assay. The performance with 1,357 negative samples demonstrated 99.2% with not detected results. Linearity using patient samples was shown from 1.54 to 6.93 log 10 copies/ml. The assay performed well, detecting and showing linearity with all HIV-1 genotypes tested. The Veris HIV-1 assay demonstrated analytical performance comparable to that of currently marketed HIV-1 assays. (DxN Veris products are Conformité Européenne [CE]-marked in vitro diagnostic products. The DxN Veris product line has not been submitted to the U.S. FDA and is not available in the U.S. market. The DxN Veris molecular diagnostics system is also known as the Veris MDx molecular diagnostics system and the Veris MDx system.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. A European multicientre study on the comparison of HBV viral loads between VERIS HBV assay and Roche COBAS® TAQMAN® HBV test, Abbott RealTime HBV assay, Siemens VERSANT HBV assay, and Qiagen artus HBV RG kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Izopet, Jacques; Lombardi, Alessandra; Marcos, MaAngeles; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Hepatitis B viral load testing is essential to treatment and monitoring decisions in patients with chronic Hepatitis B. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HBV Assay (Veris) for use on the fully automated DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. 1 OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical performance of the Veris HBV Assay at multiple EU laboratories STUDY DESIGN: Method comparison was performed with a total of 344 plasma specimens from HBV infected patients tested with Veris and COBAS ® TaqMan ® HBV Test (Cobas), 207 specimens tested with Veris and RealTime HBV Assay (RealTime), 86 specimens tested with Veris and VERSANT ® HBV Assay (Versant), and 74 specimens tested with Veris and artus ® HBV RG PCR kit (artus). Bland-Altman analysis showed average bias of -0.46 log 10 IU/mL between Veris and Cobas, -0.46 log 10 IU/mL between Veris and RealTime, -0.36 log 10 IU/mL between Veris and Versant, and -0.12 log 10 IU/mL between Veris and artus. Bias was consistent across the assay range. Patient monitoring results using Veris demonstrated similar viral load trends over time to Cobas, RealTime, and artus. The VERIS HBV Assay demonstrated comparable clinical performance, with varying degrees of negative bias, compared to other currently marketed assays for HBV DNA monitoring. This negative bias should be taken into consideration if switching monitoring methods to Veris. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Polymerase chain reaction assay targeting cytochrome b gene for the detection of dog meat adulteration in meatball formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahfujur; Ali, Md Eaqub; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Hashim, Uda; Hanapi, Ummi Kalthum

    2014-08-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the assessment of dog meat adulteration in meatballs was developed. The assay selectively amplified a 100-bp region of canine mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from pure, raw, processed and mixed backgrounds. The specificity of the assay was tested against 11 animals and 3 plants species, commonly available for meatball formulation. The stability of the assay was proven under extensively autoclaving conditions that breakdown target DNA. A blind test from ready to eat chicken and beef meatballs showed that the assay can repeatedly detect 0.2% canine meat tissues under complex matrices using 0.04 ng of dog DNA extracted from differentially treated meatballs. The simplicity, stability and sensitivity of the assay suggested that it could be used in halal food industry for the authentication of canine derivatives in processed foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MS transport assays for γ-aminobutyric acid transporters--an efficient alternative for radiometric assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T

    2014-08-05

    Transport assays for neurotransmitters based on radiolabeled substrates are widely spread and often indispensable in basic research and the drug development process, although the use of radioisotopes is inherently coupled to issues concerning radioactive waste and safety precautions. To overcome these disadvantages, we developed mass spectrometry (MS)-based transport assays for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). These "MS Transport Assays" provide all capabilities of [(3)H]GABA transport assays and therefore represent the first substitute for the latter. The performance of our approach is demonstrated for GAT1, the most important GABA transporter (GAT) subtype. As GABA is endogenously present in COS-7 cells employed as hGAT1 expression system, ((2)H6)GABA was used as a substrate to differentiate transported from endogenous GABA. To record transported ((2)H6)GABA, a highly sensitive, short, robust, and reliable HILIC-ESI-MS/MS quantification method using ((2)H2)GABA as an internal standard was developed and validated according to the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) guidelines. Based on this LC-MS quantification, a setup to characterize hGAT1 mediated ((2)H6)GABA transport in a 96-well format was established, that enables automated processing and avoids any sample preparation. The K(m) value for ((2)H6)GABA determined for hGAT1 is in excellent agreement with results obtained from [(3)H]GABA uptake assays. In addition, the established assay format enables efficient determination of the inhibitory potency of GAT1 inhibitors, is capable of identifying those inhibitors transported as substrates, and furthermore allows characterization of efflux. The approach described here combines the strengths of LC-MS/MS with the high efficiency of transport assays based on radiolabeled substrates and is applicable to all GABA transporter subtypes.

  3. Evaluation of Multiplexed Foot-and-Mouth Disease Nonstructural Protein Antibody Assay Against Standardized Bovine Serum Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, J; Parida, S; Clavijo, A

    2007-05-14

    Liquid array technology has previously been used to show proof-of-principle of a multiplexed non structural protein serological assay to differentiate foot-and-mouth infected and vaccinated animals. The current multiplexed assay consists of synthetically produced peptide signatures 3A, 3B and 3D and recombinant protein signature 3ABC in combination with four controls. To determine diagnostic specificity of each signature in the multiplex, the assay was evaluated against a naive population (n = 104) and a vaccinated population (n = 94). Subsequently, the multiplexed assay was assessed using a panel of bovine sera generated by the World Reference Laboratory for foot-and-mouth disease in Pirbright, UK. This sera panel has been used to assess the performance of other singleplex ELISA-based non-structural protein antibody assays. The 3ABC signature in the multiplexed assay showed comparative performance to a commercially available non-structural protein 3ABC ELISA (Cedi test{reg_sign}) and additional information pertaining to the relative diagnostic sensitivity of each signature in the multiplex is acquired in one experiment. The encouraging results of the evaluation of the multiplexed assay against a panel of diagnostically relevant samples promotes further assay development and optimization to generate an assay for routine use in foot-and-mouth disease surveillance.

  4. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references

  5. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  6. Predicting changes in cardiac myocyte contractility during early drug discovery with in vitro assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, M.J., E-mail: michael.morton@astrazeneca.com [Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Armstrong, D.; Abi Gerges, N. [Drug Safety and Metabolism, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Bridgland-Taylor, M. [Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Pollard, C.E.; Bowes, J.; Valentin, J.-P. [Drug Safety and Metabolism, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular-related adverse drug effects are a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Activity of an investigational drug at the L-type calcium channel could manifest in a number of ways, including changes in cardiac contractility. The aim of this study was to define which of the two assay technologies – radioligand-binding or automated electrophysiology – was most predictive of contractility effects in an in vitro myocyte contractility assay. The activity of reference and proprietary compounds at the L-type calcium channel was measured by radioligand-binding assays, conventional patch-clamp, automated electrophysiology, and by measurement of contractility in canine isolated cardiac myocytes. Activity in the radioligand-binding assay at the L-type Ca channel phenylalkylamine binding site was most predictive of an inotropic effect in the canine cardiac myocyte assay. The sensitivity was 73%, specificity 83% and predictivity 78%. The radioligand-binding assay may be run at a single test concentration and potency estimated. The least predictive assay was automated electrophysiology which showed a significant bias when compared with other assay formats. Given the importance of the L-type calcium channel, not just in cardiac function, but also in other organ systems, a screening strategy emerges whereby single concentration ligand-binding can be performed early in the discovery process with sufficient predictivity, throughput and turnaround time to influence chemical design and address a significant safety-related liability, at relatively low cost. - Highlights: • The L-type calcium channel is a significant safety liability during drug discovery. • Radioligand-binding to the L-type calcium channel can be measured in vitro. • The assay can be run at a single test concentration as part of a screening cascade. • This measurement is highly predictive of changes in cardiac myocyte contractility.

  7. International network for comparison of HIV neutralization assays: the NeutNet report II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Heyndrickx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutralizing antibodies provide markers for vaccine-induced protective immunity in many viral infections. By analogy, HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by immunization may well predict vaccine effectiveness. Assessment of neutralizing antibodies is therefore of primary importance, but is hampered by the fact that we do not know which assay(s can provide measures of protective immunity. An international collaboration (NeutNet involving 18 different laboratories previously compared different assays using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and soluble CD4 (Phase I study. METHODS: In the present study (Phase II, polyclonal reagents were evaluated by 13 laboratories. Each laboratory evaluated nine plasmas against an 8 virus panel representing different genetic subtypes and phenotypes. TriMab, a mixture of three mAbs, was used as a positive control allowing comparison of the results with Phase I in a total of nine different assays. The assays used either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (Virus Infectivity Assays, VIA, or Env (gp160-pseudotyped viruses (pseudoviruses, PSV produced in HEK293T cells from molecular clones or from uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically engineered cell lines in either single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs including extra- or intra-cellular p24 antigen detection, luciferase, beta-galactosidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene expression. FINDINGS: Using TriMab, results of Phase I and Phase II were generally in agreement for six of the eight viruses tested and confirmed that the PSV assay is more sensitive than PBMC (p = 0.014. Comparisons with the polyclonal reagents showed that sensitivities were dependent on both virus and plasma. CONCLUSIONS: Here we further demonstrate clear differences in assay sensitivities that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus

  8. International network for comparison of HIV neutralization assays: the NeutNet report II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyndrickx, Leo; Heath, Alan; Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Alcami, Jose; Bongertz, Vera; Jansson, Marianne; Malnati, Mauro; Montefiori, David; Moog, Christiane; Morris, Lynn; Osmanov, Saladin; Polonis, Victoria; Ramaswamy, Meghna; Sattentau, Quentin; Tolazzi, Monica; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Willems, Betty; Wrin, Terri; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies provide markers for vaccine-induced protective immunity in many viral infections. By analogy, HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by immunization may well predict vaccine effectiveness. Assessment of neutralizing antibodies is therefore of primary importance, but is hampered by the fact that we do not know which assay(s) can provide measures of protective immunity. An international collaboration (NeutNet) involving 18 different laboratories previously compared different assays using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and soluble CD4 (Phase I study). In the present study (Phase II), polyclonal reagents were evaluated by 13 laboratories. Each laboratory evaluated nine plasmas against an 8 virus panel representing different genetic subtypes and phenotypes. TriMab, a mixture of three mAbs, was used as a positive control allowing comparison of the results with Phase I in a total of nine different assays. The assays used either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (Virus Infectivity Assays, VIA), or Env (gp160)-pseudotyped viruses (pseudoviruses, PSV) produced in HEK293T cells from molecular clones or from uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically engineered cell lines in either single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs including extra- or intra-cellular p24 antigen detection, luciferase, beta-galactosidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene expression. Using TriMab, results of Phase I and Phase II were generally in agreement for six of the eight viruses tested and confirmed that the PSV assay is more sensitive than PBMC (p = 0.014). Comparisons with the polyclonal reagents showed that sensitivities were dependent on both virus and plasma. Here we further demonstrate clear differences in assay sensitivities that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus. Consistent with the Phase I study, we recommend

  9. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as 51 Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer

  10. A laboratory-scale pretreatment and hydrolysis assay for determination of reactivity in cellulosic biomass feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Edward J; Ness, Ryan M; Nagle, Nicholas J; Peterson, Darren J; Scarlata, Christopher J

    2013-11-14

    The rapid determination of the release of structural sugars from biomass feedstocks is an important enabling technology for the development of cellulosic biofuels. An assay that is used to determine sugar release for large numbers of samples must be robust, rapid, and easy to perform, and must use modest amounts of the samples to be tested.In this work we present a laboratory-scale combined pretreatment and saccharification assay that can be used as a biomass feedstock screening tool. The assay uses a commercially available automated solvent extraction system for pretreatment followed by a small-scale enzymatic hydrolysis step. The assay allows multiple samples to be screened simultaneously, and uses only ~3 g of biomass per sample. If the composition of the biomass sample is known, the results of the assay can be expressed as reactivity (fraction of structural carbohydrate present in the biomass sample released as monomeric sugars). We first present pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis experiments on a set of representative biomass feedstock samples (corn stover, poplar, sorghum, switchgrass) in order to put the assay in context, and then show the results of the assay applied to approximately 150 different feedstock samples covering 5 different materials. From the compositional analysis data we identify a positive correlation between lignin and structural carbohydrates, and from the reactivity data we identify a negative correlation between both carbohydrate and lignin content and total reactivity. The negative correlation between lignin content and total reactivity suggests that lignin may interfere with sugar release, or that more mature samples (with higher structural sugars) may have more recalcitrant lignin. The assay presented in this work provides a robust and straightforward method to measure the sugar release after pretreatment and saccharification that can be used as a biomass feedstock screening tool. We demonstrated the utility of the assay by

  11. Predicting changes in cardiac myocyte contractility during early drug discovery with in vitro assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, M.J.; Armstrong, D.; Abi Gerges, N.; Bridgland-Taylor, M.; Pollard, C.E.; Bowes, J.; Valentin, J.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular-related adverse drug effects are a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Activity of an investigational drug at the L-type calcium channel could manifest in a number of ways, including changes in cardiac contractility. The aim of this study was to define which of the two assay technologies – radioligand-binding or automated electrophysiology – was most predictive of contractility effects in an in vitro myocyte contractility assay. The activity of reference and proprietary compounds at the L-type calcium channel was measured by radioligand-binding assays, conventional patch-clamp, automated electrophysiology, and by measurement of contractility in canine isolated cardiac myocytes. Activity in the radioligand-binding assay at the L-type Ca channel phenylalkylamine binding site was most predictive of an inotropic effect in the canine cardiac myocyte assay. The sensitivity was 73%, specificity 83% and predictivity 78%. The radioligand-binding assay may be run at a single test concentration and potency estimated. The least predictive assay was automated electrophysiology which showed a significant bias when compared with other assay formats. Given the importance of the L-type calcium channel, not just in cardiac function, but also in other organ systems, a screening strategy emerges whereby single concentration ligand-binding can be performed early in the discovery process with sufficient predictivity, throughput and turnaround time to influence chemical design and address a significant safety-related liability, at relatively low cost. - Highlights: • The L-type calcium channel is a significant safety liability during drug discovery. • Radioligand-binding to the L-type calcium channel can be measured in vitro. • The assay can be run at a single test concentration as part of a screening cascade. • This measurement is highly predictive of changes in cardiac myocyte contractility

  12. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Saet-byul [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Junhoe [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Im-kyung [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Joo Chun [Department of Microbiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Joon [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Myun [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young, E-mail: kylee117@yuhs.ac [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongsun, E-mail: jkim63@yuhs.ac [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  13. Neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G in Chinese patients detected by immunofluorescence assay on a monkey brain substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Youming; Hu, Xueqiang; Peng, Fuhua; Lu, Zhengqi; Wang, Yuge; Yang, Yu; Qiu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Serum neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G (NMO-IgG) is used as a biomarker to differentiate between neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the original assay is expensive and complex and shows low sensitivity. Here, we investigated the potential of NMO-IgG detection using an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay on monkey brains. NMO-IgG seroprevalence was determined in 168 samples by an IIF assay on a monkey brain substrate. The data were compared with those from a standard mouse brain IIF assay using McNemar and kappa tests. Thirty-one of 50 (62%) NMO patients, 7 of 18 (38.9%) longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis patients, 6 of 57 (10.5%) MS patients, and 5 of 10 (50%) optic neuritis patients were seropositive for NMO-IgG. None of the acute partial transverse myelitis patients (n = 3) or healthy controls (n = 20) was positive. Thus, the sensitivity of the test was 62% for the patients with clinically definite NMO. The specificity was 89.5%, considering the 57 MS patients as the control group. The modified IIF assay on monkey brains and the standard IIF assay based on mouse brains were not significantly different (McNemar test; p = 1.000). The two assays were concordant in 39 seropositive samples and 100 seronegative samples (kappa test; kappa = 0.592, p monkey brain assay was no better than the standard mouse brain IIF assay, we affirmed that NMO-IgG is a sensitive and specific biomarker to differentiate between NMO and MS. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A New Cytotoxicity Assay for Brevetoxins Using Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. McCall

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brevetoxins are a family of ladder-framed polyether toxins produced during blooms of the marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. Consumption of shellfish or finfish exposed to brevetoxins can lead to the development of neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The toxic effects of brevetoxins are believed to be due to the activation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cell membranes. The traditional cytotoxicity assay for detection of brevetoxins uses the Neuro-2A cell line, which must first be treated with the neurotoxins, ouabain and veratridine, in order to become sensitive to brevetoxins. In this study, we demonstrate several drawbacks of the Neuro-2A assay, which include variability for the EC50 values for brevetoxin and non-linear triphasic dose response curves. Ouabain/ veratridine-treated Neuro-2A cells do not show a typical sigmoidal dose response curve in response to brevetoxin, but rather, have a polynomial shaped curve, which makes calculating EC50 values highly variable. We describe a new fluorescence live cell imaging model, which allows for accurate calculation of cytotoxicity via nuclear staining and additional measurement of other viability parameters depending on which aspect of the cell is stained. In addition, the SJCRH30 cell line shows promise as an alternative to Neuro-2A cells for testing brevetoxins without the need for ouabain and veratridine.

  15. Radiometric assays for the measurement of PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prostate Specific Antigen, a serine protease enzyme, of M.W. ∼ 26-33 kDa, is widely considered to be a very useful marker for prostate cancer. It satisfies nearly all the requirements of an ideal 'Tumour Marker' and has hence attracted a lot of attention in the past decade. PSA is present in multiple forms in serum, with an appreciable fraction bound to the protease inhibitor α-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and to a small extent to other proteins such as α-2-macroglobulin (AMG) leaving the rest in the free form. The total PSA levels have been reported to have 80% sensitivity and 60% specificity towards the detection of prostate cancer. The lack of specificity occurs mainly due to the high levels of t-PSA in benign prostatic hypertrophy(BPH) apart from the cancer. The concept of free PSA has been introduced in the recent past and the ratio of free/total PSA levels have been shown to be advantageous in the differential diagnosis of BPH from prostate cancer. The f/t ratio is considered to be particularly useful in the grey zones of decision making (t-PSA levels 4-20 ng/mL). The need for the development of assays for total and free PSA is felt due to: a. the high incidence of prostate cancers being detected currently; b. the high cost of tests (higher for free PSA assay, and the cost becomes an important parameter when a patient has to be regularly monitored after therapy) that is not affordable for many patients; c. the potential for research in the area of prostate cancer management where the PSA (total and free) assays will be of great help

  16. Results of in vitro chemosensitivity assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Nobuhiko; Morimoto, Hideki; Akita, Toshiaki; Inoue, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Takeo.

    1986-01-01

    The authors reviewed their experiences to date with chemosensitivity testing of 629 tumors by human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA) and of 199 tumors by scintillation assay (SA). HTCA and SA were both performed using a double-layer-soft-agar system with continuous exposure of cells to one concentration of standard anticancer drugs. Overall, 60 % of specimens in HTCA and 58 % in SA produced significant growth in vitro. HTCA was 52 % (13/25) reliable for predicting in vivo sensitivity, and 95 % (36/38) reliable for in vivo resistance, whereas SA was 40 % (8/20) reliable for in vivo sensitivity and 88 % (21/24) for in vivo resistance. In vitro success rates were variable, depending on the tumor histology. In vitro growth of gastric cancer specimens was characteristically lower than that of colon cancer specimens (48 % and 60 % in HTCA, and 46 % and 68 % in SA, respectively). (p < 0.005). Optimal in vitro-in vivo drug concentrations and culture conditions are still being defined. Correlation studies of in vitro-in vivo responses of gastrointestinal cancers suggested that in vitro concentrations of 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C used in this study were considerably higher than their optimal doses. Tumor cell heterogeneity poses significant problems in the clinical use of chemosensitivity assays. In this last study, we sought evidence of tumor heterogeneity by comparing chemosensitivity responses between : 1) different portions of a single tumor, 2) a primary and a metastatic biopsy taken from a patient on the same day, and 3) different metastases from a patient taken on the same day. The results demonstrated the presence of considerable heterogeneity of response to chemotherapy among different tumors from the same patient, and even within the same tumor. The reported discrepancies of in vitro and in vivo sensitivity may be due to such therapeutic heterogeneity among tumors. (J.P.N.)

  17. ARIES nondestructive assay system operation and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremers, Teresa L.; Hansen, Walter J.; Herrera, Gary D.; Nelson, David C.; Sampson, Thomas E.; Scheer, Nancy L.

    2000-01-01

    The ARIES (Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System) Project is an integrated system at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility for the dismantlement of nuclear weapons. The plutonium produced by the ARIES process was measured by an integrated nondestructive assay (NDA) system. The performance of the NDA systems was monitored by a measurement control program which is a part of a nuclear material control and accountability system. In this paper we will report the results of the measurements of the measurement control standards as well as an overview of the measurement of the ARIES process materials

  18. Test procedure for boxed waste assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, J.

    1994-01-01

    This document, prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratory's NMT-4 group, details the test methodology and requirements for Acceptance/Qualification testing of a Boxed Waste Assay System (BWAS) designed and constructed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation. Testing of the BWAS at the Plutonium Facility (TA55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be performed to ascertain system adherence to procurement specification requirements. The test program shall include demonstration of conveyor handling capabilities, gamma ray energy analysis, and imaging passive/active neutron accuracy and sensitivity. Integral to these functions is the system's embedded operating and data reduction software

  19. Assaying gene function by growth competition experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Joshua; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2004-07-01

    High-throughput screening and analysis is one of the emerging paradigms in biotechnology. In particular, high-throughput methods are essential in the field of functional genomics because of the vast amount of data generated in recent and ongoing genome sequencing efforts. In this report we discuss integrated functional analysis methodologies which incorporate both a growth competition component and a highly parallel assay used to quantify results of the growth competition. Several applications of the two most widely used technologies in the field, i.e., transposon mutagenesis and deletion strain library growth competition, and individual applications of several developing or less widely reported technologies are presented.

  20. Automatic titrator for high precision plutonium assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.; Hollen, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Highly precise assay of plutonium metal is required for accountability measurements. We have developed an automatic titrator for this determination which eliminates analyst bias and requires much less analyst time. The analyst is only required to enter sample data and start the titration. The automated instrument titrates the sample, locates the end point, and outputs the results as a paper tape printout. Precision of the titration is less than 0.03% relative standard deviation for a single determination at the 250-mg plutonium level. The titration time is less than 5 min

  1. Qualification of a select one-stage activated partial thromboplastin time-based clotting assay and two chromogenic assays for the post-administration monitoring of nonacog beta pegol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiefenbacher, S; Bohra, R; Amiral, J; Bowyer, A; Kitchen, S; Lochu, A; Rosén, S; Ezban, M

    2017-10-01

    Essentials Nonacog beta pegol (N9-GP) is an extended half-life, recombinant human factor IX (FIX). One-stage clotting (OSC) and chromogenic FIX activity assays were assessed for N9-GP recovery. OSC STA ® -Cephascreen ® , ROX FIX and BIOPHEN FIX chromogenic assays were qualified for N9-GP. Other extended half-life factor products should be assessed in a similar way prior to approval. Background Nonacog beta pegol (N9-GP) is an extended half-life, glycoPEGylated recombinant human factor IX that is under development for the prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding episodes in hemophilia B patients. Considerable reagent-dependent variability has been observed when one-stage clotting assays are used to measure the recovery of recombinant FIX products, including N9-GP. Objective To qualify select one-stage clotting and chromogenic FIX activity assays for measuring N9-GP recovery. Methods The accuracy and precision of the one-stage clotting assay (with the STA-Cephascreen activated partial thromboplastin [APTT] reagent) and the ROX Factor IX and BIOPHEN Factor IX chromogenic assays for measuring N9-GP recovery were assessed in N9-GP-spiked hemophilia B plasma samples in a systematic manner at three independent sites, with manufacturer-recommended protocols and/or site-specific assay setups, including different instruments. Results For each of the three FIX activity assays qualified on five different reagent-instrument systems, acceptable intra-assay and interassay accuracy and precision, dilution integrity, reagent robustness and freeze-thaw and short-term sample stabilities were demonstrated. The STA-Cephascreen assay showed a limited reportable range at one of the three qualification sites, and the BIOPHEN Factor IX assay showed suspect low-end sensitivity at one of the three qualification sites. An individual laboratory would account for these limitations by adjusting the assay's reportable range; thus, these findings are not considered to impact the respective

  2. Radioactive waste package assay facility. Volume 1. Application of assay technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, D.J.S.; Green, T.H.; Molesworth, T.V.; Staniforth, D.; Strachan, N.R.; Rogers, J.D.; Wise, M.O.; Forrest, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report, in three volumes, covers the work carried out by Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd., and two major sub-contractors: Harwell Laboratory (AEA Technology) and Siemens Plessey Controls Ltd., on the development of a radioactive waste package assay facility, for cemented 500 litre intermediate level waste drums. In volume 1, the reasons for assay are considered together with the various techniques that can be used, and the information that can be obtained. The practical problems associated with the use of the various techniques in an integrated assay facility are identified, and the key parameters defined. Engineering and operational features are examined and provisional designs proposed for facilities at three throughput levels: 15,000, 750 and 30 drums per year respectively. The capital and operating costs for such facilities have been estimated. A number of recommendations are made for further work. 16 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  3. Do detour tasks provide accurate assays of inhibitory control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Mark A.; Laker, Philippa R.; Beardsworth, Christine E.

    2018-01-01

    Transparent Cylinder and Barrier tasks are used to purportedly assess inhibitory control in a variety of animals. However, we suspect that performances on these detour tasks are influenced by non-cognitive traits, which may result in inaccurate assays of inhibitory control. We therefore reared pheasants under standardized conditions and presented each bird with two sets of similar tasks commonly used to measure inhibitory control. We recorded the number of times subjects incorrectly attempted to access a reward through transparent barriers, and their latencies to solve each task. Such measures are commonly used to infer the differential expression of inhibitory control. We found little evidence that their performances were consistent across the two different Putative Inhibitory Control Tasks (PICTs). Improvements in performance across trials showed that pheasants learned the affordances of each specific task. Critically, prior experience of transparent tasks, either Barrier or Cylinder, also improved subsequent inhibitory control performance on a novel task, suggesting that they also learned the general properties of transparent obstacles. Individual measures of persistence, assayed in a third task, were positively related to their frequency of incorrect attempts to solve the transparent inhibitory control tasks. Neophobia, Sex and Body Condition had no influence on individual performance. Contrary to previous studies of primates, pheasants with poor performance on PICTs had a wider dietary breadth assayed using a free-choice task. Our results demonstrate that in systems or taxa where prior experience and differences in development cannot be accounted for, individual differences in performance on commonly used detour-dependent PICTS may reveal more about an individual's prior experience of transparent objects, or their motivation to acquire food, than providing a reliable measure of their inhibitory control. PMID:29593115

  4. Antifungal chemical compounds identified using a C. elegans pathogenicity assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Breger

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for the development of new antifungal agents. A facile in vivo model that evaluates libraries of chemical compounds could solve some of the main obstacles in current antifungal discovery. We show that Candida albicans, as well as other Candida species, are ingested by Caenorhabditis elegans and establish a persistent lethal infection in the C. elegans intestinal track. Importantly, key components of Candida pathogenesis in mammals, such as filament formation, are also involved in nematode killing. We devised a Candida-mediated C. elegans assay that allows high-throughput in vivo screening of chemical libraries for antifungal activities, while synchronously screening against toxic compounds. The assay is performed in liquid media using standard 96-well plate technology and allows the study of C. albicans in non-planktonic form. A screen of 1,266 compounds with known pharmaceutical activities identified 15 (approximately 1.2% that prolonged survival of C. albicans-infected nematodes and inhibited in vivo filamentation of C. albicans. Two compounds identified in the screen, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a major active component of honeybee propolis, and the fluoroquinolone agent enoxacin exhibited antifungal activity in a murine model of candidiasis. The whole-animal C. elegans assay may help to study the molecular basis of C. albicans pathogenesis and identify antifungal compounds that most likely would not be identified by in vitro screens that target fungal growth. Compounds identified in the screen that affect the virulence of Candida in vivo can potentially be used as "probe compounds" and may have antifungal activity against other fungi.

  5. An improved in vitro micronucleus assay to biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo, Ivette Z.; Okazaki, Kayo; Vieira, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    The biological dosimetry is widely used to estimate the absorbed dose in people occupationally or accidentally exposed to the radiation for a better medical treatment, minimizing the harmful effects. Many techniques and methods have been proposed to detect and quantify the radioinduced lesions in genetic material, among them, the micronucleus (MN) assay. In the present study, we proposed an improved in vitro micronucleus technique that is rapid, sensitive and with minor cell manipulations. Assays were carried out with human tumor cells (MCF-7) seeded (3x10 4 cells) in slides placed into Petri dishes. Adherent cells were maintained with RPMI medium, supplemented with fetal calf serum, 1 % antibiotics, cytochalasin B (2 μg/mL), and incubated at 37 deg C in the presence of 5% CO2 for 72h. Cells were pre-treated for 24h with aminoguanidine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Nitric oxide is an intracellular free-radical, involved in DNA double-strand break repair mechanisms. After incubation, adherent cells on slides were briefly fixed with paraformaldehyde and stained with acridine orange (100 μg/mL) for analysis through fluorescence microscopy. Dye fluorescence permitted accurate discrimination between nuclei and micronuclei (bright green) and cytoplasm (red), and made possible a faster counting of binucleated cells. Aminoguanidine (2 mM) induced significant increase (p< 0.05) in frequencies of binucleated cells with micronuclei and in the number of micronuclei per binucleated cell. Data showed that proposed modifications permit to understand an early aspect of NO inhibition and suggested an improved protocol to MN assays. (author)

  6. Effective implementation of novel MET pharmacodynamic assays in translational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Apurva K; Navas, Tony; Herrick, William G; Hollingshead, Melinda G; Bottaro, Donald P; Doroshow, James H; Parchment, Ralph E

    2017-01-01

    MET tyrosine kinase (TK) dysregulation is significantly implicated in many types of cancer. Despite over 20 years of drug development to target MET in cancers, a pure anti-MET therapeutic has not yet received market approval. The failure of two recently concluded phase III trials point to a major weakness in biomarker strategies to identify patients who will benefit most from MET therapies. The capability to interrogate oncogenic mutations in MET via circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) provides an important advancement in identification and stratification of patients for MET therapy. However, a wide range in type and frequency of these mutations suggest there is a need to carefully link these mutations to MET dysregulation, at least in proof-of-concept studies. In this review, we elaborate how we can utilize recently developed and validated pharmacodynamic biomarkers of MET not only to show target engagement, but more importantly to quantitatively measure MET dysregulation in tumor tissues. The MET assay endpoints provide evidence of both canonical and non-canonical MET signaling, can be used as "effect markers" to define biologically effective doses (BEDs) for molecularly targeted drugs, confirm mechanism-of-action in testing combination of drugs, and establish whether a diagnostic test is reporting MET dysregulation. We have established standard operating procedures for tumor biopsy collections to control pre-analytical variables that have produced valid results in proof-of-concept studies. The reagents and procedures are made available to the research community for potential implementation on multiple platforms such as ELISA, quantitative immunofluorescence assay (qIFA), and immuno-MRM assays.

  7. [Clinical evaluation of a novel HBsAg quantitative assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kazumi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Naganuma, Hatsue; Hiramatsu, Kumiko; Iida, Takayasu; Takasaka, Yoshimitsu; Mizokami, Masashi

    2007-07-01

    The clinical implication of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) concentrations in HBV-infected individuals remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel fully automated Chemiluminescence Enzyme Immunoassay (Sysmex HBsAg quantitative assay) by comparative measurements of the reference serum samples versus two independent commercial assays (Lumipulse f or Architect HBsAg QT). Furthermore, clinical usefulness was assessed for monitoring of the serum HBsAg levels during antiviral therapy. A dilution test using 5 reference-serum samples showed linear correlation curve in range from 0.03 to 2,360 IU/ml. The HBsAg was measured in total of 400 serum samples and 99.8% had consistent results between Sysmex and Lumipulse f. Additionally, a positive linear correlation was observed between Sysmex and Architect. To compare the Architect and Sysmex, both methods were applied to quantify the HBsAg in serum samples with different HBV genotypes/subgenotypes, as well as in serum contained HBV vaccine escape mutants (126S, 145R). Correlation between the methods was observed in results for escape mutants and common genotypes (A, B, C) in Japan. Observed during lamivudine therapy, an increase in HBsAg and HBV DNA concentrations preceded the aminotransferase (ALT) elevation associated with drug-resistant HBV variant emergence (breakthrough hepatitis). In conclusion, reliability of the Sysmex HBsAg quantitative assay was confirmed for all HBV genetic variants common in Japan. Monitoring of serum HBsAg concentrations in addition to HBV DNA quantification, is helpful in evaluation of the response to lamivudine treatment and diagnosis of the breakthrough hepatitis.

  8. Statistical precision of delayed-neutron nondestructive assay techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.; McNeany, S.R.

    1979-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of the statistical precision of delayed-neutron nondestructive assay instruments is presented. Such instruments measure the fissile content of nuclear fuel samples by neutron irradiation and delayed-neutron detection. The precision of these techniques is limited by the statistical nature of the nuclear decay process, but the precision can be optimized by proper selection of system operating parameters. Our method is a three-part analysis. We first present differential--difference equations describing the fundamental physics of the measurements. We then derive and present complete analytical solutions to these equations. Final equations governing the expected number and variance of delayed-neutron counts were computer programmed to calculate the relative statistical precision of specific system operating parameters. Our results show that Poisson statistics do not govern the number of counts accumulated in multiple irradiation-count cycles and that, in general, maximum count precision does not correspond with maximum count as first expected. Covariance between the counts of individual cycles must be considered in determining the optimum number of irradiation-count cycles and the optimum irradiation-to-count time ratio. For the assay system in use at ORNL, covariance effects are small, but for systems with short irradiation-to-count transition times, covariance effects force the optimum number of irradiation-count cycles to be half those giving maximum count. We conclude that the equations governing the expected value and variance of delayed-neutron counts have been derived in closed form. These have been computerized and can be used to select optimum operating parameters for delayed-neutron assay devices

  9. Use of the microculture kinetic assay of apoptosis to determine chemosensitivities of leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, V D; Greer, J P; Whitlock, J A; Koury, M J

    1998-08-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents exert their antitumor effects by inducing apoptosis. The microculture kinetic (MiCK) assay provides an automated, continuous means of monitoring apoptosis in a cell population. We used the MiCK assay to determine the chemosensitivities of the human promyelocytic HL-60 and lymphoblastic CEM cell lines and leukemia cells freshly isolated from patients with acute nonlymphocytic (ANLL) or acute lymphocytic (ALL) leukemias. Continuous monitoring of apoptosis in the MiCK assay permits determination of the time to the maximum apoptosis (Tm) and its two components which are initiation time (Ti) and development time (Td). Duration of the three timing components of apoptosis varies from hours to days depending on the drug, drug concentration, and type of target cells. In the MiCK assay, the extent of apoptosis is reported in kinetic units of apoptosis. Kinetic units are determined by the slope of the curve created when optical density caused by cell blebbing is plotted as a function of time. Using the leukemia cell lines, we define the relationship between kinetic units determined by the MiCK assay and the percentage of morphologically apoptotic cells in the culture. Flow cytometry analysis of apoptosis in Annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled preparations of HL-60 and CEM cells was also used to compare with data obtained by the MiCK assay. The feasibility of the MiCK assay of apoptosis as a chemosensitivity test was confirmed by its comparison with a 3H-thymidine incorporation assay. We show that samples from 10 ANLL and ALL patients patients tested for sensitivity to various doses of idarubicin (IDR), daunorubicin (DNR), or mitoxantrone (MTA) gave the same percentages of apoptotic cells when calculated by the MiCK assay as when determined by morphological analysis. The MiCK assay was used for dose-response analyses of the sensitivities to IDR, DNR, and MTA of leukemia cells from 4 other patients (2 ANLL and 2 ALL). The results from both cell

  10. Fluorescence lifetime assays: current advances and applications in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritz, Stephan; Doering, Klaus; Woelcke, Julian; Hassiepen, Ulrich

    2011-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime assays complement the portfolio of established assay formats available in drug discovery, particularly with the recent advances in microplate readers and the commercial availability of novel fluorescent labels. Fluorescence lifetime assists in lowering complexity of compound screening assays, affording a modular, toolbox-like approach to assay development and yielding robust homogeneous assays. To date, materials and procedures have been reported for biochemical assays on proteases, as well as on protein kinases and phosphatases. This article gives an overview of two assay families, distinguished by the origin of the fluorescence signal modulation. The pharmaceutical industry demands techniques with a robust, integrated compound profiling process and short turnaround times. Fluorescence lifetime assays have already helped the drug discovery field, in this sense, by enhancing productivity during the hit-to-lead and lead optimization phases. Future work will focus on covering other biochemical molecular modifications by investigating the detailed photo-physical mechanisms underlying the fluorescence signal.

  11. The Statistics of wood assays for preservative retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia K. Lebow; Scott W. Conklin

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers general statistical concepts that apply to interpreting wood assay retention values. In particular, since wood assays are typically obtained from a single composited sample, the statistical aspects, including advantages and disadvantages, of simple compositing are covered.

  12. Use of polymeric dyes in lignin biodegradation assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, M.H.; Alic, M.; Glenn, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the historical use of various 14 C-radiolabeled and unlabeled substrates to screen for ligninolytic activity. The disadvantages of these assays are presented. The authors describe the development of assays utilizing polymeric dyes

  13. Synthesis of photothermal nanocomposites and their application to antibacterial assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ning; Wang, Chun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Lidong

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we report a novel gold nanorod (AuNR)-based nanocomposite that shows strong binding to bacterium and high antibacterial efficiency. The AuNRs were used as a photothermal material to transform near-infrared radiation (NIR) into heat. We selected poly (acrylic acid) to modify the surface of the AuNRs based on a simple self-assembly method. After conjugation of the bacterium-binding molecule vancomycin, the nanocomposites were capable of efficiently gathering on the cell walls of bacteria. The nanocomposites exhibited a high bacterial inhibition capability owing to NIR-induced heat generation in situ. Therefore, the prepared photothermal nanocomposites show great potential for use in antibacterial assays.

  14. Detection of garlic gamma-irradiated by assay comet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Miranda, Enrique F. Prieto; Carro, Sandra; Iglesias Enrique, Isora; Matos, Wilberto

    2009-01-01

    The garlic samples were irradiated in a facility with 60 Co sources, at absorbed dose values of 0-0,15 kGy. The detection method utilized for the identification of the irradiated garlic was biological comet assay. The samples were classified post-irradiation several times. The irradiated samples showed high strand breaks of DNA exhibiting comets of several forms, while the not irradiated and lower dose samples showed a behavior like round shape and light comets. Significant differences were found for higher absorbed dose values at 0.06 kGy, this absorbed dose value is corresponding with the applied dose value at this food in order to avoid the germination. (author)

  15. Detection of garlic gamma-irradiated by assay comet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Miranda, Enrique F. Prieto; Carro, Sandra; Iglesias Enrique, Isora; Matos, Wilberto [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)], e-mail: damaris@ceaden.edu.cu

    2009-07-01

    The garlic samples were irradiated in a facility with {sup 60}Co sources, at absorbed dose values of 0-0,15 kGy. The detection method utilized for the identification of the irradiated garlic was biological comet assay. The samples were classified post-irradiation several times. The irradiated samples showed high strand breaks of DNA exhibiting comets of several forms, while the not irradiated and lower dose samples showed a behavior like round shape and light comets. Significant differences were found for higher absorbed dose values at 0.06 kGy, this absorbed dose value is corresponding with the applied dose value at this food in order to avoid the germination. (author)

  16. Experimental 233U nondestructive assay with a random driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goris, P.

    1979-01-01

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) of 233 U in quantities up to 15 grams containing 7 ppM 232 U age 2 years was investigated with a random driver. A passive singles counting technique showed a reproducibility within 0.2% at the 95% confidence level. This technique would be applicable throughout a process in which all of the 233 U had the same 232 U content at the same age. Where the 232 U content varies, determination of 233 U fissile content would require active NDA. Active coincidence counting utilizing a 238 Pu, Li neutron source and a plastic scintillator detector system showed a reproducibility limit within 15% at the 95% confidence limit. The active technique was found to be very dependent on the detector system resolving time in order to make proper random coincidence corrections associated with the high gamma activity from the 232 U decay chain

  17. Cytological assay of micronucleus induction by radiation in oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattathiri, V.N.; Bindu, L.; Remani, P.; Chandralekha, B.; Davis, C.A.; Krishnan Nair, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to analyze the dose-response relationship of micronucleus (MN) induction by radiation in eighty-three patients with oral cancers. Serial scrape smears were taken before treatment and after delivery of various fractions of a course of radical radiotherapy. The smears were stained with Giemsa's stain and frequency of micronucleated cells (MNC) evaluated. Before treatment 70.5% of tumours showed MNC, the mean value being 4.18 MNC/1000 cells. The frequency of MNC, increased with increasing dose of radiation. As regards relation to treatment duration, there was initially a slight increase, followed by rapid increase and then a plateauing. Radiosensitive and resistant tumours showed differing pattern of change. The MN test by serial cytological assay has potential as a tool to understand the dynamics of radiation induced cell death and predict radiosensitivity. (author). 4 refs., 5 figs

  18. MCNP efficiency calculations of INEEL passive active neutron assay system for simulated TRU waste assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, W.Y.; Meachum, T.R.; Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.

    2000-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) passive active neutron (PAN) radioassay system is used to certify transuranic (TRU) waste drums in terms of quantifying plutonium and other TRU element activities. Depending on the waste form involved, significant systematic and random errors need quantification in addition to the counting statistics. To determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results, a statistical sampling and verification approach has been developed. In this approach, the total performance of the PAN nondestructive assay system is simulated using the computer models of the assay system, and the resultant output is compared with the known input to assess the total uncertainty. The supporting steps in performing the uncertainty analysis for the passive assay measurements in particular are as follows: (1) Create simulated waste drums and associated conditions; (2) Simulate measurements to determine the basic counting data that would be produced by the PAN assay system under the conditions specified; and (3) Apply the PAN assay system analysis algorithm to the set of counting data produced by simulating measurements to determine the measured plutonium mass. The validity of this simulation approach was verified by comparing simulated output against results from actual measurements using known plutonium sources and surrogate waste drums. The computer simulation of the PAN system performance uses the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Code System to produce a neutron transport calculation for a simulated waste drum. Specifically, the passive system uses the neutron coincidence counting technique, utilizing the spontaneous fission of 240 Pu. MCNP application to the SWEPP PAN assay system uncertainty analysis has been very useful for a variety of waste types contained in 208-ell drums measured by a passive radioassay system. The application of MCNP to the active radioassay system is also feasible

  19. Specific binding assay technique; standardization of reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, K.G.; Roitt, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    The standardization of a labelled constituent, such as anti-IgE, for use in a specific binding assay method is disclosed. A labelled ligand, such as IgE, is standardized against a ligand reference substance, such as WHO standard IgE, to determine the weight of IgE protein represented by the labelled ligand. Anti-light chain antibodies are contacted with varying concentrations of the labelled ligand. The ligand is then contacted with the labelled constituent which is then quantitated in relation to the amount of ligand protein present. The preparation of 131 I-labelled IgE is described. Also disclosed is an improved specific binding assay test method for determining the potency of an allergen extract in serum from an allergic individual. The improvement involved using a parallel model system of a second complex which consisted of anti-light chain antibodies, labelled ligand and the standardized labelled constituent (anti-IgE). The amount of standardized labelled constituent bound to the ligand in the first complex was determined, as described above, and the weight of ligand inhibited by addition of soluble allergen was then used as a measure of the potency of the allergen extract. (author)

  20. Human semen assays for workplace monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Gledhill, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    Decades of human semen studies have yielded compelling evidence that sperm can be used to access reproductive potential and diagnose pathology. With these studies as background, the small number of detailed semen studies of men exposed to physical and chemical agents point with optimism to the application of human semen assays as efficient, effective means to monitor for reproductive hazards in the workplace. Sperm are the most accessible of human gonadal tissue and provide a means of monitoring exposure induced changes in the human testes, changes which may result in infertility and increased frequencies of genetically abnormal gametes. The focus on semen has precipitated the development of new sperm bioassays which use older conventional andrological methods (i.e., sperm counts, motility, and morphology) as well as recently developed high speed flow and scanning methods for automated cytological analyses. The status of these sperm assays for workplace surveillance is reviewed, procedures are suggested with examples of use, and their effectiveness is evaluated. The available mouse models of induced semen changes are briefly described and the importance of these models for evaluating the genetic implications of findings in human semen is discussed

  1. Rapid multiple immunoenzyme assay of mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urusov, Alexandr E; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Petrakova, Alina V; Sadykhov, Elchin G; Koroleva, Olga V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2015-01-27

    Mycotoxins are low molecular weight fungal metabolites that pose a threat as toxic contaminants of food products, thereby necessitating their effective monitoring and control. Microplate ELISA can be used for this purpose, but this method is characteristically time consuming, with a duration extending to several hours. This report proposes a variant of the ELISA method for the detection and quantification of three mycotoxins, ochratoxin A, aflatoxin B1 and zearalenone, in the kinetic regime. The main requirement for the proposed kinetic protocol was to provide a rapid method that combined sensitivity and accuracy. The use of biotin with an extended spacer together with a streptavidin-polyperoxidase conjugate provided high signal levels, despite these interactions occurring under non-equilibrium conditions. Duration of the individual mycotoxin assays was 20 min, whereas the analysis of all three mycotoxins in parallel reached a maximum duration of 25 min. Recovery of at least 95% mycotoxins in water-organic extracts was shown. The developed assays were successfully validated using poultry processing products and corn samples spiked with known quantities of mycotoxins. The detection limits for aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A and zearalenone in these substances were 0.24, 1.2 and 3 ng/g, respectively.

  2. Rapid Multiple Immunoenzyme Assay of Mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr E. Urusov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are low molecular weight fungal metabolites that pose a threat as toxic contaminants of food products, thereby necessitating their effective monitoring and control. Microplate ELISA can be used for this purpose, but this method is characteristically time consuming, with a duration extending to several hours. This report proposes a variant of the ELISA method for the detection and quantification of three mycotoxins, ochratoxin A, aflatoxin B1 and zearalenone, in the kinetic regime. The main requirement for the proposed kinetic protocol was to provide a rapid method that combined sensitivity and accuracy. The use of biotin with an extended spacer together with a streptavidin–polyperoxidase conjugate provided high signal levels, despite these interactions occurring under non-equilibrium conditions. Duration of the individual mycotoxin assays was 20 min, whereas the analysis of all three mycotoxins in parallel reached a maximum duration of 25 min. Recovery of at least 95% mycotoxins in water-organic extracts was shown. The developed assays were successfully validated using poultry processing products and corn samples spiked with known quantities of mycotoxins. The detection limits for aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A and zearalenone in these substances were 0.24, 1.2 and 3 ng/g, respectively.

  3. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium ( 47 Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO 3 . In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the 47 Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison

  4. Trofile HIV co-receptor usage assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Andrew J; McGovern, Rachel A; Harrigan, P Richard

    2009-03-01

    The introduction of CCR5 antagonists increases the options available for constructing therapeutic drug regimens for HIV-positive patients. However, as these drugs do not inhibit HIV variants that use the CXCR4 co-receptor, a pretreatment test is required to determine accurately HIV co-receptor usage (tropism) before initiating CCR5 antagonist-based therapy. To discuss the Monogram Trofile assay as a diagnostic tool for determining HIV tropism by critically reviewing reported literature and available data. Monogram Trofile has become, largely by default, the de facto standard for HIV tropism assay. However, there is significant room for improvement in the speed, cost and availability of the test. Furthermore, the test is not quantitative, requires high-input HIV RNA viral loads, and produces results that are less biologically stable than expected. These technical considerations may limit the use of CCR5 antagonists in therapy. Nevertheless, this test is likely to remain the most widely used tropism diagnostic for the short term. We expect that a more practical and possibly more accurate method for measuring HIV tropism can be developed.

  5. Steroidogenic disruptive effects of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors duloxetine, venlafaxine and tramadol in the H295R cell assay and in a recombinant CYP17 assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islin, Julie; Munkboel, Cecilie Hurup; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the steroidogenic endocrine disrupting effect of the three most widely used serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors duloxetine, venlafaxine and tramadol, using two in vitro models, the H295R assay and a recombinant CYP17 enzyme assay. Steroid hormones were...... quantified using LC-MS/MS. Duloxetine showed endocrine disrupting effects at 5-20μM with CYP17 being the main target. Venlafaxine also affected the steroidogenesis, mainly by affecting the CYP17 lyase reaction, although at much higher concentrations i.e. 100μM. Tramadol only exerted minor effects...... on the steroidogenesis with the lowest observed effect at 314μM. Based on the H295R results, the inhibition of CYP17 by duloxetine and venlafaxine was investigated in a recombinant CYP17 assay with the use of the 4 major CYP17 substrates pregnenolone, progesterone, 17α-hydroxypregnenolone and 17α...

  6. Utility and diagnostic performance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by two immunochromatographic assays as compared with the molecular Genotype assay in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Thumamo Pokam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the disadvantages of smear microscopy for detection of tuberculosis cases is its inability to differentiate between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB and non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM. This study evaluated two, new immunochromatographic assays – Capilia TB-Neo and SD Bioline – on unheated and heated cultures at 80 °C for 30 min respectively for their ability to discriminate between MTB complex and NTM as compared with the molecular Genotype assay. Mycobacteria used in the study were obtained from smear-positive specimens collected from patients at four major hospitals in Cross River State, Nigeria. Capilia TB-Neo and SD Bioline showed sensitivities of 98.8% and 93.8% respectively and 100% specificity for both assays. Heating the isolates did not significantly impact the test performance. Both tests are recommended for use in rapid differentiation of strains isolated in Nigeria.

  7. Multiplexing a high-throughput liability assay to leverage efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, John; Anthony, Monique; Stewart, Jeremy; Connors, David; Chen, Taosheng; Banks, Martyn; Petrillo, Edward W; Agler, Michele

    2009-06-01

    In order to identify potential cytochrome P-450 3A4 (drug-metabolizing enzyme) inducers at an early stage of the drug discovery process, a cell-based transactivation high-throughput luciferase reporter assay for the human pregnane X receptor (PXR) in HepG2 cells has been implemented and multiplexed with a viability end point for data interpretation, as part of a Lead Profiling portfolio of assays. As a routine part of Lead Profiling operations, assays are periodically evaluated for utility as well as for potential improvements in technology or process. We used a recent evaluation of our PXR-transactivation assay as a model for the application of Lean Thinking-based process analysis to lab-bench assay optimization and automation. This resulted in the development of a 384-well multiplexed homogeneous assay simultaneously detecting PXR transactivation and HepG2 cell cytotoxicity. In order to multiplex fluorescent and luminescent read-outs, modifications to each assay were necessary, which included optimization of multiple assay parameters such as cell density, plate type, and reagent concentrations. Subsequently, a set of compounds including known cytotoxic compounds and PXR inducers were used to validate the multiplexed assay. Results from the multiplexed assay correlate well with those from the singleplexed assay formats measuring PXR transactivation and viability separately. Implementation of the multiplexed assay for routine compound profiling provides improved data quality, sample conservation, cost savings, and resource efficiencies.

  8. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopek, Thomas R.; Liber, Howard L.; Penman, Bruce W.; Thilly, William G.; Hoppe, IV, Henry

    1981-01-01

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay.

  9. Clinical validation of the Tempus xO assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubier, Nike; Tell, Robert; Huether, Robert; Bontrager, Martin; Bush, Stephen; Parsons, Jerod; Shah, Kaanan; Baker, Tim; Selkov, Gene; Taxter, Tim; Thomas, Amber; Bettis, Sam; Khan, Aly; Lau, Denise; Lee, Christina; Barber, Matthew; Cieslik, Marcin; Frankenberger, Casey; Franzen, Amy; Weiner, Ali; Palmer, Gary; Lonigro, Robert; Robinson, Dan; Wu, Yi-Mi; Cao, Xuhong; Lefkofsky, Eric; Chinnaiyan, Arul; White, Kevin P.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a clinically validated NGS assay that includes tumor, germline and RNA sequencing. We apply this assay to clinical specimens and cell lines, and we demonstrate a clinical sensitivity of 98.4% and positive predictive value of 100% for the clinically actionable variants measured by the assay. We also demonstrate highly accurate copy number measurements and gene rearrangement identification. PMID:29899824

  10. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305 Herpes simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices...

  11. 40 CFR 79.67 - Glial fibrillary acidic protein assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Glial fibrillary acidic protein assay... Glial fibrillary acidic protein assay. (a) Purpose. Chemical-induced injury of the nervous system, i.e... paragraph (e)(3) in this section). Assays of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the major intermediate...

  12. Detection of induced male germline mutation: Correlations and comparisons between traditional germline mutation assays, transgenic rodent assays and expanded simple tandem repeat instability assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Timothy M. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ont., K1S 5B6 (Canada); Lambert, Iain B. [Department of Biology, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ont., K1S 5B6 (Canada); Williams, Andrew [Biostatistics and Epidemiology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 6604B, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Douglas, George R. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L. [Mutagenesis Section, Environmental and Occupational Toxicology Division, Safe Environments Programme, 0803A, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0K9 (Canada)]. E-mail: carole_yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca

    2006-06-25

    Several rodent assays are capable of monitoring germline mutation. These include traditional assays, such as the dominant lethal (DL) assay, the morphological specific locus (SL) test and the heritable translocation (HT) assay, and two assays that have been developed more recently-the expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) and transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation assays. In this paper, we have compiled the limited amount of experimental data that are currently available to make conclusions regarding the comparative ability of the more recently developed assays to detect germline mutations induced by chemical and radiological agents. The data suggest that ESTR and TGR assays are generally comparable with SL in detecting germline mutagenicity induced by alkylating agents and radiation, though TGR offered less sensitivity than ESTR in some cases. The DL and HT assays detect clastogenic events and are most susceptible to mutations arising in post-spermatogonial cells, and they may not provide the best comparisons with TGR and ESTR instability. The measurement of induced ESTR instability represents a relatively sensitive method of identifying agents causing germline mutation in rodents, and may also be useful for bio-monitoring exposed individuals in the human population. Any future use of the TGR and ESTR germline mutation assays in a regulatory testing context will entail more robust and extensive characterization of assay performance. This will require substantially more data, including experiments measuring multiple endpoints, a greatly expanded database of chemical agents and a focus on characterizing stage-specific activity of mutagens in these assays, preferably by sampling epididymal sperm exposed at defined pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic stages of development.

  13. Detection of induced male germline mutation: Correlations and comparisons between traditional germline mutation assays, transgenic rodent assays and expanded simple tandem repeat instability assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, Timothy M.; Lambert, Iain B.; Williams, Andrew; Douglas, George R.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2006-01-01

    Several rodent assays are capable of monitoring germline mutation. These include traditional assays, such as the dominant lethal (DL) assay, the morphological specific locus (SL) test and the heritable translocation (HT) assay, and two assays that have been developed more recently-the expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) and transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation assays. In this paper, we have compiled the limited amount of experimental data that are currently available to make conclusions regarding the comparative ability of the more recently developed assays to detect germline mutations induced by chemical and radiological agents. The data suggest that ESTR and TGR assays are generally comparable with SL in detecting germline mutagenicity induced by alkylating agents and radiation, though TGR offered less sensitivity than ESTR in some cases. The DL and HT assays detect clastogenic events and are most susceptible to mutations arising in post-spermatogonial cells, and they may not provide the best comparisons with TGR and ESTR instability. The measurement of induced ESTR instability represents a relatively sensitive method of identifying agents causing germline mutation in rodents, and may also be useful for bio-monitoring exposed individuals in the human population. Any future use of the TGR and ESTR germline mutation assays in a regulatory testing context will entail more robust and extensive characterization of assay performance. This will require substantially more data, including experiments measuring multiple endpoints, a greatly expanded database of chemical agents and a focus on characterizing stage-specific activity of mutagens in these assays, preferably by sampling epididymal sperm exposed at defined pre-meiotic, meiotic and post-meiotic stages of development

  14. Time dependent analysis of assay comparability: a novel approach to understand intra- and inter-site variability over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiwarter, Susanne; Middleton, Brian; Jones, Barry; Courtney, Paul; Lindmark, Bo; Page, Ken M.; Clark, Alan; Landqvist, Claire

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate here a novel use of statistical tools to study intra- and inter-site assay variability of five early drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics in vitro assays over time. Firstly, a tool for process control is presented. It shows the overall assay variability but allows also the following of changes due to assay adjustments and can additionally highlight other, potentially unexpected variations. Secondly, we define the minimum discriminatory difference/ratio to support projects to understand how experimental values measured at different sites at a given time can be compared. Such discriminatory values are calculated for 3 month periods and followed over time for each assay. Again assay modifications, especially assay harmonization efforts, can be noted. Both the process control tool and the variability estimates are based on the results of control compounds tested every time an assay is run. Variability estimates for a limited set of project compounds were computed as well and found to be comparable. This analysis reinforces the need to consider assay variability in decision making, compound ranking and in silico modeling.

  15. Comparison of multiple assays for detecting human antibodies directed against antigens on normal and malignant tissue culture cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, S.A.; Schwarz, S.; Anding, H.; Hyatt, C.; Williams, G.M.; Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, Md.

    1977-01-01

    Four separate assays of human antibody reactivity to four separate normal and malignant human tissue culture cells lines from two patients have been evaluated using a single highly-reactive allogeneic serum. The visual end-point cytolysis assay and the chromium-51 release assay were equally sensitive in measuring complement mediated antibody cytotoxicity and both were far more sensitive than a trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The assay of antibody reactivity by hemadsorption technique was about 10 times more sensitive than any of the cytotoxicity assays. This latter assay measures only IgG antibody however. These assays showed that cell lines from different patients may differ greatly in 'reactivity' to an allogeneic serum and emphasized the importance of utilizing tumor and normal cells from the same patient when using tissue culture cells to search for tumor specific reactivity. These observations emphasize the importance of utilizing multiple assays against paired normal and malignant cells from the same patient to be certain of the specificity and magnitude of the measured antibody

  16. Comparison of Antioxidant Evaluation Assays for Investigating Antioxidative Activity of Gallic Acid and Its Alkyl Esters in Different Food Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonsatta, Natthaporn; Deetae, Pawinee; Luangpituksa, Pairoj; Grajeda-Iglesias, Claudia; Figueroa-Espinoza, Maria Cruz; Le Comte, Jérôme; Villeneuve, Pierre; Decker, Eric A; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Panya, Atikorn

    2017-08-30

    The addition of antioxidants is one of the strategies to inhibit lipid oxidation, a major cause of lipid deterioration in foods leading to rancidity development and nutritional losses. However, several studies have been reported that conventional antioxidant assays, e.g., TPC, ABTS, FRAP, and ORAC could not predict antioxidant performance in several foods. This study aimed to investigate the performance of two recently developed assays, e.g., the conjugated autoxidizable triene (CAT) and the apolar radical-initiated conjugated autoxidizable triene (ApoCAT) assays to predict the antioxidant effectiveness of gallic acid and its esters in selected food models in comparison with the conventional antioxidant assays. The results indicated that the polarities of the antioxidants have a strong impact on antioxidant activities. In addition, different oxidant locations demonstrated by the CAT and ApoCAT assays influenced the overall antioxidant performances of the antioxidants with different polarities. To validate the predictability of the assays, the antioxidative performance of gallic acid and its alkyl esters was investigated in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, bulk soybean oils, and roasted peanuts as the lipid food models. The results showed that only the ApoCAT assay could be able to predict the antioxidative performances in O/W emulsions regardless of the antioxidant polarities. This study demonstrated that the relevance of antioxidant assays to food models was strongly dependent on physical similarities between the tested assays and the food structure matrices.

  17. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, D Ransom; Holland, William C; McCall, Jennifer R; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Baden, Daniel G; Darius, H Taiana; Chinain, Mireille; Tester, Patricia A; Shea, Damian; Quintana, Harold A Flores; Morris, James A; Litaker, R Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R)). However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R) in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F)) was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2) for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C) with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1). Fish (N = 61) of six different species were screened using the RBA(F). Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a) correlated well (R2 = 0.71) with those of the RBA(F), given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F) affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F), which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F) advantages include the long-term (> 5 years) stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R). The RBA(F) is cost-effective, allows high sample

  18. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ransom Hardison

    Full Text Available Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs. One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R. However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2 for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1. Fish (N = 61 of six different species were screened using the RBA(F. Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a correlated well (R2 = 0.71 with those of the RBA(F, given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F, which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F advantages include the long-term (> 5 years stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R. The RBA(F is cost-effective, allows high sample

  19. Identification of irradiated refrigerated pork with the DNA comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, M.M. E-mail: villavic@net.ipen.br; Marin-Huachaca, N.S.; Mancini-Filho, J. E-mail: jmancini@usp.br; Delincee, H.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. E-mail: henry.delincee@bfe.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2004-10-01

    Food irradiation can contribute to a safer and more plentiful food supply by inactivating pathogens, eradicating pests and by extending shelf-life. Particularly in the case of pork meat, this process could be a useful way to inactivate harmful parasites such as Trichinella and Taenia solium. Ionizing radiation causes damage to the DNA of the cells (e.g. strand breaks), which can be used to detect irradiated food. Microelectrophoresis of single cells ('Comet Assay') is a simple and rapid test for DNA damage and can be used over a wide dose range and for a variety of products. Refrigerated pork meat was irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source, Gammacell 220 (A.E.C.L.) installed in IPEN (Sao Paulo, Brazil). The doses given were 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy for refrigerated samples. Immediately after irradiation the samples were returned to the refrigerator (6 deg. C). Samples were kept in the refrigerator after irradiation. Pork meat was analyzed 1, 8 and 10 days after irradiation using the DNA 'Comet Assay'. This method showed to be an inexpensive and rapid technique for qualitative detection of irradiation treatment.

  20. Identification of irradiated refrigerated pork with the DNA comet assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, M. M.; Marin-Huachaca, N. S.; Mancini-Filho, J.; Delincée, H.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2004-09-01

    Food irradiation can contribute to a safer and more plentiful food supply by inactivating pathogens, eradicating pests and by extending shelf-life. Particularly in the case of pork meat, this process could be a useful way to inactivate harmful parasites such as Trichinella and Taenia solium. Ionizing radiation causes damage to the DNA of the cells (e.g. strand breaks), which can be used to detect irradiated food. Microelectrophoresis of single cells (``Comet Assay'') is a simple and rapid test for DNA damage and can be used over a wide dose range and for a variety of products. Refrigerated pork meat was irradiated with a 60Co source, Gammacell 220 (A.E.C.L.) installed in IPEN (Sa~o Paulo, Brazil). The doses given were 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5kGy for refrigerated samples. Immediately after irradiation the samples were returned to the refrigerator (6°C). Samples were kept in the refrigerator after irradiation. Pork meat was analyzed 1, 8 and 10 days after irradiation using the DNA ``Comet Assay''. This method showed to be an inexpensive and rapid technique for qualitative detection of irradiation treatment.

  1. An improved method for staining cell colonies in clonogenic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda, Kishore; Natale, Leanna; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2007-06-01

    Clonogenic assay is a widely used experimental approach to test for the effects of drugs/genes on the growth and proliferative characteristics of cells in vitro. Accurate quantitation of treatment effects in clonogeneic assays depends on the ability to visualize and count cell colonies precisely. We report a novel method (referred as ETeB) for staining cell colonies grown on plastic and specially coated substrates like collagen. Using colon cancer cell lines grown on plastic and collagen, we compared the colony staining efficiencies of the widely used methylene blue, and Ethidium bromide (ETeB) stains. Results show that the ETeB protocol works well on plastic and is extremely effective for staining colonies on collagen when compared to methylene blue. The key features and advantages of ETeB technique are; (a) reduction in background for colonies grown on collagen and possibly other substrates, (b) the whole procedure takes less than a minute, (c) no post-stain washing step is required which eliminates colony losses for cell lines that are loosely adherent, (d) colony visualization and counting can be done immediately following the staining procedure using a standard UV illuminator and software, and (e) the method works across a wide variety of cell lines. The simplicity and robustness of this procedure should warrant its usage in both small and large-scale clonogenic experiments.

  2. ABTS assay of phenol oxidase activity in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floch, Carine; Alarcon-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Criquet, Stéven

    2007-12-01

    Phenol oxidases (PO) are involved in degradation of many recalcitrant aromatic compounds and may be sensitive to some pollutants. Hence, their activities may be a useful indicator for evaluating soil quality and health. To this end, the aim of this study was to develop a simple method to assay PO activity directly in bulk samples by spectrophotometric test using 2,2'-azinobis-(-3 ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfononic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) as the substrate. Three Mediterranean soils were used as models. For each soil, we studied the kinetic parameters and the effects of certain factors (i.e. amount of soil, pH, temperature, incubation time and substrate concentration) in order to determine the optimum conditions for the ABTS assay. Results showed that PO attain their optimum activities when incubating 0.1 g of soil at 30 degrees C for 5 min with 10 ml of a Modified Universal Buffer (MUB) at pH 2 and 200 microl of a 0.1 M ABTS solution.

  3. Development of a Calibration Strip for Immunochromatographic Assay Detection Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yue-Ming; Wei, Jian-Chong; Mak, Peng-Un; Vai, Mang-I; Du, Min; Pun, Sio-Hang

    2016-06-29

    With many benefits and applications, immunochromatographic (ICG) assay detection systems have been reported on a great deal. However, the existing research mainly focuses on increasing the dynamic detection range or application fields. Calibration of the detection system, which has a great influence on the detection accuracy, has not been addressed properly. In this context, this work develops a calibration strip for ICG assay photoelectric detection systems. An image of the test strip is captured by an image acquisition device, followed by performing a fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm and maximin-distance algorithm for image segmentation. Additionally, experiments are conducted to find the best characteristic quantity. By analyzing the linear coefficient, an average value of hue (H) at 14 min is chosen as the characteristic quantity and the empirical formula between H and optical density (OD) value is established. Therefore, H, saturation (S), and value (V) are calculated by a number of selected OD values. Then, H, S, and V values are transferred to the RGB color space and a high-resolution printer is used to print the strip images on cellulose nitrate membranes. Finally, verification of the printed calibration strips is conducted by analyzing the linear correlation between OD and the spectral reflectance, which shows a good linear correlation (R² = 98.78%).

  4. Evaluation of irradiation in foods using DNA comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawar, Affaf; Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad; Khan, Q.M.; Ali, T.; Khan, A.I.; Asi, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Comet assay is a rapid, inexpensive and sensitive biological technique to detect DNA damage in food stuffs by irradiation. In this study the Comet assay is applied on foods of plant and animal origins. Samples were irradiated by using 60 Co gamma-radiation source. The applied doses were 2, 6 and 10 kGy for food of plant origin and 0.5, 1 and 2 kGy for meat items. The un-irradiated and irradiated samples were clearly differentiated on the basis of DNA fragmentation. During the electrophoresis study, it was found that in un-irradiated cells DNA remained intact and appeared as Comets without tail whereas in irradiated cells Comets with tails were visible due to stretching of fragmented DNA. Moreover, it was also revealed that the DNA tail length was dose dependent. Dry food stuffs (seeds) showed good results as compared to moist foods (meat, fruits and vegetables) due to the absence of background damage. (author)

  5. LSDS Development for Isotopic Fissile Content Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Park, Chang Je; Park, Geun Il; Lee, Jung Won; Song, Kee Chan

    2010-01-01

    Concerning the sustainable energy supply and green house effect, nuclear energy became the most feasible option to meet the energy demand in Korea. However, the production of the spent nuclear fuel is the inevitable situation. Since the first nuclear power plant started to produce the electricity in Korea, the accumulated amount of spent fuels exceeded 10k tomes recently. The accumulation of the spent fuels is the big issue in the society. Therefore, as an option which strengthens the nuclear proliferation resistance and reduces the amount of spent fuels, sodium fast reactor (SFR) program linked with pyro-processing is under development to re-use the PWR spent fuel and produce the energy. In the process, the produced metallic material involves uranium and TRU (transuranic; neptunium, plutonium, and americium). The uranium-TRU is used to fabricate SFR fuel. The burning the recycled fuel in the reactor is to solve the current spent fuel storage problem and to minimize the actinides accumulation having long half-life. Generally, the spent fuel from PWR has unburned ∼1 % U235, produced ∼0.5 % plutonium from decay chain, ∼3 % fission products, ∼ 0.1 % minor actinides (MA) and uranium remainder. About 1.5 % fissile materials still exist in the spent fuel. Therefore, spent fuel is not only waste but energy resource. The direct and isotopic fissile content assay is the crucial technology for the spent fuel reuse. Additionally, the fissile content analysis will contribute to the optimum storage design and safe spent fuel management. Several nondestructive technologies have been developed for the spent fuel assay; gamma ray measurement, passive and active neutron measurements. Spent fuel emits intense gamma rays and neutrons by (a, n) and spontaneous fission. This intense background has the limitation on the direct analysis of fissile materials. Recently, to analyze the individual fissile content, leadslowing down spectrometer (LSDS) has been being developed in Korea

  6. Localized irradiations, Evaluation through ''comet assay''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorgio, M.D.; Taja, M.R.; Nasazzi, N.B.; Bustos, N.; Cavalieri, H.; Bolgiani, A.

    2000-01-01

    During the last 50 years various radiation accidents involving localized irradiations occurred, resulting mainly from improper handling of sealed sources Co 60 , Cs 137 or Ir 192 at workplaces for industrial gammagraphy. Severe skin reaction may develop at the contact sites. Such inhomogeneous irradiations lead to a differential exposure of lymphocytes in lymphatic tissues or other organs that may recirculate into the peripheral blood producing a mixed irradiated and unirradiated population of lymphocytes. Applying the mathematical models ''Contaminated Poisson'' of Dolphin and Qdr method of Sasaki, a mean dose in the irradiated body area and its size can be estimated from unstable chromosome aberration scoring. This give an indication of the proportion of haemopoietic stem cell compartment involved in the overexposure. There are also different biophysical techniques that can give responses in biological dosimetry. The ''Comet Assay'' (single cell gel electrophoresis) is a sensitive and rapid method for DNA strand break detection in individual cells. The advantages of the technique include: collection of data at the level of individual cell; the need for small numbers of cells per sample; its sensitivity for detecting DNA damage and that virtually any eukaryote cell population is amenable to analysis. The objective of this work is to apply ''Comet Assay'' method to evaluate the effect of radiation on skin and subcutaneous tissues, differentiating irradiated from unirradiated body areas. It could provide a useful tool to estimate the extension and the dose in the irradiated region, contributing with the current techniques. In this first study, we evaluate the alkaline comet assay as a method for detection of DNA radiation induced damage in keratinocytes from primary culture obtained from full thickness skin biopsies of patients requiring grafts. Skin and, particularly, keratinocytes were selected as an appropriate cellular system due to: Skin, the first barrier

  7. Localized irradiations, evaluation through 'Comet Assay'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Taja, Maria R.; Nasazzi, Nora B.; Bustos, N.; Cavalieri, H.; Bolgiani, A.

    2000-01-01

    During the last 50 years various radiation accidents involving localized irradiations occurred, resulting mainly from improper handling of sealed sources of Cobalt 60, Cesium 137 or Iridium 192 at work placed for industrial gammagraphy and other radiation sources. Severe skin reaction may developed at the contact sites. Such inhomogeneous irradiations lead to a differential exposure of lymphocytes in lymphatic tissues or other organs that may recirculate into the peripheral blood producing a mixed irradiated and unirradiated population of lymphocytes. Applying the mathematical models 'Contaminated Poisson' of Dolphin and Qdr method of Sasaki, a mean dose in the irradiated body area and its size can be estimated from unstable chromosome aberration scoring. There are also different biophysical techniques that can give response in localized irradiations. Biological dosimetry is a necessary complement to physical and clinical dosimetries. Thus, there is increasing interest in the assessment of biological markers that permit the detection of radiation induced damage in the localized irradiations. The 'Comet Assay' (single cell gel electrophoresis) is a sensitive, rapid and relatively inexpensive method for measuring DNA damage in individual cells. Single cells are embedded in agarose on microscope slides, lysed to remove the majority of the proteins, electrophoresed, then stained with ethidium bromide in order to visualize the DNA. When visualized using a fluorescent microscope, DNA of undamaged cells appears as a spherical mass occupying the cavity formed by the lysed cell. Following radiation damage, the smaller the fragment size and the grater the number of fragments of DNA, the grater the percentage of DNA that it is able to migrate in an electric field, forming a comet image. The assay can be performed under alkaline conditions to examine DNA single strand breaks (SSBs), or in non denaturing (neutral) conditions to measure double strand breaks (DSBs) in individual

  8. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Assayed Quality Control Material for Clinical Microbiology Assays. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is classifying the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  9. Assessment of the microscreen phage-induction assay for screening hazardous wastes (1989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houk, V.S.; DeMarini, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Microscreen phage-induction assay, which quantitatively measures the induction of prophage Lambda in Escherichia coli WP2s(Lambda), was used to test 14 crude (unfractionated) hazardous industrial-waste samples for genotoxic activity in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. Eleven of the 14 wastes induced prophage, and induction was observed at concentrations as low as 0.4 picograms per ml. Comparisons of the mutagenic activity of these waste samples in Salmonella and their ability to induce prophage Lambda indicate that the phage-induction assay was a more-sensitive indicator of genetic damage for this group of wastes. All but one of the wastes that were mutagenic to Salmonella were detected by the phage-induction assay, and 5 wastes not mutagenic to Salmonella were genetically active in the phage assay. The enhanced ability of the phage-induction assay to detect genotoxic activity may be related to the constituents comprising these waste samples. Partial chemical characterizations of the wastes showed high concentrations of carcinogenic metals, solvents, and chlorinated compounds, most of which are detected poorly by the Salmonella assay.

  10. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication

  11. Glucuronoyl Esterase Screening and Characterization Assays Utilizing Commercially Available Benzyl Glucuronic Acid Ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampus Sunner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research on glucuronoyl esterases (GEs has been hampered by the lack of enzyme assays based on easily obtainable substrates. While benzyl d-glucuronic acid ester (BnGlcA is a commercially available substrate that can be used for GE assays, several considerations regarding substrate instability, limited solubility and low apparent affinities should be made. In this work we discuss the factors that are important when using BnGlcA for assaying GE activity and show how these can be applied when designing BnGlcA-based GE assays for different applications: a thin-layer chromatography assay for qualitative activity detection, a coupled-enzyme spectrophotometric assay that can be used for high-throughput screening or general activity determinations and a HPLC-based detection method allowing kinetic determinations. The three-level experimental procedure not merely facilitates routine, fast and simple biochemical characterizations but it can also give rise to the discovery of different GEs through an extensive screening of heterologous Genomic and Metagenomic expression libraries.

  12. Serum gonadotropins levels in childhood. Critical comparison between immunoradiometric assays and radioimmunoassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertogh, R. De; Vankrieken, L. (Physiology of Human Reproduction Research Unit, University of Louvain, School of Medicine, Brussels (Belgium)); Wolter, R.; Vliet, G. Van (Hopital Universitaire des Enfants, Reine Fabiola, Free University of Brussels (Belgium))

    1989-01-01

    The complex changes in serum LH and FSH levels from infancy to adulthood are diversely evaluated by radioimmunoassays or bioassays. The relative lack of sensitivity and specificity of radioimmunoassay, using polyclonal antibodies, could possibly be overcome by new immunoradiometric assays, using specific antibodies to LH and FSH. Significant differences were indeed observed between radioimmunoassays and immunoradiometric assays. During the prepubertal period, LH levels, measured by the immunoradiometric assays, were below the sensitivity of the method in the majority of the samples. LH levels were, however, well detectable when measured with radioimmunoassay, showing the heterogeneity of circulating LH structures. At the onset of puberty, LH levels increased at least 3 to 4 times in both sexes, when measured with immunoradiometric assays, whereas their increase was only 20 to 60% with the radioimmunoassays. FSH levels remained well detectable in the prepubertal period whether measured by immunoradiometric or radioimmunoassays. At pubertal onset, FSH increase in both sexes was more important in the immunoradiometric assays. The results obtained with immunoradiometric assays give a better insight into the quantitative and qualitative function of the gonadotropes during childhood. The almost complete absence of LH during the prepubertal period and the steep increase at the onset of puberty better reflects the reported data obtained with bioassays. The persistance of significant levels of FSH in the prepubertal ages, and the lesser increase at the onset of puberty, when compared with LH, illustrates that the individual regulation of LH and FSH secretion vary over time and is influenced by developmental factors. (author).

  13. A novel reporter system for neutralizing and enhancing antibody assay against dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ke-Yu; Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Zhen-You; Li, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Tao; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Shi, Pei-Yong; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-02-18

    Dengue virus (DENV) still poses a global public health threat, and no vaccine or antiviral therapy is currently available. Antibody plays distinct roles in controlling DENV infections. Neutralizing antibody is protective against DENV infection, whereas sub-neutralizing concentration of antibody can increase DENV infection, termed antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Plaque-based assay represents the most widely accepted method measuring neutralizing or enhancing antibodies. In this study, a novel reporter virus-based system was developed for measuring neutralization and ADE activity. A stable Renilla luciferase reporter DENV (Luc-DENV) that can produce robust luciferase signals in BHK-21 and K562 cells were used to establish the assay and validated against traditional plaque-based assay. Luciferase value analysis using various known DENV-specific monoclonal antibodies showed good repeatability and a well linear correlation with conventional plaque-based assays. The newly developed assay was finally validated with clinical samples from infected animals and individuals. This reporter virus-based assay for neutralizing and enhancing antibody evaluation is rapid, lower cost, and high throughput, and will be helpful for laboratory detection and epidemiological investigation for DENV antibodies.

  14. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gagnon, David [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Gjoerup, Ole [Molecular Oncology Research Institute, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: Peter.Bullock@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  15. Development and evaluation of a nested-PCR assay for Senecavirus A diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feronato, Cesar; Leme, Raquel A; Diniz, Jaqueline A; Agnol, Alais Maria Dall; Alfieri, Alice F; Alfieri, Amauri A

    2018-02-01

    Senecavirus A (SVA) has been associated with vesicular disease in weaned and adult pigs and with high mortality of newborn piglets. This study aimed to establish a nested-PCR assay for the routine diagnosis of SVA infection. Tissue samples (n = 177) were collected from 37 piglets of 18 pig farms located in four different Brazilian states. For the nested-PCR, a primer set was defined to amplify an internal VP1 fragment of 316 bp of SVA genome. Of the 37 piglets, 15 (40.5%) and 23 (62.2%) were positive for the SVA in the RT-PCR and nested-PCR assays, respectively. The SVA RNA was detected in 61/177 (34.5%) samples with the RT-PCR, while the nested-PCR assay showed 84/177 (47.5%) samples with the virus (p PCR and nested-PCR assays, respectively. Nucleotide sequencing analysis revealed similarities of 98.7-100% among SVA Brazilian strains and of 86.6-98% with SVA strains from other countries. The nested-PCR assay in this study was suitable to recover the SVA RNA in biological specimens, piglets, and/or herds that were considered as negative in the RT-PCR assay, and is proposed for the routine investigation of the SVA infection in piglets, especially when other techniques are not available or when a great number of samples has to be examined.

  16. Microbiological assay for the determination of meropenem in pharmaceutical dosage form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Andreas S L; Weisheimer, Vanessa; Oppe, Tércio P; Steppe, Martin; Schapoval, Elfrides E S

    2005-04-01

    Meropenem is a highly active carbapenem antibiotic used in the treatment of a wide range of serious infections. The present work reports a microbiological assay, applying the cylinder-plate method, for the determination of meropenem in powder for injection. The validation method yielded good results and included linearity, precision, accuracy and specificity. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of meropenem upon the strain of Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 used as the test microorganism. The results of assay were treated statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and were found to be linear (r=0.9999) in the range of 1.5-6.0 microg ml(-1), precise (intra-assay: R.S.D.=0.29; inter-assay: R.S.D.=0.94) and accurate. A preliminary stability study of meropenem was performed to show that the microbiological assay is specific for the determination of meropenem in the presence of its degradation products. The degraded samples were also analysed by the HPLC method. The proposed method allows the quantitation of meropenem in pharmaceutical dosage form and can be used for the drug analysis in routine quality control.

  17. Development of an assay for urinary free cortisol determination on the Technicon Immuno 1 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letellier, M.; Levesque, A.; Daigle, F.

    1997-01-01

    To develop and evaluate a method using an ethyl acetate extraction procedure for the determination of urinary free cortisol on the Technicon Immuno 1 system from Bayer Corporation. We tested the assay precision, linearity, and correlation with the Urinary Kallestad Quanticoat Cortisol radioimmunoassay. We also studied the efficiency of the extraction procedure, performed a cross-reactivity study with different cortisol metabolites, and determined the reference values. The assay shows within-run CVs varying from 1.6 to 5.3% and between-day CVs from 2.7 to 6.1% for urinary free cortisol concentrations from 58 to 1097 nmol/L. The assay demonstrates an excellent linearity and a very good correlation with the Kallestad Quanticoat Cortisol assay (slope 0.94, y-intercept = 29 nmol/L, Sy|x = 54 nmol/L, r = 0.996). The reference values were estimated at 42-281 nmol/d. The extraction procedure shows an average recovery of 99.0% and minimal interference with the cortisol metabolites tested with the exception of cortisone. The evaluation shows that the developed assay has the analytical characteristics required for its utilization in a clinical laboratory. (author)

  18. Metal-amplified Density Assays, (MADAs), including a Density-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DeLISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Gonidec, Mathieu; Shapiro, Nathan D; Kresse, Kayleigh M; Whitesides, George M

    2015-02-21

    This paper reports the development of Metal-amplified Density Assays, or MADAs - a method of conducting quantitative or multiplexed assays, including immunoassays, by using Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure metal-amplified changes in the density of beads labeled with biomolecules. The binding of target analytes (i.e. proteins, antibodies, antigens) to complementary ligands immobilized on the surface of the beads, followed by a chemical amplification of the binding in a form that results in a change in the density of the beads (achieved by using gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules, and electroless deposition of gold or silver), translates analyte binding events into changes in density measureable using MagLev. A minimal model based on diffusion-limited growth of hemispherical nuclei on a surface reproduces the dynamics of the assay. A MADA - when performed with antigens and antibodies - is called a Density-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, or DeLISA. Two immunoassays provided a proof of principle: a competitive quantification of the concentration of neomycin in whole milk, and a multiplexed detection of antibodies against Hepatitis C virus NS3 protein and syphilis T. pallidum p47 protein in serum. MADAs, including DeLISAs, require, besides the requisite biomolecules and amplification reagents, minimal specialized equipment (two permanent magnets, a ruler or a capillary with calibrated length markings) and no electrical power to obtain a quantitative readout of analyte concentration. With further development, the method may be useful in resource-limited or point-of-care settings.

  19. First two-reagent vitamin D assay for general clinical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saida, Fakhri B; Padilla-Chee, Mario; Dou, Chao; Yuan, Chong

    2018-05-01

    Vitamin D is a lipid-soluble molecule that plays key physiological roles in the metabolism of calcium, phosphate and magnesium. Recent studies show that deficiency in vitamin D is linked to cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases and cancer. As a result, regular monitoring of 25-OH vitamin D (the main circulating form of vitamin D) is becoming essential. Current 25-OH vitamin D testing methodologies are cumbersome (too many reagents, long incubation times, phase separation) and are not compatible with general clinical chemistry platforms. Here, we report on a novel method to detect 25-OH vitamin D that is fast (results in 10 min or less), simple (two reagents) and compatible with virtually all general clinical chemistry analyzers. An immunoturbidimetric assay for 25-OH vitamin D (the Diazyme EZ Vitamin D Assay) has been developed using nanoparticles and vitamin D-specific antibodies. The performance of the assay kit, which consists of two reagents and five calibrators, was tested on the Beckman AU680 analyzer (AU680). The new assay was precise, sensitive (LOD = 7.2 nmol/L), linear (up to 390.1 nmol/L) and correlated strongly (R 2  > 0.95) with major commercial 25-OH vitamin D assays. Additionally, the assay was found to be the fastest to date, with the first results obtained within 10 min. Throughput on the AU680 was estimated at over 300 tests per hour. The newly developed 25-OH vitamin D assay is fast, precise and accurate. It can be run on most general chemistry analyzers. This assay aims at providing vitamin D-testing capabilities to all clinical chemistry laboratories. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Isotopic fissile assay of spent fuel in a lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Jeon, Ju Young [Dept. of Fuel Cycle Technology, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Je [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS) system is under development to analyze isotopic fissile content that is applicable to spent fuel and recycled material. The source neutron mechanism for efficient and effective generation was also determined. The source neutron interacts with a lead medium and produces continuous neutron energy, and this energy generates dominant fission at each fissile, below the unresolved resonance region. From the relationship between the induced fissile fission and the fast fission neutron detection, a mathematical assay model for an isotopic fissile material was set up. The assay model can be expanded for all fissile materials. The correction factor for self-shielding was defined in the fuel assay area. The corrected fission signature provides well-defined fission properties with an increase in the fissile content. The assay procedure was also established. The assay energy range is very important to take into account the prominent fission structure of each fissile material. Fission detection occurred according to the change of the Pu239 weight percent (wt%), but the content of U235 and Pu241 was fixed at 1 wt%. The assay result was obtained with 2∼3% uncertainty for Pu239, depending on the amount of Pu239 in the fuel. The results show that LSDS is a very powerful technique to assay the isotopic fissile content in spent fuel and recycled materials for the reuse of fissile materials. Additionally, a LSDS is applicable during the optimum design of spent fuel storage facilities and their management. The isotopic fissile content assay will increase the transparency and credibility of spent fuel storage.

  1. Evaluation of tetrazolium-based semiautomatic colorimetric assay for measurement of human antitumor cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, D.S.; Park, J.G.; Hata, K.; Day, R.; Herberman, R.B.; Whiteside, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-based colorimetric assay was developed and compared with 51Cr release from different adherent tumor cell targets (human squamous cell carcinoma lines of the head and neck established in our laboratory, melanoma, and colorectal carcinoma) using 5-7-day human lymphokine-activated killer cells and monocyte-depleted peripheral blood lymphocytes as effectors. With adherent tumor cell targets, MTT colorimetry was more sensitive than the 51Cr release assay in measuring the antitumor activity of effectors: median, 4385 (range, 988-8144) versus median, 1061 (range, 582-7294) lytic units (the number of effector cells required to lyse 20% of 5 x 10(3) targets)/10(7) effectors (P less than 0.01). Background effects (without effector cells) were comparable in 4-h assays (9% versus 10%) between MTT colorimetry and 51Cr release. In 24-h assays, MTT colorimetry showed higher antitumor activity (70-100% versus 40-60% lysis at 1:1 effector:target cell ratio) but lower background effects (6% versus 38%) than 51Cr release assay. Thus, MTT colorimetry was more sensitive, did not use radiolabeled targets, required fewer effector cells, and was easier, less expensive, and better adaptable to serial monitoring of effector cell function in cancer patients. This colorimetric assay is especially well suited to adherent tumor cell targets. The use of adherent tumor cell monolayers, as opposed to trypsinized single cell suspensions, provides an opportunity to measure interactions of effector cells with enzymatically unaltered solid tumor targets. Because of the greater sensitivity of the colorimetric assay, the transformation of MTT data into lytic units, as commonly used for 51Cr release assays, required an adjustment to avoid the extrapolation based on the exponential fit equation

  2. Metabolic profiles show specific mitochondrial toxicities in vitro in myotube cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiuwei; Vu, Heather; Liu Liping; Wang, Ting-Chuan; Schaefer, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity has been a serious concern, not only in preclinical drug development but also in clinical trials. In mitochondria, there are several distinct metabolic processes including fatty acid β-oxidation, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and each process contains discrete but often intimately linked steps. Interruption in any one of those steps can cause mitochondrial dysfunction. Detection of inhibition to OXPHOS can be complicated in vivo because intermediate endogenous metabolites can be recycled in situ or circulated systemically for metabolism in other organs or tissues. Commonly used assays for evaluating mitochondrial function are often applied to ex vivo or in vitro samples; they include various enzymatic or protein assays, as well as functional assays such as measurement of oxygen consumption rate, membrane potential, or acidification rates. Metabolomics provides quantitative profiles of overall metabolic changes that can aid in the unraveling of explicit biochemical details of mitochondrial inhibition while providing a holistic view and heuristic understanding of cellular bioenergetics. In this paper, we showed the application of quantitative NMR metabolomics to in vitro myotube cells treated with mitochondrial toxicants, rotenone and antimycin A. The close coupling of the TCA cycle to the electron transfer chain (ETC) in OXPHOS enables specific diagnoses of inhibition to ETC complexes by discrete biochemical changes in the TCA cycle.

  3. Some target assay uncertainties for passive neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensslin, N.; Langner, D.G.; Menlove, H.O.; Miller, M.C.; Russo, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides some target assay uncertainties for passive neutron coincidence counting of plutonium metal, oxide, mixed oxide, and scrap and waste. The target values are based in part on past user experience and in part on the estimated results from new coincidence counting techniques that are under development. The paper summarizes assay error sources and the new coincidence techniques, and recommends the technique that is likely to yield the lowest assay uncertainty for a given material type. These target assay uncertainties are intended to be useful for NDA instrument selection and assay variance propagation studies for both new and existing facilities. 14 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Spectrophotometric Enzyme Assays for High-Throughput Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis Reymond

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews high-throughput screening enzyme assays developed in our laboratory over the last ten years. These enzyme assays were initially developed for the purpose of discovering catalytic antibodies by screening cell culture supernatants, but have proved generally useful for testing enzyme activities. Examples include TLC-based screening using acridone-labeled substrates, fluorogenic assays based on the β-elimination of umbelliferone or nitrophenol, and indirect assays such as the back-titration method with adrenaline and the copper-calcein fluorescence assay for aminoacids.

  5. Time-resolved immunofluorometric assay of serum ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yao [China Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2007-06-15

    This assay is a solid phase, two-site fluoroimmunometric assay based on the direct sandwish technique. Standards or samples containing ferritin are first reacted with immobilized anti-ferritin antibodies. Then the europium-lablled antibodies are reacted with the bound antigen. The range of this assay is 2-1000 ng/mL. The analytical sentivity is better than 0.05 ng/mL. The intra-assay variation and inter-assay variation are both below 5%; This kit was compared with Wallac DELFIA kit. The correlation is r=0.96. (authors)

  6. Nondestructive Assay Options for Spent Fuel Encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jansson, Peter [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2014-10-02

    This report describes the role that nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques and systems of NDA techniques may have in the context of an encapsulation and deep geological repository. The potential NDA needs of an encapsulation and repository facility include safeguards, heat content, and criticality. Some discussion of the facility needs is given, with the majority of the report concentrating on the capability and characteristics of individual NDA instruments and techniques currently available or under development. Particular emphasis is given to how the NDA techniques can be used to determine the heat production of an assembly, as well as meet the dual safeguards needs of 1) determining the declared parameters of initial enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time and 2) detecting defects (total, partial, and bias). The report concludes with the recommendation of three integrated systems that might meet the combined NDA needs of the encapsulation/repository facility.

  7. Development of a Radioactive Waste Assay System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Duck Won; Song, Myung Jae; Shin, Sang Woon; Sung, Kee Bang; Ko, Dae Hach [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Jeong; Park, Jong Mook; Jee, Kwang Yoong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear Act of Korea requires the manifest of low and intermediate level radioactive waste generated at nuclear power plants prior to disposal sites.Individual history records of the radioactive waste should be contained the information about the activity of nuclides in the drum, total activity, weight, the type of waste. A fully automated nuclide analysis assay system, non-destructive analysis and evaluation system of the radioactive waste, was developed through this research project. For the nuclides that could not be analysis directly by MCA, the activities of the representative {gamma}-emitters(Cs-137, Co-60) contained in the drum were measured by using that system. Then scaling factors were used to calculate the activities of {alpha}, {beta}-emitters. Furthermore, this system can automatically mark the analysis results onto the drum surface. An automated drum handling system developed through this research project can reduce the radiation exposure to workers. (author). 41 refs., figs.

  8. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41 degree API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing

  9. Universal fieldable assay with unassisted visual detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelyapov, Nicolas (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A universal detection system based on allosteric aptamers, signal amplification cascade, and eye-detectable phrase transition. A broadly applicable homogeneous detection system is provided. It utilizes components of the blood coagulation cascade in the presence of polystyrene microspheres (MS) as a signal amplifier. Russell's viper venom factor X activator (RVV-X) triggers the cascade, which results in an eye-visible phase transition--precipitation of MS bound to clotted fibrin. An allosteric RNA aptamer, RNA132, with affinity for RVV-X and human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF.sub.165) was created. RNA132 inhibits enzymatic activity of RVV-X. The effector molecule, VEGF.sub.165, reverses the inhibitory activity of RNA132 on RVV-X and restores its enzymatic activity, thus triggering the cascade and enabling the phase transition. Similar results were obtained for another allosteric aptamer modulated by a protein tyrosine phosphatase. The assay is instrumentation-free for both processing and readout.

  10. Development of an integrated assay facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molesworth, T.V.; Bailey, M.; Findlay, D.J.S.; Sene, M.R.; Swinhoe, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Initial results of active neutron and active gamma-ray interrogation of a 500 liter cemented simulated CAGR intermediate level radioactive waste drum are described. The basis of the interrogation systems was the Harwell electron linear accelerator HELIOS, which was used to produce the interrogating neutrons and gamma-rays. Several sets of neutron detectors were located around the drum to count signature neutrons. The responses of the system were measured by placing known samples at many different locations within the drum. In general, measured responses confirmed calculated responses. Good agreement was obtained for the azimuthal angle dependences. The absolute responses agreed well for gamma-ray interrogation, but the calculations were apparently over-estimates for neutron interrogation. Those aspects requiring consideration in the practical application of assay techniques are identified. 8 refs., 6 figs

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON MILK CASEIN ASSAY METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODICA CĂPRIłĂ

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Casein, the main milk protein was determined by different assay methods: the gravimetric method, the method based on the neutralization of the NaOH excess used for the casein precipitate solving and the method based on the titration of the acetic acid used for the casein precipitation. The last method is the simplest one, with the fewer steps, and also with the lowest error degree. The results of the experiment revealed that the percentage of casein from the whole milk protein represents between 72.6–81.3% in experiment 1, between 73.6–81.3% in experiment 2 and between 74.3–81% in experiment 3.

  12. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, George N

    2017-01-01

    Food allergy is a public health concern especially after recognizing its constantly increased prevalence and severity. Despite careful reading of food ingredient statements, food allergic individuals may experience reactions caused by "hidden", "masked", or "contaminated" proteins that are known major allergens. Many techniques have been developed to detect even small traces of food allergens, for clinical or laboratory purposes. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is one of the best validated and most routinely used immunoassay in allergy research, in allergy diagnosis in allergy-related quality control in various industries. Although as a technique it has been implemented for the last 45 years, the evolution in biochemistry allowed the development of ultrasensitive ELISA variations that are capable of measuring quantities in the scale of picograms, rendering ELISA attractive, robust, and very famous.

  13. Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy with AFP driving Apoptin gene shows potent antitumor effect in hepatocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kang-Jian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy and viral therapy are used for cancer therapy for many years, but the results are less than satisfactory. Our aim was to construct a new recombinant adenovirus which is more efficient to kill hepatocarcinoma cells but more safe to normal cells. Methods By using the Cancer Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy strategy, Apoptin, a promising cancer therapeutic gene was inserted into the double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus AD55 in which E1A gene was driven by alpha fetoprotein promoter along with a 55 kDa deletion in E1B gene to form AD55-Apoptin. The anti-tumor effects and safety were examined by western blotting, virus yield assay, real time polymerase chain reaction, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Hoechst33342 staining, Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, xenograft tumor model, Immunohistochemical assay, liver function analysis and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay. Results The recombinant virus AD55-Apoptin has more significant antitumor effect for hepatocelluar carcinoma cell lines (in vitro than that of AD55 and even ONYX-015 but no or little impair on normal cell lines. Furthermore, it also shows an obvious in vivo antitumor effect on the Huh-7 liver carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with bigger beginning tumor volume till about 425 mm3 but has no any damage on the function of liver. The induction of apoptosis is involved in AD55-Apoptin induced antitumor effects. Conclusion The AD55-Apoptin can be a potential anti-hepatoma agent with remarkable antitumor efficacy as well as higher safety in cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy system.

  14. Erythrocytes and cell line-based assays to evaluate the cytoprotective activity of antioxidant components obtained from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Albert; Martínez, Verónica; Mitjans, Montserrat; Balboa, Elena; Conde, Enma; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative stress can damage cellular components including DNA, proteins or lipids, and may cause several skin diseases. To protect from this damage and addressing consumer's appeal to natural products, antioxidants obtained from algal and vegetal extracts are being proposed as antioxidants to be incorporated into formulations. Thus, the development of reliable, quick and economic in vitro methods to study the cytoactivity of these products is a meaningful requirement. A combination of erythrocyte and cell line-based assays was performed on two extracts from Sargassum muticum, one from Ulva lactuca, and one from Castanea sativa. Antioxidant properties were assessed in erythrocytes by the TBARS and AAPH assays, and cytotoxicity and antioxidant cytoprotection were assessed in HaCaT and 3T3 cells by the MTT assay. The extracts showed no antioxidant activity on the TBARS assay, whereas their antioxidant capacity in the AAPH assay was demonstrated. On the cytotoxicity assays, extracts showed low toxicity, with IC50 values higher than 200μg/mL. C. sativa extract showed the most favourable antioxidant properties on the antioxidant cytoprotection assays; while S. muticum and U. lactuca extracts showed a slight antioxidant activity. This battery of methods was useful to characterise the biological antioxidant properties of these natural extracts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating the genotoxic effects of workers exposed to lead using micronucleus assay, comet assay and TCR gene mutation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhijian; Lou Jianlin; Chen Shijie; Zheng Wei; Wu Wei; Jin Lifen; Deng Hongping; He Jiliang

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic effects of lead (Pb) exposure, 25 workers in a workplace producing storage battery were monitored for three genetic end-points using micronucleus (MN) assay, comet assay and TCR gene mutation test. Twenty-five controls were matched with workers according to age, gender and smoking. The air Pb concentration in the workplace was 1.26 mg/m 3 . All subjects were measured for Pb concentration of blood by atom absorption spectrophotometry. The mean Pb concentration of blood in workers (0.32 mg/l) was significantly higher than that in controls (0.02 mg/l). The results of MN test showed that the mean micronuclei rate (MNR) and mean micronucleated cells rate (MCR) in workers were 9.04 ± 1.51 per mille and 7.76 ± 1.23 per mille , respectively, which were significantly higher than those (2.36 ± 0.42 per mille and 1.92 ± 0.31 per mille ) in controls (P -4 and 1.74 ± 0.17 x 10 -4 , respectively, there was no significant difference between workers and controls (P > 0.05). The results of our study indicated that the genetic damage was detectable in 25 workers occupationally exposed to lead

  16. First direct fluorescence polarization assay for the detection and quantification of spirolides in mussel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otero, Paz; Alfonso, Amparo [Departamento de Farmacologia, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Universitario s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Alfonso, Carmen [CIFGA Laboratorio, Plaza de Santo Domingo, 1, 27001 Lugo (Spain); Araoz, Romulo; Molgo, Jordi [CNRS, Institut de Neurobiologie Alfred Fessard - FRC2118, Laboratoire de Neurobiologie et Developpement UPR3294, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Vieytes, Mercedes R. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Botana, Luis M., E-mail: luis.botana@usc.es [Departamento de Farmacologia, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Universitario s/n, 27002 Lugo (Spain)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A direct assay based in the binding of nAChR to spirolide toxins by FP is described. {yields} A direct relationship between FP and 13-desMeC in the range of 10-500 nM is obtained. {yields} FP is dependent on the 13, 19-didesMeC in a higher concentration range than 13-desMeC. {yields} FP assay is a sensitive method to detect and quantify 13-desMeC in mussel samples. - Abstract: In 2009, we achieve the first inhibition FP assay to detect imine cyclic toxins. In the present paper we propose a new FP assay for direct quantify spirolides. This new method has resulted in significant improvement of sensitivity, rapidity and accessibility. In the method design, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata membranes labelled with a derivative of fluorescein was used. Spirolides, 13-desmethyl spirolide C (13-desMeC) and 13,19-didesmethyl spirolide C (13,19-didesMeC) were extracted and purified from cultures of the Alexandrium ostenfeldii dinoflagellate. Data showed the decrease of FP when toxin concentration was increased. Thus, a relationship between the FP units and the spirolides amount present in a sample was obtained. This direct assay is a reproducible, simple and very sensitive method with a detection limit about 25 nM for 13-desMeC and 150 nM for 13,19-didesMeC. The procedure was used to measure spirolides in mussel samples using an extraction and clean up protocol suitable for the FP assay. Results obtained show that this method is able to quantify 13-desMeC in the range of 50-350 {mu}g kg{sup -1} meat. Other liposoluble toxins did not interfere with the assay, proving a specific method. Moreover, the matrix do not affect in the range of toxin concentrations that involving risk of spirolides intoxication.

  17. First direct fluorescence polarization assay for the detection and quantification of spirolides in mussel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, Paz; Alfonso, Amparo; Alfonso, Carmen; Araoz, Romulo; Molgo, Jordi; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A direct assay based in the binding of nAChR to spirolide toxins by FP is described. → A direct relationship between FP and 13-desMeC in the range of 10-500 nM is obtained. → FP is dependent on the 13, 19-didesMeC in a higher concentration range than 13-desMeC. → FP assay is a sensitive method to detect and quantify 13-desMeC in mussel samples. - Abstract: In 2009, we achieve the first inhibition FP assay to detect imine cyclic toxins. In the present paper we propose a new FP assay for direct quantify spirolides. This new method has resulted in significant improvement of sensitivity, rapidity and accessibility. In the method design, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata membranes labelled with a derivative of fluorescein was used. Spirolides, 13-desmethyl spirolide C (13-desMeC) and 13,19-didesmethyl spirolide C (13,19-didesMeC) were extracted and purified from cultures of the Alexandrium ostenfeldii dinoflagellate. Data showed the decrease of FP when toxin concentration was increased. Thus, a relationship between the FP units and the spirolides amount present in a sample was obtained. This direct assay is a reproducible, simple and very sensitive method with a detection limit about 25 nM for 13-desMeC and 150 nM for 13,19-didesMeC. The procedure was used to measure spirolides in mussel samples using an extraction and clean up protocol suitable for the FP assay. Results obtained show that this method is able to quantify 13-desMeC in the range of 50-350 μg kg -1 meat. Other liposoluble toxins did not interfere with the assay, proving a specific method. Moreover, the matrix do not affect in the range of toxin concentrations that involving risk of spirolides intoxication.

  18. Viability-qPCR for detecting Legionella: Comparison of two assays based on different amplicon lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M

    2015-08-01

    Two different real-time quantitative PCR (PMA-qPCR) assays were applied for quantification of Legionella spp. by targeting a long amplicon (approx 400 bp) of 16S rRNA gene and a short amplicon (approx. 100 bp) of 5S rRNA gene. Purified DNA extracts from pure cultures of Legionella spp. and from environmental water samples were quantified. Application of the two assays to quantify Legionella in artificially contaminated water achieved that both assays were able to detect Legionella over a linear range of 10 to 10(5) cells ml(-1). A statistical analysis of the standard curves showed that both assays were linear with a good correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.99) between the Ct and the copy number. Amplification with the reference assay was the most effective for detecting low copy numbers (1 bacterium per PCR mixture). Using selective quantification of viable Legionella by the PMA-qPCR method we obtained a greater inhibition of the amplification of the 400-bp 16S gene fragment (Δlog(10) = 3.74 ± 0.39 log(10) GU ml(-1)). A complete inhibition of the PCR signal was obtained when heat-killed cells in a concentration below 1 × 10(5) cells ml(-1) were pretreated with PMA. Analysing short amplicon sizes led to only 2.08 log reductions in the Legionella dead-cell signal. When we tested environmental water samples, the two qPCR assays were in good agreement according to the kappa index (0.741). Applying qPCR combined with PMA treatment, we also obtained a good agreement (kappa index 0.615). The comparison of quantitative results shows that both assays yielded the same quantification sensitivity (mean log = 4.59 vs mean log = 4.31). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial Assay of Soil Mold Isolates from Wonorejo Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septia Arisanti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to an examine antimicrobial activity of 34 soil molds isolates from the Wonorejo Surabaya on the growth of Gram negatif bacteria (Escherichia coli and Coliform Bacteria Group, Gram positif bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Antimicrobial ability detected with modification of dual culture antagonism assay in Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA medium. The result showed that genus Aspergillus, Scopulariopsis, Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Fusarium, and Trichoderma were able to inhibit E. coli; while genus Aspergillus, Scopulariopsis, Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Exophiala, Stachybotrys, and Acremonium inhibit B. subtilis; further on only genus Aspergillus could inhibit group of Coliform bacteria; and genus Scopulariopsis, Penicillium, Trichoderma, and Absidia inhibited the growth of yeast S. cerevisiae.

  20. Evaluation of Robust Estimators Applied to Fluorescence Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Ruotsalainen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated standard robust methods in the estimation of fluorescence signal in novel assays used for determining the biomolecule concentrations. The objective was to obtain an accurate and reliable estimate using as few observations as possible by decreasing the influence of outliers. We assumed the true signals to have Gaussian distribution, while no assumptions about the outliers were made. The experimental results showed that arithmetic mean performs poorly even with the modest deviations. Further, the robust methods, especially the M-estimators, performed extremely well. The results proved that the use of robust methods is advantageous in the estimation problems where noise and deviations are significant, such as in biological and medical applications.