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Sample records for peripheral venous access

  1. Near-infrared vascular imaging in peripheral venous and arterial access

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    Cuper, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    Venous and arterial access are among the most widespread medical procedures performed in children. Especially in young children venous and arterial access can be problematic due to tiny blood vessels that are difficult to localize beneath a layer of baby fat. This thesis describes the development and clinical evaluation of the VascuLuminator, a guidance tool for peripheral venous and arterial access by visualizing blood vessels underneath the skin with near-infrared light. In a third to a fif...

  2. Vascular access in neonatology: peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter

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    Marcia Lienemann

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to present aspects of peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter, highlighting important points in choosing the type of access. For the passage of peripherally inserted central catheter is previously performing specific course necessary, while the primary indication occurs when it is necessary to access the patient's stay for a long period of time. Whereas peripheral venipuncture is the most appropriate in cases of needing an IV line quickly and safely, for the administration of fluids, blood collection, blood transfusion and other.

  3. Peripheral Insertion of a Central Venous Access Device Under Fluoroscopic Guidance Using a Peripherally Accessed System (PAS) Port in the Forearm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sojiro; Morita, Yoshitaka; Awatani, Toshihide; Takasaki, Motohiro; Horimi, Tadashi; Ozawa, Zen

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the technique, efficacy, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a peripherally accessed system (PAS) port via the forearm. Methods: Beginning in July 1994, 105 central venous access devices were implanted in 104 patients for the long-term infusion of antibiotics or antineoplasmic agents, blood products, or parenteral nutrition. The devices was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance with real-time venography from a peripheral route. Results: All ports were successfully implanted. There were no procedure-related complications. No thrombosis or local infection was observed; however, in six patients catheter-related phlebitis occurred. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a PAS port via the forearm is safe and efficacious, and injection of contrast medium through a peripheral IV catheter before introduction of the catheter helps to avoid catheter-related phlebitis

  4. Peripheral Venous Access Ports: Outcomes Analysis in 109 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodner, Leonard J.; Nosher, John L.; Patel, Kaushik M.; Siegel, Randall L.; Biswal, Rajiv; Gribbin, Christopher E.; Tokarz, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective outcomes analysis of central venous catheters with peripheral venous access ports, with comparison to published data.Methods: One hundred and twelve central venous catheters with peripherally placed access ports were placed under sonographic guidance in 109 patients over a 4-year period. Ports were placed for the administration of chemotherapy, hyperalimentation, long-term antibiotic therapy, gamma-globulin therapy, and frequent blood sampling. A vein in the upper arm was accessed in each case and the catheter was passed to the superior vena cava or right atrium. Povidone iodine skin preparation was used in the first 65 port insertions. A combination of Iodophor solution and povidone iodine solution was used in the last 47 port insertions. Forty patients received low-dose (1 mg) warfarin sodium beginning the day after port insertion. Three patients received higher doses of warfarin sodium for preexistent venous thrombosis. Catheter performance and complications were assessed and compared with published data.Results: Access into the basilic or brachial veins was obtained in all cases. Ports remained functional for a total of 28,936 patient days. The port functioned in 50% of patients until completion of therapy, or the patient's expiration. Ports were removed prior to completion of therapy in 18% of patients. Eleven patients (9.9% of ports placed) suffered an infectious complication (0.38 per thousand catheter-days)-in nine, at the port implantation site, in two along the catheter. In all 11 instances the port was removed. Port pocket infection in the early postoperative period occurred in three patients (4.7%) receiving a Betadine prep vs two patients (4.2%) receiving a standard O.R. prep. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.9). Venous thrombosis occurred in three patients (6.8%) receiving warfarin sodium and in two patients (3%) not receiving warfarin sodium. This difference was not statistically significant

  5. Does the preference of peripheral versus central venous access in peripheral blood stem cell collection/yield change stem cell kinetics in autologous stem cell transplantation?

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    Dogu, Mehmet Hilmi; Kaya, Ali Hakan; Berber, Ilhami; Sari, İsmail; Tekgündüz, Emre; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Iskender, Dicle; Kayıkçı, Ömur; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Keskin, Ali; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2016-02-01

    Central venous access is often used during apheresis procedure in stem cell collection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether central or peripheral venous access has an effect on stem cell yield and the kinetics of the procedure and the product in patients undergoing ASCT after high dose therapy. A total of 327 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The use of peripheral venous access for stem cell yield was significantly more frequent in males compared to females (p = 0.005). Total volume of the product was significantly lower in central venous access group (p = 0.046). As being a less invasive procedure, peripheral venous access can be used for stem cell yield in eligible selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Near-infrared vascular imaging in peripheral venous and arterial access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuper, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    Venous and arterial access are among the most widespread medical procedures performed in children. Especially in young children venous and arterial access can be problematic due to tiny blood vessels that are difficult to localize beneath a layer of baby fat. This thesis describes the development

  7. Venous access: options, approaches and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asch, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Venous access is an essential part of medical practice. It is needed to obtain blood samples to make the diagnosis and to administer fluids or medicines as part of treatment. Although relatively new in the history of medicine, the placement and maintenance of the various venous access devices now occupies a significant portion of many vascular and interventional radiology practices. Thus, it is important to have a thorough understanding of these devices and their uses. The first long-term venous access devices were used in 1973. These were placed via a surgical cut-down on the subclavian vein. In 1982, the first subcutaneous implantable ports were described. These procedures were initially performed by surgeons, but over the last 5-10 years, both the insertion and management of these devices has shifted to interventional radiologists. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines have almost completely supplanted the use of standard central lines (Fig. 1). A number of factors have facilitated this - namely, ready and less expensive room access, outpatient procedure and radiologists' accessibility and familiarity with image-guidance procedures and catheters and guide wires. (author)

  8. Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltz, Jan P.; Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O.; Wittenberg, Guenther; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

  9. Interventional radiology in the provision and maintenance of long-term central venous access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, S.M.; Given, M.; Marshall, N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Establishing and maintaining venous access forms an increasing proportion of the workload in interventional radiology. Several patient groups require medium-term to long-term venous catheters for a variety of purposes, including chemotherapy, long-term antimicrobials, parenteral nutrition, short-term access for haemodialysis or exhausted haemodialysis. Often, these catheters are required for treatment and frequent blood testing, which can quickly exhaust the peripheral veins. Venous access devices include implantable catheters (ports), tunnelled catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters, which have different functions, advantages and limitations. Imaging-guided placement is the preferred method of insertion in many institutions because of higher success rates and radiologists are well suited to address catheter complications.

  10. Long-term Outcome of Peripherally Implanted Venous Access Ports in the Forearm in Female Cancer Patients

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    Klösges, Laura, E-mail: l.kloesges@uni-bonn.de; Meyer, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.meyer@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Boschewitz, Jack, E-mail: jack.boschewitz@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Andersson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.andersson@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rudlowski, Christian, E-mail: c.rudlowski@evk.de [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bergisch Gladbach, Department of Gynecology (Germany); Schild, Hans H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Wilhelm, Kai, E-mail: kai.wilhelm@ek-bonn.de [Ev. Kliniken Bonn, Johanniter-Krankenhaus, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the long-term outcome of peripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm at our institution in a female patient collective.MethodsBetween June 2002 and May 2011, a total of 293 female patients with an underlying malignancy had 299 forearm ports implanted in our interventional radiology suite. The mean age of the cohort was 55 ± 12 years (range 26–81 years). The majority of women suffered from breast (59.5 %) or ovarian cancer (28.1 %). Complications were classified as infectious complications, thrombotic and nonthrombotic catheter dysfunction (dislocation of the catheter or port chamber, fracture with/without embolization or kinking of the catheter, port occlusion), and others.ResultsWe analyzed a total of 90,276 catheter days in 248 port systems (47 patients were lost to follow-up). The mean device service interval was 364 days per catheter (range 8–2,132, median 223 days, CI 311–415, SD 404). Sixty-seven early (≤30 days from implantation) or late complications (>30 days) occurred during the observation period (0.74/1,000 catheter days). Common complications were port infection (0.18/1,000 days), thrombotic dysfunction (0.12/1,000 days), and skin dehiscence (0.12/1,000 days). Nonthrombotic dysfunction occurred in a total of 21 cases (0.23/1,000 days) and seemed to cumulate on the venous catheter entry site on the distal upper arm.ConclusionPeripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm are a safe alternative to chest or upper-arm ports in female oncology patients. Special attention should be paid to signs of skin dehiscence and nonthrombotic dysfunction, especially when used for long-term treatment.

  11. Peripheral arteriovenous fistula as vascular access for long-term chemotherapy.

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    Kovalyov, Oleksiy O; Kostyuk, Oleksandr G; Tkachuk, Tetyana V

    To provide long-term vascular access in clinical oncology peripheral forearm veins (up to 95% of patients in Ukraine), central venous access and "complete implanted vascular systems" are used most often. Many oncology patients have contraindications to catheterization of superior vena cava. Besides, exploitation of central veins is associated with potential technical and infectious complications. The aim - to study short-term and long-term results of arteriovenous fistula exploitation as vascular access for continuous anticancer therapy. Peripheral venous bed status in 41 oncology patients taking long-term chemotherapy treatment is analyzed in the article. Doppler sonography, morphologic and immune histochemical analyses were used in the study. Doppler sonography found qualitative and quantitative changes in forearm veins at different time periods after initiation of chemotherapy in the majority of patients. The major morphologic manifestations of venous wall damage were chemical phlebitis, local or extended hardening of venous wall, venous thrombosis and extravasations with necrosis and subsequent paravasal tissue sclerosis. Alternative vascular access created in 12 patients completely met the adequacy criteria (safety, multiple use, longevity, realization of the designed therapy program). The conclusion was made about inapplicability of forearm veins for long-term administration of cytostatic agents. If it is impossible to use central veins, arteriovenous fistula can become an alternative vascular access.

  12. Complication of Hemodialysis Access: A Case Report of Venous Hypertension

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    Sadegh Asadi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular access for dialysis is essential for these patients with end-stage renal disease, improvements in hemodialysis managment have lead to extended life expectancy. The creation and maintenance of hemoaccess occupies a significant portion of most vascular and general surgery practices.Venous hypertension due to arteriovenous fistula is usually secondary to venous outlet obstruction. Side to side proximal artery arteriovenous fistula serves as a certain cause of hemodialysis, but it is rarely reported as a peripheral venous hypertension cause. We are reporting a case with developed venous hypertension having dermal injuries in the arm. The patient underwent successful side-to-side radio cephalic fistula creation in the snuffbox a year ago.

  13. Inflammation and peripheral venous disease. The San Diego Population Study.

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    Cushman, M; Callas, P W; Allison, M A; Criqui, M H

    2014-09-02

    The inflammatory response to healing in venous thrombosis might cause vein damage and post-thrombotic syndrome. Inflammation may also be involved in venous insufficiency apart from deep-vein thrombosis. We studied the association of inflammation markers with venous insufficiency in a general population sample. We characterised 2,404 men and women in a general population cohort for peripheral venous disease and its severity using physical exam, symptom assessment, and venous ultrasound. Inflammation markers, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, interleukin 1-beta (IL-1-beta), IL-8, IL-10, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin, monocyte chemoattractant-1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) were compared in 352 case participants with peripheral venous disease and 352 controls with no venous abnormalities frequency matched to cases by age, sex and race. Associations were also evaluated including a subset of 108 cases of severe venous disease, as previously defined. Odds ratios (95% CI), for peripheral venous disease for biomarkers in the top quartile (adjusting for age, race, sex, body mass index and history of venous thrombosis) were 1.8 (1.1-3.0), 1.6 (1.0-2.5) and 1.5 (0.9-2.3) for CRP, fibrinogen and IL-10, respectively. Associations were larger considering cases of severe venous disease, with odds ratios for these three analytes of 2.6 (1.2-5.9), 3.1 (1.3-7.3) and 2.2 (1.1-4.4), and for IL-8: 2.4 (1.1-5.2). There was no association of IL-1-beta, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, MCP-1 or VEGF with overall cases or severe venous disease. In conclusion, a subset of inflammation markers were associated with increased risk of peripheral venous disease, suggesting potential therapeutic targets for treatment.

  14. Correlation of Lactic Acid and Base Deficit Values Obtained From Arterial and Peripheral Venous Samples in a Pediatric Population During Intraoperative Care.

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    Bordes, Brianne M; Walia, Hina; Sebastian, Roby; Martin, David; Tumin, Dmitry; Tobias, Joseph D

    2017-12-01

    Lactic acid and base deficit (BD) values are frequently monitored in the intensive care unit and operating room setting to evaluate oxygenation, ventilation, cardiac output, and peripheral perfusion. Although generally obtained from an arterial cannula, such access may not always be available. The current study prospectively investigates the correlation of arterial and peripheral venous values of BD and lactic acid. The study cohort included 48 patients. Arterial BD values ranged from -8 to 4 mEq/L and peripheral venous BD values ranged from -8 to 4 mEq/L. Arterial lactic acid values ranged from 0.36 to 2.45 μmol/L and peripheral venous lactic acid values ranged from 0.38 to 4 μmol/L. The arterial BD (-0.4 ± 2.2 mEq/L) was not significantly different from the peripheral venous BD (-0.6 ± 2.2 mEq/L). The arterial lactic acid (1.0 ± 0.5 μmol/L) was not significantly different from the peripheral venous lactic acid (1.1 ± 0.6 μmol/L). Pearson correlation coefficients demonstrated a very high correlation between arterial and peripheral venous BD ( r = .88, P lactic acid ( r = .67, P lactic acid corresponded to a 0.9-unit increase in peripheral venous lactic acid (95% CI: 0.6-1.2; P lactic acid and BD values.

  15. Management of venous hypertension following arteriovenous fistula creation for hemodialysis access

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    Varun Mittal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Venous hypertension (VH is a distressing complication following the creation of arteriovenous fistula (AVF. The aim of management is to relieve edema with preservation of AVF. Extensive edema increases surgical morbidity with the loss of hemodialysis access. We present our experience in management of VH. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 37 patients with VH managed between July 2005 to May 2014. Patient demographics, evaluation, and procedures performed were noted. A successful outcome of management with surgical ligation (SL, angioembolization (AE, balloon dilatation (BD or endovascular stent (EVS was defined by immediate disappearance of thrill and murmur with resolution of edema in the next 48-72 h, no demonstrable flow during check angiogram and resolution of edema with preservation of AVF respectively. Results: All 8 distal AVF had peripheral venous stenosis and were managed with SL in 7 and BD in one patient. In 29 proximal AVF, central and peripheral venous stenosis was present in 16 and 13 patients respectively. SL, AE, BD, and BD with EVS were done in 18, 5, 4, and 3 patients, respectively. All patients had a successful outcome. SL was associated with wound related complications in 11 (29.73 % patients. A total of 7 AVF were salvaged. One had restenosis after BD and was managed with AE. BD, EVS, and AE had no associated morbidity. Conclusions: Management of central and peripheral venous stenosis with VH should be individualized and in selected cases it seems preferable to secure a new access in another limb and close the native AVF in edematous limb for better overall outcome.

  16. Central Venous Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeshan, Arul; Warakaulle, Dinuke R.; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access plays an important role in the management of an ever-increasing population of patients ranging from those that are critically ill to patients with difficult clinical access. Interventional radiologists are key in delivering this service and should be familiar with the wide range of techniques and catheters now available to them. A comprehensive description of these catheters with regard to indications, technical aspects of catheterization, success rates, and associated early and late complications, as well as a review of various published guidelines on central venous catheter insertion are given in this article

  17. In-Line Filtration Reduces Postoperative Venous Peripheral Phlebitis Associated With Cannulation: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

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    Villa, Gianluca; Chelazzi, Cosimo; Giua, Rosa; Tofani, Lorenzo; Zagli, Giovanni; Boninsegni, Paolo; Pinelli, Fulvio; De Gaudio, A Raffaele; Romagnoli, Stefano

    2018-04-23

    Peripheral venous cannulation is an everyday practice of care for patients undergoing anesthesia and surgery. Particles infused with intravenous fluids (eg, plastic/glass/drugs particulate) contribute to the pathogenesis of peripheral phlebitis. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of in-line filtration in reducing the incidence of postoperative phlebitis associated with peripheral short-term vascular access. In this controlled trial, 268 surgical patients were randomly assigned to in-line filtration and standard care (NCT03193827). The incidence of phlebitis (defined as visual infusion phlebitis [VIP] score, ≥2) within 48 hours was compared between the 2 groups, as well as the onset and severity of phlebitis and the reasons for removal of the cannula. The lifespan of venous cannulae was compared for the in-line filter and no-filter groups through a Kaplan-Meier curve. The incidence of phlebitis within 48 hours postoperatively was 2.2% and 26.9% (difference, 25% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 12%-36%]; odds ratio, 0.05 [0.01-0.15]), respectively, for the in-line filter and no-filter groups (P phlebitis (hazard ratio, 0.05 [95% CI, 0.014-0.15]; P phlebitis and prolongs cannula lifespan during peripheral venous cannulation in surgical patients.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Access in the Emergency Department: Patient-Centered Survey

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    Keith Boniface

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To assess characteristics, satisfaction, and disposition of emergency department (ED patients who successfully received ultrasound (US-guided peripheral intravenous (IV access. Methods: This is a prospective observational study among ED patients who successfully received US-guided peripheral IV access by ED technicians. Nineteen ED technicians were taught to use US guidance to obtain IV access. Training sessions consisted of didactic instruction and hands-on practice. The US guidance for IV access was limited to patients with difficult access. After successfully receiving an US-guided peripheral IV, patients were approached by research assistants who administered a 10-question survey. Disposition information was collected after the conclusion of the ED visit by accessing patients’ electronic medical record. Results: In total, 146 surveys were completed in patients successfully receiving US-guided IVs. Patients reported an average satisfaction with the procedure of 9.2 of 10. Forty-two percent of patients had a body mass index (BMI of greater than 30, and 17.8% had a BMI of more than 35. Sixty-two percent reported a history of central venous catheter placement. This patient population averaged 3 ED visits per year in the past year. Fifty-three percent of the patients were admitted. Conclusion: Patients requiring US-guided IVs in our ED are discharged home at the conclusion of their ED visit about half of the time. These patients reported high rates of both difficult IV access and central venous catheter placement in the past. Patient satisfaction with US-guided IVs was very high. These data support the continued use of US-guided peripheral IVs in this patient population. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:475–477.

  19. Incidence of thrombosis in children with tunneled central venous access devices versus peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs).

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    Kanin, Maralee; Young, Guy

    2013-11-01

    The recent proliferation of deep vein thrombosis in children has been attributed to the increased use of central venous catheters, specifically tunneled lines and peripherally inserted central catheters. A formal comparison of the incidence rate for deep vein thrombosis between tunneled lines and peripherally inserted central catheters has not been undertaken. Children inclusion. Data were extracted from the hospital discharge database which includes data on all procedures and up to 20 diagnoses per admission. Diagnoses and procedures were identified by International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision coding. Patients were excluded if they received more than one central line. Data collected included type of central line, deep vein thrombosis event, and underlying medical illnesses classified according to chronic complex conditions. Over the seven year study period there was an overall rate of 73 deep vein thromboses per 10,000 hospital discharges. Of the 6915 eligible subjects, 181 had a deep vein thrombosis for an overall incidence rate of 2.6%. There were 152 thrombi (2.6%) in subjects with peripherally inserted central catheters and 29 thrombi (3.1%) in subjects with tunneled lines [OR=.83 (0.55, 1.29), p=0.38]. Despite the relative ease and simplicity of use of peripherally inserted central catheters leading to a substantial rise in their use, this study demonstrates that such lines pose a substantial risk for venous thrombosis and no difference in incidence was detected between such lines and tunneled lines. © 2013.

  20. Management of Peripheral and Truncal Venous Injuries

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    Triantafillos G. Giannakopoulos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Civilian injuries are increasing according to the World Health Organization, and this is attributed mainly to road traffic accidents and urban interpersonal violence. Vascular injuries are common in these scenarios and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Associated peripheral venous trauma is less likely to lead to death and controversy remains whether ligation or repair should be the primary approach. Conversely, non-compressible truncal venous insult can be lethal due to exsanguination, thus a high index of suspicion is crucial. Operative management is demanding with fair results but recent endovascular adjuncts demonstrate promising results and seem to be the way forward for these serious conditions.

  1. Percutaneous subclavian artery stent-graft placement following failed ultrasound guided subclavian venous access

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    Szkup Peter

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound guidance for central and peripheral venous access has been proven to improve success rates and reduce complications of venous cannulation. Appropriately trained and experienced operators add significantly to diminished patient morbidity related to venous access procedures. We discuss a patient who required an arterial stent-graft to prevent arterial hemorrhage following inadvertent cannulation of the proximal, ventral, right subclavian artery related to unsuccessful ultrasound guided access of the subclavian vein. Case presentation During pre-operative preparation for aortic valve replacement and aorto-coronary bypass surgery an anesthetist attempted ultrasound guided venous access. The ultrasound guided attempt to access the right jugular vein failed and the ultrasound guided attempt at accessing the subclavian vein resulted in inappropriate placement of an 8.5 F sheath in the arterial system. Following angiographic imaging and specialist consultations, an arterial stent-graft was deployed in the right subclavian artery rather than perform an extensive anterior chest wall resection and dissection to extract the arterial sheath. The patient tolerated the procedure, without complication, despite occlusion of the right internal mammary artery and the right vertebral artery. There were no neurologic sequelae. There was no evidence of hemorrhage after subclavian artery sheath extraction and stent-graft implantation. Conclusion The attempted ultrasound guided puncture of the subclavian vein resulted in placement of an 8.5 F subclavian artery catheter. Entry of the catheter into the proximal subclavian artery beneath the medial clavicle, the medial first rib and the manubrium suggests that the operator, most likely, did not directly visualize the puncture needle enter the vessel with the ultrasound. The bones of the anterior chest impede the ultrasound beam and the vessels in this area would not be visible to ultrasound

  2. Sex hormone levels in spermatic and peripheral venous blood in patients with varicocele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Mang; He Xuejun; Wang Luhua; Fang Lingli; Xi Baoshan; Hong Hanye; Yang Fengtao; She Shaoyi

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of changes of plasma sex hormone levels in patients with varicocele. Methods: Plasma sex hormones (LH, FSH, T) levels in spermatic and peripheral venous blood in 25 patients with varicocele and 22 patients with inguinal hernia were measured and compared. Results: The plasma T levels of spermatic venous blood in varicocele group were lower than those in inguinal hernia group (p 0.05). Conclusion: The sex hormones concentrations in peripheral blood could be influenced by many factors, making interpretation difficult. The concentration of plasma sex hormone in spermatic venous blood might reflect the truth better

  3. Peripheral Edema, Central Venous Pressure, and Risk of AKI in Critical Illness

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    Chen, Kenneth P.; Cavender, Susan; Lee, Joon; Feng, Mengling; Mark, Roger G.; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Although venous congestion has been linked to renal dysfunction in heart failure, its significance in a broader context has not been investigated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Using an inception cohort of 12,778 critically ill adult patients admitted to an urban tertiary medical center between 2001 and 2008, we examined whether the presence of peripheral edema on admission physical examination was associated with an increased risk of AKI within the first 7 days of critical illness. In addition, in those with admission central venous pressure (CVP) measurements, we examined the association of CVPs with subsequent AKI. AKI was defined using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Results Of the 18% (n=2338) of patients with peripheral edema on admission, 27% (n=631) developed AKI, compared with 16% (n=1713) of those without peripheral edema. In a model that included adjustment for comorbidities, severity of illness, and the presence of pulmonary edema, peripheral edema was associated with a 30% higher risk of AKI (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.15 to 1.46; Pedema was not significantly related to risk. Peripheral edema was also associated with a 13% higher adjusted risk of a higher AKI stage (95% CI, 1.07 to 1.20; Pedema were associated with 34% (95% CI, 1.10 to 1.65), 17% (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.14), 47% (95% CI, 1.18 to 1.83), and 57% (95% CI, 1.07 to 2.31) higher adjusted risk of AKI, respectively, compared with edema-free patients. In the 4761 patients with admission CVP measurements, each 1 cm H2O higher CVP was associated with a 2% higher adjusted risk of AKI (95% CI, 1.00 to 1.03; P=0.02). Conclusions Venous congestion, as manifested as either peripheral edema or increased CVP, is directly associated with AKI in critically ill patients. Whether treatment of venous congestion with diuretics can modify this risk will require further study. PMID:26787777

  4. [The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC)].

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    Emoli, Alessandro; Cappuccio, Serena; Marche, Bruno; Musarò, Andrea; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC). The insertion of a peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) is not without risks. The Italian Group for the Study of Long-Term Central Venous Access Devices (GAVeCeLT) has developed a protocol (SIP: Safe Implantation of PICCs) with the aim of minimizing the risks which may be associated with the placement of PICCs. The protocol is based on recommendations available in the literature and on the main clinical practice guidelines. The SIP protocol, a bundle of evidence-based recommendations, it is is easy to use, inexpensive, and cost-effective. If routinely used and carefully inplemented, it greatly reduces complications such as failure of venipuncture, accidental arterial puncture, damage of median nerve, infection and catheter related venous thrombosis.

  5. [Incidence of phlebitis due to peripherally inserted venous catheters: impact of a catheter management protocol].

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    Ferrete-Morales, C; Vázquez-Pérez, M A; Sánchez-Berna, M; Gilabert-Cerro, I; Corzo-Delgado, J E; Pineda-Vergara, J A; Vergara-López, S; Gómez-Mateos, J

    2010-01-01

    To assess the impact on the incidence of PPIVC by implementing a catheter management protocol and to determine risk factors for PPIVC development in hospitalized patients. A total of 3978 episodes of venous catheterization were prospectively included from September 2002 to December 2007. A catheter management protocol was implemented during this period of time. The incidence and variables associated to the occurrence of PPIVC were determined. The incidence of PPIVC from 2002 to 2007 was 4.8%, 4.3%, 3.6%, 2.5%, 1.3% and 1.8% (phistory of phlebitis was the only factor independently associated to phlebitis due to peripherally inserted central venous catheters (AOR 3.24; CI at 95% CI= 1.05-9.98, p=0.04). A catheter management protocol decreases the incidence of PPIVC in hospitalized patients. The risk of PPIVC increases for peripherally inserted central venous catheters when the patients have a history of phlebitis and for peripheral venous catheters when amiodarone or cefotaxime are infused. Catheterization of peripheral veins performed during morning shifts is associated with a lower incidence of PPIVC when compared with night shift catheterizations.

  6. Pediatric central venous access devices: nursing interventions

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    Duffy EA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Duffy, Kathryn N Nelson Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: A central venous catheter (CVC is an indwelling catheter that provides permanent or temporary stable venous access for both acute and chronically ill pediatric patients. These catheters provide stable venous access that can be used for a variety of medical purposes including drawing blood, hemodynamic monitoring, infusion of intravenous medications, infusion of intravenous fluids, chemotherapy, blood products, and parenteral nutrition. Each day, nurses access and care for CVCs in infants, children, and adolescents; the precision of this care can prevent life-threatening complications. The purpose of this review and the case study is to highlight the importance and components of evidence-based nursing practice in pediatric CVC care. A historical perspective of CVC care is provided in conjunction with current national initiatives to improve patient outcomes for children with CVCs. Infection prevention, clinical practice guidelines, quality improvement, and evidence-based care bundles are discussed. Keywords: pediatric nursing, central venous catheters, central line-associated bloodstream infection, care bundles, pediatric case study 

  7. Peripheral venous distension elicits a blood pressure raising reflex in young and middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Evan L; Brian, Michael S; Coyle, Dana E; Edwards, David G; Stocker, Sean D; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2016-06-01

    Distension of peripheral veins in humans elicits a pressor and sympathoexcitatory response that is mediated through group III/IV skeletal muscle afferents. There is some evidence that autonomic reflexes mediated by these sensory fibers are blunted with increasing age, yet to date the venous distension reflex has only been studied in young adults. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the venous distension reflex would be attenuated in middle-aged compared with young adults. Nineteen young (14 men/5 women, 25 ± 1 yr) and 13 middle-aged (9 men/4 women, 50 ± 2 yr) healthy normotensive participants underwent venous distension via saline infusion through a retrograde intravenous catheter in an antecubital vein during limb occlusion. Beat-by-beat blood pressure, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and model flow-derived cardiac output (Q), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were recorded throughout the trial. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased during the venous distension in both young (baseline 83 ± 2, peak 94 ± 3 mmHg; P blood pressure, MSNA, and TPR were similar between young and middle-aged adults. Additionally, no correlation was found between age and the response to venous distension (all P > 0.05). These findings suggest that peripheral venous distension elicits a pressor and sympathetic response in middle-aged adults similar to the response observed in young adults. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Peripheral venous malformations and pulmonary hypertension: A case report and literature review

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    Nambakam Tanuja Subramanyam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive pure peripheral venous malformations are rare. We report occurrence of peripheral venous malformations associated with pulmonary hypertension in a middle-aged male, who had nodular, irregular, soft, compressible, painless, non-pulsatile swellings over dependant positions such as forearms, hands, axilla, and genitalia, with overgrowth of hands and fingers enlarging slowly since early childhood. He had right ventricular failure signs. Plain films showed soft-tissue mass with diffuse calcifications (phleboliths. Doppler study showed low flow vascular channels, compressible hypoechoic lesions along with occasional hyperechoeic lesion corresponding with phleboliths. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, T1-weighted showed polypoidal mass with heterogenous hypo to intermediate signal with no flow voids. T2-weighted MRI showed high-signal intensity mass. Computed tomography (CT pulmonary angiogram showed pulmonary hypertension, no thrombi or vascular malformation. He was treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, amiodarone, antiplatelets, and venous stockings. Specific therapy such as sclerosis and surgical resection could not be done as he was discharged against medical advice.

  9. Ethanol sclerotherapy of peripheral venous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimon, U. E-mail: rimonu@sheba.health.gov.il; Garniek, A.; Galili, Y.; Golan, G.; Bensaid, P.; Morag, B

    2004-12-01

    Background: venous malformations are congenital lesions that can cause pain, decreased range of movement, compression on adjacent structures, bleeding, consumptive coagulopathy and cosmetic deformity. Sclerotherapy alone or combined with surgical excision is the accepted treatment in symptomatic malformations after failed treatment attempts with tailored compression garments. Objectives: to report our experience with percutaneous sclerotherapy of peripheral venous malformations with ethanol 96%. Patients and methods: 41 sclerotherapy sessions were performed on 21 patients, aged 4-46 years, 15 females and 6 males. Fourteen patients were treated for painful extremity lesions, while five others with face and neck lesions and two with giant chest malformations had treatment for esthetic reasons. All patients had a pre-procedure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. In all patients, 96% ethanol was used as the sclerosant by direct injection using general anesthesia. A minimum of 1-year clinical follow-up was performed. Follow-up imaging studies were performed if clinically indicated. Results: 17 patients showed complete or partial symptomatic improvement after one to nine therapeutic sessions. Four patients with lower extremity lesions continue to suffer from pain and they are considered as a treatment failure. Complications were encountered in five patients, including acute pulmonary hypertension with cardiovascular collapse, pulmonary embolus, skin ulcers (two) and skin blisters. All patients fully recovered. Conclusion: sclerotherapy with 96% ethanol for venous malformations was found to be effective for symptomatic improvement, but serious complications can occur.

  10. Ethanol sclerotherapy of peripheral venous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimon, U.; Garniek, A.; Galili, Y.; Golan, G.; Bensaid, P.; Morag, B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: venous malformations are congenital lesions that can cause pain, decreased range of movement, compression on adjacent structures, bleeding, consumptive coagulopathy and cosmetic deformity. Sclerotherapy alone or combined with surgical excision is the accepted treatment in symptomatic malformations after failed treatment attempts with tailored compression garments. Objectives: to report our experience with percutaneous sclerotherapy of peripheral venous malformations with ethanol 96%. Patients and methods: 41 sclerotherapy sessions were performed on 21 patients, aged 4-46 years, 15 females and 6 males. Fourteen patients were treated for painful extremity lesions, while five others with face and neck lesions and two with giant chest malformations had treatment for esthetic reasons. All patients had a pre-procedure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. In all patients, 96% ethanol was used as the sclerosant by direct injection using general anesthesia. A minimum of 1-year clinical follow-up was performed. Follow-up imaging studies were performed if clinically indicated. Results: 17 patients showed complete or partial symptomatic improvement after one to nine therapeutic sessions. Four patients with lower extremity lesions continue to suffer from pain and they are considered as a treatment failure. Complications were encountered in five patients, including acute pulmonary hypertension with cardiovascular collapse, pulmonary embolus, skin ulcers (two) and skin blisters. All patients fully recovered. Conclusion: sclerotherapy with 96% ethanol for venous malformations was found to be effective for symptomatic improvement, but serious complications can occur

  11. Improving patient safety during insertion of peripheral venous catheters: an observational intervention study

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    Kampf, Günter

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Peripheral venous catheters are frequently used in hospitalized patients but increase the risk of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Evidence-based guidelines describe specific steps that are known to reduce infection risk. However, the degree of guideline implementation in clinical practice is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the use of specific steps for insertion of peripheral venous catheters in clinical practice and to implement a multimodal intervention aimed at improving both compliance and the optimum order of the steps.Methods: The study was conducted at University Hospital Hamburg. An optimum procedure for inserting a peripheral venous catheter was defined based on three evidence-based guidelines (WHO, CDC, RKI including five steps with 1A or 1B level of evidence: hand disinfection before patient contact, skin antisepsis of the puncture site, no palpation of treated puncture site, hand disinfection before aseptic procedure, and sterile dressing on the puncture site. A research nurse observed and recorded procedures for peripheral venous catheter insertion for healthcare workers in four different departments (endoscopy, central emergency admissions, pediatrics, and dermatology. A multimodal intervention with 5 elements was established (teaching session, dummy training, e-learning tool, tablet and poster, and direct feedback, followed by a second observation period. During the last observation week, participants evaluated the intervention.Results: In the control period, 207 insertions were observed, and 202 in the intervention period. Compliance improved significantly for four of five steps (e.g., from 11.6% to 57.9% for hand disinfection before patient contact; p<0.001, chi-square test. Compliance with skin antisepsis of the puncture site was high before and after intervention (99.5% before and 99.0% after. Performance of specific steps in the correct order also improved (e.g., from 7.7% to 68

  12. Percutaneous central venous catheters versus peripheral cannulae for delivery of parenteral nutrition in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, S B; Clerihew, L; McGuire, W

    2007-07-18

    Parenteral nutrition for neonates may be delivered via a short peripheral cannula or a central venous catheter. The latter may either be inserted via the umbilicus or percutaneously. Because of the complications associated with umbilical venous catheter use, many neonatal units prefer to use percutaneously inserted catheters following the initial stabilisation period. The method of parenteral nutrition delivery may affect nutrient input and consequently growth and development. Although potentially more difficult to place, percutaneous central venous catheters may be more stable than peripheral cannulae, and need less frequent replacement. These delivery methods may also be associated with different risks of adverse events, including acquired systemic infection and extravasation injury. To determine the effect of infusion via a percutaneous central venous catheter versus a peripheral cannula on nutrient input, growth and development, and complications including systemic infection, or extravasation injuries in newborn infants who require parenteral nutrition. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2007), MEDLINE (1966 - February 2007), EMBASE (1980 - February 2007), conference proceedings, and previous reviews. Randomised controlled trials that compared the effect of delivering parenteral nutrition via a percutaneous central venous catheter versus a peripheral cannulae in neonates. Data were extracted the data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by each author, and synthesis of data using relative risk, risk difference and mean difference. Four trials eligible for inclusion were found. These trials recruited a total of 368 infants and reported a number of different outcomes. One study showed that the use of a percutaneous

  13. Optoacoustic monitoring of central and peripheral venous oxygenation during simulated hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Andrey; Kinsky, Michael; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Khan, Muzna N.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock may be fatal unless promptly recognized and treated. The most commonly used indicators of shock (hypotension and tachycardia) lack sensitivity and specificity. In the initial stages of shock, the body compensates by reducing blood flow to the peripheral (skin, muscle, etc.) circulation in order to preserve vital organ (brain, heart, liver) perfusion. Characteristically, this can be observed by a greater reduction in peripheral venous oxygenation (for instance, the axillary vein) compared to central venous oxygenation (the internal jugular vein). While invasive measurements of oxygenation are accurate, they lack practicality and are not without complications. We have developed a novel optoacoustic system that noninvasively determines oxygenation in specific veins. In order to test this application, we used lower body negative pressure (LBNP) system, which simulates hemorrhage by exerting a variable amount of suction on the lower body, thereby reducing the volume of blood available for central circulation. Restoration of normal blood flow occurs promptly upon cessation of LBNP. Using two optoacoustic probes, guided by ultrasound imaging, we simultaneously monitored oxygenation in the axillary and internal jugular veins (IJV). LBNP began at -20 mmHg, thereafter was reduced in a step-wise fashion (up to 30 min). The optoacoustically measured axillary oxygenation decreased with LBNP, whereas IJV oxygenation remained relatively constant. These results indicate that our optoacoustic system may provide safe and rapid measurement of peripheral and central venous oxygenation and diagnosis of shock with high specificity and sensitivity.

  14. Peripheral i.v. analysis (PIVA) of venous waveforms for volume assessment in patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, K M; Alvis, B D; Baudenbacher, F; Boyer, R; Brophy, C M; Beer, I; Eagle, S

    2017-12-01

    The assessment of intravascular volume status remains a challenge for clinicians. Peripheral i.v. analysis (PIVA) is a method for analysing the peripheral venous waveform that has been used to monitor volume status. We present a proof-of-concept study for evaluating the efficacy of PIVA in detecting changes in fluid volume. We enrolled 37 hospitalized patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD) as a controlled model for intravascular volume loss. Respiratory rate (F0) and pulse rate (F1) frequencies were measured. PIVA signal was obtained by fast Fourier analysis of the venous waveform followed by weighing the magnitude of the amplitude of the pulse rate frequency. PIVA was compared with peripheral venous pressure and standard monitoring of vital signs. Regression analysis showed a linear correlation between volume loss and change in the PIVA signal (R2=0.77). Receiver operator curves demonstrated that the PIVA signal showed an area under the curve of 0.89 for detection of 20 ml kg-1 change in volume. There was no correlation between volume loss and peripheral venous pressure, blood pressure or pulse rate. PIVA-derived pulse rate and respiratory rate were consistent with similar numbers derived from the bio-impedance and electrical signals from the electrocardiogram. PIVA is a minimally invasive, novel modality for detecting changes in fluid volume status, respiratory rate and pulse rate in spontaneously breathing patients with peripheral i.v. cannulas. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Quantitative determination of peripheral arterio-venous shunts by means of radioactively labelled microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    In the present work a nuclear method of quantitative measurement of peripheral arterio-venous shunts with a whole-body scanner is standardized. This method, developed at the beginning of the 70s at Tuebingen, stands out in contrast with earlier measuring methods by the application of the theory of quantitative scintiscanning. This means that the scintigram obtained after injection of sup(99m)technetium-labelled human albumin microspheres into an artery before the shunt is corrected for the quantitative shunt calculation by several factors using a computer, to avoid systematic mistakes. For the standardization of the method, 182 scintigrams were taken during model experiments and experiments on animals and human beings. This method, having a deviation of 10% at most, is excellently suited for the quantitative determination of peripheral arterio-venous shunts. Already for a pulmonary activity of 3% a peripheral shunt is proved with 97.5% probability. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Position of peripheral venous cannulae and the incidence of thrombophlebitis: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolini, Giancarlo; Bonghi, Antonia Pollidoro; Di Labio, Luisa; Di Mascio, Rocco

    2009-06-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to investigate the most suitable location of peripheral venous cannulae to reduce the incidence of thrombophlebitis. Peripheral intravenous cannulae are used for vascular access, but the site of insertion and size of the cannula could expose patients to local and systemic infectious complications. Small cannula size is an important factor in reducing the incidence of thrombophlebitis, but cannula location has not yet been studied. Evidence-based knowledge on how to prevent these complications is needed. An observational survey carried out was carried out in 2007 with 427 patients in one Italian hospital. A structured observation protocol was used to survey the frequency of thrombophlebitis and the relationship of location and size of peripheral intravenous cannulae. The variables evaluated were age, gender, cannula size and site of cannula location. Chi-square or Student t tests were used, and the adjusted odds ratios and relative 95% confidence intervals are reported. The frequency of peripheral intravenous cannulae thrombophlebitis was higher in females (OR:1.91;CI:1.20-3.03;P < 0.006). The highest incidence was found in patients with cannulae inserted in the dorsal side of the hand veins compared to those with cannulae inserted in cubital fossa veins (OR:3.33;CI:1.37-8.07; P < 0.001). The use of cubital fossa veins rather than forearm and hand veins should be encouraged to reduce the risk of thrombophlebitis in patients with peripheral intravenous cannulae.

  17. Incidence of upper limb venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, B J J; Mohammad, N; Sangkar, J V; Abd Aziz, Y F; Gan, G G; Goh, K Y; Benedict, I

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to prospectively determine the incidence of venous thrombosis (VT) in the upper limbs in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). We prospectively investigated the incidence of VT in the upper limbs of 26 patients who had PICC inserted. The inclusion criteria were all patients who had a PICC inserted, whilst the exclusion criterion was the inability to perform a venogram (allergies, previous contrast medium reaction and inability of gaining venous access). Both valved and non-valved catheters were evaluated. Prior to removal of the PICC, an upper limb venogram was performed. The number of segments involved with VT were determined. The duration of central venous catheterization was classified as; less than 6 days, between 6 days and 14 days and more than 14 days. VT was confirmed in 38.5% (10/26) of the patients. The majority 85.7% (12/14) were complete occlusive thrombi and the majority of VT only involved one segment. There was no statistical correlation between the site of insertion of the PICC and the location of VT. Neither was there any observed correlation between the occurrence of VT with the patient's history of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac insufficiency, smoking or cancer. There was also no statistical correlation with the size of the catheter. In conclusion, PICCs are associated with a significant risk of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEVT).

  18. Comparative study of peripherally inserted central venous catheter and traditional central catheter assisted with X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianchun; Wang Xiurong; Jiang Zhuming

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility, complications, mid- and long-term advantages of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) compared with central venous access assisted with X-ray. Methods: From Jan 1997 to Dec 1998, the authors conducted a study in 60 patients with placed PICC lines and 60 patients with central lines. Study variables included tip placement and complication rates. Results: Tere were on significant differences between PICC and CVC in the successful placement 95.0% and 88.3%, t = 1.745, P 0.19; the mean duration 13(6-98) days and 14 (7-104) days, F = 0.049, P = 0.83; the total occlusion rate 6.7% (4/60) and 5.0%(3/60), t = 0.152, P = 0.70. In PICC patients, the occlusion rate was slightly higher in 3 Fr (20-gauge) catheter (3/20, 15.0%) than in 4 Fr(18-gauge) catheters (1/20, 5.0%), t = 1.111, P=0.29. Phlebitis occurred in 5.0% of patients (3/60) and one catheter fracture was happened on the catheter hub junction (1.7%). In 3 catheter tips dislocation cases, the catheter tips were moved to the optional position assisted with X-ray image. In CVC group, pneumothorax happened in 1 case (1.7%). In 4 catheter dislocation cases, the catheters were with drawn. No catheter-related sepsis and hemo-pneumothorax happened in both group patients. Conclusions: Both PICC and CVC can be acceptable in clinical use. PICC assisted with X-ray possesses the advantages of less trauma, accurate localization preventing some possible severe complications of central venous access such as pneumothorax. The new method provides a reliable, effective venous access for mid-and long-term usage in patients receiving a variety of solutions, primarily parenteral alimentation, chemotherapy or antibiotic infusion

  19. Microbiological testing of devices used in maintaining peripheral venous catheters

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    Fernanda de Paula Rossini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the use of peripheral venous catheters based on microbiological analysis of devices (dressing and three-way stopcocks and thus contribute to the prevention and infection control. Methods: this was a prospective study of microbiological analysis of 30 three-way stopcocks (external surfaces and lumens and 30 dressing used in maintaining the peripheral venous catheters of hospitalized adult patients. Results: all external surfaces, 40% of lumens, and 86.7% of dressing presented bacterial growth. The main species isolated in the lumen were 50% coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 14.3% Staphylococcus aureus, and 14.3% Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fifty nine percent of multidrug-resistant bacteria were isolated of the three-way stopcocks, 42% of the lumens, and 44% of the dressing with a predominance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus resistant to methicillin. Besides, 18% gram-negative bacteria with resistance to carbapenems were identified from multidrug-resistant bacteria on the external surfaces of the three-way stopcocks. Conclusion: it is important to emphasize the isolation of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and gram-negative bacteria resistant to methicillin and carbapenems in samples of devices, respectively, which reinforces the importance of nursing care in the maintenance of the biologically safe environment as well as prevention and infection control practices.

  20. Ultrasonography-guided peripheral intravenous access versus traditional approaches in patients with difficult intravenous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Thomas G; Parikh, Aman K; Satz, Wayne A; Fojtik, John P

    2005-11-01

    We assess the success rate of emergency physicians in placing peripheral intravenous catheters in difficult-access patients who were unsuccessfully cannulated by emergency nurses. A technique using real-time ultrasonographic guidance by 2 physicians was compared with traditional approaches using palpation and landmark guidance. This was a prospective, systematically allocated study of all patients requiring intravenous access who presented to 2 university hospitals between October 2003 and March 2004. Inclusion criterion was the inability of any available nurse to obtain intravenous access after at least 3 attempts on a subgroup of patients who had a history of difficult intravenous access because of obesity, history of intravenous drug abuse, or chronic medical problems. Exclusion criterion was the need for central venous access. Patients presenting on odd days were allocated to the ultrasonographic-guided group, and those presenting on even days were allocated to the traditional-approach group. Endpoints were successful cannulation, number of sticks, time, and patient satisfaction. Sixty patients were enrolled, 39 on odd days and 21 on even days. Success rate was greater for the ultrasonographic group (97%) versus control (33%), difference in proportions of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI] 39% to 71%). The ultrasonographic group required less overall time (13 minutes versus 30 minutes, for a difference of 17 [95% CI 0.8 to 25.6]), less time to successful cannulation from first percutaneous puncture (4 minutes versus 15 minutes, for a difference of 11 [95% CI 8.2 to 19.4]), and fewer percutaneous punctures (1.7 versus 3.7, for a difference of 2.0 [95% CI 1.27 to 2.82]) and had greater patient satisfaction (8.7 versus 5.7, for a difference of 3.0 [95% CI 1.82 to 4.29]) than the traditional landmark approach. Ultrasonographic-guided peripheral intravenous access is more successful than traditional "blind" techniques, requires less time, decreases the number of

  1. Complications of an implantable venous access port: Prevention and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Tae Seok; Song, Myung Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, In Ho [Dept. Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Chungang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Placement of an implantable venous access port (IVAP) is a popular procedure for repeated and intermittent chemotherapy in patients with malignancy. In this article, we present various IVAP related complications. In addition, we review the technical tips to prevent and manage the complications. It is important that the operator should keep the mechanism of the complications in mind, perform a careful procedure for prevention, and manage the complication properly and immediately in case of its development for safety and satisfaction of the patients Complications of an implantable venous access port: Prevention and treatment.

  2. Microbiological testing of devices used in maintaining peripheral venous catheters 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Fernanda de Paula; de Andrade, Denise; Santos, Lissandra Chaves de Sousa; Ferreira, Adriano Menis; Tieppo, Caroline; Watanabe, Evandro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the use of peripheral venous catheters based on microbiological analysis of devices (dressing and three-way stopcocks) and thus contribute to the prevention and infection control. Methods: this was a prospective study of microbiological analysis of 30 three-way stopcocks (external surfaces and lumens) and 30 dressing used in maintaining the peripheral venous catheters of hospitalized adult patients. Results: all external surfaces, 40% of lumens, and 86.7% of dressing presented bacterial growth. The main species isolated in the lumen were 50% coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 14.3% Staphylococcus aureus, and 14.3% Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fifty nine percent of multidrug-resistant bacteria were isolated of the three-way stopcocks, 42% of the lumens, and 44% of the dressing with a predominance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus resistant to methicillin. Besides, 18% gram-negative bacteria with resistance to carbapenems were identified from multidrug-resistant bacteria on the external surfaces of the three-way stopcocks. Conclusion: it is important to emphasize the isolation of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and gram-negative bacteria resistant to methicillin and carbapenems in samples of devices, respectively, which reinforces the importance of nursing care in the maintenance of the biologically safe environment as well as prevention and infection control practices. PMID:28513768

  3. Peripheral venous catheter insertion simulation training: A randomized controlled trial comparing performance after instructor-led teaching versus peer-assisted learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelloux, Sophie; Grégoire, Arnaud; Kirmizigul, Patrice; Maillot, Sandrine; Bui-Xuan, Bernard; Llorca, Guy; Boet, Sylvain; Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Rimmelé, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Peripheral venous catheter insertion is a procedural skill that every medical student should master. Training is often limited to a small number of students and is poorly evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of peer-assisted learning in comparison to instructor-led teaching for peripheral venous catheter insertion training. Students were randomized to the control group attending a traditional instructor-led training session (slideshow and demonstration by an anesthetist instructor, followed by training on a procedural simulator) or to the test group attending a peer-assisted training session (slideshow and demonstration video-recorded by the same instructor, followed by training on a procedural simulator). The primary endpoint was the performance of peripheral venous catheter insertion, assessed on procedural simulator one week later by blinded experts using a standardized 20-item grid. Students self-evaluated their confidence levels using a numeric 10-point scale. Eighty-six students were included, 73 of whom attended the assessment session. The median performance score was 12/20 [8-15] in the instructor-led teaching group versus 13/20 [11-15] in the peer-assisted learning group (P=0.430). Confidence levels improved significantly after the assessment session and were significantly higher in the peer-assisted learning group (7.6/10 [7.0-8.0] versus 7.0/10 [5.0-8.0], P=0.026). Peer-assisted learning is effective for peripheral venous catheter insertion training and can be as effective as instructor-led teaching. Given the large number of students to train, this finding is important for optimizing the cost-effectiveness of peripheral venous catheter insertion training. Copyright © 2017 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Performance and safety of femoral central venous catheters in pediatric autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooling, Laura; Hoffmann, Sandra; Webb, Dawn; Yamada, Chisa; Davenport, Robertson; Choi, Sung Won

    2017-12-01

    Autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cell collection (A-HPCC) in children typically requires placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) for venous access. There is scant published data regarding the performance and safety of femoral CVCs in pediatric A-HPCC. Seven-year, retrospective study of A-HPCC in pediatric patients collected between 2009 and January 2017. Inclusion criteria were an age ≤ 21 years and A-HPCC using a femoral CVC for venous access. Femoral CVC performance was examined by CD34 collection rate, inlet rate, collection efficiency (MNC-FE, CD34-FE), bleeding, flow-related adverse events (AE), CVC removal, and product sterility testing. Statistical analysis and graphing were performed with commercial software. A total of 75/119 (63%) pediatric patients (median age 3 years) met study criteria. Only 16% of children required a CVC for ≥ 3 days. The CD34 collect rate and CD34-FE was stable over time whereas MNC-FE decreased after day 4 in 80% of patients. CD34-FE and MNC-FE showed inter- and intra-patient variability over time and appeared sensitive to plerixafor administration. Femoral CVC showed fewer flow-related AE compared to thoracic CVC, especially in pediatric patients (6.7% vs. 37%, P = 0.0005; OR = 0.12 (95%CI: 0.03-0.45). CVC removal was uneventful in 73/75 (97%) patients with hemostasis achieved after 20-30 min of pressure. In a 10-year period, there were no instances of product contamination associated with femoral CVC colonization. Femoral CVC are safe and effective for A-HPCC in young pediatric patients. Femoral CVC performance was maintained over several days with few flow-related alarms when compared to thoracic CVCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of body temperature on peripheral venous pressure measurements and its agreement with central venous pressure in neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Altan; Salman, M Alper; Salman, A Ebru; Aypar, Ulka

    2005-04-01

    Previous studies suggest a correlation of central venous pressure (CVP) with peripheral venous pressure (PVP) in different clinical settings. The effect of body temperature on PVP and its agreement with CVP in patients under general anesthesia are investigated in this study. Fifteen American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients undergoing elective craniotomy were included in the study. CVP, PVP, and core (Tc) and peripheral (Tp) temperatures were monitored throughout the study. A total of 950 simultaneous measurements of CVP, PVP, Tc, and Tp from 15 subjects were recorded at 5-minute intervals. The measurements were divided into low- and high-Tc and -Tp groups by medians as cutoff points. Bland-Altman assessment for agreement was used for CVP and PVP in all groups. PVP measurements were within range of +/-2 mm Hg of CVP values in 94% of the measurements. Considering all measurements, mean bias was 0.064 mm Hg (95% confidence interval -0.018-0.146). Corrected bias for repeated measurements was 0.173 +/- 3.567 mm Hg (mean +/- SD(corrected)). All of the measurements were within mean +/- 2 SD of bias, which means that PVP and CVP are interchangeable in our setting. As all the measurements were within 1 SD of bias when Tc was > or = 35.8 degrees C, even a better agreement of PVP and CVP was evident. The effect of peripheral hypothermia was not as prominent as core hypothermia. PVP measurement may be a noninvasive alternative for estimating CVP. Body temperature affects the agreement of CVP and PVP, which deteriorates at lower temperatures.

  6. Central and peripheral venous lines-associated blood stream infections in the critically ill surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugas, Mohamed Ali; Cho, Hyongyu; Trilling, Gregory M; Tahir, Zainab; Raja, Humaera Farrukh; Ramadan, Sami; Jerjes, Waseem; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-09-04

    Critically ill surgical patients are always at increased risk of actual or potentially life-threatening health complications. Central/peripheral venous lines form a key part of their care. We review the current evidence on incidence of central and peripheral venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in critically ill surgical patients, and outline pathways for prevention and intervention. An extensive systematic electronic search was carried out on the relevant databases. Articles were considered suitable for inclusion if they investigated catheter colonisation and catheter-related bloodstream infection. Two independent reviewers engaged in selecting the appropriate articles in line with our protocol retrieved 8 articles published from 1999 to 2011. Outcomes on CVC colonisation and infections were investigated in six studies; four of which were prospective cohort studies, one prospective longitudinal study and one retrospective cohort study. Outcomes relating only to PICCs were reported in one prospective randomised trial. We identified only one study that compared CVC- and PICC-related complications in surgical intensive care units. Although our search protocol may not have yielded an exhaustive list we have identified a key deficiency in the literature, namely a paucity of studies investigating the incidence of CVC- and PICC-related bloodstream infection in exclusively critically ill surgical populations. In summary, the diverse definitions for the diagnosis of central and peripheral venous catheter-related bloodstream infections along with the vastly different sample size and extremely small PICC population size has, predictably, yielded inconsistent findings. Our current understanding is still limited; the studies we have identified do point us towards some tentative understanding that the CVC/PICC performance remains inconclusive.

  7. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walser, Eric M., E-mail: walser.eric@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  8. The Retrograde Transvenous Push-Through Method: A Novel Treatment of Peripheral Arteriovenous Malformations with Dominant Venous Outflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, Walter A.; Müller-Wille, René; Teusch, Veronika I.; Dudeck, Oliver; Cahill, Anne M.; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Uller, Wibke

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel retrograde transvenous embolization technique of peripheral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) using Onyx.Materials and MethodsWe conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent transvenous retrograde Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow over a 29-month period. The embolization is aimed at retrograde filling of the nidus after building a solid plug in the dominant venous outflow (push-through). Classification, clinical signs, technical aspects, clinical and technical success rates, and complications were recorded. Short-term outcome was assessed.Results11 Symptomatic patients (8 female; mean age 31.4 years) were treated at our Vascular Anomalies Center with this method between January 2012 and May 2014. The AVMs were located on the upper extremity (n = 3), pelvis (n = 2), buttock (n = 2), and lower extremity (n = 4). Retrograde embolization was successfully carried out after preparatory transarterial-flow reduction in eight cases (73 %) and venous-flow reduction with Amplatzer Vascular Plugs in four cases (36 %). Complete devascularization (n = 10; 91 %) or 95 % devascularization (n = 1; 9 %) led to complete resolution (n = 8; 73 %) or improvement of clinical symptoms (n = 3; 27 %). One minor complication occurred (pain and swelling). During a mean follow-up time of 8 months, one clinically asymptomatic recurrence of AVM was detected.ConclusionInitial results suggest that retrograde transvenous Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow is a safe and effective novel technique with a low complication rate

  9. The Retrograde Transvenous Push-Through Method: A Novel Treatment of Peripheral Arteriovenous Malformations with Dominant Venous Outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, Walter A., E-mail: walter.wohlgemuth@ukr.de; Müller-Wille, René, E-mail: Rene.Mueller-Wille@ukr.de; Teusch, Veronika I., E-mail: Veronika.Teusch@gmx.de [University Medical Center Regensburg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Dudeck, Oliver, E-mail: Oliver.Dudeck@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Cahill, Anne M., E-mail: Cahill@email.chop.edu [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (United States); Alomari, Ahmad I., E-mail: Ahmad.Alomari@childrens.harvard.edu [Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Uller, Wibke, E-mail: Wibke.Uller@ukr.de [University Medical Center Regensburg, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel retrograde transvenous embolization technique of peripheral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) using Onyx.Materials and MethodsWe conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent transvenous retrograde Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow over a 29-month period. The embolization is aimed at retrograde filling of the nidus after building a solid plug in the dominant venous outflow (push-through). Classification, clinical signs, technical aspects, clinical and technical success rates, and complications were recorded. Short-term outcome was assessed.Results11 Symptomatic patients (8 female; mean age 31.4 years) were treated at our Vascular Anomalies Center with this method between January 2012 and May 2014. The AVMs were located on the upper extremity (n = 3), pelvis (n = 2), buttock (n = 2), and lower extremity (n = 4). Retrograde embolization was successfully carried out after preparatory transarterial-flow reduction in eight cases (73 %) and venous-flow reduction with Amplatzer Vascular Plugs in four cases (36 %). Complete devascularization (n = 10; 91 %) or 95 % devascularization (n = 1; 9 %) led to complete resolution (n = 8; 73 %) or improvement of clinical symptoms (n = 3; 27 %). One minor complication occurred (pain and swelling). During a mean follow-up time of 8 months, one clinically asymptomatic recurrence of AVM was detected.ConclusionInitial results suggest that retrograde transvenous Onyx embolization of peripheral AVMs with dominant venous outflow is a safe and effective novel technique with a low complication rate.

  10. Novel approach to epicardial pacemaker implantation in patients with limited venous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Roberto; Scanavacca, Mauricio; da Silva, Kátia Regina; Martinelli Filho, Martino; Carrillo, Roger

    2013-11-01

    Limited venous access in certain patients increases the procedural risk and complexity of conventional transvenous pacemaker implantation. The purpose of this study was to determine a minimally invasive epicardial approach using pericardial reflections for dual-chamber pacemaker implantation in patients with limited venous access. Between June 2006 and November 2011, 15 patients underwent epicardial pacemaker implantation. Procedures were performed through a minimally invasive subxiphoid approach and pericardial window with subsequent fluoroscopy-assisted lead placement. Mean patient age was 46.4 ± 15.3 years (9 male [(60.0%], 6 female [40.0%]). The new surgical approach was used in patients determined to have limited venous access due to multiple abandoned leads in 5 (33.3%), venous occlusion in 3 (20.0%), intravascular retention of lead fragments from prior extraction in 3 (20.0%), tricuspid valve vegetation currently under treatment in 2 (13.3%), and unrepaired intracardiac defects in 2 (13.3%). All procedures were successful with no perioperative complications or early deaths. Mean operating time for isolated pacemaker implantation was 231.7 ± 33.5 minutes. Lead placement on the superior aspect of right atrium, through the transverse sinus, was possible in 12 patients. In the remaining 3 patients, the atrial lead was implanted on the left atrium through the oblique sinus, the postcaval recess, or the left pulmonary vein recess. None of the patients displayed pacing or sensing dysfunction, and all parameters remained stable throughout the follow-up period of 36.8 ± 25.1 months. Epicardial pacemaker implantation through pericardial reflections is an effective alternative therapy for those patients requiring physiologic pacing in whom venous access is limited. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, K W; Schregel, W; Stanga, Z; Bischoff, S C; Brass, P; Hartl, W; Muehlebach, S; Pscheidl, E; Thul, P; Volk, O

    2009-11-18

    Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious). Long-term (>7-10 days) parenteral nutrition (PN) requires central venous access whereas for PN 3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter) should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7-10 days), a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L) or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site.

  12. Arterial and venous plasma levels of bupivacaine following peripheral nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D C; Mather, L E; Bridenbaugh, L D; Balfour, R I; Lysons, D F; Horton, W G

    1976-01-01

    Mean arterial plasma (MAP) and peripheral mean venous plasma (MVP) levels of bupivacaine were ascertained in 3 groups of 10 patients each for: (1) intercostal nerve block, 400 mg; (2) block of the sciatic, femoral, and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves, with or without block of the obturator nerve, 400 mg; and (3) supraclavicular brachial plexus block, 300 mg. MAP levels were consistently higher than simultaneously sampled MVP levels, the highest levels occurring from bilateral intercostal nerve block. No evidence of systemic toxicity was observed. The results suggest that bupivacaine has a much wider margin of safety in humans than is now stated.

  13. Computer identification of symptomatic deep venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R Scott; Linford, Lorraine H; Sharp, Jamie H; White, Gayle; Lloyd, James F; Weaver, Lindell K

    2007-10-11

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are considered a safe method to provide long-term antibiotic therapy, chemotherapy and nutrition support. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a complication that requires early PICC removal, may extend hospitalization and can result in pulmonary embolism. PICC insertion teams strive to understand risk factors and develop methods to prevent DVTs. However, they can only manage what they can measure. At LDS Hospital, identification of PICC associated DVTs was dependent on verbal notification or manual surveillance of more than a thousand free-text vascular reports. Accurate DVT rates were not known which hindered prevention. We describe the development of a computer application (PICC-DVT monitor) to identify PICC associated DVTs each day. A one-year evaluation of the monitor by the PICC team and a review of 445 random vascular reports found a positive predictive value of 98%, sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 100% and a PICC team associated DVT rate of 2.8%.

  14. Correlation between central venous pressure and peripheral venous pressure with passive leg raise in patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Ali, Shahna; Ray, Utpal; Varshney, Ankur; Doley, Kashmiri

    2015-11-01

    Central venous pressure (CVP) assesses the volume status of patients. However, this technique is not without complications. We, therefore, measured peripheral venous pressure (PVP) to see whether it can replace CVP. To evaluate the correlation and agreement between CVP and PVP after passive leg raise (PLR) in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation. Prospective observational study in Intensive Care Unit. Fifty critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation were included in the study. CVP and PVP measurements were taken using a water column manometer. Measurements were taken in the supine position and subsequently after a PLR of 45°. Pearson's correlation and Bland-Altman's analysis. This study showed a fair correlation between CVP and PVP after a PLR of 45° (correlation coefficient, r = 0.479; P = 0.0004) when the CVP was correlation was good when the CVP was >10 cmH2O. Bland-Altman analysis showed 95% limits of agreement to be -2.912-9.472. PVP can replace CVP for guiding fluid therapy in critically ill patients.

  15. Managing Inadvertent Arterial Catheterization During Central Venous Access Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, Tony; Ettles, Duncan; Robinson, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 200,000 central venous catheterizations are carried out annually in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. Inadvertent arterial puncture occurs in up to 3.7%. Significant morbidity and death has been reported. We report on our experience in the endovascular treatment of this iatrogenic complication. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out of 9 cases referred for endovascular treatment of inadvertent arterial puncture during central venous catheterization over a 5 year period. Results: It was not possible to obtain accurate figures on the numbers of central venous catheterizations carried out during the time period. Five patients were referred with carotid or subclavian pseudoaneurysms and hemothorax following inadvertent arterial catheter insertion and subsequent removal. These patients all underwent percutaneous balloon tamponade and/or stent-graft insertion. More recently 4 patients were referred with the catheter still in situ and were successfully treated with a percutaneous closure device. Conclusion: If inadvertent arterial catheterization during central venous access procedures is recognized and catheters removed, sequelae can be treated percutaneously. However, once the complication is recognized it is better to leave the catheter in situ and seal the artery percutaneously with a closure device

  16. Advantages and disadvantages of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) compared to other central venous lines: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Eva; Hammarskjöld, Fredrik; Lundberg, Dag; Arnlind, Marianne Heibert

    2013-06-01

    The use of central venous lines carries a significant risk for serious complications and high economic costs. Lately, the peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) has gained in popularity due to presumed advantages over other central venous lines. The aim of this systematic literature review was to identify scientific evidence justifying the use of PICC. The literature review was performed according to the principles of Cochrane Collaboration. The electronic literature search included common databases up to March 2011. Only those studies rated as high or moderate quality were used for grading of evidence and conclusions. The search resulted in 827 abstracts, 48 articles were read in full text, and 11 met the inclusion criteria. None of the articles was classified as high quality and two had moderate quality. The results of these two studies indicate that PICC increases the risk for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), but decreases the risk for catheter occlusion. The quality of scientific evidence behind these conclusions, however, was limited. Due to the lack of studies with sufficiently high quality, questions such as early complications, patient satisfaction and costs could not be answered. We conclude that although PICCs are frequently used in oncology, scientific evidence supporting any advantage or disadvantage of PICC when comparing PICC with traditional central venous lines is limited, apart from a tendency towards increased risk for DVT and a decreased risk for catheter occlusion with PICC.

  17. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischoff, S. C.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious. Long-term (>7–10 days parenteral nutrition (PN requires central venous access whereas for PN 3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7–10 days, a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site.

  18. Phlebitis risk varies by peripheral venous catheter site and increases after 96 hours: a large multi-centre prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolini, Giancarlo; Manzoli, Lamberto; Simonetti, Valentina; Flacco, Maria Elena; Comparcini, Dania; Capasso, Lorenzo; Di Baldassarre, Angela; Eltaji Elfarouki, Ghaleb

    2014-11-01

    This multi-centre prospective field study evaluated whether peripheral venous catheter site of insertion influences the risk of catheter-related phlebitis. Potential predictors of phlebitis were also investigated. Millions of patients worldwide use peripheral venous catheters, which frequently cause local complications including phlebitis, infection and obstruction. Although phlebitis predictors have been broadly investigated, uncertainties remain on the potential effect of cannulation anatomical site, duration and the appropriate time for catheter removal. A prospective cohort design was carried out from January-June 2012. The clinical course of each patient who received a new peripheral venous catheter for any cause in five Italian hospitals was followed by trained nurses until catheter removal. The presence of phlebitis was assessed every 24 hours using the Visual Infusion Phlebitis score. Analyses were based upon multilevel mixed-effects regression. The final sample consisted of 1498 patients. The average time for catheters in situ was 65·6 hours and 23·6% of the catheters were in place beyond 96 hours. Overall phlebitis incidence was 15·4%, 94·4% of which were grade 1. The likelihood of phlebitis independently increased with increasing catheter duration, being highest after 96 hours. Compared with patients with catheter placed in the dorsum of the hand (22·8% of the sample), those with the catheter located in the antecubital fossa (34·1%) or forearm were less likely to have a phlebitis of any grade. Antecubital fossa and forearm veins may be preferential sites for peripheral venous cannulation. Our results support Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to replace catheters in adults no later than 96 hours. A relevant proportion of healthcare personnel did not adhere to such guidelines - more attention to this issue is required. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Importance of blood cultures from peripheral veins in pediatric patients with cancer and a central venous line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Rutkjaer, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    When an infection is suspected in a child with cancer and a central venous line (CVL), cultures are often only obtained from the CVL and not from a peripheral vein (PV). This study was undertaken to evaluate the importance of concomitant blood cultures from the CVL and a PV....

  20. Intramuscular ketamine to facilitate pediatric central vascular access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmark, T Kent; Hargrove, Jenny R; Brown, Lance

    2004-07-01

    Obtaining prompt vascular access in young children presenting to the emergency department (ED) is frequently both necessary and technically challenging. The objective of our study was to describe our experience using intramuscular (IM) ketamine to facilitate the placement of central venous catheters in children presenting to our ED needing vascular access in a timely fashion. We performed a retrospective medical record review of all pediatric patients central venous catheter facilitated by the use of IM ketamine. Eleven children met our inclusion criteria. Most of the children were young and medically complicated. The children ranged in age from 6 months to 8 years. The only complication identified was vomiting experienced by an 8-year-old boy. Emergency physicians successfully obtained central venous access in all subjects in the case series. The use of IM ketamine to facilitate the placement of central venous catheters in children who do not have peripheral venous access appears to be helpful. Emergency physicians may find it useful to be familiar with this use of IM ketamine.

  1. How to achieve ultrasound-guided femoral venous access: the new standard of care in the electrophysiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Benedict M; Child, Nicholas; Roberts, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Bedside vascular ultrasound machines are increasingly available. They are used to facilitate safer vascular access across a number of different specialties. In the electrophysiology laboratory however, where patients are frequently anticoagulated and require the insertion of multiple venous sheaths, anatomical landmark techniques predominate. Despite the high number of vascular complications associated with electrophysiological procedures and the increasing evidence to support its use in electrophysiology, ultrasound remains underutilised. A new standard of care is required. A comprehensive technical report, providing a detailed explanation of this important technique, will provide other electrophysiology centres with the knowledge and justification for adopting ultrasound guidance as their standard practice. We review the increasing body of evidence which demonstrates that routine ultrasound usage can substantially improve the safety of femoral venous access in the electrophysiology laboratory. We offer a comprehensive technical report to guide operators through the process of ultrasound-guided venous access, with a specific focus on the electrophysiology laboratory. Additionally, we detail a novel technique which utilises real-time colour Doppler ultrasound to accurately identify needle tip location during venous puncture. The use of vascular ultrasound to guide femoral venous cannulation is rapid, inexpensive and easily learnt. Ultrasound is readily available and offers the potential to significantly reduce vascular complications in the unique setting of the electrophysiology laboratory. Ultrasound guidance to achieve femoral venous access should be the new standard of care in electrophysiology.

  2. Comparison of oxidative/antioxidative status of penile corpus cavernosum blood and peripheral venous blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeni, E; Gulum, M; Selek, S; Erel, O; Unal, D; Verit, A; Savas, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine and to compare the oxidative and antioxidative status of penile corpus cavernosum and peripheral venous blood. A total of 28 adult healthy males were included in the study. Whole blood was simultaneously withdrawn from penile corpus cavernosum and the cubital vein and their plasma separated. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC), vitamin C, total protein, albumin, uric acid, bilirubin and total peroxide (TP) levels of both plasma samples were measured and compared. While TAC, total protein, albumin, bilirubin and uric acid levels were higher, vitamin C levels were lower in cavernosal blood than that of peripheral blood. On the other hand, TP level was found to be higher in penile blood samples than that of peripheral blood. We thought that the normal erectile process of the penile cavernosal body leads to increased production of oxidants as in the mechanism of ischaemia-reperfusion; however, the increase of TAC can prevent development of oxidative injury.

  3. Occluded Brescia-Cimino Hemodialysis Fistulas: Endovascular Treatment with Both Brachial Arterial and Venous Access Using the Pull-Through Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyayama, Shiro; Matsui, Osamu; Taki, Keiichi; Minami, Tetsuya; Shinmura, Rieko; Ito, Chiharu; Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Miki; Ushiogi, Yashuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the usefulness of both arterial and venous access with the pull-through technique in endovascular treatment of totally occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas. We treated 26 patients (17 men, 9 women; age range 43-82 years, mean age 66 years) with occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas. First, the occluded segment was traversed from the antegrade brachial arterial access using a microcatheter-guidewire system. Second, the vein was retrogradely punctured after confirmation of all diseased segments, and a 0.014- or 0.016-inch guidewire was pulled through the venous access when the occluded segment was long. All interventions including thrombolysis, thromboaspiration, angioplasty, and stent placement were performed via the venous access. The occlusion was successfully crossed via the brachial arterial access in 23 patients (88%). In 2 patients it was done from the venous approach. In the remaining patient it was not possible to traverse the occluded segment. The pull-through technique was successful in all 19 attempts. Clinical success was achieved in 96%, the primary patency rates at 6, 12, and 18 months were 83%, 78%, and 69%, the primary assisted patency rates were 92%, 92%, and 72%, and the secondary patency rates were 92%, 92%, and 92%, respectively. Minor complications in 5 patients included venous perforation in 2 (8%), venous rupture in 1 (4%), and regional hematoma in 2 (8%). Our study suggests that endovascular treatments with both arterial and venous access using the pull-through technique are highly effective in restoring function in totally occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas

  4. Venous access and care: harnessing pragmatics in harm reduction for people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Magdalena; Rhodes, Tim

    2012-06-01

    To explore the facilitators of long-term hepatitis C avoidance among people who inject drugs. We employed a qualitative life history design. Recruitment took place through low-threshold drug services and drug user networks in South East and North London. Participants were interviewed at the recruitment services or in their homes. The sample comprised 35 people who inject drugs, 20 of whom were hepatitis C antibody-negative. Participants' average injecting trajectory was 19 years (6-33), with 66% primarily injecting heroin, and 34% a crack and heroin mix. Nine (26%) of the sample were female and the average age was 39 years (23-53). Two interviews were conducted with each participant, with the second interview incorporating reference to a computer-constructed life history time-line. Interview accounts were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Hepatitis C risk awareness was recent and deprioritized by the majority of participants. The facilitation of venous access and care was an initial and enduring rationale for safe injecting practices. Difficult venous access resulted in increased contamination of injecting environments and transitions to femoral injecting. Participants expressed an unmet desire for non-judgemental venous access information and advice. Harm reduction interventions which attend to the immediate priorities of people who inject drugs, such as venous access and care, have the potential to re-engage individuals who are jaded or confused by hepatitis C prevention messages. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Feasibility of power contrast injections and bolus triggering during CT scans in oncologic patients with totally implantable venous access ports of the forearm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltz, Jan Peter; Machann, Wolfram; Noack, Claudia; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Background: Conventional totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAPs) are not approved for power contrast injections but often remain the only venous access site in oncologic patients. Therefore, these devices can play an important role if patients with a TIVAP are scheduled for a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) as vascular access may become more difficult during the course of chemotherapy. Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of power injections in conventional TIVAPs in the forearm and to analyze the feasibility of bolus triggering during CT scans. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study we analyzed 177 power injections in 141 patients with TIVAPs in the forearm. Between October 2008 and March 2010 all patients underwent power injections (1.5 mL/s, 150 psi) via the TIVAP for ceCT because conventional vascular access via a peripheral vein had failed. Adequate functioning and catheter's tip location after injection were evaluated. Peak injection pressure and attenuation levels of aorta, liver and spleen were analyzed and compared with results of 50 patients who were injected via classical peripheral cannulas (3 mL/s, 300 psi). Feasibility of automatic scan initiation was evaluated. In vitro the port was stressed with 5 mL/s (300 psi). Results: One TIVAP showed tip dislocation with catheter rupture. Three (2.1%) devices were explanted owing to assumed infection within 4 weeks after the injection. Mean injection pressure was 121.9 ±24.1 psi. Triggering with automatic scan initiation succeeded in 13/44 (29.6%) scans. Injection via classical cannulas resulted in significantly higher enhancement (p < 0.05). In vitro the port system tolerated flow rates of up to 5 mL/s, injection pressures of up to 338 psi. Conclusion: Power injection is a safe alternative for patients with TIVAPs in the forearm if classic vascular access ultimately fails. Triggering was successful in one-third of the attempts. Image quality in the arterial phase

  6. Valuation of the effectiveness of the nitrous oxide administration to the paediatric patient during channelling a peripheral venous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Margenta Gutiérrez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To valuate if the administration of nitrous oxide (Kalinox® during the technique of channelling a peripheral venous level decreases pain, improves the child´s behavior and facilitates the realization of the technique for the nurse. Experimental, randomized clinical trial. Population: children between 6-12 years old with an indication of peripheral venous channeling and medical approbation for administration of Kalinox to the Pediatric ICU unit of the Hospital in Toledo. Sample: 54 subjects in each group (alpha error of 0.05, with a study power of 90% and expecting a mean effect d/s = 0.5 for reducing pain in the experimental group. Main variables: the administration of nitrous oxide (independent variable and level of pain, motor behavior, degree of difficulty in performing the technique, and complications (dependent variables, besides, sociodemographic and clinical variables will be measured. It was used differents validated scales (Oucher, VAS y Frankl and one performed by us. Data will be analyze by SPSS software programme.

  7. A systematic review of extravasation and local tissue injury from administration of vasopressors through peripheral intravenous catheters and central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubani, Osama M; Green, Robert S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to collect and describe all published reports of local tissue injury or extravasation from vasopressor administration via either peripheral intravenous (IV) or central venous catheter. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases was performed from inception through January 2014 for reports of adults who received vasopressor intravenously via peripheral IV or central venous catheter for a therapeutic purpose. We included primary studies or case reports of vasopressor administration that resulted in local tissue injury or extravasation of vasopressor solution. Eighty-five articles with 270 patients met all inclusion criteria. A total of 325 separate local tissue injury and extravasation events were identified, with 318 events resulting from peripheral vasopressor administration and 7 events resulting from central administration. There were 204 local tissue injury events from peripheral administration of vasopressors, with an average duration of infusion of 55.9 hours (±68.1), median time of 24 hours, and range of 0.08 to 528 hours. In most of these events (174/204, 85.3%), the infusion site was located distal to the antecubital or popliteal fossae. Published data on tissue injury or extravasation from vasopressor administration via peripheral IVs are derived mainly from case reports. Further study is warranted to clarify the safety of vasopressor administration via peripheral IVs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transposition of cephalic vein to rescue hemodialysis access arteriovenous fistula and treat symptomatic central venous obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Jose Skupien

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that stenosis or central venous obstruction affects 20 to 50% of patients who undergo placement of catheters in central veins. For patients who are given hemodialysis via upper limbs, this problem causes debilitating symptoms and increases the risk of loss of hemodialysis access. We report an atypical case of treatment of a dialysis patient with multiple comorbidities, severe swelling and pain in the right upper limb (RUL, few alternative sites for hemodialysis vascular access, a functioning brachiobasilic fistula in the RUL and severe venous hypertension in the same limb, secondary to central vein occlusion of the internal jugular vein and right brachiocephalic trunk. The alternative surgical treatment chosen was to transpose the RUL cephalic vein, forming a venous necklace at the anterior cervical region, bypassing the site of venous occlusion. In order to achieve this, we dissected the cephalic vein in the right arm to its junction with the axillary vein, devalved the cephalic vein and anastomosed it to the contralateral external jugular vein, providing venous drainage to the RUL, alleviating symptoms of venous hypertension and preserving function of the brachiobasilic fistula.

  9. Peripheral Venous Waveform Analysis for Detecting Hemorrhage and Iatrogenic Volume Overload in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Kyle M; Sileshi, Ban; Baudenbacher, Franz J; Boyer, Richard B; Kohorst, Kelly L; Brophy, Colleen M; Eagle, Susan S

    2016-10-01

    Unrecognized hemorrhage and unguided resuscitation is associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. The authors investigated peripheral venous waveform analysis (PIVA) as a method for quantitating hemorrhage as well as iatrogenic fluid overload during resuscitation. The authors conducted a prospective study on Yorkshire Pigs (n = 8) undergoing hemorrhage, autologous blood return, and administration of balanced crystalloid solution beyond euvolemia. Intra-arterial blood pressure, electrocardiogram, and pulse oximetry were applied to each subject. Peripheral venous pressure was measured continuously through an upper extremity standard peripheral IV catheter and analyzed with LabChart. The primary outcome was comparison of change in the first fundamental frequency (f1) of PIVA with standard and invasive monitoring and shock index (SI). Hemorrhage, return to euvolemia, and iatrogenic fluid overload resulted in significantly non-zero slopes of f1 amplitude. There were no significant differences in heart rate or mean arterial pressure, and a late change in SI. For the detection of hypovolemia the PIVA f1 amplitude change generated an receiver operator curves (ROC) curve with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.93; heart rate AUC = 0.61; mean arterial pressure AUC = 0.48, and SI AUC = 0.72. For hypervolemia the f1 amplitude generated an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.85, heart rate AUC = 0.62, mean arterial pressure AUC = 0.63, and SI AUC = 0.65. In this study, PIVA demonstrated a greater sensitivity for detecting acute hemorrhage, return to euvolemia, and iatrogenic fluid overload compared with standard monitoring and SI. PIVA may provide a low-cost, minimally invasive monitoring solution for monitoring and resuscitating patients with perioperative hemorrhage.

  10. CARCINOEMBRYONIC ANTIGEN LEVELS IN THE PERIPHERAL AND MESENTERIC VENOUS BLOOD OF PATIENTS WITH RECTAL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminio Cabral de REZENDE JUNIOR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA is an important prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, however the rectum presents different routes of venous drainage, stating that the level of CEA in peripheral and mesenteric rectal tumors may be different, depending on the location of the tumor in the rectal segment. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the peripheral and mesenteric venous levels of CEA and the association between these levels and the tumour location in the rectums of patients successfully operated on for rectal carcinoma. Methods Thirty-two patients who were surgically treated for rectal carcinoma were divided into patients with tumours located in the upper rectum (n = 11 or lower rectum (n = 21. The CEA values were assessed by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Serum and mesenteric CEA levels were associated with the tumour anatomopathological characteristics: location, histological type, cellular differentiation grade, depth of invasion into the rectal wall, angiolymphatic invasion, tumour, node, and metastasis staging; and the CEA index (≤1.0 or ≥1.0 ng /mL. Results Analysis of the serum CEA values using clinical and anatomopathological parameters revealed no significant association with tumour location, histological type, cellular differentiation grade, depth of invasion into the intestinal wall, and tumour, node, and metastasis staging. The mesenteric CEA levels were significantly associated with the tumour location (P = 0.01. The CEA values in the mesenteric venous blood and the presence of angiolymphatic invasion (P = 0.047 were significantly different. A significant relationship was found between the CEA index value and the rectal tumour location (P = 0.0001. Conclusions The CEA levels were higher in the mesenteric vein in tumours located in the upper rectum and in the presence of angiolymphatic invasion. CEA drainage from lower rectum adenocarcinomas preferentially occurs

  11. A prospective clinical trial to assess peripheral venous catheter-related phlebitis using needleless connectors in a surgery department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Ohad; Shlomo, Fanny; Ben-Adiva, Gila; Edri, Zehava; Shema-Didi, Lilach

    2017-10-01

    The use of intravascular catheters is often complicated by phlebitis, which is associated with increased morbidity and extended duration of hospitalization. We conducted a study to investigate the impact of needleless intravenous access devices on the rate of phlebitis in peripheral venous catheters (PVCs). We prospectively recruited patients in 2 phases. The first group was treated with a regular cap, and the second group was treated with a needleless connector. The incidence of catheter-related phlebitis (CRP) was recorded as the primary end point. A total of 620 PVCs using regular caps were inserted into 340 patients and CRP rates were recorded. In the second phase of the study, 169 PVCs using needleless connectors were inserted into 135 patients. In the group treated with the regular cap, the CRP rate was 60% compared with 7% in the group treated with the needleless cap (P phlebitis had a statistically significant longer mean hospitalization period (P <.001), as were patients in the regular cap group (P <.01). The use of needleless connectors was found to be associated with a significant reduction of CRP in peripheral veins in a surgery department setting. The decreased morbidity resulted in a lower number of catheter replacements and duration of hospitalization. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence and risk factors for central venous access port-related infection in Chinese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Yao; Lee, Kuan-Der; Chen, Ping-Tsung; Chen, Min-Chi; Chen, Yi-Yang; Huang, Cih-En; Kuan, Feng-Che; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lu, Chang Hsien

    2015-11-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy via central venous access ports is an important part of the standard treatment for most cancers, but it is accompanied with the risk of infections. This study aimed to analyze the incidence and risk factors for central venous access port-related infection (CPI) among Chinese patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. Between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2005 a total of 1391 cancer patients with 1449 totally implantable central venous access ports were evaluated. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model were used for the analyses of risk factors. The overall CPI incidence rate was 0.21 per 1000 catheter-days. Hematological malignancies and head and neck cancer were associated with an increased risk of CPI (hazard ratio 4.00 and 4.11, respectively, both p risk of infection than for patients in a nonadjuvant setting (p ports. Implementation of an insertion bundle for the prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections is warranted, especially for those patients with hematological and head and neck cancers, as well as for patients receiving chemotherapy in the metastatic settings. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Vascular access in pediatric patients in the emergency department: types of access, indications, and complications [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Rachel; Langhan, Melissa; Pade, Kathryn H

    2017-06-22

    Vascular access is a potentially life-saving procedure that is a mainstay of emergency medicine practice. There are a number of challenges associated with obtaining and maintaining vascular access, and the choice of the route of access and equipment used will depend on patient- and provider-specific factors. In this issue, the indications and complications of peripheral intravenous access, intraosseous access, and central venous access are reviewed. Timely and effective assessment and management of difficult-access patients, pain control techniques that can assist vascular access, and contraindications to each type of vascular access are also discussed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  14. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  15. Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Parás-Bravo

    Full Text Available The use of venous catheters is a widespread practice, especially in oncological and oncohematological units. The objective of this study was to evaluate the complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs in a cohort of patients.In this retrospective cohort study, we included all patient carrying PICCs (n = 603 inserted at our institute between October 2010 and December 2013. The main variables collected were medical diagnosis, catheter care, location, duration of catheterization, reasons for catheter removal, complications, and nursing care. Complications were classified as infection, thrombosis, phlebitis, migration, edema, and/or ecchymosis.All patients were treated according to the same "nursing care" protocol. The incidence rate of complications was two cases per 1000 days of catheter duration. The most relevant complications were infection and thrombosis, both with an incidence of 0.17 cases per 1000 days of the total catheterization period. The total average duration of catheterization was 170 days [SD 6.06]. Additionally to "end of treatment" (48.42% and "exitus", (22.53% the most frequent cause of removal was migration (displacement towards the exterior of the catheter (5.80%.PICCs are safe devices that allow the administration of long-term treatment and preserve the integrity of the venous system of the patient. Proper care of the catheter is very important to improve the quality life of patients with oncologic and hematologic conditions. Therefore, correct training of professionals and patients as well as following the latest scientific recommendations are particularly relevant.

  16. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Culp Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available William C Culp Jr1, Mohammed Yousaf2, Benjamin Lowry1, Timothy C McCowan3, William C Culp21Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Scott and White Hospital, The Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA; 2Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAPurpose: To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement.Methods: Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L, buffered 1% lidocaine (LB, or 2% chloroprocaine (CP injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable.Results: Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L.Conclusion: Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine.Keywords: local anesthesia, analgesia, central venous access, lidocaine, chloroprocaine

  17. Kimura's Disease without Peripheral Eosinophilia: An Unusual and Challenging Case Simulating Venous Malformation on Imaging Studies-Case Report and Review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokania, Vivek; Patil, Digvijay; Agarwal, Ketan; Thakur, Prajakta; Prajapati, Piyush

    2017-06-01

    Kimura's Disease (KD) is a rare chronic inflammatory disorder presenting as multiple painless solitary subcutaneous nodules, predominantly in the head and neck region and frequently associated with regional lymphadenopathy and/or salivary gland involvement. Because of painless nature and indolent course, there is usually a delay in the patient's presentation. KD may radiologically mimic other chronic inflammatory conditions like tuberculosis, vascular malformations and neoplasms. Clinical correlation and histological evaluation along with elevated peripheral eosinophil and serum IgE level are considered important for confirmatory diagnosis. We report a case of painless swelling over right submandibular region extending to the right superficial parotid. The haematological reports were within normal limits. Ultrasound (USG), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Angiogram (MRA) favoured a diagnosis of venous malformation. However, histopathological examination of excised lesion confirmed a diagnosis of KD. This case proves the possibility of the KD even in the absence of peripheral eosinophilia and/ or elevated serum IgE level, and may mimic venous malformation on imaging studies. Therefore, KD must find a place in the differentials of solitary painless neck swelling even in the absence of peripheral eosinophilia and/or elevated IgE level.

  18. Controlling Access to Input/Output Peripheral Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Rodionov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author proposes a system that manages information security policy on enterprise. Problems related to managing information security policy on enterprise and access to peripheral devices in computer systems functioning under control of Microsoft Windows NT operating systems are considered.

  19. Leukocytic Response and Peripheral Venous Blood Lymphocyte Apoptosis as a Marker of Tissue Ischemia in Acute Massive Blood Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Borovkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the level of peripheral venous blood lymphocyte apoptosis and intraoperative hypoxia in victims with acute massive blood loss. Subjects and methods. Twenty-two patients with open and close chest and abdominal traumas complicated by acute massive blood loss were examined. All the patients were emergently operated on to stop bleeding. Tissue metabolism was evaluated from gases, acid-base parameters, and plasma lactate, glucose, potassium, and sodium levels. Apoptosis of mononuclear cells was studied and dead leukocytes were counted using flow cytometry. Results. Preoperatively, the victims were found to have venous hypoxemia, hyperlactatemia, hyperglycemia, moderate leukocytosis, and higher dead leukocyte counts. There were also raised counts of lymphocytes coming into the process of apoptosis. A significant relationship was found between monocyte counts and hypoxia values. At the end of surgery, oxygen balance values became stable and exerted an effect on the count of leukocytes, the relative level of granulocytes, the relative and absolute counts of dead and damaged leukocytes, and the concentration of lymphocytes in the victims’ venous blood during the early stages of apoptosis, as evidenced by nonlinear regression models. Conclusion. The indicators of immunocompetent cell apoptosis and the count of venous blood dead leukocytes along with lactate levels and venous hypoxemia parameters reflect the degree of tissue hypoxia and may be used as specific markers.

  20. Cryopreserved recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for the restoration of occluded central venous access devices in pediatric oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Y.; Al-Katheri, A.; Al-Sedairy, R.; Al-Omari, A.; Abdullah, Mohammed F.; Crankson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Thrombolytic therapy with urokinase 5000 units has been the standard therapy for restoration of thrombosed central catheters. However, with the decreased availability of urokinase, alternatives needed to be sought. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy, bioactivity, dwell time and cost of cryopreserved recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) in the restoration of occluded central venous access devices. For children 10kg, a dose of 1 mg was used. The dwell time was 1-2 hours. Of the 40 courses of rTPA, 39 fully restored central venous line patency (97%). Successful courses were instilled for an average of 1 hour. Cryopreserved rTPA appears to be safe and effective in the dose used to restore the patency of occluded central venous access devices in pediatric oncology patients. (author)

  1. Expediting Clinician Adoption of Safety Practices: The UCSF Venous Access Patient Safety Interdisciplinary Education Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donaldson, Nancy E; Plank, Rosemary K; Williamson, Ann; Pearl, Jeffrey; Kellogg, Jerry; Ryder, Marcia

    2005-01-01

    ...) Venous Access Device (VAD) Patient Safety Interdisciplinary Education Project was to develop a 30-hour/one clinical academic unit VAD patient safety course with the aim of expediting clinician adoption of critical concepts...

  2. Central venous access through the external jugular vein in children submitted to bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Godoy

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of long-term central venous access is a sine qua non step for bone marrow transplantation in children. Most frequently, long-term central venous access has been obtained via blind percutaneous cannulation of subclavian and internal jugular veins or via internal jugular vein cutdown. In order to avoid some potential minor and major complications associated with the subclavian or internal jugular approaches, the authors describe an easy, simple and safe method for central venous access through an external jugular vein cutdown that should be of interest to readers involved in the field of bone marrow transplantation. It should be also considered for children as well as adults needing central venous access via an external catheter - or totally implantable port - for reasons other than bone marrow transplantation, such as total parenteral nutrition and administration of chemotherapeutic agents.O estabelecimento de um acesso venoso central de longa duração é uma condição sine qua non para realizar o transplante de medula óssea em crianças. Com frequência, este acesso tem sido obtido através da punção percutânea das veias subclávia e jugular interna ou via dissecção da jugular interna. Com o objetivo de evitar algumas complicações maiores e menores associadas com a subclávia e a jugular interna, os autores descrevem um método simples, fácil e seguro para o acesso venoso central através de dissecção da veia jugular externa. Este método deveria ser de interesse dos leitores envolvidos com o transplante de medula óssea e ser considerado também para crianças e/ou adultos que necessitem de cateter venoso central de longa permanência (externo ou totalmente implantável devido a outras razões, como a nutrição parenteral ou a administração de agentes quimioterápicos.

  3. Venipuncture versus peripheral catheter: do infusions alter laboratory results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, Victoria Lerma; Gómez, Ignacio Arribas; Andreu, Francisco A Bernabeu

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the equivalence between analytic parameters from blood samples obtained from a saline solution lock device used for the infusion of drugs and those from venipuncture. In our emergency department, patients bearing a saline solution lock device have blood extracted by venipuncture to avoid possible contamination of the sample. Adults from the emergency department with a saline solution lock device who required laboratory tests were selected as candidates for this cross-sectional observational study. Infusions were halted and flushed with 0.9% saline solution; 2 minutes later, 2 mL of blood was drawn and discarded, and the corresponding laboratory tubes were filled. Immediately after, another sample was withdrawn from the opposite extremity by venipuncture. Both samples were analyzed for hematology, biochemistry, venous blood gases, and coagulation parameters. Concordance was evaluated by use of the intraclass correlation coefficient with its 95% confidence intervals; Bland-Altman plots were used to illustrate the percentage of samples with differences exceeding 2 SDs. The mean differences were also checked to detect those exceeding the laboratory's systematic error. An intraclass correlation coefficient of over 0.9 was achieved for all parameters except for pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and partial pressure of oxygen. Differences of over 2 SDs were found in fewer than 10% of all parameters. None of them exceeded 3 SDs, except for pH and venous blood gases. All parameters showed differences below the laboratory's accepted systematic error except for pH and venous blood gases. Blood samples extracted from a peripheral catheter with or without drug infusions are valid for the analysis of hematology, biochemistry, and coagulation parameters but not for venous blood gases. Nurses should know the benefits of using an existing peripheral catheter for drawing blood samples for laboratory analysis even when infusing commonly used drugs

  4. [Fistulae or catheter for elderly who start hemodialysis without permanent vascular access?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Cortés, Ma J; Viedma, G; Sánchez Perales, M C; Borrego, F J; Borrego, J; Pérez del Barrio, P; Gil Cunquero, J M; Liébana, A; Pérez Bañasco, V

    2005-01-01

    Autologous access is the best vascular access for dialysis also in older patients and it should be mature when patient needs hemodialysis. It is not always possible. Surgeon availability and demographic characteristics of patients (age, diabetes, vascular disease...) are factors that determine primary vascular access. To analyse outcome and vascular access complications in elderly who start hemodialysis without vascular access. All patients older than 75 years who initiated hemodialysis without vascular access between January 2000 and June 2002 were included, They were divided en two groups depending on primary vascular access. GI: arterio-venous fistulae. GIIl: Tunnelled cuffed catheter. Epidemiological and analytical data, vascular access complications related, as well as patient and first permanent vascular access survival from their inclusion in dialysis up to December 2002 were analysed and compared in both groups. 32 patients were studied. GI: n = 17 (4 men) and GIIl: n =1 5 (8 men), age: 79.9 +/- 3.8 and 81.7 +/- 4 years respectively (ns). There were no differences in sex and comorbidity (diabetes, ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease and hypertension). It took GI 3 months to get a permanent vascular access suitable for using, while it took GIIl 1.3 months (p catheters was higher in GI (3.35 vs 1.87 p central venous thrombosis happen in GI (I: 25 CVT/100 patients-year) vs 30% in GIIl (I = 14.4/100 patients-year) (ns). No significant differences neither in bleeding (66.7% vs 33.3%) nor ischemia (75% vs 25%) were found. Dialysis dose (Kt/V) as well as anaemia degree were similar in both groups. Permanent vascular access survival after 2 years was 45.8% in GI and 24% in GII (ns). Patient survival was similar in GI and GII (72% vs 51% ns). Elderly who start hemodialysis without vascular access took longer to get a suitable permanent vascular access when arterio-venous fistulae is placed than with a tunnelled cuffed hemodialysis catheter. As a

  5. Radiologic placement of hemodialysis central venous catheters: a practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemmer, D.; Sadler, D.J.; Gray, R.R.; Saliken, J.C.; So, C.B. [Foothills Hospital, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2001-04-01

    Typical indications for central venous catheters (CVCs) are hemodialysis (HD), apheresis, total parenteral nutrition, analgesia, chemotherapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and cases of difficult or absent peripheral venous access. One of the largest medical services requesting CVC insertion is nephrology for HD patients. Demographics dictate that the demand for CVCs will continue to grow over the next few decades, placing striking demands on interventional radiology departments. In our centre, interventional radiologists now place nearly all percutaneously inserted HD CVCs. Radiologists provide rapid access to CVC services with significantly fewer complications than CVCs placed by other clinicians. With the demand for CVC management increasing and available operating room time decreasing, many clinicians now refer CVC insertions to radiologists. As well, clinicians who ordinarily place their own lines often refer high-risk patients, such as those who are obese or uncooperative and those with burns or coagulopathy. Our experience, derived from over 7000 CVC insertions, manipulations and removals, has allowed us to continually progress and improve our techniques, many of which are summarized here. (author)

  6. Complications of Central Venous Totally Implantable Access Port: Internal Jugular Versus Subclavian Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pil Young Jung

    Full Text Available Background: Totally implantable access port (TIAP provides reliable, long term vascular access with minimal risk of infection and allows patients normal physical activity. With wide use of ports, new complications have been encountered. We analyzed TIAP related complications and evaluated the outcomes of two different percutaneous routes of access to superior vena cava. Methods: All 172 patients who underwent port insertion with internal jugular approach (Group 1, n = 92 and subclavian approach (Group 2, n = 79 between August 2011 and May 2013 in a single center were analyzed, retrospectively. Medical records were analyzed to compare the outcomes and the occurrence of port related complications between two different percutaneous routes of access to superior vena cava. Results: Median follow-up for TIAP was 278 days (range, 1-1868. Twenty four complications were occurred (14.0%, including pneumothorax (n = 1, 0.6%, migration/malposition (n = 4, 2.3%, pinch-off syndrome (n = 4, 2.3%, malfunction (n = 2, 1.1%, infection (n = 8, 4.7%, and venous thrombosis (n = 5, 2.9%. The overall incidence was 8.7% and 20.3% in each group (p = 0.030. Mechanical complications except infectious and thrombotic complications were more often occurred in group 2 (p = 0.033. The mechanical complication free probability is significantly higher in group 1 (p = 0.040. Conclusions: We suggest that the jugular access should be chosen in patients who need long term catheterization because of high incidence of mechanical complication, such as pinch-off syndrome.

  7. Metastatic spread from squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx to the totally implantable venous access port insertion site: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangla, Ankit; Agarwal, Nikki; Mullane, Michael Russell

    2017-12-01

    The totally implantable venous access port plays a crucial role in delivering chemotherapy in the outpatient setting. Here, we report the first case of a patient with hypopharyngeal tumor who developed chest wall metastasis over the totally implantable venous access port inserted in the internal jugular vein. Our patient, a 58-year-old man with a hypopharyngeal tumor presented with a lump over the totally implantable venous access port site. The port was removed and the lump was biopsied. The CT studies showed that the tumor had spread along the catheter from the hypopharynx to the chest wall. The pathology from the biopsy showed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The patient had poor performance status and opted for hospice care. We present a novel case of metastasis over the totally implantable venous access port implanted in a patient with a hypopharyngeal tumor. We also reviewed relevant literature comparing the data from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube site metastasis with our patient and other similar case reports. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Percutaneous Endovascular Salvage Techniques for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breault, Stéphane; Glauser, Frédéric; Babaker, Malik; Doenz, Francesco; Qanadli, Salah Dine

    2015-01-01

    PurposeImplanted venous access devices (IVADs) are often used in patients who require long-term intravenous drug administration. The most common causes of device dysfunction include occlusion by fibrin sheath and/or catheter adherence to the vessel wall. We present percutaneous endovascular salvage techniques to restore function in occluded catheters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of these techniques.Methods and MaterialsThrough a femoral or brachial venous access, a snare is used to remove fibrin sheath around the IVAD catheter tip. If device dysfunction is caused by catheter adherences to the vessel wall, a new “mechanical adhesiolysis” maneuver was performed. IVAD salvage procedures performed between 2005 and 2013 were analyzed. Data included clinical background, catheter tip position, success rate, recurrence, and rate of complication.ResultsEighty-eight salvage procedures were performed in 80 patients, mostly women (52.5 %), with a mean age of 54 years. Only a minority (17.5 %) of evaluated catheters were located at an optimal position (i.e., cavoatrial junction ±1 cm). Mechanical adhesiolysis or other additional maneuvers were used in 21 cases (24 %). Overall technical success rate was 93.2 %. Malposition and/or vessel wall adherences were the main cause of technical failure. No complications were noted.ConclusionThese IVAD salvage techniques are safe and efficient. When a catheter is adherent to the vessel wall, mechanical adhesiolysis maneuvers allow catheter mobilization and a greater success rate with no additional risk. In patients who still require long-term use of their IVAD, these procedures can be performed safely to avoid catheter replacement

  10. Percutaneous Endovascular Salvage Techniques for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction

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    Breault, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.breault@chuv.ch [Lausanne University Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department (Switzerland); Glauser, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.glauser@chuv.ch [Lausanne University Hospital, Angiology and Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Departments (Switzerland); Babaker, Malik, E-mail: malik.babaker@chuv.ch; Doenz, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.doenz@chuv.ch; Qanadli, Salah Dine, E-mail: salah.qanadli@chuv.ch [Lausanne University Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeImplanted venous access devices (IVADs) are often used in patients who require long-term intravenous drug administration. The most common causes of device dysfunction include occlusion by fibrin sheath and/or catheter adherence to the vessel wall. We present percutaneous endovascular salvage techniques to restore function in occluded catheters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of these techniques.Methods and MaterialsThrough a femoral or brachial venous access, a snare is used to remove fibrin sheath around the IVAD catheter tip. If device dysfunction is caused by catheter adherences to the vessel wall, a new “mechanical adhesiolysis” maneuver was performed. IVAD salvage procedures performed between 2005 and 2013 were analyzed. Data included clinical background, catheter tip position, success rate, recurrence, and rate of complication.ResultsEighty-eight salvage procedures were performed in 80 patients, mostly women (52.5 %), with a mean age of 54 years. Only a minority (17.5 %) of evaluated catheters were located at an optimal position (i.e., cavoatrial junction ±1 cm). Mechanical adhesiolysis or other additional maneuvers were used in 21 cases (24 %). Overall technical success rate was 93.2 %. Malposition and/or vessel wall adherences were the main cause of technical failure. No complications were noted.ConclusionThese IVAD salvage techniques are safe and efficient. When a catheter is adherent to the vessel wall, mechanical adhesiolysis maneuvers allow catheter mobilization and a greater success rate with no additional risk. In patients who still require long-term use of their IVAD, these procedures can be performed safely to avoid catheter replacement.

  11. Effects of smoking on venous cannulation pain: a randomized prospective trial

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    Volkan Hanci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: It has been demonstrated that smoking increases pain perception; however the effect of smoking on perception of pain during venous cannulation is not known. The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not smoking has an effect on pain perception due to peripheral venous cannulation. METHODS: 220 patients scheduled to have elective surgery were enrolled in the study and were divided into two groups (Group S and C, n = 110 for each according to their smoking habits. Numerical rating scale was introduced to the patients and then peripheral venous cannulation at the dorsum of the hand was made with a 20 G intracath. Pain perception of the patients was scored by subsequent numerical rating scale questioning. RESULTS: The demographic characteristics of the groups were identical. Numerical rating scale scores in Group S and C were 3.31 ± 1.56 and 1.65 ± 1.23, respectively (p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: Pain perception due to peripheral venous cannulation is higher in smokers. Future studies on pain treatment should consider the smoking habits of patients.

  12. An Evaluation of Complications in Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion in the Emergency Department

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    Engin OZAKIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: In emergency departments, emergency physicians frequently have to perform central venous access. In cases where peripheral venous access is not possible, central venous access is required for dialysis, fulfillment of urgent fluid need, or central venous pressure measurement. This study was carried out to evaluate the emergence of complications in the process of and in the 15 days following the insertion of central venous catheter under ultrasound guidance in the emergency department. Methods: For this study, patients who presented to the emergency department over a period of eight months with an urgent need for central catheter were examined prospectively. Age, gender, and accompanying diseases of patients as well as the type, time, duration, and indication of the venous access were recorded. Furthermore, the amount of experience of the physician was taken into consideration. Results: In the emergency department, physicians performed ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion for 74 patients (40 men and 34 women. For access, internal jugular vein was used in 65 (87.8% patients, and femoral vein was used in 9 (12.2% patients. The reason for access was urgent dialysis need in 55 (74.3%, CVP measurement in 3 (4.1%, fluid support due to severe hypovolemia in 6 (8.1%, and difficulty of peripheral venous access in 10 (13.5% patients. None of the patients developed complications in the process of or after the insertion. Patients did not have infections related to the catheter in 15 days following the insertion. Conclusions: Central venous access is frequently required in emergency departments. The risk of complication is little if any in ultrasonographyguided access carried out under appropriate conditions. ÖZET: Amaç: Acil servislerde acil tıp hekimlerince santral damar yolu işlemi sık uygulanır. Periferik damar yolu açılamadığı hallerde, diyaliz, acil sıvı ihtiyacı veya santral venöz basınç

  13. Comparison of three types of central venous catheters in patients with malignant tumor receiving chemotherapy

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    Fang S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Shirong Fang,1 Jinhong Yang,2 Lei Song,3 Yan Jiang,1 Yuxiu Liu4 1Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Oncology, Weifang People’s Hospital, Weifang, 3Intensive Care Unit, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, 4Nursing College, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, People’s Republic of China Background: Central venous catheters (CVCs have been an effective access for chemotherapy instead of peripherally intravenous catheters. There were limited studies on the choices and effects of different types of CVCs for chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the complications, cost, and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction of three commonly used CVCs for chemotherapy, such as implanted venous port, peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs, and external non-tunneled central venous catheters (NTCs.Methods: A double-center prospective cohort study was carried out from March 2014 to December 2016. Catheterization situation, complications, catheter maintenance, cost, and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction were recorded, investigated, and analyzed. Forty-five ports, 60 PICCs and 40 NTCs were included. All the CVCs were followed up to catheter removal.Results: There was no statistical difference in catheterization success rates between port and PICC. NTC had less success rate by one puncture compared with port. Ports had fewer complications compared with PICCs and NTCs. The complication rates of ports, PICCs and NTCs were 2.2%, 40%, and 27.5%, respectively. If the chemotherapy process was <12 months, NTCs cost least, and the cost of port was much higher than PICC and NTC. When the duration time was longer than 12 months, the cost of port had no difference with the cost of PICC. Quality of life and patients’ satisfaction of port group were significantly higher than the other two groups. Conclusion: Although port catheterization costs more and needs professional medical staff and strict operational

  14. A Novel Technique Using a Protection Filter During Fibrin Sheath Removal for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction

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    Sotiriadis, Charalampos; Hajdu, Steven David [University Hospital of Lausanne, Cardiothoracic and Vascular Unit, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Degrauwe, Sophie [University Hospital of Lausanne, Department of Cardiology (Switzerland); Barras, Heloise; Qanadli, Salah Dine, E-mail: salah.qanadli@chuv.ch [University Hospital of Lausanne, Cardiothoracic and Vascular Unit, Department of Radiology (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    With the increased use of implanted venous access devices (IVADs) for continuous long-term venous access, several techniques such as percutaneous endovascular fibrin sheath removal, have been described, to maintain catheter function. Most standard techniques do not capture the stripped fibrin sheath, which is subsequently released in the pulmonary circulation and may lead to symptomatic pulmonary embolism. The presented case describes an endovascular technique which includes stripping, capture, and removal of fibrin sheath using a novel filter device. A 64-year-old woman presented with IVAD dysfunction. Stripping was performed using a co-axial snare to the filter to capture the fibrin sheath. The captured fragment was subsequently removed for visual and pathological verification. No immediate complication was observed and the patient was discharged the day of the procedure.

  15. Inpatient Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications: Should Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Lines Be Placed in the Intensive Care Unit Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyak, Michael; Kabir, Ishraq; Britt, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are now commonly used for central access in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting; however, there is a paucity of data evaluating the complication rates associated with these lines. We performed a retrospective review of all PICCs placed in the inpatient setting at our institution during a 1-year period from January 2013 to December 2013. These were divided into two groups: those placed at the bedside in the ICU and those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. Data regarding infectious and thrombotic complications were collected and evaluated. During the study period, 1209 PICC line placements met inclusion criteria and were evaluated; 1038 were placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients, and 171 were placed at the bedside in ICU patients. The combined thrombotic and central line associated blood stream infection rate was 6.17 per cent in the non-ICU group and 10.53 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.035). The thrombotic complication rate was 5.88 per cent in the non-ICU group and 7.60 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.38), whereas the central line associated blood stream infection rate was 0.29 per cent in the non-ICU group and 2.92 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.002). This study seems to suggest that PICC lines placed at the bedside in the ICU setting are associated with higher complication rates, in particular infectious complications, than those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. The routine placement of PICC lines in the ICU settings needs to be reevaluated given these findings.

  16. Phlebitis and infiltration: vascular trauma associated with the peripheral venous catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Luciene Muniz; Parreira, Pedro Miguel; Oliveira, Anabela de Sousa Salgueiro; Mónico, Lisete dos Santos Mendes; Arreguy-Sena, Cristina; Henriques, Maria Adriana

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to determine the incidence rate and risk factors for the nursing-sensitive indicators phlebitis and infiltration in patients with peripheral venous catheters (PVCs). Method: cohort study with 110 patients. Scales were used to assess and document phlebitis and infiltration. Socio-demographic variables, clinical variables related to the PVC, medication and hospitalization variables were collected. Descriptive and inferential analysis and multivariate logistic models were used. Results: the incidence rate of phlebitis and infiltration was respectively 43.2 and 59.7 per 1000 catheter-days. Most PVCs with these vascular traumas were removed in the first 24 hours. Risk factors for phlebitis were: length of hospital stay (p=0.042) and number of catheters inserted (p<0.001); risk factors for infiltration were: piperacillin/tazobactan (p=0.024) and the number of catheters inserted (p<0.001). Conclusion: the investigation documented the incidence of nursing-sensitive indicators (phlebitis and infiltration) and revealed new risk factors related to infiltration. It also allowed a reflection on the nursing care necessary to prevent these vascular traumas and on the indications and contraindications of the PVC, supporting the implementation of the PICC as an alternative to PVC. PMID:29791668

  17. The intracavitary ECG method for positioning the tip of central venous access devices in pediatric patients: results of an Italian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Francesca; Pittiruti, Mauro; Lamperti, Massimo; Graziano, Ugo; Celentano, Davide; Capozzoli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The Italian Group for Venous Access Devices (GAVeCeLT) has carried out a multicenter study investigating the safety and accuracy of intracavitary electrocardiography (IC-ECG) in pediatric patients. We enrolled 309 patients (age 1 month-18 years) candidate to different central venous access devices (VAD) - 56 peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), 178 short term centrally inserted central catheters (CICC), 65 long term VADs, 10 VADs for dialysis - in five Italian Hospitals. Three age groups were considered: A (ECG was applicable in 307 cases. The increase of the P wave on IC-ECG was detected in all cases but two. The tip of the catheter was positioned at the cavo-atrial junction (CAJ) (i.e., at the maximal height of the P wave on IC-ECG) and the position was checked during the procedure by fluoroscopy or chest x-ray, considering the CAJ at 1-2 cm (group A), 1.5-3 cm (group B), or 2-4 cm (group C) below the carina. There were no complications related to IC-ECG. The overall match between IC-ECG and x-ray was 95.8% (96.2% in group A, 95% in group B, and 96.8% in group C). In 95 cases, the IC-ECG was performed with a dedicated ECG monitor, specifically designed for IC-ECG (Nautilus, Romedex): in this group, the match between IC-ECG and x-ray was 98.8%. We conclude that the IC-ECG method is safe and accurate in the pediatric patients. The applicability of the method is 99.4% and its feasibility is 99.4%. The accuracy is 95.8% and even higher (98.8%) when using a dedicated ECG monitor.

  18. Relative incidence of phlebitis associated with peripheral intravenous catheters in the lower versus upper extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaya, A; Schwartz, Y; Kory, R; Yinnon, A M; Ben-Chetrit, E

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral venous access in elderly, hospitalized patients is often challenging. The usual alternative is insertion of a central venous catheter, with associated risk for complications. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relative incidence of phlebitis secondary to lower as compared to upper extremity intravenous catheters (IVCs) and associated risk factors. A non-randomized, observational, cohort-controlled study was carried out. Consecutive patients receiving a lower extremity IVC were enrolled and compared with patients receiving an upper extremity IVC. Patients were followed from insertion until removal of the IVC. The major endpoint was phlebitis. The incidence of phlebitis secondary to upper extremity IVCs was 3/50 (6 %) compared to 5/53 (9.4 %) in lower extremity IVCs (χ(2) Yates = 0.08, p = 0.776). Age, gender, obesity, diabetes mellitus, site (arm versus leg, left versus right), and size of needle were not found to be risk factors for phlebitis according to univariate analysis. None of the patients developed bloodstream infection. In elderly patients with poor venous access, lower extremity IVCs are a reasonable and low-risk alternative to central venous catheters.

  19. Computer Identification of Symptomatic Deep Venous Thrombosis Associated with Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R. Scott; Linford, Lorraine H.; Sharp, Jamie H.; White, Gayle; Lloyd, James F.; Weaver, Lindell K.

    2007-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are considered a safe method to provide long-term antibiotic therapy, chemotherapy and nutrition support. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a complication that requires early PICC removal, may extend hospitalization and can result in pulmonary embolism. PICC insertion teams strive to understand risk factors and develop methods to prevent DVTs. However, they can only manage what they can measure. At LDS Hospital, identification of PICC associated DVTs was dependent on verbal notification or manual surveillance of more than a thousand free-text vascular reports. Accurate DVT rates were not known which hindered prevention. We describe the development of a computer application (PICC-DVT monitor) to identify PICC associated DVTs each day. A one-year evaluation of the monitor by the PICC team and a review of 445 random vascular reports found a positive predictive value of 98%, sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 100% and a PICC team associated DVT rate of 2.8%. PMID:18693831

  20. Effective flow performances and dialysis doses delivered with permanent catheters: a 24-month comparative study of permanent catheters versus arterio-venous vascular accesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaud, Bernard; Leray-Moragues, Hélène; Kerkeni, Nadia; Bosc, Jean-Yves; Martin, Katja

    2002-07-01

    Permanent venous catheters have emerged as a long-term vascular access option for renal replacement therapy in end-stage renal disease patients. The design and venous location of catheter devices bear intrinsic flow limitations that may negatively affect the adequacy of dialysis and the patient outcome. There is limited data comparing the long-term dialysis adequacy delivered with permanent catheters vs arterio-venous vascular accesses (AVA). To explore this problem, we conducted a prospective 24-month trial comparing the flow performances and dialysis dose (Kt/Vdp) deliveries of both access options in a group of 42 haemodialysis patients during two study phases. During the first 12 months the patients completed a treatment period by means of permanent dual silicone catheters (DualKT). Then they were transferred to an AVA (40 native arterio-venous fistulas and two PTFE grafts) and monitored for an additional 12-month period. Assessments of flow adequacy and dialysis quantification were performed monthly. Dialysis adequacy was achieved in all cases. No patient had to be transferred prematurely to the AVA because of catheter failure. Three catheters had to be replaced due to bacteraemia in three patients. The mean effective blood flow rates achieved were 316+/-3.5 ml/min and 340+/-3.3 ml/min with DualKT and AVA, respectively, for a pre-set machine blood flow of 348+/-2.2 ml/min. Recirculation rates evaluated with the 'slow blood flow' method were 8.6+/-0.6 and 12.1+/-0.8% for DualKT and AVA using mean values of the solute markers urea and creatinine. Due to the possibility of a comparison veno-venous vs arterio-venous blood circulation, a corrected arterio-venous access recirculation could be derived from the difference between the two, which was around 3%. The blood flow resistance of the DualKT was slightly higher than with AVA as indicated by venous pressure differences. Kt/Vdp delivered was 1.37+/-0.02 and 1.45+/-0.02 with DualKT and AVA access respectively. The

  1. First do no harm: pain relief for the peripheral venous cannulation of adults, a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Mary; Crathorne, Louise; Peters, Jaime; Coelho, Helen; Haasova, Marcela; Cooper, Chris; Milner, Quentin; Shawyer, Vicki; Hyde, Christopher; Powell, Roy

    2016-10-01

    Peripheral venous cannulation is an everyday practice in hospitals, which many adults find painful. However, anaesthesia for cannulation is usually only offered to children. Inadequate pain relief is not only unpleasant for patients but may cause anxiety about further treatment and deter patients from seeking medical care in the future. The aim of this study is to discover the most effective local anaesthetic for adult peripheral venous cannulation and to find out how the pain of local anaesthetic application compares with that of unattenuated cannulation. These aims are addressed through a systematic review, network meta-analysis and random-effects meta-analysis. Searching covered 12 databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1990 to August 2015. The main included study design was RCTs. The primary outcome measure is self-reported pain, measured on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. The systematic review found 37 includable studies, 27 of which were suitable for network meta-analysis and two for random-effects meta-analysis. The results of the network meta-analysis indicate that none of the 17 anaesthetic considered had a very high probability of being the most effective when compared to each other; 2 % lidocaine had the highest probability (44 %). When the anaesthetics were compared to no treatment, the network meta-analysis showed that again 2 % lidocaine was estimated to be the most effective (mean difference -25.42 (95 % CI -32.25, -18.57). Other members of the 'caine' family were also estimated to be more effective than no treatment as were Ametop ® , EMLA ® and Rapydan ® patch. The meta-analysis compared the pain of anaesthetic application with the unattenuated pain of cannulation. This found that all applications of local anaesthetic were less painful than cannulation without local anaesthetic. In particular a 1 % lidocaine injection was estimated to be -12.97 (95 % CI -15.71, -10.24) points (100 mm VAS) less painful than unattenuated cannulation

  2. Implantation of venous access devices under local anesthesia: patients’ satisfaction with oral lorazepam

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    Chang DH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available De-Hua Chang,1 Sonja Hiss,1 Lena Herich,2 Ingrid Becker,2 Kamal Mammadov,1 Mareike Franke,1 Anastasios Mpotsaris,1 Robert Kleinert,3 Thorsten Persigehl,1 David Maintz,1 Christopher Bangard1 1Department of Radiology, 2Institute of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology, 3Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany Objective: The aim of the study reported here was to evaluate patients’ satisfaction with implantation of venous access devices under local anesthesia (LA with and without additional oral sedation.Materials and methods: A total of 77 patients were enrolled in the prospective descriptive study over a period of 6 months. Subcutaneous implantable venous access devices through the subclavian vein were routinely implanted under LA. Patients were offered an additional oral sedative (lorazepam before each procedure. The level of anxiety/tension, the intensity of pain, and patients’ satisfaction were evaluated before and immediately after the procedure using a visual analog scale (ranging from 0 to 10 with a standardized questionnaire.Results: Patients’ satisfaction with the procedure was high (mean: 1.3±2.0 with no significant difference between the group with premedication and the group with LA alone (P=0.54. However, seven out of 30 patients (23.3% in the group that received premedication would not undergo the same procedure without general anesthesia. There was no significant influence of lorazepam on the intensity of pain (P=0.88. In 12 out of 30 patients (40% in the premedication group, the level of tension was higher than 5 on the visual analog scale during the procedure. In 21 out of 77 patients (27.3%, the estimate of the level of tension differed between the interventionist and the patient by 3 or more points in 21 out of 77 patients (27.3%.Conclusion: Overall patient satisfaction is high for implantation of venous access devices under LA. A combination of LA with lorazepam administered

  3. Introducing a Fresh Cadaver Model for Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Access Training in Undergraduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ryan; Ho, Hang; Ng, Vivienne; Tran, Melissa; Rappaport, Douglas; Rappaport, William J A; Dandorf, Stewart J; Dunleavy, James; Viscusi, Rebecca; Amini, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Over the past decade, medical students have witnessed a decline in the opportunities to perform technical skills during their clinical years. Ultrasound-guided central venous access (USG-CVA) is a critical procedure commonly performed by emergency medicine, anesthesia, and general surgery residents, often during their first month of residency. However, the acquisition of skills required to safely perform this procedure is often deficient upon graduation from medical school. To ameliorate this lack of technical proficiency, ultrasound simulation models have been introduced into undergraduate medical education to train venous access skills. Criticisms of simulation models are the innate lack of realistic tactile qualities, as well as the lack of anatomical variances when compared to living patients. The purpose of our investigation was to design and evaluate a life-like and reproducible training model for USG-CVA using a fresh cadaver. This was a cross-sectional study at an urban academic medical center. An 18-point procedural knowledge tool and an 18-point procedural skill evaluation tool were administered during a cadaver lab at the beginning and end of the surgical clerkship. During the fresh cadaver lab, procedure naïve third-year medical students were trained on how to perform ultrasound-guided central venous access of the femoral and internal jugular vessels. Preparation of the fresh cadaver model involved placement of a thin-walled latex tubing in the anatomic location of the femoral and internal jugular vein respectively. Fifty-six third-year medical students participated in this study during their surgical clerkship. The fresh cadaver model provided high quality and lifelike ultrasound images despite numerous cannulation attempts. Technical skill scores improved from an average score of 3 to 12 (pcadaver model prevented extravasation of fluid, maintained ultrasound-imaging quality, and proved to be an effective educational model allowing third-year medical

  4. Prophylaxis of Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2001-06-01

    Mechanical measures such as graduated compression stockings and intermittent compression boots are available for venous thrombosis prophylaxis, but compliance may be limited. Plantar venous pneumatic compression devices have attained widespread acceptance by both patients and nurses because of their comfort and compact size, but their track record for efficacy is poor. Inferior vena cava filters prevent pulmonary embolism, but do not halt the thrombotic process or prevent venous thrombosis. Pharmacologic prophylaxis traditionally has relied upon minidose unfractionated heparin; however, re-examination is warranted in the face of increasingly ill and complex patients. My opinion is that small, fixed doses of once-daily low molecular weight heparin will eventually replace minidose unfractionated heparin as the standard pharmacologic prophylaxis regimen for most surgical and medical patients. Prolongation of prophylaxis after hospital discharge should receive increased emphasis. Most patients being transferred to a skilled nursing facility should receive venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Similarly, most patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement should receive prolonged preventive regimens, with at least 1 month of anticoagulation. Despite advances, certain aspects of venous thrombosis prophylaxis remain problematic. First, a surprisingly high number of hospitalized patients develop venous thrombosis because of failed (rather than omitted) prophylaxis. Second, many patients in intensive care have a combination of peripheral vascular disease and active bleeding (usually gastrointestinal) that precludes mechanical or pharmacologic prophylaxis. Third, neurosurgical patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumors suffer a high rate of venous thrombosis and major pulmonary embolism despite the routine use of combined mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis. My opinion is that these three areas, in addition to the hospital culture of prophylaxis, should receive

  5. Results of a Peripheral Cutting Balloon Prospective Multicenter European Registry in Hemodialysis Vascular Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To report initial experience with the Peripheral Cutting Balloon (PCB) in treatment of failing hemodialysis shunts. Methods. A total of 190 patients (95 men, 95 women; average age 64.4 ± 11.9 years, range 32-87 years) who were treated with the PCB for pressure-resistant stenosis, restenosis or failed percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in the venous limb of an arteriovenous shunt were followed in seven European centers using a simple registry. The group consisted of 109 de novo lesions (57%) and 79 restenotic lesions (43%). Results. Technical success was achieved in 88.9% of cases. Primary patency was as follows (the results for whole group and simultaneous results for de novo lesions and restenoses are presented): 1 month (140 patients followed): 94%, 98%, and 93%; 3 months (116 patients followed): 93%, 98%, and 92%; 6 months (40 patients followed): 85%, 92%, and 79%; 12 months (27 patients followed): 74%, 87%, and 48%. No complication occurred. Patients experienced an equal or lower level of pain during the procedure compared with conventional PTA. Conclusion. The PCB proved to be successful in dilating pressure-resistant stenoses. We cannot conclude whether PCB angioplasty can lower the restenosis rate in hemodialysis access lesions, but the long-term patency for de novo lesions is high. A further randomized study is advisable

  6. Feasibility and Safety of Endovascular Stripping of Totally Implantable Venous Access Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heye, Sam; Maleux, Geert; Goossens, G. A.; Vaninbroukx, Johan; Jerôme, M.; Stas, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous stripping of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVAD) in case of catheter-related sleeve and to report a technique to free the catheter tip from vessel wall adherence. Materials and Methods: A total of 37 stripping procedures in 35 patients (14 men, 40%, and 21 women, 60%, mean age 53 ± 14 years) were reviewed. Totally implantable venous access devices were implanted because of malignancy in most cases (85.7%). Catheter-related sleeve was confirmed as cause of persistent catheter dysfunction despite instillation of thrombolytics. A technique to mobilize the catheter tip from the vessel wall was used when stripping with the snare catheter was impossible. Technical success, complication rate, and outcome were noted. Results: A total of 55.9% (n = 19) of the 34 technically successful procedures (91.9%) could be done with the snare catheter. In 15 cases (44.1%), additional maneuvers to free the TIVAD’s tip from the vessel wall were needed. Success rate was not significantly lower before (72.4%) than after (96.7%) implementation of the new technique (P = 0.09). No complications were observed. Follow-up was available in 67.6% of cases. Recurrent catheter dysfunction was found in 17 TIVADs (78.3%) at a mean of 137.7 days and a median of 105 days. Conclusions: Stripping of TIVADs is technically feasible and safe, with an overall success rate of 91.9%. Additional endovascular techniques to mobilize the distal catheter tip from the wall of the superior vena cava or right atrium to allow encircling the TIVAD tip with the snare catheter may be needed in 44.1% of cases.

  7. Risk of venous thromboembolism associated with peripherally inserted central catheters: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Anand, Sarah; Hickner, Andy; Buist, Michael; Rogers, Mary Am; Saint, Sanjay; Flanders, Scott A

    2013-07-27

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. However, the size of this risk relative to that associated with other central venous catheters (CVCs) is unknown. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with PICCs versus that associated with other CVCs. We searched several databases, including Medline, Embase, Biosis, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Conference Papers Index, and Scopus. Additional studies were identified through hand searches of bibliographies and internet searches, and we contacted study authors to obtain unpublished data. All human studies published in full text, abstract, or poster form were eligible for inclusion. All studies were of adult patients aged at least 18 years who underwent insertion of a PICC. Studies were assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa risk of bias scale. In studies without a comparison group, the pooled frequency of venous thromboembolism was calculated for patients receiving PICCs. In studies comparing PICCs with other CVCs, summary odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with a random effects meta-analysis. Of the 533 citations identified, 64 studies (12 with a comparison group and 52 without) including 29 503 patients met the eligibility criteria. In the non-comparison studies, the weighted frequency of PICC-related deep vein thrombosis was highest in patients who were critically ill (13·91%, 95% CI 7·68-20·14) and those with cancer (6·67%, 4·69-8·64). Our meta-analysis of 11 studies comparing the risk of deep vein thrombosis related to PICCs with that related to CVCs showed that PICCs were associated with an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (OR 2·55, 1·54-4·23, p<0·0001) but not pulmonary embolism (no events). With the baseline PICC-related deep vein thrombosis rate of 2·7% and pooled OR of 2·55, the number needed to harm relative to CVCs was 26 (95% CI 13-71). PICCs are

  8. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of aortocoronary bypass grafts in the early postoperative phase with peripheral-venous contrast medium injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuengerthal, S.; Lang, J.; Donhoeffner, A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a fully digitalised subtraction unit, aortocoronary bypass grafts can be visualised in the early postoperative phase by means of peripheral venous contrast medium injection (57 out of a total of 60 cases). In more than one-half of the cases (31 out of a total of 60), it is possible to outline sharply the bypass grafts from the beginning to their entry into the bridged-over coronary artery, in such a manner that any loops, kinks, stenoses or reduced flow rates can be recognised. This examination is not considered to be an invasive one by the patient, and the cardiosurgeon can welcome it as a valuable additional means of controlling and assessing the results of surgery. (orig.) [de

  9. Isotopic diagnosis of peripheral thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornu, Pierre; Scalet, Michel

    1975-01-01

    Radio-isotope diagnosis of peripheral venous thrombosis, using tracer doses of iodine-labelled fibrinogen, provides an important contribution to the solution of the worrying problem of pulmonary embolism due to latent phlebitis. This elegant and precise technique permits early diagnosis of venous thrombosis of the lower limbs at a subclinical stage. It has permitted determination of the frequency, both after surgery and after myocardial infarction, and above all, it provides an objective criterion for assessment of the efficacy of prophylactic measures proposed [fr

  10. History of venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfaldoni, S; Wollina, U; Lotti, J; Gianfaldoni, R; Lotti, T; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G

    To retrieve the history of venous ulcers and of skin lesions in general, we must go back to the appearance of human beings on earth. It is interesting to note that cutaneous injuries evolved parallel to human society. An essential first step in the pathogenesis of ulcers was represented by the transition of the quadruped man to Homo Erectus. This condition was characterized by a greater gravitational pressure on the lower limbs, with consequences on the peripheral venous system. Furthermore, human evolution was characterized by an increased risk of traumatic injuries, secondary to his natural need to create fire and hunt (e.g. stones, iron, fire, animal fighting). Humans then began to fight one another until they came to real wars, with increased frequency of wounds and infectious complications. The situation degraded with the introduction of horse riding, introduced by the Scites, who first tamed animals in the 7th century BC. This condition exhibited iliac veins at compression phenomena, favouring the venous stasis. With time, man continued to evolve until the modern age, which is characterized by increased risk factors for venous wounds such as poor physical activity and dietary errors (1, 2).

  11. Greece reports prototype intervention with first peripherally inserted central catheter: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Evangelos A; Stafylarakis, Emmanuil; Kapritsou, Maria; Mitsos, Aristotelis P; Fotis, Theofanis G; Kiekkas, Panagiotis; Mariolis-Sapsakos, Theodoros; Argyras, Eriphyli; Nomikou, Irini Th; Dimitrakopoulos, Antonios

    2012-09-01

    Placement of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), definitely offers a clear advantage over any other method regarding central venous catheterization. Its ultrasonographic orientation enhances significantly its accuracy, safety and efficacy, making this method extremely comfortable for the patient who can continue his or her therapy even in an outpatient basis. We present the first reported case of a PICCS insertion in Greece, which has been performed by a university-degree nurse. The aim of this review of literature was to present the evolution in nursing practice in Greece. A PICC was inserted in a 77-year-old male patient suffering from a recent chemical pneumonia with a history of Alzheimer's disease. A description of all the technical details of this insertion is reported, focusing on the pros and cons of the method and a thorough review of the history and advances in central venous catheterization throughout the years is also presented. PICCs provide long-term intravenous access and facilitate the delivery of extended antibiotic therapy, chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition. We strongly believe that PICCs are the safest and most effective method of peripherally inserted central venous catheterization. Larger series are necessary to prove the above hypothesis, and they are under construction by our team. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the efficacy of lavender aromatherapy on peripheral venous cannulation pain and anxiety: A prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Tugba; Karaman, Serkan; Dogru, Serkan; Tapar, Hakan; Sahin, Aynur; Suren, Mustafa; Arici, Semih; Kaya, Ziya

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of lavender aromatherapy on pain, anxiety, and level of satisfaction associated with the peripheral venous cannulation (PVC) in patients undergoing surgery. One hundred and six patients undergoing surgery were randomized to receive aromatherapy with lavender essential oil (the lavender group) or a placebo (the control group) during PVC. The patients' pain, anxiety, and satisfaction scores were measured. There was no statistically significantly difference between the groups in terms of demographic data. After cannulation, the pain and anxiety scores (anxiety 2) of the patients in the lavender group were significantly lower than the control group (for p = 0.01 for pain scores; p aromatherapy had beneficial effects on PVC pain, anxiety, and satisfaction level of patients undergoing surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Calculating acid-base and oxygenation status during COPD exacerbation using mathematically arterialised venous blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rees, Stephen Edward; Rychwicka-Kielek, Beate A; Andersen, Bjarne F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background: Repeated arterial puncture is painful. A mathematical method exists for transforming peripheral venous pH, PCO2 and PO2 to arterial eliminating the need for arterial sampling. This study evaluates this method to monitor acid-base and oxygenation during admission...... for exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: Simultaneous arterial and peripheral venous blood was analysed. Venous values were used to calculate arterial pH, PCO2 and PO2, with these compared to measured values using Bland-Altman analysis and scatter plots. Calculated values of PO2......H, PCO2 and PO2 were 7.432±0.047, 6.8±1.7 kPa and 9.2±1.5 kPa, respectively. Calculated and measured arterial pH and PCO2 agreed well, differences having small bias and SD (0.000±0.022 pH, -0.06±0.50 kPa PCO2), significantly better than venous blood alone. Calculated PO2 obeyed the clinical rules...

  14. [A totally implantable venous access device. Implantation in general or local anaesthesia? A retrospective cost analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuld, J; Richter, S; Moussavian, M R; Kollmar, O; Schilling, M K

    2009-08-01

    Implantation of venous access port systems can be performed in local or general anesthesia. In spite of the increasing rate of interventionally implanted systems, the surgical cut-down represents a safe alternative. Thus, the question arises whether--in context to the increasing health-economic pressure--open implantation in general anesthesia is still a feasible alternative to implantation in local anesthesia regarding OR efficiency and costs. In a retrospective analysis, 993 patients receiving a totally implantable venous access device between 2001 and 2007 were evaluated regarding OR utilization, turnover times, intraoperative data and costs. Implantations in local (LA) and general anesthesia (GA) were compared. GA was performed in 762 cases (76.6 %), LA was performed in 231 patients (23.3 %). Mean operation time was similar in both groups (LA 47.27 +/- 1.40 min vs. GA 45.41 +/- 0.75 min, p = 0.244). Patients receiving local anesthesia had a significantly shorter stay in the OR unit (LA 95.9 +/- 1.78 min vs. GA 105.92 +/- 0.92 min; p cut (LA 39.57 +/- 0.69 min vs. GA 50.46 +/- 0.52 min; p material costs were significantly lower in the LA group compared with the GA group (LA: 400.72 +/- 8.25 euro vs. GA: 482.86 +/- 6.23 euro; p systems in local anesthesia is superior in comparison to the implantation under general anesthesia regarding procedural times in the OR unit and costs. With the same operation duration, but less personnel and material expenditure, implantation in local anesthesia offers a potential economic advantage by permitting faster changing times. Implantation in GA only should be performed at a special request by the patient or in difficult venous conditions. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart.New York.

  15. Risk Factors Related to Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Nonselective Removal in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohe Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the incidence and risk factors associated with nonselective removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC in neonates. In this prospective cohort study, neonates who underwent PICC placement at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in China from October 2012 to November 2015 were included. The patient demographics, catheter characteristics, catheter duration, PICC insertion site, indication for PICC insertion, infuscate composition, PICC tip location, and catheter complications were recorded in a computerized database. Risk factors for nonselective removal were analyzed. A total of 497 PICCs were placed in 496 neonates. Nonselective removal occurred in 9.3% of PICCs during 10,540 catheter-days (4.6 nonselective removals per 1,000 catheter-days. These included occlusion (3%, infection (1.4%, leakage (2.0%, phlebitis (0.6%, displacement (1%, pleural effusion(0.6%, and breaks (0.6%. Noncentral tip position was independently associated with an increased risk of nonselective removal (odds ratio 2.621; 95% confidence interval, 1.258-5.461 after adjusting for gestational age, sex, birth weight, and PICC dwell time. No significant differences in the rate of complications occurred between silastic and polyurethane PICC or different insertion sites. Noncentral PICC tip position was the only independent risk factor for nonselective removal of PICC.

  16. Complications of central venous stenosis due to permanent central venous catheters in children on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinat, Choni; Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Becker-Cohen, Rachel; Feinstein, Sofia; Frishberg, Yaacov

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters are frequently used as access for hemodialysis (HD) in children. One of the known complications is central venous stenosis. Although this complication is not rare, it is often asymptomatic and therefore unacknowledged. Superior vena cava (SVC) stenosis is obviously suspected in the presence of upper body edema, but several other signs and symptoms are often unrecognized as being part of this syndrome. We describe four patients with various manifestations of central venous stenosis and SVC syndrome. These sometimes life- or organ-threatening conditions include obstructive sleep apnea, unresolving stridor, increased intracranial pressure, increased intraocular pressure, right-sided pleural effusion, protein-losing enteropathy and lymphadenopathy. The temporal relationship of these complications associated with the use of central venous catheters and documentation of venous stenosis, together with their resolution after alleviation of high venous pressure, points to a causal role. We suggest pathophysiological mechanisms for the formation of each of these complications. In patients with occlusion of the SVC, various unexpected clinical entities can be caused by high central venous pressure. As often the etiology is not obvious, a high index of suspicion is needed as in some cases prompt alleviation of the high pressure is mandatory.

  17. Central Venous Occlusion in the Hemodialysis Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Vinay Narasimha; Eason, Joseph B; Allon, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Central venous stenosis (CVS) is encountered frequently among hemodialysis patients. Prior ipsilateral central venous catheterization and cardiac rhythm device insertions are common risk factors, but CVS can also occur in the absence of this history. Chronic CVS can cause thrombosis with partial or complete occlusion of the central vein at the site of stenosis. CVS is frequently asymptomatic and identified as an incidental finding during imaging studies. Symptomatic CVS presents most commonly as an upper- or lower-extremity edema ipsilateral to the CVS. Previously unsuspected CVS may become symptomatic after placement of an ipsilateral vascular access. The likelihood of symptomatic CVS may be affected by the central venous catheter (CVC) location; CVC side; duration of CVC dependence; type, location, and blood flow of the ipsilateral access; and extent of collateral veins. Venous angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement can improve the stenosis and alleviate symptoms, but CVS typically recurs frequently, requiring repeated interventions. Refractory symptomatic CVS may require ligation of the ipsilateral vascular access. Because no available treatment option is curative, the goal should be to prevent CVS by minimizing catheters and central vein instrumentation in patients with chronic kidney disease and dialysis patients. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pinch-off syndrome: transection of implantable central venous access device

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Takuya; Nagata, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ken; Kano, Nobuyasu

    2012-01-01

    As the population of people with cancer increases so does the number of patients who take chemotherapy. Majority of them are administered parentally continuously. Implantable central venous catheter device is a good choice for those patients; however, severe complication would occur concerning the devices. Pinch-off syndrome is one of the most severe complications. The authors report a severe case of pinch-off syndrome. The patient with the implantable central venous device could not take che...

  19. Pyoderma gangrenosum: an exceptional complication of venous access device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Sophie; Toussoun, Gilles; Ho Quoc, Christophe; Sebban, Henry; Delay, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare disease whose precise etiology remains unknown. It causes rapidly developing skin necrosis and can occur after surgery, or after a nonspecific external stimulus. This condition is difficult to diagnose because it often mimics a fulminant infection. We present a case of very significant local presentation of PG after placement of a venous access device. Fifteen days after placement, the patient developed extensive cutaneous ulcers and necrosis in the subclavicular area, which led to the misdiagnosis of infection. The device was removed and the patient was given antibiotics. Because there was no improvement following antibiotic treatment, combined with the worrying and extensive appearance of the skin and extremely intense pain, the diagnosis of PG was made. The patient was immediately treated with high-dose corticosteroids, resulting in rapid improvement of the lesions and relief of pain. PG should be considered in cases of extensive, antibiotic-resistant ulceration and treatment with corticosteroids should be initiated. Clinical improvement is usually dramatic, with almost immediate suppression of the pain and arrest of the lesion's progression. Early treatment is the best guarantee for an effective recovery.

  20. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.L.; Gibson, M.

    2006-01-01

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications

  1. The prehospital intravenous access assessment: a prospective study on intravenous access failure and access delay in prehospital emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prottengeier, Johannes; Albermann, Matthias; Heinrich, Sebastian; Birkholz, Torsten; Gall, Christine; Schmidt, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    Intravenous access in prehospital emergency care allows for early administration of medication and extended measures such as anaesthesia. Cannulation may, however, be difficult, and failure and resulting delay in treatment and transport may have negative effects on the patient. Therefore, our study aims to perform a concise assessment of the difficulties of prehospital venous cannulation. We analysed 23 candidate predictor variables on peripheral venous cannulations in terms of cannulation failure and exceedance of a 2 min time threshold. Multivariate logistic regression models were fitted for variables of predictive value (P0.6) of their respective receiver operating characteristic curve. A total of 762 intravenous cannulations were enroled. In all, 22% of punctures failed on the first attempt and 13% of punctures exceeded 2 min. Model selection yielded a three-factor model (vein visibility without tourniquet, vein palpability with tourniquet and insufficient ambient lighting) of fair accuracy for the prediction of puncture failure (AUC=0.76) and a structurally congruent model of four factors (failure model factors plus vein visibility with tourniquet) for the exceedance of the 2 min threshold (AUC=0.80). Our study offers a simple assessment to identify cases of difficult intravenous access in prehospital emergency care. Of the numerous factors subjectively perceived as possibly exerting influences on cannulation, only the universal - not exclusive to emergency care - factors of lighting, vein visibility and palpability proved to be valid predictors of cannulation failure and exceedance of a 2 min threshold.

  2. Case report: Unilateral conduction hearing loss due to central venous occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Phillip; Patel, Swetal; Qazi, Rizwan A

    2016-05-07

    Central venous stenosis is a well-known complication in patients with vascular access for hemodialysis. We report two cases involving patients on hemodialysis with arteriovenous fistulas who developed reversible unilateral conductive hearing loss secondary to critical stenosis of central veins draining the arteriovenous dialysis access. A proposed mechanism for the patients' reversible unilateral hearing loss is pterygoid venous plexus congestion leading to decreased Eustachian tube patency. Endovascular therapy was conducted to treat the stenosis and the hearing loss of both patients was returned to near normal after successful central venous angioplasty.

  3. [Effectiveness of the transparent sterile dressing vs standard to fix the peripheral venous catheter (PVC) on the incidence of phlebitis. A randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, Cristiana; D'Alessandro, Fabio; Gambino, Orazio; Amodeo, Alfredo; Pignotti, Elettra; Zanotti, Enrichetta; Tremosini, Morena; Trofa, Carmela; Sabattini, Tania; Matino, Federica; Genco, Rossana; Schiavone, Miguel; Bombino, Caterina; Mini, Sandra; Rocchegiani, Laura; Notarnicola, Teresa; Capezzali, Daniela; Boschi, Rita; Loro, Loretta

    2012-01-01

    Effectiveness of the transparent sterile dressing vs standard to fix the peripheral venous catheter (PVC), on the incidence of phlebitis. A randomized controlled trial. The type of dressing could contribute to the incidence of phlebitis, infiltration and accidental removals but the results of the studies are contrasting and samples are limited. To compare the effectiveness of a transparent polyurethane sterile dressing on the rate of phlebitis associated to peripheral venous catheter (PVC) vs a non sterile sticking plaster in use in current practice (standard dressing). Randomized controlled trial. Participants. 1061 PVCs (703 patients, adults and children) at a research orthopedic hospital in the north of Italy; 540 PVCs allocated to receive the sterile and 521 the standard dressing. 96 PVCs were excluded for phlebitis, 48 (9.6%) in the sterile and 48 (10.1%) in the standard dressing group, RR 0.96 (95%CI 0.697 - 1.335). Accidental removal of the PVCs was more frequent with the sterile dressing (9.6% vs 6.3%) but the number of catheters removed without complications was larger in the standard dressing group (48.9% vs 54.9% P=0.0503). Eighty-five PVCs were replaced for detachment of the dressing (50, 9.2% sterile and 35, 6.7% standard dressing). The cheapest transparent sterile dressing costs 32 cents while the standard 9 cents. A sticking non sterile plasters is not influential on the rate of phlebitis and ensures an good fix of the PVC compared the transparent sterile dressing to of polyurethane film.

  4. Devices and dressings to secure peripheral venous catheters to prevent complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Nicole; Webster, Joan; Mihala, Gabor; Rickard, Claire M

    2015-06-12

    A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) is typically used for short-term delivery of intravascular fluids and medications. It is an essential element of modern medicine and the most frequent invasive procedure performed in hospitals. However, PVCs often fail before intravenous treatment is completed: this can occur because the device is not adequately attached to the skin, allowing the PVC to fall out, leading to complications such as phlebitis (irritation or inflammation to the vein wall), infiltration (fluid leaking into surrounding tissues) or occlusion (blockage). An inadequately secured PVC also increases the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), as the pistoning action (moving back and forth in the vein) of the catheter can allow migration of organisms along the catheter and into the bloodstream. Despite the many dressings and securement devices available, the impact of different securement techniques for increasing PVC dwell time is still unclear; there is a need to provide guidance for clinicians by reviewing current studies systematically. To assess the effects of PVC dressings and securement devices on the incidence of PVC failure. We searched the following electronic databases to identify reports of relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs): the Cochrane Wounds Group Register (searched 08 April 2015): The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to March 7 2015); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, March 7 2015); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to March 7 2015); and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March 8 2015). RCTs or cluster RCTs comparing different dressings or securement devices for the stabilisation of PVCs. Cross-over trials were ineligible for inclusion, unless data for the first treatment period could be obtained. Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for missing information. We used standard

  5. A cost-effective peripheral venous port system placed at the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, R; Albrink, M H; Hart, M B; Rosemurgy, A S

    1992-07-01

    High costs and a paucity of available operating time have led us to seek alternatives to operatively placed vascular access systems. This prospective study is the initial report of a peripheral port system (P.A.S. PORT System, Pharmacia Deltec, Inc.) placed at the bedside. Seventy-nine patients (52 male, 27 female), ages 3-92 years, had ports implanted by surgical residents with attending supervision. Sixty-eight (86%) received the P.A.S. PORT for long-term antibiotics, antifungal, or antiviral therapy; four (5%) for TPN infusion; three (4%) for blood products; two (3%) for chemotherapy; and two (3%) for iv narcotics. Ports were placed in 10 (13%) HIV(+) patients, three (4%) who were fully anticoagulated, and one who was a hemophiliac with a platelet count of zero. Eight patients (10%) developed superficial phlebitis, all of which resolved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents within 48 hr without port removal. Seven patients (9%) had their port removed due to infection. The average hospital charge to place the P.A.S. PORT System was $1488.00 vs $2811.00 for a tunneled external chest catheter and $3729.00 for the placement of a chest port. Bedside insertion of vascular access devices can be safely performed with acceptable infection rates allowing more efficient use of hospital operating rooms and with substantial cost savings.

  6. ENDOVASCULAR TREATMENT FOR DISORDERS OF THE VENOUS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Osiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual rate of deep vein thrombosis in general population is from 5 to 9 cases per 10 000, whereas for venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism taken together amounts to 14 cases per 10 000. To improve longterm results of therapy for thrombosis of deep veins of the lower extremities, it is important to restore venous function and outflow. Anticoagulant therapy with low weight or non-fractionated heparin preparations remains the most widely used method of management. However, total or partial thrombosis resolution under anticoagulant treatment is achieved only in 4 and 14% of cases, respectively. Thrombolysis allows for early resorption of the thrombus by means of a minimally invasive procedure with lower risk of complication. After the venous flow is restored, the aim of treatment is to prevent damage to the venous valves, venous hypertension and repeated thrombosis with development of the post-thrombotic syndrome. Compared to anticoagulation, systemic thrombolysis has the benefit of more rapid clot resorption and less damage to the venous valve. One of its serious limitations is a high bleeding risk related to higher doses of the drug administered through a peripheral vein catheter. Therefore, selective intra-clot administration of thombolytics (direct catheter thrombolysis has been suggested as an alternative. For more effective therapy with the use of lower doses of thrombolytics, the so called pharmaco-mechanical thrombectomy has been developed. Venous stenosis hindering the venous outflow is frequently seen after direct catheter or pharmaco-mechanical thrombolysis. Angioplasty with stent placement is recommended in the cases with residual venous abnormality after successful thrombolysis and thrombectomy. 

  7. Placement of central venous port catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters in the routine clinical setting of a radiology department: analysis of costs and intervention duration learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, Roman; Gebauer, Bernhard; Schnapauff, Dirk; Streitparth, Florian; Wieners, Gero; Grieser, Christian; Freyhardt, Patrick; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H

    2017-12-01

    Background Placement of central venous port catheters (CVPS) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) is an integral component of state-of-the-art patient care. In the era of increasing cost awareness, it is desirable to have more information to comprehensively assess both procedures. Purpose To perform a retrospective analysis of interventional radiologic implantation of CVPS and PICC lines in a large patient population including a cost analysis of both methods as well as an investigation the learning curve in terms of the interventions' durations. Material and Methods All CVPS and PICC line related interventions performed in an interventional radiology department during a three-year period from January 2011 to December 2013 were examined. Documented patient data included sex, venous access site, and indication for CVPS or PICC placement. A cost analysis including intervention times was performed based on the prorated costs of equipment use, staff costs, and expenditures for disposables. The decrease in intervention duration in the course of time conformed to the learning curve. Results In total, 2987 interventions were performed by 16 radiologists: 1777 CVPS and 791 PICC lines. An average implantation took 22.5 ± 0.6 min (CVPS) and 10.1 ± 0.9 min (PICC lines). For CVPS, this average time was achieved by seven radiologists newly learning the procedures after performing 20 CVPS implantations. Total costs per implantation were €242 (CVPS) and €201 (PICC lines). Conclusion Interventional radiologic implantations of CVPS and PICC lines are well-established procedures, easy to learn by residents, and can be implanted at low costs.

  8. A Predictive Framework to Elucidate Venous Stenosis: CFD & Shape Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S M; Cassel, Kevin; Boghosian, Michael; Hammes, Mary; Coe, Fredric

    2017-07-01

    The surgical creation of vascular accesses for renal failure patients provides an abnormally high flow rate conduit in the patient's upper arm vasculature that facilitates the hemodialysis treatment. These vascular accesses, however, are very often associated with complications that lead to access failure and thrombotic incidents, mainly due to excessive neointimal hyperplasia (NH) and subsequently stenosis. Development of a framework to monitor and predict the evolution of the venous system post access creation can greatly contribute to maintaining access patency. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been exploited to inspect the non-homeostatic wall shear stress (WSS) distribution that is speculated to trigger NH in the patient cohort under investigation. Thereafter, CFD in liaison with a gradient-free shape optimization method has been employed to analyze the deformation modes of the venous system enduring non-physiological hemodynamics. It is observed that the optimally evolved shapes and their corresponding hemodynamics strive to restore the homeostatic state of the venous system to a normal, pre-surgery condition. It is concluded that a CFD-shape optimization coupling that seeks to regulate the WSS back to a well-defined physiological WSS target range can accurately predict the mode of patient-specific access failure.

  9. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Iain, E-mail: iain.franklin@health.qld.gov.au; Gilmore, Christopher [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation.

  10. Peripheral Circulatory Features during High-Frequency Jet Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kontorovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of a study of peripheral circulatory features during high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV. The main specific features of peripheral circulation and oxygen transport during HFJV are formulated on the basis of a study of cardiac output (impedance cardiography, peripheral vascular resistance, peripheral vascular blood filling (photoplethysmogram analysis, adaptive peripheral blood flow reactions (spectral analysis of peripheral vascular pulsation. HFJV gives rise to the peculiar pattern of peripheral hemodynamics and tissue gas exchange, which is characterized by higher oxygen uptake without a decrease in mixed venous blood saturation, with normal extraction coefficient and preserved low peripheral vascular resistance. During HFJV, unlike traditional ventilation, the main peripheral hemodynamic feature is the increased capillary bed blood volume caused by the blood flow involvement of reserve capillaries under control of volume (parasympathetic regulation of adaptive peripheral hemodynamic reactions. Key words: high-frequency jet ventilation, oxygen transport, peripheral hemodynamics.

  11. Complications after percutaneous placement of totally implantable venous access ports in the forearm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltz, J.P.; Petritsch, B.; Thurner, A.; Hahn, D.; Kickuth, R.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on radiological imaging of complications after interventional percutaneous insertion of totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAPs) which were placed in the forearm. Thus far most reviews have dealt with pectorally-placed TIVAPs. Compared with the pectoral approach, implantation in the forearm has been associated with certain complications owing to a longer route of the port catheter within a smaller vein, and owing to the route across the elbow joint, resulting in higher rates of catheter-associated thrombosis and possible mechanical complications. The purpose of this review is to describe the complications after implantation of TIVAPs in the forearm, and to make radiologists familiar with the key findings of the complications during radiological imaging, including colour-coded and compression Duplex ultrasound, computed tomography, and digital subtraction venography.

  12. Pinch-off syndrome: transection of implantable central venous access device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Takuya; Nagata, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ken; Kano, Nobuyasu

    2012-11-30

    As the population of people with cancer increases so does the number of patients who take chemotherapy. Majority of them are administered parentally continuously. Implantable central venous catheter device is a good choice for those patients; however, severe complication would occur concerning the devices. Pinch-off syndrome is one of the most severe complications. The authors report a severe case of pinch-off syndrome. The patient with the implantable central venous device could not take chemotherapy because the device occluded. Further examination revealed the transection of the catheter. The transected fragment of the catheter in the heart was successfully removed by using a loop snare placed through the right femoral vein.

  13. Satisfactory reliability among nursing students using the instrument PVC ASSESS to evaluate management of peripheral venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlqvist, Margary; Berglund, Britta; Nordström, Gun; Klang, Birgitta; Johansson, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Nursing students should be given opportunities to participate in clinical audits during their education. However, audit tools are seldom tested for reliability among nursing students. The aim of this study was to present reliability among nursing students using the instrument PVC assess to assess management of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) and PVC-related signs of thrombophlebitis. PVC assess was used to assess 67 inserted PVCs in 60 patients at ten wards at a university hospital. One group of nursing students (n=4) assessed PVCs at the bedside (inter-rater reliability) and photographs of these PVCs were taken. Another group of students (n=3) assessed the PVCs in the photographs after 4 weeks (test-retest reliability). To determine reliability, proportion of agreement [P(A)] and Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) were calculated. For bedside assessment of PVCs, P(A) ranged from good to excellent (0.80-1.0) in 55% of the 26 PVC assess items that were tested. P(A) was poor (satisfactory reliability among nursing students. However, students need training in how to use the instrument before assessing PVCs.

  14. Fanconi anaemia with bilateral diffuse pulmonary arterio venous fistulae: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarakoon Lasitha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report a patient with cytogenetically confirmed Fanconi anaemia with associated diffuse bilateral pulmonary arterio-venous fistulae. This is only the second reported case of diffuse pulmonary arterio-venous fistulae with Fanconi anaemia. Case Presentation A 16 year old Sri Lankan boy, with a cytogenetically confirmed Fanconi anaemia was admitted to University Medical Unit, National Hospital of Sri Lanka for further assessment and treatment. Both central and peripheral cyanosis plus clubbing were noted on examination. The peripheral saturation was persistently low on room air and did not improve with supplementary Oxygen. Contrast echocardiography failed to demonstrate an intra cardiac shunt but showed early crossover of contrast, suggesting the possibility of pulmonary arterio-venous fistulae. Computed tomography pulmonary angiogram was inconclusive. Subsequent right heart catheterisation revealed bilateral diffuse arterio-venous fistulae not amenable for device closure or surgical intervention. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the second reported patient with diffuse pulmonary arterio-venous fistulae associated with Fanconi anaemia. We report this case to create awareness among clinicians regarding this elusive association. We recommend screening patients with Fanconi anaemia using contrast echocardiography at the time of assessment with transthoracic echocardiogram. Though universal screening may be impossible given the cost constraints, such screening should at least be performed in patients with clinical evidence of desaturation or when a therapeutic option such as haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered. Treatment of pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae would improve patient outcome as desaturation by shunting worsens the anaemic symptoms by reducing the oxygen carrying capacity of blood.

  15. Central venous recanalization in patients with short gut syndrome: restoration of candidacy for intestinal and multivisceral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Elvira V; Reyes, Jorge; Faintuch, Salomao; Smith, Amy; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem

    2005-09-01

    To assess feasibility and success of venous recanalization in patients with short gut syndrome who have lost their traditional central venous access and required intestinal or multivisceral transplantation. Twelve patients between the ages of 7 and 55 years with short gut syndrome and long-standing total parenteral nutrition (TPN) dependency and/or hypercoagulability were treated. All had extensive chronic central venous occlusions and survival was dependent on restoration of access and planned transplantation. Central venous recanalizations were obtained via sharp needle recanalization techniques, venous reconstructions with stents, and/or extraanatomic access to the central venous system for placement of central venous tunneled catheters. Central venous access was restored in all patients without operative-related mortality. Three major hemodynamic perioperative technical complications were recorded and successfully treated. There were three self-limited early infectious complications. With a mean follow-up of 22 months, eight of the 12 patients were alive with successful small bowel or multivisceral transplantation; six of those became independent of TPN. The remaining four patients died of complications related to TPN (n = 3) or transplantation (n = 1). With a mean follow-up of 20 months, all but two of the recanalized venous accesses were maintained, for a success rate of 83%. Recanalizations of extensive chronic vein occlusions are feasible but associated with high risk. The technique is life-saving for TPN-dependent patients and can restore candidacy for intestinal and multivisceral transplantation. This approach is likely to be increasingly requested because of the current clinical availability of the transplant procedure.

  16. Does the Implantation Technique for Totally Implantable Venous Access Ports (TIVAPs) Influence Long-Term Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacchi, Daniele; Sammartino, Paolo; Sibio, Simone; Accarpio, Fabio; Cardi, Maurizio; Sapienza, Paolo; De Cesare, Alessandro; Atta, Joseph Maher Fouad; Impagnatiello, Alessio; Di Giorgio, Angelo

    2016-02-01

    Totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAP) are eventually explanted for various reasons, related or unrelated to the implantation technique used. Having more information on long-term explantation would help improve placement techniques. From a series of 1572 cancer patients who had TIVAPs implanted in our center with the cutdown technique or Seldinger technique, we studied the 542 patients who returned to us to have their TIVAP explanted after 70 days or more. As outcome measures we distinguished between TIVAPs explanted for long-term complications (infection, catheter-, reservoir-, and patient-related complications) and TIVAPs no longer needed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were run to investigate the reasons for explantation and their possible correlation with implantation techniques. The most common reason for explantation was infection (47.6 %), followed by catheter-related (20.8 %), patient-related (14.7 %), and reservoir-related complications (4.7 %). In the remaining 12.2 % of cases, the TIVAP was explanted complication free after the planned treatments ended. Infection correlated closely with longer TIVAP use. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the Seldinger technique as a major risk factor for venous thrombosis and catheter dislocation. The need for long-term TIVAP explantation in about one-third of cancer patients is related to the implantation techniques used.

  17. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasen, M.H.; Charnsangavej, C.

    1998-01-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax ( Fig. 1 ). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations). (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  18. Relationship between peripheral insertion site and catheter-related phlebitis in adult hospitalized patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparcini, Dania; Simonetti, Valentina; Blot, Stijn; Tomietto, Marco; Cicolini, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    To explore the relationship between the anatomical site of peripheral venous catheterization and risk of catheter-related phlebitis. Peripheral venous catheterization is frequently associated with phlebitis. Recent guidelines, recommend the use of an upper-extremity site for catheter insertion but no univocal consensus exists on the anatomical site with lower risk of phlebitis. Systematic review. We searched Medline (PubMed) and CINAHL (EBSCOhost) databases until the end of January 2017. We also reviewed the reference lists of retrieved articles and gray literature was excluded. Searches were limited to articles published in English with no restriction imposed to date of publication. The primary outcome was the incidence of phlebitis associated with anatomical site of peripheral catheterization. We included randomized controlled trials and observational studies on adult patients who required a peripheral catheter for the administration of medi- cation, intermittent or continuous fluid infusion. Antecubital fossa veins are associated with lower phlebitis rates, while hands veins are the most risky sites to develop phlebitis. There is no consensus regarding vein in forearm. Choosing the right anatomical site to insert a peripheral venous catheter is important to decrease phlebitis rate. Further studies should compare indwelling time in different anatomical sites with phlebitis rate. A more standardized approach in defining and assessing phlebitis among studies is recommended.

  19. Arterial and venous plasma levels of bupivacaine following epidural and intercostal nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D C; Mather, L E; Bridenbaugh, P O; Bridenbaugh, L D; Balfour, R I; Lysons, D F; Horton, W G

    1976-07-01

    Arterial and peripheral venous plasma levels of bupivacaine were determined in 30 patients following epidural anesthesia using 150 and 225 mg, as well as following intercostal nerve block with 400 mg. Arterial levels were consistently higher than levels in simultaneously sampled venous blood, and the highest levels occurred with bilateral intercostal nerve block. No evidence of systemic toxicity was observed. The results suggest that bupivacaine may have a wider margin of safety in man than is now stated.

  20. Radiologically-placed venous ports in children under venous anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Joo Yeon; Jeon, Ung Bae; Choo, Ki Seok; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, Yun Jin; Nam, Sang Ool; Lim, Young Tak

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiologic venous port placement in children under venous anesthesia. Between April 2009 and July 2011, 44 ports were implanted in 41 children (24 boys, 17 girls). The age of patients ranged from 9 months to 19 years (mean, 6.5 years) and their body weights ranged from 6.8 kg to 56.3 kg (mean, 23.2 kg). Right internal jugular vein access was used in 42 ports, right subclavian vein in 1, and left subclavian in 1. Durability and complications of port implantation were reviewed. The technical success rate was 100%. The catheter life was 10-661 days (mean 246 days). Two patients died during the follow-up period, 21 and 6 ports were removed at the end of treatment or as a result of complications, respectively. One port was removed and replaced by a Hickmann catheter. Three ports were explanted due to port-related sepsis, one due to a catheter kink, and two for unexplained fever or insertion site pain. The overall port-related infection was 3 cases (6.8%, 0.28/1000 catheter days). Venous port placement by interventional radiologists in children under intravenous sedation is relatively safe, with a high rate of technical success and low rate of complications.

  1. Radiologically-placed venous ports in children under venous anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joo Yeon; Jeon, Ung Bae; Choo, Ki Seok; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, Yun Jin; Nam, Sang Ool; Lim, Young Tak [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiologic venous port placement in children under venous anesthesia. Between April 2009 and July 2011, 44 ports were implanted in 41 children (24 boys, 17 girls). The age of patients ranged from 9 months to 19 years (mean, 6.5 years) and their body weights ranged from 6.8 kg to 56.3 kg (mean, 23.2 kg). Right internal jugular vein access was used in 42 ports, right subclavian vein in 1, and left subclavian in 1. Durability and complications of port implantation were reviewed. The technical success rate was 100%. The catheter life was 10-661 days (mean 246 days). Two patients died during the follow-up period, 21 and 6 ports were removed at the end of treatment or as a result of complications, respectively. One port was removed and replaced by a Hickmann catheter. Three ports were explanted due to port-related sepsis, one due to a catheter kink, and two for unexplained fever or insertion site pain. The overall port-related infection was 3 cases (6.8%, 0.28/1000 catheter days). Venous port placement by interventional radiologists in children under intravenous sedation is relatively safe, with a high rate of technical success and low rate of complications.

  2. Percutaneous retrieval of an intracardiac central venous port fragment using snare with triple loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghaderian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripherally inserted venous ports fracture with embolization in patients who received chemotherapy is a serious and rare complication, and few cases have been reported in children. We report a successful endovascular technique using a snare for retrieving broken peripherally inserted venous ports in a child for chemotherapy. Catheter fragments may cause complications such as cardiac perforation, arrhythmias, sepsis, and pulmonary embolism. A 12-year-old female received chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia through a central venous port implanted into her right subclavian area. The patient completed chemotherapy without complications 6 months ago. Venous port was accidentally fractured during its removal. Chest radiographs of the patient revealed intracardiac catheter fragment extending from the right subclavian to the right atrium (RA and looping in the RA. The procedure was performed under ketamine and midazolam anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance using a percutaneous femoral vein approach. A snare with triple loops (10 mm in diameter was used to successfully retrieve the catheter fragments without any complication. Percutaneous transcatheter retrieval of catheter fragments is occasionally extremely useful and should be considered by interventional cardiologists for retrieving migrated catheters and can be chosen before resorting to surgery, which has potential risks related to thoracotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass, and general anesthesia.

  3. Central venous stenosis among hemodialysis patients is often not associated with previous central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoda, Atsushi; Akimoto, Tetsu; Kato, Maki; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Nakata, Manabu; Sugase, Taro; Ogura, Manabu; Ito, Chiharu; Sugimoto, Hideharu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    It is widely assumed that central venous stenosis (CVS) is most commonly associated with previous central venous catheterization among the chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. We evaluated the validity of this assumption in this retrospective study. The clinical records from 2,856 consecutive HD patients with vascular access failure during a 5-year period were reviewed, and a total of 26 patients with symptomatic CVS were identified. Combined with radiological findings, their clinical characteristics were examined. Only seven patients had a history of internal jugular dialysis catheterization. Diagnostic multidetector row computed tomography angiography showed that 7 of the 19 patients with no history of catheterization had left innominate vein stenosis due to extrinsic compression between the sternum and arch vessels. These patients had a shorter period from the time of creation of the vascular access to the initial referral (9.2 ± 7.6 months) than the rest of the patients (35.5 ± 18.6 months, p = 0.0017). Our findings suggest that cases without a history of central venous catheterization may not be rare among the HD patients with symptomatic CVS. However, those still need to be confirm by larger prospective studies of overall chronic HD patients with symptomatic CVS.

  4. Microbiological testing of devices used in maintaining peripheral venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Fernanda de Paula; Andrade, Denise de; Santos, Lissandra Chaves de Sousa; Ferreira, Adriano Menis; Tieppo, Caroline; Watanabe, Evandro

    2017-05-15

    to evaluate the use of peripheral venous catheters based on microbiological analysis of devices (dressing and three-way stopcocks) and thus contribute to the prevention and infection control. this was a prospective study of microbiological analysis of 30 three-way stopcocks (external surfaces and lumens) and 30 dressing used in maintaining the peripheral venous catheters of hospitalized adult patients. all external surfaces, 40% of lumens, and 86.7% of dressing presented bacterial growth. The main species isolated in the lumen were 50% coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 14.3% Staphylococcus aureus, and 14.3% Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fifty nine percent of multidrug-resistant bacteria were isolated of the three-way stopcocks, 42% of the lumens, and 44% of the dressing with a predominance of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus resistant to methicillin. Besides, 18% gram-negative bacteria with resistance to carbapenems were identified from multidrug-resistant bacteria on the external surfaces of the three-way stopcocks. it is important to emphasize the isolation of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and gram-negative bacteria resistant to methicillin and carbapenems in samples of devices, respectively, which reinforces the importance of nursing care in the maintenance of the biologically safe environment as well as prevention and infection control practices. avaliar o uso de cateteres venosos periféricos com base em análises microbiológicas de dispositivos (curativos e torneiras de três vias - T3Vs) e assim contribuir para a prevenção e controle de infecção. estudo prospectivo de análise microbiológica de 30 T3Vs (superfícies externas e lúmens) e 30 curativos utilizados na manutenção dos cateteres venosos periféricos de pacientes adultos hospitalizados. todas as superfícies externas, 40% dos lúmens e 86,7% dos curativos apresentaram crescimento bacteriano. As principais espécies isoladas no lúmen foram 50% Staphylococcus coagulase-negativa, 14

  5. Risk factors for central line-associated bloodstream infection in pediatric oncology patients with a totally implantable venous access port: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana Taveira, Michelle Ribeiro; Lima, Luciana Santana; de Araújo, Cláudia Corrêa; de Mello, Maria Júlia Gonçalves

    2017-02-01

    Totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAPs) are used for prolonged central venous access, allowing the infusion of chemotherapy and other fluids and improving the quality of life of children with cancer. TIVAPs were developed to reduce the infection rates associated with central venous catheters; however, infectious events remain common and have not been fully investigated in pediatric oncology patients. A retrospective cohort was formed to investigate risk factors for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in pediatric cancer patients. Sociodemographic, clinical, and TIVAP insertion-related variables were evaluated, with the endpoint being the first CLABSI. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to determine CLABSI-free catheter survival. Overall, 188 children were evaluated over 77,541 catheter days, with 94 being diagnosed with CLABSI (50%). Although coagulase-negative staphylococci were the pathogens most commonly isolated, Gram-negative microorganisms (46.8%) were also prevalent. In the multivariate analysis, factors that increased the risk for CLABSI were TIVAP insertion prior to chemotherapy (risk ratio [RR] = 1.56; P Risk factors for CLABSI in pediatric cancer patients with a TIVAP may be related to the severity of the child's condition at catheter insertion. Insertion of the catheter before chemotherapy and unfavorable conditions such as malnutrition and bone marrow aplasia can increase the risk of CLABSI. Protocols must be revised and surveillance increased over the first 10 weeks of treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Placement of a Port Catheter Through Collateral Veins in a Patient with Central Venous Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin; Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  7. MRI in venous thromboembolic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sostman, H.D.; Debatin, J.F.; Spritzer, C.E.; Coleman, R.E.; Grist, T.M.; MacFall, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to detect deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). MR venography was performed on 217 patients suspected of having DVT. Cine-MR imaging of the pulmonary arteries was performed in 14 other patients who were thought to have PE based on other imaging studies. In a third group of 5 patients, MR pulmonary angiograms were performed in the sagittal and coronal planes with a multislice fast gradient recalled echo technique. All but one of the 217 MR venograms were technically adequate. In 72 patients with correlative imaging studies (venography and ultrasound) MR venography was 99% sensitive and 95% specific. On the basis of follow-up (mean 8.3 months), no false-negative MR venograms were detected in an additional 64 patients. In 11 other patients MR revealed a diagnosis other than DVT. Cine-MR showed PE in all 14 patients evaluated. MR pulmonary arteriography demonstrated filling defects consistent with acute PE in 2 of 3 patients with acute PE; in the third patient only a questionable filling defect was seen. Coarctations or webs were found in the pulmonary arteries of both patients with chronic PE. These preliminary data suggest that MR imaging may be able to evaluate both the peripheral venous and the pulmonary arterial component of venous thromboembolic disease. Further technical refinement and more extensive clinical experience will be required to establish the role of this method in diagnosing pulmonary embolism, but MR venography is now used routinely in our hospital for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. (orig.)

  8. Risk factors for venous port migration in a single institute in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Cheng-Han; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Chang, Hsu-Liang; Hung, Jen-Yu; Chen, Pei-Huan; Yang, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background An implantable port device provides an easily accessible central route for long-term chemotherapy. Venous catheter migration is one of the rare complications of venous port implantation. It can lead to side effects such as pain in the neck, shoulder, or ear, venous thrombosis, and even life-threatening neurologic problems. To date, there are few published studies that discuss such complications. Methods This retrospective study of venous port implantation in a single center, a Taiw...

  9. Automatic Control of Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Lung Assist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Ruedger; Bensberg, Ralf; Stollenwerk, Andre; Arens, Jutta; Grottke, Oliver; Walter, Marian; Rossaint, Rolf

    2016-10-01

    Veno-venous extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA) can provide sufficient gas exchange even in most severe cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Commercially available systems are manually controlled, although an automatically controlled ECLA could allow individualized and continuous adaption to clinical requirements. Therefore, we developed a demonstrator with an integrated control algorithm to keep continuously measured peripheral oxygen saturation and partial pressure of carbon dioxide constant by automatically adjusting extracorporeal blood and gas flow. The "SmartECLA" system was tested in six animal experiments with increasing pulmonary hypoventilation and hypoxic inspiratory gas mixture to simulate progressive acute respiratory failure. During a cumulative evaluation time of 32 h for all experiments, automatic ECLA control resulted in a peripheral oxygen saturation ≥90% for 98% of the time with the lowest value of 82% for 15 s. Partial pressure of venous carbon dioxide was between 40 and 49 mm Hg for 97% of the time with no value 49 mm Hg. With decreasing inspiratory oxygen concentration, extracorporeal oxygen uptake increased from 68 ± 25 to 154 ± 34 mL/min (P < 0.05), and reducing respiratory rate resulted in increasing extracorporeal carbon dioxide elimination from 71 ± 37 to 92 ± 37 mL/min (P < 0.05). The "SmartECLA" demonstrator allowed reliable automatic control of the extracorporeal circuit. Proof of concept could be demonstrated for this novel automatically controlled veno-venous ECLA circuit. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of aldosterone in adrenal venous effluent in a case of Conn's syndrome, ch. 5a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelich, M.; Bruning, P.F.; Moolenaar, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    In a case of Conn's syndrome samples were obtained from the venous effluent of both adrenals and from peripheral veins during venography. The aldosterone concentration was measured by means of radioimmunoassay. The sensitivty of the aldosterone assay was 27 pg (P<0.05), the parallelism between the standard and the serum dilutions was excellent and there was no cross-reaction with cortisol, cortisone, 21-desoxycortisol, dexamethasone or spironolactone in amounts up to 1 μg per incubation. The aldosterone concentrations measured in peripheral venous blood were 220-250 ng/100 ml serum. In the effluent of the left adrenal, in which an aldosterone producing tumor was localized, an aldosterone level of 8480 ng/100 ml serum was estimated

  11. The diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis using laser Doppler skin perfusion measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, J. C.; Ubbink, D. T.; Büller, H. R.; Jacobs, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Compression ultrasonography (CUS) falls short in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis in asymptomatic patients and thrombi limited to the calf veins. Alternatively, laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF) may be useful for this purpose, as it can measure the peripheral vasoconstriction response upon an

  12. Percutaneous transfemoral repositioning of malpositioned central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnell, G G; Roizental, M

    1995-04-01

    Central venous catheters inserted by blind surgical placement may not advance into a satisfactory position and may require repositioning. Malpositioning via surgical insertion is common in patients in whom central venous catheters have previously been placed, as these patients are more likely to have central venous thrombosis and distortion of central venous anatomy. This is less of a problem when catheter placement is guided by imaging; however, even when insertion is satisfactory, central venous catheters may become displaced spontaneously after insertion (Fig. 1). Repositioning can be effected by direct manipulation using guidewires or tip-deflecting wires [1, 2], by manipulation via a transfemoral venous approach [3-5], and by injection of contrast material or saline [6]. Limitations of the direct approach include (1) the number and type of maneuvers that can be performed to effect repositioning when anatomy is distorted, (2) difficulty in accessing the catheter, and (3) the risk of introducing infection. Moreover, these patients are often immunosuppressed, and there is a risk of introducing infection by exposing and directly manipulating the venous catheter. Vigorous injection of contrast material or saline may be unsuccessful for the same reasons: It seldom exerts sufficient force to reposition large-caliber central venous catheters and may cause vessel damage or rupture if injection is made into a small or thrombosed vessel. We illustrate several alternative methods for catheter repositioning via a transfemoral venous approach.

  13. Lower extremity arterial and venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieggreen, Mary

    2005-06-01

    The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the general population is high, but the awareness of primary care providers of the disease process is low. The disease is not recognized by primary care providers. Early recognition and treatment of venous diseases that progress to postphlebotic syndrome, such as after a deep vein thrombosis, will prevent venous ulcers that add considerable expense to the health care system. Vascular assessment, including routine ABI measurement of patients who are in risk categories for vascular disease will identify those patients so that prevention programs can be put into place early. Major contributions to the understanding and management of leg ulcers and wound healing have been made in the last decade. However, there is still confusion as to the exact mechanism behind ulcer development and the best method to manage, cure,and prevent these ulcers has yet to be found.

  14. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA. Technique and contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Yousef W.; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency. Using optimized technique and a stable MRI contrast agent, peripheral CE-MRA is a safe procedure with diagnostic accuracy close to that of conventional catheter X

  15. Effect of Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Difficult-to-Place Peripheral Venous Catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partovi-Deilami, Kohyar; Nielsen, Jesper K.; Møller, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    operated by nurse anesthetists for these patients. This prospective observational study with a pre/post design focused on inpatients with DIVA referred for PVC placement, a service provided by nurse anesthetists in most Scandinavian hospitals. The rate of success, procedure time, number of skin punctures......) with ultrasound. Procedure time was reduced from 20 to 10 minutes, discomfort was unchanged, and the median number of skin punctures decreased from 3 to 2. The incidence of central venous catheter placement dropped from 34% to 7%. Implementation of a training program and a mobile service in which nurse......, discomfort, catheter size, location, and incidence of central venous catheter placement are reported before and after implementation of a training program and a mobile service using ultrasound to place difficult-to-place PVCs. The success rate increased from 0% (0 of 33 patients) to 83% (58 of 70 patients...

  16. A successful model to learn and implement ultrasound-guided venous catheterization in apheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalasingam, Nigopan; Thomsen, Anna-Marie Eller; Folkersen, Lars; Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Sloth, Erik

    2017-12-01

    Apheresis treatments can be performed with peripheral venous catheters (PVC), although central venous catheters (CVC) are inserted when PVCs fail or patient with history of difficult vascular access prior to the apheresis. Ultrasound guidance for PVC has shown promising results in other settings. To investigate if ultrasound guidance for PVC could be implemented among apheresis nurses. Second, how implementation of ultrasound guidance affected the number of CVCs used for apheresis per patient. Apheresis nurses completed a systematic training program for ultrasound-guided vascular access. All independent catheterizations were registered during the implementation stage. The number of CVCs in the pre- and postimplementation stages of the ultrasound guidance was compared. Six nurses completed the training program within a median of 48 days (range 38-83 days). In 77 patients, 485 independent ultrasound-guided PVC placements were performed during the implementation stage. All apheresis treatments (485/485) were accomplished using PVCs without requiring CVC as rescue. During the preimplementation stage, 125 of 273 (45.8%) procedures required a CVC for completion of apheresis procedures; during the postimplementation stage only 30 of 227 (13.2%) procedures required a CVC (p < 0.001). In the postimplementation stage, no CVCs were placed as rescue caused by failed PVCs but were only placed for patients where the ultrasound machine was unavailable. It indicates an effective success rate of 100% for ultrasound-guided PVC use. This study showed that ultrasound guidance could be implemented among apheresis nurses as a routine tool eliminating the need of CVC as a rescue. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Vascular access strategy for delivering long-term antimicrobials to patients with infective endocarditis: device type, risk of infection and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, F Z; Baig, W W; Munyombwe, T; West, R; Sandoe, J A T

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the use of different vascular access devices and the incidence of intravascular catheter-related infection (CRI) in patients receiving intravenous antibiotics for infective endocarditis (IE). To examine whether rates of infection vary with type of vascular access device, and assess the impact of CRI on mortality in IE. A prospective observational service evaluation of all inpatients who received intravenous antibiotics for IE was performed. In total, 114 inpatients were evaluated. All cases of CRI [including exit-site infection, intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) and mortality] were recorded. Tunnelled and non-tunnelled central venous catheters (CVCs), and peripherally inserted cannulae were used for antibiotic delivery. There were 15 episodes of CRI, 11 of which were CRBSI (all associated with CVC use). The remainder comprised uncomplicated exit-site infections. Use of tunnelled CVCs [hazard ratio (HR) 16.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.13-134.93; P = 0.007] and non-tunnelled CVCs (HR 24.54, 95% CI 2.83-212.55; P = 0.004) was associated with a significantly increased risk of CRI. Risk of mortality increased significantly with Staphylococcus aureus as the cause of IE (P < 0.001) and CRBSI (P = 0.034). Risk of CRI in patients with IE is linked to the type of vascular access device used. Rates of CRBSI were greatest with CVCs, while peripheral venous cannulae were not associated with CRBSI or serious sequelae. Many patients (40%) tolerated complete treatment courses delivered via peripheral cannulae. These findings confirm the importance of device selection in reducing the risk of CRI; a potentially modifiable variable that impacts on outcome and mortality in IE. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sustained improvements in peripheral venous catheter care in non-intensive care units: a quasi-experimental controlled study of education and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohamad G; Jones, Karen; Rey, Janice E; Berriel-Cass, Dorine; Kalinicheva, Tatyana; Szpunar, Susanna; Saravolatz, Louis D

    2012-05-01

    Peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) can be associated with serious infectious complications. We evaluated the effect of education and feedback on process measures to improve PVC care and infectious complications. Quasi-experimental controlled crossover study with sampling before and after education. An 804-bed tertiary care teaching hospital. Nurses and patients in 10 non-intensive care units. We implemented a process to improve PVC care in 10 non-intensive care units. The 4 periods (each 3 months in duration) included a preintervention period and a staggered educational intervention among nurses. During intervention period 1, 5 units participated in the intervention (group A), and 5 units served as a control group (group B). Group B underwent the intervention during intervention period 2, and both groups A and B received feedback on performance during intervention period 3. Process measures were evaluated twice monthly, and feedback was given to nurses directly and to the unit manager on a monthly basis. During the preintervention period, there were no significant differences between groups A and B. Of 4,904 intravascular catheters evaluated, 4,434 (90.4%) were peripheral. By the end of the study, there were significant improvements in processes, compared with the preintervention period, including accurate documentation of dressing (from 442 cases [38%] to 718 cases [59%]; P feedback to nurses increases and sustains compliance with processes to reduce the risk of infection from PVCs.

  19. Evaluation of the Necessity of Port Fixation in Central Venous Port Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Su; Kim, Hyung Pil [Inje University Pusan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jae Ik; Won, Je Hwan [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The technical success and complications were especially focused on and evaluated the need for fixation of a port under fluoroscopic guidance placement of the totally implantable central venous access ports for long term central venous access. Two hundred eighty nine consecutive patients (170 men, 119 women, mean age: 52-year-old) who underwent venous port implantation for the administration of chemotherapy were followed over a 1-month period. The procedures were performed in the angiographic suite by an interventional radiologist and all access was through the right jugular vein, except for the patients who had undergone a right mastectomy. The procedures were performed in the following order: 1) venous puncture, 2) making a pocket, 3) catheter tunneling, 4) port insertion, 5) catheter sizing, and 6) insertion. A port which was connected to the tunneled catheter was inserted into the minimally sized subcutaneous pocket with the aid of a small retractor. A follow-up was performed with medical records and chest radiographs. The follow-up period for evaluating the venous port ranged from 59 to 329 days (mean: 175 days) The procedures performed to gain right jugular vein access were successful without difficulty in all cases. The 18 patients that underwent procedures to gain left jugular vein access encountered some difficulty upon insertion of a catheter into the SVC due to encountering the tortuous left brachiocephalic vein. No complications occurred during and immediately after the procedure. In one case the port chamber rotated within the subcutaneous pocket; however, no catheter migration or malfunction occurred. If port insertion was followed by catheter insertion, the port chamber can be tightly implanted in the minimally sized pocket. This would avoid the need for fixation of the catheter to the port chamber leading into the pocket

  20. 'Multi-associations': predisposed to misinterpretation of peripheral tissue oxygenation and circulation in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Gerhard; Pocivalnik, Mirjam; Riedl, Regina; Pichler-Stachl, Elisabeth; Morris, Nicholas; Zotter, Heinz; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2011-08-01

    Interpretation of peripheral circulation in ill neonates is crucial but difficult. The aim was to analyse parameters potentially influencing peripheral oxygenation and circulation. In a prospective observational cohort study in 116 cardio-circulatory stable neonates, peripheral muscle near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with venous occlusion was performed. Tissue oxygenation index (TOI), mixed venous oxygenation (SvO(2)), fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), haemoglobin flow (Hbflow), oxygen delivery (DO(2)), oxygen consumption (VO(2)), and vascular resistance (VR) were assessed. Correlation coefficients between NIRS parameters and demographic parameters (gestational age, birth weight, age, actual weight, diameter of calf, subcutaneous adipose tissue), monitoring parameters (heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)), mean blood pressure (MAP), core/peripheral temperature, central/peripheral capillary refill time) and laboratory parameters (haemoglobin concentration (Hb-blood), pCO(2)) were calculated. All demographic parameters except for Hbflow and DO(2) correlated with NIRS parameters. Heart rate correlated with TOI, SvO(2), VO(2) and VR. SaO(2) correlated with FOE/FTOE. MAP correlated with Hbflow, DO(2), VO(2) and VR. Core temperature correlated with FTOE. Peripheral temperature correlated with all NIRS parameters except VO(2). Hb-blood correlated with FOE and VR. pCO(2) levels correlated with TOI and SvO(2). The presence of multiple interdependent factors associated with peripheral oxygenation and circulation highlights the difficulty in interpreting NIRS data. Nevertheless, these findings have to be taken into account when analysing peripheral oxygenation and circulation data.

  1. Mass Spectrometry-Based Adrenal and Peripheral Venous Steroid Profiling for Subtyping Primary Aldosteronism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenhofer, G.; Dekkers, T.; Peitzsch, M.; Dietz, A.S.; Bidlingmaier, M.; Treitl, M.; Williams, T.A.; Bornstein, S.R.; Haase, M.; Rump, L.C.; Willenberg, H.S.; Beuschlein, F.; Deinum, J.; Lenders, J.W.; Reincke, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differentiating patients with primary aldosteronism caused by aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) from those with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BAH), which is essential for choice of therapeutic intervention, relies on adrenal venous sampling (AVS)-based measurements of aldosterone

  2. High-resolution ultrasound imaging and noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of blood variables in peripheral blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is being widely used in clinics to obtain diagnostic information non-invasively and in real time. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging platform, Vevo (VisualSonics, Inc.) provides in vivo, real-time images with exceptional resolution (up to 30 microns) using high-frequency transducers (up to 80 MHz). Recently, we built optoacoustic systems for probing radial artery and peripheral veins that can be used for noninvasive monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and concentration of important endogenous and exogenous chromophores (such as ICG). In this work we used the high-resolution ultrasound imaging system Vevo 770 for visualization of the radial artery and peripheral veins and acquired corresponding optoacoustic signals from them using the optoacoustic systems. Analysis of the optoacoustic data with a specially developed algorithm allowed for measurement of blood oxygenation in the blood vessels as well as for continuous, real-time monitoring of arterial and venous blood oxygenation. Our results indicate that: 1) the optoacoustic technique (unlike pure optical approaches and other noninvasive techniques) is capable of accurate peripheral venous oxygenation measurement; and 2) peripheral venous oxygenation is dependent on skin temperature and local hemodynamics. Moreover, we performed for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) a comparative study of optoacoustic arterial oximetry and a standard pulse oximeter in humans and demonstrated superior performance of the optoacoustic arterial oximeter, in particular at low blood flow.

  3. Laser Recanalization of Central Venous Occlusion to Salvage a Threatened Arteriovenous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambhia, Sagar; Janko, Matthew; Hacker, Robert I

    2018-07-01

    Central venous occlusion is conventionally managed with balloon angioplasty, stent extension, or sharp recanalization. Here, we describe recanalization of a chronically occluded innominate vein using excimer laser after conventional techniques were unsuccessful. Patient clinical improvement and fistula patency have been sustained 2 years postintervention. This technique may provide new hemodialysis access options for patients who would not otherwise be candidates for hemodialysis access on the ipsilateral side of a central venous occlusion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of risk factors and the establishment of a risk model for peripherally inserted central catheter thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Hu; Ruo-Nan Hao; Jie Zhang; Zhi-Cheng Ma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the main risk factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) related upper extremity deep venous thrombosis and establish the risk predictive model of PICC-related upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. Methods: Patients with PICC who were hospitalized between January 2014 and July 2015 were studied retrospectively; they were divided into a thrombosis group (n = 52), with patients who had a venous thrombosis complication after PICC, and a no-thrombosis ...

  5. Stent tunnel technique to save thrombosed native hemodialysis fistula with extensive venous aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabellino M

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Martin Rabellino,1 Guillermo J Rosa-Diez,2 Sergio A Shinzato,1 Pablo Rodriguez,1 Oscar A Peralta,1 Maria S Crucelegui,2 Rosario Luxardo,2 Agustina Heredia-Martinez,2 Mariela I Bedini-Rocca,2 Ricardo D García-Mónaco1 1Department of Angiography and Endovascular Therapy, 2Department of Nephrology, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina Introduction and purpose: The increasing number of patients undergoing hemodialysis and the limited number of access sites have resulted in an increasing number of techniques to maintain vascular access for hemodialysis. Thrombosed arteriovenous (AV fistulas with large venous aneurysms have poor treatment results, with both endovascular and surgical techniques, leading to a high rate of definitive AV access loss. The purpose of this study was to review the feasibility and initial results of this novel endovascular treatment of thrombosed AV fistulas with large venous aneurysms.Materials and methods: A novel endovascular treatment technique of inserting nitinol auto-expandable uncovered stents stretching through the whole puncture site area, thus creating a tunnel inside the thrombus, was retrospectively analyzed and described.Results: A total of 17 stents were placed in 10 hemodialysis fistulas, with a mean venous coverage length of 17.8 cm. In all the cases, 100% technical success was achieved, with complete restoration of blood flow in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. The mean follow-up was 167 days (range 60–420 days, with a primary and assisted patency of 80% and 100%, respectively. No multiple trans-stent struts-related complications were observed. Three stent fractures were diagnosed with plain films at the site of puncture without consequence in the venous access permeability.Conclusion: The “stent tunnel technique” is a feasible, safe and effective alternative to salvage native hemodialysis access, thus extending the function of the venous access with

  6. Multiple versus single lumen umbilical venous catheters for newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, N S; Kumar, M; Shah, S S

    2005-07-20

    Multiple lumen umbilical venous catheters (ML-UVCs) instead of single lumen UVCs (SL-UVCs) may decrease the need for additional venous lines. Although it seems self-evident that ML-UVCs would reduce the need of additional venous lines, the rates of associated complications might be different. To compare the effectiveness and the safety of ML-UVCs versus SL-UVCs in terms of need of additional vascular access, rates of complications, morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. Randomized and quasi-randomized trials were identified by searching the MEDLINE (1966 - February 2005), EMBASE (1980- February 2005), CINAHL (1982 - February 2005), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2004) and Science Direct (subject area: medicine, journal and abstract database; 1967 to February 2005). Literature search also included a manual search of the abstracts of scientific meetings published in Pediatric Research (1990-2004). Additional citations were sought using references in articles retrieved from searches. Subject experts were contacted to identify the unpublished and ongoing studies. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials comparing safety and efficacy of multiple versus single lumen umbilical venous catheter in neonates (both term and preterm) who were in need of umbilical venous catheter insertion for vascular access in first four weeks of life. Each review author performed data extraction independently and differences were resolved by discussion. The following outcomes were determined: total number of additional peripheral intravenous lines per baby in first week and first four weeks of life, total number of additional percutaneously and surgically placed central venous lines per baby in first four weeks of life, and other safety and efficacy measures. The treatment effect estimators used were RR, RD, and WMD when appropriate along with their 95% CI. If RD was statistically significant, then number

  7. [Complications associated to central venous catheters in hematology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gabás, Carmen; Castillo-Ayala, Ana; Hinojo-Marín, Begoña; Muriel-Abajo, M Ángeles; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Isabel; de Mena-Arenas, Ana M; Rodríguez-Gonzalo, Ana; Chao-Lozano, Cristina; García-Menéndez, Carmen; Madroñero-Agreda, M Antonia

    2015-01-01

    To discover the incidence of central venous catheters (tunnelled, subcutaneous and PICC) in patients with onco-hematological conditions, hospitalized in the Hematology or Transplantations of Hematopoietic Stem Cells Units, in two tertiary care hospitals. A cross-sectional, descriptive study form was developed in order to gather sociodemographic, clinical data as well as complications and follow-up of the care protocol. Each catheter was assigned a correlative identification number. Information was collected on 366 catheters: 185 in the University Hospital Ramón y Cajal (HURYC), 80 tunnelled, 40 subcutaneous venous access and 65 PICC, and 181 in the University Hospital Gregorio Marañón (HUGM), 101 tunnelled and 80 subcutaneous venous access. Major complications in the tunnellized were infections (13.7% in HURYC vs. 6.8% in HUGM - p<0.001) and occlusions (at least once in 3.8% vs. 21.8%). In subcutaneous venous access, infections were confirmed in 5% in HURYC vs. 1.2% in HUGM. There were occlusions at least once in 10% in HUGM and no other significant complications were detected. Regarding PICC, information was only collected in HURYC, where complications were phlebitis 10.8%, thrombosis 7.7%, confirmed or suspected infection 4.6%, occlusion at least once 7.7%. Differences between hospitals with regard to major complications, infection and occlusion may be related to different care protocol. We need to stress the high incidence of phlebitis and thrombosis in PICC catheters, compared with data of lower incidence of other papers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Simple Radiowave-Based Method For Measuring Peripheral Blood Flow Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Project objective is to design small radio frequency based flow probes for the measurement of blood flow velocity in peripheral arteries such as the femoral artery and middle cerebral artery. The result will be the technological capability to measure peripheral blood flow rates and flow changes during various environmental stressors such as microgravity without contact to the individual being monitored. This technology may also lead to an easier method of detecting venous gas emboli during extravehicular activities.

  9. Venous damage prevention by defibrotide in vinorelbine-treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mare, M; Maisano, R; Caristi, N; Adamo, V; Altavilla, G; Carboni, R; Munaò, S; La Torre, F

    2003-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of venous toxicity induced by vinorelbine administration in patients who received a preventive therapy with defibrotide. From July 1996 to July 2002 we treated 203 patients with vinorelbine, 51 with vinorelbine alone and 152 with vinorelbine in combination with other drugs via peripheral vein infusion. Of the 203 patients, 123 were male and 80 female with a median age of 67 years (range 18 to 82 years), and 118 were chemotherapy-naive. Defibrotide was delivered i.v. at a dose of 400 mg in 250 ml normal saline. After infusion of 125 ml over about 15 min, vinorelbine mixed with 10 ml normal saline was delivered as quick brief repeated pulses over 5 min through the plastic tube, followed by infusion of the remaining defibrotide. The specific Rittenberg scale was used to assess venous irritation episodes. Among a total of 1336 vinorelbine infusions, with a median of five infusions per patient, the incidence of venous irritation episodes graded according to Rittenberg scale was 1.1% (15), of which 0.6% (8) were grade 2 and 0.5% (7) grade 1. Globally, 15 patients (7.3%) developed venous toxicity after a median of 3 infusions (range 1-14), but no patient had more than one event. Our findings support the use of defibrotide as an effective, safe and low-cost means for preventing vinorelbine-related venous damage.

  10. [Infectious or noninfectious phlebitis: lessons from a an interventional programm on phlebitis associated to peripheral venous catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Teresa; Véliz, Elena; Fica, Alberto; Leiva, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    There is no consensus definition to distinguish infectious from non-infectious phlebitis associated to peripheral venous catheter. To evaluate the impact of an intervention program on the rate of infectious (those associated to bacteremia or local purulent discharge) and non-infectious phlebitis (the rest) and identify differential features. Interventional study developed in three stages: basal measurement, intervention, and evaluation. Ten infectious and 186 non-infectious phlebitis were registered. Infectious phlebitis diminished after intervention (0.2 to 0.04 events per 1,000 bed-days; p = 0.02) but not the rest (2.3 per 1,000 bed-days before and after). Five of 10 patients with infectious phlebitis had bacteremia, one with infectious endocarditis and valve replacement, and other with septic shock and a fatal outcome. None of the patients in the non-infectious group presented complications. Infectious phlebitis appeared later (mean 4.1 versus 2.4 days; p = 0.007) and were associated to fever (40% vs 5.9%, p = 0.004). Non-infectious phlebitis was associated to irritating compounds (OR 6.1; IC95 1.3-29, p phlebitis. Distinction appears to be relevant because those of infectious origin are associated with fever, complications or death, respond to an intervention program, and emerge lately.

  11. Transvenous sclerotherapy of peripheral arteriovenous malformations and hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.W.; Moradian, G.P.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Amplantz, K.

    1989-01-01

    After exsanguination of the lesion and control of arterial inflow and venous outflow, the authors used a transvenous or direct puncture technique for injection of a sclerosing solution (3% sotradecol and ionic contrast material) to treat 18 patients with peripheral arteriovenous malformations or hemangiomas. The results are discussed. Good results were achieved in 12 patients. The other six patients had residual symptoms. Multiple treatment sessions were usually necessary. Short-term management included the use of intravenous heparin, steroids, and antibiotics. No significant long-term complications occurred. Short-term complications, including swelling, local pain, blistering, and localized deep venous thrombosis, occurred in 70% of the patients

  12. Partial peritoneal alimentation in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, R J; Atkinson, J B; Whalen, T V; Thomas, D W; Sinatra, F R; Roloson, G J

    1988-01-01

    We provided partial peritoneal alimentation to a 1.69-kg 11-month-old premature infant who had no available central venous access, depleted peripheral venous access, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. A cuffed silastic catheter was surgically inserted into the suprahepatic space. An alimentation solution was continuously infused into the peritoneum for 28 days to supplement peripheral venous and nasogastric alimentation and contributed 42 +/- 15% of total calories daily. Weight gain was achieved, but complications included hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, intravascular dehydration, catheter site leakage, ascites, and hydrocele. At autopsy 11 months later, lipid accumulation was present in the upper peritoneum and the hilar regions of the lungs secondary to preexisting lymphatic obstruction. Partial peritoneal alimentation may be feasible when other access routes are inadequate, but lymphatic obstruction is a contraindication to the peritoneal administration of lipid emulsions.

  13. In the absence of a central venous catheter, risk of venous thromboembolism is low in critically injured children, adolescents, and young adults: evidence from the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H; Candrilli, Sean D

    2011-05-01

    To describe the incidence and risk factors of venous thromboembolism in a large sample of critical care pediatric, adolescent, and young adult trauma patients. The National Trauma Data Bank-the largest and most complete aggregation of trauma registry data in the United States. Seven hundred eighty-four level I to level IV trauma centers. Patients ≤ 21 yrs of age who spent at least 1 day in a critical care unit during a trauma admission between 2001 and 2005. To characterize differences between patients with and without venous thromboembolism, we extracted variables regarding patient demographics, injury pattern and severity, procedures, total length of stay, and intensive care unit and ventilator days. Odds ratios for predictors of venous thromboembolism were estimated with a logistic regression model. Among the 135,032 critical care patients analyzed, venous thromboembolism was uncommon (6 per 1,000 discharges). Placement of a central venous catheter was a significant predictor of venous thromboembolism (odds ratio = 2.24; p central venous catheter were of even greater magnitude, particularly in adolescents and young adults. The risk of venous thromboembolism in critical care patients without a central venous catheter was central venous access.

  14. Higher complication risk of totally implantable venous access port systems in patients with advanced cancer - a single institution retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Fang; Lo, An-Chi; Tsai, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Pei-Yi; Sun, Shen; Chang, Te-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Yuan-Shin; Chen, Jen-Ruei

    2013-02-01

    Totally implantable port systems are generally recommended for prolonged central venous access in diverse settings, but their risk of complications remains unclear for patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of port system failure in patients with advanced cancer. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a comprehensive cancer centre. A detailed chart review was conducted among 566 patients with 573 ports inserted during January-June, 2009 (average 345.3 catheter-days). Cox regression analysis was applied to evaluate factors during insertion and early maintenance that could lead to premature removal of the port systems due to infection or occlusion. Port system-related infection was significantly associated with receiving palliative care immediately after implantation (hazard ratio, HR = 7.3, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI = 1.2-46.0), after adjusting for probable confounders. Primary cancer site also impacted the occurrence of device-related infection. Receiving oncologic/palliative care (HR = 3.0, P = 0.064), advanced cancer stage (HR = 6.5, P = 0.077) and body surface area above 1.71 m(2) (HR = 3.4, P = 0.029) increased the risk of port system occlusion. Our study indicates that totally implantable port systems yield a higher risk of complications in terminally ill patients. Further investigation should be carefully conducted to compare outcomes of various central venous access devices in patients with advanced cancer and to develop preventive strategies against catheter failure.

  15. 'Multi-associations': predisposed to misinterpretation of peripheral tissue oxygenation and circulation in neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, Gerhard; Pocivalnik, Mirjam; Pichler-Stachl, Elisabeth; Morris, Nicholas; Zotter, Heinz; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt; Riedl, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of peripheral circulation in ill neonates is crucial but difficult. The aim was to analyse parameters potentially influencing peripheral oxygenation and circulation. In a prospective observational cohort study in 116 cardio-circulatory stable neonates, peripheral muscle near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with venous occlusion was performed. Tissue oxygenation index (TOI), mixed venous oxygenation (SvO 2 ), fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), haemoglobin flow (Hbflow), oxygen delivery (DO 2 ), oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), and vascular resistance (VR) were assessed. Correlation coefficients between NIRS parameters and demographic parameters (gestational age, birth weight, age, actual weight, diameter of calf, subcutaneous adipose tissue), monitoring parameters (heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ), mean blood pressure (MAP), core/peripheral temperature, central/peripheral capillary refill time) and laboratory parameters (haemoglobin concentration (Hb-blood), pCO 2 ) were calculated. All demographic parameters except for Hbflow and DO 2 correlated with NIRS parameters. Heart rate correlated with TOI, SvO 2 , VO 2 and VR. SaO 2 correlated with FOE/FTOE. MAP correlated with Hbflow, DO 2 , VO 2 and VR. Core temperature correlated with FTOE. Peripheral temperature correlated with all NIRS parameters except VO 2 . Hb-blood correlated with FOE and VR. pCO 2 levels correlated with TOI and SvO 2 . The presence of multiple interdependent factors associated with peripheral oxygenation and circulation highlights the difficulty in interpreting NIRS data. Nevertheless, these findings have to be taken into account when analysing peripheral oxygenation and circulation data

  16. Remifentanil for the insertion and removal of long-term central venous access during monitored anesthesia care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burlacu, Crina L

    2012-02-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine the analgesic efficacy of three different rates of remifentanil infusion in patients undergoing insertion or removal of long-term central venous access devices during monitored anesthesia care and local anesthetic field infiltration. DESIGN: Double-blinded, randomized, controlled study. SETTING: Operating theatre of an University hospital. PATIENTS: 44 unpremedicated, ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients, aged 18-65 years, undergoing insertion or removal of a Port-a-Cath or Hickman catheter. INTERVENTIONS: Patients sedated with a propofol target-controlled infusion were randomly allocated to three groups: Group R25 (n = 14), Group R50 (n = 15), and Group R75 (n = 15), to receive remifentanil 0.025, 0.05, and 0.075 mug\\/kg\\/min, respectively. Rescue remifentanil 0.5 mug\\/kg was administered for pain scores > 3. The remifentanil infusion rate was maintained constant unless respiratory and\\/or cardiovascular unwanted events occurred, whereupon the rate was adjusted in 0.01 mug\\/kg\\/min decrements as necessary. MEASUREMENTS: Pain scores (primary outcome), sedation, and movement scores (secondary outcomes) were assessed during local anesthetic infiltration of the anterior chest wall and 5 other procedural steps. MAIN RESULTS: All infusion rates had equal analgesic efficacy, as shown by comparable pain scores, number of rescue boluses, and number of patients requiring rescue analgesia. Excessive sedation was associated with the highest remifentanil rate such that Group R75 patients were significantly more sedated than Groups R25 or R50 at selective procedural steps (P < 0.05). More Group R75 patients (6\\/15) required remifentanil rate reduction than did patients from Group R50 (1\\/15) or Group R25 (0\\/14), P < 0.01, most commonly because of respiratory depression. CONCLUSIONS: For the insertion or removal of long-term central venous access devices, all three remifentanil infusion rates proved to be equally analgesic

  17. Central Venous Catheter-related Fungemia Caused by Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglietta, Fabio; Letizia Faneschi, Maria; Braione, Adele; Palumbo, Claudio; Rizzo, Adriana; Lobreglio, Giambattista; Pizzolante, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infection due to Rhodotorula glutinis is extremely rare and mostly associated with underlying immunosuppression or cancer. Vascular access devices provide the necessary surfaces for biofilm formation and are currently responsible for a significant percentage of human infections. In this work, we describe a rare case of central venous catheter-related Rhodotorula glutinis fungemia in a female patient with acute myelogenous leukemia in remission. The timely removal of central venous catheter was an essential element for overcoming this CVC-related Rhodotorula fungemia.

  18. It all unraveled from there: case report of a central venous catheter guidewire unraveling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, Samuel; Emdadi, Vanessa; Mancinelli, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters can present challenges to emergency physicians in the process of central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 68-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with severe shortness of breath and was intubated. A central line was placed after the intubation to facilitate peripheral access. A CVC guidewire unraveled during placement after getting caught on an IVC filter. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians should be aware of the complications that IVC filters can cause in the placement of CVCs. Imaging and identification of IVC filters beforehand will allow for proper planning of how to manage the case in which a filter catches on the guidewire. Simple anecdotal techniques, such as advancing the guidewire and spinning the guidewire between the fingers, can facilitate the removal of the guide wire from the IVC filter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which is inserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion of the vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter. Objective: To point out the main theoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses to perform the PICC. Methodology: Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching the database scientific journals and bibliographies area. Results: The success of integration depends on the patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tip should be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava. In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursing care in making the dressing, and the first 24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICC remains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasing invasive procedures. Conclusion: According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawful for the insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  20. Influence of meal composition on postprandial peripheral plasma concentrations of vasoactive peptides in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Høst, U; Kelbaek, H

    1996-01-01

    In a randomized cross-over study healthy non-obese male human subjects received standardized isocaloric, isovolumetric meals consisting of either carbohydrate, protein or fat and a non-caloric control meal consisting of an equal volume of water. Peripheral venous plasma concentrations of calcitonin...... that the postprandial peripheral plasma concentrations of CGRP, VIP and PYY are dependent on the caloric meal composition. The VIP, but not the CGRP and PYY concentrations seem to be influenced by gastric distension. The physiological significance of the postprandial alterations in peripheral concentrations...

  1. Measurement of peripheral venous catheter-related phlebitis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göransson, Katarina; Förberg, Ulrika; Johansson, Eva; Unbeck, Maria

    2017-09-01

    Many instruments for measurement of peripheral venous catheter (PVC)-related phlebitis are available, but no consensus exists on their applicability in clinical practice. This absence of consensus affects the ability to identify and compare proportions of PVCs causing phlebitis within and across hospitals as the range varies between 2% and 62% in previous studies. We hypothesised that the instruments' ability to identify phlebitis varies. The aim of this study is to illustrate the complexity of application of phlebitis instruments to a clinical dataset. In this cross-sectional study, we applied 17 instruments for phlebitis identification (divided into three groups [instruments using definitions, severity rating systems, and scoring systems]) to PVCs in adult patients admitted to 12 inpatient units at Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden. We calculated the proportion of PVCs causing phlebitis on the basis of each instrument's minimum criterion for phlebitis. We also analysed each instrument's face validity. We compared proportions using the Z test. On the basis of data collected between Feb 2, 2009, and Feb 20, 2009, May 18, 2009, and June 5, 2009, and Feb 8, 2010, and Feb 26, 2010, we applied 17 instruments for phlebitis identification (eight instruments using definitions, seven severity rating systems, and two scoring systems) to 1175 observed PVCs in 1032 patients. The highest number of PVCs causing phlebitis generated by definitions was 137 (11·7%), by severity rating systems was 395 (33·6%), and by scoring systems was 363 (30·9%). The proportion generated by instruments using definitions was significantly different to that of both the severity rating (difference 21·9% [95% CI 18·6-25·2]; pphlebitis published in the scientific community. From a work environment and patient safety perspective, clinical staff engaged in PVC management should be aware of the absence of adequately validated instruments for phlebitis assessment. We suggest that researchers

  2. Port type is a possible risk factor for implantable venous access port-related bloodstream infections and no sign of local infection predicts the growth of gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Feng; Chang, Hsu-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Lee, Yen-Lung; Chen, Pei-Huan; Fan, Wen-Chieh; Su, Yu-Chung; Yang, Chih-Jen

    2015-09-30

    Implantable venous access port (IVAP)-related blood stream infections (BSIs) are one of the most common complications of implantable venous ports. The risk factors and pathogens for IVAP-related BSIs are still controversial. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who received IVAPs at a Hospital in Taiwan from January 1, 2011 to June 31, 2014. Two types of venous port, BardPort® 6.6 fr (Bard port) and Autosuture Chemosite® 7.5 fr (TYCO port) were used. All patients with clinically proven venous port-related BSIs were enrolled. A total of 552 patients were enrolled. There were 34 episodes of IVAP-related BSIs during the study period for a total incidence of 0.177 events/1000 catheter days. Port type (TYCO vs. Bard, HR = 7.105 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.688-29.904), p = 0.0075), age > 65 years (HR = 2.320 (95 % CI, 1.179-4.564), p = 0.0148), and lung cancer (HR = 5.807 (95% CI, 2.946-11.447), p port infections. We also found that no local sign of infection was significantly associated with the growth of gram-negative bacilli (p = 0.031). TYCO venous ports, age > 65 years, and lung cancer were all significant risk factors for IVAP-related BSIs, and no sign of infection was significantly associated with the growth of gram-negative bacilli.

  3. An analysis of leukapheresis and central venous catheter use in the randomized, placebo controlled, phase 3 IMPACT trial of Sipuleucel-T for metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Robert C; Polcari, Anthony J; Shore, Neil D; Price, Thomas H; Sims, Robert B; Maher, Johnathan C; Whitmore, James B; Corman, John M

    2013-02-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy. We review the safety of the leukapheresis procedure required for sipuleucel-T preparation and complications related to venous catheter use in the randomized, placebo controlled phase 3 IMPACT (IMmunotherapy for ProstAte Cancer Trial) study (NCT 00065442). A total of 512 patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. All patients were scheduled to undergo 3 standard 1.5 to 2.0 blood volume leukapheresis procedures at 2-week intervals. Leukapheresis related adverse events and those related to venous catheter use were reviewed. Immune cell counts were examined throughout the treatment course. Of 512 enrolled patients 506 underwent 1 or more leukapheresis procedures and were included in this analysis. Adverse events were comparable between the sipuleucel-T and control arms. Leukapheresis related adverse events were primarily associated with transient hypocalcemia (39.3%). Most leukapheresis related adverse events (97%) were of mild/moderate intensity. Median white blood cell count and absolute monocyte and lymphocyte counts were stable and within normal ranges throughout the treatment course. Of all patients 23.3% had a central venous catheter placed primarily for leukapheresis. Patients with vs without a central venous catheter had a higher risk of infection potentially related to catheter use (11.9% vs 1.3%, p nervous system (5.9% vs 2.1%, p = 0.06). Adverse events related to leukapheresis are manageable and quickly reversible. The majority of patients can undergo leukapheresis without a central venous catheter. Central venous catheters are associated with an increased risk of infections and venous vascular events. Peripheral intravenous access should be used when feasible. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Arterial versus venous lactate: a measure of sepsis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaraweera, Sahan Asela; Gibbons, Berwyck; Gour, Anami; Sedgwick, Philip

    2017-08-01

    This study assessed the agreement between arterial and venous blood lactate and pH levels in children with sepsis. This retrospective, three-year study involved 60 PICU patients, with data collected from electronic or paper patient records. The inclusion criteria comprised of children (≤17 years old) with sepsis and those who had a venous blood gas taken first with an arterial blood gas taken after within one hour. The lactate and pH values measured through each method were analysed. There is close agreement between venous and arterial lactate up to 2 mmol/L. As this value increases, this agreement becomes poor. The limits of agreement (LOA) are too large (±1.90 mmol/L) to allow venous and arterial lactate to be used interchangeably. The mean difference and LOA between both methods would be much smaller if derived using lactate values under 2.0 mmol/L. There is close agreement between arterial and venous pH (MD = -0.056, LOA ± 0.121). However, due to extreme variations in pH readings during sepsis, pH alone is an inadequate marker. A venous lactate ≤2 mmol/L can be used as a surrogate for arterial lactate during early management of sepsis in children. However, if the value exceeds 2 mmol/L, an arterial sample must confirm the venous result. What is known: • In children with septic shock, a blood gas is an important test to show the presence of acidosis and high lactic acid. Hyperlactataemia on admission is an early predictor of outcome and is associated with a greater mortality risk. • An arterial sample is the standard for lactate measurement, however getting a sample may be challenging in the emergency department or a general paediatric ward. Venous samples are quicker and easier to obtain. Adult studies generally advise caution in replacing venous lactate values for the arterial standard, whilst paediatric studies are limited in this area. What is new: • This is the first study assessing the agreement between arterial and peripheral venous

  5. Duplex correlation phlebography in venous mapping of the upper limbs for artery venous fistulas for hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esperon Percovich, A.; Lopez Chapuis, D.; Velverdu, M.; Curi, J.; Sciuto, F.; Velverdu, M.; Curi, J.

    1995-01-01

    When clinical evaluation is not enough,the evaluation of the venous condition of the upper limbs for the realization of angio access for hemodialysis is classically based on phlebography,an invasive,risky method.the appear rance of non invasive techniques such as eco Doppler(duplex) makes it necessary to do research in order to determine the utility of the method and define its indications.The authors analyse 35 venous mappings of the upper limbs by phlebography and duplex and compare its results for the different venous regions.They come to the conclusion that duplex presented the best performance for the hum ero axillary subclavian region,detecting thrombosis with a sensitivity of 100% a specificity of 97% positive predictive value of 50% and negative predictive value of 100%.For superficial axis (radial and superficial ulnar,basilic and cephalic)there is low sensitivity for the determination of presence and permeability of the axis but 100% specificity.Duplex was not useful for the description of veins in order to determine utility for Avf.Finally,the authors make recommendations as regards indications of these para clinical tests [es

  6. [Assertiveness and peripheral intravenous catheters dwell time with ultrasonography-guided insertion in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Ariane Ferreira Machado; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; da Pedreira, Mavilde Luz Gonçalves

    2013-06-01

    Randomized controlled trial which aimed to verify whether the use of vascular ultrasound (VUS) increases assertiveness in the use of peripheral venous catheter in children, and the catheter dwell time, when compared to traditional puncture. Data were collected after approval of theethical merit. Children and adolescents undergoing VUS-guided peripheral intravenous (GVUS) or puncture guided by clinical assessment of the venous conditions(CG) were included in the study. Significance level was set at pAssertiveness was found in 73 (71.6%) GVUS catheters and in 84(71.8%) of the CG (p=0.970), and catheter dwell time presented a median of less than one day in both groups (p=0.121), showing nostatistically significant difference. VUS did not significantly influence the results of the dependent variables investigated. ClinicalTrials.govNCT00930254.

  7. Risk of infection due to medical interventions via central venous catheters or implantable venous access port systems at the middle port of a three-way cock: luer lock cap vs. luer access split septum system (Q-Syte).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Fabian; Hartmann, Werner; Holzmann, Thomas; Gensicke, Sandra; Kölbl, Oliver; Hautmann, Matthias G

    2014-01-25

    Many cancer patients receive a central venous catheter or port system prior to therapy to assure correct drug administration. Even appropriate hygienic intervention maintenance carries the risk of contaminating the middle port (C-port) of a three-way cock (TWC), a risk that increases with the number of medical interventions. Because of the complexity of the cleaning procedure with disconnection and reconnection of the standard luer lock cap (referred as "intervention"), we compared luer lock caps with a "closed access system" consisting of a luer access split septum system with regard to process optimization (work simplification, process time), efficiency (costs) and hygiene (patient safety). For determination of process optimization the workflow of an intervention according to the usual practice and risks was depicted in a process diagram. For determining the actual process costs, we analyzed use of material and time parameters per intervention and used the process parameters for programming the process into a simulation run (n = 1000) to determine the process costs as well as their differences (ACTUAL vs. NOMINAL) within the framework of a discrete event simulation.Additionally cultures were carried out at the TWC C-ports to evaluate possible contamination. With the closed access system, the mean working time of 5.5 minutes could be reduced to 2.97 minutes. The results for average process costs (labour and material costs per use) were 3.92 € for luer lock caps and 2.55 € for the closed access system. The hypothesis test (2-sample t-test, CI 0.95, p-valuerisks (related to material, surroundings, staff handling) could be reduced by 65.38%. In the present research, the closed access system with a divided split septum was superior to conventional luer lock caps. The advantage of the closed access system lies in the simplified handling for staff, which results in a reduced risk of patient infection due to improved clinical hygiene.

  8. Percutaneous retrieval of centrally embolized fragments of central venous access devices or knotted Swan-Ganz catheters. Clinical report of 14 retrievals with detailed angiographic analysis and review of procedural aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Kalińczuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Totally implantable venous access systems (TIVAS, Swan-Ganz (SG and central venous catheters (CVC allow easy and repetitive entry to the central cardiovascular system. Fragments of them may be released inadvertently into the cardiovascular system during their insertion or as a result of mechanical complications encountered during long-term utilization. Aim : To present results of percutaneous retrieval of embolized fragments of central venous devices or knotted SG and review the procedural aspects with a series of detailed angiographies. Material and methods : Between January 2003 and December 2012 there were 14 (~0.025% successful retrievals in 13 patients (44 ±16 years, 15% females of embolized fragments of TIVAS (n = 10 or CVC (n = 1 or of dislodged guide-wires (n = 2 or knotted SG (n = 1. Results : Foreign bodies with the forward end located in the right ventricle (RV, as well as those found in the pulmonary artery (PA, often required repositioning with a pigtail catheter as compared to those catheter fragments which were located in the right atrium (RA and/or great vein and possessed an accessible free end allowing their direct ensnarement with the loop snare (57.0% (4/7 vs. 66.7% (2/3 vs. 0.0% (0/3; p = 0.074 respectively. Procedure duration was 2–3 times longer among catheters retrieved from the PA than among those with the forward edge located in the RV or RA (30 (18–68 vs. 13.5 (11–37 vs. 8 min (8–13; p = 0.054 respectively. The SG catheter knotted in the vena cava superior (VCS was encircled with the loop snare introduced transfemorally, subsequently cut at its skin entrance and then pulled down inside the 14 Fr vascular sheath. Conclusions : By using the pigtail catheter and the loop snare, it is feasible to retrieve centrally embolized fragments or knotted central venous access devices.

  9. Percutaneous Placement of Central Venous Catheters: Comparing the Anatomical Landmark Method with the Radiologically Guided Technique for Central Venous Catheterization Through the Internal Jugular Vein in Emergent Hemodialysis Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroglu, M.; Demir, M.; Koroglu, B.K.; Sezer, M.T.; Akhan, O.; Yildiz, H.; Yavuz, L.; Baykal, B.; Oyar, O. [Suleyman Demirel Univ., Isparta (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Internal Medicine and Anesthesiology

    2006-02-15

    Purpose: To compare the success and immediate complication rates of the anatomical landmark method (group 1) and the radiologically (combined real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy) guided technique (group 2) in the placement of central venous catheters in emergent hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: The study was performed prospectively in a randomized manner. The success and immediate complication rates of radiologically guided placement of central venous access catheters through the internal jugular vein (n = 40) were compared with those of the anatomical landmark method (n 40). The success of placement, the complications, the number of passes required, and whether a single or double-wall puncture occurred were also noted and compared. Results: The groups were comparable in age and sex. The indication for catheter placement was hemodialysis access in all patients. Catheter placement was successful in all patients in group 2 and unsuccessful in 1 (2.5%) patient in group 1. All catheters functioned adequately and immediately after the placement (0% initial failure rate) in group 2, but 3 catheters (7.5% initial failure rate) were non-functional just after placement in group 1. The total number of needle passes, double venous wall puncture, and complication rate were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusion: Percutaneous central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein can be performed by interventional radiologists with better technical success rates and lower immediate complications. In conclusion, central venous catheterization for emergent dialysis should be performed under both real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.

  10. Emergency endovascular management of peripheral artery aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillard Jonathan H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Endovascular stenting has been successfully employed in the management of aortic aneurysms; however, its use in managing peripheral arterial conditions remains questionable. We review the utility of endovascular technique in the management of peripheral arterial conditions like aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms and arterio-venous fistulas in the emergency setting. Though long term data about graft patency rates is not yet available, the endovascular approach appears to be a useful minimally invasive technique in situations where open repair is either difficult or not feasible.

  11. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Byung Boong; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    ). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various...... forms of treatment. Chapter 1 is devoted to basic hemodynamic concepts and normal venous physiology. Chapter 2 presents the mechanism and magnitude of hemodynamic changes in acute deep vein thrombosis indicating their pathophysiological and clinical significance. Chapter 3 describes the hemodynamic...... changes that occur in different classes of chronic venous disease and their relation to the anatomic extent of disease in the macrocirculation and microcirculation. The next four chapters (Chapters 4-7) describe the hemodynamic changes resulting from treatment by compression using different materials...

  12. Phlebitis: treatment, care and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Ray; Parry, Andrew

    Peripheral venous catheter-associated phlebitis is caused by inflammation to the vein at a cannula access site. It can have a mechanical, chemical or infectious cause. Good practice when inserting a cannula, including appropriate choice of device and site, can help to prevent phlebitis. Good infection control techniques are also vital in preventing the condition. There are two phlebitis scoring systems, which should be used in routine practice to identify and treat early signs of the Peripheral venous cannulation

  13. Ultrasonic Guided Insertion of Central Venous Catheter in Infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Purpose: ultrasound is licensed for application of regional blocks and insertion of vascular access. We aimed to compare ultrasonic guided (USG) and anatomical landmark technique (ALT) for insertion of central venous catheter (CVC) as regard success rate and rate of complications in infants and children.

  14. Occupational therapy for patients with an arterio-venous fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iustinian BENGULESCU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available End stage renal disease (ESRD represents a chronic medical condition that has become a public health problem and requires substantial funding. The number of patients with ESRD is rapidly increasing. From the moment that ESRD is diagnosed, the natural evolution of this pathology is towards mandatory dialysis, in absence of a renal transplant procedure. In order to perform hemodialysis, a vascular access site must be created and maintained functional. A proper vascular access site allows an adequate blood flow through the dialysis machine, in order to obtain the required results. The arterio-venous fistula represents the number one recommended vascular access site procedure. Establishing and maintaining a vascular access represents one of the biggest problems in hemodialysis. The arterio-venous fistula thus becomes the patient’s lifeline. Maintaining a good quality vascular access site is a demanding process and requires cooperation between both the patient and the health care providers. For ESRD patients there is a constant concern regarding the patency of their vascular access. The aim of this paper is to present the postoperative measures that ESRD patients should provide in order to preserve their vascular access. Also, we want to present the main signs of an early complication that patients should recognize and therefore immediately present themselves to the physician. By establishing this type of cooperation and trust between the patient and the medical staff we will be able to reduce the number of surgical procedures required for the creation and maintenance of the vascular access. Our final thought remains that a well-informed patient has better chances of prolonging his “lifeline”.

  15. Diagnosing a popliteal venous aneurysm in a primary care setting: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symvoulakis Emmanouil K

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Popliteal venous aneurysms are uncommon but potentially fatal vascular disorders. They can be symptomatic or asymptomatic, mimicking different conditions. Popliteal venous aneurysms are possible sources of embolism. Case presentation A 68-year-old woman presented at a rural primary health care unit in Crete, Greece, reporting local symptoms of discomfort in the right popliteal fossa with pain during palpation. Colour Doppler ultrasonography revealed local widening and saccular dilatation in the right distal popliteal vein. The diagnosis of a popliteal venous aneurysm was formulated. Conclusion Popliteal venous aneurysms are rare conditions, but are potentially more common than usually thought in daily practice. Physician awareness and access to ultrasound examination may allow for early diagnosis, before the occurrence of any thromboembolic or other major complication.

  16. Intracardiac air- the "hospital killer' identified? | Smith | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous access is an essential part of caring for the sick neonate. The primary problem with catheters, whether peripherally or centrally placed, is the difficulty in maintaining them, the development of phlebitis and systemic infection, and fluid extravasation. A lesser known complication is the development of venous air ...

  17. Central venous pressure monitoring via peripherally or centrally inserted central catheters: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Noto, Alberto; Martucci, Gennaro; Farbo, Marco; Burgio, Gaetano; Biasucci, Daniele G

    2017-07-14

    The central venous pressure (CVP) is the most commonly used static marker of preload for guiding fluid therapy in critically ill patients, though its usefulness remains controversial. Centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs) are the gold-standard devices for CVP monitoring but peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) may represent a valid alternative. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis with the aim to investigate whether the difference between PICC- and CICC-measured CVP is not significant. We searched for clinical studies published in PubMed and EMBASE databases from inception until December 21st 2016. We included studies providing data on paired and simultaneous CVP measurement from PICCs and CICCs. We conducted two analyses on the values of CVP, the first one according to the total number of CVP assessments, the second one considering the number of patients recruited. Four studies matched the inclusion criteria, but only three of them provided data for the meta-analyses. Both analyses showed non-significant differences between PICC-measured and CICC-measured CVP: 1489 paired simultaneous CVP assessments (MD 0.16, 95%CI -0.14, 0.45, p = 0.30) on a total of 57 patients (MD 0.22, 95%CI -1.46, 1.91, p = 0.80). Both analyses showed no heterogeneity (I2 = 0%). Available evidence supports that CVP monitoring with PICCs is accurate and reproduces similar values to those obtained from CICCs. The possibility to monitor CVP should not be used among clinical criteria for preferring a CICC over a PICC line.

  18. Direct venous thrombolysis and venous angioplasty in the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, J.P.; Guenther, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Venous thromboses of stenoses in the upper extremity are often the result of a compression syndrome of the shoulder girdle, the Paget-von Schroetter syndrome, vascular surgery, space-occupying lesions in the mediastinum or the result of catheterisation. Direct venous thrombolysis and venous angioplasty were performed successfully in six patients. (orig.) [de

  19. Analysis of the vertebral venous system in relation to cerebral venous drainage on MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Seung Kug; Sohn, Chul Ho; Kim, Gab Chul; Kim, Yong Sun

    2004-01-01

    In the supine position, cerebral venous drainage occurs primarily through the internal jugular veins, as seen on venous phase cerebral angiography. However, in the erect position, the vertebral venous system represents the major alternative pathway of cerebral venous drainage, while outflow through the internal jugular veins is absent or negligible. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vertebral venous system and its relationship between the surrounding venous structures using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the case of subjects in the supine position. We retrospectively reviewed the results of 65 patients (M:F = 31: 34, mean age 61.6 years) who underwent multi-phase contrast-enhanced carotid MRA. The imaging studies were performed using a 3.0 T MR unit (TR: 5.2, TE: 1.1, FA: 20, 3.8 thickness, EC: 1). We analyzed the appearance and extent of the vertebral venous system (vertebral venous plexus and vertebral artery venous plexus) and the internal jugular vein on the venous phase images. We also evaluated the main drainage pattern of the cerebral venous drainage and the drainage pattern of the vertebral venous system. The visualized vertebral venous system was defined as either poor, vertebral venous plexus dominant, vertebral artery venous plexus dominant or mixed. In the vertebral venous system, the vertebral artery venous plexus was visualized in 54 cases (83%). The appearance of the visualized vertebral artery venous plexus was symmetrical in 39 cases (72%) and asymmetrical in 15 cases (28%). The extent of the visualized vertebral artery venous plexus was partial in 26 cases (48%) and complete in 28 cases (52%). The vertebral venous plexus was visualized in 62 cases (95%). The appearance of the visualized vertebral artery venous plexus was symmetrical in 43 cases (69%) and asymmetrical in 19 cases (31%). The extent of the visualized vertebral artery venous plexus was partial in 35 cases (56%) and complete in 27 cases (44%). The appearance of the

  20. Combination of phlebography and sanguinous measurement of venous blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.

    1988-01-01

    Phlebographic visualisation offers the highest spatial resolution of all imaging methods both in respect of veins of the leg and pelvis and of the abdomen. Phlebography offers optimal conditions for assessing morphological changes at the veins and in their direct neighbourhood. No quantitative information is available via phlebography if haemodynamics are disturbed; qualitative information is yielded merely to a restricted extent (by assessing flow velocity and collaterals). Direct sanguinous measurement of venous blood pressure is particularly suitable for the quantitative and qualitative assessment of disturbed haemodynamic conditions; in this respect it stands out among the function tests based on the employment of apparatures. If it is combined with phlebography, it is possible not only to optimise the diagnostic yield in the hands of one investigator, but also to reduce the invasiveness of both methods to one single puncture, since the puncture needle is at the same time also an instrument to measure the pressure. The article points out the possibilities and limitations of combining a) ascending phlebography of the leg and pelvis with peripheral venous pressure measurement (phlebodynamometry) and b) visualisation of the veins of the pelvis and vena cava inferior with central sanguinous venous pressure measurement (CP). Indicatious and technical execution are described. (orig.) [de

  1. [Peripheral venous catheter use in the emergency department: reducing adverse events in patients and biosafety problems for staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás Vecina, Santiago; Mozota Duarte, Julián; Ortega Marcos, Miguel; Gracia Ruiz Navarro, María; Borillo, Vicente; San Juan Gago, Leticia; Roqueta Egea, Fermin; Chanovas Borrás, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To test a strategy to reduce the rate of adverse events in patients and safety problems for emergency department staff who insert peripheral venous catheters (PVCs). The strategy consisted of training, implementing a protocol, and introducing safety-engineered PVCs. Prospective, multicenter, observational, preauthorization study in patients requiring PVC placement in an emergency department. The study had 2 phases. The first consisted of training, implementing a protocol for using conventional PVCs, and monitoring practice. The second phase introduced safety-engineered PVC sets. The number of adverse events in patients and threats to safety for staff were compared between the 2 phases. A total of 520 patients were included, 180 in the first phase and 340 in the second. We detected breaches in aseptic technique, failure to maintain a sterile field, and improper management of safety equipment and devices. Some practices improved significantly during the second phase. Eighty-six adverse events occurred in the first phase and 52 (15.4%) in the second; the between-phase difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of postinfusion phlebitis was 50% lower in the second phase. Seven splash injuries and 1 accidental puncture occurred with conventional PVCs in the first phase; 2 splash injuries occurred with the safety-engineered PVCs in the second phase (36% decrease, P = .04). Differences were particularly noticeable for short-term PVC placements (P = .02). Combining training, a protocol, and the use of safety-engineered PVC sets offers an effective strategy for improving patient and staff safety.

  2. Risk factors for venous port migration in a single institute in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Cheng-Han; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Chang, Hsu-Liang; Hung, Jen-Yu; Chen, Pei-Huan; Yang, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-14

    An implantable port device provides an easily accessible central route for long-term chemotherapy. Venous catheter migration is one of the rare complications of venous port implantation. It can lead to side effects such as pain in the neck, shoulder, or ear, venous thrombosis, and even life-threatening neurologic problems. To date, there are few published studies that discuss such complications. This retrospective study of venous port implantation in a single center, a Taiwan hospital, was conducted from January 2011 to March 2013. Venous port migration was recorded along with demographic and characteristics of the patients. Of 298 patients with an implantable import device, venous port migration had occurred in seven, an incidence rate of 2.3%. All seven were male and had received the Bard port Fr 6.6 which had smaller size than TYCO port Fr 7.5 and is made of silicon. Significantly, migration occurred in male patients (P = 0.0006) and in those with lung cancer (P = 0.004). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that lung cancer was a significant risk factor for port migration (odds ratio: 11.59; P = 0.0059). The migration rate of the Bard port Fr 6.6 was 6.7%. The median time between initial venous port implantation and port migration was 35.4 days (range, 7 to 135 days) and 71.4% (5/7) of patients had port migration within 30 days after initial port implantation. Male sex and lung cancer are risk factors for venous port migration. The type of venous port is also an important risk factor.

  3. Insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsikoris, Ioannis, E-mail: gkotsikoris@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Zygomalas, Apollon, E-mail: azygomalas@upatras.gr [Department of General Surgery, University Hospital of Patras (Greece); Papas, Theofanis, E-mail: pfanis@otenet.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Maras, Dimitris, E-mail: dimmaras@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Pavlidis, Polyvios, E-mail: polpavlidis@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Andrikopoulou, Maria, E-mail: madric@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Tsanis, Antonis, E-mail: atsanis@gmail.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Alivizatos, Vasileios, E-mail: valiviz@hol.gr [Department of General Surgery and Artificial Nutrition Unit, “Agios Andreas” General Hospital of Patras (Greece); Bessias, Nikolaos, E-mail: bessias@otenet.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece)

    2012-09-15

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is an effective alternative vascular access for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations in terms of efficacy of the procedure and early complications. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2010, the vascular access team of our hospital placed 409 central venous catheters in patients with chronic renal failure. The procedure was performed using the Seldinger blind technique. In 18 (4.4%) cases it was impossible to advance the guidewire, and so the patients were transported to the angiography suite. Results: Using the angiographic technique, the guidewire was advanced in order to position the central venous catheter. The latter was inserted into the subclavian vein in 12 (66.6%) cases, into the internal jugular vein in 4 (22.2%) and into the femoral vein in 2 (11.1%) cases. There was only one complicated case with severe arrhythmia in 1 (5.5%) patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that insertion of central venous catheters using angiographic techniques in hemodialysis patients with previous multiple catheterizations is a safe and effective procedure with few complications and high success rates.

  4. Insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsikoris, Ioannis; Zygomalas, Apollon; Papas, Theofanis; Maras, Dimitris; Pavlidis, Polyvios; Andrikopoulou, Maria; Tsanis, Antonis; Alivizatos, Vasileios; Bessias, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is an effective alternative vascular access for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations in terms of efficacy of the procedure and early complications. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2010, the vascular access team of our hospital placed 409 central venous catheters in patients with chronic renal failure. The procedure was performed using the Seldinger blind technique. In 18 (4.4%) cases it was impossible to advance the guidewire, and so the patients were transported to the angiography suite. Results: Using the angiographic technique, the guidewire was advanced in order to position the central venous catheter. The latter was inserted into the subclavian vein in 12 (66.6%) cases, into the internal jugular vein in 4 (22.2%) and into the femoral vein in 2 (11.1%) cases. There was only one complicated case with severe arrhythmia in 1 (5.5%) patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that insertion of central venous catheters using angiographic techniques in hemodialysis patients with previous multiple catheterizations is a safe and effective procedure with few complications and high success rates

  5. Measurement of cardiac index by transpulmonary thermodilution using an implanted central venous access port: a prospective study in patients scheduled for oncologic high-risk surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suria, Stéphanie; Wyniecki, Anne; Eghiaian, Alexandre; Monnet, Xavier; Weil, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    Transpulmonary thermodilution allows the measurement of cardiac index for high risk surgical patients. Oncologic patients often have a central venous access (port-a-catheter) for chronic treatment. The validity of the measurement by a port-a-catheter of the absolute cardiac index and the detection of changes in cardiac index induced by fluid challenge are unknown. We conducted a monocentric prospective study. 27 patients were enrolled. 250 ml colloid volume expansions for fluid challenge were performed during ovarian cytoreductive surgery. The volume expansion-induced changes in cardiac index measured by transpulmonary thermodilution by a central venous access (CIcvc) and by a port-a-catheter (CIport) were recorded. 23 patients were analyzed with 123 pairs of measurements. Using a Bland and Altman for repeated measurements, the bias (lower and upper limits of agreement) between CIport and CIcvc was 0.14 (-0.59 to 0.88) L/min/m2. The percentage error was 22%. The concordance between the changes in CIport and CIcvc observed during volume expansion was 92% with an r = 0.7 (with exclusion zone). No complications (included sepsis) were observed during the follow up period. The transpulmonary thermodilution by a port-a-catheter is reliable for absolute values estimation of cardiac index and for measurement of the variation after fluid challenge. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02063009.

  6. Survivability of Existing Peripheral Intravenous Access Following Blood Sampling in a Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Sheree W; Friesen, Mary Ann; Stanger, Debra; Trickey, Amber Williams

    2018-03-07

    Although pediatric patients report venipuncture as their most feared experience during hospitalization, blood sampling from peripheral intravenous accesses (PIVs) is not standard of care. Blood sampling from PIVs has long been considered by healthcare personnel to harm the access. In an effort to minimize painful procedures, pediatric nursing staff conducted a prospective, observational study to determine if blood sampling using existing PIVs resulted in the loss of the access. The ability to obtain the sample from the PIV was measured along with patient and PIV characteristics. Specimen collection using 100 existing PIVs was attempted on pediatric inpatients. Each PIV was observed for functionality, infiltration, occlusion, and dislodgement following collection and again in 4h. Frequencies of PIV loss and successful blood sampling were calculated. Patient age, PIV gauge, access site, and PIV age were evaluated for associations with successful sampling using chi-square tests, Fisher's exact tests, and logistic regression. PIV survivability was reported at 99%. The ability to obtain a complete specimen was reported at 76% and found to be significantly related to PIV age and site. Size of PIV and patient's age were not significantly related to successful sampling. Encouraging rates of PIV survivability and collectability suggest blood sampling from PIVs to be a valuable technique to minimize painful and distressful procedures. Nursing practice was changed in this pediatric department. Patients and families are saved the pain and distress of venipuncture. Nurses reported saving time and personal distress by avoiding the venipuncture procedure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Proscillaridin activity in portal and peripheral venous blood after oral administration to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.E.; Bergdahl, B.; Dencker, H.; Wettrell, G.; Linkoeping Univ.

    1977-01-01

    The absorption of proscillaridin A was studied in four patients undergoing catheterization of the portal vein for diagnostic purposes. Proscillaridin 1.5 mg was given as a single oral dose and plasma glycoside activity was analyzed by the 86 Rb-uptake inhibition technique. Proscillaridin appeared rapidly in the portal blood, peak activity being found after 15 min in three and after 30 min in one patient. In peripheral blood the peak activity occurred after approximately 35 min. Despite rapid passage across the gut wall, porto-peripheral differences in glycoside activity were small; they were zero after 4h. The mean amount absorbed as active proscillaridin during the first 4h after the dose was calculated to be only 7.1% of the given amount. Late porto-peripheral differences, probably due to enterohepatic recycling, appeared after 6h in three patients. The results suggest that proscillaridin undergoes first pass inactivation in the gut wall. Enterohepatic recirculation may contribute to the amounts of active glycoside that reach the systemic circulation. (orig.) [de

  8. Is there a link between the structural impact of thoracic outlet and the development of central venous stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoda, Atsushi; Akimoto, Tetsu; Sugase, Taro; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Kusano, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Central venous stenosis (CVS) is a serious complication for chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Previous reports of CVS have focused on prior central venous catheterization, because of the higher prevalence and potential for prevention of such an event. However, recent studies have demonstrated that CVS may also develop without a history of central venous catheterization. Although information about the etiological backgrounds regarding the development of CVS without previous central venous catheterization have gradually accumulated, the clinical impact of the chronic compression of the central venous system by the surrounding structures, which may likely determine the central venous susceptibility to CVS, remains poorly understood. This study proposes the hypothesis that the combination of chronic venous compression at the level of thoracic outlet characterized by the natural physique and elevated venous flow induced by the creation of vascular access should be evaluated as a potential factor for the development of CVS, since they may accelerate the development of venous stenosis, presumably through the stimulation of intimal hyperplasia, and thereby the subclavian venous susceptibility to CVS should be determined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Internal jugular vein access for the interventional management of nonfunctioning artero-venous haemodialysis fistulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basile, A. E-mail: antodoc@yahoo.com; Garcia Medina, J.; Lupattelli, T.; Garcia Medina, V.; Leal, R

    2004-12-01

    We report our experience and results with the use of internal jugular vein as secondary approach for the endovascular treatment of twelve nonfunctioning artero-venous (AV) fistulas in haemodialysis patients.

  10. Severe acute myocardial infarction and peripheral thrombosis in patient with bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Seyfeddin Gürbüz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-associated thrombosis worsens the lives of patients substantially. Venous manifestations of cancer-associated thrombosis include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Arterial events include stroke and myocardial infarction. In this patient, myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock are associated with diffuse coronary thrombosis together with peripheral thrombosis. He had surgery because of bladder carcinoma. Severe hypercoagulable condition probably facilitated by cancer itself and surgery caused multivessel coronary and peripheral intense thrombus burden. Intracoronary 10 mcg/kg tirofiban bolus and 15 mg tissue plasminogen activator (tPA were administered respectively before revascularization and thrombectomy operation was performed. Complete revascularization was achieved.

  11. Applications of contrast enhanced CT through external jugular access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiaolan; Zou Wenxing; Chen Meixia; Xie Hongbo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A retrospective analysis and evaluation for the effects of contrast enhanced computed tomography through external jugular access. Methods: 1250 cases (male 692 and female 558) underwent CT contrast enhanced examination were retrospectively reviewed from May, 2002 to Oct, 2002. The patients aged from 12 to 86 years, averagely 49 years. Contrast agent (Ultravist) was given through an intravenous catheter placed in the cubital vein. Precise injection rates were ensured by a power injector (Medrad MCT310, USA). Excellent enhancement was achieved with this protocol in most of the patients, while external jugular access was established in 96 cases because it was unable to setup a cubital venous access. Results: Good enhancement were acquired when 96 cases of contrast agent injected through external jugular vein. And the external jugular access was setup successfully with a single puncture. Conclusion: It is a common occasion when patient undergoing contrast enhanced CT scan is in poor conditions: debility, cachexia, or with complication of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which often results in invalidity of cabital venous access, and consequently, making bolus injection impossible. The external jugular vein is a large and central blood vessel, which is easy to setup an access. In our experience, an external jugular access should be recommended as a substitution if the cubital venous access is not available. (authors)

  12. Applications of contrast enhanced CT through external jugular access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiaolan, Xu; Wenxing, Zou; Meixia, Chen; Hongbo, Xie [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-09-15

    Objective: A retrospective analysis and evaluation for the effects of contrast enhanced computed tomography through external jugular access. Methods: 1250 cases (male 692 and female 558) underwent CT contrast enhanced examination were retrospectively reviewed from May, 2002 to Oct, 2002. The patients aged from 12 to 86 years, averagely 49 years. Contrast agent (Ultravist) was given through an intravenous catheter placed in the cubital vein. Precise injection rates were ensured by a power injector (Medrad MCT310, USA). Excellent enhancement was achieved with this protocol in most of the patients, while external jugular access was established in 96 cases because it was unable to setup a cubital venous access. Results: Good enhancement were acquired when 96 cases of contrast agent injected through external jugular vein. And the external jugular access was setup successfully with a single puncture. Conclusion: It is a common occasion when patient undergoing contrast enhanced CT scan is in poor conditions: debility, cachexia, or with complication of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which often results in invalidity of cabital venous access, and consequently, making bolus injection impossible. The external jugular vein is a large and central blood vessel, which is easy to setup an access. In our experience, an external jugular access should be recommended as a substitution if the cubital venous access is not available. (authors)

  13. Risk factors of mesenteric venous thrombosis and current situation of diagnosis and treatment in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Zhiwei; Zhu Huanxing; Xu Changsheng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate risk factors of mesenteric venous thrombosis and current situation of diagnosis and treatment in China. Methods: One hundred and seven case of mesenteric venous thrombosis reported in literature were analyzed. The literature from 2003 to 2007 were retrieved from Chinese Scientific and Technical Periodical Database and Wanfangdata. Results: One hundred and seven papers included 978 MVT patients, male: female = 1. 9:1, the average age was 47. 9. The most common risk factors were portal hypertension (28. 9% ), splenectomy (18. 8%) and thrombophlebitis (11. 5%) in 833 cases with integrated medical history. Final diagnosis was established by medical imageology (40. 0%) and exploratory laparotomy (60. 0%). The achievement ratio of thrombolysis therapy was 83. 9% (73 /87) by peripheral vein and 90. 0% (63 /70) by superior mesenteric artery. 34. 7% patients took warfarin orally after discharge. Conclusions: Portal hypertension, splenectomy and thrombophlebitis may be the most common risk factor for MVT; through peripheral vein or superior mesenteric artery urokinase thrombolytic therapy is an effective means of treatment of early MVT; MVT diagnostic awareness and anticoagulant therapy after surgery awareness of the importance is to be strengthened. (authors)

  14. Peripherally inserted central catheters and upper extremity deep vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, B.; Gibbs, H.; Catchpole, I.; Hetherington, R.; Harper, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for venous thrombosis in patients with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). A retrospective study of all upper extremity venous duplex scans was carried out in the Vascular Medicine department from year 2000 to 2002 inclusive. A chart review of positive scans was undertaken to identify possible thrombotic risk factors. Of 317 upper extremity venous duplex scans carried out, 115, or 32%, were positive for upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Three main risk factors were identified - presence of a central line, malignancy and administration of chemotherapy. PICC were the most common central line present. Symptomatic thrombosis occurred in 7% of PICC inserted for chemotherapy compared with 1% of PICC inserted for other reasons. Ten per cent of the patients receiving chemotherapy through a PICC developed a thrombosis. The post-thrombotic syndrome was infrequent following upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Patients receiving chemotherapy through a PICC are at increased risk of thrombosis. There may be a role for prophylactic low-dose anticoagulation in these high-risk patients

  15. Determination of acute venous thrombosis in the low extremities by means of I-125 labeled fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleitas, A.S.; Alvarez, J.A.; Charles-Edouard, D.; Hernandez, A.

    1993-01-01

    30 patients with a diagnosis of acute venous thrombosis in the low extremities to whom the disease had been confirmed by means of haematic, haemodynamic and x-ray tests. By applying the I-125 fibrinogen method, a 100% of specificity and a 71% of sensibility were found, the 85% of the cases being well classified. According to the results obtained, this method is useful and feasible, and can be implemented in every hospital equipped whit a Nucleomedicine Department. From a medical and social viewpoint, this method is widely used in Angiology as well as in other medical specialties such as General Surgery, Orthopedics, Gynecology and Obstetrics; also, in detecting,preventing and following up the peripheric venous thrombosis

  16. Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis after port insertion: What are the risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaie, Omidreza; Kasumova, Gyulnara G; Kent, Tara S; Eskander, Mariam F; Fadayomi, Ayotunde B; Ng, Sing Chau; Critchlow, Jonathan F; Tawa, Nicholas E; Tseng, Jennifer F

    2017-08-01

    Totally implantable venous access devices (ports) are widely used, especially for cancer chemotherapy. Although their use has been associated with upper extremity deep venous thrombosis, the risk factors of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in patients with a port are not studied adequately. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Florida State Ambulatory Surgery and Services Database was queried between 2007 and 2011 for patients who underwent outpatient port insertion, identified by Current Procedural Terminology code. Patients were followed in the State Ambulatory Surgery and Services Database, State Inpatient Database, and State Emergency Department Database for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis occurrence. The cohort was divided into a test cohort and a validation cohort based on the year of port placement. A multivariable logistic regression model was developed to identify risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in patients with a port. The model then was tested on the validation cohort. Of the 51,049 patients in the derivation cohort, 926 (1.81%) developed an upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. On multivariate analysis, independently significant predictors of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis included age deep venous thrombosis (odds ratio = 1.77), all-cause 30-day revisit (odds ratio = 2.36), African American race (versus white; odds ratio = 1.86), and other nonwhite races (odds ratio = 1.35). Additionally, compared with genitourinary malignancies, patients with gastrointestinal (odds ratio = 1.55), metastatic (odds ratio = 1.76), and lung cancers (odds ratio = 1.68) had greater risks of developing an upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. This study identified major risk factors of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. Further studies are needed to evaluate the appropriateness of thromboprophylaxis in patients at greater risk of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  17. Endovascular intervention for central venous cannulation in patients with vascular occlusion after previous catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikwer, Andreas; Acosta, Stefan; Kölbel, Tilo; Åkeson, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to assess endovascular intervention for central venous cannulation in patients with vascular occlusion after previous catheterization. Patients referred for endovascular management of central venous occlusion during a 42-month period were identified from a regional endovascular database, providing prospective information on techniques and clinical outcome. Corresponding patient records, angiograms, and radiographic reports were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen patients aged 48 years (range 0.5-76), including 11 females, were included. All patients but 1 had had multiple central venous catheters with a median total indwelling time of 37 months. Eleven patients cannulated for hemodialysis had had significantly fewer individual catheters inserted compared with 5 patients cannulated for nutritional support (mean 3.6 vs. 10.2, pvenous occlusions. Patients were subjected to recanalization (n=2), recanalization and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (n=5), or stenting for vena cava superior syndrome (n=1) prior to catheter insertion. The remaining 8 patients were cannulated by avoiding the occluded route. Central venous occlusion occurs particularly in patients under hemodialysis and with a history of multiple central venous catheterizations with large-diameter catheters and/or long total indwelling time periods. Patients with central venous occlusion verified by CT or MRT venography and need for central venous access should be referred for endovascular intervention.

  18. Effect of Multi-layer Compression Bandage Systems on Leg Ulcers Associated with Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Kuplay

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Venous leg ulcer is a major health problem in terms of high prevalence and high cost for treatment. Multi-layer compression bandage systems for venous leg ulcers are supposed to be the gold standard for the treatment of venous ulcers. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layer compression bandage systems for the treatment of venous leg ulcers.Patients and Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients diagnosed to have leg ulcers were evaluated and four patients were excluded from the study due to the peripheral arterial disease. Fifteen patients, enrolled in the study, were classified according to CEAP classification and belonged to the same class. Betaven® multi-layer compression bandage was applied to patients. Patients were followed-up in terms of wound healing and reduction in wound diameter.Results: Twelve male and three female patients underwent multi-layer bandage system. Mean age of patients was 38.2 ± 4.2 years. Ulcer size was measured planimetrically and baseline ulcer size was 4-10 cm². The location of ulcer was on medial malloelus in seven patients, lateral malleolus in three patients, anterior surface of the leg in four patients and lateral side of the leg in one patient. Patients had chronic venous insuuficiency for a mean of 5.1 ± 2.1 years. CEAP classifications were C6, Ep, As2,3-p18, Pr2,3, 18. Each bandage was changed five days after application along with wound care. Mean duration of treatment was 6 ± 2 weeks. Complete healing of the venous ulcers occurred in all patients except for one. This patient was referred to plastic surgery clinic for reconstruction.Conclusion: Multi-layer compression bandage system is an effective method of treatment for venous leg ulcers associated with chronic venous insufficiency by reducing venous return and increasing intertitial tissue pressure. This effect occurred in the shortrun as well as with a low cost and prevented loss of labor.

  19. Efficacy of SMART Stent Placement for Salvage Angioplasty in Hemodialysis Patients with Recurrent Vascular Access Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Hatakeyama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular access stenosis is a major complication in hemodialysis patients. We prospectively observed 50 patients in whom 50 nitinol shape-memory alloy-recoverable technology (SMART stents were used as salvage therapy for recurrent peripheral venous stenosis. Twenty-five stents each were deployed in native arteriovenous fistula (AVF and synthetic arteriovenous polyurethane graft (AVG cases. Vascular access patency rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The primary patency rates in AVF versus AVG at 3, 6, and 12 months were 80.3% versus 75.6%, 64.9% versus 28.3%, and 32.3% versus 18.9%, respectively. The secondary patency rates in AVF versus AVG at 3, 6, and 12 months were 88.5% versus 75.5%, 82.6% versus 61.8%, and 74.4% versus 61.8%, respectively. Although there were no statistically significant difference in patency between AVF and AVG, AVG showed poor tendency in primary and secondary patency. The usefulness of SMART stents was limited in a short period of time in hemodialysis patients with recurrent vascular access stenosis.

  20. Venous Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  1. Challenges in the Management of Pediatric Central Venous Access Devices in the Community.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wallace, Elaine

    2012-05-25

    Central venous access devices (CVADs) play an essential role in the care of critically ill children. Significant challenges exist for teams in managing CVADs particularly in a community setting. The authors aimed to assess the experience of general practitioners (GPs) caring for children with CVADs. From 200 CVADs inserted in a pediatric hospital in 2009, 50 patients were randomly selected and 44 GPs were forwarded a questionnaire. Twenty (46%) GPs responded. The main reasons (n = 22) for using CVADs were medication administration (n = 11), nutrition (n = 6), and blood sampling (n = 5). Thirteen (65%) GPs had no education in CVAD management and 14 (70%) were unaware of existing guidelines. Those identified by GPs as having primary responsibility for care of CVADs in the community included hospital\\/pediatric teams (n = 9), parents (n = 3), GPs (n = 2), public health nurses (n = 1), and palliative care ("home care") teams (n = 1). The main challenges (n = 15) identified by GPs were lack of education (n = 4), line management difficulties (n = 3), infection risk (n = 3), infrequent exposure to CVADs (n = 3), and poor communication (n = 1). GPs felt that these challenges could be addressed through: education (n = 8), increased manpower and community support (n = 1), and improved communication (n = 1). This study highlights the inconsistency and challenges for GPs surrounding CVAD use in children. Further education and support is necessary to assist GPs in their use particularly when providing end-of-life care for children in the community.

  2. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation using an innovative dual-lumen cannula following implantation of a total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdle, Jemma; Penn, Sarah; Maunz, Olaf; Simon, Andre

    2017-01-01

    We report our first clinical use of the new Protek Duo TM cannula for peripheral veno-venous extra-corporeal life support (ECLS). A 53-year-old male patient underwent implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) for biventricular failure. However, due to the development of post-operative respiratory dysfunction, the patient required ECLS for six days.

  3. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnosis of venous disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minar, E.

    1993-01-01

    Limited accuracy in the clinic diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (VT) makes such diagnostic tests such as duplex sonography or venography necessary. Exact information on the age and extent of the thrombus are necessary for the clinician to optimize the therapeutric management. The correct diagnosis of calf vein thrombosis and of recurrent VT in patients with postphlebitis changes also has implications for treatment. After exclusion of thrombosis, the radiologist should evaluate the leg for other possible causes of symptoms besides VT. Investigation of the venous sytem also has a role in the diagnosis in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. In patients with chronic venous insuffficiency the deep venous system should assessed for patency and venous valve function. The superficial veins should be differentiated in segments with sufficient or insufficient venous valves, and it is also necessary to look for insufficiency of the perforrating veins. In patients with superficial phlebitis there is risk of propagation into the deep venous system. (orig.) [de

  5. Brain venous pathologies: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatico, Rosana; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Yanez, Paulina; Romero, Carlos; Trejo, Mariano; Lambre, Hector

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe MRI findings of the different brain venous pathologies. Material and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2004, 18 patients were studied 10 males and 8 females between 6 and 63 years old; with different brain venous pathologies. In all cases brain MRI were performed including morphological sequences with and without gadolinium injection and angiographic venous sequences. Results: 10 venous occlusions were found, 6 venous angiomas, and 2 presented varices secondary to arteriovenous dural fistula. Conclusion: Brain venous pathologies can appear in many different clinical contexts, with different prognosis and treatment. In all the cases brain MRI was the best imaging study to disclose typical morphologic abnormalities. (author) [es

  6. Inferior vena cava filter insertion through the popliteal vein: enabling the percutaneous endovenous intervention of deep vein thrombosis with a single venous access approach in a single session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kang, Yang Jun; Jung, Hye Doo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the efficiency of placing an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter through the same popliteal vein access site used for percutaneous endovenous intervention in patients with extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. METHODS This retrospective study included 21 patients who underwent IVC filter insertion through the popliteal vein over a three-year period. Patient medical records were reviewed for the location of the deep vein thrombosis, result of filter removal, and total number of endovascular procedures needed for filter insertion and recanalization of the lower extremity venous system. Follow-up lower extremity computed tomography (CT) venography was also reviewed in each patient to assess the degree of filter tilt in the IVC. RESULTS All patients had extensive lower extremity deep vein thrombosis involving the iliac vein and/or femoral vein. Seventeen patients showed deep vein thrombosis of the calf veins. In all patients, IVC filter insertion and the recanalization procedure were performed during a single procedure through the single popliteal vein access site. In the 17 patients undergoing follow-up CT, the mean tilt angle of the filter was 7.14°±4.48° in the coronal plane and 8.77°±5.49° in the sagittal plane. Filter retrieval was successful in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%) in whom filter retrieval was attempted. CONCLUSION Transpopliteal IVC filter insertion is an efficient technique that results in low rates of significant filter tilt and enables a single session procedure using a single venous access site for filter insertion and percutaneous endovenous intervention. PMID:27559713

  7. Self-taught axillary vein access without venography for pacemaker implantation: prospective randomized comparison with the cephalic vein access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squara, Fabien; Tomi, Julien; Scarlatti, Didier; Theodore, Guillaume; Moceri, Pamela; Ferrari, Emile

    2017-12-01

    Axillary vein access for pacemaker implantation is uncommon in many centres because of the lack of training in this technique. We assessed whether the introduction of the axillary vein technique was safe and efficient as compared with cephalic vein access, in a centre where no operators had any previous experience in axillary vein puncture. Patients undergoing pacemaker implantation were randomized to axillary or cephalic vein access. All three operators had no experience nor training in axillary vein puncture, and self-learned the technique by reading a published review. Axillary vein puncture was fluoroscopy-guided without contrast venography. Cephalic access was performed by dissection of delto-pectoral groove. Venous access success, venous access duration (from skin incision to guidewire or lead in superior vena cava), procedure duration, X-ray exposure, and peri-procedural (1 month) complications were recorded. results We randomized 74 consecutive patients to axillary (n = 37) or cephalic vein access (n = 37). Axillary vein was successfully accessed in 30/37 (81.1%) patients vs. 28/37 (75.7%) of cephalic veins (P = 0.57). Venous access time was shorter in axillary group than in cephalic group [5.7 (4.4-8.3) vs. 12.2 (10.5-14.8) min, P < 0.001], as well as procedure duration [34.8 (30.6-38.4) vs. 42.0 (39.1-46.6) min, P = 0.043]. X-ray exposure and peri-procedural overall complications were comparable in both groups. Axillary puncture was safe and faster than cephalic access even for the five first procedures performed by each operator. Self-taught axillary vein puncture for pacemaker implantation seems immediately safe and faster than cephalic vein access, when performed by electrophysiologists trained to pacemaker implantation but not to axillary vein puncture. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Cerebral venous angiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author)

  9. Septic Thrombophlebitis of the Cephalic Vein Caused by a Peripherally Inserted Venous Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mirmohammadsadeghi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Septic thrombophlebitis of a vein is a rare but life-threatening complication of an intravascular (IV catheter placed percutaneously in the veins. Most published clinical experiences with IV catheters, mainly in the outpatient settings, have reported very low rates of catheter-related bloodstream infection compared to rates with central venous catheters placed in a subclavian or internal jugular vein. Most of the complications reported with IV catheters have been non-infectious, particularly sterile phlebitis or thrombosis. We report a case of cephalic vein suppurative thrombophlebitis from an intravascular catheter and offer guidelines for diagnosis and management of this complication. Key words: Septic thrombophlebitis, Intravascular catheter, Suppurative thrombophlebitis

  10. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arabi, Mohammad, E-mail: marabi2004@hotmail.com; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Division of Endovascular Interventional Radiology, Department of Medical Imaging (Saudi Arabia); Ahmed, Dildar; Aslam, Naveed [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Department of Nephrology (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeWe report our institutional experience with sharp central venous recanalization in chronic hemodialysis patients who failed standard techniques.Materials and MethodsSince January 2014, a series of seven consecutive patients (four males and three females), mean age 35 years (18–65 years), underwent sharp central venous recanalization. Indications included obtaining hemodialysis access (n = 6) and restoration of superior vena cava (SVC) patency to alleviate occlusion symptoms and restore fistula function (n = 1). The transseptal needle was used for sharp recanalization in six patients, while it could not be introduced in one patient due to total occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Instead, transmediastinal SVC access using Chiba needle was obtained.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all cases. SVC recanalization achieved symptoms’ relief and restored fistula function in the symptomatic patient. One patient underwent arteriovenous fistula creation on the recanalized side 3 months after the procedure. The remaining catheters were functional at median follow-up time of 9 months (1–14 months). Two major complications occurred including a right hemothorax and a small hemopericardium, which were managed by covered stent placement across the perforated SVC.ConclusionSharp central venous recanalization using the transseptal needle is feasible technique in patients who failed standard recanalization procedures. The potential high risk of complications necessitates thorough awareness of anatomy and proper technical preparedness.

  11. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single-Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arabi, Mohammad; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Ahmed, Dildar; Aslam, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWe report our institutional experience with sharp central venous recanalization in chronic hemodialysis patients who failed standard techniques.Materials and MethodsSince January 2014, a series of seven consecutive patients (four males and three females), mean age 35 years (18–65 years), underwent sharp central venous recanalization. Indications included obtaining hemodialysis access (n = 6) and restoration of superior vena cava (SVC) patency to alleviate occlusion symptoms and restore fistula function (n = 1). The transseptal needle was used for sharp recanalization in six patients, while it could not be introduced in one patient due to total occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Instead, transmediastinal SVC access using Chiba needle was obtained.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all cases. SVC recanalization achieved symptoms’ relief and restored fistula function in the symptomatic patient. One patient underwent arteriovenous fistula creation on the recanalized side 3 months after the procedure. The remaining catheters were functional at median follow-up time of 9 months (1–14 months). Two major complications occurred including a right hemothorax and a small hemopericardium, which were managed by covered stent placement across the perforated SVC.ConclusionSharp central venous recanalization using the transseptal needle is feasible technique in patients who failed standard recanalization procedures. The potential high risk of complications necessitates thorough awareness of anatomy and proper technical preparedness.

  12. Venous ulcers -- self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery to improve blood flow through your veins. Prevention If you are at risk for venous ulcers, take the steps listed above under Wound Care. ... weight if you are overweight. Manage your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. ... Venous leg ulcers - self-care; Venous insufficiency ulcers - self-care; Stasis ...

  13. Peripheral Venous Catheter-Related Adverse Events: Evaluation from a Multicentre Epidemiological Study in France (the CATHEVAL Project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuska Miliani

    Full Text Available Peripheral venous catheters (PVC are medical devices most frequently used during hospital care. Although the frequency of specific PVC-related adverse events (PVCAEs has been reported, the global risk related to the insertion of this device is poorly estimated. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of PVCAEs during the indwell time, after catheter removal, and to identify practice-mirroring risk factors.A prospective observational study was conducted as a part of a research project, called CATHEVAL, in one surgery ward and four medicine wards from three public general tertiary care hospitals in Northern France that were invited to participate between June-2013 and June-2014. Each participating ward included during a two-month study period all patients older than 15 years carrying a PVC. All inserted PVCs were monitored from insertion of PVC to up to 48 hours after removal. Monitored data included several practice-mirroring items, as well as the occurrence of at least one PVCAE. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, based on a marginal risk approach, was used to identify factors associated with the occurrence of at least one PVCAE.Data were analysed for 815 PVCs (1964 PVC-days in 573 patients. The incidence of PVCAE was 52.3/100 PVCs (21.9/100 PVC-days. PVCAEs were mainly clinical: phlebitis (20.1/100 PVCs, haematoma (17.7/100 PVCs and liquid/blood escape (13.1/100 PVCs. Infections accounted for only 0.4/100 PVCs. The most frequent mechanical PVCAEs, was obstruction/occlusion of PVC (12.4/100 PVCs. The incidence of post-removal PVCAEs was 21.7/100 PVCs. Unstable PVC and unclean dressing were the two main risk factors.Limitation of breaches in healthcare quality including post-removal monitoring should be reinforced to prevent PVC-related adverse events in hospital settings.

  14. Usefulness of Totally Implantable Central Venous Access Devices in Elderly Patients: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Yuki; Kuranishi, Fumito; Ogawa, Yoshiteru

    2018-01-01

    The need for totally implantable central venous access devices (TICVADs) has increased with increased opportunities in the use of chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of TICVAD implantation and use in patients aged ≥85 years. Between January 2010 and August 2016, 117 patients underwent TICVAD implantation and their records were retrospectively reviewed. Participants were divided into 2 groups (plus-85 and sub-85 groups). Fifty-five patients (47.0%) had solid organ cancer alone; 35 patients (29.9%) had cerebrovascular or cranial nerve disease. The average follow-up period was 201 (2-1,620) days. Major complications were identified in 6 (14.6%) plus-85 patients and 11 (14.5%) sub-85 patients (p = 0.9813). Catheter-related infections developed in 3 plus-85 (7.3%) and 4 sub-85 patients (5.3%; p = 0.6549). There were no significant group differences in hematoma, pneumothorax, occlusion, and removal rates. In plus-85 patients examined just before surgery and a month after surgery, increased rates of serum albumin and Onodera's prognostic nutritional index were observed in 48% (14/39) and 41% (12/39), respectively. The use of TICVADs in the plus-85 group resulted in effective outcomes. The results of this retrospective study support the wider use of TICVADs in patients aged ≥85 years. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Charles Y., E-mail: charles.kim@duke.edu; Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  16. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Charles Y.; Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  17. Evaluation of peripheral vasodilative indices in skin tissue of type 1 diabetic rats by use of RGB images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Noriyuki; Nishidate, Izumi; Nakano, Kazuya; Aizu, Yoshihisa; Niizeki, Kyuichi

    2016-04-01

    We investigated a method to evaluate the arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats from RGB digital color images. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the dorsal reversed McFarlane skin flap are calculated based on the responses of change in the total blood concentration to occlusion of blood flow to and from the flap tissues at a pressure of 50 mmHg. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin flap tissue were significantly reduced in type 1 diabetic rat group compared with the non-diabetic rat group. The results of the present study indicate the possibility of using the proposed method for evaluating the peripheral vascular dysfunctions in diabetes mellitus.

  18. Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a previous history of catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Yildirim, Sedat; Torun, Dilek

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate dialysis history, imaging findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in six patients with central venous stenosis without a history of previous catheter placement. Between April 2000 and June 2004, six (10%) of 57 haemodialysis patients had stenosis of a central vein without a previous central catheter placement. Venography findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in these six patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were three women (50%) and three men aged 32-60 years (mean age: 45 years) and all had massive arm swelling as the main complaint. The vascular accesses were located at the elbow in five patients and at the wrist in one patient. Three patients had stenosis of the left subclavian vein and three patients had stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein. The mean duration of the vascular accesses from the time of creation was 25.1 months. Flow volumes of the vascular access were very high in four patients who had flow volume measurement. The mean flow volume was 2347 ml/min. One of three patients with brachiocephalic vein stenosis had compression of the vein by the brachiocephalic artery. All the lesions were first treated with balloon angioplasty and two patients required stent placement on long term. Number of interventions ranged from 1 to 4 (mean: 2.1). Symptoms resolved in five patients and improved in one patient who had a stent placed in the left BCV. Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a history of central venous catheterization tends to occur or be manifested in patients with a proximal permanent vascular access with high flow rates. Balloon angioplasty with or without stent placement offers good secondary patency rates in mid-term.

  19. Models of the venous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac output is largely controlled by venous return, the driving force of which is the energy remaining at the postcapillary venous site. This force is influenced by forces acting close to the right atrium, and internally or externally upon the veins along their course. Analogue models of the v......Cardiac output is largely controlled by venous return, the driving force of which is the energy remaining at the postcapillary venous site. This force is influenced by forces acting close to the right atrium, and internally or externally upon the veins along their course. Analogue models...... of the venous system require at least three elements: a resistor, a capacitor and an inductor, with the latter being of more importance in the venous than in the arterial system. Non-linearities must be considered in pressure/flow relations in the small venules, during venous collapse, or low flow conditions...

  20. [Femoral arteriovenous fistula: a late uncommon complication of central venous catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conz, P A; Malagoli, A; Normanno, M; Munaro, D

    2007-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was admitted due to AV graft thrombosis; given the technical impossibility of performing other native AV fistulas, we chose to insert a tunnelled central venous catheter. Considering the vascular history of the patient, the central venous catheter could not be placed into the internal jugular vein; it was therefore put into the left femoral vein. Following a 3-month-period of the catheter working properly, the patient was hospitalized due to sudden acute pain in the left thigh. In a few days the patient developed an important haematoma with serious anemization in the left lower limb. Ultrasonography showed the presence of a fistula between the left common femoral artery and the femoral vein, leading to the subsequent successful positioning of a stent into the common femoral artery through right trans-femoral access. Angiography examination showed the femoral vein patency along the proximal stretch with respect to the function of the tunnelled venous catheter.

  1. Venous, Arterialized-Venous, or Capillary Glucose Reference Measurements for the Accuracy Assessment of a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropff, Jort; van Steen, Sigrid C; deGraaff, Peter; Chan, Man W; van Amstel, Rombout B E; DeVries, J Hans

    2017-11-01

    Different reference methods are used for the accuracy assessment of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. The effect of using venous, arterialized-venous, or capillary reference measurements on CGM accuracy is unclear. We evaluated 21 individuals with type 1 diabetes using a capillary calibrated CGM system. Venous or arterialized-venous reference glucose samples were taken every 15 min at two separate visits and assessed per YSI 2300 STAT Plus. Arterialization was achieved by heated-hand technique. Capillary samples were collected hourly during the venous reference visit. The investigation sequence (venous or arterialized-venous) was randomized. Effectiveness of arterialization was measured by comparing free venous oxygen pressure (PO2) of both visit days. Primary endpoint was the median absolute relative difference (ARD). Median ARD using arterialized-venous reference samples was not different from venous samples (point estimated difference 0.52%, P = 0.181). When comparing the three reference methods, median ARD was also not different over the full glycemic range (venous 9.0% [n = 681], arterialized-venous 8.3% [n = 684], and capillary 8.1% [n = 205], P = 0.216), nor over the separate glucose ranges. Arterialization was successful (PO2 venous 5.4 kPa vs. arterialized-venous 8.9 kPa, P reference measurements did not significantly impact CGM accuracy. Venous reference seems preferable due to its ease of operation.

  2. Maintenance of peripheral venous access and its impact on the development of phlebitis: a survey of 186 catheters in a general surgery department in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Rego Furtado, Luís Carlos

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the results of a clinical audit conducted to assess the minimum requirements for safe maintenance of peripheral intravenous catheters. The audit also determined the incidence of phlebitis and attempted to establish a causal relationship between some of the variables used to assess a catheter's maintenance status and the development of phlebitis.

  3. Imaging findings and therapeutic alternatives for peripheral vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Santos, Daniela dos; Abud, Thiago Giansante; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral vascular malformations represent a spectrum of lesions that appear through the lifetime and can be found in the whole body. Such lesions are uncommon and are frequently confounded with infantile hemangioma, a common benign neoplastic lesion. In the presence of such lesions, the correlation between the clinical and radiological findings is extremely important to achieve a correct diagnosis, which will guide the best therapeutic approach. The most recent classifications for peripheral vascular malformations are based on the blood flow (low or high) and on the main vascular components (arterial, capillary, lymphatic or venous). Peripheral vascular malformations represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, and complementary methods such as computed tomography, Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, in association with clinical findings can provide information regarding blood flow characteristics and lesions extent. Arteriography and venography confirm the diagnosis, evaluate the lesions extent and guide the therapeutic decision making. Generally, low flow vascular malformations are percutaneously treated with sclerosing agents injection, while in high flow lesions the approach is endovascular, with permanent liquid or solid embolization agents. (author)

  4. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting.

  5. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Revealing Primary Sjögren Syndrome: Report of 2 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mercurio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disease of the exocrine glands, characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of these glands. Neurologic complications are quite common, mainly involving the peripheral nervous system (PNS. The most common central nervous system (CNS manifestations are myelopathy and microcirculation vasculitis. However, specific diagnostic criteria for CNS SS are still lacking. We report two cases of primary SS in which the revealing symptom was cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT in the absence of genetic or acquired thrombophilias.

  6. Differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas vs. groove pancreatitis: Usefulness of the portal venous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Kousei; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Kakihara, Daisuke; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Masafumi; Takahata, Shunichi; Ito, Tetsuhide; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify if the portal venous phase is helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: MDCT and MRI of groove pancreatic carcinomas (n = 7) and groove pancreatitis (n = 15) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists independently. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images was subjectively assessed. The presence or absence of common bile duct (CBD) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions was evaluated. Additionally, the appearance of groove pancreatic carcinoma and that of groove pancreatitis in the portal venous phase on dynamic MDCT and MRI were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in the presence or absence of CBD and MPD strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions between groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. However, patchy focal enhancement in the portal venous phase was more commonly observed in groove pancreatitis than groove pancreatic carcinoma (Reviewers 1 and 2: 14/15 [93.3%] vs. 1/7 [14.3%], P < 0.0001). In addition, peripheral enhancement was only seen in groove pancreatic carcinomas (Reviewer 1: 4/7 [57.1%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.005, and Reviewer 2: 3/7 [42.9%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.05). Conclusion: The portal venous phase may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis.

  7. Central venous device-related thrombosis as imaged with MDCT in oncologic patients: prevalence and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, Orlando; Castelguidone, Elisabetta de Lutio di; Granata, Vincenza; D'Errico, Adolfo Gallipoli; Sandomenico, Claudia; Petrillo, Mario; Aprea, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    Background: Venous thrombosis is a common occurrence in cancer patients, developing spontaneously or in combination with indwelling central venous devices (CVD). Purpose: To analyze the multidetector CT (MDCT) prevalence, appearance, and significance of catheter related thoracic venous thrombosis in oncologic patients and to determine the percentage of thrombi identified in the original reports. Material and Methods: Five hundred consecutive patients were considered. Inclusion criteria were: presence of a CVD; availability of a contrast-enhanced MDCT; and cancer history. Exclusion criteria were: direct tumor compression/infiltration of the veins; poor image quality; device tip not in the scanned volume; and missing clinical data. Seventeen (3.5%) out of the final 481 patients had a diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Results: Factors showing the highest correlation with thrombosis included peripherally-inserted CVD, right brachiocephalic vein tip location, patient performance status 3, metastatic stage disease, ongoing chemotherapy, and longstanding CVD. The highest prevalence was in patients with lymphoma, lung carcinoma, melanoma, and gynecologic malignancies. Eleven out of 17 cases had not been identified in the original report. Conclusion: CVD-related thrombosis is not uncommon in cancer patients and can also be observed in outpatients with a good performance status and a non-metastatic disease. Thrombi can be very tiny. Radiologists should be aware of the possibility to identify (or overlook) small thrombi

  8. Simultaneous Iliac Vein Bovine Pericardial Patch Venoplasty and Creation of PTFE Lower Limb Arteriovenous Fistula Graft for Rescue Vascular Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meecham, Lewis; Fisher, Owain; Kirby, George; Evans, Richard; Buxton, Pauline; Legge, Jocelyn; Rajagopalan, Sriram; Asquith, John; Pherwani, Arun

    2016-10-01

    We present a case of external iliac vein patch venoplasty to accommodate rescue vascular access via a polytetrafluoroethylene loop arteriovenous fistula graft (AVG) for a patient with multiple central venous stenoses. A 35-year-old female with anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease required rescue vascular access for hemodialysis. Repeated occlusion and/or thrombosis of long-term central venous access cannulae, to facilitate dialysis, had caused stenosis of brachiocephalic veins: right external iliac vein and occlusion of the left common iliac vein. A previous right brachiobasilic fistula had occluded within 1 year. No other upper limb options for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) were available. A right external iliac vein bovine patch angioplasty concurrently with a polytetrafluoroethylene AV graft between common femoral artery and common femoral vein was performed to restore venous patency and allow rescue dialysis access. At 3-year follow-up, the fistula remains widely patent with 2 L/min flow rates and no recurrent stenosis to the treated iliac vein. She has not required any further surgical or interventional radiological procedures to maintain fistula or central venous patency. Central venous stenosis or occlusion is common for patients requiring dialysis, especially those with multiple previous long-term central venous cannulations. If restriction of outflow is present, AVF may fail. Venous patch angioplasty in these cases is a successful technique, allowing AVF formation and long-term patency. Central venous stenosis can be treated successfully with patch venoplasty to accommodate AVF/AVG formation for rescue vascular access; this is a potentially lifesaving intervention for patients requiring dialysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endovascular treatment of central venous stenosis and obstruction in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-xue; Ye, Meng; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Yi-ping; Zhang, Ji-wei

    2013-02-01

    Central venous stenosis and obstruction (CVD) is a serious and prevalent challenge to both resolve the venous hypertension symptoms and maintain the pantency of the ipsilateral hemodialysis access in hemodialysis patients. This study aimed to summarize our experience of the endovascular management of the central venous stenosis or obstruction in hemodialysis patients. Twenty-four haemodialysis cases of central vein stenosis or obstruction with ipsilateral functional vascular access in our hospital between July 2006 and February 2012 were treated by interventional therapy and the data were analyzed retrospectively. Eighteen males and six females with mean age of (66.4 ± 13.8) years and manifesting with arm swelling and venous hypertension were enrolled; 62.5% of them had a history of catheterization. Venography showed stenotic lesion in 10 cases including eight cases of brachiocephalic vein stenosis and two cases of subclavian vein stenosis and 14 cases of obstruction lesions including seven cases of short brachiocephalic obstruction and seven cases of long segment obstruction. Interventional therapy was performed and the technique success rate was 83.3%. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in nine cases and stent was performed in 11 cases firstly. The symptoms of venous hypertension were resolved after intervention in all the cases. There was no major complication and death perioperatively. During follow-up, reintervention was done, the primary patency rates were (88.9 ± 10.5)%, (64.8 ± 10.5)% and (48.6 ± 18.7)% at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after treatment in the PTA group; (90.0 ± 9.5)% and (77.1 ± 14.4)% at 6 months and 1 year after treatment in the stent group, respectively. The secondary patency rates were (48.6 ± 18.7)% in the PTA group and (83.3 ± 15.2)% in the stent group 1 year after treatment, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (primary patency, P = 0.20; secondary patency, P = 0

  10. Correlation between arterial blood gas analysis and peripheral blood gas analysis in acid-base unbalance state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Lee Kim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Acid-base unbalance is most common problem in severe ill patient, especially in condition of abnormal renal function state. Acid-base unbalances are respiratory acidosis, respiratory alkalosis, metabolic acidosis, and metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic acidosis is frequently appeared in clinical state. Arterial blood gas analysis is considered as a basic test to the intensive care unit patient and emergency state. Recently some researches were done, comparing with arterial blood gas analysis and venous blood gas analysis. Because of venous blood sampling is safer than arterial blood gas analysis, and beside not so different among them for detecting pH, pCO2, HCO3, except pO2 measuring. This research was done in emergency room, and for explaining no different between arterial blood gas analysis and peripheral blood gas analysis result in acid-base unbalance state patient. Especially in kidney functions decreased state. : The study was done from March, 2010 to January, 2011. The object was 89 peoples who came to emergency room for treating internal medicine problem. (Women 53, average age: 66.7±12.1 Then compare between arterial blood gas analysis and peripheral blood gas analysis. Result: The mean arterial minus venous difference for pH, pCO2, and bicarbonate was −0.0170, 2.6528, and 0.6124. Bland-Altman plot was done for predicting agreement of two groups, and the scale was pH −2.95 to 4.17, pCO2 −4.45 to 9.76, bicarbonate −2.95 to 4.16, in 95% relative. Conclusion: The peripheral blood gas pH, pCO2, bicarbonate level is almost same as arterial blood gas analysis results. And enough to measuring acid-base unbalance state, in absent of arterial blood testing.

  11. Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a previous history of catheter placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Yildirim, Sedat; Torun, Dilek

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dialysis history, imaging findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in six patients with central venous stenosis without a history of previous catheter placement. Material and methods: Between April 2000 and June 2004, six (10%) of 57 haemodialysis patients had stenosis of a central vein without a previous central catheter placement. Venography findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in these six patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were three women (50%) and three men aged 32-60 years (mean age: 45 years) and all had massive arm swelling as the main complaint. The vascular accesses were located at the elbow in five patients and at the wrist in one patient. Results: Three patients had stenosis of the left subclavian vein and three patients had stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein. The mean duration of the vascular accesses from the time of creation was 25.1 months. Flow volumes of the vascular access were very high in four patients who had flow volume measurement. The mean flow volume was 2347 ml/min. One of three patients with brachiocephalic vein stenosis had compression of the vein by the brachiocephalic artery. All the lesions were first treated with balloon angioplasty and two patients required stent placement on long term. Number of interventions ranged from 1 to 4 (mean: 2.1). Symptoms resolved in five patients and improved in one patient who had a stent placed in the left BCV. Conclusion: Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a history of central venous catheterization tends to occur or be manifested in patients with a proximal permanent vascular access with high flow rates. Balloon angioplasty with or without stent placement offers good secondary patency rates in mid-term

  12. [Catheter fracture and pulmonary embolization of the distal fragment: a rare complication of the totally implantable venous access port].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebahi, H; El Adib, A G; Mouaffak, Y; El Hattaoui, M; Chaara, A; Sadek, H; Khouchani, M; Mahmal, L; Younous, S

    2015-01-01

    Totally implantable venous access port plays a crucial role in the treatment of patients in oncology. However, its use can result sporadically in catheter fracture with catheter tip embolization into pulmonary arteries. We report this unusual but potentially serious complication in four patients. In these patients, the port had been inserted percutaneously into the subclavian vein using the infra-clavicular approach. This side effect occurred late in three patients. In all patients, the catheter fracture was asymptomatic or pauci-symptomatic and was caused by the pinch-off syndrome. The retrieval of the embolized fragments was successfully performed by transcatheter procedure in the cardiac catheterisation laboratory. We reviewed the literature and the newest guidelines and recommendations to detail the clinico-radiological features, the possible causes of this complication and discussed means to recognize, manage and prevent it. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation of Peripheral Vein Tumour Marker Levels, Internal Iliac Vein Tumour Marker Levels and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Patients with Prostate Cancer and Borderline High Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Cormac; Lal, Priti; Trerotola, Scott O; Nadolski, Gregory J; Watts, Micah M; Gorrian, Catherine Mc; Guzzo, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    To correlate prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free to total PSA percentage (fPSA%) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) levels from peripheral and pelvic venous samples with prostatectomy specimens in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and borderline elevation of PSA. In this prospective institutional review board approved study, 7 patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer had a venous sampling procedure prior to prostatectomy (mean 3.2 days, range 1-7). Venous samples were taken from a peripheral vein (PVS), the right internal iliac vein, a deep right internal iliac vein branch, left internal iliac vein and a deep left internal iliac vein branch. Venous sampling results were compared to tumour volume, laterality, stage and grade in prostatectomy surgical specimens. Mean PVS PSA was 4.29, range 2.3-6 ng/ml. PSA and PAP values in PVS did not differ significantly from internal iliac or deep internal iliac vein samples (p > 0.05). fPSA% was significantly higher in internal iliac (p = 0.004) and deep internal iliac (p = 0.003) vein samples compared to PVS. One of 7 patients had unilateral tumour only. This patient, with left-sided tumour, had a fPSA% of 6, 6, 6, 14 and 12 in his peripheral, right internal iliac, deep right internal iliac branch, left internal iliac and deep left internal iliac branch samples respectively. There were no adverse events. fPSA%, unlike total PSA or PAP, is significantly higher in pelvic vein compared to peripheral vein samples when prostate cancer is present. Larger studies including patients with higher PSA values are warranted to further investigate this counterintuitive finding.

  14. Coronary and peripheral stenting in aorto-ostial protruding stents: The balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Tarek A; Sanchez, Carlos E; Bailey, Steven R

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of aorto-ostial in-stent restenosis lesions represents a challenge for interventional cardiologists. Excessive protrusion of the stent into the aorta may lead to multiple technical problems, such as difficult catheter reengagement of the vessel ostium or inability to re-wire through the stent lumen in repeat interventions. We describe a balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique in cases where conventional coaxial engagement of an aorto-ostial protruding stent with the guide catheter or passage of the guide wire through the true lumen is not feasible. This technique is applicable both in coronary and peripheral arteries. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cystic Adventitial Disease of Popliteal Artery with Venous Aneurysm of Popliteal Vein: Two-Year Follow-Up after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Takizawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of cystic adventitial disease of popliteal artery with venous aneurysm of popliteal vein. A 46-year-old woman had sudden-onset intermittent claudication and coldness in her right leg. The right-sided ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI was 1.01, but peripheral arterial pulsation was decreased at knee venting position. Computed tomography revealed simple cystic lesion of the popliteal artery and stenosis of the arterial lumen in this lesion. The patient was treated by complete resection of the cystic adventitial layer of popliteal artery. A venous aneurysm of popliteal vein was revealed by intraoperative echo and was simply ligated. The patient had uneventful postoperative course and no symptoms of relevance during the two years of follow-up.

  16. Selective digital venous hypertension: A rare complication of hemodialysis arteriovenous fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swayne, L.C.; Manstein, C.; Somers, R.; Cope, C.

    1983-04-01

    We report and document angiographically a case of selective venous hypertension, masquerading as an infection, which involved the three middle digits of the right hand in a patient with an access arteriovenous (AV) fistula. This complication arose following hemodialysis and was resolved after resection of the right radial artery at the site of AV fistula and re-anastomosis.

  17. Phlebitis as a consequence of peripheral intravenous administration of cisatracurium besylate in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeder, Annelijn M; van der Steen, Marijke S; Rozendaal, Annemieke; van Zanten, Arthur R H

    2016-10-03

    This case report series describes 3 cases of cisatracurium besylate associated phlebitis after an infusion period of 14-20 hours. No similar cases have been reported in the literature. Association of phlebitis with another neuromuscular blocking agent, atracurium, has been described in the literature. The acidity of atracurium is thought to be the main cause. It is recommended that atracurium is administered only via central venous catheters when indicated to infuse over prolonged periods of time due to the acidity. Cisatracurium is a stereoisomer of atracurium and as such has the same molecular weight. Although cisatracurium also has a similar acidity as atracurium, a recommendation concerning infusion via a central venous catheter is lacking. We suggest prolonged administration of cisatracurium besylate only via centrally placed venous catheters or if not possible to careful monitor relevant peripheral intravenous sites to diminish the risks of phlebitis and associated complications or other cutaneous reactions. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2012-01-01

    MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic......-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged...... intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal...

  19. Neonatal deep white matter venous infarction and liquefaction: a pseudo-abscess lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruess, Lynne; Rusin, Jerome A.; Dent, Carly M.; Tiarks, Hailey J.; Yoshida, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Deep white matter hemorrhagic venous infarction with subsequent cavitation due to necrosis and liquefaction has been described in neonates and may be associated with infection and meningitis. In our experience, the MRI pattern of these lesions is confused with the pattern seen with cerebral abscesses. The purpose of our study was to characterize the MRI findings of post infarction necrosis and liquefaction after hemorrhagic deep white matter venous infarction in infants and to distinguish these lesions from cerebral abscesses. An institutional review board approved a retrospective review of imaging records to identify all patients with cerebral venous infarction at a children's hospital during a 10-year period. Nine infants had deep white matter hemorrhagic venous infarction with white matter fluid signal cavitary lesions. A diagnosis of cerebral abscess was considered in all. The imaging and laboratory findings in these patients are reviewed and compared to descriptions of abscesses found in the literature. There were six female and three male infants. The mean age at presentation was 20 days (range: 0-90 days), while the corrected age at presentation was less than 30 days for all patients. Seven patients presented with seizures and signs of infection; one infant presented with lethargy and later proved to have protein C deficiency. MRI was performed 0-12 days from presentation in these eight patients. Another patient with known protein C deficiency underwent MRI at 30 days for follow-up of screening US abnormalities. There were a total of 38 deep cerebral white matter fluid signal cavitary lesions: 25 frontal, 9 parietal, 2 temporal, 2 occipital. Larger lesions had dependent debris. All lesions had associated hemorrhage and many lesions had evidence of adjacent small vessel venous thrombosis. Lesions imaged after gadolinium showed peripheral enhancement. Three lesions increased in size on follow-up imaging. Three patients, two with meningitis confirmed via

  20. Neonatal deep white matter venous infarction and liquefaction: a pseudo-abscess lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruess, Lynne; Rusin, Jerome A. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); The Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health, Columbus, OH (United States); Dent, Carly M.; Tiarks, Hailey J.; Yoshida, Michelle A. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Deep white matter hemorrhagic venous infarction with subsequent cavitation due to necrosis and liquefaction has been described in neonates and may be associated with infection and meningitis. In our experience, the MRI pattern of these lesions is confused with the pattern seen with cerebral abscesses. The purpose of our study was to characterize the MRI findings of post infarction necrosis and liquefaction after hemorrhagic deep white matter venous infarction in infants and to distinguish these lesions from cerebral abscesses. An institutional review board approved a retrospective review of imaging records to identify all patients with cerebral venous infarction at a children's hospital during a 10-year period. Nine infants had deep white matter hemorrhagic venous infarction with white matter fluid signal cavitary lesions. A diagnosis of cerebral abscess was considered in all. The imaging and laboratory findings in these patients are reviewed and compared to descriptions of abscesses found in the literature. There were six female and three male infants. The mean age at presentation was 20 days (range: 0-90 days), while the corrected age at presentation was less than 30 days for all patients. Seven patients presented with seizures and signs of infection; one infant presented with lethargy and later proved to have protein C deficiency. MRI was performed 0-12 days from presentation in these eight patients. Another patient with known protein C deficiency underwent MRI at 30 days for follow-up of screening US abnormalities. There were a total of 38 deep cerebral white matter fluid signal cavitary lesions: 25 frontal, 9 parietal, 2 temporal, 2 occipital. Larger lesions had dependent debris. All lesions had associated hemorrhage and many lesions had evidence of adjacent small vessel venous thrombosis. Lesions imaged after gadolinium showed peripheral enhancement. Three lesions increased in size on follow-up imaging. Three patients, two with meningitis confirmed via

  1. Elucidating the mechanism of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case of transient blindness after central venous catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Neal M; Raychev, Radoslav; Kim, Doojin; Liebeskind, David S

    2012-11-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a condition characterized by reversible symptoms including headache, visual disturbances, focal neurological deficits, altered mentation, and seizures. It has been associated with circumstances that may affect the cerebrovascular system, such as hypertension, eclampsia, and immunosuppression with calcineurin inhibitors. The underlying etiology of PRES has remained unclear; however, cerebrovascular autoregulatory dysfunction, hyperperfusion, and endothelial activation have been implicated. We describe a case of a young patient with lung transplant, who presented with headache, acute binocular blindness, and seizure immediately after infusion of saline through a peripherally inserted central catheter line, which inadvertently terminated cephalad in the left internal jugular vein, near the jugular foramen. Subsequent brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed vasogenic edematous lesions in a pattern consistent with PRES--a diagnosis supported by his constellation of symptoms, history of lung transplantation on tacrolimus immunosuppression, and relative hypertension. This is the first reported case describing the development of PRES after the insertion of a peripherally inserted central catheter line. The development of PRES in a typical high-risk patient immediately after cerebral venous outflow obstruction implicates the role of the cerebral venous system and provides potential insight into the mechanism of this disorder that remains of unclear pathogenesis.

  2. Incidence and risk factors of infections complications related to implantable venous-access ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Ji Sue; Seo, Tae Seok; Song, Myung Gyu; Cha, In Ho; Kim, Jun Suk; Choi, Chul Won; Seo, Jae Hong; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of infections associated with implantable venous access ports (IVAPs.) From August 2003 through November 2011, 1747 IVAPs were placed in our interventional radiology suite. One hundred forty four IVAPs were inserted in patients with hematologic malignancy and 1603 IVAPs in patients with solid tumors. Among them, 40 ports (23 women and 17 men; mean age, 57.1 years; range, 13-83) were removed to treat port-related infections. We evaluated the incidence of port-related infection, patient characteristics, bacteriologic data, and patient progress. Univariable analyses (t test, chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test) and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors for IVAP related infection. Overall, 40 (2.3%) of 1747 ports were removed for symptoms of infection with an incidence rate of 0.067 events/1000 catheter-days. According to the univariable study, the incidences of infection were seemingly higher in the patients who received the procedure during inpatient treatment (p = 0.016), the patients with hematologic malignancy (p = 0.041), and the patients receiving palliative chemotherapy (p = 0.022). From the multiple binary logistic regression, the adjusted odds ratios of infection in patients with hematologic malignancies and those receiving palliative chemotherapy were 7.769 (p = 0.001) and 4.863 (p = 0.003), respectively. Microorganisms were isolated from 26 (65%) blood samples, and two of the most causative organisms were found to be Staphylococcus (n = 10) and Candida species (n = 7). The underlying hematologic malignancy and the state of receiving palliative chemotherapy were the independent risk factors of IVAP-related infection.

  3. Incidence and risk factors of infections complications related to implantable venous-access ports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Ji Sue; Seo, Tae Seok; Song, Myung Gyu; Cha, In Ho; Kim, Jun Suk; Choi, Chul Won; Seo, Jae Hong; Oh, Sang Cheul [Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of infections associated with implantable venous access ports (IVAPs.) From August 2003 through November 2011, 1747 IVAPs were placed in our interventional radiology suite. One hundred forty four IVAPs were inserted in patients with hematologic malignancy and 1603 IVAPs in patients with solid tumors. Among them, 40 ports (23 women and 17 men; mean age, 57.1 years; range, 13-83) were removed to treat port-related infections. We evaluated the incidence of port-related infection, patient characteristics, bacteriologic data, and patient progress. Univariable analyses (t test, chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test) and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors for IVAP related infection. Overall, 40 (2.3%) of 1747 ports were removed for symptoms of infection with an incidence rate of 0.067 events/1000 catheter-days. According to the univariable study, the incidences of infection were seemingly higher in the patients who received the procedure during inpatient treatment (p = 0.016), the patients with hematologic malignancy (p = 0.041), and the patients receiving palliative chemotherapy (p = 0.022). From the multiple binary logistic regression, the adjusted odds ratios of infection in patients with hematologic malignancies and those receiving palliative chemotherapy were 7.769 (p = 0.001) and 4.863 (p = 0.003), respectively. Microorganisms were isolated from 26 (65%) blood samples, and two of the most causative organisms were found to be Staphylococcus (n = 10) and Candida species (n = 7). The underlying hematologic malignancy and the state of receiving palliative chemotherapy were the independent risk factors of IVAP-related infection.

  4. Considerations on prevention of phlebitis and venous pain from intravenous prostaglandin E(1) administration by adjusting solution pH: in vitro manipulations affecting pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Emiko; Nishikata, Mayumi; Okamura, Noboru; Matsuyama, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1); Alprostadil Alfadex) is a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation used to treat patients with peripheral vascular disease. The main adverse effects of intravenous PGE(1) administration, phlebitis and venous pain, arise from the unphysiologically low pH of infusion solutions. When PGE(1) infusion solutions with a pH value greater then 6 are used, phlebitis and venous pain are considered to be avoidable. Beginning with a PGE(1) infusion solution with pH greater than 6, we add the amount of 7% sodium bicarbonate needed to bring the solution to pH 7.4 if phlebitis or venous pain develops. In the present study we established a convenient nomogram showing the relationship between the titratable acidity of various infusion solutions and the volume of 7% sodium bicarbonate required to attain pH 7.4 for preventing the phlebitis and venous pain associated with PGE(1) infusion.

  5. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriëtte; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michaël A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design: Prospective observational controlled study. Setting: Nonacademic university-affiliated

  6. Risk factors for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI in a large cohort of volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kresimir Dolic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of intra- and extra-cranial venous system impairment in the pathogenesis of various vascular, inflammatory and neurodegenerative neurological disorders, as well as in aging, has not been studied in detail. Nor have risk factors been determined for increased susceptibility of venous pathology in the intra-cranial and extra-cranial veins. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between presence of a newly proposed vascular condition called chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI and environmental factors in a large volunteer control group without known central nervous system pathology. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The data were collected in a prospective study from 252 subjects who were screened for medical history as part of the entry criteria and participated in the case-control study of CCSVI prevalence in multiple sclerosis (MS patients, and then were analyzed post-hoc. All participants underwent physical and Doppler sonography examinations, and were assessed with a structured environmental questionnaire. Fullfilment of ≥ 2 positive venous hemodynamic (VH criteria on Doppler sonography was considered indicative of CCSVI diagnosis. Risk and protective factors associated with CCSVI were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Seventy (27.8% subjects presented with CCSVI diagnosis and 153 (60.7% presented with one or more VH criteria. The presence of heart disease (p = .001, especially heart murmurs (p = .007, a history of infectious mononucleosis (p = .002, and irritable bowel syndrome (p = .005 were associated with more frequent CCSVI diagnosis. Current or previous smoking (p = .029 showed a trend for association with more frequent CCSVI diagnosis, while use of dietary supplements (p = .018 showed a trend for association with less frequent CCSVI diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Risk factors for CCSVI differ from established risk factors for peripheral venous diseases. Vascular

  7. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriette; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective:  The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design:  Prospective observational controlled study. Setting:  Nonacademic university-affiliated

  8. The Use of Ultrasound to Improve Axillary Vein Access and Minimize Complications during Pacemaker Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaiel, Abdullah; Hassan, Jeremy; Blenkhorn, Fay; Mardigyan, Vartan

    2016-05-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in the United States recommends the use of ultrasound (US) for central venous access to improve patient outcomes. However, in a recent publication, US is still underutilized for axillary vein access during pacemaker implantation. We sought to describe a technique for US-guided axillary vein access during pacemaker implantation and to report complication rates and success rate. Retrospective data collection included success rate and complications on all pacemaker implants by one operator since implementing the systematic use of US at our institution, from November 2012 to January 2015. For the last 59 cases, data were collected prospectively to include time of venous access and number of attempts. A total of 403 consecutive patients were included in the analysis. Two leads were implanted in 255 cases and one lead was implanted in 148 cases. The rate of successful US-guided access was 99.25%. There were no access-related complications. The average number of venipuncture attempts was 1.18 per patient. The average time to obtain venous access was 2.24 minutes including the time to apply the sterile US sleeve. The described technique has the potential to improve the success rate of axillary vein access and minimize complications during pacemaker implantation. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Correlation of Peripheral Vein Tumour Marker Levels, Internal Iliac Vein Tumour Marker Levels and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Patients with Prostate Cancer and Borderline High Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrelly, Cormac, E-mail: farrellycormac@gmail.com [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Lal, Priti [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (United States); Trerotola, Scott O.; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Watts, Micah M. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Gorrian, Catherine Mc. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, University College Dublin School of Medicine & Medical Science (Ireland); Guzzo, Thomas J. [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Urology and Surgery (United States)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo correlate prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free to total PSA percentage (fPSA%) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) levels from peripheral and pelvic venous samples with prostatectomy specimens in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and borderline elevation of PSA.Materials and MethodsIn this prospective institutional review board approved study, 7 patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer had a venous sampling procedure prior to prostatectomy (mean 3.2 days, range 1–7). Venous samples were taken from a peripheral vein (PVS), the right internal iliac vein, a deep right internal iliac vein branch, left internal iliac vein and a deep left internal iliac vein branch. Venous sampling results were compared to tumour volume, laterality, stage and grade in prostatectomy surgical specimens.ResultsMean PVS PSA was 4.29, range 2.3–6 ng/ml. PSA and PAP values in PVS did not differ significantly from internal iliac or deep internal iliac vein samples (p > 0.05). fPSA% was significantly higher in internal iliac (p = 0.004) and deep internal iliac (p = 0.003) vein samples compared to PVS. One of 7 patients had unilateral tumour only. This patient, with left–sided tumour, had a fPSA% of 6, 6, 6, 14 and 12 in his peripheral, right internal iliac, deep right internal iliac branch, left internal iliac and deep left internal iliac branch samples respectively. There were no adverse events.ConclusionfPSA%, unlike total PSA or PAP, is significantly higher in pelvic vein compared to peripheral vein samples when prostate cancer is present. Larger studies including patients with higher PSA values are warranted to further investigate this counterintuitive finding.

  10. Correlation of Peripheral Vein Tumour Marker Levels, Internal Iliac Vein Tumour Marker Levels and Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Patients with Prostate Cancer and Borderline High Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrelly, Cormac; Lal, Priti; Trerotola, Scott O.; Nadolski, Gregory J.; Watts, Micah M.; Gorrian, Catherine Mc.; Guzzo, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo correlate prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free to total PSA percentage (fPSA%) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) levels from peripheral and pelvic venous samples with prostatectomy specimens in patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and borderline elevation of PSA.Materials and MethodsIn this prospective institutional review board approved study, 7 patients with biopsy proven prostate cancer had a venous sampling procedure prior to prostatectomy (mean 3.2 days, range 1–7). Venous samples were taken from a peripheral vein (PVS), the right internal iliac vein, a deep right internal iliac vein branch, left internal iliac vein and a deep left internal iliac vein branch. Venous sampling results were compared to tumour volume, laterality, stage and grade in prostatectomy surgical specimens.ResultsMean PVS PSA was 4.29, range 2.3–6 ng/ml. PSA and PAP values in PVS did not differ significantly from internal iliac or deep internal iliac vein samples (p > 0.05). fPSA% was significantly higher in internal iliac (p = 0.004) and deep internal iliac (p = 0.003) vein samples compared to PVS. One of 7 patients had unilateral tumour only. This patient, with left–sided tumour, had a fPSA% of 6, 6, 6, 14 and 12 in his peripheral, right internal iliac, deep right internal iliac branch, left internal iliac and deep left internal iliac branch samples respectively. There were no adverse events.ConclusionfPSA%, unlike total PSA or PAP, is significantly higher in pelvic vein compared to peripheral vein samples when prostate cancer is present. Larger studies including patients with higher PSA values are warranted to further investigate this counterintuitive finding.

  11. Protocol for the realization of venous mapping by chronic venous insufficiency in lower limbs under sonographic guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Rojas, Diego Jose

    2013-01-01

    The current state of knowledge is reviewed with respect to the realization of lower limbs venous mapping. Venous mapping is obtained by the use of color and spectral Doppler ultrasound. Doppler ultrasound has provided a precise graphical representation of the superficial and deep venous systems. The performance of the venous mapping is considered essential for the correct handling of venous diseases. The anatomical and pathophysiological basic concepts are defined to realize the sonographic assessment of the veins of the lower limbs. The required technical aspects are revised for the realization of sonographic exploration of the patient with venous insufficiency. Sonographic findings are characterized to support the diagnostic of venous insufficiency of the lower limbs. The CEAP (clinical-etiologic-anatomic-pathophysiologic) classification is utilized to differentiate forms and degrees of severity of the disorder, and has allowed an interinstitutional comparison in clinical studies, the evaluation of treatment and monitoring of patients. A proposal is designed to perform reports that have served of guide surgical to vascular surgeons [es

  12. Copper and ceruloplasmin contents in the blood serum of peripheral and pre-hepatic veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Canelas

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available Copper and ceruloplasmin contents were determined in samples of peripheral and pre-hepatic venous blood of 11 patients with Manson's schistosomiasis and one patient with hepatolenticular degeneration, all of çhich submitted either to porto-caval or spleno-renal shunt. Individual difference were not significant in any of the non-Wilsonian patients. The results are discussed in regard to the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of Wilson's disease.

  13. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    Internal jugular veins are the major cerebral venous outflow pathway in supine humans. In upright humans the positioning of these veins above heart level causes them to collapse. An alternative cerebral outflow pathway is the vertebral venous plexus. We set out to determine the effect of posture...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  14. Colorectal cancer with venous tumor thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kensuke Otani; Soichiro Ishihara; Keisuke Hata; Koji Murono; Kazuhito Sasaki; Koji Yasuda; Takeshi Nishikawa; Toshiaki Tanaka; Tomomichi Kiyomatsu; Kazushige Kawai; Hiroaki Nozawa; Hironori Yamaguchi; Toshiaki Watanabe

    2018-01-01

    Summary: Colorectal cancer is seldom accompanied by venous tumor thrombosis, and little is known about the features of venous tumor thrombosis in colorectal cancer. However, some reports show that colorectal cancer patients can develop venous tumor thrombosis and warn clinicians not to overlook this complication. In this report, we perform a review of 43 previously reported cases and investigate the characteristics of colorectal cancer accompanied by venous tumor thrombosis. The histological ...

  15. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient

  16. Diagnosis and endovascular treatment of multiple cerebral venous and venous sinuses thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baomin; Zhang Ji; Yin Ling; Huang Xusheng; Jiang Jinli; Liu Jun; Lang Senyang; Zhou Dingbiao; Zhu Ke

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Eighty-five cases with multiple cerebral venous and venous sinuses thrombosis including the diagnosis and endovascular therapy were reported. Methods: The long T2 and short T1 signals in the related regions of multiple venous sinuses on MRI and prolonged blood circulation time of the brain with tortuous dilatation of vein in angiography were the important characteristics for the diagnosis. Of the 85 cases, the treatment procedures were consisted of injecting urokinase intermittently via common carotid artery and intra-sinus contact thrombolysis as well as warfarin intake orally. Results: Intracranial pressure of 80 cases reduced down between 230 and 300 mm H 2 O, and clinical deficits were markedly improved within 10 days. Re-angiography of 18 cases revealed recanalization partly in 5 cases and circulation time appeared near normal i 8 cases during one week after therapy. Conclusions: Combined intraarterial thrombolysis consecutively with general anticoagulation for the treatment of multiple thrombosis in cerebral venous sinuses may be one of the effective means

  17. The blind pushing technique for peripherally inserted central catheter placement through brachial vein puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Myeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Kim, Han Myun; Song, Myung Gyu; Song, Soon-Young; Yeon, Jae Woo; Yoon, Dae Young; Lee, Sam Yeol

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a prospective clinical trial evaluating the technical feasibility and short-term clinical outcome of the blind pushing technique for placement of pretrimmed peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) through brachial vein access. Patients requiring PICC placement at any of the three participating institutions were prospectively enrolled between January and December 2016. The review boards of all participating institutions approved this study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. PICC placement was performed using the blind pushing technique and primary brachial vein access. The following data were collected from unified case report forms: access vein, obstacles during PICC advancement, procedure time, and postprocedural complications. During the 12-month study period, 1380 PICCs were placed in 1043 patients. Of these, 1092 PICCs placed in 837 patients were enrolled, with 834 PICCs (76%) and 258 PICCs (34%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. In both arms, obstacles were most commonly noted in the subclavian veins (n = 220) and axillary veins (n = 94). Successful puncture of the access vein was achieved at first try in 1028 PICCs (94%). The technical success rate was 99%, with 1055 PICCs (97%) placed within 120 seconds of procedure time and 1088 PICCs (99%) having the tip located at the ideal position. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound detected catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) for 18 PICCs in 16 patients and late symptomatic UEDVT for 16 PICCs in 16 patients (3.1%). Catheter-associated UEDVT was noted for 28 PICCs (82%) and 6 PICCs (18%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. The incidence of obstacles and the procedure time (pushing technique and primary brachial vein access is technically feasible and may represent an alternative to the conventional PICC placement technique, having low incidences of

  18. Incidence and risk factors for central venous access port-related infection in Chinese cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yao Wang

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: Infection remains to be a challenging issue for totally implantable central venous ports. Implementation of an insertion bundle for the prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections is warranted, especially for those patients with hematological and head and neck cancers, as well as for patients receiving chemotherapy in the metastatic settings.

  19. Significance of venous anastomosis in fingertip replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yasunori; Doi, Kazuteru; Ikeda, Keisuke; Abe, Yukio; Dhawan, Vikas

    2003-03-01

    Adequate venous outflow is the most important factor for successful fingertip replantation. The authors have attempted venous anastomosis in all cases of fingertip replantation to overcome postoperative congestion. In this article, the significance of venous repair for fingertip replantation is described from the authors' results of 64 complete fingertip amputations in 55 consecutive patients, which were replanted from January of 1996 to June of 2001. The overall survival rate was 86 percent. Of the 44 replantations in zone I, 37 survived, and the success rate was 84 percent. Of the 20 replantations in zone II, 18 survived, and the success rate was 90 percent. Venous anastomosis was attempted in all cases, but it was possible in 39 zone I and in all zone II replantations. For arterial repair, vein grafts were necessary in 17 of the 44 zone I and in one of the 20 zone II replantations; for venous repair, they were necessary in six zone I replantations and one zone II replantation. Postoperative vascular complications occurred in 15 replantations. There were five cases of arterial thrombosis and 10 cases of venous congestion. Venous congestion occurred in nine zone I and one zone II replantations. In five of these 10 replantations, venous anastomosis was not possible. In another five replantations, venous outflow was established at the time of surgery, but occlusion occurred subsequently. Except for the five failures resulting from arterial thrombosis, successful venous repair was possible in 49 of 59 replantations (83 percent). Despite the demand for skillful microsurgical technique and longer operation time, the authors' results using venous anastomosis in successful fingertip replantations are encouraging. By performing venous anastomosis, external bleeding can be avoided and a higher survival rate can be achieved. Venous anastomosis for fingertip replantation is a reliable and worthwhile procedure.

  20. Carbon dioxide as a venous contrast agent: Applications in interventional radiology=20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Seong Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon Yul; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Pfammatter, Thomas; Cho, Kyung Jae

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of carbon dioxide(CO 2 ) as a venous contrast agent for upper-arm placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC), vena caval filter placement, and for visualization of the portal vein in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS). About 20-30ml of CO 2 was used as an alternative to iodinated contrast material for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and fluoroscopy to guide upper-arm placement of PICC in 46 patients, for inferior venacavogram before filter placement in five, and for visualization of the portal vein during TIPS in two. Vital signs, peripheral arterial oxygen saturation, and renal function were checked during and after delivery of CO 2 . All CO 2 DSA for PICC placement clearly delineated patency or stenosis of the central veins. In 41 of 46 patients (89 %), PICC placement with CO 2 guidance was successful. The mean number of venipunctures for PICC placement was 1.9, and the mean volume of CO 2 injected for venipuncture was 35ml. In five patients, Titanium Greenfield filters were successfully implanted into the inferior vena cava following CO 2 vena cavography. In two patients in whom hepatopetal portal flow was seen on indirect portography, the portal vein was visualized by CO 2 -wedged hepatic venography. Injection of CO 2 into the splenic vein following TIPS placement revealed shunt patency. Vital signs and oxygen saturation did not change, and there was no evidence of renal toxicity following CO 2 injection. CO 2 is a safe and useful alternative contrast agent for upper-arm placement of PICC, pre-filter placement cavography, and wedged hepatic venography and portography for TIPS

  1. Venous abnormalities demonstrated by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, T; Tsukune, Y; Ashida, H; Tokuda, M; Oyama, Y [St. Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-05-01

    CT is capable of demonstrating various venous changes. However, little have been described on this subject in the literature. Examples of various venous abnormalities such as obstructed jugular vein, superior and inferior vena cava (IVC), tumor invasion of IVC and renal vein and venous changes in portal hypertension were presented. It was stressed that noninvasive CT is a good tool in diagnosis of some of venous changes and may be able to eliminate angiography in such cases.

  2. Totally implantable central venous access port infections in patients with digestive cancer: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touré, Abdoulaye; Vanhems, Philippe; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Cassier, Philippe; Péré-Vergé, Denis; Souquet, Jean-Christophe; Ecochard, René; Chambrier, Cécile

    2012-12-01

    Central venous access port-related bloodstream infection (CVAP-BSI) is associated with morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. This study examined the incidence rates and risk factors for CVAP-BSI in adult patients with digestive cancer. This prospective observational cohort study was performed from 2007 to 2011 in 2 oncology units of a university hospital. Incidence rate was expressed as number of CVAP-BSI per 1,000 catheter-days. A Cox regression model was used to identify risk factors for CVAP-BSI. A total of 315 patients were included. CVAP-BSI occurred in 41 patients (13.0%). The overall incidence rate was 0.76/1,000 catheter-days. The rate was higher in patients with esophageal cancer (1.28. P = .05) and pancreatic cancer (1.24; P = .007). Risk factors independently associated with CVAP-BSI were World Health Organization performance status between 2 and 4, catheter utilization-days in the previous month, pancreatic cancer, and parenteral nutrition. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci and enterobacteria were the main microorganisms isolated. In adult patients with digestive cancer, pancreatic cancer, cumulative catheter utilization-days, World Health Organization performance status, and parenteral nutrition were identified as independent risk factors for CVAP-BSI. Patients with any of these risk factors could be candidates for preventive strategies. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Central venous catheter insertion problem solving using intravenous catheter: technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemohammad M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous catheter is an accepted method for hemodynamic monitor-ring, drug and fluid administration, intravenous access, hemodialysis and applying cardiac pace-maker in hospitalized patients. This procedure can be associated with severe complications. The aim of this article is to provide a practical approach to prevent catheter malposition in states that the guide wire will not pass freely.During central venous insertion in internal jugular vein using modified seldinger technique, when after venous insertion, the passage of the guide wire shows difficulties and don’t pass freely, insertion of an intravenous cannula over the wire and re-insertion of the wire can help to prevent malposition of the wire and the catheter. Use of an intravenous cannula over the guide, in situations that the guide wire cannot pass freely among the needle inserted in internal jugular vein, and re-insertion of the guide can probably prevent or reduce the tissue or vascular trauma and the associated complica-tions. This simple maneuver can be helpful in difficult cases especially in cardiac surgery patients who receive high dose heparin and it is necessary to avoid traumatize-tion of carotid artery.

  4. Altered Venous Function during Long-Duration Spaceflights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques-Olivier Fortrat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Venous adaptation to microgravity, associated with cardiovascular deconditioning, may contribute to orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. The aim of this study was to analyze the main parameters of venous hemodynamics with long-duration spaceflight.Methods: Venous plethysmography was performed on 24 cosmonauts before, during, and after spaceflights aboard the International Space Station. Venous plethysmography assessed venous filling and emptying functions as well as microvascular filtration, in response to different levels of venous occlusion pressure. Calf volume was assessed using calf circumference measurements.Results: Calf volume decreased during spaceflight from 2.3 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.2 L (p < 0.001, and recovered after it (2.3 ± 0.3 L. Venous compliance, determined as the relationship between occlusion pressure and the change in venous volume, increased during spaceflight from 0.090 ± 0.005 to 0.120 ± 0.007 (p < 0.01 and recovered 8 days after landing (0.071 ± 0.005, arbitrary units. The index of venous emptying rate decreased during spaceflight from −0.004 ± 0.022 to −0.212 ± 0.033 (p < 0.001, arbitrary units. The index of vascular microfiltration increased during spaceflight from 6.1 ± 1.8 to 10.6 ± 7.9 (p < 0.05, arbitrary units.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that overall venous function is changed during spaceflight. In future, venous function should be considered when developing countermeasures to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic intolerance with long-duration spaceflight.

  5. Transcatheter closure of a large patent ductus arteriosus using jugular access in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Precylia; Assaidi, Anass; Baruteau, Alban-Elouen; Fraisse, Alain

    2018-03-01

    Trans-catheter device closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) via femoral route is the commonly used, safe and effective procedure. Trans-jugular approach has been successfully used in older children with interrupted inferior vena cava. We report a case of successful occlusion of PDA using Amplatzer duct occluder (ADO) via trans-jugular approach following difficulties encountered in gaining femoral venous access. A 6-month-old male infant, weighing 8 kg was admitted for percutaneous catheter closure of PDA. Echocardiogram showed a 4.5 mm duct and left heart dilatation. Femoral venous access was not possible; therefore, we decided to use a trans-jugular approach. The duct was occluded using 8/6 mm ADO. Successful closure of the duct was confirmed with an aortogram. Post procedure echocardiogram showed no residual shunt across the duct. We highlight that trans-catheter closure of PDA using jugular venous access is safe and effective even in infants.

  6. Spiral CT dual-phase scanning for hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison study on the peripheral enhancement and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenxia; Min Pengqiu; Zhou Xiangping; Song Bin; Liu Yan; Shen Mingen; Li Zhenlin; Yang Min

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the peripheral enhancement features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions in arterial and portal venous phases with histopathology, and to study the histopathologic bases of peripheral enhancement of the HCC lesions and how it affects the biologic behavior and prognosis. Methods: Forty-two histopathologically proven HCC patients were included. First, an unenhanced scanning covering the whole liver was done, and followed by arterial and portal venous phase scanning. The delay time was 20 sec and 60 sec after the injecting of contrast media. the slides of 5 μm thickness were stained with HE and the standard immunoperoxidase method using the polyclonal antibody of factor VIII-related antigen (F8RA). The pseudo capsule of the lesion, tumor invasion of the pseudo capsule, and the number of positive stained tumor vessels in the pseudo capsule were evaluated. Results: Among the 42 cases, in arterial phase, the pseudo capsule of the HCC lesions was demonstrated as hyper-or hypo-attenuation in 13 and 8 cases, respectively, and no marked pseudo capsule was perceived in 21 cases. In portal venous phase, hyper-attenuated pseudo capsule was shown in 27 cases, hypo-attenuated pseudo capsule in 2 cases, and no pseudo capsule in 13 cases. On CT scans, daughter foci were showed in 14 cases, in which 9 cases were single and 5 of 42 patients, and tumor cells invaded the pseudo capsule in 16 caes among these cases. F8RA immunohistochemical staining showed that the pseudo capsule contained rich positive staining neo-vascular structure in 15 of 25 cases, and the other 10 cases had thick pseudo capsule but few neo-vascular structure. HE staining showed no marked pseudo capsule in 17 cases, in which 8 cases exhibited no clear border between the tumor tissue and liver parenchyma. Conclusion: The peripheral enhancement features of HCC on spiral CT dural-phase scanning could reflect the histopathologic characteristics and predict the biologic behavior and prognosis

  7. Combined oral contraceptives: venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bastos, Marcos; Stegeman, Bernardine H; Rosendaal, Frits R; Van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Stijnen, Theo; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2014-03-03

    Combined oral contraceptive (COC) use has been associated with venous thrombosis (VT) (i.e., deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). The VT risk has been evaluated for many estrogen doses and progestagen types contained in COC but no comprehensive comparison involving commonly used COC is available. To provide a comprehensive overview of the risk of venous thrombosis in women using different combined oral contraceptives. Electronic databases (Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier and ScienceDirect) were searched in 22 April 2013 for eligible studies, without language restrictions. We selected studies including healthy women taking COC with VT as outcome. The primary outcome of interest was a fatal or non-fatal first event of venous thrombosis with the main focus on deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Publications with at least 10 events in total were eligible. The network meta-analysis was performed using an extension of frequentist random effects models for mixed multiple treatment comparisons. Unadjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were reported.Two independent reviewers extracted data from selected studies. 3110 publications were retrieved through a search strategy; 25 publications reporting on 26 studies were included. Incidence of venous thrombosis in non-users from two included cohorts was 0.19 and 0.37 per 1 000 person years, in line with previously reported incidences of 0,16 per 1 000 person years. Use of combined oral contraceptives increased the risk of venous thrombosis compared with non-use (relative risk 3.5, 95% confidence interval 2.9 to 4.3). The relative risk of venous thrombosis for combined oral contraceptives with 30-35 μg ethinylestradiol and gestodene, desogestrel, cyproterone acetate, or drospirenone were similar and about 50-80% higher than for combined oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. A dose related effect of ethinylestradiol was observed for gestodene

  8. Sonographic detection of portal venous gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wang Yul; Lee, S. K.; Cho, O. K.

    1989-01-01

    Portal venous gas suggests underlying bowel disease such as strangulating intestinal obstruction and its demonstration carries with it an important implications with respect to patient management. Radiography has been the gold standard for the detection of portal venous gas. We have experienced two cases of portal venous gas diagnosed by ultrasound. Sonographic findings were floating echoes in the main portal vein and highly echogenic linear or patchy echoes within the hepatic parenchyma. Simple abdominal films of those cases failed to demonstrate gas in the portal venous system

  9. Venous pump of the calf: a study of venous and muscular pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Y S; Barthelemy, P; Juhan, C

    1994-11-01

    Little data are available concerning the relation between the muscular pumping mechanism and the variation of superficial and deep venous pressure during normal action of the calf pump; therefore we undertook this study to determine the pressure values in three compartments of the calf and in the deep and the superficial venous system and to establish correlation between muscular and venous pressure. Nine healthy young women with a mean age of 23 years (range 19 to 28 years) were examined. In the same calf, a muscular catheter was placed in the deep posterior compartment (DPC), in the superficial posterior compartment (SPC), and in the anterior tibial compartment (ATC), and a vascular catheter was placed in the popliteal vein and in the greater saphenous vein (GSV). The five lines of pressure were simultaneously recorded in the following situations: at rest, during Valsalva maneuver, foot flexion, and foot extension. The situation was studied with the patient in the following positions: decubitus, sitting, standing, and squatting. A final continuous recording was carried out after the patient had been walking for 5 minutes. Mean values with standard errors of muscular and venous pressure were established in each situation. At rest and during Valsalva maneuver, the muscular pressures did not vary, whereas venous pressures increased significantly when the patient was sitting and standing. On the other hand, squatting was associated with a rise in the muscular and vein pressures. Foot flexion entailed a significant increase in the ATC pressure and a rise in the GSV pressure, whereas foot extension caused the DPC pressure to rise without venous pressure modifications. Walking was associated with an alternating increase in the DPC, SPC, GSV and popliteal vein pressures when the foot was compressed to floor followed by a significant decrease when the foot pressure was released. The variations in the deep and superficial venous pressures when the patient is sitting and

  10. Evaluation of hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity with doppler ultrasonography during the puerperium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekindil, Goekhan [Department of Radiology, Trakya University School of Medicine, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Varol, Fuesun G. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Trakya University School of Medicine, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Ali Yuece, M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Trakya University School of Medicine, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Yardim, Turgut [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Trakya University School of Medicine, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    1999-03-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate pregnancy-induced changes of hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity in the puerperium and to determine if these changes disappeared by the end of the puerperium. Methods and material: Healthy normal volunteers (90) were examined on the 2nd and 7th days of puerperium and between the 6th and 8th weeks postpartum. Doppler waveform patterns were obtained in the middle hepatic vein and main portal vein. The hepatic venous pulsatility was named as normal, damped or flat. Results: On the 2nd day postpartum, the hepatic vein pulsatility was shown as normal in 8 (26%), damped in 11 (37%) and flat in 11 (37%) cases. On the 7th day postpartum, 15 (50%) cases had normal, 9 (30%) cases had dampened, and 6 (20%) cases had still flat pattern. The majority of the cases (60%) displayed normal hepatic venous pulsatility in the 6th and 8th weeks of puerperium, whereas 23% had still dampened and 17% had flat patterns. There was a trend toward normal pulsatility with increasing puerperal age. The mean portal venous velocity was still higher than the non-pregnant levels and did not showed significant alterations during puerperium. Conclusion: This study emphasised that, since pregnancy-induced alterations in hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity had not completely returned to normal in most cases until the end of the puerperium, these physiological changes should be considered whenever hepatic and portal systems are interpreted with Doppler sonography during the puerperal period.

  11. Evaluation of hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity with doppler ultrasonography during the puerperium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekindil, Goekhan; Varol, Fuesun G.; Ali Yuece, M.; Yardim, Turgut

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate pregnancy-induced changes of hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity in the puerperium and to determine if these changes disappeared by the end of the puerperium. Methods and material: Healthy normal volunteers (90) were examined on the 2nd and 7th days of puerperium and between the 6th and 8th weeks postpartum. Doppler waveform patterns were obtained in the middle hepatic vein and main portal vein. The hepatic venous pulsatility was named as normal, damped or flat. Results: On the 2nd day postpartum, the hepatic vein pulsatility was shown as normal in 8 (26%), damped in 11 (37%) and flat in 11 (37%) cases. On the 7th day postpartum, 15 (50%) cases had normal, 9 (30%) cases had dampened, and 6 (20%) cases had still flat pattern. The majority of the cases (60%) displayed normal hepatic venous pulsatility in the 6th and 8th weeks of puerperium, whereas 23% had still dampened and 17% had flat patterns. There was a trend toward normal pulsatility with increasing puerperal age. The mean portal venous velocity was still higher than the non-pregnant levels and did not showed significant alterations during puerperium. Conclusion: This study emphasised that, since pregnancy-induced alterations in hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity had not completely returned to normal in most cases until the end of the puerperium, these physiological changes should be considered whenever hepatic and portal systems are interpreted with Doppler sonography during the puerperal period

  12. A Novel Stretch Sensor to Measure Venous Hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syrpailyne Wankhar

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic venous insufficiency is a debilitating condition causing varicose veins and venous ulcers. The pathophysiology includes reflux and venous obstruction. The diagnosis is often made by clinical examination and confirmed by Venous Doppler studies. Plethysmography helps to quantitatively examine the reflux and diagnose the burden of deep venous pathology to better understand venous hemodynamics, which is not elicited by venous duplex examination alone. However, most of these tests are qualitative, expensive, and not easily available. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential use of a novel stretch sensor in the assessment of venous hemodynamics during different maneuvers by measuring the change in calf circumference. We designed the stretch sensor by using semiconductor strain gauges pasted onto a small metal bar to form a load cell. The elastic and Velcro material attached to the load cell form a belt. It converts the change in limb circumference to a proportional tension (force of distension when placed around the calf muscle. We recorded the change in limb circumference from arrays of stretch sensors by using an in-house data acquisition system. We calculated the venous volume (VV, venous filling index (VFI, ejection fraction (EF and residual venous volume (RVV on two normal subjects and on two patients to assess venous hemodynamics. The values (VV > 60 ml, VFI 60%, RVV 2ml/s, EF 35% in patients were comparable to those reported in the literature.

  13. Extra Luminal Entrapment of Guide Wire; A Rare Complication of Central Venous Catheter Placement in Right Internal Jugular Vein

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Md Abu Masud; Kumar, Naveen; Kumar, Shailesh; Kumari, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Central venous Catheterization (CVC) is a commonly performed procedure for venous access. It is associated with several complications. We report a rare case of extra luminal entrapment of guide wire during CVC placement in right jugular vein. We report a case of 28 years old female patient presented in our emergency with history of entrapped guide wire in right side of neck during CVC. X-ray showed coiling of guide wire in neck. CT Angiography showed guide wire coursing in between common caro...

  14. Colonization of a Central Venous Catheter by the Hyaline Fungus Fusarium solani Species Complex: A Case Report and SEM Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Colombo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of opportunistic infections by filamentous fungi is increasing partly due to the widespread use of central venous catheters (CVC, indwelling medical devices, and antineoplastic/immunosuppressive drugs. The case of a 13-year-old boy under treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia is presented. The boy was readmitted to the Pediatric Ward for intermittent fever of unknown origin. Results of blood cultures drawn from peripheral venous sites or through the CVC were compared. CVC-derived bottles (but not those from peripheral veins yielded hyaline fungi that, based on morphology, were identified as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Gene amplification and direct sequencing of the fungal ITS1 rRNA region and the EF-1alpha gene confirmed the isolate as belonging to the Fusarium solani species complex. Portions of the CVC were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Fungi mycelia with long protruding hyphae were seen into the lumen. The firm adhesion of the fungal formation to the inner surface of the catheter was evident. In the absence of systemic infection, catheter removal and prophylactic voriconazole therapy were followed by disappearance of febrile events and recovery. Thus, indwelling catheters are prone to contamination by environmental fungi.

  15. Unintentional arterial puncture during cephalic vein cannulation: case report and anatomical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Keller, C.; Colvin, J.; Colvin, H.; Rieder, J.; Maurer, H.; Moriggl, B.

    2004-01-01

    The cephalic antebrachial vein is often used for venous access. However, superficial radial arteries of the forearm are known and unintentional arterial puncture can result from attempts to cannulate the lateral veins of the arm. Accidental puncture of a superficial radial artery during peripheral

  16. Current concepts in repair of extremity venous injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy K; Clouse, W Darrin

    2016-04-01

    Extremity venous injury management remains controversial. The purpose of this communication is to offer perspective as well as experiential and technical insight into extremity venous injury repair. Available literature is reviewed and discussed. Historical context is provided. Indication, the decision process for repair, including technical conduct, is delineated. In particular, the authors' experiences in both civilian and wartime injury are used for perspective. Extremity venous injury repair was championed within data from the Vietnam Vascular Registry. However, patterns of extremity venous injury differ between combat and civilian settings. Since Vietnam, civilian descriptive series opine the benefits and potential complications associated with both venous injury repair and ligation. These surround extremity edema, chronic venous insufficiency, thromboembolism, and limb loss. Whereas no clear superiority in either approach has been identified to date, there appears to be no increased risk of pulmonary embolism or chronic venous changes with repair. Newer data from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and meta-analysis have reinforced this and also have suggested limb salvage benefit for extremity venous repair in combined arterial and venous injuries in modern settings. The patient's physiologic state and associated injury drive five triage categories suggesting vein injury management. Vein repair thrombosis occurs in a significant proportion, yet many recanalize and possibly have a positive impact on limb venous return. Further, early decompression favors reduced blood loss, acute edema, and inflammation, supporting collateral development. Large soft tissue injury minimizing collateral capacity increases the importance of repair. Constructs of repair are varied with modest differences in patency. Venous shunting is feasible, but specific roles remain nebulous. An aggressive posture toward extremity venous injury repair seems justified today because of the likely

  17. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soralova, T.; Sevcikova, H.; Petersky, D.

    2014-01-01

    We decided to process this theme due to its nonspecific clinical features as they often cause diagnostic problems not only to clinicians but also to diagnostic. It is important to think of this disease mainly in young women who administer hormonal contraception. Imaging methods play the crucial role in diagnostic of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The gold standard is a native CT of brain which shows the venous sinus thrombosis as a hyperdense lesion in the locus of the sinus (dense triangle sign), CT venography shows the sinus thrombosis as a defect in a contrast filling of the venous sinus (empty delta sign). Other investigative methods are magnetic resonance imaging or MRA. In short we also mention quite a rare but more serious thrombosis of profound cerebral veins v. cerebri magna-Galeni, vv. cerebri internae). The importance of early diagnostic and non specificity of symptoms is presented in 3 clinical cases that are the part of this work. (author)

  18. Nursing diagnoses in patients with chronic venous ulcer: observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glycia de Almeida Nogueira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze nursing diagnoses in people with chronic venous ulcer. An observational, descriptive, quantitative research conducted in an ambulatory specialized in wound treatment, with a non-probabilistic sample of 20 patients.  Data collection was performed in an institutional form denominated Assessment Protocol for Clients with Tissue Lesions. Diagnoses were established by consensus among four researchers with experience in nursing diagnoses and wound treatments. From data analysis, 16 diagnoses were identified, with 100% of participants presenting: Impaired tissue integrity, Ineffective peripheral tissue perfusion, Risk of infection, Impaired physical mobility and Ineffective health self-control. These diagnoses are found in Safety/Protection, Activity/Rest and Health promotion domains, which from the clinical practice stand point should be priority focuses in nursing intervention and assessment.

  19. Detection of an embolized central venous catheter fragment with endobronchial ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Harris, Kassem; Alraiyes, Abdul H; Picone, Anthony L

    2018-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman underwent Convex-probe Endobronchial Ultrasound (CP-EBUS) for 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose avid subcarinal lymphadenopathy on Positron Emission Tomogram (PET) scan. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of the subcarinal lymph node revealed squamous cell lung carcinoma. A small hyperechoic rounded density was noted inside the lumen of the azygous vein. Based on chest computed tomography findings and her clinical history, this was felt to be a broken fragment of a peripherally inserted central catheter, which was placed for intravenous antibiotics, a few months prior to this presentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever CP-EBUS description of a broken fragment of central venous catheter. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Post-General Anesthesia Ultrasound-Guided Venous Mapping Increases Autogenous Access Placement Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, C Y Maximilian; Korayem, Adam; Finlay, David J

    2018-04-18

    This study investigates the impact of introducing a post-general anesthesia ultrasound mapping (PAUS) on the type of vascular access chosen for hemodialysis in patients without previous accesses. 203 of 297 consecutive patients met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Within-subjects analysis was performed on patients with both an outpatient ultrasound-guided vein mapping and a PAUS using sign tests and Wilcoxon signed ranked tests. Further, a between-subjects analysis added patients with only the outpatient vein mapping; demographic and comorbidity data were analyzed using t-tests and chi-squared tests. An ordinal logit regression was run for the type of access placed, while a bivariate logit regression was used to compare rates of autogenous access maturation. 165 (81%) patients received both a standard outpatient vein mapping and a PAUS. At the outpatient vein mapping, 130 (79%) patients had suitable veins for an autogenous access while 35 (21%) patients did not have suitable veins for an autogenous access and were planned for a prosthetic access. During PAUS, all 165 (100%) patients were found to have suitable veins for autogenous access formation (P<0.001). When comparing specific autogenous access configurations, Wilcoxon signed rank testing showed significantly more preferable access configurations in the PAUS group compared to the outpatient mapping (P<0.001); Outpatient mapping resulted in 81 (47%) radiocephalic accesses, 10 (6%) radiobasilic accesses, 20 (12%) brachiocephalic accesses, 19 (12%) brachiobasilic accesses and 35 (21%) prosthetic accesses planned, in contrast to 149 (90%) radiocephalic accesses, 3 (2%) radiobasilic accesses, 10 (6%) brachiocephalic accesses, 3 (2%) brachiobasilic accesses and 0 prosthetic accesses when the same patients were analyzed using PAUS. With the analysis expanded to include the 38 (19%) patients with only the outpatient vein mapping (without-PAUS), the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test showed no significant differences

  1. Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Subcutaneous Venous Access Device Scars: A Head-to-Head Patient Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Eichler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a product widely used in sports medicine, tissue repair, and general surgery. A recent meta-analysis showed this product to be beneficial when introduced into a wound area, be it intra-articular (i.e., joint-injections or direct introduction onto the wound surface. Methods. Between the years of 2012 and 2014 a questionnaire evaluating surgical outcome after port (venous access device removal was answered by 100 patients in the control group and 20 patients in a PRP group, leading to a total of 120 patients in this single center, retrospective, subjective outcome evaluation. Results. No statistical difference was shown in postsurgical complication rates, postsurgical pain, decreased mobility, and overall quality of life. A significant difference was shown in overall patient satisfaction and the desire to further improve port area scarring. Results differed significantly in favor of the PRP group. Interestingly, approximately 40.2% of patients are dissatisfied with the surgical outcome after port removal in the control group. This result, though surprising, may be improved to 10% dissatisfaction when a PRP product is used. Conclusion. PRP products such as Arthrex ACP are safe to use and present an additional option in improving surgical outcome.

  2. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K; Pott, F; Stok, W J; Karemaker, J M

    2004-01-01

    Internal jugular veins are the major cerebral venous outflow pathway in supine humans. In upright humans the positioning of these veins above heart level causes them to collapse. An alternative cerebral outflow pathway is the vertebral venous plexus. We set out to determine the effect of posture and central venous pressure (CVP) on the distribution of cerebral outflow over the internal jugular veins and the vertebral plexus, using a mathematical model. Input to the model was a data set of beat-to-beat cerebral blood flow velocity and CVP measurements in 10 healthy subjects, during baseline rest and a Valsalva manoeuvre in the supine and standing position. The model, consisting of 2 jugular veins, each a chain of 10 units containing nonlinear resistances and capacitors, and a vertebral plexus containing a resistance, showed blood flow mainly through the internal jugular veins in the supine position, but mainly through the vertebral plexus in the upright position. A Valsalva manoeuvre while standing completely re-opened the jugular veins. Results of ultrasound imaging of the right internal jugular vein cross-sectional area at the level of the laryngeal prominence in six healthy subjects, before and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R2 = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway. The internal jugular veins are collapsed in the standing position and blood is shunted to an alternative venous pathway, but a marked increase in CVP while standing completely re-opens the jugular veins. PMID:15284348

  3. Penile venous surgery for treating erectile dysfunction: Past, present, and future perspectives with regard to new insights in venous anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsing Hsieh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the physiologic model of normal erectile function, a healthy veno-occlusive mechanism is essential to initiate and maintain a rigid erection. The surgical treatment of patients with venous leakage, which is synonymous with corporoveno-occlusive dysfunction (CVOD, was based on the decreased venous outflow during the erection process. The initial reports of short-term results were promising, but the long-term benefits of penile venous ligation surgery were limited. Most clinical guideline panels concluded that surgeries performed in an attempt to limit the venous outflow of the penis were not recommended. Consequently, this surgery was nearly abandoned in most medical societies worldwide. These unfavorable postoperative outcomes seemed attributable to the indispensable usage of electrocautery and insufficient venous management, based on conventional penile venous anatomy. Advances in better understanding of human penile venous anatomy has enabled the development of refined penile venous stripping surgery. The thorough stripping surgery is an even more radical procedure, which is an even more radical procedure, and seems to be a viable option for the treatment of CVOD, however, there is still a need for further study with well-defined diagnostic criteria, and standardized patient and partner outcome assessment.

  4. Cerebral venous outflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive B. Beggs

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the impact of restricted cerebral venous outflow on the biomechanics of the intracranial fluid system is investigated. The cerebral venous drainage system is often viewed simply as a series of collecting vessels channeling blood back to the heart. However there is growing evidence that it plays an important role in regulating the intracranial fluid system. In particular, there appears to be a link between increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pulsatility in the Aqueduct of Sylvius and constricted venous outflow. Constricted venous outflow also appears to inhibit absorption of CSF into the superior sagittal sinus. The compliance of the cortical bridging veins appears to be critical to the behaviour of the intracranial fluid system, with abnormalities at this location implicated in normal pressure hydrocephalus. The compliance associated with these vessels appears to be functional in nature and dependent on the free egress of blood out of the cranium via the extracranial venous drainage pathways. Because constricted venous outflow appears to be linked with increased aqueductal CSF pulsatility, it suggests that inhibited venous blood outflow may be altering the compliance of the cortical bridging veins.

  5. Central venous cannulation: are routine chest radiographs necessary after B-mode and colour Doppler sonography check?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, Cecilia; Fabrizzi, Giancarlo; Russo, Marco

    2006-01-01

    After the insertion of a central venous catheter, a chest radiograph is usually obtained to ensure correct positioning of the catheter tip. To determine in a paediatric population whether B-mode and colour Doppler sonography after central venous access is useful to evaluate catheter position, thus obviating the need for a postprocedural radiograph. A prospective study of 107 consecutive central venous access procedures placed in a paediatric intensive care unit was performed. At the end of the procedure, B-mode and colour Doppler sonography were used to assess catheter position and check for complications. A postprocedural chest radiograph was obtained in all patients. In 96 patients postprocedural B-mode and colour Doppler sonography showed colour Doppler signals within the vena cava. Among the 11 patients predicted to have a potential complication, there was one pneumothorax and ten malpositions. Chest radiography showed a total of 13 complications - 1 pneumothorax and 12 malpositions. The concordance between colour Doppler sonography and chest radiography was 98.1% in the detection of catheter position; sonography had a sensitivity of 84.6% and a specificity of 100%. The close concordance between B-mode and colour Doppler sonography and chest radiography justifies the more frequent use of sonography to evaluate catheter position because ionizing radiation is eliminated. Chest radiography may then be performed only when there is suspected inappropriate catheter tip position after sonography. (orig.)

  6. Novel Use of a Pneumatic Compression Device for Haemostasis of Haemodialysis Fistula Access Catheterisation Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Reilly, Michael K., E-mail: moreilly1@mater.ie; Ryan, David; Sugrue, Gavin; Geoghegan, Tony; Lawler, Leo P.; Farrelly, Cormac T. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Ireland)

    2016-12-15

    PurposeTransradial pneumatic compression devices can be used to achieve haemostasis following radial artery puncture. This article describes a novel technique for acquiring haemostasis of arterio-venous haemodialysis fistula access sites without the need for suture placement using one such compression device.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of fistulograms with or without angioplasty/thrombectomy in a single institution was performed. 20 procedures performed on 12 patients who underwent percutaneous intervention of failing or thrombosed arterio-venous fistulas (AVF) had 27 puncture sites. Haemostasis was achieved using a pneumatic compression device at all access sites. Procedure details including size of access sheath, heparin administration and complications were recorded.ResultsTwo diagnostic fistulograms, 14 fistulograms and angioplasties and four thrombectomies were performed via access sheaths with an average size (±SD) of 6 Fr (±1.12). IV unfractionated heparin was administered in 11 of 20 procedures. Haemostasis was achieved in 26 of 27 access sites following 15–20 min of compression using the pneumatic compression device. One case experienced limited bleeding from an inflow access site that was successfully treated with reinflation of the device for a further 5 min. No other complication was recorded.ConclusionsHaemostasis of arterio-venous haemodialysis fistula access sites can be safely and effectively achieved using a pneumatic compression device. This is a technically simple, safe and sutureless technique for acquiring haemostasis after AVF intervention.

  7. Chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinsky, Claire D; Waldorf, Heidi

    2009-11-01

    Identifying characteristic cutaneous findings is important in determining the appropriate management of certain venous diseases. The health care provider should be familiar with the classic description of patterns and distributions of skin manifestations, such as varicose veins, stasis dermatitis, palpable cord, petechiae, and telangiectasias. In addition to the gross appearance of the skin, a skin biopsy may help elucidate a diagnosis. General treatment and prevention of the underlying venous pathology is essential. Furthermore, specific management of skin findings should include therapy to ameliorate progression of disease and symptomatology when warranted.

  8. Usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography in diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuga, Takayuki; Akiyama, Norio; Takenaka, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Kentaro; Zempo, Noriya; Esato, Kensuke

    1992-01-01

    The diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was evaluated in 19 patients with peripheral vascular disease. It takes thirty minutes or less to perform this test, without any complications. The percent of correct diagnosis on obstructive and stenotic region was 75% in cases of deep vein thrombosis. In addition, it was easy to diagnose an existence of a graft patent. However, it was unsatisfactory to understand morphologic changes of an iliac artery and to determine the position of grafting. The position and size of dilatation and existence of thrombus were easily evaluated in patients with venous aneurysm and varicose vein. MRA was a non-invasive, short spending time imaging. It was available for pregnant women and people with drug allergy, heart failure or renal failure. We believe that MRA can be used in the preoperative examination and the evaluation of the postoperative complications in the peripheral vascular diseases. (J.P.N.)

  9. Usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography in diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuga, Takayuki; Akiyama, Norio; Takenaka, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Kentaro; Zempo, Noriya; Esato, Kensuke (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-03-01

    The diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was evaluated in 19 patients with peripheral vascular disease. It takes thirty minutes or less to perform this test, without any complications. The percent of correct diagnosis on obstructive and stenotic region was 75% in cases of deep vein thrombosis. In addition, it was easy to diagnose an existence of a graft patent. However, it was unsatisfactory to understand morphologic changes of an iliac artery and to determine the position of grafting. The position and size of dilatation and existence of thrombus were easily evaluated in patients with venous aneurysm and varicose vein. MRA was a non-invasive, short spending time imaging. It was available for pregnant women and people with drug allergy, heart failure or renal failure. We believe that MRA can be used in the preoperative examination and the evaluation of the postoperative complications in the peripheral vascular diseases. (J.P.N.).

  10. Features and selection of vascular access devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansivero, Gail Egan

    2010-05-01

    To review venous anatomy and physiology, discuss assessment parameters before vascular access device (VAD) placement, and review VAD options. Journal articles, personal experience. A number of VAD options are available in clinical practice. Access planning should include comprehensive assessment, with attention to patient participation in the planning and selection process. Careful consideration should be given to long-term access needs and preservation of access sites. Oncology nurses are uniquely suited to perform a key role in VAD planning and placement. With knowledge of infusion therapy, anatomy and physiology, device options, and community resources, nurses can be key leaders in preserving vascular access and improving the safety and comfort of infusion therapy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Security material for venous peripheral..catheterization evaluation in an emergency ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Jiménez Ruiz, Manuel; Rodríguez Navarro, Luis Miguel; Muñoz Pascual, José Carlos; Ramos Rueda, M del Carmen; Torres Pérez, Luis

    2007-06-01

    Venous canalization can be one of the most frequent causes of accidents due to an accidental puncture. To carry out activities which serve to lessen these misfortunes, bearing high biological risk, should become a priority for sanitary institutions and for their professionals. Inside a global strategy which deals with this aspect and with the objective of evaluating the convenience these instruments have in our center the authors made a practical evaluation on a series of them to discover their technical viability and their subjective consideration by professionals who employ them. For motives related to the practices of the ward in which this research took place, an emergency ward, the authors intentionally chose two passive instruments, available on the market, and three nurses who received 120 sample security catheters, 60 each for products A and B, to carry out habitual clinical practices, alongside a pad of paper on which to record any incidents. Regarding instrument A, 30 incidents, 52.6%, were detected while 37 sample procedures occurred. Regarding instrument B, 4 incidents, 7.01%, were detected while 47 sample procedures occurred. In absolute terms, neither of the two instruments demonstrated problems of an insecure manner; which is to say neither produced a situation related to the appearance of mis fortunate incidents associated to accidental punctures. The lower number of incidents with instrument B appears to be related to the habitual use of a conventional cathetec not a security one, produced by the same manufacturer in our center This research project was subsidized by the Sanitary Research Fund, PI 051265.

  12. Venous thromboembolism and arterial complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandoni, Paolo; Piovella, Chiara; Pesavento, Raffaele

    2012-04-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests the likelihood of a link between venous and arterial thrombosis. The two vascular complications share several risk factors, such as age, obesity, smoking, diabetes mellitus, blood hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and metabolic syndrome. Moreover, there are many examples of conditions accounting for both venous and arterial thrombosis, such as the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, hyperhomocysteinemia, malignancies, infections, and the use of hormonal treatment. Finally, several recent studies have consistently shown that patients with venous thromboembolism are at a higher risk of arterial thrombotic complications than matched control individuals. We, therefore, speculate the two vascular complications are simultaneously triggered by biological stimuli responsible for activating coagulation and inflammatory pathways in both the arterial and the venous system. Future studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association, to assess its extent, and to evaluate its implications for clinical practice. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Venous trauma in the Lebanon War--2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitecki, Samy S; Karram, Tony; Hoffman, Aaron; Bass, Arie

    2007-10-01

    Reports on venous trauma are relatively sparse. Severe venous trauma is manifested by hemorrhage, not ischemia. Bleeding may be internal or external and rarely may lead to hypovolemic shock. Repair of major extremity veins has been a subject of controversy and the current teaching is to avoid venous repair in an unstable or multi-trauma patient. The aim of the current paper is to present our recent experience in major venous trauma during the Lebanon conflict, means of diagnosis and treatment in a level I trauma center. All cases of major venous trauma, either isolated or combined with arterial injury, admitted to the emergency room during the 33-day conflict were reviewed. Out of 511 wounded soldiers and civilians who were admitted to our service over this period, 12 (2.3%) sustained a penetrating venous injury either isolated (5) or combined with arterial injury (7). All injuries were secondary to high velocity penetrating missiles or from multiple pellets stored in long-range missiles. All injuries were accompanied by additional insult to soft tissue, bone and viscera. The mean injury severity score was 15. Severe external bleeding was the presenting symptom in three cases of isolated venous injury (jugular, popliteal and femoral). The diagnosis of a major venous injury was made by a CTA scan in five cases, angiography in one and during surgical exploration in six cases. All injured veins were repaired: three by venous interposition grafts, four by end to end anastomosis, three by lateral suture and two by endovascular techniques. None of the injuries was treated by ligation of a major named vein. Immediate postoperative course was uneventful in all patients and the 30-day follow-up (by clinical assessment and duplex scan) has demonstrated a patent repair with no evidence of thrombosis. Without contradicting the wisdom of ligating major veins in the setup of multi-trauma or an unstable patient, our experience indicates that a routine repair of venous trauma can

  14. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H

    2012-01-01

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral...... arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three...... demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output....

  15. Venous infraction of developmental venous anomaly: A case report with perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Hye Jeong; Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Han Myun; Hwang, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Yang, Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is a common congenital venous malformation characterized by dilated medullary veins in caput medusa configuration and a draining vein. Despite the high incidence of DVAs, they are benign anatomic variations and rarely cause symptoms. Here, we report computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings with perfusion images of acute infarction from underlying DVA in a 63-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset of neurologic symptoms and recovered without any neurologic deficit.

  16. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and central venous pressure (CVP) on the distribution of cerebral outflow over the internal jugular veins and the vertebral plexus, using a mathematical model. Input to the model was a data set of beat-to-beat cerebral blood flow velocity and CVP measurements in 10 healthy subjects, during baseline rest......Internal jugular veins are the major cerebral venous outflow pathway in supine humans. In upright humans the positioning of these veins above heart level causes them to collapse. An alternative cerebral outflow pathway is the vertebral venous plexus. We set out to determine the effect of posture...... and a Valsalva manoeuvre in the supine and standing position. The model, consisting of 2 jugular veins, each a chain of 10 units containing nonlinear resistances and capacitors, and a vertebral plexus containing a resistance, showed blood flow mainly through the internal jugular veins in the supine position...

  17. [DESCRIPTION OF A RETROPERITONEAL ACCESS ROUTE TO THE VESSELS OF THE SPLEEN FOR SPLENORENAL ARTERIAL AND VENOUS ANASTOMOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Vernet Vila, José María

    2014-01-01

    To perform arterial or venous spleno-renal anastomoses, surgeons have so far systematically used the transperitoneal way whic is burdened by a high mortality an morbility percentage. On the basis of anatomo-surgical considerations, a retroperitoneal approach has been found reaching the hilus of the spleen via the lumbar region; the first arterial spleno-renal anastomosis by this way was performed in 1972 and the first venous spleno-renal anastomosis due to portal hipertension also by this way was performed in 1974, the alter proving to be the least aggresive by avoiding damaging the páncreas, the most surgical and direct for reaching the splenic vessels thereby enabling a better exposure and an easier performing of the anastomoses. By being retroperitoneal, the loss or infección of the ascitic liquid in the cirrhotic patient is prevented.

  18. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  19. Surgical management of venous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loose, D A

    2007-01-01

    Among vascular malformations, the predominantly venous malformations represent the majority of cases. They form a clinical entity and therefore need clear concepts concerning diagnosis and treatment. This paper presents an overview of contemporary classification as well as tactics and techniques of treatment. According to the Hamburg Classification, predominantly venous malformations are categorized into truncular and extratruncular forms, with truncular forms distinguished as obstructions and dilations, and extratruncular forms as limited or infiltrating. The tactics of treatment represent surgical and non-surgical methods or combined techniques. Surgical approaches utilize different tactics and techniques that are adopted based on the pathologic form and type of the malformation: (I) operation to reduce the haemodynamic activity of the malformation; (II) operation to eliminate the malformation; and (III) reconstructive operation. As for (I), a type of a tactic is the operation to derive the venous flow. In (II), the total or partial removal of the venous malformation is demonstrated subdivided into three different techniques. In this way, the infiltrating as well as the limited forms can be treated. An additional technique is dedicated to the treatment of a marginal vein. Approach (III) involves the treatment of venous aneurysms, where a variety of techniques have been successful. Long-term follow-up demonstrates positive results in 91% of the cases. Congenital predominantly venous malformations should be treated according to the principles developed during the past decades in vascular surgery, interventional treatment and multidisciplinary treatment. The days of predominantly conservative treatment should be relegated to the past. Special skills and experiences are necessary to carry out appropriate surgical strategy, and the required operative techniques should be dictated by the location and type of malformation and associated findings.

  20. Starclose SE® hemostasis after 6F direct antegrade superficial femoral artery access distal to the femoral head for peripheral endovascular procedures in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Kitrou, Panagiotis; Christeas, Nikolaos; Karnabatidis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Direct superficial femoral artery (SFA) antegrade puncture is a valid alternative to common femoral artery (CFA) access for peripheral vascular interventions. Data investigating vascular closure device (VCD) hemostasis of distant SFA 6F access are limited. We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the Starclose SE® VCD for hemostasis, following direct 6F antegrade SFA access distal to the femoral head. This prospective, single-center study included patients who were not suitable for CFA puncture and were scheduled to undergo peripheral endovascular interventions using direct antegrade SFA 6F access, at least 2 cm below the inferior edge of femoral head. Hemostasis was obtained with the Starclose SE® VCD (Abbott Laboratories). Primary endpoints were successful hemostasis rate and periprocedural (30-day) major complication rate. Secondary endpoint was the rate of minor complications. Clinical and Doppler ultrasound follow-up was performed at discharge and at one month. Between September 2014 and August 2015, a total of 30 patients (21 male; 70.0%) with a mean body mass index of 41.2 kg/m2 were enrolled. Mean age was 72±9 years (range, 67-88 years). Most patients suffered from critical limb ischemia (87.1%) and diabetes (61.3%). Calcifications were present in eight cases (26.6%). Reason for direct SFA puncture was obesity (100%). Successful hemostasis was achieved in 100% of the cases. No major complications were noted after one-month follow-up. Minor complications included two <5 cm hematomas (6.6%) not necessitating treatment. In this prospective study, Starclose SE® VCD was safe and effective for hemostasis of antegrade direct SFA puncture. Uncomplicated hemostasis was achieved even in cases of puncturing 2 to 7 cm below the inferior edge of the femoral head.

  1. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, TAM tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands is upregulated in venous leg ulcer patients: a novel insight into chronic wound immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkor, Kata; Németh, Tibor; Nagy, István; Kondorosi, Éva; Urbán, Edit; Kemény, Lajos; Szolnoky, Győző

    2016-08-01

    The systemic host defence mechanisms, especially innate immunity, in venous leg ulcer patients are poorly investigated. The aim of the current study was to measure Candida albicans killing activity and gene expressions of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and innate immune response regulators, TAM receptors and ligands of peripheral blood mononuclear cells separated from 69 venous leg ulcer patients and 42 control probands. Leg ulcer patients were stratified into responder and non-responder groups on the basis of wound healing properties. No statistical differences were found in Candida killing among controls, responders and non-responders. Circulating blood mononuclear cells of patients overexpress pro-inflammatory (IL-1α, TNFα, CXCL-8) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines as well as TAM receptors (Tyro, Axl, MerTK) and their ligands Gas6 and Protein S compared with those of control individuals. IL-1α is notably overexpressed in venous leg ulcer treatment non-responders; in contrast, Axl gene expression is robustly stronger among responders. These markers may be considered as candidates for the prediction of treatment response among venous leg ulcer patients. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Prevalence of lower extremity venous duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson William

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This retrospective study was performed to determine the prevalence of lower extremity venous duplication using duplex ultrasound in the patient population of a large urban medical center. Materials and Methods: The reports of all lower extremity venous ultrasound examinations performed at our institution between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 were reviewed. Ultrasound examinations that were performed for purposes other than the detection of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis were excluded. The prevalence of duplication and its specific location were recorded. In addition, the prevalence of thrombus and its specific location were also recorded. Results: A total of 3118 exams were performed in 2664 patients. Of the 2664 patients, 2311 had only one examination performed during the study period; 353 patients had more than one examination performed. We found that 10.1% of patients (270/2664 had at least one venous segment duplicated and 5.4% of patients (143/2664 had a thrombus in at least one venous segment. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of both duplication and thrombus with a change in venous segment. Only 0.4% of patients (11/2664 had thrombus within a duplicated segment. Of those who had more than one examination performed, 15.3% (54/353 had the same venous segment(s seen on one examination but not another. Conclusion: Lower extremity venous duplication is a frequent anatomic variant that is seen in 10.1% of patients, but it may not be as common as is generally believed. It can result in a false negative result for deep vein thrombosis.

  3. Non malignant peripheral lymphadenopathy in Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis should be suspected and ruled out in patients who present with PL, particularly in rural areas with no access to histopathology services. Keywords: Peripheral lymphadenopathy, Tuberculosis, Toxoplasmosis, Lymphadenitis. Résumé La lymphadenopathie périphérique persistante (PL) qui n'est pas associée ...

  4. Serum Procalcitonin and Peripheral Venous Lactate for Predicting Dengue Shock and/or Organ Failure: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipa Thanachartwet

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are no biomarkers that can predict the incidence of dengue shock and/or organ failure, although the early identification of risk factors is important in determining appropriate management to reduce mortality. Therefore, we sought to determine the factors associated with dengue shock and/or organ failure and to evaluate the prognostic value of serum procalcitonin (PCT and peripheral venous lactate (PVL levels as biomarkers of dengue shock and/or organ failure.A prospective observational study was conducted among adults hospitalized for confirmed viral dengue infection at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Bangkok, Thailand between October 2013 and July 2015. Data, including baseline characteristics, clinical parameters, laboratory findings, serum PCT and PVL levels, management, and outcomes, were recorded on pre-defined case report forms. Of 160 patients with dengue, 128 (80.0% patients had dengue without shock or organ failure, whereas 32 (20.0% patients developed dengue with shock and/or organ failure. Using a stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis, PCT ≥0.7 ng/mL (odds ratio [OR]: 4.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.60-14.45; p = 0.005 and PVL ≥2.5 mmol/L (OR: 27.99, 95% CI: 8.47-92.53; p <0.001 were independently associated with dengue shock and/or organ failure. A combination of PCT ≥0.7 ng/mL and PVL ≥2.5 mmol/L provided good prognostic value for predicting dengue shock and/or organ failure, with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.74-0.92, a sensitivity of 81.2% (95% CI: 63.6-92.8%, and a specificity of 84.4% (95% CI: 76.9-90.2%. Dengue shock patients with non-clearance of PCT and PVL expired during hospitalization.PCT ≥0.7 ng/mL and PVL ≥2.5 mmol/L were independently associated with dengue shock and/or organ failure. The combination of PCT and PVL levels could be used as prognostic biomarkers for the prediction of dengue shock and/or organ failure.

  5. THE AZYGOS VENOUS SYSTEM AND ITS ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS

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    Madiki Sudhakara Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Azygos veins are important cavocaval and portacaval junctions, which form a collateral circulation in caval vein occlusion and in portal hypertension, cirrhosis of liver. The unpaired azygos venous system consists of azygos vein, hemiazygos vein and accessory azygos vein. This system of veins, along with its mediastinal, bronchial and oesophageal tributaries drains most of the body wall of trunk, namely posterior abdominal and thoracic wall. Anatomical variations of this unpaired azygos venous system are clinically important. AIMS To study and report the occurrence of anatomical variations of the unpaired azygos venous system in the region of East Godavari District, Andhra Pradesh (India. METHODS The present study was carried out in the Department of Anatomy, KIMS & RF, Amalapuram and G.S.L. Medical College, Rajahmundry over a period of 2 years. The present study was conducted on 60 cadavers (irrespective of age and sex. The entire course of the azygos venous system in these 60 cadavers was carefully observed and documented. RESULTS Anatomical variations were present in 16.66% of cases, out of which three distinct types were identified. 6.6% exhibited two separate azygos venous systems with no communications, 5% with communication between the left brachiocephalic vein and the azygos vein and 5% presence of post-aortic venous channels. CONCLUSION Variations of azygos venous system may be wrongly dubbed as aneurysm, lymphadenopathy or other abnormalities while reporting a CT scan of mediastinum. Venous anomalies are also detected only during surgery. The most troublesome intraoperative hazard is haemorrhage, which is mainly of venous origin. To avoid such situations is to have an awareness and knowledge of the expected venous anomalies.

  6. Noninvasive optoacoustic system for rapid diagnosis and management of circulatory shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Kinsky, Michael; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Andrey; Henkel, S. N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Prough, Donald S.

    2013-03-01

    Circulatory shock can lead to death or severe complications, if not promptly diagnosed and effectively treated. Typically, diagnosis and management of circulatory shock are guided by blood pressure and heart rate. However, these variables have poor specificity, sensitivity, and predictive value. Early goal-directed therapy in septic shock patients, using central venous catheterization (CVC), reduced mortality from 46.5% to 30%. However, CVC is invasive and complication-prone. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive, rapid assessment of peripheral and central venous oxygenation. In this work we used a medical grade optoacoustic system for noninvasive, ultrasound image-guided measurement of central and peripheral venous oxygenation. Venous oxygenation during shock declines more rapidly in the periphery than centrally. Ultrasound imaging of the axillary [peripheral] and internal jugular vein [central] was performed using the Vivid e (GE Healthcare). We built an optoacoustic interface incorporating an optoacoustic transducer and a standard ultrasound imaging probe. Central and peripheral venous oxygenations were measured continuously in healthy volunteers. To simulate shock-induced changes in central and peripheral oxygenation, we induced peripheral vasoconstriction in the upper extremity by using a cooling blanket. Central and peripheral venous oxygenations were measured before (baseline) and after cooling and after rewarming. During the entire experiment, central venous oxygenation was relatively stable, while peripheral venous oxygenation decreased by 5-10% due to cooling and recovered after rewarming. The obtained data indicate that noninvasive, optoacoustic measurements of central and peripheral venous oxygenation may be used for diagnosis and management of circulatory shock with high sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Dural sinus thrombosis - A rare manifestation of internal jugular venous occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Binnani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dural sinus thrombosis is an uncommon complication of a commonly done procedure of central venous catheterisation. We present a case of massive hemorrhagic venous infarct with gross cerebral edema due to dural sinus thrombosis along with right internal jugular vein thrombus. A 21-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department with fever and swelling of the right neck four days following discharge after his prior hospitalization two weeks ago for acute renal failure due to severe gastroenteritis, when he underwent hemodialysis through right internal jugular access. On presentation, he was conscious, with swelling on right side of the neck, which was diagnosed as right internal jugular vein occlusion. However, he rapidly dete-riorated and developed signs of raised intracranial pressure despite being on treatment with heparin. He was diagnosed as having massive hemorrhagic cerebral venous infarct with gross cerebral edema complicated with shift of the ventricles to the left due to dural sinus thrombosis. Despite emergency decompressive craniotomy, he succumbed in the next two days due to coning. Asymptomatic catheter-related thrombosis is frequent in the intensive care units, but major complications like retrograde extension into dural sinus causing thrombosis is rare. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this major catastrophe for an early and meaningful intervention.

  8. Effect of hepatic venous sphincter contraction on transmission of central venous pressure to lobar and portal pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautt, W W; Legare, D J; Greenway, C V

    1987-11-01

    In dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital, central vena caval pressure (CVP), portal venous pressure (PVP), and intrahepatic lobar venous pressure (proximal to the hepatic venous sphincters) were measured. The objective was to determine some characteristics of the intrahepatic vascular resistance sites (proximal and distal to the hepatic venous sphincters) including testing predictions made using a recent mathematical model of distensible hepatic venous resistance. The stimulus used was a brief rise in CVP produced by transient occlusion of the thoracic vena cava in control state and when vascular resistance was elevated by infusions of norepinephrine or histamine, or by nerve stimulation. The percent transmission of the downstream pressure rise to upstream sites past areas of vascular resistance was elevated. Even small increments in CVP are partially transmitted upstream. The data are incompatible with the vascular waterfall phenomenon which predicts that venous pressure increments are not transmitted upstream until a critical pressure is overcome and then further increments would be 100% transmitted. The hepatic sphincters show the following characteristics. First, small rises in CVP are transmitted less than large elevations; as the CVP rises, the sphincters passively distend and allow a greater percent transmission upstream, thus a large rise in CVP is more fully transmitted than a small rise in CVP. Second, the amount of pressure transmission upstream is determined by the vascular resistance across which the pressure is transmitted. As nerves, norepinephrine, or histamine cause the hepatic sphincters to contract, the percent transmission becomes less and the distensibility of the sphincters is reduced. Similar characteristics are shown for the "presinusoidal" vascular resistance and the hepatic venous sphincter resistance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Normal venous anatomy and physiology of the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notowitz, L B

    1993-06-01

    Venous disease of the lower extremities is common but is often misunderstood. It seems that the focus is on the exciting world of arterial anatomy and pathology, while the topic of venous anatomy and pathology comes in second place. However, venous diseases such as chronic venous insufficiency, leg ulcers, and varicose veins affect much of the population and may lead to disability and death. Nurses are often required to answer complex questions from the patients and his or her family about the patient's disease. Patients depend on nurses to provide accurate information in terms they can understand. Therefore it is important to have an understanding of the normal venous system of the legs before one can understand the complexities of venous diseases and treatments. This presents an overview of normal venous anatomy and physiology.

  10. Online shopping interface components: relative importance as peripheral and central cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Clyde A; Wu, Wann-Yih; Tsai, Dungchun

    2006-06-01

    The Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) uses central (more thoughtful) and peripheral (less thoughtful) routes of persuasion to maximize communication effectiveness. This research implements ELM to investigate the relative importance of different aspects of the user experience in online shopping. Of all the issues surrounding online shopping, convenience, access to information, and trust were found to be the most important. These were implemented in an online conjoint shopping task. Respondents were found to use the central route of the ELM on marketing messages that involved issues of minimizing travel, information access, and assurances of system security. Users employed the peripheral ELM route when considering usability, price comparison, and personal information protection. A descriptive model of Web-based marketing components, their roles in the central and peripheral routes, and their relative importance to online consumer segments was developed.

  11. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  12. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B.; Dias, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  13. Erythrocytes and von Willebrand factor in venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, M.W.J.

    2018-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism represents the third leading vascular disease after myocardial infarction and stroke. Erythrocytes, the most abundant cells in venous thrombi, were thought to be innocent bystanders that become tangled up in the fibrin mesh of venous thrombi. However, this thesis describes

  14. The Biocarbon vascular access device (DiaTAB) for haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, P J; Slooff, M J; Lichtendahl, D H; van der Hem, G K

    1985-01-01

    The Biocarbon vascular access device (DiaTAB) is a relatively new method in secondary access surgery. Punctures, often the cause of complications can be avoided because it is a no-needle method of dialysis. However thrombosis due to stenosis of the venous anastomosis or of the efferent vein is a continuing problem. A new experience is the fibrin flap formation under the plug of the device, which can be removed easily.

  15. 'Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency' in multiple sclerosis. Is multiple sclerosis a disease of the cerebrospinal venous outflow system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattjes, M.P.; Doepp, F.; Bendszus, M.; Fiehler, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic impaired venous outflow from the central nervous system has recently been claimed to be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. This resulted in the term chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in MS. The concept of CCSVI is based on sonography studies showing that impaired venous outflow leading to pathological reflux is almost exclusively present in MS patients but not in healthy controls. Based on these findings, a new pathophysiological concept has been introduced suggesting that chronic venous outflow obstruction and venous reflux in the CNS result in pathological iron depositions leading to inflammation and neurodegeneration. The theory of CCSVI in MS has rapidly generated tremendous interest in the media and among patients and the scientific community. In particular, the potential shift in treatment concepts possibly leading to an interventional treatment approach including balloon angioplasty and venous stent placement is currently being debated. However, results from recent studies involving several imaging modalities have raised substantial concerns regarding the CCSVI concept in MS. In this review article, we explain the concept of CCSVI in MS and discuss this hypothesis in the context of MS pathophysiology and imaging studies which have tried to reproduce or refute this theory. In addition, we draw some major conclusions focusing in particular on the crucial question as to whether interventional treatment options are expedient. In conclusion, the present conclusive data confuting the theory of CCSVI in MS should lead to reluctance with respect to the interventional treatment of possible venous anomalies in MS patients. (orig.)

  16. VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonno van BELLEN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Methods Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrassonographic findings, type of surgery (open or laparoscopic, abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI and post-operative ultrassonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Results Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%, the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%, but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. Conclusion No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrassonographic findings were found. Although

  17. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Erin C. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  18. Venous anomalies and abnormalities of the posterior fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulao, A.; Alvarez, H.; Garcia Monaco, R.; Pruvost, P.; Lasjaunias, P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report a series of 16 patients with venous anomalies or abnormalities of the posterior fossa studied by angiography, CT and/or MRI. We believe that so-called 'venous angioma' are extreme anatomic variants that drain normal territories, and we prefer to call them developmental venous anomalies (DVA). Posterior fossa DVA, like the supra-tentorial ones are classified according to their drainage into deep and superficial type. They are exclusively located in the cerebellum or tectum. In 4 cases DVA was an incidental finding, in 3 an associated cerebral venous malformation (CVM) was found and felt to be the cause of the symptoms and only in one (Trigeminal pain) was a link between both suspected. Cavernous venous malformation (CVM) were found in frequent association with DVA (27%). 4 cases were single and 2 multiple. 5 CVM were located in the brain stem and 3 in the cerebellum. The clinical and radiological files were reviewed and a direct relationship between symptoms and localization was found in all patients with CVM. In 2 cases venous dysplasia was found: 1 Sturge-Weber and 1 First branchial arch syndrome. Both posterior fossa venous abnormalities were incidental findings. (orig.)

  19. Hepatic venous pressure gradients measured by duplex ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasu, J.-P.; Rocher, L.; Peletier, G.; Kuoch, V.; Kulh, E.; Miquel, A.; Buffet, C.; Biery, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: The hepatic venous pressure gradient is a major prognostic factor in portal hypertension but its measurement is complex and requires invasive angiography. This study investigated the relationship between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and a number of Doppler measurements, including the arterial acceleration index. METHOD: We measured the hepatic venous pressure gradient in 50 fasting patients at hepatic venography. Immediately afterwards, a duplex sonographic examination of the liver was performed at which multiple measurements and indices of the venous and arterial hepatic vasculature were made. RESULTS: Hepatic arterial acceleration was correlated directly with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (r = 0.83, P -2 provided a positive predictive value of 95%, a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 95% for detecting patients with severe portal hypertension (hepatic venous pressure gradient > 12 mmHg). A correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the congestion index of the portal vein velocity (r = 0.45,P = 0.01) and portal vein velocity (r = 0.40,P = 0.044), was also noted. CONCLUSION: Measuring the hepatic arterial acceleration index may help in the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension. Tasu, J.-P. et al. (2002)

  20. Space-time relationship in continuously moving table method for large FOV peripheral contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabati, M; Lauzon, M L; Frayne, R

    2003-01-01

    Data acquisition using a continuously moving table approach is a method capable of generating large field-of-view (FOV) 3D MR angiograms. However, in order to obtain venous contamination-free contrast-enhanced (CE) MR angiograms in the lower limbs, one of the major challenges is to acquire all necessary k-space data during the restricted arterial phase of the contrast agent. Preliminary investigation on the space-time relationship of continuously acquired peripheral angiography is performed in this work. Deterministic and stochastic undersampled hybrid-space (x, k y , k z ) acquisitions are simulated for large FOV peripheral runoff studies. Initial results show the possibility of acquiring isotropic large FOV images of the entire peripheral vascular system. An optimal trade-off between the spatial and temporal sampling properties was found that produced a high-spatial resolution peripheral CE-MR angiogram. The deterministic sampling pattern was capable of reconstructing the global structure of the peripheral arterial tree and showed slightly better global quantitative results than stochastic patterns. Optimal stochastic sampling patterns, on the other hand, enhanced small vessels and had more favourable local quantitative results. These simulations demonstrate the complex spatial-temporal relationship when sampling large FOV peripheral runoff studies. They also suggest that more investigation is required to maximize image quality as a function of hybrid-space coverage, acquisition repetition time and sampling pattern parameters

  1. Repositioning and Leaving In Situ the Central Venous Catheter During Percutaneous Treatment of Associated Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: A Report of Eight Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockx, Luc; Raat, Henricus; Donck, Jan; Wilms, Guy; Marchal, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a combined procedure of repositioning and leaving in situ a central venous catheter followed by immediate percutaneous treatment of associated superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Methods: Eight patients are presented who have central venous catheter-associated SVCS (n = 6 Hickman catheters, n = 2 Port-a-cath) caused by central vein stenosis (n = 4) or concomitant thrombosis (n = 4). With the use of a vascular snare introduced via the transcubital or transjugular approach, the tip of the central venous catheter could be engaged, and repositioned after deployment of a stent in the innominate or superior vena cava. Results: In all patients it was technically feasible to reposition the central venous catheter and treat the SVCS at the same time. In one patient flipping of the Hickman catheter in its original position provoked dislocation of the released Palmaz stent, which could be positioned in the right common iliac vein. Conclusion: Repositioning of a central venous catheter just before and after stent deployment in SVCS is technically feasible and a better alternative than preprocedural removal of the vascular access

  2. Pulmonary venous abnormalities encountered on pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) elegantly renders pulmonary venous anatomy. With increasing numbers of radiofrequency ablation procedures being performed, there is now a greater emphasis on pre-procedure imaging to delineate this anatomy. Pulmonary venous mapping studies can be performed with or ...

  3. Renal vein to renal collecting system fistula: An extreme complication from central venous thrombosis secondary to indwelling catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Safaya

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters are routinely used for resuscitation, chemotherapy and nutrition but are not without risk. Central lines are the most common extrinsic cause of venous thrombosis in neonates and infants. We present an ex-36 week 1800g infant baby girl recovering after a staged repair of gastroschisis with ileostomy and mucous fistula formation. The patient was receiving parenteral nutrition through an indwelling saphenous vein tunneled catheter, with its tip in the inferior vena cava. The patient developed polyuria, with a characteristic odor of the parenteral nutrition and a urine analysis showed glucose and triglyceride levels consistent with the composition of the parenteral nutrition fluid. A fluoroscopic cysto-urogram and an inferior vena-cavogram showed a catheter-associated inferior vena cava thrombosis leading to backpressure changes, diverting all intravenous contrast into the right renal vein and to renal collecting system, thus elucidating the route of the parenteral nutrition fluid reaching the bladder. Our case represents an extreme case of complicated central venous thrombosis. We emphasize the importance of practicing a high index of suspicion for thrombotic complications in severely ill neonates with central venous access. An early diagnosis and aggressive management may prevent progression of the disease towards an overwhelming complication. Keywords: Central venous catheterization complications, Renal vein-collecting system connection, Renal vein- collecting system fistula

  4. Combined Ovarian and Adrenal Venous Sampling in the Localization of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Independent Ectopic Cushing Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; Li, Ran; Zhang, Xiaobo; Lu, Lin; Li, Ji; Pan, Hui; Zhu, Huijuan

    2018-03-01

    Cushing syndrome is rarely caused by the secretion of cortisol from ovarian tumors. In clinical decision-making, it is important to determine whether the ovarian tumor is capable of secreting cortisol. Selective ovarian and adrenal venous sampling is scarcely reported in the localization of ACTH-independent ectopic Cushing syndrome. We present a case of 40-year-old Chinese woman who had weight gain, hirsutism, hypertension, and menstrual disorder over 6 months. Her physical examination and biochemical assessment revealed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing syndrome. Adrenal computed tomography scan indicated no abnormality. A mass of 5.7 cm × 4.2 cm × 3.4 cm was discovered by pelvic ultrasonography. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy revealed no abnormal radioactivity intake. Combined ovarian and adrenal venous sampling together with a cortisol assay were conducted. Results revealed cortisol concentration of the right-side ovarian vein, left-side ovarian vein, and peripheral vein of 268.60, 29.00, and 35.18 μg/dL, respectively, suggesting a right-side ovarian origin. A right-side salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and the pathological diagnosis revealed ovarian steroid cell tumor, not otherwise specified. The cortisol level was substantially lower after the patient underwent surgery and symptoms of Cushing syndrome disappeared. At 3-year follow-up, the patient remained disease free, and no tumor was observed on pelvic ultrasonogram. Combined ovarian and adrenal venous sampling is valuable in the localization of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent ectopic Cushing syndrome.

  5. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  6. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  7. MR findings of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Myung Kwan; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Choi, Choong Gom [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To describe MR findings of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. We reviewed 11 MR images of six patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The MR images were retrospectively analyzed in terms of location and signal intensity of the thrombi, parenchymal lesions such as hemorrhage and edema, and changes in follow up study obtained in 4 patients. The thrombus in venous sinus was visualized on MRI in all six patients. The most frequently involved sites were superior sagittal sinus(n=4) and left transverse sinus(n=4). Signal intensity of the thrombus was isointense or hyperintense on both T1- and T2-weighted images with loss of normal signal void of the sinus on all sequences in all patients. Parenchymal lesion was patients in five of six cases, manifested as local hemorrhage in three and edema in three cases(one case overlapped). Local edema seen in three patients was completely resolved on follow up study of seven to 29 days intervals. It is concluded that iso- or high signal intensity with loss of signal void in venous sinus is virtually diagnostic of venous sinus thrombosis. If there are local parenchymal lesions such as hemorrhage and/or edema of unknown causes, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis should be included in differential diagnosis.

  8. Nursing care as a predictor of phlebitis related to insertion of a peripheral venous cannula in emergency departments: findings from a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palese, A; Ambrosi, E; Fabris, F; Guarnier, A; Barelli, P; Zambiasi, P; Allegrini, E; Bazoli, L; Casson, P; Marin, M; Padovan, M; Picogna, M; Taddia, P; Salmaso, D; Chiari, P; Marognolli, O; Canzan, F; Saiani, L

    2016-03-01

    To date, few studies have investigated the occurrence of phlebitis related to insertion of a peripheral venous cannula (PVC) in an emergency department (ED). To describe the natural history of ED-inserted PVC site use; the occurrence and severity of PVC-related phlebitis; and associations with patient, PVC and nursing care factors. A prospective study was undertaken of 1262 patients treated as urgent cases in EDs who remained in a medical unit for at least 24h. The first PVC inserted was observed daily until its removal; phlebitis was measured using the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Scale. Data on patient, PVC, nursing care and organizational variables were collected, and a time-to-event analysis was performed. The prevalence of PVC-related phlebitis was 31%. The cumulative incidence (78/391) was almost 20% three days after insertion, and reached >50% (231/391) five days after insertion. Being in a specialized hospital [hazard ratio (HR) 0.583, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.366-0.928] and receiving more nursing care (HR 0.988, 95% CI 0.983-0.993) were protective against PVC-related phlebitis at all time points. Missed nursing care increased the incidence of PVC-related phlebitis by approximately 4% (HR 1.038, 95% CI 1.001-1.077). Missed nursing care and expertise of the nurses caring for the patient after PVC insertion affected the incidence of phlebitis; receiving more nursing care and being in a specialized hospital were associated with lower risk of PVC-related phlebitis. These are modifiable risk factors of phlebitis, suggesting areas for intervention at both hospital and unit level. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Computed tomographic manifestations of abdominal and pelvic venous collaterals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, J.J.; Thomas, J.L.; Bernardino, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    Obstruction of blood flow through the inferior vena cava and portal vein may produce venous collaterals. These include the paravertebral venous system and its communications with the ascending lumbar veins and azygous/hemiazygous system; gonadal, periureteric, and other retroperitoneal veins; abdominal wall veins; hemorrhoidal venous plexus; and the portal venous system. The anatomic location of these vessels is discussed. Computed tomography demonstrates them as round or tubular structures that are isodens when compared with other venous structures following contrast material administration. Techniques of examination and methods of differentiation of these vascular structures from other abnormalities, especially lymphadenopathy, are discussed

  10. Sex-specific aspects of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roach, Rachel Elizabeth Jo

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a disease that occurs in 1-2 per 1000 people per year. At the time of their first venous thrombosis, approximately 50% of women are exposed to reproductive risk factors (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, pregnancy and the puerperium). In this thesis, we showed

  11. [The comparison of blood levels between peripheral vein and tooth extraction wound after the oral administration of antibiotics (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, T; Ookawa, H; Morishita, M; Takeyasu, K; Shiiki, K; Imoto, T

    1981-06-01

    The oral administration of 300 mg of clindamycin was undertaken on 23 patients, of 500 mg of cefadroxil on 11 patients and of 250 mg of talampicillin on 12 patients, and then tooth extraction was performed under local anesthesia. Blood samples were taken from the extraction wound and the peripheral vein at the same time and assayed by the bioassay method. The blood levels of clindamycin and cefadroxil indicated a similar pattern between the extraction wound and the peripheral vein, but the blood level of talampicillin reached peek level rapider than clindamycin and cefadroxil. The blood levels of the extraction wound were 60 - 80% as compared with the venous blood levels with each antimicrobial agent.

  12. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Intracranial developmental venous anomaly: is it asymptomatic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, A Bolívar; de Asís Bravo Rodríguez, F; Bravo Rey, I; Romero, E Roldán

    2018-03-16

    Intracranial developmental venous anomalies are the most common vascular malformation. In the immense majority of cases, these anomalies are asymptomatic and discovered incidentally, and they are considered benign. Very exceptionally, however, they can cause neurological symptoms. In this article, we present three cases of patients with developmental venous anomalies that presented with different symptoms owing to complications derived from altered venous drainage. These anomalies were located in the left insula, right temporal lobe, and cerebellum. The exceptionality of the cases presented as well as of the images associated, which show the mechanism through which the symptoms developed, lies in the low incidence of symptomatic developmental venous anomalies reported in the literature. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Venous sinus stenting for pseudotumour cerebri with venous sinus stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huairui; Bai Rulin; Wu Xiaojun; Qi Xiangqian; Mei Qiyong; Lu Yicheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relation between venous sinus stenosis and pseduotumour cerebri and to discuss the efficacy and strategy of venous sinus stenting for its treatment. Methods: Venous sinus stenting was performed in a total of 9 patients with pseudotumour cerebri accompanied by dural sinus stenosis. The clinical data, including the clinical presentations, intracranial pressure, angiographic findings, pressure of dural sinus,methods of treatment and the therapeutic results, were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Bilateral disc edema was seen in all patients. The pressure gradient in the lateral sinuses was obviously high before stenting (22.67±7.25)mmHg in all patients and a reduction in intra-sinus pressure and pressure gradient was also found (5.78±3.77)mmHg. The symptoms associated with intracranial hypertension were gradually improved or disappeared in two weeks after the placement of the stent in all cases, and the intracranial pressure dropped evidently (12.78±5.97)cm H 2 O. Vision was improved in 7 cases at three months, whereas it remained poor in 2 cases despite normalized intracranial pressure. There was no other permanent procedure-related morbidity. The patients were followed up for 3 months to 5 years, and no recurrence developed. Conclusion: Lateral sinus stenting is an effective method for the treatment of pseudotumour cerebri with dural sinus stenosis. (authors)

  15. Thyrocervical artery - jugular fistula following internal jugular venous catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P P Zachariah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arteriovenous fistula (AVF is an anomalous communication between an artery and a vein, caused by an iatrogenic or traumatic etiology. Surgically created upper limb AVF remains the preferred vascular access for patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Nonetheless central vein cannulation for hemodialysis is a common procedure done in patients who need hemodialysis. We incidentally detected a thyrocervical artery - jugular fistula in a patient on maintenance hemodialysis. He underwent a successful intra arterial coil embolization of the feeding vessel. Review of literature has shown that, a thyrocervical artery - internal jugular vein arteriovenous fistula following a central venous catheterization has not been reported so far.

  16. Effects of isokinetic calf muscle exercise program on muscle strength and venous function in patients with chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Sabriye; Çetin, Cem; Yavuz, Turhan; Demir, Hilmi M; Atalay, Yurdagül B

    2018-05-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to observe the change of the ankle joint range of motion, the muscle strength values measured with an isokinetic dynamometer, pain scores, quality of life scale, and venous return time in chronic venous insufficiency diagnosed patients by prospective follow-up after 12-week exercise program including isokinetic exercises. Methods The patient group of this study comprised 27 patients (23 female, 4 male) who were diagnosed with chronic venous insufficiency. An exercise program including isokinetic exercise for the calf muscle was given to patients three days per week for 12 weeks. At the end of 12 weeks, five of the patients left the study due to inadequate compliance with the exercise program. As a result, control data of 22 patients were included. Ankle joint range of active motion, isokinetic muscle strength, pain, quality of life, and photoplethysmography measurements were assessed before starting and after the exercise program. Results Evaluating changes of the starting and control data depending on time showed that all isokinetic muscle strength measurement parameters, range of motion, and overall quality of life values of patients improved. Venous return time values have also increased significantly ( p < 0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, increase in muscle strength has been provided with exercise therapy in patients with chronic venous insufficiency. It has been determined that the increase in muscle strength affected the venous pump and this ensured improvement in venous function and range of motion of the ankle. In addition, it has been detected that pain reduced and quality of life improved after the exercise program.

  17. Clinicoroentgenological diagnosis of chronic venous ovarian insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grakova, L.S.; Galkin, E.V.; Naumova, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper is devoted to clinicoroentgenological correlations of venous renogonadal hemodynamics in 168 women of reproductive age (151 women with infertility, habitual abortion, disordered menstrual function and 17 patients without disorders of the reproductive tract). Clinicolaboratory investigation was followed by visceral and parietal flebography for the detection of a pathological venous reflux into the ovarian pampiniform plexus. Clinicoroentgenological semiotics of chronic venous ovarian insufficiency was analyzed. Infertility was shown to be the main clinical manifestation of ovarian varicocele

  18. REVIEW ARTICLE Venous thromboembolism associated with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Venous thromboembolism associated with protein S deficiency due to ... 2 Institute of Cardiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland ... It has been long recognized that reduced PS activity is a risk factor for venous ... 1988). Sequencing of PROS1 gene intensified studies of genotype-.

  19. Portal-venous gas unrelated to mesenteric ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesner, Walter; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Ji, Hoon; Ros, Pablo R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report on 8 patients with all different non-ischemic etiologies for portal-venous gas and to discuss this rare entity and its potentially misleading CT findings in context with a review of the literature. The CT examinations of eight patients who presented with intrahepatic portal-venous gas, unrelated to bowel ischemia or infarction, were reviewed and compared with their medical records with special emphasis on the pathogenesis and clinical impact of portal-venous gas caused by non-ischemic conditions. The etiologies for portal-venous gas included: abdominal trauma (n=1); large gastric cancer (n=1); prior gastroscopic biopsy (n=1); prior hemicolectomy (n=1); graft-vs-host reaction (n=1); large paracolic abscess (n=1); mesenteric recurrence of ovarian cancer superinfected with clostridium septicum (n=1); and sepsis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=1). The clinical outcome of all patients was determined by their underlying disease and not negatively influenced by the presence of portal-venous gas. Although the presence of portal-venous gas usually raises the suspicion of bowel ischemia and/or intestinal necrosis, this CT finding may be related to a variety of non-ischemic etiologies and pathogeneses as well. The knowledge about these conditions may help to avoid misinterpretation of CT findings, inappropriate clinical uncertainty and unnecessary surgery in certain cases. (orig.)

  20. Postoperative deep venous thrombosis in Japan. Incidence and prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, K.; Shirai, N.; Hayashi, M.; Matsumoto, K.; Hirose, M.

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative deep venous thrombosis was investigated using the iodine-125-fibrinogen method in 256 patients undergoing major surgery. Deep venous thrombosis was found in 49 patients (15.3 percent), and nonfatal pulmonary embolism developed in one of seven patients in whom the thrombus extended to the popliteal vein. The same investigation was performed in 110 patients who wore a graduated compression stocking on one leg, with the other leg serving as a control. Deep venous thrombosis was found in 4 of 110 stockinged legs (3.6 percent) and in 16 of 110 control legs (14.5 percent). The incidence of deep venous thrombosis decreased significantly in patients who wore the stocking. An increase in femoral venous flow velocity was found in the stockinged legs by the Doppler method. The mean velocity of venous return by xenon-133 clearance was significantly greater in the stockinged legs than in the control legs. These findings were considered to support the efficacy of graduated compression stockings for the prevention of deep venous thrombosis

  1. 2016 Expert consensus document on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of short-term peripheral venous catheter-related infections in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep A. Capdevila

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of endovascular catheters is a routine practice in secondary and tertiary care level hospitals. The short-term use of peripheral catheters has been found to be associated with the risk of nosocomial bacteraemia, resulting in morbidity and mortality. Staphylococcus aureus is mostly associated with peripheral catheter insertion. This Consensus Document has been prepared by a panel of experts of the Spanish Society of Cardiovascular Infections, in cooperation with experts from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, Spanish Society of Chemotherapy, and the Spanish Society of Thoracic-Cardiovascular Surgery, and aims to define and establish guidelines for the management of short duration peripheral vascular catheters. The document addresses the indications for insertion, catheter maintenance, registering, diagnosis and treatment of infection, indications for removal, as well as placing an emphasis on continuous education as a drive toward quality. Implementation of these guidelines will allow uniformity in use, thus minimizing the risk of infections and their complications.

  2. Congenital Retinal Macrovessel and the Association of Retinal Venous Malformations With Venous Malformations of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichi, Francesco; Freund, K Bailey; Ciardella, Antonio; Morara, Mariachiara; Abboud, Emad B; Ghazi, Nicola; Dackiw, Christine; Choudhry, Netan; Souza, Eduardo Cunha; Cunha, Leonardo Provetti; Arevalo, J Fernando; Liu, T Y Alvin; Wenick, Adam; He, Lingmin; Villarreal, Guadalupe; Neri, Piergiorgio; Sarraf, David

    2018-04-01

    Congenital retinal macrovessel (CRM) is a rarely reported venous malformation of the retina that is associated with venous anomalies of the brain. To study the multimodal imaging findings of a series of eyes with congenital retinal macrovessel and describe the systemic associations. In this cross-sectional multicenter study, medical records were retrospectively reviewed from 7 different retina clinics worldwide over a 10-year period (2007-2017). Patients with CRM, defined as an abnormal, large, macular vessel with a vascular distribution above and below the horizontal raphe, were identified. Data were analyzed from December 2016 to August 2017. Clinical information and multimodal retinal imaging findings were collected and studied. Pertinent systemic information, including brain magnetic resonance imaging findings, was also noted if available. Of the 49 included patients, 32 (65%) were female, and the mean (SD) age at onset was 44.0 (20.9) years. A total of 49 eyes from 49 patients were studied. Macrovessel was unilateral in all patients. Color fundus photography illustrated a large aberrant dilated and tortuous retinal vein in all patients. Early-phase frames of fluorescein angiography further confirmed the venous nature of the macrovessel in 40 of 40 eyes. Optical coherence tomography angiography, available in 17 eyes (35%), displayed microvascular capillary abnormalities around the CRM, which were more evident in the deep capillary plexus. Of the 49 patients with CRM, 39 (80%) did not illustrate any evidence of ophthalmic complications. Ten patients (20%) presented with retinal complications, typically an incidental association with CRM. Twelve patients (24%) were noted to have venous malformations of the brain with associated magnetic resonance imaging. Of these, location of the venous anomaly in the brain was ipsilateral to the CRM in 10 patients (83%) and contralateral in 2 patients (17%), mainly located in the frontal lobe in 9 patients (75%). Our study has

  3. Recommendations to increase the validity and comparability of peripheral measurements by near infrared spectroscopy in neonates. 'Round table', section of haematology, oxygen transport and microcirculation, 48th annual meeting of ESPR, Prague 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pichler, G.; Wolf, M.; Roll, C.

    2008-01-01

    Several studies of peripheral measurements with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and venous or arterial occlusion have been performed in neonates. Results have been variable. Reasons include differences in patient populations, technical aspects of the devices used or the way measurements were ma...

  4. Hepatic venous pressure gradients measured by duplex ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasu, J.-P.; Rocher, L.; Peletier, G.; Kuoch, V.; Kulh, E.; Miquel, A.; Buffet, C.; Biery, M

    2002-08-01

    AIMS: The hepatic venous pressure gradient is a major prognostic factor in portal hypertension but its measurement is complex and requires invasive angiography. This study investigated the relationship between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and a number of Doppler measurements, including the arterial acceleration index. METHOD: We measured the hepatic venous pressure gradient in 50 fasting patients at hepatic venography. Immediately afterwards, a duplex sonographic examination of the liver was performed at which multiple measurements and indices of the venous and arterial hepatic vasculature were made. RESULTS: Hepatic arterial acceleration was correlated directly with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (r = 0.83, P < 0.0001) and with the Child-Pugh score (r = 0.63, P < 0.0001). An acceleration index cut-off value of 1 m.s{sup -2} provided a positive predictive value of 95%, a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 95% for detecting patients with severe portal hypertension (hepatic venous pressure gradient > 12 mmHg). A correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the congestion index of the portal vein velocity (r = 0.45,P = 0.01) and portal vein velocity (r = 0.40,P = 0.044), was also noted. CONCLUSION: Measuring the hepatic arterial acceleration index may help in the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension. Tasu, J.-P. et al. (2002)

  5. Venous, Arterialized-Venous, or Capillary Glucose Reference Measurements for the Accuracy Assessment of a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropff, Jort; van Steen, Sigrid C.; deGraaff, Peter; Chan, Man W.; van Amstel, Rombout B. E.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2017-01-01

    Background: Different reference methods are used for the accuracy assessment of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems. The effect of using venous, arterialized-venous, or capillary reference measurements on CGM accuracy is unclear. Methods: We evaluated 21 individuals with type 1 diabetes

  6. Ultrasound Guidance as a Rescue Technique for Peripheral Intravenous Cannulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pappas, Nancy L; Michaud, Terese E; Wolbers, Russell M; Steward, James C; Fevurly, Thomas A; Samolitis, Timothy J; Shoneboom, Bruce A; Watts, Dorraine D

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous (W) cannulation can be difficult to perform using the traditional landmark or visual/palpation technique in patients with access difficulties such as deep, sclerotic, small, or fragile veins...

  7. Diagnostics of defeats of venous collectors of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, T.V.; Polunina, I.S.; Shcherbakova, E.Ya.; Kuldakova, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Comparative data of transcranial ultrasonic dopplerography (170 patients) and radionuclidous antroscintigraphy (124), received during diagnostics of defects of venous collectors of brain are analyzed. Five variants of defeats of venous collectors (cross, sigmoid, internal of jugular of jugular vein), but also unpaired sine (direct, confluent) are described. Received results permit to reveal interrelation of infringements of venous outflow and increase of intracranial pressure

  8. Congenital absence of infrarenal IVC and iliac venous system : Unusual collateral Pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Joo; Lee, Byung Hee; Kim, Kie Hwan; Do, Young Soo; Chin, Soo Yil

    1994-01-01

    We present a case with congenital absence of the infrarenal portion of inferior vena cava and iliac venous system, showing unusual venous collaterals including the left ovarian venous collateral via parametrial venous complex, and a mesenteric-periureteric venous connection. The venous collateral pathways were demonstrated by computed tomography and venography

  9. Predictors of Venous Thromboembolic Events Associated with Central Venous Port Insertion in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hohl Moinat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous port (CVP catheter in the cancer population is associated with increased incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE. However, trials have shown limited benefit of antithrombotic treatment to prevent catheter-related venous thrombosis. This prospective observational cohort study was designed to assess the incidence of VTE closely related to CVP implantation in patients with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy, and to identify a high risk subgroup of patients. Between February 2006 and December 2011, 1097 consecutive cancer patients with first CVP implantation were included. Catheter-related VTE were defined as deep venous thrombosis in the arm, with or without pulmonary embolism (PE, or isolated PE. The incidence of CVP-associated VTE was 5.9% (IC95 4.4–7.3% at 3 months, and 11.3% (IC95 9.4–13.2% at 12 months. The incidence of any VTE was 7.6% (IC95 6.0–9.3% at 3 months, and 15.3% (IC95 13.1–17.6% at 12 months. High Khorana risk score and lung cancer were significant predictors of 3 month VTE. In conclusion, this large cohort study of patients with first CVP catheter implantation confirms the high incidence of VTE associated with the CVP implantation and allow identifying high risk patients who may benefit from thromboprophylaxis.

  10. Classification of venous malformations in children and implications for sclerotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Stefan [Department of Radiology, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Paediatric Radiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Aref, Hussein [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Department of Radiology, Alexandria Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria (Egypt); Chigot, Valerie; Brunelle, Francis [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Bonin, Beatrice [Paediatric Maxillofacial Surgery, Trousseau Hospital, Tours (France)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a simple and descriptive classification system for venous malformations (VMs) that may serve as a basis for interventional therapy, and to test its usefulness in a sample of consecutively referred paediatric patients. The classification system we developed includes four types: type I, isolated malformation without peripheral drainage; type II, malformation that drains into normal veins; type III, malformation that drains into dilated veins; and type IV, malformation that represents dysplastic venous ectasia. The system was prospectively tested using phlebography in a sample of 43 children and adolescents with VMs who were referred for treatment during a 10-month period. Our hypothesis was that the type of VM would determine whether low-risk sclerotherapy was indicated. Thirteen (30%) patients had a type-I VM, 16 (37%) had a type-II, 9 (21%) had a type-III, and 5 (12%) had a type-IV malformation. In more than 90% of patients with a type-I or type-II lesion, sclerotherapy could be performed without any problems. In one third of patients with a type-III VM, sclerotherapy had to be withheld and one of nine (11%) developed a severe complication after therapy. Of the five patients with type-IV lesions, three (60%) had to be excluded from sclerotherapy. Our initial results indicate that sclerotherapeutic intervention in patients with type-III and type-IV VMs must be carefully considered, while it can be safely performed in low-risk patients with type-I and type-II lesions. (orig.)

  11. Survey of Complications of Peripheral Venous Catheterization at an Intensive Care Unit of (ICU of Susa City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayatinejad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Peripheral catheters are the most common invasive procedures in patients, and have several therapeutic uses, yet result in infectious and non-infectious complications as well as problems such as pain and bruising, drug and fluid leakage out of the vessels, ecchymosis, hematoma, thrombosis, embolism, infection and phlebitis. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the complications of peripheral veins catheterization and some related factors at an intensive care unit (ICU of Susa city. Methods This descriptive cross sectional study was conducted on 224 catheters in patients, who were hospitalized for at least 48 hours at the intensive care unit. Data was collected through a questionnaire (demographic information, medications, catheter number, catheter site and placement and a checklist of catheter mechanical complications and phlebitis checklist. Review of the catheter site was done as well (at first, second, third and fourth, twelfth hour. To analyze the data, descriptive and analytical statistics (chi-square and Mann-Whitney were used, and the significance level was considered as P 0.05. A significant correlation was reported between variables such as type of drugs, catheter survival time, and work shift (P < 0.05. Conclusions Due to mechanical problems and phlebitis caused by peripheral catheters, choosing the right location and proper care and management of catheters can reduce the risk of complications and prevent overload to the patient and system due to increased skills by using educational programs.

  12. Mechanochemical endovenous ablation and new frontiers in venous intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, D

    2017-01-01

    Venous insufficiency of the lower extremities is a common condition and related to various symptoms, including venous ulcers. The effect of venous insufficiency on patients’ health-related quality of life is substantial and comparable with other chronic diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, and

  13. Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism and risk of occult cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp Hansen, Anette; Veres, Katalin; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet

    2017-01-01

    The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected.An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk.......The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected.An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk....

  14. Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism and risk of occult cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anette Tarp; Veres, Katalin; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet

    2017-01-01

    The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected. An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk.......The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected. An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk....

  15. Epidemiology and diagnostics of venous disease in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Curyło

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in Poland. The percentage of people who die from cardiovascular disease is decreasing year by year, but adequate patient education and access to specialist physicians are still required. Chronic venous disease is one of the disorders of this system, whose probability of occurrence increases with age. Other risk factors include gender, type of occupation, obesity, eating habits and constipation, pregnancy, and genetic factor. The symptoms of the disease include: pain, lower limb edema, fatigue / leg pain, tingling, enlargement of the small blood vessels, enlargement and constriction of the subcutaneous veins, skin lesions, skin discolouration, itching of the skin of the legs, congestive dermatitis, ulcers. The degree of disease is determined using the CEAP scale. Prophylactic and early detection of disease results in shorter treatment times and reduced costs. Unfortunately, a large number of primary care physicians are skipping the physical examination of the lower limb, thus prolonging the diagnosis process and the patient being treated for a more advanced disease. Studies show that there is a difference in the incidence of chronic venous disease and the severity of the disease, depending on the province that has been affected. This may indicate the need to standardize nationwide training methods for doctors. The most common method of treatment is the combination of pharmacotherapy and compression therapy.

  16. Systemic Venous Inflow to the Liver Allograft to Overcome Diffuse Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Lupascu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse splanchnic venous thrombosis (DSVT, formerly defined as contraindication for liver transplantation (LT, is a serious challenge to the liver transplant surgeon. Portal vein arterialisation, cavoportal hemitransposition and renoportal anastomosis, and finally combined liver and small bowel transplantation are all possible alternatives to deal with this condition. Five patients with preoperatively confirmed extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis were transplanted using cavoportal hemitransposition (4x and renoportal anastomosis (1x. Median follow-up was 58 months (range: 0,5 to 130 months. Two patients with previous radiation-induced peritoneal injury died, respectively, 18 days and 2 months after transplantation. The three other patients had excellent long-term survival, despite the fact that two of them needed a surgical reintervention for severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis is no longer an absolute contraindication to liver transplantation. Although cavoportal hemitransposition and renoportal anastomosis undoubtedly are life-saving procedures allowing for ensuring adequate allograft portal flow, careful follow-up of these patients remains necessary as both methods are unable to completely eliminate the complications of (segmental portal hypertension.

  17. Cerebrofacial venous metameric syndrome (CVMS) 3: Sturge-Weber syndrome with bilateral lymphatic/venous malformations of the mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, N.; Sachet, M.; Bao, C.; Lasjaunias, P.

    2003-01-01

    We present a case of Sturge-Weber syndrome with a bilateral lymphatic/venous malformation of the mandible. Modern biology suggests an explanation for such a case. The classification of cerebrofacial venous metameric syndromes (CVMS) enables us to recognise this lesion as involving the most caudal of the cranial metamere (CVMS 3). (orig.)

  18. Proteomic Profiling in Early Venous Stenosis Formation in a Porcine Model of Hemodialysis Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanjay; Fu, Alex A.; Puggioni, Alessandra; Glockner, James F.; McKusick, Michael A.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To use proteomic analysis to identify up- and downregulated proteins in early venous stenosis formation in a porcine model of hemodialysis graft failure. MATERIALS AND METHODS Pigs had chronic renal insufficiency created by subtotal renal infarction caused by renal artery embolization. Arteriovenous polytetrafluoroethylene grafts were placed 28 days later and the animals were killed after a further 3 days (n = 4), 7 days (n = 4), or 14 days (n = 4). Proteomic analysis with isotope-coded affinity tags and multidimensional liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry was performed on the venous stenosis and control vessels. Expression of proteins was further confirmed by Western blot analysis. The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels were determined before renal artery embolization and at the time of graft placement. RESULTS At graft placement, mean BUN and creatinine levels were significantly higher than before embolization (P < .05). Six proteins were identified that were common to all four animals at the same time point. Five proteins (α-fetoprotein, fetuin A, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component, and lactoferrin) were upregulated and one protein (decorin) was downregulated. Expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor, α-fetoprotein, and lactoferrin was further validated with Western blotting. By day 14, lactoferrin and fetuin-A expression were increased significantly in early venous stenosis formation. CONCLUSIONS Significantly increased expression of lactoferrin and fetuin-A were observed in early venous stenosis by day 14. Understanding the role of lactoferrin and fetuin-A in hemodialysis vascular access failure could help in improving outcomes in patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:19028119

  19. Imaging of head and neck venous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flis, Christine M.; Connor, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are non proliferative lesions that consist of dysplastic venous channels. The aim of imaging is to characterise the lesion and define its anatomic extent. We will describe the plain film, ultrasound (US) (including colour and duplex Doppler), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional angiographic and direct phlebographic appearances of venous malformations. They will be illustrated at a number of head and neck locations, including orbit, oral cavity, superficial and deep facial space, supraglottic and intramuscular. An understanding of the classification of such vascular anomalies is required to define the correct therapeutic procedure to employ. Image-guided sclerotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is now the first line treatment option in many cases of head and neck venous malformations, so the radiologist is now an integral part of the multidisciplinary management team. (orig.)

  20. Cardiovascular Pressures with Venous Gas Embolism and Decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B. D.; Robinson, R.; Sutton, T.; Kemper, G. B.

    1995-01-01

    Venous gas embolism (VGE) is reported with decompression to a decreased ambient pressure. With severe decompression, or in cases where an intracardiac septal defect (patent foramen ovale) exists, the venous bubbles can become arterialized and cause neurological decompression illness. Incidence rates of patent foramen ovale in the general population range from 25-34% and yet aviators, astronauts, and deepsea divers who have decompression-induced venous bubbles do not demonstrate neurological symptoms at these high rates. This apparent disparity may be attributable to the normal pressure gradient across the atria of the heart that must be reversed for there to be flow potency. We evaluated the effects of: venous gas embolism (0.025, 0.05 and 0.15 ml/ kg min for 180 min.) hyperbaric decompression; and hypobaric decompression on the pressure gradient across the left and right atria in anesthetized dogs with intact atrial septa. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was used as a measure of left atrial pressure. In a total of 92 experimental evaluations in 22 dogs, there were no reported reversals in the mean pressure gradient across the atria; a total of 3 transient reversals occurred during the peak pressure gradient changes. The reasons that decompression-induced venous bubbles do not consistently cause serious symptoms of decompression illness may be that the amount of venous gas does not always cause sufficient pressure reversal across a patent foramen ovale to cause arterialization of the venous bubbles.

  1. Core content for training in venous and lymphatic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmet, Steven E; Min, Robert J; Comerota, Anthony J; Meissner, Mark H; Carman, Teresa L; Rathbun, Suman W; Jaff, Michael R; Wakefield, Thomas W; Feied, Craig F

    2014-10-01

    The major venous societies in the United States share a common mission to improve the standards of medical practitioners, the educational goals for teaching and training programs in venous disease, and the quality of patient care related to the treatment of venous disorders. With these important goals in mind, a task force made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, interventional radiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery was formed to develop a consensus document describing the Core Content for venous and lymphatic medicine and to develop a core educational content outline for training. This outline describes the areas of knowledge considered essential for practice in the field, which encompasses the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with acute and chronic venous and lymphatic disorders. The American Venous Forum and the American College of Phlebology have endorsed the Core Content. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Pseudo interruption of the inferior vena cava complicating the device closure of patent ductus arteriosus: Case report and short review of venous system embryology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateshwaran Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A nineteen-month-old girl was taken up for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA device closure. A diagnostic catheter from the right femoral venous access entered the superior vena cava (SVC, through the azygos vein suggesting interruption of inferior vena caval with azygos continuity. Therefore, the PDA device was closed from the right jugular venous access. However, a postprocedure echocardiogram (echo showed a patent inferior vena caval connection into the right atrium. An angiogram from femoral veins showed communication between the iliac veins and the azygos system, in addition to normal drainage into the inferior vena cava (IVC. Congenital communication between the iliac veins and the azygos system can mimic IVC interruption. An attempt to theoretically explain the embryological origin of the communication has been made.

  3. Use of Nitinol Stents Following Recanalization of Central Venous Occlusions in Hemodialysis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, Dheeraj K.; Saluja, Jasdeep S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively review the patency of endovascular interventions with nitinol stent placement for symptomatic central venous occlusions in hemodialysis patients. Methods. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular interventions for dysfunctional hemodialysis grafts and fistulas was performed from April 2004 to August 2006. A total of 6 patients presented with arm and/or neck and facial swelling and left brachiocephalic vein occlusion. The study group consisted of 3 men and 3 women with a mean age of 79.5 years (SD 11.2 years). Of these 6 patients, 1 had a graft and 5 had fistulas in the left arm. The primary indication for nitinol stent placement was technical failure of angioplasty following successful traversal of occluded central venous segments. Patency was assessed from repeat fistulograms and central venograms performed when patients redeveloped symptoms or were referred for access dysfunction determined by the ultrasound dilution technique. No patients were lost to follow-up. Results. Nitinol stent placement to obtain technically successful recanalization of occluded venous segments was initially successful in 5 of 6 patients (83%). In 1 patient, incorrect stent positioning resulted in partial migration to the superior vena cava requiring restenting to prevent further migration. Clinical success was observed in all patients (100%). Over the follow-up period, 2 patients underwent repeat intervention with angioplasty alone. Primary patency was 83.3% (95% CI 0.5-1.2) at 3 months, and 66.7% at 6 and 12 months (0.2-1.1, 0.1-1.2). Secondary patency was 100% at 12 months with 3 patients censored over that time period. Mean primary patency was 10.4 months with a mean follow-up of 12.4 months. No complications related to recanalization of the occluded central venous segments were observed. Conclusion. Our initial experience has demonstrated that use of nitinol stents for central venous occlusion in hemodialysis patients is

  4. Chronic venous disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The San Valentino Vascular Screening Project conducted in Italy found a ... developed healthcare systems, the cost of treating advanced venous disease ..... tissue inflammation and necrosis. Sclerosing ... and for its tributaries as an alternative.

  5. Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jens Kristian; Ellingsen Moe, Espen; Nybo, Mads

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent and potentially lethal condition. Venous thrombi are mainly constituted of fibrin and red blood cells, but platelets also play an important role in VTE formation. Information about VTE in patients with thrombocytopenia is, however, missing. O...... having thrombocytopenia with VTE seem to be safely treated with anticoagulants without increased occurrence of bleeding....

  6. A BMPy Road for Venous Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Lauren M; Kahn, Mark L

    2017-09-11

    Detailed molecular pathways for the specific growth of arteries and lymphatic vessels have been identified, but the mechanisms controlling venous vessel growth have been obscure. Tischfield and colleagues (2017) shed new light on this problem by identifying a role for BMP signaling in development of the cerebral venous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Duplex imaging of residual venous obstruction to guide duration of therapy for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Elliot J P; Liem, Timothy K

    2015-07-01

    Clinical trials have shown that the presence of ultrasound-identified residual venous obstruction (RVO) on follow-up scanning may be associated with an elevated risk for recurrence, thus providing a potential tool to help determine the optimal duration of anticoagulant therapy. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the clinical utility of post-treatment duplex imaging in predicting venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence and in adjusting duration of anticoagulation. The Ovid MEDLINE Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects were queried for the terms residual thrombus or obstruction, duration of therapy, deep vein thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis, DVT, venous thromboembolism, VTE, antithrombotic therapy, and anticoagulation, and 228 studies were selected for review. Six studies determined the rate of VTE recurrence on the basis of the presence or absence of RVO. Findings on venous ultrasound scans frequently remained abnormal in 38% to 80% of patients, despite at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. In evaluating for VTE recurrence, the definition of RVO varied widely in the literature. Some studies have shown an association between RVO and VTE recurrence, whereas other studies have not. Overall, the presence of RVO is a mild risk factor for recurrence (odds ratio, 1.3-2.0), but only when surveillance imaging is performed soon after the index deep venous thrombosis (3 months). RVO is a mild risk factor for VTE recurrence. The presence or absence of ultrasound-identified RVO has a limited role in guiding the duration of therapeutic anticoagulation. Further research is needed to evaluate its utility relative to other known risk factors for VTE recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving venous leg ulcer management

    OpenAIRE

    Weller, Carolina Dragica

    2017-01-01

    This thesis reports several different methods to develop and evaluate complex interventions designed to improve venous leg ulcer management. Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU) are the most common chronic wound problem in the community. Its health and economic burden is predicted to increase due to ageing of the community and increase in prevalence of diabetes and obesity. Although many patients seek health care for VLU, most do not receive the most effective management. Patients with this condi...

  9. Compression therapies for chronic venous leg ulcers: interventions and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latz CA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher A Latz,1 Kellie R Brown,2 Ruth L Bush11Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, USA; 2Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Compression therapy has been the mainstay for the treatment of lower extremity edema, venous insufficiency, and particularly, venous ulcerative disease. Though modern surgical treatments exist, none are completely effective without good compressive options to allow for decreased swelling and better oxygenation of damaged tissues. This review article will describe the pathophysiology and presentation of lower extremity venous ulcerations, as well as current options for compression therapy. The benefits, along with the major pitfall of nonadherence, will also be discussed.Keywords: venous disease, chronic venous insufficiency, venous ulceration

  10. Intramedullary Venous Drainage System for Distal Fingertip Replantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purisa, Husrev; Ozturk, Muhammed Besir; Kabakas, Fatih; Mersa, Berkan; Ozcelik, Ismail Bulent; Sezer, Ilker

    2017-08-01

    The number of venous anastomoses performed during fingertip replantation is one of the most important factors affecting the success of replantation. However, because vessel diameters decrease in the zone 1 level, vessel anastomoses, especially vein anastomoses, are technically difficult and, thus, cannot be performed in most cases. Alternative venous drainage methods are crucial when any reliable vein repair is not possible. In the literature, so many artery-only replantation techniques have been defined, such as arteriovenous anastomoses, forming an arteriovenous or venocutaneous fistula, manual milking and massage, puncturing, and external bleeding via a fishmouth incision and using a medical leech. It has been shown that, in distal fingertip replantations, the medullary cavity may also be a good way for venous return. In this study, we introduce an alternative intramedullary venous drainage system we developed to facilitate venous drainage in artery-only fingertip replantations. The results of 24 fingertip replantations distal to the nail fold by using this system are presented with a literature review.

  11. Venous compression syndrome of internal jugular veins prevalence in patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Sandro; Niglio, Tarcisio; Orsini, Augusto; De Sio, Simone; d'Alessandro, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Dimitri; Fedele, Francesco; d'Alessandro, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the incidence of Venous Compression Syndrome (VCS) with full block of the flow of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) in patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency. We included 769 patients with MS and CCSVI (299 males, 470 females) and 210 controls without ms and ccsvi (92 males, 118 females). each subject was investigated by echo-color-doppler (ecd). morphological and hemodynamic ecd data were recorded by a computerized mem-net maps of epidemiological national observatory on ccsvi and they were analyzed by mem-net clinical analysis programs. VCS of IJVs occurs in 240 subjects affected by CCSVI and MS (31% of total) and in 12 controls (6% of total). The differences between the two groups are statistical significant (X² = 36.64, pCerebro-Spinal Venous Insufficiency, Multiple Sclerosis, Venous Compression Syndrome.

  12. Development and Validation of a Preprocedural Risk Score to Predict Access Site Complications After Peripheral Vascular Interventions Based on the Vascular Quality Initiative Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Access site complications following peripheral vascular intervention (PVI are associated with prolonged hospitalization and increased mortality. Prediction of access site complication risk may optimize PVI care; however, there is no tool designed for this. We aimed to create a clinical scoring tool to stratify patients according to their risk of developing access site complications after PVI. Methods: The Society for Vascular Surgery’s Vascular Quality Initiative database yielded 27,997 patients who had undergone PVI at 131 North American centers. Clinically and statistically significant preprocedural risk factors associated with in-hospital, post-PVI access site complications were included in a multivariate logistic regression model, with access site complications as the outcome variable. A predictive model was developed with a random sample of 19,683 (70% PVI procedures and validated in 8,314 (30%. Results: Access site complications occurred in 939 (3.4% patients. The risk tool predictors are female gender, age > 70 years, white race, bedridden ambulatory status, insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, prior minor amputation, procedural indication of claudication, and nonfemoral arterial access site (model c-statistic = 0.638. Of these predictors, insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and prior minor amputation were protective of access site complications. The discriminatory power of the risk model was confirmed by the validation dataset (c-statistic = 0.6139. Higher risk scores correlated with increased frequency of access site complications: 1.9% for low risk, 3.4% for moderate risk and 5.1% for high risk. Conclusions: The proposed clinical risk score based on eight preprocedural characteristics is a tool to stratify patients at risk for post-PVI access site complications. The risk score may assist physicians in identifying patients at risk for access site complications and selection of patients who may benefit from bleeding avoidance

  13. The effect of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) valve technology on catheter occlusion rates--the 'ELeCTRiC' study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Andrew J; Streater, Carmel T; Noorani, Remy; Crofts, Joanne L; Del Mundo, Aldwin B; Parker, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) are increasingly being used to provide short to medium-term central venous access. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that PICC valve technology does not influence PICC occlusion rates. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients who required a PICC were randomized to one of three types of dual lumen PICC (open ended non-valved, Groshong valve, PASV valve). PICC occlusions were recorded and managed with a protocol that used urokinase. A total of 102 patients were recruited to the study. The overall risk of occlusion per catheter was 35% (95% CI 26% to 44%). The overall rate of occlusion was 76 occlusions per 1000 catheter days (95% CI 61 to 95). Presence or type of valve did not significantly influence this rate (open-ended non-valved PICC 38% of catheters, 79 occlusions per 1000 catheter days; Groshong 38% of catheters, 60 occlusions per 1000 catheter days; PASV 27% of catheters, 99 occlusions per 1000 catheter days). The dose of urokinase required to treat PICC occlusions did not significantly differ between PICC types. Valved PICCs do not appear to influence PICC occlusion rates.

  14. Metallic stent placement in hemodialysis graft patients after insufficient balloon dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Huei-Lung; Pan, Huay-Ben; Lin, Yih-Huie; Chen, Chiung-Yu; Lai, Pin-Hong; Yang, Chien-Fang; Chung, Hsiao-Min; Wu, Tung-Ho; Chou, Kang-Ju

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to report our experience of metallic stent placement after insufficient balloon dilation in graft hemodialysis patients. Twenty-three patients (13 loop grafts in the forearm and 10 straight grafts in the upper arm) underwent metallic stent placement due to insufficient flow after urokinase thrombolysis and balloon dilation. The indications for metallic stent deployment included 1) recoil and/or kinked venous stenosis in 21 patents (venous anastomosis: 17 patients, peripheral outflow vein: four patients); and 2) major vascular rupture in two patients. Metallic stents 8-10mm in diameter and 40-80 mm in length were used. Of them, eight stents were deployed across the elbow crease. Access patency was determined by clinical follow-up and the overall rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. No procedure-related complications (stent fracture or central migration) were encountered except for a delayed Wallstent shortening/migration at the venous anastomosis, which resulted in early access failure. The overall primary and secondary patency rates (±standard error) of all the vascular accesses in our 23 patients at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months were 69%±9 and 88%±6,41% ±10 and 88%±6, 30%±10 and 77%±10, and 12%±8 and 61%±13, respectively. For the forearm and upper-arm grafts, the primary and secondary patency rates were 51%±16 and 86%±13 vs 45%±15 and 73%±13 at 6 months, and 25%±15 and 71%±17 vs 23%±17 and 73%±13 at 12 months (ρ = .436 and .224), respectively. Metallic stent placement is a safe and effective means for treating peripheral venous lesions in dialysis graft patients after insufficient balloon dilation. No statistically difference in the patency rates between the forearm and upper-arm patient groups was seen

  15. Cerebral sino-venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayama, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Tsunesaburo; Nakajima, Kenji

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral sino-venous thrombosis were reported. Repeated CT findings were studied and discussed on account of the treatments for those pathologic conditions. Those of studied cases are; a 22-year-old postpartum woman, a 42-year-old woman with irregular vaginal bleeding, and a 26-year-old man with severe reactive emesis after drinking alcohol. They were treated conservatively. Case 1 died in its acute stage. In the remaining ones, each had an uneventful recovery. CT scan findings of them manifested their exact clinical conditions. These findings were devided into two categories, one was direct signs expressed sino-venous occlusion, the other was indirect signs which appeared as a result of these occlusion. Direct signs cannot always get in every cases with sino-venous occlusion, but as for indirect signs, we can get various changes corresponding to the time taken CT photoes, and they are useful to decide appropriate treatments at that time. Considering suitable treatments for this disease, it is necessary to select most suitable ones according to their pathologic conditions, which may be precisely drawn with CT scans. (J.P.N.)

  16. Local thrombolysis for patients of severe cerebral venous sinus thrombosis during puerperium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xin-bin; Fu, Zhenqiang; Song, Lai-jun; Guan, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore and evaluate the efficacy of intrasinus thrombolysis (IST) in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) during postpartum period. Methods: 11 patients during postpartum period with CVST who received IST during July 2007–November 2011 were included. Urokinase was infused into the sinuses via a microcatheter. Magnetic resonance venography (MRV) was performed to assess the recanalization of venous sinuses. Results: Before discharge, the intracranial pressure in 11 patients was under 200 mmH 2 O. MRV confirmed that venous sinus of 9 patients were smooth. The cortex venous and deep venous recovered to normal. Venous sinus of 2 patients recanalized partly, and cortex venous and deep venous had compensation. 9 patients had good outcome and 2 patients had only mild deficits. Conclusion: Intrasinus thrombolysis is safe and effective in patients with severe cerebral venous sinus thrombosis during postpartum period

  17. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    In the clinical setting, diagnosis and treatment of venous leg ulcers can vary considerably from patient to patient. The first step to reducing this variation is to document venous leg ulcer care through use of quantitative scientific documentation principles. This requires the development of val...

  18. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Bo; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Grøn, Randi

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Risk factors for VTE among pregnant women are not sufficiently investigated.......Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Risk factors for VTE among pregnant women are not sufficiently investigated....

  19. Vascular access for hemodialysis. Patency rates and results of revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palder, S B; Kirkman, R L; Whittemore, A D; Hakim, R M; Lazarus, J M; Tilney, N L

    1985-08-01

    Over a 4-year interval, 324 arteriovenous conduits were created in 256 patients with end-stage renal disease as access for chronic hemodialysis. These included 154 Cimino fistulae, 163 polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts, and seven miscellaneous grafts. Satisfactory patency rates were demonstrated for as long as 4 years for both Cimino fistulae and PTFE grafts by life-table analysis. Failures of Cimino fistulae usually occurred early in the postoperative period, secondary to attempts to use inadequate veins. Thrombosis caused the majority of PTFE graft failures and was generally the result of venous stenosis. Correction of such venous stenosis is mandatory to restore graft patency and can result in prolonged graft survival.

  20. Venous Return and Clinical Hemodynamics: How the Body Works during Acute Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tao; Baker, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Venous return is a major determinant of cardiac output. Adjustments within the venous system are critical for maintaining venous pressure during loss in circulating volume. This article reviews two factors that are thought to enable the venous system to compensate during acute hemorrhage: 1) changes in venous elastance and 2) mobilization of…

  1. Barriers and facilitators to intraosseous access in adult resuscitations when peripheral intravenous access is not achievable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Cheung, Warren; Rosenberg, Hans; Vaillancourt, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Studies suggest that intraosseous (IO) access is underutilized in adult resuscitations, despite recommendations from advanced trauma and cardiac life support guidelines. The objective was to determine factors associated with IO access use by physicians during adult resuscitations when intravenous (IV) access is not immediately achievable. This study was an online survey among physicians purposefully recruited from various clinical care areas at three teaching hospitals. Questions were generated from the qualitative results of 20 iterative interviews, verified for internal validity, and piloted. The interview guide was based on the constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), which elicits salient attitudes, social influences, and control beliefs that potentially influence intention to use IO access. Recruitment took place in September 2012 until reaching more than 100% of the required sample size (n = 200). Internal consistency was measured using Cronbach's alpha, and the effect of TPB constructs and specific beliefs were assessed with regression analyses. For the 205 respondents, the mean age was 35 years (range = 20 to 66 years), and 53.3% were male. Participants' departmental affiliations were 50.3% emergency medicine (EM), 16.9% internal medicine, 14.9% anesthesia, 10.8% general surgery, and 7.2% critical care. Residents comprised 60.7% of the sample, and 39.3% were attending physicians. Median intention to use IO access when IV is not immediately achievable was 4.67 (interquartile range [IQR] = 4 to 5) out of 5 (5 highest) and predicted by the following TPB constructs: attitudes (AdjCoefficients = 0.504; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.334 to 0.673), social influences (AdjCoefficients = 0.285; 95% CI = 0.172 to 0.398), and control beliefs (AdjCoefficients 0.217; 95% CI = 0.113 to 0.320). Physicians were more likely to use IO access if they believed that it provided rapid vascular access for delivering large volumes of fluids, could prevent delays in

  2. Mesenteric venous thrombosis after prolonged air travel-a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Salas-Coronas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of acute mesenteric venous thrombosis after a long distance flight in a traveller presenting with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and vomiting within 48 h of prolonged immobility situation. Venous thrombosis in the lower limbs and venous thromboembolism has been clearly associated with prolonged air travel (economy class syndrome. Thrombosis was diagnosed by computed tomography of the abdomen, and after starting anticoagulant therapy with acenocumarol, symptoms yielded completely in a few weeks. The study of thrombophilia was negative, although the existence of two first-degree relatives (mother and grandmother with a history of venous thrombosis with a history of venous thrombosis makes it likely a situation of inherited thrombophilia. Although exceptional, mesenteric venous thrombosis should be considered in travellers with acute abdominal pain after prolonged air travel when there are thrombophilic conditions.

  3. Local thrombolysis for patients of severe cerebral venous sinus thrombosis during puerperium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xin-bin, E-mail: gxb3906080@sina.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052 (China); Fu, Zhenqiang, E-mail: fuzhenqiang1005@163.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052 (China); Song, Lai-jun, E-mail: laijunsong@sina.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052 (China); Guan, Sheng, E-mail: gsradio@126.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou, 450052 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To explore and evaluate the efficacy of intrasinus thrombolysis (IST) in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) during postpartum period. Methods: 11 patients during postpartum period with CVST who received IST during July 2007–November 2011 were included. Urokinase was infused into the sinuses via a microcatheter. Magnetic resonance venography (MRV) was performed to assess the recanalization of venous sinuses. Results: Before discharge, the intracranial pressure in 11 patients was under 200 mmH{sub 2}O. MRV confirmed that venous sinus of 9 patients were smooth. The cortex venous and deep venous recovered to normal. Venous sinus of 2 patients recanalized partly, and cortex venous and deep venous had compensation. 9 patients had good outcome and 2 patients had only mild deficits. Conclusion: Intrasinus thrombolysis is safe and effective in patients with severe cerebral venous sinus thrombosis during postpartum period.

  4. COST ANALYSIS OF PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhaoxin; Connolly, Bairbre L; Ungar, Wendy J; Coyte, Peter C

    2018-01-01

    A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is a useful option in providing secure venous access, which enables patients to be discharged earlier with the provision of home care. The objective was to identify the costs associated with having a PICC from a societal perspective, and to identify factors that are associated with total PICC costs. Data were obtained from a retrospective cohort of 469 hospitalized pediatric patients with PICCs inserted. Both direct and indirect costs were estimated from a societal perspective. Insertion costs, complication costs, nurse and physician assessment costs, inpatient ward costs, catheter removal costs, home care costs, travel costs, and the cost associated with productivity losses incurred by parents were included in this study. Based on catheter dwell time, the median total cost associated with a PICC per patient per day (including inpatient hospital costs) was $3,133.5 ($2,210.7-$9,627.0) in 2017 Canadian dollars ($1.00USD = $1.25CAD in 2017). The adjusted mean cost per patient per day was $2,648.2 ($2,402.4-$2,920.4). Excluding inpatient ward costs, the median total and adjusted costs per patient per day were $198.8 ($91.8-$2,475.8) and $362.7($341.0-$386.0), respectively. Younger age, occurrence of complications, more catheter dwell days, wards with more intensive care, and the absence of home care were significant factors associated with higher total PICC costs. This study has demonstrated the costs associated with PICCs. This information may be helpful for healthcare providers to understand PICC related cost in children and resource implications.

  5. [Emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Yeong; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Ho; Jo, Ik Hyun; Seo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Il Kyu; Cheung, Dae Young

    2015-02-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare form of gastritis caused by infection of the stomach wall by gas forming bacteria. It is a very rare condition that carries a high mortality rate. Portal venous gas shadow represents elevation of intestinal luminal pressure which manifests as emphysematous gastritis or gastric emphysema. Literature reviews show that the mortality rate is especially high when portal venous gas shadow is present on CT scan. Until recently, the treatment of emphysematous gastritis has been immediate surgical intervention. However, there is a recent trend of avoiding surgery because of the frequent occurrence of post-operative complications such as anastomosis leakage. In addition, aggressive surgical treatment has failed to show significant improvement in prognosis. Recently, the authors experienced a case of emphysematous gastritis accompanied by portal venous gas which was treated successfully by conservative treatment without immediate surgical intervention. Herein, we present a case of emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air along with literature review.

  6. [Venous thromboembolic disease: presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in its clinical spectrum includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, which is usually a complication of deep vein thrombosis. It is a relatively common disease with significant morbidity and requires an accurate diagnosis. They are numerous risk factors for venous thromboembolism, and there is evidence that the risk of thromboembolic disease increases proportionally to the number of predisposing risk factors present. The primary care physician should know the risk factors and suspect the presence of venous thromboembolic disease when there is a compatible clnical picture. The treatment for this pathology is anticoagulation. We report a patient with cardiovascular risk factors who was seen with pain in the right leg and shortness of breath and referred to the hospital with suspected venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripheral Vasculature: High-Temporal- and High-Spatial-Resolution Three-dimensional Contrast-enhanced MR Angiography1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Clifton R.; Glockner, James F.; Stanson, Anthony W.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of performing high-spatial-resolution (1-mm isotropic) time-resolved three-dimensional (3D) contrast material–enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography of the peripheral vasculature with Cartesian acquisition with projection-reconstruction–like sampling (CAPR) and eightfold accelerated two-dimensional (2D) sensitivity encoding (SENSE). Materials and Methods: All studies were approved by the institutional review board and were HIPAA compliant; written informed consent was obtained from all participants. There were 13 volunteers (mean age, 41.9; range, 27–53 years). The CAPR sequence was adapted to provide 1-mm isotropic spatial resolution and a 5-second frame time. Use of different receiver coil element sizes for those placed on the anterior-to-posterior versus left-to-right sides of the field of view reduced signal-to-noise ratio loss due to acceleration. Results from eight volunteers were rated independently by two radiologists according to prominence of artifact, arterial to venous separation, vessel sharpness, continuity of arterial signal intensity in major arteries (anterior and posterior tibial, peroneal), demarcation of origin of major arteries, and overall diagnostic image quality. MR angiographic results in two patients with peripheral vascular disease were compared with their results at computed tomographic angiography. Results: The sequence exhibited no image artifact adversely affecting diagnostic image quality. Temporal resolution was evaluated to be sufficient in all cases, even with known rapid arterial to venous transit. The vessels were graded to have excellent sharpness, continuity, and demarcation of the origins of the major arteries. Distal muscular branches and the communicating and perforating arteries were routinely seen. Excellent diagnostic quality rating was given for 15 (94%) of 16 evaluations. Conclusion: The feasibility of performing high-diagnostic-quality time-resolved 3D

  8. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  9. Iliofemoral and iliocaval interventions in deep venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Significant spontaneous thrombus disintegration in deep venous thrombosis (DVT) occurs very infrequently. On the contrary, these thrombi are prone to appositional growth and migration into the pulmonary arteries. The development of chronic venous insufficiency due to post-thrombotic syndrome is a frequent consequence of DVT. Therapeutic options in DVT include anticoagulation and recanalising procedures such as thrombolysis and thrombectomy. After appropriate indication assessment, the interventional radiologist can offer an efficacy-proven minimally-invasive vessel restitution approach by performing locoregional thrombolysis, pharmacomechanical therapy or, particularly in iliocaval thrombosis, mechanical thrombectomy. These methods not only serve to restitute of vessel patency, but also allow preserving venous valve function. In DVT with recurrent pulmonary embolism, retrievable filters with extended implantation duration can be deployed. In chronic proximal venous flow obstruction or in case of significant residual stenosis after thrombolysis, balloon angioplasty with stent implantation is the treatment modality of choice. Consequently, the radiologist can adopt an important role in the treatment of extensive venous disease. In this article, the treatment modalities concerning iliofemoral and iliocaval thrombosis are demonstrated and illustrated. (orig.)

  10. Emulsifiers' composition modulates venous irritation of the nanoemulsions as a lipophilic and venous irritant drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengwen; Wan, Jiangling; Chen, Huabing; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a nanoemulsion (NE) system was investigated for intravenous delivery of lipophilic and venous irritant drugs. NEs were prepared to deliver diallyl trisulfide (DT) for systemic therapy of bacterial and fungal infection, egg phospholipid was chosen as the main emulsifier, and two co-emulsifiers were also incorporated, including Poloxamer 188 (P188) and Solutol HS 15 (S15). Soybean oil was used as the dispersed phases, forming stable DT NEs with small particle sizes. The venous irritation of DT NEs was evaluated by in vitro human umbilical cord endothelial cells (CRL 1730) compatibility model with the intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) concentrations as the indices. The intracellular ATP and GTP reduction changed with the incorporation of a variety of co-emulsifiers, which varied in a free DT concentration-dependent manner. It was deduced that the free DT concentrations of NEs containing co-emulsifiers were determined by the partition coefficient of DT between oil and surfactant buffer solution. In conclusion, NE was an appropriate delivery system for lipophilic and venous irritant drug, and optimization of the composition of emulsifiers was an effective method to alleviate the venous irritation of DT NEs.

  11. Systemic treatments for the prevention of venous thrombo-embolic events in paediatric cancer patients with tunnelled central venous catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoot, Reineke A.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; van de Wetering, Marianne D.; van Ommen, Cornelia H.

    2013-01-01

    Venous thrombo-embolic events (VTEs) occur in 2.2% to 14% of paediatric cancer patients and cause significant morbidity and mortality. The malignant disease itself, the cancer treatment and the presence of central venous catheters (CVCs) increase the risk of VTE. The primary objective of this review

  12. [The unnecessary application of central venous catheterization in surgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Keiko; Inoue, Satoki; Kawaguchi, Masahiko

    2018-04-06

    Perioperative physicians occasionally encounter situations where central venous catheters placed preoperatively turn out to be unnecessary. The purpose of this retrospective study is to identify the unnecessary application of central venous catheter placement and determine the factors associated with the unnecessary application of central venous catheter placement. Using data from institutional perioperative central venous catheter surveillance, we analysed data from 1,141 patients who underwent central venous catheter placement. We reviewed the central venous catheter registry and medical charts and allocated registered patients into those with the proper or with unnecessary application of central venous catheter according to standard indications. Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with the unnecessary application of central venous catheter placement. In 107 patients, representing 9.38% of the overall population, we identified the unnecessary application of central venous catheter placement. Multivariate analysis identified emergencies at night or on holidays (odds ratio [OR] 2.109, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.021-4.359), low surgical risk (OR=1.729, 95% CI 1.038-2.881), short duration of anesthesia (OR=0.961/10min increase, 95% CI 0.945-0.979), and postoperative care outside of the intensive care unit (OR=2.197, 95% CI 1.402-3.441) all to be independently associated with the unnecessary application of catheterization. Complications related to central venous catheter placement when the procedure consequently turned out to be unnecessary were frequently observed (9/107) compared with when the procedure was necessary (40/1034) (p=0.032, OR=2.282, 95% CI 1.076-4.842). However, the subsequent multivariate logistic model did not hold this significant difference (p=0.0536, OR=2.115, 95% CI 0.988-4.526). More careful consideration for the application of central venous catheter is required in cases of emergency surgery at night or on

  13. Cerebral venous angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagawa, Tetsuji; Taguchi, Haruyoshi; Kamiya, Kazuko; Yano, Takashi; Nakajima, Reiko

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a 27-year-old male patient who was diagnosed as having cerebral venous angioma in the postero-temporal area by CT scan and cerebral angiography. The patient improved by removing angioma with electrocoagulation of medullary veins. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee S Sasanka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein.

  15. Risk factors for development of complication following peripherally inserted central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Aydın

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs are inserted into central veins through the upper extremity veins. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate PICC procedures, related complications, their causes and factors influencing the success of the procedure during anaesthesia Methods: ‘Central Venous Catheterization Forms’ filled out for 850 patients in whom a PICC was inserted by residents during general anaesthesia between November 2009 and March 2013 in the operating room of Uludag University Medical Faculty Hospital were retrospectively analysed. Results: A total of 1174 procedures were evaluated. The most preferred vein for the first attempt was the right basilic vein (32.7%. Difficulty (more than two attempts with the PICC procedure was correlated with the patient’s age (p30 kg/m² (p<0.05, resident with less than 4 years of training (p=0.001, number of PICC attempts ≥2 (p<0.001, more than one resident involved in the catheterization procedure (p<0.001 and previous failed PICC procedures (p<0.001. Conclusion: We conclude that catheterization should be performed under the surveillance of a staff keeping in mind the risks of complications. In the case of failure following 2 attempts, the procedure should be handed over to a more experienced staff member. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 29-35

  16. Determination of intestinal viability by Doppler ultrasonography in venous infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, M; Martin, E W; Carey, L C

    1980-01-01

    The accuracy of Doppler ultrasound in predicting the viability of ischemic intestine secondary to venous obstruction was assessed. Twenty loops of ischemic intestine were created in dogs by temporarily obstructing venous return from the bowel. Doppler arterial flow signals within the intestine quickly disappeared following venous occlusion. In ten segments, arterial signals promptly returned following release of venous occlusion. Nine of these ten segments were viable at reoperation 24 hours later. In ten segments, no arterial signals could be detected following release of venous occlusion, and only one segment proved to be viable. Doppler ultrasound findings were far more accurate in distinguishing between viable and nonviable intestine thatn were clinical guides to intestinal viability. PMID:7352777

  17. Modelling Framework and Assistive Device for Peripheral Intravenous Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Kin F.; Robinson, Martin P.; Gilbert, Mathew A.; Pelah, Adar

    2016-02-01

    Intravenous access for blood sampling or drug administration that requires peripheral venepuncture is perhaps the most common invasive procedure practiced in hospitals, clinics and general practice surgeries.We describe an idealised mathematical framework for modelling the dynamics of the peripheral venepuncture process. Basic assumptions of the model are confirmed through motion analysis of needle trajectories during venepuncture, taken from video recordings of a skilled practitioner injecting into a practice kit. The framework is also applied to the design and construction of a proposed device for accurate needle guidance during venepuncture administration, assessed as consistent and repeatable in application and does not lead to over puncture. The study provides insights into the ubiquitous peripheral venepuncture process and may contribute to applications in training and in the design of new devices, including for use in robotic automation.

  18. Venous leg ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Leg ulcers usually occur secondary to venous reflux or obstruction, but 20% of people with leg ulcers have arterial disease, with or without venous disorders. Between 1.5 and 3.0/1000 people have active leg ulcers. Prevalence increases with age to about 20/1000 in people aged over 80 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of standard treatments, adjuvant treatments, and organisational interventions for venous leg ulcers? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence of venous leg ulcers? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: compression bandages and stockings, cultured allogenic (single or bilayer) skin replacement, debriding agents, dressings (cellulose, collagen, film, foam, hyaluronic acid-derived, semi-occlusive alginate), hydrocolloid (occlusive) dressings in the presence of compression, intermittent pneumatic compression, intravenous prostaglandin E1, larval therapy, laser treatment (low-level), leg ulcer clinics, multilayer elastic system, multilayer elastomeric (or non-elastomeric) high-compression regimens or bandages, oral treatments (aspirin, flavonoids, pentoxifylline, rutosides, stanozolol, sulodexide, thromboxane alpha2 antagonists, zinc), peri

  19. Avaliação da pressão venosa periférica na esclerose sistêmica Peripheral venous pressure in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Potério-Filho

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer a utilidade da medida indireta da pressão venosa periférica (PVP na avaliação de pacientes com esclerose sistêmica (ES, comparando com uma população controle normal. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo avaliando 18 pacientes esclerodérmicas do sexo feminino (sendo oito delas com úlcera cutânea isquêmica submetidas à medida indireta da PVP (por pletismografia. Os dados foram comparados a um grupo controle normal de 18 mulheres hígidas, pareadas para idade. RESULTADOS: Os níveis de pressão arterial foram semelhantes nos dois grupos. Os valores de PVP estavam significativamente diminuídos nos pacientes com ES (58.9 ± 11.6 mmHg no grupo ES e 96.9 ± 7.1 mmHg no grupo controle; p OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to establish the usefulness of indirect measurement of peripheral venous pressure (PVP in the evaluation of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc, comparing them with a normal control population. METHODS: Eighteen female SSc patients (eight patients presenting cutaneous ischemic ulcers were submitted to indirect measurement of the PVP (by plethysmography, and data were compared with a control group of 18 healthy women, paired by age. RESULTS: Arterial pressure levels were similar in both groups. PVP levels were significantly decreased in the SSc patients (58.9 ± 11.6 mmHg in the SSc group and 96.9 ± 7.1 mmHg in the control group; p < 0.0001; in the SSc group, patients with ischemic ulcers presented PVP levels significantly decreased compared with those patients without ulcers (50.6 ± 10.8 mmHg in the ulcer group and 65.5 ± 7.2 mmHg in the group without ulcers; p = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that decreased PVP in SSc is associated with a decrease in the blood flow of these patients, predisposing them to cutaneous ischemic ulcers.

  20. Peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy; Chronic pain - peripheral neuropathy ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  1. Anatomical features of venous outflow from rat’s reproductive organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Nikitin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The venous drainage from reproductive organs of rats is described; new data on peculiarities of the venous drainage are obtained.Objects of study were adult Wistar white rats (20 animals. The animals have passed precision dissection of vessels in order to study anatomic peculiarities of venous drainage from the left spermary in male rats and internal genital organs in female rats in norm. It has been shown that the venous drainage from the left spermary follows the spermatic vein entering into the pampiniform plexus system, which continues into the single venous trunk, which, in its turn, divides into the ascending and descending veins. The descending vein runs into the common left iliac vein, while the ascending vein runs into the renal vein. The venous drainage from female reproductive organs follows through the uterine vein, which, taking the tubal and spermatic veins, runs from the left into the left renal vein and from the right into the caudal vena cava.

  2. Central venous obstruction in the thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collin, G.; Jones, R.G.; Willis, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Central venous stenosis and occlusion can occur secondary to a spectrum of conditions ranging from aggressive malignancy to benign extrinsic anatomical compression in otherwise healthy individuals. Irrespective of aetiology, significant morbidity in the acute setting and long term can occur unless prompt accurate diagnosis and appropriate management is initiated, the radiologist being central to both. The present review will provide radiologists with a thorough illustration and explanation of the range of central venous conditions in the thorax (including deep vein thrombosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, haemodialysis, and malignancy related causes), the salient imaging findings and interventional management using case examples from the authors' practice. - Highlights: • We show a range of causes of central venous disease in the thorax. • We provide information about different imaging and management strategies. • We show several cases with successes and complications of endovascular management

  3. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Shamit S.; Konanur, Meghana; Foltz, Gretchen; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Resnick, Scott

    2016-01-01

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period

  4. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Shamit S., E-mail: shamit.desai@northwestern.edu [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Konanur, Meghana [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (United States); Foltz, Gretchen [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University, Interventional Radiology (United States); Malaisrie, S. Chris [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (United States); Resnick, Scott, E-mail: sresnick@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital (United States)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period.

  5. Contribution of MRI in supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastler, B.; Germain, P.; Gangi, A.; Klinkert, A.; Dietemann, J.L.; Wackenheim, A.; Livolsi, A.; Willard, D.

    1992-01-01

    A case of supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) in an infant aged 2 1/2 months is presented. Diagnosis was established non invasively by magnetic resonance image (MRI). Not only did MRI precisely depict the anomalous venous pathway but it moreover securely excluded pulmonary venous obstruction. (orig.)

  6. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoven, Allard T; Chelu, Raluca G; Duijnhouwer, Anthonie L; Demulier, Laurent; Devos, Daniel; Nieman, Koen; Witsenburg, Maarten; van den Bosch, Annemien E; Loeys, Bart L; van Hagen, Iris M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence, anatomy, associations and clinical impact of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return in patients with Turner syndrome. All Turner patients who presented at our Turner clinic, between January 2007 and October 2015 were included in this study and underwent ECG, echocardiography and advanced imaging such as cardiac magnetic resonance or computed tomography as part of their regular clinical workup. All imaging was re-evaluated and detailed anatomy was described. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return was diagnosed in 24 (25%) out of 96 Turner patients included and 14 (58%) of these 24 partial anomalous pulmonary venous return had not been reported previously. Right atrial or ventricular dilatation was present in 11 (46%) of 24 partial anomalous pulmonary venous return patients. When studied with advanced imaging modalities and looked for with specific attention, PAPVR is found in 1 out of 4 Turner patients. Half of these patients had right atrial and/or ventricular dilatation. Evaluation of pulmonary venous return should be included in the standard protocol in all Turner patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. A survey of current practice of vascular surgeons in venous disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Ruth L; Gloviczki, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Acute venous thromboembolism and chronic venous diseases are common conditions that affect a large proportion of the United States population. The diagnosis of venous disease has improved, and the treatment options have rapidly evolved over the past decade. To date, it is unclear to what extent vascular surgeons have become involved in the modern management of venous disorders. This survey was undertaken to explore the current interest and practice of vascular surgeons in the contemporary care of venous disease. A survey was administered via a web-based platform to active and candidate members of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS). The survey included 30 questions investigating the characteristics of venous surgeons and scope of venous practice. Open-ended questions were also included for commentary. A total of 1879 surveys were sent to SVS members nationwide, and 385 members participated (response rate of 20.5%). The participants were mostly men (89.6%) with 37.7% practicing in an academic setting and 59.2% in private practice. The respondents treated superficial veins (92.9%) and deep veins (85.8%) in clinical practice, with 89.9% having their own vascular laboratory. A wide spectrum of interventions for superficial (91.9%), deep (85.8%), and perforator veins (52.7% endovenous, 19.4% subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery) are being performed by respondents. Only 26.2% had learned endovenous thermal ablation in their training program; however, over 96% of those performing venous interventions utilized this technique. Overall, the majority (85.5%) devoted 50% or less of practice to venous disorders. Respondents indicated that limitations to expansion of vein practices mainly involved challenges with third party payers, local competition, and existing large volumes of arterial interventions needing to be performed. Despite the widespread incorporation of venous disease into current vascular practices, 66.1% are not members of the American Venous Forum (AVF

  8. [Superficial venous thrombosis. A state of art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    For a long time superficial thrombophlebitis has been thought to be a rather benign condition. Recently, when duplex ultrasound technique is used for the diagnosis more and more often, the disease is proved to be more dangerous than anticipated. Thrombosis propagates to the deep veins in 6-44% and pulmonary embolism was observed on the patients in 1,5-33%. We can calculate venous thromboembolic complications on every fourth patient. Diagnosis is clinical, but duplex ultrasound examination is mandatory, for estimation of the thrombus extent, for exclusion of the deep venous thrombosis and for follow up. Both legs should be checked with ultrasound, because simultaneous deep venous thrombosis can develop on the contralateral limb. Two different forms can be distinguished: superficial venous thrombosis with, or without varicose veins. In cases of spontaneous, non varicous form, especially when the process is migrating or recurrent, a careful clinical examination is necessery for exclusion of malignant diseases and thrombophilia. The treatment options are summarised on the basis of recent international consensus statements. The American and German guidelines are similar. Compression and mobilisation are cornerstones of the therapy. For a short segment thrombosis non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs are effective. For longer segments low molecular-weight heparins are preferred. Information on the effect of the novel oral anticoagulants for the therapy is lacking but they may appear to be effective in the future for this indication. When thrombus is close to the sapheno-femoral or sapheno-popliteal junction crossectomy (high ligation), or low molecular-weight heparin in therapeutic doses are indicated. The term superficial thrombophlebitis should be discouraged, because inflammation and infection is not the primary pathology. It should be called correctly superficial venous thrombosis in order to avoid the unnecessary administration of antibiotics and the misconception

  9. Venous function after pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for extensive iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Greeff

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic venous insufficiency is an important complication following iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. Early thrombus removal may preserve venous function and prevent this complication. This study represents the largest reported South African series of pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis to date. Objective: To evaluate the long-term outcome following pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for proximal and extensive deep venous thrombosis in a private, specialist vascular unit. Methods: All patients who underwent pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis between August 2009 and January 2016 were invited to return for clinical assessment and venous ultrasound. Clinical findings were recorded according to the Villalta score and clinical, etiology, anatomic and pathology (CEAP classification. The quality of life (QoL was assessed utilising the VEINES-QoL/Sym questionnaire, providing two scores per patient, one describing the QoL and the other symptom severity (Sym. Results: Thirty two patients (35 legs were evaluated. There were 25 females and 7 males, with a mean age of 33.5 years (±14 years. The mean follow-up period was 31 months (range 3 months – 80 months. Results of the CEAP classification were C0 = 24 (75%, C1 = 1 (4%, C2 = 2 (6%, C3 = 2 (6% and C4 = 3 (9%. Thirty-one (97% patients had Villalta scores from 0 to 4, indicating no or mild evidence of venous disease. One patient (3% had a Villalta score of 6, indicating post-thrombotic syndrome. The mean QoL score was 87% (±12 and the mean Sym score was 86% (±14. Twenty-four (75% patients had no abnormality on ultrasound, with fibrosis the most observed abnormality. Conclusion: Most patients who had undergone pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for extensive iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis showed few significant clinical signs of chronic venous insufficiency, had excellent function on venous ultrasound and reported

  10. Suicide by severing the arterio-venous subclavian dialysis catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirisinghe, P A S; Busuttil, A

    2006-02-01

    Haemodialysis access is an essential requirement for haemodialysis treatment in end-stage renal disease. The common forms are arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and arteriovenous grafts in ante-cubital fossa, forearm and upper thigh. Sometimes temporary or immediate access is created via a subclavian catheter or internal jugular catheter. This report is on a 79-year-old man who was suffering from chronic renal failure with a non-functional peripheral AVF; he was being dialysed through a permanent subclavian catheter and he became depressed due to continuing deterioration of his health. He used the easily accessible haemodialysis site as the method of suicide by cutting the tube that connected with the main vessel in his chest and bled to death. This highlights the requirement to assess carefully the patient's mental state in those on chronic haemodialysis, even though very few similar fatal cases have been previously reported.

  11. The Essentials of Parathyroid Hormone Venous Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: btaslakian@gmail.com [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, NYU School of Medicine (United States); Trerotola, Scott O., E-mail: streroto@uphs.upenn.edu [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology (United States); Sacks, Barry, E-mail: bsacks@bidmc.harvard.edu [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Oklu, Rahmi, E-mail: oklu.rahmi@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Deipolyi, Amy, E-mail: deipolya@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Hyperparathyroidism is an excess of parathyroid hormone in the blood due to over-activity of one or more parathyroid gland. Localization of abnormal glands with noninvasive imaging modalities, such as technetium sestamibi scan and cross-sectional imaging, has a high success rate. Parathyroid venous sampling is performed for patients with persistent or recurrent disease after previous parathyroid surgery, when repeat noninvasive imaging studies are negative or discordant. The success of invasive localization studies and results interpretation is dependent on the interventional radiologist’s understanding of the normal and ectopic anatomic locations of parathyroid glands, as well as their blood supply and venous drainage. Anatomic and technical considerations for selective parathyroid venous sampling are reviewed.

  12. Decreasing dialysis catheter rates by creating a multidisciplinary dialysis access program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, Patricia M; Niederhaus, Silke V; Schweitzer, Eugene J; Leeser, David B

    2018-03-01

    Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have determined that chronic dialysis units should have 45%. A multidisciplinary program was established with goals of decreasing catheter rates in order to decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections, decrease mortality associated with central line-associated bloodstream infection, decrease hospital days, and provide savings to the healthcare system. We collected the catheter rates within three dialysis centers served over a 5-year period. Using published data surrounding the incidence and related costs of central line-associated bloodstream infection and mortality per catheter day, the number of central line-associated bloodstream infection events, the costs, and the related mortality could be determined prior to and after the initiation of the dialysis access program. An organized dialysis access program resulted in a 82% decrease in the number of central venous catheter days which lead to a concurrent reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infection and deaths. As a result of creating an access program, central venous catheter rates decreased from an average rate of 45% to 8%. The cost savings related to the program was calculated to be over US$5 million. The decrease in the number of mortalities is estimated to be between 13 and 27 patients. We conclude that a formalized access program decreases catheter rates, central line-associated bloodstream infection, and the resultant hospitalizations, mortality, and costs. Areas with high hemodialysis catheter rates should develop access programs to better serve their patient population.

  13. The diagnostic value of CT scan and selective venous sampling in Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negoro, Makoto; Kuwayama, Akio; Yamamoto, Naoto; Nakane, Toshichi; Yokoe, Toshio; Kageyama, Naoki; Ichihara, Kaoru; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1986-01-01

    We studied 24 patients with Cushing's syndrome in order to find the best way to confirm the pituitary adenoma preoperatively. At first, the sellar content was studied by means of a high-resolution CT scan in each patient. Second, by selective catheterization in the bilateral internal jugular vein and the inferior petrosal sinus, venous samples (c) were obtained for ACTH assay. Simultaneously, peripheral blood sampling (P) was made at the anterior cubital vein for the same purpose, and the C/P ratio was carefully calculated in each patient. If the C/P ratio exceeded 2, it was highly suggestive of the presence of pituitary adenoma. Even by an advanced high-resolution CT scan with a thickness of 2 mm, pituitary adenomas were detected in only 32 % of the patients studied. The result of image diagnosis in Cushing disease was discouraging. As for the chemical diagnosis, the results were as follows. At the early stage of this study, the catheterization was terminated in the jugular veins of nine patients. Among these, in five patients the presence of pituitary adenoma was predicted correctly in the preoperative stage. Later, by means of inferior petrosal sinus samplings, pituitary microadenomas were detected in ten patients among the twelve. Selective venous sampling for ACTH in the inferior petrosal sinus or jugular vein proved to be useful for the differential diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome when other diagnostic measures such as CT scan were inconclusive. (author)

  14. Fish Intake and Venous Thromboembolism: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating the risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. Several lines of evidence attest that consumption of fish and its compounds, especially omega-3 fatty acids, may be effective to decrease the cardiovascular risk. Since the pathogenesis of arterial and venous thrombosis share some common aspects, we performed a systematic review of published clinical studies that investigated the association between fish intake and venous thrombosis. An electronic search was carried out in Medline, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science using the key words "fish" OR "seafood" AND "venous thromboembolism" OR "deep vein thrombosis" OR "pulmonary embolism", with no language or date restriction. Overall, 6 studies (5 prospective and 1 case-control) were finally identified. In only 1 small case-control study, a larger intake of total fish was found to be negatively associated with the risk of venous thromboembolism. No association was found in 4 large prospective studies, whereas a positive association was observed in the remaining. No substantial difference was also noticed between intake of fatty or lean fish. Taken together, the current epidemiological evidence does not support the existence of a significant effect of total fish consumption on the risk of venous thromboembolism. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Access to the city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Manja Hoppe; Møller-Jensen, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with access to the city for urban residents living in the periphery of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The paper presents an analysis of the mobility practices of residents and investigates the mobility constraints they experience in relation to the limited accessibility provided...... mobility and access to the city for residents in the periphery. Regular mobility is an ingrained part of residents' livelihood strategies. The majority of households rely on one or more members regularly travelling to central parts of the city in relation to their livelihood activities. The analysis...... by road and traffic conditions and highlights how accessibility problems of peripheral settlements are not easily understood separately from the general dysfunctions of the overall mobility system of city....

  16. Early thrombus removal strategies for acute deep venous thrombosis: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Mark H; Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank; Pappas, Peter; Raffetto, Joseph D; Wakefield, Thomas W

    2012-05-01

    The anticoagulant treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) has been historically directed toward the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. However, such treatment imperfectly protects against late manifestations of the postthrombotic syndrome. By restoring venous patency and preserving valvular function, early thrombus removal strategies can potentially decrease postthrombotic morbidity. A committee of experts in venous disease was charged by the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum to develop evidence-based practice guidelines for early thrombus removal strategies, including catheter-directed pharmacologic thrombolysis, pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, and surgical thrombectomy. Evidence-based recommendations are based on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relevant literature, supplemented when necessary by less rigorous data. Recommendations are made according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, incorporating the strength of the recommendation (strong: 1; weak: 2) and an evaluation of the level of the evidence (A to C). On the basis of the best evidence currently available, we recommend against routine use of the term "proximal venous thrombosis" in favor of more precise characterization of thrombi as involving the iliofemoral or femoropopliteal venous segments (Grade 1A). We further suggest the use of early thrombus removal strategies in ambulatory patients with good functional capacity and a first episode of iliofemoral DVT of venous outflow obstruction (Grade 1A). We suggest pharmacomechanical strategies over catheter-directed pharmacologic thrombolysis alone if resources are available and that surgical thrombectomy be considered if thrombolytic therapy is contraindicated (Grade 2C). Most data regarding early thrombus removal strategies are of low quality but do suggest patient-important benefits with respect to reducing postthrombotic morbidity. We

  17. Tapping but not massage enhances vasodilation and improves venous palpation of cutaneous veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Mika; Sasaki, Shinsuke; Mori, Masaharu; Ogino, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated whether tapping on the median cubital vein or massaging the forearm was more effective in obtaining better venous palpation for venipuncture. Forty healthy volunteers in their twenties were subjected to tapping (10 times in 5 sec) or massage (10 strokes in 20 sec from the wrist to the cubital fossa) under tourniquet inflation on the upper arm. Venous palpation was assessed using the venous palpation score (0-6, with 0 being impalpable). Three venous factors-venous depth, cross-sectional area, and elevation-were also measured using ultrasonography. The venous palpation score increased significantly by tapping but not by massage. Moreover, all 3 venous measurements changed significantly by tapping, while only the depth decreased significantly by massage. The three venous measurements correlated significantly with the venous palpation score, indicating that they are useful objective indicators for evaluating vasodilation. We suggest that tapping is an effective vasodilation technique.

  18. Increased venous thrombosis incidence in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anette Tarp; Kesmodel, U S; Juul, S

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is venous thrombosis risk increased in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization? SUMMARY ANSWER The venous thrombosis incidence was significantly increased in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization; especially in the first trimester and in the first 6 weeks post-partum. WHAT...... IS KNOWN ALREADY In vitro fertilization without pregnancy is not associated with increased venous thrombosis incidence. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This national register-based cohort study covered the period from 1995 to 2005. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All Danish pregnancies conceived...... by in vitro fertilization (n = 18 787) were included. Venous thrombosis incidence rates in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization were compared with venous thrombosis incidence rates in reference pregnancies, by calculating incidence rate ratios. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE In total, 48 cases were...

  19. Multidetector CT of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Brian P; Steenburg, Scott D

    2011-01-01

    Venous injuries as a result of blunt trauma are rare. Even though current protocols for multidetector computed tomography (CT) of patients with trauma are designed to evaluate primarily the solid organs and arteries, blunt venous injuries may nevertheless be identified, or at least suspected, on the basis of the multidetector CT findings. Venous injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Diagnosis of a possible venous injury is crucial because the physical findings of a venous injury are nonspecific and may be absent. This article aims to make the radiologist aware of various venous injuries caused by blunt trauma and to provide helpful hints to aid in the identification of venous injuries. Multidetector CT technology, in combination with interactive manipulation of the raw dataset, can be useful in the creation of multiplanar reconstructed images and in the identification of a venous injury caused by blunt trauma. Familiarity with direct and indirect signs of venous injuries, as well as with examples of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, will help in the diagnosis of these injuries.

  20. The Current Role of Venous Sampling in the Localization of Endocrine Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Jeshen H. G.; Drake, William; Matson, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Endocrine venous sampling plays a specific role in the diagnosis of endocrine disorders. In this article, we cover inferior petrosal sinus sampling, selective parathyroid venous sampling, hepatic venous sampling with arterial stimulation, adrenal venous sampling, and ovarian venous sampling. We review their indications and the scientific evidence justifying these indications in the diagnosis and management of Cushing's syndrome, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic endocrine tumors, Conn's syndrome, primary hyperaldosteronism, pheochromocytomas, and androgen-secreting ovarian tumors. For each sampling technique, we compare its diagnostic accuracy with that of other imaging techniques and, where possible, look at how it impacts patient management. Finally, we incorporate venous sampling into diagnostic algorithms used at our institution

  1. Venous and Arterial Thromboses: Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2018-04-01

    Arterial and venous thromboses are sustained by development of intraluminal thrombi, respectively, within the venous and arterial systems. The composition and structure of arterial and venous thrombi have been historically considered as being very different. Arterial thrombi (conventionally defined as "white") have been traditionally proposed to be composed mainly of fibrin and platelet aggregates, whilst venous thrombi (conventionally defined as "red") have been proposed as mostly being enriched in fibrin and erythrocytes. This archaic dichotomy seems ever more questionable, since it barely reflects the pathophysiology of thrombus formation in vivo. Both types of thrombi are actually composed of a complex fibrin network but, importantly, also contain essentially the same blood-borne cells (i.e., red blood cells, leukocytes, and platelets), and it is only the relative content of these individual elements that differ between venous and arterial clots or, otherwise, between thrombi generated under different conditions of blood flow and shear stress. Convincing evidence now suggests that either white or red intracoronary thrombi may be present in patients with myocardial infarction and, even more importantly, red thrombi may be more prone to distal embolization during percutaneous coronary intervention than those with lower content of erythrocytes. Conversely, it is now accepted that components traditionally considered to be involved "only" in arterial thrombosis are also represented in venous thrombosis. Thus, platelets comprise important components of venous clots, although they may be present in lower amounts here than in arterial thrombi, and von Willebrand factor is also represented in both arterial and venous thrombi. Of importance, such evidence thus supports the concept that adjunctive treatment normally associated to prevention of arterial thrombosis (e.g., aspirin) may have a role also in prevention and treatment of venous thrombosis. Thieme Medical

  2. Deep venous thrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome: invasive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerota, A J

    2015-03-01

    Invasive management of postthrombotic syndrome encompasses the two ends of the deep vein thrombosis spectrum, patients with acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis and those with chronic postthrombotic iliofemoral venous obstruction. Of all patients with acute deep vein thrombosis, those with involvement of the iliofemoral segments have the most severe chronic postthrombotic morbidity. Catheter-based techniques now permit percutaneous treatment to eliminate thrombus, restore patency, potentially maintain valvular function, and improve quality of life. Randomized trial data support an initial treatment strategy of thrombus removal. Failure to eliminate acute thrombus from the iliofemoral system leads to chronic postthrombotic obstruction of venous outflow. Debilitating chronic postthrombotic symptoms of the long-standing obstruction of venous outflow can be reduced by restoring unobstructed venous drainage from the profunda femoris vein to the vena cava. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Buzzatti, Nicola; Romano, Vittorio; Longoni, Matteo; Figini, Fillipo; Montorfano, Matteo; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio; Latib, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and short-term outcomes of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels. Background: The transfemoral (TF) route for transcatheter aortic valve (TAVI) is the default option due to associated advantages. However, this is limited due to the high prevalence of significant peripheral arterial disease and increased risk of vascular complications. Methods: Of 539 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in a single Italian center, 23 patients underwent TF-TAVI in the presence of small peripheral vessels as defined by a minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of ≤ 5.5 mm [by computed tomography (CT)] and/or the inability to advance a large-bore sheath. Calcification was defined as being concentric if calcium extended more than 270° around the circumference of the artery. All patients underwent 30-day clinical follow-up. Results: 17 (73.9%) patients underwent peripheral vessel pre-dilatation with a semi-compliant balloon and 6 (26.1%) patients with a Solopath sheath. 6 (26.1%) patients suffered a peri-procedural complication, with 1 patient requiring surgical embolectomy for thrombotic occlusion and the remaining patients successfully managed percutaneously in the catheter laboratory. No patient suffered a vessel perforation or required implantation of a covered stent. At 30-day follow-up, all patients were free of symptoms and signs or symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, with well-functioning TAVI prostheses as evaluated by echocardiography. Conclusions: Performing TF-TAVI is feasible in patients with no other viable vascular access option in the presence of small MLD and calcification of the peripheral vasculature, with any anticipated acute vascular complication managed in the catheter laboratory with established percutaneous techniques. - Highlights: • Small peripheral vessels is regarded as contraindication to transfemoral TAVI.

  4. Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruparelia, Neil [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Buzzatti, Nicola; Romano, Vittorio; Longoni, Matteo; Figini, Fillipo; Montorfano, Matteo; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Spagnolo, Pietro; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Latib, Azeem, E-mail: info@emocolumbus.it [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety and short-term outcomes of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) in patients with small diseased peripheral vessels. Background: The transfemoral (TF) route for transcatheter aortic valve (TAVI) is the default option due to associated advantages. However, this is limited due to the high prevalence of significant peripheral arterial disease and increased risk of vascular complications. Methods: Of 539 consecutive patients undergoing TAVI in a single Italian center, 23 patients underwent TF-TAVI in the presence of small peripheral vessels as defined by a minimal luminal diameter (MLD) of ≤ 5.5 mm [by computed tomography (CT)] and/or the inability to advance a large-bore sheath. Calcification was defined as being concentric if calcium extended more than 270° around the circumference of the artery. All patients underwent 30-day clinical follow-up. Results: 17 (73.9%) patients underwent peripheral vessel pre-dilatation with a semi-compliant balloon and 6 (26.1%) patients with a Solopath sheath. 6 (26.1%) patients suffered a peri-procedural complication, with 1 patient requiring surgical embolectomy for thrombotic occlusion and the remaining patients successfully managed percutaneously in the catheter laboratory. No patient suffered a vessel perforation or required implantation of a covered stent. At 30-day follow-up, all patients were free of symptoms and signs or symptoms of peripheral vascular disease, with well-functioning TAVI prostheses as evaluated by echocardiography. Conclusions: Performing TF-TAVI is feasible in patients with no other viable vascular access option in the presence of small MLD and calcification of the peripheral vasculature, with any anticipated acute vascular complication managed in the catheter laboratory with established percutaneous techniques. - Highlights: • Small peripheral vessels is regarded as contraindication to transfemoral TAVI.

  5. Anticoagulation period in idiopathic venous thromboembolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farraj, Rami S.

    2004-01-01

    The period of anticoagulation of a first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism has been 6 months. It is unclear if such patients would benefit from longer treatment, as there appears to be an increased risk of recurrence after anticoagulation is stopped. In a randomized prospective study of 64 patients admitted to King Hussein Medical city, Amman, Jordan, who developed a first episode of venous thromboembolism, 32 patients were given warfarin for 24-months, while 32 patients stopped anticoagulation after completion of 6-months of therapy. Our goal was to determine the effects of extended anticoagulation on rates of recurrence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism and bleeding. The patients were followed for 12-months after stopping anticoagulation. After 24-months, 7 of the 32 patients (21%) who had standard anticoagulation for 6-months had a recurrent episode of thromboembolism compared to one of the 32 patients who received anticoagulation for 24 months (3%). Extended warfarin therapy for 24-months has resulted in an absolute risk reduction of 0.1% (p<0.05). This translates into 8 patients having to be treated for 24-months to avoid one recurrence without increasing the risk of major bleeding. Two patients in each group (6%) had major nonfatal bleeding, all 4 bleeding episodes occurring within the first 3-months of anticoagulation. After 36-months of follow up, the recurrence rate of extended warfarin therapy was only 3 patients (9%), which is a 43% relative reduction in recurrence of thromboembolism compared to standard therapy for 6-months. Patients with first episodes of idiopathic venous thromboembolism have an increased risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism and should be treated with oral anticoagulants for longer than 6-months, probably 24-months. (author)

  6. Central venous catheter placement by an interventional radiology unit: an australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. K. S.; Mossop, P. J.; Vrazas, J. I.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) placement carried out by an interventional radiology unit. A review of our hospital records identified 331 consecutive patients who underwent insertion of a tunnelled or non-tunnelled CVC between January 2000 and December 2004. Key outcome measures included the technical success rate of CVC insertion and the percentage of immediate ( 30 days) complications. A total of 462 CVCs were placed under radiological guidance, with an overall success rate of 98.9%. Immediate complications included one pneumothorax, which was diagnosed 7 days after subclavian CVC insertion, and eight episodes of significant haematoma or bleeding within 24 h of CVC insertion. No cases were complicated by arterial puncture or air embolus. Catheter-related sepsis occurred in 2% of non-tunnelled CVC and 8.9% of tunnelled CVC. The overall incidence of catheter-related sepsis was 0.17 per 100 catheter days. As the demand for chemotherapy and haemodialysis grows with our ageing population, interventional radiology suites are well placed to provide a safe and reliable service for the placement of central venous access devices

  7. Traumatic dural venous sinus thrombosis: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dural venous sinus thrombosis is a benign disease, representing about 1% of cerebral vascular events. In some cases the development of the disease increased intracranial pressure or symptomatic epilepsy. The development towards a dural venous sinus thrombosis is rare, but is a condition to be considered before the development of ischemic vascular events and a history of recent head trauma. Intracranial hematomas or skull fractures can lead to the establishment of obstructive pathology of the dural venous sinuses. The knowledge of this entity is necessary for the critical care staff and neurosurgery staff.

  8. Developmental venous anomalies with capillary stain: a subgroup of symptomatic DVAs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccatagliata, Luca; van den Berg, René; Soderman, Michael; Boulin, Anne; Condette-Auliac, Stéphanie; Rodesch, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are considered benign vascular dispositions; they are asymptomatic in the vast majority of cases. They represent extreme variations of the venous drainage and may rarely be responsible for focal venous ischemia leading to neurological dysfunction.

  9. Central venous oxygen saturation during hypovolaemic shock in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P; Iversen, H; Secher, N H

    1993-01-01

    We compared central venous oxygen saturation and central venous pressure (CVP) as indices of the effective blood volume during 50 degrees head-up tilt (anti-Trendelenburg's position) induced hypovolaemic shock in eight healthy subjects. Head-up tilt increased thoracic electrical impedance from 31...... (28-36) (median and range) to 34 (30-40) Ohm, mean arterial pressure (MAP) from 79 (70-88) to 86 (80-99) mmHg, heart rate (HR) from 67 (56-71) to 99 (78-119) beats min-1 (p ....05) but thereafter remained stable. In contrast, central venous oxygen saturation showed a linear decrease with time from 0.75 (0.69-0.78) at rest to 0.60 (0.49-0.67) (p measurement of central venous oxygen saturation...

  10. Novel experience of laser-assisted 'inside-out' central venous access in a patient with bilateral subclavian vein occlusion requiring pacemaker implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Thandar; Phan, Thanh Trung; Muir, Douglas Findlay; Linker, Nicholas John; Hartley, Richard; Turley, Andrew John

    2017-10-01

    This new laser facilitated 'inside-out' technique was used for transvenous pacemaker insertion in a pacemaker-dependent patient with bilateral subclavian occlusion and a failed epicardial system who is not suitable for a transfemoral approach. Procedure was undertaken under general anaesthesia with venous access obtained from right femoral vein and left axillary vein. 7F multipurpose catheter was used to enter proximal edge of the occluded segment of subclavian vein via femoral approach, which then supported stiff angioplasty wires and microcatheters to tunnel into the body of occlusion. When encountered with impenetrable resistance, 1.4 mm Excimer laser helped delivery of a Pilot 200 wire, which then progressed towards the distal edge of occlusion. Serial balloon dilatations allowed wire tracked into subintimal plane, advanced towards left clavicle using knuckle wire technique, which was then externalized with blunt dissection from infraclavicular pocket area. It was later changed to Amplatz superstiff wire exiting from both ends to form a rail, which ultimately allowed passage of pacing leads after serial balloon dilatation from clavicular end. Our hybrid 'inside-out' technique permitted transvenous pacemaker insertion without complication and this is, to our knowledge, the first case using laser in this context. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Evaluation of treatment with carboxymethylcellulose on chronic venous ulcers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januário, Virginia; de Ávila, Dione Augusto; Penetra, Maria Alice; Sampaio, Ana Luisa Bittencourt; Noronha Neta, Maria Isabel; Cassia, Flavia de Freire; Carneiro, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the chronic leg ulcers, venous ulcers are the most common and constitute a major burden to public health. Despite all technology available, some patients do not respond to established treatments. In our study, carboxymethylcellulose was tested in the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of carboxymethylcellulose 20% on the healing of chronic venous ulcers refractory to conventional treatments. METHODS: This is an analytical, pre-experimental study. Thirty patients were included with refractory venous ulcers, and applied dressings with carboxymethylcellulose 20% for 20 weeks. The analysis was based on measurement of the area of ulcers, performed at the first visit and after the end of the treatment. RESULTS: There was a reduction of 3.9 cm2 of lesion area (p=0.0001), corresponding to 38.8% (p=0.0001). There was no interruption of treatment and no increase in lesion area in any patient. CONCLUSIONS: Carboxymethylcellulose 20% represents a low cost and effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. However, controlled studies are necessary to prove its efficacy. PMID:26982773

  12. Counteracting venous stasis during acute lower leg immobilization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelkens, F.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Kersten, B.T.P.; Scheurwater, H.; Laarhoven, E.W. van; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: During lower limb immobilization, patients are at risk to develop deep venous thrombosis. Recently, a water-pad was developed that should counteract venous stasis. The water-pad, located under the plaster, mobilizes water from the foot to the calf during weight bearing and, thereby, imitates

  13. Radiological evaluation of the chronic venous stasis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Train, J.S.; Schanzer, H.; Peirce, E.C. II; Dan, S.J.; Mitty, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic venous stasis is an extremely complex clinical syndrome of pain and changes in the skin that can involve the superficial, deep, and perforating veins. This syndrome is commonly referred to as the postphlebitic syndrome, implying that thrombophlebitis is its sole etiology. To test this hypothesis, the authors performed ascending venography on 51 limbs of patients with the chromic venous stasis syndrome and demonstrated that 32 had no radiological evidence of recent or old thrombophlebitis. Instead, they had normal-appearing veins, suggesting primary incompetence of the deep and/or perforating venous valves rather than thrombophlebitis as the etiology. Since various operations have recently been proposed to correct or bypass malfunctioning valves, precise demonstration of pathological change is required to choose the appropriate procedure and to evaluate results. Descending venograms were combined with the ascending studies in 42 limbs for this purpose. In addition to outlining the abnormalities responsible for chronic venous stasis syndrome in individual cases, interesting conclusions regarding the syndrome itself were reached

  14. Metastatic Carcinoma of Unknown Primary Presenting as Jugular Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prince Cheriyan Modayil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Jugular venous thrombosis is unusual and is associated with central venous catheterisation, intravenous drug abuse and head and neck sepsis. It is rarely associated with malignancy. We report a case of metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary in a forty year old female which presented with jugular venous thrombosis. The discussion includes investigation and treatment options for this condition.

  15. An unusual cause of hydrocephalus: aqueductal developmental venous anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagmurlu, Banu; Fitoz, Suat; Atasoy, Cetin; Erden, ilhan [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Deda, Gulhis; Unal, Ozlem [Ankara University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Vascular malformations are infrequent causes of aqueductal stenoses, developmental venous anomaly (DVA) being the rarest among them. DVAs, also known as venous angiomas, are congenital in origin and characterized by dilatation of vessels in the superficial and deep venous system. Although they are usually clinically silent, they can be complicated by hemorrhage, seizures and neurologic deficits. Herein, we report MR imaging findings of a 7-year-old girl whose hydrocephalus was due to an abnormal vein coursing through the aqueduct. (orig.)

  16. How to objectively assess jugular primary venous obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zamboni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Last January The Lancet published the article by Traboulsee et al. Prevalence of extracranial venous narrowing on catheter venography in people with multiple sclerosis, their sibilings, and unrelated healthy controls: a blinded, case control study. These Authors confirmed the presence of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency with a high prevalence of about 70% in the Canadian population, but without significant differences between patients and healthy controls, yet. However, they used a criterion never published to assess stenosis, in alternative to the classic measurement of the diameter in the segment immediately preceding the narrowest point. Traboulsee et al. measure the stenosis along the entire length of the internal jugular vein, by comparing the maximum diameter with the narrowest point. It has been demonstrated, from normal anatomy findings, how the jugular bulb diameter normally exceeds 50% of the minimum diameter of the internal jugular vein, clearly showing the reason why Traboulsee et al. did not find significant differences between people with multiple sclerosis, their sibilings, and unrelated healthy controls. Furthermore, as the outcome measure of Traboulsee et al., wall stenosis is a neglected part of primary venous obstruction, because in the majority of cases obstruction is the consequence of intraluminal obstacles, as a considerable part of truncular venous malformations, and/or compression; rarely of external hypoplasia. Finally, several recently published methods can be adopted for objective assessment of restricted jugular flow in course of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, by the means of non invasive magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and plethysmography. This may help us in improving the assessment of cerebral venous return in the near future.

  17. Suppressing unsteady flow in arterio-venous fistulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechy, L.; Iori, F.; Corbett, R. W.; Shurey, S.; Gedroyc, W.; Duncan, N.; Caro, C. G.; Vincent, P. E.

    2017-10-01

    Arterio-Venous Fistulae (AVF) are regarded as the "gold standard" method of vascular access for patients with end-stage renal disease who require haemodialysis. However, a large proportion of AVF do not mature, and hence fail, as a result of various pathologies such as Intimal Hyperplasia (IH). Unphysiological flow patterns, including high-frequency flow unsteadiness, associated with the unnatural and often complex geometries of AVF are believed to be implicated in the development of IH. In the present study, we employ a Mesh Adaptive Direct Search optimisation framework, computational fluid dynamics simulations, and a new cost function to design a novel non-planar AVF configuration that can suppress high-frequency unsteady flow. A prototype device for holding an AVF in the optimal configuration is then fabricated, and proof-of-concept is demonstrated in a porcine model. Results constitute the first use of numerical optimisation to design a device for suppressing potentially pathological high-frequency flow unsteadiness in AVF.

  18. [Venous thrombosis of atypical location in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Balea, Begoña; Sáenz de Miera Rodríguez, Andrea; Antolín Novoa, Silvia; Quindós Varela, María; Barón Duarte, Francisco; López López, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication that frequently occurs in patients with neoplastic diseases. Several models have therefore been developed to identify patient subgroups diagnosed with cancer who are at increased risk of developing VTE. The most common forms of thromboembolic episodes are deep vein thrombosis in the lower limbs and pulmonary thromboembolism. However, venous thrombosis is also diagnosed in atypical locations. There are few revisions of unusual cases of venous thrombosis. In most cases, VTE occurs in the upper limbs and in the presence of central venous catheters, pacemakers and defibrillators. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy who developed a thrombosis in the upper limbs (brachial and axillary). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of C-arm computed tomography and on-site quick cortisol assay for adrenal venous sampling: A retrospective study of 178 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin-Chen; Lee, Bo-Ching; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Huang, Kuo-How; Liu, Kao-Lang

    2017-12-01

    To compare the performance of on-site quick cortisol assay (QCA) and C-arm computed tomography (CT) assistance on adrenal venous sampling (AVS) without adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. The institutional review board at our hospital approved this retrospective study, which included 178 consecutive patients with primary aldosteronism. During AVS, we used C-arm CT to confirm right adrenal cannulation between May 2012 and June 2015 (n = 100) and QCA for bilateral adrenal cannulation between July 2015 and September 2016 (n = 78). Successful AVS required a selectivity index (cortisol adrenal vein /cortisol peripheral ) of ≥ 2.0 bilaterally. The overall success rate of C-arm CT-assisted AVS was 87%, which increased to 97.4% under QCA (P = .013). The procedure time (C-arm CT, 49.5 ± 21.3 min; QCA, 37.5 ± 15.6 min; P AVS. • Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) is a technically challenging procedure. • C-arm CT and quick cortisol assay (QCA) are efficient for assisting AVS. • QCA might outperform C-arm CT in enhancing AVS performance.

  20. Clinical evaluation of the use of an intracardiac electrocardiogram to guide the tip positioning of peripherally inserted central catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruiyi; Chen, Chunfang; Jin, Jingfen; Sharma, Komal; Jiang, Nan; Shentu, Yingqin; Wang, Xingang

    2016-06-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) provides important central venous accesses for clinical treatments, tests and monitoring. Compared with the traditional methods, intracardiac electrocardiogram (ECG)-guided method has the potential to guide more accurate tip positioning of PICCs. This study aimed to clinically evaluate the effectiveness of an intracardiac ECG to guide the tip positioning by monitoring characteristic P-wave changes. In this study, eligible patients enrolled September 2011 to May 2012 according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria received the catheterization monitored by intracardiac ECG. Then chest radiography was performed to check the catheter position. The results revealed that, with 117 eligible patients, all bar one patient who died (n = 116) completed the study, including 60 males and 56 females aged 51.2 ± 15.1 years. Most (n = 113, > 97%) had characteristic P-wave changes. The intracardiac ECG-guided positioning procedure achieved correct placement for 112 patients (96.56%), demonstrating 99.12% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In conclusion, the intracardiac ECG can be a promising technique to guide tip positioning of PICCs. However, since the sample size in this study is limited, more experience and further study during clinical practice are needed to demonstrate achievement of optimal catheterization outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Motor-commands decoding using peripheral nerve signals: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keum-Shik; Aziz, Nida; Ghafoor, Usman

    2018-06-01

    During the last few decades, substantial scientific and technological efforts have been focused on the development of neuroprostheses. The major emphasis has been on techniques for connecting the human nervous system with a robotic prosthesis via natural-feeling interfaces. The peripheral nerves provide access to highly processed and segregated neural command signals from the brain that can in principle be used to determine user intent and control muscles. If these signals could be used, they might allow near-natural and intuitive control of prosthetic limbs with multiple degrees of freedom. This review summarizes the history of neuroprosthetic interfaces and their ability to record from and stimulate peripheral nerves. We also discuss the types of interfaces available and their applications, the kinds of peripheral nerve signals that are used, and the algorithms used to decode them. Finally, we explore the prospects for future development in this area.

  2. Venous Thromboembolism in Podiatric Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jemma H; Terrill, Alexander J; Barwick, Alex L; Butterworth, Paul A

    2018-01-01

    The extent to which podiatric surgeons follow venous thromboembolism guidelines is unknown. The aim of this study therefore, was 2-fold: (a) to determine the rate of venous thromboembolism following podiatric surgery and (b) to investigate the factors that influence the use of thromboprophylaxis. Data from 4238 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery over 2 years were analyzed. Venous thromboembolism within the first 30 days following surgery was recorded using the Australasian College of Podiatric Surgeons surgical audit tool. Logistic regression analyses were undertaken to determine the factors that influenced thromboprophylaxis. Of the 4238 patient records, 3677 records (87%) provided complete data (age range 2-94 years; mean ± SD, 49.1 ± 19.7 years; 2693 females). A total of 7 venous thromboembolic events (0.2% rate) were reported. Operative duration and age (OR 12.63, 95% CI 9.47 to 16.84, P < 0.01), postoperative immobilization (OR 6.94, 95% CI 3.95 to 12.20, P < 0.01), and a prior history of VTE (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.01 to 11.04, P = 0.04) were the strongest predictors of thromboprophylaxis. Podiatric foot and ankle surgery is associated with a low rate of venous thromboembolism. This may be due in part to the thromboprophylaxis regime implemented by podiatric surgeons, which closely aligns with current evidence-based guidelines. Level II: Prospective cohort study.

  3. MRI for peripheral artery disease: Introductory physics for vascular physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Trisha L; Forbes, Thomas L; Dueck, Andrew D; Wright, Graham A

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advanced significantly in the past decade and provides a safe and non-invasive method of evaluating peripheral artery disease (PAD), with and without using exogenous contrast agents. MRI offers a promising alternative for imaging patients but the complexity of MRI can make it less accessible for physicians to understand or use. This article provides a brief introduction to the technical principles of MRI for physicians who manage PAD patients. We discuss the basic principles of how MRI works and tailor the discussion to how MRI can evaluate anatomic characteristics of peripheral arterial lesions.

  4. Severe Juxtahepatic Venous Injury: Survival after Prolonged Hepatic Vascular Isolation Without Shunting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. J. Krige

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Survival following major juxtahepatic venous injury is rare in blunt liver trauma despite the use of intracaval shunting. Prolonged liver arterial inflow control, total hepatic venous isolation and lobectomy without shunting was used in a patient to repair a combined vena caval and hepatic venous injury after blunt liver injury. An extended period of normothermic hepatic ischemia was tolerated. Early recognition of retrohepatic venous injury and temporary liver packing to control bleeding and correct hypovolemia are essential before caval occlusion. Hepatic vascular isolation without shunting is an effective simple alternative technique allowing major venous repair in complex liver trauma.

  5. Incidence of Central Vein Stenosis and Occlusion Following Upper Extremity PICC and Port Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonsalves, Carin F.; Eschelman, David J.; Sullivan, Kevin L.; DuBois, Nancy; Bonn, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of central vein stenosis and occlusion following upper extremity placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheters(PICCs) and venous ports. One hundred fifty-four patients who underwent venography of the ipsilateral central veins prior to initial and subsequent venous access device insertion were retrospectively identified. All follow-up venograms were interpreted at the time of catheter placement by one interventional radiologist over a 5-year period and compared to the findings on initial venography. For patients with central vein abnormalities, hospital and home infusion service records and radiology reports were reviewed to determine catheter dwelltime and potential alternative etiologies of central vein stenosis or occlusion. The effect of catheter caliber and dwell time on development of central vein abnormalities was evaluated. Venography performed prior to initial catheter placement showed that 150 patients had normal central veins. Three patients had central vein stenosis, and one had central vein occlusion. Subsequent venograms (n = 154)at the time of additional venous access device placement demonstrated 8 patients with occlusions and 10 with stenoses. Three of the 18 patients with abnormal follow-up venograms were found to have potential alternative causes of central vein abnormalities. Excluding these 3 patients and the 4 patients with abnormal initial venograms, a 7% incidence of central vein stenosis or occlusion was found in patients with prior indwelling catheters and normal initial venograms. Catheter caliber showed no effect on the subsequent development of central vein abnormalities. Patients who developed new or worsened central vein stenosis or occlu