WorldWideScience

Sample records for peripheral field loss

  1. The risk of pedestrian collisions with peripheral visual field loss

    OpenAIRE

    Peli, Eli; Apfelbaum, Henry; Berson, Eliot L.; Goldstein, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with peripheral field loss complain of colliding with other pedestrians in open-space environments such as shopping malls. Field expansion devices (e.g., prisms) can create artificial peripheral islands of vision. We investigated the visual angle at which these islands can be most effective for avoiding pedestrian collisions, by modeling the collision risk density as a function of bearing angle of pedestrians relative to the patient. Pedestrians at all possible locations were assumed...

  2. The risk of pedestrian collisions with peripheral visual field loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peli, Eli; Apfelbaum, Henry; Berson, Eliot L; Goldstein, Robert B

    2016-12-01

    Patients with peripheral field loss complain of colliding with other pedestrians in open-space environments such as shopping malls. Field expansion devices (e.g., prisms) can create artificial peripheral islands of vision. We investigated the visual angle at which these islands can be most effective for avoiding pedestrian collisions, by modeling the collision risk density as a function of bearing angle of pedestrians relative to the patient. Pedestrians at all possible locations were assumed to be moving in all directions with equal probability within a reasonable range of walking speeds. The risk density was found to be highly anisotropic. It peaked at ≈45° eccentricity. Increasing pedestrian speed range shifted the risk to higher eccentricities. The risk density is independent of time to collision. The model results were compared to the binocular residual peripheral island locations of 42 patients with forms of retinitis pigmentosa. The natural residual island prevalence also peaked nasally at about 45° but temporally at about 75°. This asymmetry resulted in a complementary coverage of the binocular field of view. Natural residual binocular island eccentricities seem well matched to the collision-risk density function, optimizing detection of other walking pedestrians (nasally) and of faster hazards (temporally). Field expansion prism devices will be most effective if they can create artificial peripheral islands at about 45° eccentricities. The collision risk and residual island findings raise interesting questions about normal visual development.

  3. Losses in variable fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronca, G.; Fevrier, A.; Genevey, P.; Perot, J.

    1974-01-01

    After a recall of the theory of losses in type 11 superconductors and review of recent work on this topic, the characteristics of what should be an ideal conductor for a pulsed magnet are given. The requirements of pulsed magnets for high energy physics are reviewed and total losses for a 1000 GeV synchrotron estimated. Finally, recent results of prototypes are reported along with the projects of superconducting synchrotron accelerators through the world. (author)

  4. Autism and peripheral hearing loss: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Alison N; McBoyle, Melanie; Kakande, Emily; Dar Santos, Rachelle C; Kozak, Frederick K

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review the literature describing the relationship between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and peripheral hearing loss including literature recommendations for audiological assessment and auditory habilitation in cases where peripheral hearing loss and ASD coexist. Published studies indexed in MEDLINE (1948-2011). The search strategy identified 595 potential studies. After a review of the titles, 115 abstracts were reviewed and 39 articles were retrieved and assessed independently by at least two authors for possible inclusion. 22 articles pertained to children with ASD and peripheral hearing loss, hearing assessment in children with ASD, audiological habilitation for children with ASD or hyper-responsiveness in children with ASD. 17 further studies were garnered from the reference section of the 22 papers. Controversy exists in the literature regarding prevalence of hearing impairment among individuals with ASD. In cases where ASD and hearing impairment co-exist, diagnosis of one condition often leads to a delay in diagnosing the other. Audiological assessment can be difficult in children with ASD and test-retest reliability of behavioural thresholds can be poor. In cases where hearing impairment exists and hearing aids or cochlear implantation are recommended, devices are often fit with special considerations for the child with ASD. Hyper-responsiveness to auditory stimuli may be displayed by individuals with ASD. Evidence or the suspicion of hyper-responsiveness may be taken into consideration when fitting amplification and planning behavioural intervention. Prevalence rates of hearing impairment among individuals with ASD continue to be debated. At present there is no conclusive evidence that children with ASD are at increased risk of peripheral hearing loss. A complete audiological assessment is recommended in all cases where ASD is suspected so as not to delay the diagnosis of hearing impairment in the event that hearing loss and ASD co

  5. Behaviour of the peripheral plasma in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, A.; Sato, K.I.; Arimoto, H.; Yamada, S.; Nagata, A.; Murata, H.

    1986-01-01

    By using Langmuir probes installed behind limiters, time behaviour of the peripheral plasma in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) are investigated. They are strongly affected by the confined RFP plasma and are divided into three phases (the initial phase before setting up the RFP configuration, the current rising phase, and the quiescent phase), which are just the same as those of the confined RFP plasma. Typical behaviour of the peripheral plasma have relations to the pump out phenomena and of the toroidal flux generation. (author)

  6. Using optic flow in the far peripheral field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Meaghan; D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2017-07-01

    Self-motion information can be used to update spatial memory of location through an estimate of a change in position. Viewing optic flow alone can create Illusory self-motion or "vection." Early studies suggested that peripheral vision is more effective than central vision in evoking vection, but controlling for retinal area and perceived distance suggests that all retinal areas may be equally effective. However, the contributions of the far periphery, beyond 90°, have been largely neglected. Using a large-field Edgeless Graphics Geometry display (EGG, Christie, Canada, field of view ±112°) and systematically blocking central (±20° to ±90°) or peripheral (viewing through tunnels ±20° to ±40°) parts of the field, we compared the effectiveness of different retinal regions at evoking forwards linear vection. Fifteen participants indicated when they had reached the position of a previously presented target after visually simulating motion down a simulated corridor. The amount of simulated travel needed to match a given target distance was modelled with a leaky spatial integrator model to estimate gains (perceived/actual distance) and a spatial decay factor. When optic flow was presented only in the far periphery (beyond 90°) gains were significantly higher than for the same motion presented full field or in only the central field, resulting in accurate performance in the range of speeds associated with normal walking. The increased effectiveness of optic flow in the peripheral field alone compared to full-field motion is discussed in terms of emerging neurophysiological studies that suggest brain areas dedicated to processing information from the far peripheral field.

  7. Pathophysiology of Age-Related Hearing Loss (Peripheral and Central)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) refers to bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss resulting from aging process. Presbycusis is a complex phenomenon characterized by audiometric threshold shift, deterioration in speech-understanding and speech-perception difficulties in noisy environments. Factors contributing to presbycusis include mitochondria DNA mutation, genetic disorders including Ahl, hypertension, diabetes, metabolic disease and other systemic diseases in the intrinsic aspects. Ext...

  8. Emotional facial expression detection in the peripheral visual field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri J Bayle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In everyday life, signals of danger, such as aversive facial expressions, usually appear in the peripheral visual field. Although facial expression processing in central vision has been extensively studied, this processing in peripheral vision has been poorly studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using behavioral measures, we explored the human ability to detect fear and disgust vs. neutral expressions and compared it to the ability to discriminate between genders at eccentricities up to 40°. Responses were faster for the detection of emotion compared to gender. Emotion was detected from fearful faces up to 40° of eccentricity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate the human ability to detect facial expressions presented in the far periphery up to 40° of eccentricity. The increasing advantage of emotion compared to gender processing with increasing eccentricity might reflect a major implication of the magnocellular visual pathway in facial expression processing. This advantage may suggest that emotion detection, relative to gender identification, is less impacted by visual acuity and within-face crowding in the periphery. These results are consistent with specific and automatic processing of danger-related information, which may drive attention to those messages and allow for a fast behavioral reaction.

  9. Particle loss from magnetic cusp field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, C.; Kawamura, T.; Obayashi, H.

    1974-12-01

    The motion of charged particles in an axially symmetric magnetic field of cusp configuration is studied by means of numerical calculations. A particular attention is paid to a non-adiabatic zone. The computer results are compared with a simplified loss cone model and it is shown that there is a critical value of non-adiabaticity parameter which defines an effective size of the non-adiabatic zone. (auth.)

  10. NPAS2 Compensates for Loss of CLOCK in Peripheral Circadian Oscillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Landgraf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 are the major transcriptional activators of the mammalian circadian clock. Because the paralog NPAS2 can substitute for CLOCK in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master circadian pacemaker, CLOCK-deficient mice maintain circadian rhythms in behavior and in tissues in vivo. However, when isolated from the SCN, CLOCK-deficient peripheral tissues are reportedly arrhythmic, suggesting a fundamental difference in circadian clock function between SCN and peripheral tissues. Surprisingly, however, using luminometry and single-cell bioluminescence imaging of PER2 expression, we now find that CLOCK-deficient dispersed SCN neurons and peripheral cells exhibit similarly stable, autonomous circadian rhythms in vitro. In CLOCK-deficient fibroblasts, knockdown of Npas2 leads to arrhythmicity, suggesting that NPAS2 can compensate for loss of CLOCK in peripheral cells as well as in SCN. Our data overturn the notion of an SCN-specific role for NPAS2 in the molecular circadian clock, and instead indicate that, at the cellular level, the core loops of SCN neuron and peripheral cell circadian clocks are fundamentally similar.

  11. Femoral artery plaque characteristics, lower extremity collaterals, and mobility loss in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mary M; Carroll, Timothy; Carr, James; Yuan, Chun; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Kibbe, Melina; Criqui, Michael H; Tian, Lu; Polonsky, Tamar; Zhao, Lihui; Gao, Ying; Hippe, Daniel S; Xu, Dongxiang; McCarthy, Walter; Kramer, Christopher M

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about the prognostic significance of specific characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measured plaque in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Associations of MRI-measured plaque quantity, lumen area, and plaque composition in the SFA with subsequent mobility loss were studied in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). Participants with an ankle-brachial index (ABI) Mobility loss was defined as becoming unable to walk up and down a flight of stairs or walk one-quarter of a mile without assistance among participants without mobility impairment at baseline. Analyses adjusted for age, sex, race, comorbidities, ABI, physical activity, and other confounders. Of 308 PAD participants without baseline mobility impairment, 100 (32.5%) developed mobility loss during follow-up. Compared to the lowest mean plaque area tertile at baseline, participants in the highest (worst) plaque area tertile had a higher rate of mobility loss (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-3.79, p = 0.018). Compared to the highest mean lumen area tertile, the smallest (worst) mean lumen area tertile was associated with greater mobility loss (HR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.20-3.96, p = 0.011). Neither lipid rich necrotic core nor calcium in the SFA were associated with mobility loss. In conclusion, greater plaque quantity and smaller lumen area in the proximal SFA, but not lipid rich necrotic core or calcium, were associated with higher mobility loss in people with PAD.

  12. Peripheral airway impairment measured by oscillometry predicts loss of asthma control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yixin; Aledia, Anna S; Galant, Stanley P; George, Steven C

    2013-03-01

    We previously showed that impulse oscillometry (IOS) indices of peripheral airway function are associated with asthma control in children. However, little data exist on whether dysfunction in the peripheral airways can predict loss of asthma control. We sought to determine the utility of peripheral airway impairment, as measured by IOS, in predicting loss of asthma control in children. Fifty-four children (age, 7-17 years) with controlled asthma were enrolled in the study. Spirometric and IOS indices of airway function were obtained at baseline and at a follow-up visit 8 to 12 weeks later. Physicians who were blinded to the IOS measurements assessed asthma control (National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines) on both visits and prescribed no medication change between visits. Thirty-eight (70%) patients maintained asthma control between 2 visits (group C-C), and 16 patients had asthma that became uncontrolled on the follow-up visit (group C-UC). There was no difference in baseline spirometric results between the C-C and C-UC groups, except for FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio (86% vs 82%, respectively; P IOS results, including resistance of the respiratory system at 5 Hz (R5; 6.4 vs 4.3 cm H2O · L(-1) · s), frequency dependence of resistance (difference of R5 and resistance of the respiratory system at 20 Hz [R5-20]; 2.0 vs 0.7 cm H2O · L(-1) · s), and reactance area (13.1 vs 4.1 cm H2O · L(-1)), of group C-UC were significantly higher than those of group C-C (P operating characteristic analysis showed baseline R5-20 and reactance area effectively predicted asthma control status at the follow-up visit (area under the curve, 0.91 and 0.90). Children with controlled asthma who have increased peripheral airway IOS indices are at risk of losing asthma control. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Poloidal flux loss in a field-reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.; Milroy, R.D.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Poloidal flux loss has been measured in field-reversed configurations and related to anomalous resistivity near the magnetic field null. The results indicate that mechanisms in addition to the lower-hybrid drift instability are affecting transport

  14. Pulsed field losses and intentional quenches of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Pulsed field losses of several 5-20 kJ coils have been measured under triangular field variations. The conductors, developed as potential subcables of 25-50 kA cables, consist of Cu wires and NbTi strands with or without CuNi barriers. Losses of soft-soldered subcables are compared with those of well-compacted cables. The coils were quenched intentionally by pulsing the coils above the critical current to observe loss variations due to possible conductor damage. The method of measurements, and effects of soldering and compactness of the conductors on the pulsed field losses will be presented

  15. Losses in superconducting multifilament composites under alternating changing fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1979-03-01

    The first part of this report presents a brief review of the losses in superconducting composites in a changing external field. The losses are expressed for a single triangular shaped pulse and for a field varying exponentially with time. The losses are calculated as a function of two important time constants. The first is due to the coupling currents between the filaments, the second is due to the eddy currents induced in the matrix. In the second part of the report, the case of an oscillating sinusoidal field is considered. In particular, in a rapidly varying field, several layers of filaments can be saturated by returning currents. Complete expressions of the losses are provided together with simplified expressions which enable one to calculate the losses in most cases. In the third part, a comparison between several kinds of conductors shows that in some cases the losses are reduced by increasing the twist pitch of the conductor

  16. Natural course of visual field loss in patients with Type 2 Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald A; Bozbeyoglu, Simge; Massof, Robert W; Kimberling, William

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the natural course of visual field loss in patients with Type 2 Usher syndrome and different patterns of visual field loss. Fifty-eight patients with Type 2 Usher syndrome who had at least three visual field measurements during a period of at least 3 years were studied. Kinetic visual fields measured on a standard calibrated Goldmann perimeter with II4e and V4e targets were analyzed. The visual field areas in both eyes were determined by planimetry with the use of a digitalizing tablet and computer software and expressed in square inches. The data for each visual field area measurement were transformed to a natural log unit. Using a mixed model regression analysis, values for the half-life of field loss (time during which half of the remaining field area is lost) were estimated. Three different patterns of visual field loss were identified, and the half-life time for each pattern of loss was calculated. Of the 58 patients, 11 were classified as having pattern type I, 12 with pattern type II, and 14 with pattern type III. Of 21 patients whose visual field loss was so advanced that they could not be classified, 15 showed only a small residual central field (Group A) and 6 showed a residual central field with a peripheral island (Group B). The average half-life times varied between 3.85 and 7.37 for the II4e test target and 4.59 to 6.42 for the V4e target. There was no statistically significant difference in the half-life times between the various patterns of field loss or for the test targets. The average half-life times for visual field loss in patients with Usher syndrome Type 2 were statistically similar among those patients with different patterns of visual field loss. These findings will be useful for counseling patients with Type 2 Usher syndrome as to their prognosis for anticipated visual field loss.

  17. Effect of the flow characteristics and inter blade channel shape on the losses in peripheral sections of gas turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovskij, A.V.; Kostezh, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    The results of calculational study , based on the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, on the floe structure and the level of profile losses in the peripheral cross sections of turbine blades by the Re = 2.0 x 10 5 - 1.2 x 10 6 numbers and the turbulence inlet intensity 0.02 - 0.12 are presented

  18. In vitro electrophoresis and in vivo electrophysiology of peripheral nerve using DC field stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madison, Roger D.; Robinson, Grant A.; Krarup, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given the movement of molecules within tissue that occurs naturally by endogenous electric fields, we examined the possibility of using a low-voltage DC field to move charged substances in rodent peripheral nerve in vitro. NEW METHOD: Labeled sugar- and protein-based markers were appl...

  19. Auditory and visual reaction time and peripheral field of vision in helmet users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbupillai Adhilakshmi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of fatal accidents are more in two wheeler drivers compared to four wheeler drivers. Head injury is of serious concern when recovery and prognosis of the patients are warranted, helmets are being used for safety purposes by moped, scooters and motorcycle drivers. Although, helmets are designed with cushioning effect to prevent head injuries but there are evidences of increase risk of neck injuries and reduced peripheral vision and hearing in helmet users. A complete full coverage helmets provide about less than 3 percent restrictions in horizontal peripheral visual field compared to rider without helmet. The standard company patented ergonomically designed helmets which does not affect the peripheral vision neither auditory reaction time. Objective: This pilot study aimed to evaluate the peripheral field of vision and auditory and visual reaction time in a hypertensive, diabetic and healthy male and female in order to have a better insight of protective characteristics of helmet in health and disease. Method: This pilot study carried out on age matched male of one healthy, one hypertensive and one diabetic and female subject of one healthy, one hypertensive and one diabetics. The field of vision was assessed by Lister’s perimeter whereas auditory and visual reaction time was recorded with response analyser. Result : Gender difference was not noted in peripheral field of vision but mild difference was found in auditory reaction time for high frequency and visual reaction time for both red and green colour in healthy control. But lateral and downward peripheral visual field was found reduced whereas auditory and visual reaction time was found increased in both hypertensive and diabetic subject in both sexes. Conclusion: Peripheral vision, auditory reaction time and visual reaction time in hypertensive and diabetics may lead to vulnerable accident. Helmet use has proven to reduce extent of injury in motorcyclist and

  20. Peripheral nerve field stimulation for pruritus relief in a patient with notalgia paraesthetica.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ricciardo, Bernadette

    2012-02-01

    This case study is presented to exemplify the application of peripheral nerve field stimulation in the treatment of recalcitrant notalgia paraesthetica. The patient was a 60-year-old woman with severe and disabling notalgia paraesthetica. The itch persisted despite the use of several medications - topical and oral. Following a successful trial of peripheral nerve field stimulation with a temporary electrode, two subcutaneous electrodes were inserted into the affected area with a battery implanted subcutaneously in her right buttock. The patient was reviewed at 5 months post implantation. She reported a greater than 85% improvement in her itch. She also reported a major improvement in her quality of life, with particular improvement in her ability to sleep through the night. This case illustrates the possible utilization of peripheral nerve field stimulation in the treatment of notalgia paraesthetica, which is a common yet poorly understood and treated condition. Replication and controlled studies are required to determine the general applicability of this approach.

  1. Evaluation of a Portable Collision Warning Device for Patients With Peripheral Vision Loss in an Obstacle Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundlik, Shrinivas; Tomasi, Matteo; Luo, Gang

    2015-04-01

    A pocket-sized collision warning device equipped with a video camera was developed to predict impending collisions based on time to collision rather than proximity. A study was conducted in a high-density obstacle course to evaluate the effect of the device on collision avoidance in people with peripheral field loss (PFL). The 41-meter-long loop-shaped obstacle course consisted of 46 stationary obstacles from floor to head level and oncoming pedestrians. Twenty-five patients with tunnel vision (n = 13) or hemianopia (n = 12) completed four consecutive loops with and without the device, while not using any other habitual mobility aid. Walking direction and device usage order were counterbalanced. Number of collisions and preferred percentage of walking speed (PPWS) were compared within subjects. Collisions were reduced significantly by approximately 37% (P < 0.001) with the device (floor-level obstacles were excluded because the device was not designed for them). No patient had more collisions when using the device. Although the PPWS were also reduced with the device from 52% to 49% (P = 0.053), this did not account for the lower number of collisions, as the changes in collisions and PPWS were not correlated (P = 0.516). The device may help patients with a wide range of PFL avoid collisions with high-level obstacles while barely affecting their walking speed.

  2. Uncertainty analysis for a field-scale P loss model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models are often used to predict phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields. While it is commonly recognized that model predictions are inherently uncertain, few studies have addressed prediction uncertainties using P loss models. In this study we assessed the effect of model input error on predic...

  3. Effects of Motion in the Far Peripheral Visual Field on Cognitive Test Performance and Cognitive Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Andy; Paas, Fred; Krigbaum, Genomary

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive load theory posits that limited attention is in actuality a limitation in working memory resources. The load theory of selective attention and cognitive control sees the interplay between attention and awareness as separate modifying functions that act on working memory. Reconciling the theoretical differences in these two theories has important implications for learning. Thirty-nine adult participants performed a cognitively demanding test, with and without movement in the far peripheral field. Although the results for movement effects on cognitive load in this experiment were not statistically significant, men spent less time on the cognitive test in the peripheral movement condition than in the conditions without peripheral movement. No such difference was found for women. The implications of these results and recommendations for future research that extends the present study are presented. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Prism therapy and visual rehabilitation in homonymous visual field loss.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Evelyn C

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Homonymous visual field defects (HVFD) are common and frequently occur after cerebrovascular accidents. They significantly impair visual function and cause disability particularly with regard to visual exploration. The purpose of this study was to assess a novel interventional treatment of monocular prism therapy on visual functioning in patients with HVFD of varied etiology using vision targeted, health-related quality of life (QOL) questionnaires. Our secondary aim was to confirm monocular and binocular visual field expansion pre- and posttreatment. METHODS: Twelve patients with acquired, documented HVFD were eligible to be included. All patients underwent specific vision-targeted, health-related QOL questionnaire and monocular and binocular Goldmann perimetry before commencing prism therapy. Patients were fitted with monocular prisms on the side of the HVFD with the base-in the direction of the field defect creating a peripheral optical exotropia and field expansion. After the treatment period, QOL questionnaires and perimetry were repeated. RESULTS: Twelve patients were included in the treatment group, 10 of whom were included in data analysis. Overall, there was significant improvement within multiple vision-related, QOL functioning parameters, specifically within the domains of general health (p < 0.01), general vision (p < 0.05), distance vision (p < 0.01), peripheral vision (p < 0.05), role difficulties (p < 0.05), dependency (p < 0.05), and social functioning (p < 0.05). Visual field expansion was shown when measured monocularly and binocularly during the study period in comparison with pretreatment baselines. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with HVFD demonstrate decreased QOL. Monocular sector prisms can improve the QOL and expand the visual field in these patients.

  5. Loss of Peripheral Sensory Function Explains Much of the Increase in Postural Sway in Healthy Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Anson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postural sway increases with age and peripheral sensory disease. Whether, peripheral sensory function is related to postural sway independent of age in healthy adults is unclear. Here, we investigated the relationship between tests of visual function (VISFIELD, vestibular function (CANAL or OTOLITH, proprioceptive function (PROP, and age, with center of mass sway area (COM measured with eyes open then closed on firm and then a foam surface. A cross-sectional sample of 366 community dwelling healthy adults from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging was tested. Multiple linear regressions examined the association between COM and VISFIELD, PROP, CANAL, and OTOLITH separately and in multi-sensory models controlling for age and gender. PROP dominated sensory prediction of sway across most balance conditions (β's = 0.09–0.19, p's < 0.001, except on foam eyes closed where CANAL function loss was the only significant sensory predictor of sway (β = 2.12, p < 0.016. Age was not a consistent predictor of sway. This suggests loss of peripheral sensory function explains much of the age-associated increase in sway.

  6. Self-field AC losses in Bi-2223 superconducting tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, K. H.; Leslie, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The self-field AC loss in Bi-2223 silver sheathed tapes for AC currents of up to 100 A was measured at 77 K and frequencies of 60 Hz and 600 Hz using a lock-in amplifier. The frequency dependence indicated a purely hysteretic loss which can be well described in terms of the critical state model for a flat superconducting strip. The only parameter needed to predict the self-field AC loss is the critical current of the critical state. Because the loss voltage is extremely small compared with the inductive voltage, a very high accuracy of the lock-in amplifier phase setting is required. Unlike in loss measurements on cylindrical superconducting samples, in the case of the tape the measuring circuit leads have to be brought out from the surface forming a loop where the changing magnetic field induces an additional voltage. Only if the loop formed by the leads at the voltage tabs is large enough will the apparent power dissipation approach the real AC loss associated with the length of the sample probed

  7. On losses caused in RF cavities by longitudinal electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, J.

    1976-02-01

    Rf modes with large longitudinal electric fields (div E vector unequal to 0) at the cavity wall systematically show worse rf properties than modes with div E vector identical with 0; e.g. enlarged rf residual losses. While magnetic residual losses R sub(res) proportional f 2 are due to uncharged inhomogeneities in the oxide coating the metal, the electric residual losses R sub(orthogonal) occur via charged states in the oxide: the recharging of those states by tunnel exchange causes excitation across the energy gap of the superconductor yielding residual losses at high rf field strengths. The interaction of E sub(orthogonal) with the charges generate (longitudinal) phonons showing up as contribution to R sub(orthogonal). The resulting R sub(orthogonal) increases with E sub(orthogonal) and is nearly independent of frequency f, indicating the importance of R sub(orthogonal) for low frequency sc cavities, especially at high field strengths. In addition R sub(orthogonal) can account for the observed large residual losses of strip line modes in narrow junctions and joints between superconductors. (orig.) [de

  8. Alternating field losses in Nb3Sn multifilamentary superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.H.; Deis, D.W.; Shaw, B.J.; Walker, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Transverse alternating field losses at 4.2K have been measured from 0.5 Hz to 10 kHz in a Nb 3 Sn multifilamentary superconductor in bias fields to 5 Tesla. The 0.020 inch diameter sample was prepared by heat treating a Cu, Nb-1 wt percent Zr, CuSn composite at 700 0 C for 20 hours to form Nb 3 Sn on the inside surface of the annular filaments. Metallurgical studies have been made to determine the Sn distribution and to estimate the thickness of the Nb 3 Sn layer. The I/sub c/-H curve and resistive and inductive transition curves are presented. The losses are analyzed with respect to the present loss theories using the conductor characteristics measured and excellent agreement between experiment and theory is achieved. 1 table, 6 figures

  9. Plasma Heating and Losses in Toroidal Multipole Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armentrout, C. J.; Barter, J. D.; Breun, R. A.; Cavallo, A. J.; Drake, J. R.; Etzweiler,; Greenwood, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The heating and loss of plasmas have been studied in three pulsed, toroidal multipole devices: a large levitated octupole, a small supported octupole and a very small supported quadrupole. Plasmas are produced by gun injection and heated by electron and ion cyclotron resonance heating and ohmic heating. Electron cyclotron heating rates have been measured over a wide range of parameters, and the results are in quantitative agreement with stochastic heating theory. Electron cyclotron resonance heating produces ions with energies larger than predicted by theory. With the addition of a toroidal field, ohmic heating gives densities as high as 10 13 cm -3 in the toroidal quadrupole and 10 12 cm -3 in the small octupole. Plasma losses for n=5 x 10 9 cm -3 plasmas are inferred from Langmuir probe and Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements, and measured with special striped collectors on the wall and rings. The loss to a levitated ring is measured using a modulated light beam telemeter. The confinement is better than Bohm but considerably worse than classical. Low frequency convective cells which are fixed in space are observed. These cells around the ring are diminished when a weak toroidal field is added, and loss collectors show a vastly reduced flux to the rings. Analysis of the spatial density profile shows features of B-independent diffusion. The confinement is sensitive to some kinds of dc field errors, but surprisingly insensitive to perturbations of the ac confining field

  10. Apparatus to examine pulsed parallel field losses in large conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.S.

    1977-01-01

    Conductors in tokamak toroidal field coils will be exposed to pulsed fields both parallel and perpendicular to the current direction. These conductors will likely be quite high capacity (10 to 20 kA) and therefore probably will be built up out of smaller units. We have previously published measurements of losses in conductors exposed to a pulsed parallel field, but those experiments necessarily used monolithic conductors of relatively small cross section because the pulse coil, a torus that surrounded the test conductor, was itself small. Here we describe an apparatus that is conceptually similar but has been scaled up to accept conductors of much larger cross section and current capacity. The apparatus consists basically of a superconducting torus that contains a movable spool to allow test samples to be wound inside without unwinding the torus. Details of apparatus design and capabilities are described and preliminary results from tests of the apparatus and from loss measurements using it are reported

  11. Central and Peripheral Vision Loss Differentially Affects Contextual Cueing in Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geringswald, Franziska; Pollmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Visual search for targets in repeated displays is more efficient than search for the same targets in random distractor layouts. Previous work has shown that this contextual cueing is severely impaired under central vision loss. Here, we investigated whether central vision loss, simulated with gaze-contingent displays, prevents the incidental…

  12. Auditory Temporal-Organization Abilities in School-Age Children with Peripheral Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koravand, Amineh; Jutras, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess auditory sequential organization (ASO) ability in children with and without hearing loss. Method: Forty children 9 to 12 years old participated in the study: 12 with sensory hearing loss (HL), 12 with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and 16 with normal hearing. They performed an ASO task in which…

  13. Evaluation of the impact of density gradient centrifugation on fetal cell loss during enrichment from maternal peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Ahmed; Drouin, Régen

    2014-09-01

    Physical separation by density gradient centrifugation (DGC) is usually used as an initial step of multistep enrichment protocols for purification of fetal cells (FCs) from maternal blood. Many protocols were designed but no single approach was efficient enough to provide noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Procedures and methods were difficult to compare because of the nonuniformity of protocols among different groups. Recovery of FCs is jeopardized by their loss during the process of enrichment. Any loss of FCs must be minimized because of the multiplicative effect of each step of the enrichment process. The main objective of this study was to evaluate FC loss caused by DGC. Fetal cells were quantified in peripheral blood samples obtained from both euploid and aneuploid pregnancies before and after enrichment by buoyant DGC using Histopaque 1.119 g/mL. Density gradient centrifugation results in major loss of 60% to 80% of rare FCs, which may further complicate subsequent enrichment procedures. Eliminating aggressive manipulations can significantly minimize FC loss. Data obtained raise questions about the appropriateness of the DGC step for the enrichment of rare FCs and argues for the use of the alternative nonaggressive version of the procedure presented here or prioritizing other methods of enrichments. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Rotor Field Oriented Control with adaptive Iron Loss Compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1999-01-01

    of the motor referenced to the rotor magnetizing current, and with the extension of an iron loss resistor added in parallel to the magnetizing inductance. The resistor estimator is based on the observation that the actual applied stator voltages deviates from the voltage estimated, when a motor is current......It is well known from the literature that iron loses in an induction motor implies field angle estimation errors and hence detuning problems. In this paper a new method for estimating the iron loss resistor in an induction motor is presented. The method is based on a traditional dynamic model...

  15. Variability of Measured Runoff and Soil Loss from Field Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Asadzadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Field plots are widely used in studies related to the measurements of soil loss and modeling of erosion processes. Research efforts are needed to investigate factors affecting the data quality of plots. Spatial scale or size of plots is one of these factors which directly affects measuring runoff and soil loss by means of field plots. The effect of plot size on measured runoff or soil loss from natural plots is known as plot scale effect. On the other hand, variability of runoff and sediment yield from replicated filed plots is a main source of uncertainty in measurement of erosion from plots which should be considered in plot data interpretation processes. Therefore, there is a demand for knowledge of soil erosion processes occurring in plots of different sizes and of factors that determine natural variability, as a basis for obtaining soil loss data of good quality. This study was carried out to investigate the combined effects of these two factors by measurement of runoff and soil loss from replicated plots with different sizes. Materials and Methods: In order to evaluate the variability of runoff and soil loss data seven plots, differing in width and length, were constructed in a uniform slope of 9% at three replicates at Koohin Research Station in Qazvin province. The plots were ploughed up to down slope in September 2011. Each plot was isolated using soil beds with a height of 30 cm, to direct generated surface runoff to the lower part of the plots. Runoff collecting systems composed of gutters, pipes and tankswere installed at the end of each plot. During the two-year study period of 2011-2012, plots were maintained in bare conditions and runoff and soil loss were measured for each single event. Precipitation amounts and characteristics were directly measured by an automatic recording tipping-bucket rain gauge located about 200 m from the experimental plots. The entire runoff volume including eroded sediment was measured on

  16. Peripheral hearing loss reduces the ability of children to direct selective attention during multi-talker listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Emma; Kitterick, Padraig T; Summerfield, A Quentin

    2017-07-01

    Restoring normal hearing requires knowledge of how peripheral and central auditory processes are affected by hearing loss. Previous research has focussed primarily on peripheral changes following sensorineural hearing loss, whereas consequences for central auditory processing have received less attention. We examined the ability of hearing-impaired children to direct auditory attention to a voice of interest (based on the talker's spatial location or gender) in the presence of a common form of background noise: the voices of competing talkers (i.e. during multi-talker, or "Cocktail Party" listening). We measured brain activity using electro-encephalography (EEG) when children prepared to direct attention to the spatial location or gender of an upcoming target talker who spoke in a mixture of three talkers. Compared to normally-hearing children, hearing-impaired children showed significantly less evidence of preparatory brain activity when required to direct spatial attention. This finding is consistent with the idea that hearing-impaired children have a reduced ability to prepare spatial attention for an upcoming talker. Moreover, preparatory brain activity was not restored when hearing-impaired children listened with their acoustic hearing aids. An implication of these findings is that steps to improve auditory attention alongside acoustic hearing aids may be required to improve the ability of hearing-impaired children to understand speech in the presence of competing talkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing neurons use a putative pioneer's peripheral arbor to establish their terminal fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, W B; Macagno, E R

    1995-05-01

    Pioneer neurons are known to guide later developing neurons during the initial phases of axonal outgrowth. To determine whether they are also important in the formation of terminal fields by the follower cells, we studied the role of a putative leech pioneer neuron, the pressure-sensitive (PD) neuron, in the establishment of other neurons' peripheral arbors. The PD neuron has a major axon that exits from its segmental ganglion to grow along the dorsal-posterior (DP) nerve to the dorsal body wall, where it arborizes extensively mainly in its own segment. It also has two minor axons that project to the two adjacent segments but branch to a lesser degree. We found that the peripheral projections of several later developing neurons, including the AP motor neuron and the TD sensory neuron, followed, with great precision, the major axon and peripheral arbor of the consegmental PD neuron, up to its fourth-order branches. When a PD neuron was ablated before it had grown to the body wall, the AP and TD axons grew normally toward and reached the target area, but then formed terminal arbors that were greatly reduced in size and abnormal in morphology. Further, if the ablation of a PD neuron was accompanied by the induction, in the same segment, of greater outgrowth of the minor axon of a PD neuron from the adjacent segment, the arbors of the same AP neurons grew along these novel PD neuron branches. These results demonstrate that the peripheral arbor of a PD neuron is a both necessary and sufficient template for the formation of normal terminal fields by certain later growing follower neurons.

  18. Pulsed field losses in metal-filled superconducting multifilamentary braids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturff, A.D.; Dahl, P.F.; Sampson, W.B.

    1972-01-01

    Work on the application of metallic filters to insulate and bond individual multifilamentary wires into a fully transposed conductor is summarized. As has been reported in earlier papers, conductors of this type have performed excellently in low-frequency pulsed magnets, but become coupled at relatively low values of db/dt, leading to high potential losses. Data are presented on metallic and intermetallic insulated braids showing excellent performance and exhibiting losses comparable to those of organically insulated braid for rise times less than 10 kG/s. These conductors are also able to achieve 90 percent of short sample critical current at db/dt 200 kG/s, although their losses are significantly higher at these high rates of field change

  19. Rotor Field Oriented Control with adaptive Iron Loss Compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Vadstrup, P.; Børsting, H.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known from the literature that iron loses in an induction motor implies field angle estimation errors and hence detuning problems. In this paper a new method for estimating the iron loss resistor in an induction motor is presented. The method is based on a traditional dynamic model...... controlled in a Field Oriented Control scheme. This deviation is used to force a MIT-rule based adaptive estimator. An adaptive compensator containing the developed estimator is introduced and verified by simulations and tested by real time experiments....

  20. Information loss in effective field theory: Entanglement and thermal entropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Integrating out high energy degrees of freedom to yield a low energy effective field theory leads to a loss of information with a concomitant increase in entropy. We obtain the effective field theory of a light scalar field interacting with heavy fields after tracing out the heavy degrees of freedom from the time evolved density matrix. The initial density matrix describes the light field in its ground state and the heavy fields in equilibrium at a common temperature T . For T =0 , we obtain the reduced density matrix in a perturbative expansion; it reveals an emergent mixed state as a consequence of the entanglement between light and heavy fields. We obtain the effective action that determines the time evolution of the reduced density matrix for the light field in a nonperturbative Dyson resummation of one-loop correlations of the heavy fields. The Von-Neumann entanglement entropy associated with the reduced density matrix is obtained for the nonresonant and resonant cases in the asymptotic long time limit. In the nonresonant case the reduced density matrix displays an incipient thermalization albeit with a wave-vector, time and coupling dependent effective temperature as a consequence of memory of initial conditions. The entanglement entropy is time independent and is the thermal entropy for this effective, nonequilibrium temperature. In the resonant case the light field fully thermalizes with the heavy fields, the reduced density matrix loses memory of the initial conditions and the entanglement entropy becomes the thermal entropy of the light field. We discuss the relation between the entanglement entropy ultraviolet divergences and renormalization.

  1. How does glaucoma look?: patient perception of visual field loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, David P; Smith, Nicholas D; Glen, Fiona C; Burton, Robyn; Garway-Heath, David F

    2013-06-01

    To explore patient perception of vision loss in glaucoma and, specifically, to test the hypothesis that patients do not recognize their impairment as a black tunnel effect or as black patches in their field of view. Clinic-based cross-sectional study. Fifty patients (age range, 52-82 years) with visual acuity better than 20/30 and with a range of glaucomatous visual field (VF) defects in both eyes, excluding those with very advanced disease (perimetrically blind). Participants underwent monocular VF testing in both eyes using a Humphrey Field Analyzer (HFA; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA; 24-2 Swedish interactive threshold algorithm standard tests) and other tests of visual function. Participants took part in a recorded interview during which they were asked if they were aware of their VF loss; if so, there were encouraged to describe it in their own words. Participants were shown 6 images modified in a variety of ways on a computer monitor and were asked to select the image that most closely represented their perception of their VF loss. Forced choice of an image best representing glaucomatous vision impairment. Participants had a range of VF defect severity: average HFA mean deviation was -8.7 dB (standard deviation [SD], 5.8 dB) and -10.5 dB (SD, 7.1 dB) in the right and left eyes, respectively. Thirteen patients (26%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 15%-40%) reported being completely unaware of their vision loss. None of the patients chose the images with a distinct black tunnel effect or black patches. Only 2 patients (4%; 95% CI, 0%-14%) chose the image with a tunnel effect with blurred edges. An image depicting blurred patches and another with missing patches was chosen by 54% (95% CI, 39%-68%) and 16% (95% CI, 7%-29%) of the patients, respectively. Content analysis of the transcripts from the recorded interviews indicated a frequent use of descriptors of visual symptoms associated with reported blur and missing features. Patients with glaucoma do not perceive

  2. Changes in body temperature in king penguins at sea: the result of fine adjustments in peripheral heat loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexander; Alard, Frank; Handrich, Yves

    2006-09-01

    To investigate thermoregulatory adjustments at sea, body temperatures (the pectoral muscle and the brood patch) and diving behavior were monitored during a foraging trip of several days at sea in six breeding king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus. During inactive phases at sea (water temperature: 4-7 degrees C), all tissues measured were maintained at normothermic temperatures. The brood patch temperature was maintained at the same values as those measured when brooding on shore (38 degrees C). This high temperature difference causes a significant loss of heat. We hypothesize that high-energy expenditure associated with elevated peripheral temperature when resting at sea is the thermoregulatory cost that a postabsorptive penguin has to face for the restoration of its subcutaneous body fat. During diving, mean pectoral temperature was 37.6 +/- 1.6 degrees C. While being almost normothermic on average, the temperature of the pectoral muscle was still significantly lower than during inactivity in five out of the six birds and underwent temperature drops of up to 5.5 degrees C. Mean brood patch temperature was 29.6 +/- 2.5 degrees C during diving, and temperature decreases of up to 21.6 degrees C were recorded. Interestingly, we observed episodes of brood patch warming during the descent to depth, suggesting that, in some cases, king penguins may perform active thermolysis using the brood patch. It is hypothesized that functional pectoral temperature may be regulated through peripheral adjustments in blood perfusion. These two paradoxical features, i.e., lower temperature of deep tissues during activity and normothermic peripheral tissues while inactive, may highlight the key to the energetics of this diving endotherm while foraging at sea.

  3. High-throughput sequencing of microRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells: identification of potential weight loss biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín I Milagro

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are being increasingly studied in relation to energy metabolism and body composition homeostasis. Indeed, the quantitative analysis of miRNAs expression in different adiposity conditions may contribute to understand the intimate mechanisms participating in body weight control and to find new biomarkers with diagnostic or prognostic value in obesity management. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was the search for miRNAs in blood cells whose expression could be used as prognostic biomarkers of weight loss. METHODS: Ten Caucasian obese women were selected among the participants in a weight-loss trial that consisted in following an energy-restricted treatment. Weight loss was considered unsuccessful when 5% (responders. At baseline, total miRNA isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was sequenced with SOLiD v4. The miRNA sequencing data were validated by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Differential baseline expression of several miRNAs was found between responders and non-responders. Two miRNAs were up-regulated in the non-responder group (mir-935 and mir-4772 and three others were down-regulated (mir-223, mir-224 and mir-376b. Both mir-935 and mir-4772 showed relevant associations with the magnitude of weight loss, although the expression of other transcripts (mir-874, mir-199b, mir-766, mir-589 and mir-148b also correlated with weight loss. CONCLUSIONS: This research addresses the use of high-throughput sequencing technologies in the search for miRNA expression biomarkers in obesity, by determining the miRNA transcriptome of PBMC. Basal expression of different miRNAs, particularly mir-935 and mir-4772, could be prognostic biomarkers and may forecast the response to a hypocaloric diet.

  4. Measurement of spinal or peripheral bone mass to estimate early postmenopausal bone loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riis, B.J.; Christiansen, C.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents data from 153 healthy, early postmenopausal women who were randomly allocated to two years of treatment with estrogen or placebo. Bone mineral content in the forearms was measured by single-photon absorptiometry, and bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and total-body bone mineral by dual-photon absorptiometry, before and after one and two years of treatment. At the end of the two years, there were highly significant differences of 6 to 7 percent between the estrogen and the placebo groups at all sites measured. The range of the changes of the spine measurement was twice that of the forearm and total-body measurements. It is concluded that measurement of the forearm by single-photon absorptiometry is superior to measurement of the spine by dual-photon absorptiometry both in clinical studies and in the individual patient for detecting estrogen-dependent bone loss and its treatment by estrogen replacement

  5. Thin minimal rim width at Bruch’s membrane opening is associated with glaucomatous paracentral visual field loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniguchi EV

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Elise V Taniguchi,1–3 Eleftherios I Paschalis,1,2 Dejiao Li,1,4 Kouros Nouri-Mahdavi,5 Stacey C Brauner,1 Scott H Greenstein,1 Angela V Turalba,1 Janey L Wiggs,1 Louis R Pasquale,1,6 Lucy Q Shen1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston, MA, 2Boston Keratoprosthesis Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear – Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Beijing China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine and Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 6Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: To compare optic nerve head (ONH measurements in glaucomatous eyes with paracentral visual field (VF loss to eyes with peripheral VF loss and controls.Methods: Open-angle glaucoma (OAG patients with early paracentral VF loss or isolated peripheral VF loss as well as control subjects underwent ONH imaging with swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL imaging with spectral-domain OCT. Minimum rim width at Bruch’s membrane opening (BMO-MRW, lamina cribrosa depth (LCD, and RNFL thickness were compared among the glaucoma and control groups with one-way analysis of variance, Kruskal–Wallis test, and multiple regression analysis.Results: Twenty-nine eyes from 29 OAG patients (15 early paracentral and 14 isolated peripheral VF loss and 20 eyes of 20 control subjects were included. The early paracentral and isolated peripheral VF loss groups had similar VF mean deviation (MD (–5.3±2.7 dB and –3.7±3.0 dB, p=0.15, respectively. Global BMO-MRW was lower in OAG eyes than in controls (193.8±40.0 vs 322.7±62.2 µm, p<0.001, but similar

  6. Leukocytic Response and Peripheral Venous Blood Lymphocyte Apoptosis as a Marker of Tissue Ischemia in Acute Massive Blood Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Borovkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the level of peripheral venous blood lymphocyte apoptosis and intraoperative hypoxia in victims with acute massive blood loss. Subjects and methods. Twenty-two patients with open and close chest and abdominal traumas complicated by acute massive blood loss were examined. All the patients were emergently operated on to stop bleeding. Tissue metabolism was evaluated from gases, acid-base parameters, and plasma lactate, glucose, potassium, and sodium levels. Apoptosis of mononuclear cells was studied and dead leukocytes were counted using flow cytometry. Results. Preoperatively, the victims were found to have venous hypoxemia, hyperlactatemia, hyperglycemia, moderate leukocytosis, and higher dead leukocyte counts. There were also raised counts of lymphocytes coming into the process of apoptosis. A significant relationship was found between monocyte counts and hypoxia values. At the end of surgery, oxygen balance values became stable and exerted an effect on the count of leukocytes, the relative level of granulocytes, the relative and absolute counts of dead and damaged leukocytes, and the concentration of lymphocytes in the victims’ venous blood during the early stages of apoptosis, as evidenced by nonlinear regression models. Conclusion. The indicators of immunocompetent cell apoptosis and the count of venous blood dead leukocytes along with lactate levels and venous hypoxemia parameters reflect the degree of tissue hypoxia and may be used as specific markers.

  7. Foveal and peripheral fields of vision influences perceptual skill in anticipating opponents' attacking position in volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorer, Jörg; Rienhoff, Rebecca; Fischer, Lennart; Baker, Joseph

    2013-09-01

    The importance of perceptual-cognitive expertise in sport has been repeatedly demonstrated. In this study we examined the role of different sources of visual information (i.e., foveal versus peripheral) in anticipating volleyball attack positions. Expert (n = 11), advanced (n = 13) and novice (n = 16) players completed an anticipation task that involved predicting the location of volleyball attacks. Video clips of volleyball attacks (n = 72) were spatially and temporally occluded to provide varying amounts of information to the participant. In addition, participants viewed the attacks under three visual conditions: full vision, foveal vision only, and peripheral vision only. Analysis of variance revealed significant between group differences in prediction accuracy with higher skilled players performing better than lower skilled players. Additionally, we found significant differences between temporal and spatial occlusion conditions. Both of those factors interacted separately, but not combined with expertise. Importantly, for experts the sum of both fields of vision was superior to either source in isolation. Our results suggest different sources of visual information work collectively to facilitate expert anticipation in time-constrained sports and reinforce the complexity of expert perception.

  8. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improves task performance in individuals with upper limb loss using a myoelectric prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Matthew; Tan, Daniel; Sidek, Steven M; Tyler, Dustin J

    2016-02-01

    Tactile feedback is critical to grip and object manipulation. Its absence results in reliance on visual and auditory cues. Our objective was to assess the effect of sensory feedback on task performance in individuals with limb loss. Stimulation of the peripheral nerves using implanted cuff electrodes provided two subjects with sensory feedback with intensity proportional to forces on the thumb, index, and middle fingers of their prosthetic hand during object manipulation. Both subjects perceived the sensation on their phantom hand at locations corresponding to the locations of the forces on the prosthetic hand. A bend sensor measured prosthetic hand span. Hand span modulated the intensity of sensory feedback perceived on the thenar eminence for subject 1 and the middle finger for subject 2. We performed three functional tests with the blindfolded subjects. First, the subject tried to determine whether or not a wooden block had been placed in his prosthetic hand. Second, the subject had to locate and remove magnetic blocks from a metal table. Third, the subject performed the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). We also measured the subject's sense of embodiment with a survey and his self-confidence. Blindfolded performance with sensory feedback was similar to sighted performance in the wooden block and magnetic block tasks. Performance on the SHAP, a measure of hand mechanical function and control, was similar with and without sensory feedback. An embodiment survey showed an improved sense of integration of the prosthesis in self body image with sensory feedback. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improved object discrimination and manipulation, embodiment, and confidence. With both forms of feedback, the blindfolded subjects tended toward results obtained with visual feedback.

  9. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improves task performance in individuals with upper limb loss using a myoelectric prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Matthew; Tan, Daniel; Sidek, Steven M.; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Tactile feedback is critical to grip and object manipulation. Its absence results in reliance on visual and auditory cues. Our objective was to assess the effect of sensory feedback on task performance in individuals with limb loss. Approach. Stimulation of the peripheral nerves using implanted cuff electrodes provided two subjects with sensory feedback with intensity proportional to forces on the thumb, index, and middle fingers of their prosthetic hand during object manipulation. Both subjects perceived the sensation on their phantom hand at locations corresponding to the locations of the forces on the prosthetic hand. A bend sensor measured prosthetic hand span. Hand span modulated the intensity of sensory feedback perceived on the thenar eminence for subject 1 and the middle finger for subject 2. We performed three functional tests with the blindfolded subjects. First, the subject tried to determine whether or not a wooden block had been placed in his prosthetic hand. Second, the subject had to locate and remove magnetic blocks from a metal table. Third, the subject performed the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). We also measured the subject’s sense of embodiment with a survey and his self-confidence. Main results. Blindfolded performance with sensory feedback was similar to sighted performance in the wooden block and magnetic block tasks. Performance on the SHAP, a measure of hand mechanical function and control, was similar with and without sensory feedback. An embodiment survey showed an improved sense of integration of the prosthesis in self body image with sensory feedback. Significance. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improved object discrimination and manipulation, embodiment, and confidence. With both forms of feedback, the blindfolded subjects tended toward results obtained with visual feedback.

  10. Reduced acoustic startle response and peripheral hearing loss in the 5xFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, T P; Shin, S; Fertan, E; Dingle, R N; Almuklass, A; Gunn, R K; Yu, Z; Wang, J; Brown, R E

    2017-06-01

    Hearing dysfunction has been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans, but there is little data on the auditory function of mouse models of AD. Furthermore, characterization of hearing ability in mouse models is needed to ensure that tests of cognition that use auditory stimuli are not confounded by hearing dysfunction. Therefore, we assessed acoustic startle response and pre-pulse inhibition in the double transgenic 5xFAD mouse model of AD from 3-4 to 16 months of age. The 5xFAD mice showed an age-related decline in acoustic startle as early as 3-4 months of age. We subsequently tested auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds at 4 and 13-14 months of age using tone bursts at frequencies of 2-32 kHz. The 5xFAD mice showed increased ABR thresholds for tone bursts between 8 and 32 kHz at 13-14 months of age. Finally, cochleae were extracted and basilar membranes were dissected to count hair cell loss across the cochlea. The 5xFAD mice showed significantly greater loss of both inner and outer hair cells at the apical and basal ends of the basilar membrane than wild-type mice at 15-16 months of age. These results indicate that the 5xFAD mouse model of AD shows age-related decreases in acoustic startle responses, which are at least partially due to age-related peripheral hearing loss. Therefore, we caution against the use of cognitive tests that rely on audition in 5xFAD mice over 3-4 months of age, without first confirming that performance is not confounded by hearing dysfunction. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  11. A cane reduces loss of balance in patients with peripheral neuropathy: results from a challenging unipedal balance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton-Miller, J A; Yeh, M W; Richardson, J K; Galloway, T

    1996-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that use of a cane in the nondominant hand during challenging balance tasks would significantly decrease loss of balance in patients with peripheral neuropathy while transferring from bipedal to unipedal stance on an unsteady surface. Nonrandomized control study. Tertiary-care institution. Eight consecutive patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and eight age- and gender-matched controls (C) with a mean (SD) age of 65 (8.2) years. Subjects were asked to transfer their weight onto their right foot, despite a rapid +/- 2 degrees or +/- 4 degrees frontal plane tilt of the support surface at 70% of weight transfer, and balance unipedally for at least 3 seconds. The efficacy of their weight transfer was evaluated over 112 consecutive randomized and blocked trials by calculating loss of balance as failure rates (%FR) with and without visual feedback, and with and without use of a cane in the nondominant (left) hand. Results were analyzed using a 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 repeated-measures analysis of variance (rm-ANOVA) and post hoc t tests. The rm-ANOVA showed that the FR of the PN subjects (47.6% [18.1%]) was significantly higher than C (29.2% [15.2%], p = .036). Removing visual feedback, simulating the dark of night, increased the FR fourfold (p = .000). Use of a cane in the contralateral nondominant hand significantly reduced the FR (p = .000), particularly in the PN group (cane x disease interaction: p = .055). Post hoc t tests showed that with or without visual feedback, the cane reduced the FR of the PN group fourfold and enabled them to perform more reliably than matched controls not using a cane (p = .011). An inversion perturbation resulted in a higher FR than an eversion perturbation (p = .007). The PN group employed larger mean peak cane forces (21.9% BW) than C (13.6% BW) in restoring their balance (p = .000). Use of a cane by PN patients significantly reduced their risk of losing balance on unstable surfaces, especially under low

  12. Weeds Cause Losses in Field Crops through Allelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ZOHAIB

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A large number of weeds are known to be associated with crops and causing economic losses. Weeds interfere with crops through competition and allelopathy. They produce secondary metabolites known as allelochemicals, which belong to numerous chemical classes such as phenolics, alkaloids, fatty acids, indoles, terpens etc. However, phenolics are the predominant class of allelochemicals. The allelochemicals release from weed plants takes place through leaf leachates, decomposition of plant residues, volatilization and root exudates. Weeds leave huge quantities of their residues in field and affect the associated, as well as succeeding crops, in various cropping systems. Liberation of allelochemicals from weeds affects the germination, stand establishment, growth, yield and physiology of crop plants. They cause substantial reduction in germination and growth of the crop plants by altering various physiological processes such as enzyme activity, protein synthesis, photosynthesis, respiration, cell division and enlargement, which ultimately leads to a significant reduction in crop yield. In crux, allelopathic weeds represent a potential threat for crop plants and cause economic losses.

  13. Field grain losses and insect pest management practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology ... Statistical analyses revealed that the level of crop yield losses was ... There was, however, a negative correlation between crop yield loss due to insect pests and the efficacy of PCM applied.

  14. The Association of Glaucomatous Visual Field Loss and Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luna, Regina A.; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Nguyen, Angeline M.; Friedman, David S.; Gitlin, Laura N.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To relate balance measures to visual field (VF) damage from glaucoma. Methods The OPAL kinematic system measured balance, as root mean square (RMS) sway, on 236 patients with suspect/diagnosed glaucoma. Balance was measured with feet shoulder width apart while standing on a firm/foam surface with eyes opened/closed (Instrumental Clinical Test of Sensory Integration and Balance [ICTSIB] conditions), and eyes open on a firm surface under feet together, semi-tandem, or tandem positions (standing balance conditions). Integrated VF (IVF) sensitivities were calculated by merging right and left eye 24-2 VF data. Results Mean age was 71 years (range, 57–93) and mean IVF sensitivity was 27.1 dB (normal = 31 dB). Lower IVF sensitivity was associated with greater RMS sway during eyes-open foam-surface testing (β = 0.23 z-score units/5 dB IVF sensitivity decrement, P = 0.001), but not during other ICTSIB conditions. Lower IVF sensitivity also was associated with greater RMS sway during feet together standing balance testing (0.10 z-score units/5 dB IVF sensitivity decrement, P = 0.049), but not during other standing balance conditions. Visual dependence of balance was lower in patients with worse IVF sensitivity (β = −21%/5 dB IVF sensitivity decrement, P falls and patients with VF loss from glaucoma may be at higher risk of falls because of poor balance. PMID:28553562

  15. T cell-mediated increased osteoclast formation from peripheral blood as a mechanism for crohn's disease-associated bone loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostlander, A.E.; Everts, V.; Schoenmaker, T.; Bravenboer, N.; van Vliet, S.J.; van Bodegraven, A.A.; Lips, P.; de Vries, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of osteoporosis in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) is still not completely elucidated. In this study, we evaluated osteoclastogenesis from peripheral blood cells of CD patients and studied the role of lymphocytes and inflammatory cytokines in this process. Peripheral blood

  16. Sheep model for osteoporosis: The effects of peripheral hormone therapy on centrally induced systemic bone loss in an osteoporotic sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oheim, Ralf; Simon, Maciej J K; Steiner, Malte; Vettorazzi, Eik; Barvencik, Florian; Ignatius, Anita; Amling, Michael; Clarke, Iain J; Pogoda, Pia; Beil, F Timo

    2017-04-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary disconnection (HPD) leads to low bone turnover followed by bone loss and reduced biomechanical properties in sheep. To investigate the role of peripheral hormones in this centrally induced systemic bone loss model, we planned a hormone replacement experiment. Therefore, estrogen (OHE), thyroxin (OHT) or a combination of both (OHTE) was substituted in ovariectomized HPD sheep, as both hormones are decreased in HPD sheep and are known to have a significant but yet not fully understood impact on bone metabolism. Bone turnover and structural parameters were analyzed in comparison to different control groups - untreated sheep (C), ovariectomized (O) and ovariectomized+HPD sheep (OH). We performed histomorphometric and HR-pQCT analyses nine months after the HPD procedure, as well as biomechanical testing of all ewes studied. In HPD sheep (OH) the low bone turnover led to a significant bone loss. Treatment with thyroxin alone (OHT) mainly increased bone resorption, leading to a further reduction in bone volume. In contrast, the treatment with estrogen alone (OHE) and the combined treatment with estrogen and thyroxin (OHTE) prevented HPD-induced bone loss completely. In conclusion, peripheral hormone substitution was able to prevent HPD-induced low-turnover osteoporosis in sheep. But only the treatment with estrogen alone or in combination with thyroxin was able to completely preserve bone mass and structure. These findings demonstrate the importance of peripheral hormones for a balanced bone remodeling and a physiological bone turnover. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Peripheral nerve field stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ammando, A; Messina, G; Franzini, A; Dones, I

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) is a novel neurosurgical procedure consisting of implantation of subcutaneous leads in specific painful areas in different types of painful, drug-resistant syndromes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PNFS in several patients affected by different chronic neuropathic pain syndromes, along with its risks, limits and possible correlation between the results achieved and the patients' main symptoms. Twenty-two patients affected by different types of chronic neuropathic pain were submitted to PNFS at the Department of Neurosurgery of the Istituto Neurologico "C. Besta" in Milan between July 2009 and July 2013. The visual analog scale (VAS) and variations in the use of analgesic drugs, along with complications, were considered to assess results. In 59 % of our patients, an average pain reduction of 5.50 points on the visual analog scale was observed (average pre-implant score 8.86 and average post-implant score 3.36). These patients reduced their analgesic drug use after PNFS. We observed no early or long-term complications after our last follow-up evaluation. PNFS can be considered an effective and safe option to treat carefully selected, drug-resistant and chronic neuropathic pain patients; the reversibility of the procedure and its lack, at least in our hands, of long-term complications may contribute to wider use of this procedure.

  18. Electromagnetic Field Devices and Their Effects on Nociception and Peripheral Inflammatory Pain Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Christina L; Teli, Thaleia; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2016-03-01

    Context • During cell-communication processes, endogenous and exogenous signaling affects normal and pathological developmental conditions. Exogenous influences, such as extra-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have been shown to affect pain and inflammation by modulating G-protein coupling receptors (GPCRs), downregulating cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) activity, and downregulating inflammatory modulators, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) as well as the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). EMF devices could help clinicians who seek an alternative or complementary treatment for relief of patients chronic pain and disability. Objective • The research team intended to review the literature on the effects of EMFs on inflammatory pain mechanisms. Design • We used a literature search of articles published in PubMed using the following key words: low-frequency electromagnetic field therapy, inflammatory pain markers, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), opioid receptors, G-protein coupling receptors, and enzymes. Setting • The study took place at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, NC, USA. Results • The mechanistic pathway most often considered for the biological effects of EMF is the plasma membrane, across which the EMF signal induces a voltage change. Oscillating EMF exerts forces on free ions that are present on both sides of the plasma membrane and that move across the cell surface through transmembrane proteins. The ions create a forced intracellular vibration that is responsible for phenomena such as the influx of extracellular calcium (Ca2+) and the binding affinity of calmodulin (CaM), which is the primary transduction pathway to the secondary messengers, cAMP and cGMP, which have been found to influence inflammatory pain. Conclusions • An emerging body of evidence indicates the existence of a frequency

  19. Peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) in chronic low back pain: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloimstein, Herwig; Likar, Rudolf; Kern, Michael; Neuhold, Josef; Cada, Miroslav; Loinig, Nadja; Ilias, Wilfried; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Wolf, Andreas; Dorn, Christian; Mozes-Balla, Eva Maria; Stein, Rolf; Lappe, Ivo; Sator-Katzenschlager, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) for chronic low back pain (cLBP). In this prospective, multicenter observational study, 118 patients were admitted to 11 centers throughout Austria and Switzerland. After a screening visit, all patients underwent a trial stimulation period of at least seven days before implantation of the permanent system. Leads were placed in the subcutaneous tissues of the lower back directly in the region of greatest pain. One hundred five patients were implanted with a permanent stimulating system. Patients' evaluation of pain and functional levels were completed before implantation and one, three, and six months after implantation. Adverse events, medication usage, and coverage of the painful area and predictive value of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) were monitored. All pain and quality-of-life measures showed statistically significant improvement during the treatment period. These included the average pain visual analog scale, the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, the Becks Depression Inventory, and the Short Form-12 item Health survey. Additionally, medication usage with opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anti-convulsants showed a highly significant reduction. Complications requiring surgical intervention were reported in 9.6% of the patients. The degree of coverage of painful areas seems to be an important criterion for efficacy of PNFS, whereas TENS is presumably no predictor. This prospective, multicenter study confirms that PNFS is an effective therapy for the management of cLBP. Significant improvements in many aspects of the pain condition were measured, and complications were minimal. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  20. Filtering peripheral high temperature electrons in a cylindrical rf-driven plasmas by an axisymmetric radial magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikaru Akahoshi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High temperature electrons generated near a radial wall of a cylindrical source tube in a radiofrequency (rf inductively-coupled plasma is filtered by an axisymmetric radial magnetic field formed near the source exit by locating annular permanent magnets, where the axial magnetic field strength in the radially central region is fairly uniform inside the source tube and is close to zero near the source exit. The source is operated at 3 mTorr in argon and the rf antenna is powered by a 13.56 MHz and 400 W rf generator. Measurement of electron energy probability functions shows the presence of the peripheral high temperature electrons inside the source, while the temperature of the peripheral electrons downstream of the source is observed to be reduced.

  1. Filtering peripheral high temperature electrons in a cylindrical rf-driven plasmas by an axisymmetric radial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahoshi, Hikaru; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira

    2018-03-01

    High temperature electrons generated near a radial wall of a cylindrical source tube in a radiofrequency (rf) inductively-coupled plasma is filtered by an axisymmetric radial magnetic field formed near the source exit by locating annular permanent magnets, where the axial magnetic field strength in the radially central region is fairly uniform inside the source tube and is close to zero near the source exit. The source is operated at 3 mTorr in argon and the rf antenna is powered by a 13.56 MHz and 400 W rf generator. Measurement of electron energy probability functions shows the presence of the peripheral high temperature electrons inside the source, while the temperature of the peripheral electrons downstream of the source is observed to be reduced.

  2. Peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy; Chronic pain - peripheral neuropathy ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  3. Visual attention measures predict pedestrian detection in central field loss: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Concetta F; Horowitz, Todd; Bronstad, P Matthew; Bowers, Alex R

    2014-01-01

    The ability of visually impaired people to deploy attention effectively to maximize use of their residual vision in dynamic situations is fundamental to safe mobility. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate whether tests of dynamic attention (multiple object tracking; MOT) and static attention (Useful Field of View; UFOV) were predictive of the ability of people with central field loss (CFL) to detect pedestrian hazards in simulated driving. 11 people with bilateral CFL (visual acuity 20/30-20/200) and 11 age-similar normally-sighted drivers participated. Dynamic and static attention were evaluated with brief, computer-based MOT and UFOV tasks, respectively. Dependent variables were the log speed threshold for 60% correct identification of targets (MOT) and the increase in the presentation duration for 75% correct identification of a central target when a concurrent peripheral task was added (UFOV divided and selective attention subtests). Participants drove in a simulator and pressed the horn whenever they detected pedestrians that walked or ran toward the road. The dependent variable was the proportion of timely reactions (could have stopped in time to avoid a collision). UFOV and MOT performance of CFL participants was poorer than that of controls, and the proportion of timely reactions was also lower (worse) (84% and 97%, respectively; p = 0.001). For CFL participants, higher proportions of timely reactions correlated significantly with higher (better) MOT speed thresholds (r = 0.73, p = 0.01), with better performance on the UFOV divided and selective attention subtests (r = -0.66 and -0.62, respectively, pattention may provide useful measures of functional visual ability of individuals with CFL relevant to more complex mobility tasks.

  4. Effects of the radial electric field resonances on the particle orbits and loss cones in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the radial electric field resonances on the trapping and confinement of low and intermediate energy ions (0.1-1 keV) for the Reference configuration of TJ-II have been analysed. In TJ-II these resonances appear for electric potentials that grow with pitch and with the square root of the initial kinetic energy and are placed inside strips whose width increases with the initial radius and with the absolute value of initial pitch. The 0-Resonance is the most important one for particle trapping, it appears for high electric potential (between 1000 and 3000 V for 0.5 keV ions) with the same sign than pitch, inside very wide strips (several thousands of V). Along these band periphery, for potential intensities below the central resonant values, there exists a very strong increase of particle trapping. Instead, around the resonance center, the trapping is inhibited and a very strong increase of the passing particle population appears. This increase is higher for the torus external side (Theta approximately 0 degree centigree) and for small initial radius. For peripherical particles wide loss strips appear along the border of the resonant band corresponding to more positive potential. The 2-Resonance has small effect on trapping but affects strongly to the of peripherical passing particles. It appears for moderate electric potential (between 400 and 1000 V for 0.5 keV ions) with sign opposite than pitch and inside narrow bands than the 0-Resonance. In this case a loss of peripherical passing particles appears, placed also along the more positive potential band side. The other Resonances (except the -4) have much less effect on particle trapping and confinement. All these phenomena have been explained by the action of magnetic barriers and different mechanisms for particle orbit modification. (Author) 8 refs

  5. Model parameter uncertainty analysis for annual field-scale P loss model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorous (P) loss models are important tools for developing and evaluating conservation practices aimed at reducing P losses from agricultural fields. All P loss models, however, have an inherent amount of uncertainty associated with them. In this study, we conducted an uncertainty analysis with ...

  6. Estimating the magnitude of prediction uncertainties for field-scale P loss models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models are often used to predict phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields. While it is commonly recognized that model predictions are inherently uncertain, few studies have addressed prediction uncertainties using P loss models. In this study, an uncertainty analysis for the Annual P Loss Estima...

  7. Model parameter uncertainty analysis for an annual field-scale phosphorus loss model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosphorous (P) loss models are important tools for developing and evaluating conservation practices aimed at reducing P losses from agricultural fields. All P loss models, however, have an inherent amount of uncertainty associated with them. In this study, we conducted an uncertainty analysis with ...

  8. Ultra-high field upper extremity peripheral nerve and non-contrast enhanced vascular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh B Raval

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy of Ultra-high field [UHF] 7 Tesla [T] MRI as compared to 3T MRI in non-contrast enhanced [nCE] imaging of structural anatomy in the elbow, forearm, and hand [upper extremity].A wide range of sequences including T1 weighted [T1] volumetric interpolate breath-hold exam [VIBE], T2 weighted [T2] double-echo steady state [DESS], susceptibility weighted imaging [SWI], time-of-flight [TOF], diffusion tensor imaging [DTI], and diffusion spectrum imaging [DSI] were optimized and incorporated with a radiofrequency [RF] coil system composed of a transverse electromagnetic [TEM] transmit coil combined with an 8-channel receive-only array for 7T upper extremity [UE] imaging. In addition, Siemens optimized protocol/sequences were used on a 3T scanner and the resulting images from T1 VIBE and T2 DESS were compared to that obtained at 7T qualitatively and quantitatively [SWI was only qualitatively compared]. DSI studio was utilized to identify nerves based on analysis of diffusion weighted derived fractional anisotropy images. Images of forearm vasculature were extracted using a paint grow manual segmentation method based on MIPAV [Medical Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization].High resolution and high quality signal-to-noise ratio [SNR] and contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]-images of the hand, forearm, and elbow were acquired with nearly homogeneous 7T excitation. Measured [performed on the T1 VIBE and T2 DESS sequences] SNR and CNR values were almost doubled at 7T vs. 3T. Cartilage, synovial fluid and tendon structures could be seen with higher clarity in the 7T T1 and T2 weighted images. SWI allowed high resolution and better quality imaging of large and medium sized arteries and veins, capillary networks and arteriovenous anastomoses at 7T when compared to 3T. 7T diffusion weighted sequence [not performed at 3T] demonstrates that the forearm nerves are clearly delineated by fiber tractography. The

  9. Ripple Field AC Losses in 10-MW Wind Turbine Generators With a MgB2 Superconducting Field Winding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dong; Polinder, Henk; Magnusson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting (SC) synchronous generators are proposed as a promising candidate for 10-20-MW direct-drive wind turbines because they can have low weights and small sizes. A common way of designing an SC machine is to use SC wires with high current-carrying capability in the dc field winding...... and the ac armature winding is made with copper conductors. In such generators, the dc field winding is exposed to ac magnetic field ripples due to space harmonics from the armature. In generator design phases, the ac loss caused by these ripple fields needs to be evaluated to avoid local overheating...... and an excessive cooling budget. To determine the applicability of different design solutions in terms of ac losses, this paper estimates the ac loss level of 10-MW wind generator designs employing a MgB2 SC field winding. The effects on ac losses are compared between nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic teeth...

  10. A Prospective Profile of Visual Field Loss following Stroke: Prevalence, Type, Rehabilitation, and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona J. Rowe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To profile site of stroke/cerebrovascular accident, type and extent of field loss, treatment options, and outcome. Methods. Prospective multicentre cohort trial. Standardised referral and investigation protocol of visual parameters. Results. 915 patients were recruited with a mean age of 69 years (SD 14. 479 patients (52% had visual field loss. 51 patients (10% had no visual symptoms. Almost half of symptomatic patients (n=226 complained only of visual field loss: almost half (n=226 also had reading difficulty, blurred vision, diplopia, and perceptual difficulties. 31% (n=151 had visual field loss as their only visual impairment: 69% (n=328 had low vision, eye movement deficits, or visual perceptual difficulties. Occipital and parietal lobe strokes most commonly caused visual field loss. Treatment options included visual search training, visual awareness, typoscopes, substitutive prisms, low vision aids, refraction, and occlusive patches. At followup 15 patients (7.5% had full recovery, 78 (39% had improvement, and 104 (52% had no recovery. Two patients (1% had further decline of visual field. Patients with visual field loss had lower quality of life scores than stroke patients without visual impairment. Conclusions. Stroke survivors with visual field loss require assessment to accurately define type and extent of loss, diagnose coexistent visual impairments, and offer targeted treatment.

  11. Prism therapy and visual rehabilitation in homonymous visual field loss.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Evelyn C

    2011-02-01

    Homonymous visual field defects (HVFD) are common and frequently occur after cerebrovascular accidents. They significantly impair visual function and cause disability particularly with regard to visual exploration. The purpose of this study was to assess a novel interventional treatment of monocular prism therapy on visual functioning in patients with HVFD of varied etiology using vision targeted, health-related quality of life (QOL) questionnaires. Our secondary aim was to confirm monocular and binocular visual field expansion pre- and posttreatment.

  12. Measurement of the permittivity and loss of high-loss materials using a Near-Field Scanning Microwave Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, A.P.; Blackburn, J.F.; Lees, K.; Clarke, R.N.; Hodgetts, T.E.; Hanham, S.M.; Klein, N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper improvements to a Near-Field Scanning Microwave Microscope (NSMM) are presented that allow the loss of high loss dielectric materials to be measured accurately at microwave frequencies. This is demonstrated by measuring polar liquids (loss tangent tanδ≈1) for which traceable data is available. The instrument described uses a wire probe that is electromagnetically coupled to a resonant cavity. An optical beam deflection system is incorporated within the instrument to allow contact mode between samples and the probe tip to be obtained. Liquids are contained in a measurement cell with a window of ultrathin glass. The calibration process for the microscope, which is based on image-charge electrostatic models, has been adapted to use the Laplacian ‘complex frequency’. Measurements of the loss tangent of polar liquids that are consistent with reference data were obtained following calibration against single-crystal specimens that have very low loss. - Highlights: • Design of a microwave microscope with resolution on the micron scale. • Improved theory for obtaining permittivity and loss tangent of high loss materials. • Polar reference liquids are used as test samples. • Traceable measurements with accuracy approximately ±10% in ε′ and ±20% in tan δ.

  13. Fast ion loss and radial electric field in high-aspect-ratio stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Sanuki, Heiji; Itoh, Sanae

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical model is developed to determine the radial electric field and the fast ion loss simultaneously in stellarators, and is applied to the Wendelstein VII-A stellarator. The predicted value of the radial electric field is more close to experiments than the purely neoclassical calculation. The loss rate, which is determined simultaneously, is in the range of experimental observations. The partition of the injection energy by the bulk heating, direct orbit loss and shine through is estimated by using the selfconsistent electric field profile. The orbit loss becomes noticeable as the injection energy increases. The influence of the neutral particles is also studied. Neutral particles enhance the negative radial electric field, and reduce the direct orbit loss by the expense of the charge exchange loss. The impact of the increased radial electric field on the neoclassical ion thermal energy loss is compared to the direct loss of fast ions. The reduction of the neoclassical loss is much smaller than the orbit loss. (author)

  14. Fast ion loss and radial electric field in Wendelstein VII-Λ stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Sanuki, H.; Itoh, S.

    1991-10-01

    Theoretical model is developed to determine the radial electric field and the fast ion loss simultaneously in stellarators, and is applied to the Wendelstein VII-A stellarator. The predicted value of the radial electric field is more closer to experiments than the purely neoclassical calculation. The loss rate, which is determined simultaneously, is in the range of experimental observations. The partition of the injection energy by the bulk heating, direct orbit loss and shine through is estimated by using the self consistent electric field profile. The orbit loss become noticeable as the injection energy increases. The influence of the neutral particles is also studied. Neutral particles enhances the negative radial electric field, and reduces the direct orbit loss by the expense of the charge exchange loss. The impact of the increased radial electric field on the neoclassical ion thermal energy loss is compared to the direct loss of fast ions. The reduction of the neoclassical loss is much smaller than the orbit loss. (author)

  15. Boundary between a plasma and a field with particle losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konkhashbaev, I.K.; Zandman, I.S.; Ilinich, F.R.

    1978-01-01

    For open magnetic traps with β=1, the formation of plasma-field boundary (skin-layer) and the rate of the magnetic field fiffusion into plasma were investigated through the consideration of an evolution of a wide skin-layer. A large value of the mirror ratio is assumed for the sake of simplicity. The skin-layer structure is formed by two mechanisms: a mutual plasma-field diffusion tending to expand the boundary, and escape of particles trapped in the skin-layer region, along lines of force through the magnetic mirror, which tends to compress the boundary. It is shown that compression of the wide boundary occurs for the time of the order of the ion-ion collision time when the ion and electron temperatures change substantially. The final skin-layer width proved to be larger than a hybrid one, but smaller than the ion Larmour radius and depends slightly on initial temperatures. It has been established that the diffusion of the magnetic field into the plasma of magnetic trap has the character of a stationary wave of a width equal to the ion Larmour radius and of the velocity V approximately Vsub(Ti)/(ωsub(i)tausub(i))(Vsub(Ti) is the thermal ion velocity, ωsub(i), tausub(i) - the ion cyclotron frequency and collision time)

  16. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, P. K. [Oxford Instruments NanoScience, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX13 5QX (United Kingdom); Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M. [Department of Engineering, Electrical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

  17. Characterization of Peripheral Activity States and Cortical Local Field Potentials of Mice in an Elevated Plus Maze Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonogi, Toya; Nakayama, Ryota; Sasaki, Takuya; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2018-01-01

    Elevated plus maze (EPM) tests have been used to assess animal anxiety levels. Little information is known regarding how physiological activity patterns of the brain-body system are altered during EPM tests. Herein, we monitored cortical local field potentials (LFPs), electrocardiograms (ECGs), electromyograms (EMGs), and respiratory signals in individual mice that were repeatedly exposed to EPM tests. On average, mouse heart rates were higher in open arms. In closed arms, the mice occasionally showed decreased heart and respiratory rates lasting for several seconds or minutes, characterized as low-peripheral activity states of peripheral signals. The low-activity states were observed only when the animals were in closed arms, and the frequencies of the states increased as the testing days proceeded. During the low-activity states, the delta and theta powers of cortical LFPs were significantly increased and decreased, respectively. These results demonstrate that cortical oscillations crucially depend on whether an animal exhibits low-activity states in peripheral organs rather than the EPM arm in which the animal is located. These results suggest that combining behavioral tests with physiological makers enables a more accurate evaluation of rodent mental states.

  18. Characterization of Peripheral Activity States and Cortical Local Field Potentials of Mice in an Elevated Plus Maze Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toya Okonogi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Elevated plus maze (EPM tests have been used to assess animal anxiety levels. Little information is known regarding how physiological activity patterns of the brain-body system are altered during EPM tests. Herein, we monitored cortical local field potentials (LFPs, electrocardiograms (ECGs, electromyograms (EMGs, and respiratory signals in individual mice that were repeatedly exposed to EPM tests. On average, mouse heart rates were higher in open arms. In closed arms, the mice occasionally showed decreased heart and respiratory rates lasting for several seconds or minutes, characterized as low-peripheral activity states of peripheral signals. The low-activity states were observed only when the animals were in closed arms, and the frequencies of the states increased as the testing days proceeded. During the low-activity states, the delta and theta powers of cortical LFPs were significantly increased and decreased, respectively. These results demonstrate that cortical oscillations crucially depend on whether an animal exhibits low-activity states in peripheral organs rather than the EPM arm in which the animal is located. These results suggest that combining behavioral tests with physiological makers enables a more accurate evaluation of rodent mental states.

  19. Comparison of Risk Factor Profiles for Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Subtypes Defined by Pattern of Visual Field Loss: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jae H; Loomis, Stephanie J; Rosner, Bernard A; Wiggs, Janey L; Pasquale, Louis R

    2015-04-01

    We explored whether risk factor associations differed by primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) subtypes defined by visual field (VF) loss pattern (i.e., paracentral or peripheral). We included 77,157 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and 42,773 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS 1986-2010), and incident medical record confirmed cases of paracentral (n = 440) and peripheral (n = 865) POAG subtypes. We evaluated African heritage, glaucoma family history, body mass index (BMI), mean arterial blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, physical activity, smoking, caffeine intake, and alcohol intake. We used competing risk Cox regression analyses modeling age as the metameter and stratified by age, cohort, and event type. We sequentially identified factors with the least significant differences in associations with POAG subtypes ("stepwise down" approach with P for heterogeneity [P-het] 0.10) adverse associations with both POAG subtypes were observed with glaucoma family history, diabetes, African heritage, greater caffeine intake, and higher mean arterial pressure. These data indicate that POAG with early paracentral VF loss has distinct as well as common determinants compared with POAG with peripheral VF loss.

  20. Can DMCO Detect Visual Field Loss in Neurological Patients? A Secondary Validation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ane Sophie; Steensberg, Alvilda Thougaard; la Cour, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Unrecognized visual field loss is caused by a range of blinding eye conditions as well as serious brain diseases. The commonest cause of asymptomatic visual field loss is glaucoma. No screening tools have been proven cost-effective. Damato Multifixation Campimetry Online (DMCO), an inexpensive...... online test, has been evaluated as a future cost-beneficial tool to detect glaucoma. To further validate DMCO, this study aimed to test DMCO in a preselected population with neurological visual field loss. Methods : The study design was an evaluation of a diagnostic test. Patients were included...... if they had undergone surgery for epilepsy during 2011-2014, resulting in visual field loss. They were examined with DMCO and results were compared with those obtained with the Humphrey Field Analyzer (30:2 SITA-Fast). DMCO sensitivity and specificity were estimated with 95% confidence intervals. Results...

  1. Medical review licensing outcomes in drivers with visual field loss in Victoria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Carlyn; Charlton, Judith L; Odell, Morris; Keeffe, Jill; Wood, Joanne; Bohensky, Megan; Fildes, Brian; Oxley, Jennifer; Bentley, Sharon; Rizzo, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Background Good vision is essential for safe driving and studies have associated visual impairment with an increased crash risk. Currently, there is little information about the medical review of drivers with visual field loss. This study examines the prevalence of visual field loss among drivers referred for medical review in one Australian jurisdiction and investigates factors associated with licence outcome in this group. Methods A random sample of 10,000 (31.25 per cent) medical review cases was extracted for analysis from the Victorian licensing authority. Files were screened for the presence of six visual field-related medical conditions. Data were captured on a range of variables, including referral source, age, gender, health status, crash history and licence outcome. Prevalence analyses were univariate and descriptive. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with licence outcomes in the visual field loss group. Results Approximately 1.9 per cent of the 10,000 medical review cases screened had a visual field loss condition identified (n=194). Among the visual field loss group, 57.2 per cent were permitted to continue driving (conditional/unconditional licence). Primary referral sources were the police, self-referrals and general medical practitioners. Key factors associated with licence test outcomes were visual field condition, age group, crash involvement and referral to the Driver Licensing Authority’s Medical Advisors. Those who were younger had a crash involvement triggering referral and those who were referred to the Medical Advisors were more likely to have a positive licensing outcome. Conclusion The evidence base for making licensing decisions is complicated by the variable causes, patterns, progressions and measuring technologies for visual field loss. This study highlighted that the involvement of an expert medical advisory service in Victoria resulted in an increased likelihood that drivers with visual field loss will be

  2. Ammonia volatilization losses from paddy fields under controlled irrigation with different drainage treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yupu; Yang, Shihong; Xu, Junzeng; Wang, Yijiang; Peng, Shizhang

    2014-01-01

    The effect of controlled drainage (CD) on ammonia volatilization (AV) losses from paddy fields under controlled irrigation (CI) was investigated by managing water table control levels using a lysimeter. Three drainage treatments were implemented, namely, controlled water table depth 1 (CWT1), controlled water table depth 2 (CWT2), and controlled water table depth 3 (CWT3). As the water table control levels increased, irrigation water volumes in the CI paddy fields decreased. AV losses from paddy fields reduced due to the increases in water table control levels. Seasonal AV losses from CWT1, CWT2, and CWT3 were 59.8, 56.7, and 53.0 kg N ha(-1), respectively. AV losses from CWT3 were 13.1% and 8.4% lower than those from CWT1 and CWT2, respectively. A significant difference in the seasonal AV losses was confirmed between CWT1 and CWT3. Less weekly AV losses followed by TF and PF were also observed as the water table control levels increased. The application of CD by increasing water table control levels to a suitable level could effectively reduce irrigation water volumes and AV losses from CI paddy fields. The combination of CI and CD may be a feasible water management method of reducing AV losses from paddy fields.

  3. To answer or not to answer? A field test of loss aversion

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Krawczyk

    2011-01-01

    This study is a field experiment on loss aversion. The framing of scoring rules was differentiated in two exams at the University of Warsaw, with only half the students facing explicit penalty points in the case of giving an incorrect answer. Loss aversion predicts that less risk will be taken (less questions will be answered) when losses are possible but in fact, no treatment effect was observed.

  4. Visual attention measures predict pedestrian detection in central field loss: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta F Alberti

    Full Text Available The ability of visually impaired people to deploy attention effectively to maximize use of their residual vision in dynamic situations is fundamental to safe mobility. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate whether tests of dynamic attention (multiple object tracking; MOT and static attention (Useful Field of View; UFOV were predictive of the ability of people with central field loss (CFL to detect pedestrian hazards in simulated driving.11 people with bilateral CFL (visual acuity 20/30-20/200 and 11 age-similar normally-sighted drivers participated. Dynamic and static attention were evaluated with brief, computer-based MOT and UFOV tasks, respectively. Dependent variables were the log speed threshold for 60% correct identification of targets (MOT and the increase in the presentation duration for 75% correct identification of a central target when a concurrent peripheral task was added (UFOV divided and selective attention subtests. Participants drove in a simulator and pressed the horn whenever they detected pedestrians that walked or ran toward the road. The dependent variable was the proportion of timely reactions (could have stopped in time to avoid a collision.UFOV and MOT performance of CFL participants was poorer than that of controls, and the proportion of timely reactions was also lower (worse (84% and 97%, respectively; p = 0.001. For CFL participants, higher proportions of timely reactions correlated significantly with higher (better MOT speed thresholds (r = 0.73, p = 0.01, with better performance on the UFOV divided and selective attention subtests (r = -0.66 and -0.62, respectively, p<0.04, with better contrast sensitivity scores (r = 0.54, p = 0.08 and smaller scotomas (r = -0.60, p = 0.05.Our results suggest that brief laboratory-based tests of visual attention may provide useful measures of functional visual ability of individuals with CFL relevant to more complex mobility tasks.

  5. Alternating magnetic field losses in ATLAS type aluminium stabilized NbTi superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Boxman, E W; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    During ramping up- and down of the current in large-scale magnets the ramp losses are an important factor affecting the thermal and electro-magnetic stability of the system. The calculation of the losses is not straightforward due to the large dimensions of the conductor (~600 mm/sup 2/) implying that diffusion effects have to be taken into account. The AC-losses of the Al stabilized NbTi cable conductors used in the ATLAS magnet system were measured in 0.5 m long samples, using an inductive method with pick-up coils as well as the calorimetric method. External varying magnetic fields up to 2 tesla amplitude were applied parallel and perpendicular to the conductor wide surface. The results are compared to theory. It is found that hysteresis loss, eddy current loss in the Aluminum cladding and cable-to-cladding coupling loss contribute most to the AC loss. (5 refs).

  6. Velocity-space particle loss in field-reversed theta pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, M.Y.

    1983-01-01

    A field-reversed theta pinch (FRTP) is a compact device for magnetic fusion. It has attracted much attention in recent years since encouraging experimental results have been obtained. However, the definite causes for the observed particle loss rate and plasma rotation are not well known. In this work, we study the velocity-space particle loss (VSPL), i.e., particle loss due to the existence of a loss region in velocity space, in FRTP's in order to have a better understanding about the characteristics of this device

  7. Energy loss of ions by electric-field fluctuations in a magnetized plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nersisyan, Hrachya B; Deutsch, Claude

    2011-06-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of the energy loss of charged particles in a magnetized classical plasma due to the electric-field fluctuations are reported. The energy loss for a test particle is calculated through the linear-response theory. At vanishing magnetic field, the electric-field fluctuations lead to an energy gain of the charged particle for all velocities. It has been shown that in the presence of strong magnetic field, this effect occurs only at low velocities. In the case of high velocities, the test particle systematically loses its energy due to the interaction with a stochastic electric field. The net effect of the fluctuations is the systematic reduction of the total energy loss (i.e., the sum of the polarization and stochastic energy losses) at vanishing magnetic field and reduction or enhancement at strong field, depending on the velocity of the particle. It is found that the energy loss of the slow heavy ion contains an anomalous term that depends logarithmically on the projectile mass. The physical origin of this anomalous term is the coupling between the cyclotron motion of the plasma electrons and the long-wavelength, low-frequency fluctuations produced by the projectile ion. This effect may strongly enhance the stochastic energy gain of the particle.

  8. The Role of Peripheral Nerve Function in Age-Related Bone Loss and Changes in Bone Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    E Production of Osteoblasts, and Attenuates the Inflammatory Bone Loss Induced by Lipopolysaccharide. ISRN Pharmacol, 2012. 2012: p. 439860. 17...Kobayashi M, Watanabe K, Yokoyama S, et al. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 Ligand, Suppresses Bone Resorption by Inhibit- ing the Prostaglandin E Production of...example, mechanoreceptors in the skin respond to bending and stretching and can provide information about touch. Pacini’s corpuscle consists of onion like

  9. Body temperature depression and peripheral heat loss accompany the metabolic and ventilatory responses to hypoxia in low and high altitude birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham R; Cadena, Viviana; Tattersall, Glenn J; Milsom, William K

    2008-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the thermoregulatory, metabolic and ventilatory responses to hypoxia of the high altitude bar-headed goose with low altitude waterfowl. All birds were found to reduce body temperature (T(b)) during hypoxia, by up to 1-1.5 degrees C in severe hypoxia. During prolonged hypoxia, T(b) stabilized at a new lower temperature. A regulated increase in heat loss contributed to T(b) depression as reflected by increases in bill surface temperatures (up to 5 degrees C) during hypoxia. Bill warming required peripheral chemoreceptor inputs, since vagotomy abolished this response to hypoxia. T(b) depression could still occur without bill warming, however, because vagotomized birds reduced T(b) as much as intact birds. Compared to both greylag geese and pekin ducks, bar-headed geese required more severe hypoxia to initiate T(b) depression and heat loss from the bill. However, when T(b) depression or bill warming were expressed relative to arterial O(2) concentration (rather than inspired O(2)) all species were similar; this suggests that enhanced O(2) loading, rather than differences in thermoregulatory control centres, reduces T(b) depression during hypoxia in bar-headed geese. Correspondingly, bar-headed geese maintained higher rates of metabolism during severe hypoxia (7% inspired O(2)), but this was only partly due to differences in T(b). Time domains of the hypoxic ventilatory response also appeared to differ between bar-headed geese and low altitude species. Overall, our results suggest that birds can adjust peripheral heat dissipation to facilitate T(b) depression during hypoxia, and that bar-headed geese minimize T(b) and metabolic depression as a result of evolutionary adaptations that enhance O(2) transport.

  10. Injury Signals Cooperate with Nf1 Loss to Relieve the Tumor-Suppressive Environment of Adult Peripheral Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ribeiro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells are highly plastic cells that dedifferentiate to a progenitor-like state following injury. However, deregulation of this plasticity, may be involved in the formation of neurofibromas, mixed-cell tumors of Schwann cell (SC origin that arise upon loss of NF1. Here, we show that adult myelinating SCs (mSCs are refractory to Nf1 loss. However, in the context of injury, Nf1-deficient cells display opposing behaviors along the wounded nerve; distal to the injury, Nf1−/− mSCs redifferentiate normally, whereas at the wound site Nf1−/− mSCs give rise to neurofibromas in both Nf1+/+ and Nf1+/− backgrounds. Tracing experiments showed that distinct cell types within the tumor derive from Nf1-deficient SCs. This model of neurofibroma formation demonstrates that neurofibromas can originate from adult SCs and that the nerve environment can switch from tumor suppressive to tumor promoting at a site of injury. These findings have implications for both the characterization and treatment of neurofibromas.

  11. Bifurcation of radial electric field in tokamak edge plasmas due to ion orbit loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G.J.; Zhang, X.D.

    2015-01-01

    The ion orbit loss and the formation of radial electric field Er in tokamak edge region are calculated. The ion orbit loss generates a negative Er, which in turn affects the ion loss. As a result, Er can saturates at either a low or a high value, depending on the plasma parameters. When the ion temperature in the plasma edge is higher than a threshold a self-sustaining growth in both the ion loss and Er is found, leading to a high saturation value of Er in the milliseconds time. This mechanism provides a possible explanation for the formation of the edge radial electric field during the L to H-mode transition observed in tokamak experiments. (author)

  12. Magnetic field structure influence on primary electron cusp losses for micro-scale discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dankongkakul, Ben; Araki, Samuel J.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental effort was used to examine the primary electron loss behavior for micro-scale (≲3 cm diameter) discharges. The experiment uses an electron flood gun source and an axially aligned arrangement of ring-cusps to guide the electrons to a downstream point cusp. Measurements of the electron current collected at the point cusp show an unexpectedly complex loss pattern with azimuthally periodic structures. Additionally, in contrast to conventional theory for cusp losses, the overall radii of the measured collection areas are over an order of magnitude larger than the electron gyroradius. Comparing these results to Monte Carlo particle tracking simulations and a simplified analytical analysis shows that azimuthal asymmetries of the magnetic field far upstream of the collection surface can substantially affect the electron loss structure and overall loss area

  13. Acute exposure to high‐induction electromagnetic field affects activity of model peripheral sensory neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Průcha, J.; Krůšek, Jan; Dittert, Ivan; Sinica, Viktor; Kádková, Anna; Vlachová, Viktorie

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2018), s. 1355-1362 ISSN 1582-4934 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28784A Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : electromagnetic field * primary sensory neuron * ion channel * bradykinin receptor * transient receptor potential channel Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 4.499, year: 2016

  14. How to Determine Losses in a Flow Field: A Paradigm Shifttowards the Second Law Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Herwig

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Assuming that CFD solutions will be more and more used to characterizelosses in terms of drag for external flows and head loss for internal flows, we suggest toreplace single-valued data, like the drag force or a pressure drop, by field information aboutthe losses. These information are gained when the entropy generation in the flow field isanalyzed, an approach that often is called second law analysis (SLA, referring to the secondlaw of thermodynamics. We show that this SLA approach is straight-forward, systematicand helpful when it comes to the physical interpretation of the losses in a flow field. Variousexamples are given, including external and internal flows, two phase flow, compressible flowand unsteady flow. Finally, we show that an energy transfer within a certain process can beput into a broader perspective by introducing the entropic potential of an energy.

  15. Investigation of magnetic fluids exhibiting field-induced increasing loss peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fannin, P.C.; Marin, C.N.; Couper, C.

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical analysis to explain an increase of the Brownian loss peak with increasing polarizing field, H, in a magnetic fluid, is presented. The model is based on the competition between the Brownian and Neel relaxation processes. It is demonstrated that in magnetic fluids with particles having small anisotropy constant, small average magnetic diameter and narrow particle size distribution an increase of the Brownian loss peak with the polarizing field can be observed. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental results of an Isopar M-based magnetic fluid with magnetite particles stabilized with oleic acid and the model explains qualitatively the main characteristics of the experimental results.

  16. A hand-held sensor for analyses of local distributions of magnetic fields and losses

    CERN Document Server

    Krismanic, G; Baumgartinger, N

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes a novel sensor for non-destructive analyses of local field and loss distributions in laminated soft magnetic cores, such as transformer cores. It was designed for rapid information on comparative local degrees of inhomogeneity, e.g., for the estimation of local building factors. Similar to a magnifying glass with handle, the compact hand-held sensor contains extremely sharp needle electrodes for the detection of the induction vector B as well as double-field coils for the vector H. Losses P are derived from the Poynting law. Applied to inner -- or also outer -- core regions, the sensor yields instantaneous computer displays of local H, B, and P.

  17. BRCA1 loss pre-existing in small subpopulations of prostate cancer is associated with advanced disease and metastatic spread to lymph nodes and peripheral blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarz, Natalia; Eltze, Elke; Semjonow, Axel; Rink, Michael; Andreas, Antje; Mulder, Lennart; Hannemann, Juliane; Fisch, Margit; Pantel, Klaus; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Brandt, Burkhard

    2010-03-19

    A recent study concluded that serum prostate specific antigen (PSA)-based screening is beneficial for reducing the lethality of PCa, but was also associated with a high risk of 'overdiagnosis'. Nevertheless, also PCa patients who suffered from organ confined tumors and had negative bone scans succumb to distant metastases after complete tumor resection. It is reasonable to assume that those tumors spread to other organs long before the overt manifestation of metastases. Our current results confirm that prostate tumors are highly heterogeneous. Even a small subpopulation of cells bearing BRCA1 losses can initiate PCa cell regional and distant dissemination indicating those patients which might be at high risk of metastasis. A preliminary study performed on a small cohort of multifocal prostate cancer (PCa) detected BRCA1 allelic imbalances (AI) among circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The present analysis was aimed to elucidate the biological and clinical role of BRCA1 losses on metastatic spread and tumor progression in prostate cancer patients. Experimental Design: To map molecular progression in PCa outgrowth we used FISH analysis of tissue microarrays (TMA), lymph node sections and CTC from peripheral blood. We found that 14% of 133 tested patients carried monoallelic BRCA1 loss in at least one tumor focus. Extended molecular analysis of chr17q revealed that this aberration was often a part of larger cytogenetic rearrangement involving chr17q21 accompanied by AI of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and lack of the BRCA1 promoter methylation. The BRCA1 losses correlated with advanced T stage (p < 0.05), invasion to pelvic lymph nodes (LN, p < 0.05) as well as BR (p < 0.01). Their prevalence was twice as high within 62 LN metastases (LNMs) as in primary tumors (27%, p < 0.01). The analysis of 11 matched primary PCa-LNM pairs confirmed the suspected transmission of genetic abnormalities between those two sites. In 4 of 7 patients with metastatic disease, BRCA1

  18. A loss-based, magnetic field sensor implemented in a ferrofluid infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candiani, A.; Argyros, A.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Lwin, R.; Selleri, S.; Pissadakis, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report an in-fiber magnetic field sensor based on magneto-driven optical loss effects, while being implemented in a ferrofluid infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fiber. We demonstrate that magnetic field flux changes up to 2000 gauss can be detected when the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the fiber axis. In addition, the sensor exhibits high polarization sensitivity for the interrogated wavelengths, providing the possibility of both field flux and direction measurements. The underlying physical and guidance mechanisms of this sensing transduction are further investigated using spectrophotometric, light scattering measurements, and numerical simulations, suggesting photonic Hall effect as the dominant physical, transducing mechanism

  19. Self-consistent analysis of radial electric field and fast ion losses in CHS Torsatron/Heliotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, H.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.

    1992-09-01

    A self-consistent analysis is developed to determine the radial electric field and loss cone boundary in Torsatron/Heliotron plasmas under the influence of non-classical ion losses such as the loss cone loss ans charge exchange loss of fast ions with neutrals. Analysis is applied to the NBI heated plasmas in the Compact Helical System (CHS) device. Comparison is made between theoretical results and experimental observations. The increased ion particle losses caused by the orbit loss and charge exchange loss with neutrals make the radial electric field more negative than the value of purely neoclassical calculation. The partition of the injection energy among the shine through, direct orbit loss, change exchange loss and bulk heating is evaluated by using the self-consistent electric field profile. On-going experiments in the CHS device are briefly introduced. (author)

  20. A comparison of the effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields and gamma ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savova, G.; Stankova, K. [Molecular Radiobiology and Prophylaxis Laboratory, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kuzmanova, M. [Sofia University „St. Kl. Ohridski”, Faculty of Biology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    The usage of mobile phones increased significantly in the last 15 years. The concerns about the potential negative health effects arise, because of the daily use of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources. EMF, produced by cell phones may affect biological systems by increasing the production of free radicals, and even DNA damage. Other environmental factor, with an impact on humans’ life is the ionizing radiation. The main purpose of this work is to compare the effects of 900-MHz radiofrequency fields and gamma-ionizing radiation (γ-IR) on the levels of free radicals and DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The EMF generated, at a power of 2W used for cell phone applications, led to a significant increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not in persisting DNA damage 2h post-exposure. In contrast, irradiation with 4Gy of gamma rays increased dramatically both - the intracellular ROS and the DNA damage compared to background. (author)

  1. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for a field-scale P loss model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models are often used to predict phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields. While it is commonly recognized that there are inherent uncertainties with model predictions, limited studies have addressed model prediction uncertainty. In this study we assess the effect of model input error on predict...

  2. Effects of the Electric Field on the Direct Loss Asymmetries on TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the radial electric fields upon the direct loss asymmetries have been studied for low energy (0.1-1keV)ions. The analysis shows the permanence of the predominant downwards asymmetry that is only slightly modified in the poloidal rotation direction for moderate electric fields. In TJ-II this poloidal rotation is directed towards decreasing poloidal angles for positive (outward) electric fields and the ions drift along the same direction. Nevertheless for very strong fields the lost particles concentrate in the extreme plasma periphery (at the same time that the rate loss decreases strongly) and have no time, any more, to feel the poloidal rotation before escaping. The gaps between the TF coils receive the most of the losses. On the Vacuum Vessel the losses have a very strong concentration along the Hard Core, in particular on the PLT-2 plane plate (the one that is placed down at Phi=0 degree centigree) and a moderate preference for the 2''nd toroidal octant of each period. The poloidal rotation is much less visible than on the plasma border. The resulting power loads are small. (Author)

  3. Experimental study of the counting loss in an ionization chamber in pulsed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalez, O.L.; Yanagihara, L.S.; Veissid, V.L.C.P.; Herdade, S.B.; Teixeira, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of an ionization chamber gamma ray monitor in a pulsed radiation field at a linear electron accelerator facility was studied experiementally. A loss of sensitivity was observed as expected due to the pulsed nature of the radiation. By fitting the experiemental data to semi-empirical expressions, parameters for the correction of the counting efficiency were obtained. (Author) [pt

  4. Annual losses of weed seeds due to predation in organic cereal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, P.R.; Wes, J.S.; Kropff, M.J.; Werf, van der W.

    2003-01-01

    1. Post-dispersal seed losses in annual arable weed species are poorly quantified, but may be of significance for natural population control, especially if they can be manipulated. We hypothesized that weed seed predation on the soil surface was significant, so we measured rates in the field to

  5. Enhanced O2 Loss at Mars Due to an Ambipolar Electric Field from Electron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mcenulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (T sub e) in Mars dayside ionosphere above approx. 180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to approx. 500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher T(sub e) (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher T(sub e) may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced T(sub e) in Mars ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (e) of several k(sub b)T(sub e), which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  6. Effectiveness of conventional versus virtual reality-based balance exercises in vestibular rehabilitation for unilateral peripheral vestibular loss: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Dara; Herdman, Susan; Vance, Roisin; Murray, Deirdre; Malone, Kareena; Duffy, Douglas; Glennon, Aine; McConn-Walsh, Rory

    2015-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of virtual reality-based balance exercises to conventional balance exercises during vestibular rehabilitation in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss (UVL). Assessor-blind, randomized controlled trial. Two acute care university teaching hospitals. Patients with UVL (N=71) who had dizziness/vertigo, and gait and balance impairment. Patients with UVL were randomly assigned to receive 6 weeks of either conventional (n=36) or virtual reality-based (n=35) balance exercises during vestibular rehabilitation. The virtual reality-based group received an off-the-shelf virtual reality gaming system for home exercise, and the conventional group received a foam balance mat. Treatment comprised weekly visits to a physiotherapist and a daily home exercise program. The primary outcome was self-preferred gait speed. Secondary outcomes included other gait parameters and tasks, Sensory Organization Test (SOT), dynamic visual acuity, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Vestibular Rehabilitation Benefits Questionnaire, and Activities Balance Confidence Questionnaire. The subjective experience of vestibular rehabilitation was measured with a questionnaire. Both groups improved, but there were no significant differences in gait speed between the groups postintervention (mean difference, -.03m/s; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.09 to .02m/s). There were also no significant differences between the groups in SOT scores (mean difference, .82%; 95% CI, -5.00% to 6.63%) or on any of the other secondary outcomes (P>.05). In both groups, adherence to exercise was high (∼77%), but the virtual reality-based group reported significantly more enjoyment (P=.001), less difficulty with (P=.009) and less tiredness after (P=.03) balance exercises. At 6 months, there were no significant between-group differences in physical outcomes. Virtual reality-based balance exercises performed during vestibular rehabilitation were not superior to conventional balance

  7. Low field critical currents and ac losses of thin film niobium--tin superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a study of the low field critical current and ac loss properties of niobium-tin thin films and layered composites fabricated by electron-beam coevaporation are presented. Particular emphasis is placed upon determining the suitability of this material for use as a conductor in a superconducting power transmission line. Chapter I contains a summary of this work and its major results together with an introduction to the scientific and engineering concepts associated with a superconducting power transmission line. Chapter II is a discussion of the physics of current transport and the associated loss mechanisms in a type-II superconductor. Chapter III gives the details of the electron-beam coevaporation technique developed to fabricate the samples for this study. Also discussed in this chapter are the effects of the evaporation conditions on the growth morphology of the niobium-tin films. Chapter IV presents the details of the experimental techniques developed to measure the ac loss and critical current in these samples as a function of temperature. Chapter V shows the dependence of the critical current of these films and composites on temperature, magnetic field, and on the number of artificially introduced pinning centers in the layered composites. Experimental results are also presented concerning the stability of these conductors against flux jumps. Chapter VI is a discussion of the ac losses in these samples. Detailed comparisons are made between the measured loss and the predictions of the critical state model

  8. A proximal retarding field analyzer for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Karl; Murphy, Shane; Palmer, Richard E.

    2017-03-01

    A compact proximal retarding field analyzer for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy measurements is described. Using the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as a field emission (FE) electron source in conjunction with this analyzer, which is placed at a glancing angle to the surface plane, FE sample current and electron reflectivity imaging may be performed simultaneously. This is demonstrated in measurements of Ag nanostructures prepared on graphite by electron-beam lithography, where a material contrast of 13% is observed, with a lateral resolution of 25 nm, between the silver and graphite in electron reflectivity images. Topological contrast mechanisms such as edge enhancement and shadowing are also observed, giving rise to additional features in the electron reflectivity images. The same instrument configuration has been used to measure electron energy loss spectra on bare graphite, where the zero loss peak, π band plasmon loss peak and secondary electron peaks are observed. Using this simple and compact analyzer an STM, with sufficient open access to the tip-sample junction, may easily be augmented to provide simultaneous elemental and topographic mapping, supplementing STM image measurements with FE sample current and electron reflectivity images, as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements, in the same instrument.

  9. Laser field effects on the transport phenomena: Energy loss and stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Silva, H.; Sakanaka, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    The energy loss method has been applied to a large variety of transport problems in optics, solid-state and fusion research. In these papers, however, the transport equations were linearized, so there are no multiphoton interaction. On the other hand, Bivona et al. (1982) [2] have shown that, for a one-component plasma, the strong field effects would be only of academic interest. On the basis of the center of mass approach [3], a generalization of the energy loss rate which is in accordance with the recent results of Arista et al. (1989) [4] is obtained. (Author)

  10. Incidence of micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to modulated and unmodulated 2450 MHz radiofrequency fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Reddy, Abhishek B; McKenzie, Raymond J; McIntosh, Robert L; Prihoda, Thomas J; Wood, Andrew W

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral blood samples from four healthy volunteers were collected and aliquots were exposed in vitro for 2 h to either (i) modulated (wideband code division multiple access, WCDMA) or unmodulated continuous wave (CW) 2450 MHz radiofrequency (RF) fields at an average specific absorption rate of 10.9 W/kg or (ii) sham-exposed. Aliquots of the same samples that were exposed in vitro to an acute dose of 1.5 Gy ionizing gamma-radiation (GR) were used as positive controls. Half of the aliquots were treated with melatonin (Mel) to investigate if such treatment offers protection to the cells from the genetic damage, if any, induced by RF and GR. The cells in all samples were cultured for 72 h and the lymphocytes were examined to determine the extent of genetic damage assessed from the incidence of micronuclei (MN). The results indicated the following: (i) the incidence of MN was similar in incubator controls, and those exposed to RF/sham and Mel alone; (ii) there were no significant differences between WCDMA and CW RF exposures; (iii) positive control cells exposed to GR alone exhibited significantly increased MN; and (iv) Mel treatment had no effect on cells exposed to RF and sham, while such treatment significantly reduced the frequency of MN in GR-exposed cells. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Performance of the visual field index in glaucoma patients with moderately advanced visual field loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Mo; Cirineo, Nila; Ramanathan, Meera; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros; Morales, Esteban; Coleman, Anne L; Caprioli, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    To explore the relationship between the visual field index (VFI) and the visual field mean deviation (MD) in glaucoma patients with moderately advanced perimetric damage and to identify the magnitude of the boundary effect of VFI that occurred when the VFI estimation strategy changed from pattern deviation probability value to total deviation probability value as the MD crossed -20 dB in longitudinal visual field (VF) series. A retrospective cohort study of longitudinal data analysis. The MD and VFI values obtained from VF tests conducted on 148 eyes of 148 glaucoma patients having an MD around -20 dB were studied. A total of 1286 VFs with MD values within the range of -16 dB to -24 dB were included. The eyes were divided into 2 groups, with the first having serial MDs all better than or all worse than -20 dB and the second with serial MDs crossing the -20 dB value. Change in MD (ΔMD) was defined as the absolute difference between the MD values of 2 consecutive VFs. Based on the 2 VFI values of the same VFs, the absolute value of change in VFI (ΔVFI) was calculated. The means (± standard deviation) for the ΔVFI were 4.17% (± 3.3%) in the group of eyes with MDs on either side of -20 dB, and were 15.8% (± 8.4%) in the group with MDs crossing -20 dB (P values were 6.8%/dB (± 10.5%) when the range of MD falls on either side of -20 dB, and 7.9%/dB (± 6.2%) when the range of MD crosses the -20 dB values (P = .042). The values of the VFI become highly variable in serial VFs of eyes with MDs crossing -20 dB, in comparison to those VFIs associated with MDs on either side of -20 dB. The likelihood for this effect is the change from use of pattern deviation probability value to total deviation probability value in the points included in the calculation of VFI at -20 dB of MD. The development of indices to measure VF rates that are free from this boundary effect in moderately advanced glaucoma is desirable. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Experimental Study of Soil Organic Matter Loss From Cultivated Field Plots In The Venezuelan Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, B.; Huon, S.; Velasquez, F.; Vallès, V.; Girardin A, C.; Mariotti, A. B.

    The question of discriminating sources of organic matter in suspended particles of stream flows can be addressed by using total organic carbon (TOC) concentration and stable isotope (13C, 15N) measurements when constant fluxes of organic matter supply can be assumed. However, little is known on the dynamics of organic matter release during soil erosion and on the temporal stability of its isotopic signature. In this study, we have monitored soil organic carbon loss and water runoff using natural rainfall events on three experimental field plots with different vegetation cover (bare soil, maize and coffee fields), set up on natural slopes of a tropical mountainous watershed in NW Venezuela (09°13'32'' ­ 09°10'00''N, 70°13'49'' ­ 70°18'34''W). Runoff and soil loss are markedly superior for the bare field plot than for the coffee field plot: by a factor 15 ­ 36, respectively, for the five-month experiment, and by a factor 30 ­ 120, respectively, during a single rainfall event experiment. Since runoff and soil organic matter loss are closely linked during most of the flow (at the time scales of this study), TOC concentration in suspended matter is constant. Furthermore, stable isotope compositions reflect those of top-soil organic matter from which they originate.

  13. Does an Intrinsic Magnetic Field Inhibit or Enhance Planetary Ionosphere Outflow and Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Moore, T. E.; Foster, J. C.; Barabash, S. V.; Nilsson, H.

    2017-12-01

    A characteristic feature of the planets Earth, Venus and Mars is the observation of the outflow of ionospheric ions, most notably oxygen. The oxygen ion outflow is frequently assumed to be a proxy for the loss of water from the planetary atmosphere. In terms of global outflow rates for the Earth the rate varies from 1025 to 1026 s-1, depending on geomagnetic activity. For both Venus and Mars global rates of the order 5x1024 s-1 have been reported. Venus and Mars do not have a large-scale intrinsic magnetic field, and there are several pathways for atmospheric and ionospheric loss. At Mars, because of its low gravity, neutral oxygen can escape through dissociative recombination. At Venus only processes related to the solar wind interaction with the planet such as sputtering and direct scavenging of the ionosphere by the solar wind can result in oxygen escape. At the Earth the intrinsic magnetic field forms a barrier to the solar wind, but reconnection of the Earth's magnetic field with the Interplanetary Magnetic Field allows solar wind energy and momentum to be transferred into the magnetosphere, resulting in ionospheric outflows. Observations of oxygen ions at the dayside magnetopause suggest that at least some of these ions escape. In terms of the evolution of planetary atmospheres how the solar-wind driven escape rates vary for magnetized versus umagnetized planets is also not clear. An enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure will increase escape from the unmagnetized planets, but it may also result in enhanced reconnection at the Earth, increasing outflow and loss rates for the Earth as well. Continued improvement in our understanding of the different pathways for ionospheric and atmospheric loss will allow us to determine how effective an intrinsic planetary field is in preserving a planetary atmosphere, or if we have to look for other explanations as to why the atmospheres of Venus and Mars have evolved to their desiccated state.

  14. Extremely Low Frequency-Magnetic Fields (ELF-EMF) occupational exposure and natural killer activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobba, Fabriziomaria; Bargellini, Annalisa; Scaringi, Meri; Bravo, Giulia; Borella, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Extremely Low Frequency-Magnetic Fields (ELF-MF) are possible carcinogens to humans and some data suggest that they can act as promoters or progressors. Since NK cells play a major role in the control of cancer development, an adverse effect on ELF-MF on NK function has been hypothesized. We examined NK activity in 52 workers exposed to different levels of ELF-MF in various activities. Individual exposure was monitored during 3 complete work-shifts using personal dosimeters. Environmental exposure was also monitored. ELF-MF levels in the workers were expressed as Time-Weighted Average (TWA) values. NK activity was measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). In the whole group the median occupational TWA was 0.21 μT. According to the TWA levels, workers were classified as low exposed (26 subjects, TWA ≤ 0.2 μT) and higher exposed workers (26 subjects; TWA > 0.2 μT). In higher exposed workers, we observed a trend to reduce NK activity compared to low exposed, but the difference was not significant. Then we selected a subgroup of highest exposed workers (12 subjects; TWA > 1 μT); no difference was observed between low and highest exposed subjects in the main personal variables. Considering both E:T ratios from 12:1 to 50:1 and Lytic Units, a significant reduction in NK activity was observed in the highest exposed workers compared to the low exposed. Multivariate analysis showed a significant negative correlation between exposure and LU, while no correlation was evidenced with other personal characteristics. ELF-MF are considered possible carcinogens, and existing data suggest that they can act as promoters. Due to the role of NK activity in host defence against cancer, the results obtained in this study in workers exposed to ELF-MF levels exceeding 1 μT are in agreement with this hypothesis, and support the need for further investigation in this field

  15. Gamma rays from relativistic electrons undergoing Compton losses in isotropic photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdziarski, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetic equation describing Compton losses of relativistic electrons in an isotropic field of soft background photons is solved exactly including both continuous energy losses in the classical Thomson regime and catastrophic losses in the quantum Klein-Nishina regime. This extends the previous treatments of this problem, which assumed the validity of either one of these regimes alone. The problem is relevant to astrophysical sources containing relativistic electrons. Analytical solutions for the steady state electron and gamma-ray spectra in the case of power-law soft photons and monoenergetic and power-law electron injections are obtained. Numerical solutions are presented for monoenergetic, blackbody, and power-law soft photons. A comparison between the numerical and the available analytic solutions is made. 15 refs

  16. Towards identifying the mechanisms underlying field-aligned edge-loss of HHFW power on NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Scotti, F.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Ahn, J-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); and others

    2014-02-12

    Fast-wave heating will be a major heating scheme on ITER, as it can heat ions directly and is relatively unaffected by the large machine size unlike neutral beams. However, fast-wave interactions with the plasma edge can lead to deleterious effects such as, in the case of the high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) system on NSTX, large losses of fast-wave power in the scrape off layer (SOL) under certain conditions. In such scenarios, a large fraction of the lost HHFW power is deposited on the upper and lower divertors in bright spiral shapes. The responsible mechanism(s) has not yet been identified but may include fast-wave propagation in the scrape off layer, parametric decay instability, and RF currents driven by the antenna reactive fields. Understanding and mitigating these losses is important not only for improving the heating and current-drive on NSTX-Upgrade but also for understanding fast-wave propagation across the SOL in any fast-wave system. This talk summarizes experimental results demonstrating that the flow of lost HHFW power to the divertor regions largely follows the open SOL magnetic field lines. This lost power flux is relatively large close to both the antenna and the last closed flux surface with a reduced level in between, so the loss mechanism cannot be localized to the antenna. At the same time, significant losses also occur along field lines connected to the inboard edge of the bottom antenna plate. The power lost within the spirals is roughly estimated, showing that these field-aligned losses to the divertor are significant but may not account for the total HHFW loss. To elucidate the role of the onset layer for perpendicular fast-wave propagation with regards to fast-wave propagation in the SOL, a cylindrical cold-plasma model is being developed. This model, in addition to advanced RF codes such as TORIC and AORSA, is aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism(s) behind these SOL losses, to minimize their effects in NSTX-U, and to predict

  17. Towards identifying the mechanisms underlying field-aligned edge-loss of HHFW power on NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R. J.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Scotti, F.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Ahn, J-W.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; McLean, A.

    2014-01-01

    Fast-wave heating will be a major heating scheme on ITER, as it can heat ions directly and is relatively unaffected by the large machine size unlike neutral beams. However, fast-wave interactions with the plasma edge can lead to deleterious effects such as, in the case of the high-harmonic fast-wave (HHFW) system on NSTX, large losses of fast-wave power in the scrape off layer (SOL) under certain conditions. In such scenarios, a large fraction of the lost HHFW power is deposited on the upper and lower divertors in bright spiral shapes. The responsible mechanism(s) has not yet been identified but may include fast-wave propagation in the scrape off layer, parametric decay instability, and RF currents driven by the antenna reactive fields. Understanding and mitigating these losses is important not only for improving the heating and current-drive on NSTX-Upgrade but also for understanding fast-wave propagation across the SOL in any fast-wave system. This talk summarizes experimental results demonstrating that the flow of lost HHFW power to the divertor regions largely follows the open SOL magnetic field lines. This lost power flux is relatively large close to both the antenna and the last closed flux surface with a reduced level in between, so the loss mechanism cannot be localized to the antenna. At the same time, significant losses also occur along field lines connected to the inboard edge of the bottom antenna plate. The power lost within the spirals is roughly estimated, showing that these field-aligned losses to the divertor are significant but may not account for the total HHFW loss. To elucidate the role of the onset layer for perpendicular fast-wave propagation with regards to fast-wave propagation in the SOL, a cylindrical cold-plasma model is being developed. This model, in addition to advanced RF codes such as TORIC and AORSA, is aimed at identifying the underlying mechanism(s) behind these SOL losses, to minimize their effects in NSTX-U, and to predict

  18. Prior rates of visual field loss and lifetime risk of blindness in glaucomatous patients undergoing trabeculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulsham, W S; Fu, L; Tatham, A J

    2015-10-01

    Trend-based analyses examining rates of visual field (VF) loss in glaucoma are useful for predicting risk of vision-related morbidity. Although patients with faster losses are likely to require treatment escalation, little is known about rates that might trigger a decision to intervene surgically. The aims of this study were to investigate prior rates of VF loss in patients attending for trabeculectomy and to estimate, in the absence of surgical intervention, lifetime risk of visual impairment, and blindness. A retrospective analysis of 117 eyes of 86 consecutive patients with glaucoma attending for trabeculectomy, including 53 patients referred from general ophthalmology clinics and 33 patients from specialist glaucoma clinics. Rates of change in standard automated perimetry mean deviation were examined using linear regression and random coefficient models. Risk of lifetime visual impairment and blindness was calculated using life expectancy data. Mean age at surgery was 71.0±9.7 years. Patients were followed for 10.7±7.5 years prior to surgery with an average of seven useable fields per eye. On average patients referred from general clinics lost 1.04 dB/year compared with 0.77 dB/year in those referred from glaucoma clinics (P=0.070). Patients referred from general clinics had more medication changes prior to surgery (3.4 and 2.6 changes, respectively; P=0.004). Given Scottish life expectancy data, untreated, 61 eyes (52%) would have passed the threshold for visual impairment, whereas 40 (34%) would have passed the threshold demarcating blindness. Patients attending for trabeculectomy had faster average rates of field loss prior to surgery than published values for the general glaucoma population with over one-third of eyes studied predicted to have become blind without intervention. Those managed by glaucoma specialists had fewer changes in medication and tended to slower rates of VF loss, although the latter did not reach statistical significance.

  19. Prediction of the diffuse-field transmission loss of interior natural-ventilation openings and silencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibby, Chris; Hodgson, Murray

    2017-01-01

    The work reported here, part of a study on the performance and optimal design of interior natural-ventilation openings and silencers ("ventilators"), discusses the prediction of the acoustical performance of such ventilators, and the factors that affect it. A wave-based numerical approach-the finite-element method (FEM)-is applied. The development of a FEM technique for the prediction of ventilator diffuse-field transmission loss is presented. Model convergence is studied with respect to mesh, frequency-sampling and diffuse-field convergence. The modeling technique is validated by way of predictions and the comparison of them to analytical and experimental results. The transmission-loss performance of crosstalk silencers of four shapes, and the factors that affect it, are predicted and discussed. Performance increases with flow-path length for all silencer types. Adding elbows significantly increases high-frequency transmission loss, but does not increase overall silencer performance which is controlled by low-to-mid-frequency transmission loss.

  20. Field Evaluation of Cereal Combine Harvesters Processing Losses on JD-955 and JD-1165 Combines Equipped with Grain Loss Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Mostofi Sarkari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Grain loss monitors are installed on combine harvester and make it possible to measure grain loss on different parts of the combine. The instrument permits the operator to adjust a proper ground speed to keep grain loss within an acceptable range. In this study a loss monitoring system was implemented to measure grain losses continuously on straw walker and sieves. Two grain loss monitors (KEE and TeeJet were installed behind the straw walker and the sieves of JD-955 and JD-1165 combine harvesters. Harvesting performance parameters such as combine total and processing losses were then measured. To evaluate the precision and accuracy of the instruments, the measured and monitored losses were compared and investigated. The results of a two-year research showed that the average processing loss of the combine harvesters with 10-12% grain moisture content and 750 rpm drum speed was 0.82% which is whitin the acceptable range recommended by ASAE Standard No. S343.3. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the measured and monitored values of processing loss.

  1. Possible control scenario of radial electric field by loss-cone-particle injection into helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motojima, Osamu; Shishkin, A.A.; Inagaki, Shigeru; Watanabe, Kiyomasa

    1999-08-01

    The possibility of controlling the radial electric field of toroidal plasmas by injecting high energy electrons along the reversible loss cone orbit of the helical magnetic traps is investigated. It is well known that the radial electric field plays an important role in the confinement improvement scenario especially in the low collisional regime under the physics picture of neoclassical theory. For this purpose, it is made clear that the most suitable particles are transit particles, which show a transition from helically trapped orbits to blocked ones. It is also found that a parallel AC electric field launched from outside assists this transition and makes it possible for particles to penetrate deeply into the plasma. In addition we clarify that the viscosity of the plasma coupled with the helical field configuration provide a bifurcation of plasma states and its stable solution results in confinement improvement. (author)

  2. Comparing an Annual and a Daily Time-Step Model for Predicting Field-Scale Phosphorus Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Carl H; Forsberg, Adam; Mittelstet, Aaron; Radcliffe, David E; Storm, Daniel; Ramirez-Avila, John; Sharpley, Andrew N; Osmond, Deanna

    2017-11-01

    A wide range of mathematical models are available for predicting phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural fields, ranging from simple, empirically based annual time-step models to more complex, process-based daily time-step models. In this study, we compare field-scale P-loss predictions between the Annual P Loss Estimator (APLE), an empirically based annual time-step model, and the Texas Best Management Practice Evaluation Tool (TBET), a process-based daily time-step model based on the Soil and Water Assessment Tool. We first compared predictions of field-scale P loss from both models using field and land management data collected from 11 research sites throughout the southern United States. We then compared predictions of P loss from both models with measured P-loss data from these sites. We observed a strong and statistically significant ( loss between the two models; however, APLE predicted, on average, 44% greater dissolved P loss, whereas TBET predicted, on average, 105% greater particulate P loss for the conditions simulated in our study. When we compared model predictions with measured P-loss data, neither model consistently outperformed the other, indicating that more complex models do not necessarily produce better predictions of field-scale P loss. Our results also highlight limitations with both models and the need for continued efforts to improve their accuracy. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Measuring Plasma Formation Field Strength and Current Loss in Pulsed Power Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Radiographic Technologies Dept.; Patel, Sonal G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Radiographic Technologies Dept.; Falcon, Ross Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Radiographic Technologies Dept.; Cartwright, Keith [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Radiographic Technologies Dept.; Kiefer, Mark L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Radiographic Technologies Dept.; Cuneo, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Radiographic Technologies Dept.; Maron, Yitzhak [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2017-11-01

    This LDRD investigated plasma formation, field strength, and current loss in pulsed power diodes. In particular the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) e-beam diode was studied on the RITS-6 accelerator. Magnetic fields of a few Tesla and electric fields of several MV/cm were measured using visible spectroscopy techniques. The magnetic field measurements were then used to determine the current distribution in the diode. This distribution showed that significant beam current extends radially beyond the few millimeter x-ray focal spot diameter. Additionally, shielding of the magnetic field due to dense electrode surface plasmas was observed, quantified, and found to be consistent with the calculated Spitzer resistivity. In addition to the work on RITS, measurements were also made on the Z-machine looking to quantify plasmas within the power flow regions. Measurements were taken in the post-hole convolute and final feed gap regions on Z. Dopants were applied to power flow surfaces and measured spectroscopically. These measurements gave species and density/temperature estimates. Preliminary B-field measurements in the load region were attempted as well. Finally, simulation work using the EMPHASIS, electromagnetic particle in cell code, was conducted using the Z MITL conditions. The purpose of these simulations was to investigate several surface plasma generations models under Z conditions for comparison with experimental data.

  4. Objective Analysis of Performance of Activities of Daily Living in People With Central Field Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardhan, Shahina; Latham, Keziah; Tabrett, Daryl; Timmis, Matthew A

    2015-11-01

    People with central visual field loss (CFL) adopt various strategies to complete activities of daily living (ADL). Using objective movement analysis, we compared how three ADLs were completed by people with CFL compared with age-matched, visually healthy individuals. Fourteen participants with CFL (age 81 ± 10 years) and 10 age-matched, visually healthy (age 75 ± 5 years) participated. Three ADLs were assessed: pick up food from a plate, pour liquid from a bottle, and insert a key in a lock. Participants with CFL completed each ADL habitually (as they would in their home). Data were compared with visually healthy participants who were asked to complete the tasks as they would normally, but under specified experimental conditions. Movement kinematics were compared using three-dimension motion analysis (Vicon). Visual functions (distance and near acuities, contrast sensitivity, visual fields) were recorded. All CFL participants were able to complete each ADL. However, participants with CFL demonstrated significantly (P approach. Various kinematic indices correlated significantly to visual function parameters including visual acuity and midperipheral visual field loss.

  5. Alternating current loss calculation in a high-TC superconducting transmission cable considering the magnetic field distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noji, H; Haji, K; Hamada, T

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the alternating current (ac) losses of a 114 MVA high-T C superconducting (HTS) transmission cable using an electric-circuit (EC) model. The HTS cable is fabricated by Tokyo Electric Power Company and Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. The EC model is comprised of a resistive part and an inductive part. The resistive part is obtained by the approximated Norris equation for a HTS tape. The Norris equation indicates hysteresis losses due to self-fields. The inductive part has two components, i.e. inductances related to axial fields and those related to circumferential fields. The layer currents and applied fields of each layer were calculated by the EC model. By using both values, the ac losses of the one-phase HTS cable were obtained by calculation considering the self-field, the axial field and the circumferential field of the HTS tape. The measured ac loss transporting 1 kA rms is 0.7 W m -1 ph -1 , which is equal to the calculation. The distribution of each layer loss resembles in shape the distribution of the circumferential field in each layer, which indicates that the circumferential fields strongly influence the ac losses of the HTS cable

  6. Fine structures on zero-field steps in low-loss Josephson tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Barbara, Paola; Mygind, Jesper

    1993-01-01

    The first zero-field step in the current-voltage characteristic of intermediate-length, high-quality, low-loss Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson tunnel junctions has been carefully investigated as a function of temperature. When decreasing the temperature, a number of structures develop in the form...... of regular and slightly hysteretic steps whose voltage position depends on the junction temperature and length. This phenomenon is interesting for the study of nonlinear dynamics and for application of long Josephson tunnel junctions as microwave and millimeter-wavelength oscillators....

  7. Transient loss of plasma from a theta pinch having an initially reversed magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidrich, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the transient loss of plasma from a 25-cm-long theta pinch initially containing a reversed trapped magnetic field are presented. The plasma, amenable to MHD analyses, was a doubly ionized helium plasma characterized by an ion density N/sub i/ = 2 x 10 16 cm -3 and an ion temperature T/sub i/ = 15 eV at midcoil and by N/sub i/ = 0.5 x 10 16 cm -3 and T/sub i/ = 6 eV at a position 2.5 cm beyond the end of the theta coil

  8. Characteristics of Phosphorus Runoff Losses from Typical Paddy Fields in Guangdong Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NING Jian-feng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Three experimental paddy fields located in the city of Zengcheng, Qingyuan and Gaozhou in Guangdong Province were selected to monitor the runoff losses of phosphorus from the year of 2008 to 2012. The results showed that runoff event in paddy field occurred mainly in the early rice season. The runoff concentration of total phosphorus(TP under conventional fertilization treatment was in the range of 0.02~1.56 mg·L-1. It was recorded that TP concentration in 11%~18% of the total runoff samples exceeded the grade Ⅴ of the national surface water environmental quality(0.4 mg·L-1. Peak concentration of different phosphorus forms[TP, dissolved total P(DTP and particulate P(PP] were observed within 14 days after fertilization, which indicated the high environmental pollution risk of phosphorus during this period. Application of phosphorus fertilizer increased runoff load of DTP in paddy field and showed no effect on that of PP and TP. The annual runoff loads of 0.63~4.05, 0.33~2.91 kg·hm-2 and 1.10~6.68 kg·hm-2 for DTP, PP and TP, respectively, were recorded under conventional fertilizer model. Runoff load of phosphorus exhibited wide spatial and temporal variation during experimental period. Runoff coefficient of 0.06%~6.81% of phosphorus was recorded. It was observed that DTP dominated the phosphorus runoff load. Phosphorus runoff losses from paddy field was affected by a variety of natural and human factors, and fertilization, precipitation and runoff volume were identified as the main factors.

  9. Binocular glaucomatous visual field loss and its impact on visual exploration--a supermarket study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Sippel

    Full Text Available Advanced glaucomatous visual field loss may critically interfere with quality of life. The purpose of this study was to (i assess the impact of binocular glaucomatous visual field loss on a supermarket search task as an example of everyday living activities, (ii to identify factors influencing the performance, and (iii to investigate the related compensatory mechanisms. Ten patients with binocular glaucoma (GP, and ten healthy-sighted control subjects (GC were asked to collect twenty different products chosen randomly in two supermarket racks as quickly as possible. The task performance was rated as "passed" or "failed" with regard to the time per correctly collected item. Based on the performance of control subjects, the threshold value for failing the task was defined as μ+3σ (in seconds per correctly collected item. Eye movements were recorded by means of a mobile eye tracker. Eight out of ten patients with glaucoma and all control subjects passed the task. Patients who failed the task needed significantly longer time (111.47 s ±12.12 s to complete the task than patients who passed (64.45 s ±13.36 s, t-test, p < 0.001. Furthermore, patients who passed the task showed a significantly higher number of glances towards the visual field defect (VFD area than patients who failed (t-test, p < 0.05. According to these results, glaucoma patients with defects in the binocular visual field display on average longer search times in a naturalistic supermarket task. However, a considerable number of patients, who compensate by frequent glancing towards the VFD, showed successful task performance. Therefore, systematic exploration of the VFD area seems to be a "time-effective" compensatory mechanism during the present supermarket task.

  10. Measurements of Plasma Power Losses in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korepanov, Sergey; Smirnov, Artem; Garate, Eusebio; Donin, Alexandr; Kondakov, Alexey; Singatulin, Shavkat

    2013-10-01

    A high-confinement operating regime with plasma lifetimes significantly exceeding past empirical scaling laws was recently obtained by combining plasma gun edge biasing and tangential Neutral Beam Injection in the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment. To analyze the power balance in C-2, two new diagnostic instruments - the pyroelectric (PE) and infrared (IR) bolometers - were developed. The PE bolometer, designed to operate in the incident power density range from 0.1-100 W/cm2, is used to measure the radial power loss, which is dominated by charge-exchange neutrals and radiation. The IR bolometer, which measures power irradiated onto a thin metal foil inserted in the plasma, is designed for the power density range from 0.5-5 kW/cm2. The IR bolometer is used to measure the axial power loss from the plasma near the end divertors. The maximum measurable pulse duration of ~ 10 ms is limited by the heat capacitance of the IR detector. Both detectors have time resolution of about 10-100 μs and were calibrated in absolute units using a high power neutral beam. We present the results of first direct measurements of axial and radial plasma power losses in C-2.

  11. The discrepancy between human peripheral nerve chronaxie times as measured using magnetic and electric field stimuli: the relevance to MRI gradient coil safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recoskie, Bryan J; Chronik, Blaine A; Scholl, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) resulting from electric fields induced from the rapidly changing magnetic fields of gradient coils is a concern in MRI. Nerves exposed to either electric fields or changing magnetic fields would be expected to display consistent threshold characteristics, motivating the direct application of electric field exposure criteria from the literature to guide the development of gradient magnetic field exposure criteria for MRI. The consistency of electric and magnetic field exposures was tested by comparing chronaxie times for electric and magnetic PNS curves for 22 healthy human subjects. Electric and magnetic stimulation thresholds were measured for exposure of the forearm using both surface electrodes and a figure-eight magnetic coil, respectively. The average chronaxie times for the electric and magnetic field conditions were 109 ± 11 μs and 651 ± 53 μs (±SE), respectively. We do not propose that these results call into question the basic mechanism, namely that rapidly switched gradient magnetic fields induce electric fields in human tissues, resulting in PNS. However, this result does motivate us to suggest that special care must be taken when using electric field exposure data from the literature to set gradient coil PNS safety standards in MRI.

  12. Binocular glaucomatous visual field loss and its impact on visual exploration--a supermarket study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, Katrin; Kasneci, Enkelejda; Aehling, Kathrin; Heister, Martin; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Schiefer, Ulrich; Papageorgiou, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glaucomatous visual field loss may critically interfere with quality of life. The purpose of this study was to (i) assess the impact of binocular glaucomatous visual field loss on a supermarket search task as an example of everyday living activities, (ii) to identify factors influencing the performance, and (iii) to investigate the related compensatory mechanisms. Ten patients with binocular glaucoma (GP), and ten healthy-sighted control subjects (GC) were asked to collect twenty different products chosen randomly in two supermarket racks as quickly as possible. The task performance was rated as "passed" or "failed" with regard to the time per correctly collected item. Based on the performance of control subjects, the threshold value for failing the task was defined as μ+3σ (in seconds per correctly collected item). Eye movements were recorded by means of a mobile eye tracker. Eight out of ten patients with glaucoma and all control subjects passed the task. Patients who failed the task needed significantly longer time (111.47 s ±12.12 s) to complete the task than patients who passed (64.45 s ±13.36 s, t-test, p supermarket task. However, a considerable number of patients, who compensate by frequent glancing towards the VFD, showed successful task performance. Therefore, systematic exploration of the VFD area seems to be a "time-effective" compensatory mechanism during the present supermarket task.

  13. Glaucoma Severity and Participation in Diverse Social Roles: Does Visual Field Loss Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yelin; Trope, Graham E; Buys, Yvonne M; Badley, Elizabeth M; Gignac, Monique A M; Shen, Carl; Jin, Ya-Ping

    2016-07-01

    To assess the association between glaucoma severity and participation in diverse social roles. Cross-sectional survey. Individuals with glaucoma, 50+, with visual acuity in the better eye >20/50 were enrolled. They were classified into 3 groups based on visual field loss in the better eye: mild [mean deviation (MD)>-6 dB], moderate (MD, -6 to -12 dB), and severe (MDSocial Role Participation Questionnaire assessed respondents' perceptions of the importance, difficulty, and satisfaction with participation in 11 social role domains (eg, community events, travel). Differences between groups were examined using multivariate linear regression analyses. A total of 118 participants (52% female) were included: 60 mild, 29 moderate, and 29 severe. All social role domains were rated as important by all participants except for education and employment. Women (Psocial activities. Compared with those with mild glaucoma, individuals with severe glaucoma reported significantly more difficulty participating in community/religious/cultural events (Psocial events (P=0.04). Participation in diverse social roles is valued by individuals with glaucoma. Severe visual field loss impedes involvement in and satisfaction with activities in community/religious/cultural events, travelling, and relationships with family members. Appropriate community and targeted interventions are needed to allow people with severe glaucoma to maintain active social participation-a key component to successful aging.

  14. Equating spatial summation in visual field testing reveals greater loss in optic nerve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalloniatis, Michael; Khuu, Sieu K

    2016-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that visual field assessment in ocular disease measured with target stimuli within or close to complete spatial summation results in larger threshold elevation compared to when measured with the standard Goldmann III target size. The hypothesis predicts a greater loss will be identified in ocular disease. Additionally, we sought to develop a theoretical framework that would allow comparisons of thresholds with disease progression when using different Goldmann targets. The Humphrey Field Analyser (HFA) 30-2 grid was used in 13 patients with early/established optic nerve disease using the current Goldmann III target size or a combination of the three smallest stimuli (target size I, II and III). We used data from control subjects at each of the visual field locations for the different target sizes to establish the number of failed points (events) for the patients with optic nerve disease, as well as global indices for mean deviation (MD) and pattern standard deviation (PSD). The 30-2 visual field testing using alternate target size stimuli showed that all 13 patients displayed more defects (events) compared to the standard Goldmann III target size. The median increase for events was seven additional failed points: (range 1-26). The global indices also increased when the new testing approach was used (MD -3.47 to -6.25 dB and PSD 4.32 to 6.63 dB). Spatial summation mapping showed an increase in critical area (Ac) in disease and overall increase in thresholds when smaller target stimuli were used. When compared to the current Goldmann III paradigm, the use of alternate sized targets within the 30-2 testing protocol revealed a greater loss in patients with optic nerve disease for both event analysis and global indices (MD and PSD). We therefore provide evidence in a clinical setting that target size is important in visual field testing. © 2016 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2016 The College of Optometrists.

  15. Visual Field Defects and Retinal Ganglion Cell Losses in Human Glaucoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwerth, Ronald S.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The depth of visual field defects are correlated with retinal ganglion cell densities in experimental glaucoma. This study was to determine whether a similar structure-function relationship holds for human glaucoma. Methods The study was based on retinal ganglion cell densities and visual thresholds of patients with documented glaucoma (Kerrigan-Baumrind, et al.) The data were analyzed by a model that predicted ganglion cell densities from standard clinical perimetry, which were then compared to histologic cell counts. Results The model, without free parameters, produced accurate and relatively precise quantification of ganglion cell densities associated with visual field defects. For 437 sets of data, the unity correlation for predicted vs. measured cell densities had a coefficient of determination of 0.39. The mean absolute deviation of the predicted vs. measured values was 2.59 dB, the mean and SD of the distribution of residual errors of prediction was -0.26 ± 3.22 dB. Conclusions Visual field defects by standard clinical perimetry are proportional to neural losses caused by glaucoma. Clinical Relevance The evidence for quantitative structure-function relationships provides a scientific basis of interpreting glaucomatous neuropathy from visual thresholds and supports the application of standard perimetry to establish the stage of the disease. PMID:16769839

  16. Auralization of vibroacoustic models in engineering using Wave Field Synthesis: Application to plates and transmission loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, A.; Gauthier, P.-A.; Berry, A.

    2017-12-01

    While perceptual evaluation and sound quality testing with jury are now recognized as essential parts of acoustical product development, they are rarely implemented with spatial sound field reproduction. Instead, monophonic, stereophonic or binaural presentations are used. This paper investigates the workability and interest of a method to use complete vibroacoustic engineering models for auralization based on 2.5D Wave Field Synthesis (WFS). This method is proposed in order that spatial characteristics such as directivity patterns and direction-of-arrival are part of the reproduced sound field while preserving the model complete formulation that coherently combines frequency and spatial responses. Modifications to the standard 2.5D WFS operators are proposed for extended primary sources, affecting the reference line definition and compensating for out-of-plane elementary primary sources. Reported simulations and experiments of reproductions of two physically-accurate vibroacoustic models of thin plates show that the proposed method allows for an effective reproduction in the horizontal plane: Spatial and frequency domains features are recreated. Application of the method to the sound rendering of a virtual transmission loss measurement setup shows the potential of the method for use in virtual acoustical prototyping for jury testing.

  17. Homonymous Visual Field Loss and Its Impact on Visual Exploration: A Supermarket Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasneci, Enkelejda; Sippel, Katrin; Heister, Martin; Aehling, Katrin; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Schiefer, Ulrich; Papageorgiou, Elena

    2014-10-01

    Homonymous visual field defects (HVFDs) may critically interfere with quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HVFDs on a supermarket search task and to investigate the influence of visual search on task performance. Ten patients with HVFDs (four with a right-sided [HR] and six with a left-sided defect [HL]), and 10 healthy-sighted, sex-, and age-matched control subjects were asked to collect 20 products placed on two supermarket shelves as quickly as possible. Task performance was rated as "passed" or "failed" with regard to the time per correctly collected item ( T C -failed = 4.84 seconds based on the performance of healthy subjects). Eye movements were analyzed regarding the horizontal gaze activity, glance frequency, and glance proportion for different VF areas. Seven of 10 HVFD patients (three HR, four HL) passed the supermarket search task. Patients who passed needed significantly less time per correctly collected item and looked more frequently toward the VFD area than patients who failed. HL patients who passed the test showed a higher percentage of glances beyond the 60° VF ( P < 0.05). A considerable number of HVFD patients performed successfully and could compensate for the HVFD by shifting the gaze toward the peripheral VF and the VFD area. These findings provide new insights on gaze adaptations in patients with HVFDs during activities of daily living and will enhance the design and development of realistic examination tools for use in the clinical setting to improve daily functioning. (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01372319, NCT01372332).

  18. Peripheral reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral collisions, that is, collisions involving a small amount of overlap of nuclear matter, are discussed including inclusive interactions, the magnitude of the peripheral cross section, fragmentation, a compilation of experiments and available data, limiting fragmentation, factorization, some models, fragment momentum distributions, and future research directions

  19. Development and Testing of UCLA's Electron Losses and Fields Investigation (ELFIN) Instrument Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, C.; Bingley, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Caron, R.; Cruce, P. R.; Chung, M.; Rowe, K.; Runov, A.; Liu, J.; Tsai, E.

    2017-12-01

    UCLA's Electron Losses and Fields Investigation (ELFIN) is a 3U+ CubeSat mission designed to study relativistic particle precipitation in Earth's polar regions from Low Earth Orbit. Upon its 2018 launch, ELFIN will aim to address an important open question in Space Physics: Are Electromagnetic Ion-Cyclotron (EMIC) waves the dominant source of pitch-angle scattering of high-energy radiation belt charged particles into Earth's atmosphere during storms and substorms? Previous studies have indicated these scattering events occur frequently during storms and substorms, and ELFIN will be the first mission to study this process in-situ.Paramount to ELFIN's success is its instrument suite consisting of an Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) and a Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM). The EPD is comprised of two collimated solid-state detector stacks which will measure the incident flux of energetic electrons from 50 keV to 4 MeV and ions from 50 keV to 300 keV. The FGM is a 3-axis magnetic field sensor which will capture the local magnetic field and its variations at frequencies up to 5 Hz. The ELFIN spacecraft spins perpendicular to the geomagnetic field to provide 16 pitch-angle particle data sectors per revolution. Together these factors provide the capability to address the nature of radiation belt particle precipitation by pitch-angle scattering during storms and substorms.ELFIN's instrument development has progressed into the late Engineering Model (EM) phase and will soon enter Flight Model (FM) development. The instrument suite is currently being tested and calibrated at UCLA using a variety of methods including the use of radioactive sources and applied magnetics to simulate orbit conditions during spin sectoring. We present the methods and test results from instrument calibration and performance validation.

  20. Loss of the E3 ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1 sensitizes peripheral axons to degeneration in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanik, Laurent P.; Sleigh, James N.; Tian, Cong; Samuels, Mark E.; Bedard, Karen; Seburn, Kevin L.; Burgess, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by peripheral axon degeneration with subsequent motor and sensory deficits. Several CMT gene products function in endosomal sorting and trafficking to the lysosome, suggesting that defects in this cellular pathway might present a common pathogenic mechanism for these conditions. LRSAM1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is implicated in this process, and mutations in LRSAM1 have rece...

  1. Fast Winds and Mass Loss from Metal-Poor Field Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.; Smith, Graeme H.; Strader, Jay

    2009-11-01

    Echelle spectra of the infrared He I λ10830 line were obtained with NIRSPEC on the Keck 2 telescope for 41 metal-deficient field giant stars including those on the red giant branch (RGB), asymptotic giant branch (AGB), and red horizontal branch (RHB). The presence of this He I line is ubiquitous in stars with T effgsim 4500 K and MV fainter than -1.5, and reveals the dynamics of the atmosphere. The line strength increases with effective temperature for T effgsim 5300 K in RHB stars. In AGB and RGB stars, the line strength increases with luminosity. Fast outflows (gsim 60 km s-1) are detected from the majority of the stars and about 40% of the outflows have sufficient speed as to allow escape of material from the star as well as from a globular cluster. Outflow speeds and line strengths do not depend on metallicity for our sample ([Fe/H]= -0.7 to -3.0), suggesting the driving mechanism for these winds derives from magnetic and/or hydrodynamic processes. Gas outflows are present in every luminous giant, but are not detected in all stars of lower luminosity indicating possible variability. Mass loss rates ranging from ~3 × 10-10 to ~6 × 10-8 M sun yr-1 estimated from the Sobolev approximation for line formation represent values with evolutionary significance for red giants and RHB stars. We estimate that 0.2 M sun will be lost on the RGB, and the torque of this wind can account for observations of slowly rotating RHB stars in the field. About 0.1-0.2 M sun will be lost on the RHB itself. This first empirical determination of mass loss on the RHB may contribute to the appearance of extended horizontal branches in globular clusters. The spectra appear to resolve the problem of missing intracluster material in globular clusters. Opportunities exist for "wind smothering" of dwarf stars by winds from the evolved population, possibly leading to surface pollution in regions of high stellar density. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which

  2. Scanning laser polarimetry, but not optical coherence tomography predicts permanent visual field loss in acute nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersmith, Mark J; Anderson, Susan; Durbin, Mary; Kardon, Randy

    2013-08-15

    Scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) reveals abnormal retardance of birefringence in locations of the edematous peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), which appear thickened by optical coherence tomography (OCT), in nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). We hypothesize initial sector SLP RNFL abnormalities will correlate with long-term regional visual field loss due to ischemic injury. We prospectively performed automated perimetry, SLP, and high definition OCT (HD-OCT) of the RNFL in 25 eyes with acute NAION. We grouped visual field threshold and RNFL values into Garway-Heath inferior/superior disc sectors and corresponding superior/inferior field regions. We compared sector SLP RNFL thickness with corresponding visual field values at presentation and at >3 months. At presentation, 12 eyes had superior sector SLP reduction, 11 of which had inferior field loss. Six eyes, all with superior field loss, had inferior sector SLP reduction. No eyes had reduced OCT-derived RNFL acutely. Eyes with abnormal field regions had corresponding SLP sectors thinner (P = 0.003) than for sectors with normal field regions. During the acute phase, the SLP-derived sector correlated with presentation (r = 0.59, P = 0.02) and with >3-month after presentation (r = 0.44, P = 0.02) corresponding superior and inferior field thresholds. Abnormal RNFL birefringence occurs in sectors corresponding to regional visual field loss during acute NAION when OCT-derived RNFL shows thickening. Since the visual field deficits show no significant recovery, SLP can be an early marker for axonal injury, which may be used to assess recovery potential at RNFL locations with respect to new treatments for acute NAION.

  3. Self-field ac losses in biaxially aligned Y endash Ba endash Cu endash O tape conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Y.; Hosaka, M.; Sadakata, N.; Saitoh, T.; Kohno, O.; Takeda, K.

    1997-01-01

    Self-field ac losses were measured by the conventional ac four-probe method in biaxially aligned Y endash Ba endash Cu endash O tapes using polycrystalline Hastelloy tapes with textured yttria-stabilized-zirconia buffer layers. The ac losses increased in proportion to the fourth power of transport current in the high J c sample, and agreed well with Norris close-quote equation for thin strip conductors. However, the low J c sample had rather higher losses than Norris close-quote prediction, suggesting excessive magnetic flux penetration caused by percolated current paths. The results confirmed Norris close-quote prediction of the low ac losses for thin strip conductors, and indicated the importance of removing percolated structures of current paths to avoid higher ac losses than the theoretical predictions based on uniform conductors. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Marsh dieback, loss, and recovery mapped with satellite optical, airborne polarimetric radar, and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Rangoonwala, Amina; Chi, Zhaohui; Jones, Cathleen E.; Bannister, Terri

    2014-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper and Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite based optical sensors, NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle synthetic aperture radar (UAVSAR) polarimetric SAR (PolSAR), and field data captured the occurrence and the recovery of an undetected dieback that occurred between the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012 in the Spartina alterniflora marshes of coastal Louisiana. Field measurements recorded the dramatic biomass decrease from 2010 to 2011 and a biomass recovery in 2012 dominated by a decrease of live biomass, and the loss of marsh as part of the dieback event. Based on an established relationship, the near-infrared/red vegetation index (VI) and site-specific measurements delineated a contiguous expanse of marsh dieback encompassing 6649.9 ha of 18,292.3 ha of S. alterniflora marshes within the study region. PolSAR data were transformed to variables used in biophysical mapping, and of this variable suite, the cross-polarization HV (horizontal send and vertical receive) backscatter was the best single indicator of marsh dieback and recovery. HV backscatter exhibited substantial and significant changes over the dieback and recovery period, tracked measured biomass changes, and significantly correlated with the live/dead biomass ratio. Within the context of regional trends, both HV and VI indicators started higher in pre-dieback marshes and exhibited substantially and statistically higher variability from year to year than that exhibited in the non-dieback marshes. That distinct difference allowed the capturing of the S. alterniflora marsh dieback and recovery; however, these changes were incorporated in a regional trend exhibiting similar but more subtle biomass composition changes.

  5. Effectiveness of conventional versus virtual reality based vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of dizziness, gait and balance impairment in adults with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Dara; Herdman, Susan; Moloney, Roisin; Murray, Deirdre; Duffy, Douglas; Malone, Kareena; French, Helen; Hone, Stephen; Conroy, Ronan; McConn-Walsh, Rory

    2012-03-26

    Unilateral peripheral vestibular loss results in gait and balance impairment, dizziness and oscillopsia. Vestibular rehabilitation benefits patients but optimal treatment remains unknown. Virtual reality is an emerging tool in rehabilitation and provides opportunities to improve both outcomes and patient satisfaction with treatment. The Nintendo Wii Fit Plus® (NWFP) is a low cost virtual reality system that challenges balance and provides visual and auditory feedback. It may augment the motor learning that is required to improve balance and gait, but no trials to date have investigated efficacy. In a single (assessor) blind, two centre randomised controlled superiority trial, 80 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss will be randomised to either conventional or virtual reality based (NWFP) vestibular rehabilitation for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure is gait speed (measured with three dimensional gait analysis). Secondary outcomes include computerised posturography, dynamic visual acuity, and validated questionnaires on dizziness, confidence and anxiety/depression. Outcome will be assessed post treatment (8 weeks) and at 6 months. Advances in the gaming industry have allowed mass production of highly sophisticated low cost virtual reality systems that incorporate technology previously not accessible to most therapists and patients. Importantly, they are not confined to rehabilitation departments, can be used at home and provide an accurate record of adherence to exercise. The benefits of providing augmented feedback, increasing intensity of exercise and accurately measuring adherence may improve conventional vestibular rehabilitation but efficacy must first be demonstrated. Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT01442623.

  6. New type low loss, strong field, RF coils for commercial nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Shigetaka

    1990-01-01

    New RF coils of L-C-R connection loops type are proposed. One of the coils is only a bundle of μ order diameter isolated conductor, facing the both sides of the bundle ends each other for a capacity. The next characters were found by experiments. (1) This type coils show a sharp first resonance mode and few other modes are measured. (2) The complete proportional relation between the number of the conductors and the conductance of the bundle. (3) The ratio of the RF current resistance to the direct current resistance can be 1. Variational principle for eigenvalue problem was considered for it. The loss due to the vortex current in the conductor itself when exposed in the magnetic field was calculated accurately. And it was found that when the diameter of the conductor is 1/3 of the high frequency skin depth δ, the vortex current is very small. The litz wire can be used below 10 kHz. But this coil can be used above 100 MHz(δ≅7μ), because this coil need not to be stranded. For example, the turbulent heating at the axis of a tokamak plasma in μs order is possible, when a large amplitude stationary magnetosonic wave is excited by the magnetic piston of these coils array around the plasma. And the distance between the plasma and the coils can be large. The commercial nuclear fusion is thought to be possible. (author)

  7. Effect of air flow, panel curvature, and internal pressurization on field-incidence transmission loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    In the context of sound transmission through aircraft fuselage panels, equations for the field-incidence transmission loss (TL) of a single-walled panel are derived that include the effects of external air flow, panel curvature, and internal fuselage pressurization. Flow is shown to provide a modest increase in TL that is uniform with frequency up to the critical frequency. The increase is about 2 dB at Mach number M = 0.5, and about 3.5 dB at M = 1. Above the critical frequency where TL is damping controlled, the increase can be slightly larger at certain frequencies. Curvature is found to stiffen the panel, thereby increasing the TL at low frequencies, but also to introduce a dip at the 'ring frequency' of a full cylinder having the same radius as the panel. Pressurization appears to produce a slight decrease in TL throughout the frequency range, and also slightly shifts the dips at the critical frequency and at the ring frequency.

  8. Loss of the E3 ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1 sensitizes peripheral axons to degeneration in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent P. Bogdanik

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by peripheral axon degeneration with subsequent motor and sensory deficits. Several CMT gene products function in endosomal sorting and trafficking to the lysosome, suggesting that defects in this cellular pathway might present a common pathogenic mechanism for these conditions. LRSAM1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is implicated in this process, and mutations in LRSAM1 have recently been shown to cause CMT. We have generated mouse mutations in Lrsam1 to create an animal model of this form of CMT (CMT2P. Mouse Lrsam1 is abundantly expressed in the motor and sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Both homozygous and heterozygous mice have largely normal neuromuscular performance and only a very mild neuropathy phenotype with age. However, Lrsam1 mutant mice are more sensitive to challenge with acrylamide, a neurotoxic agent that causes axon degeneration, indicating that the axons in the mutant mice are indeed compromised. In transfected cells, LRSAM1 primarily localizes in a perinuclear compartment immediately beyond the Golgi and shows little colocalization with components of the endosome to lysosome trafficking pathway, suggesting that other cellular mechanisms also merit consideration.

  9. Loss of the E3 ubiquitin ligase LRSAM1 sensitizes peripheral axons to degeneration in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanik, Laurent P; Sleigh, James N; Tian, Cong; Samuels, Mark E; Bedard, Karen; Seburn, Kevin L; Burgess, Robert W

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by peripheral axon degeneration with subsequent motor and sensory deficits. Several CMT gene products function in endosomal sorting and trafficking to the lysosome, suggesting that defects in this cellular pathway might present a common pathogenic mechanism for these conditions. LRSAM1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is implicated in this process, and mutations in LRSAM1 have recently been shown to cause CMT. We have generated mouse mutations in Lrsam1 to create an animal model of this form of CMT (CMT2P). Mouse Lrsam1 is abundantly expressed in the motor and sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Both homozygous and heterozygous mice have largely normal neuromuscular performance and only a very mild neuropathy phenotype with age. However, Lrsam1 mutant mice are more sensitive to challenge with acrylamide, a neurotoxic agent that causes axon degeneration, indicating that the axons in the mutant mice are indeed compromised. In transfected cells, LRSAM1 primarily localizes in a perinuclear compartment immediately beyond the Golgi and shows little colocalization with components of the endosome to lysosome trafficking pathway, suggesting that other cellular mechanisms also merit consideration.

  10. Magnetic loss and B(H) behaviour of non-oriented electrical sheets under a trapezoidal exciting field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedous-Lebouc, A.; Errard, S.; Cornut, B.; Brissonneau, P.

    1994-05-01

    The excess loss and hysteresis response of electrical steel are measured and discussed in the case of trapezoidal field excitation similar to the current provided by a current commutation supply of a self-synchronous rotating machine. Three industrial non-oriented SiFe samples of different magnetic grades and thicknesses are tested using an automatic Epstein frame equipment. The losses and the unusual observed B( H) loops are analysed in terms of the rate of change of the field, the diffusion of the induction inside the sheet and by the calculation of the theoretical hysteresis cycles due to the eddy currents.

  11. Station blackout: Deterministic and probabilistic approach in the field of electrical supply losses by EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin, T.; Carnino, A.

    1986-01-01

    This example shows the thoroughness of EDF's approach in processing the difficult problems of the loss of electrical power supplies. Efforts are continuing in several directions: continued revision and improvement of operating procedures in the event of loss of electrical power supplies, PWR plant operator training courses devoted to the problems of power supply losses, and continued testing on simulators, and particularly testing under real conditions, including tests lasting several hours made possible by the performance of the new EDF simulators (two-phase code and taking all power losses into account)

  12. Effects of electromagnetic fields on bone loss in hyperthyroidism rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoxu; Zhang, Yingchi; Fu, Tao; Liu, Yang; Wei, Sheng; Yang, Yong; Zhao, Dongming; Zhao, Wenchun; Song, Mingyu; Tang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Optimal therapeutics for hyperthyroidism-induced osteoporosis are still lacking. As a noninvasive treatment, electromagnetic fields (EMF) have been proven to be effective for treating osteoporosis in non-hyperthyroidism conditions. We herein systematically evaluated the reduced effects of EMF on osteoporosis in a hyperthyroidism rat model. With the use of Helmholtz coils and an EMF stimulator, 15 Hz/1 mT EMF was generated. Forty-eight 5-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four different groups: control, levothyroxine treated (L-T4), EMF exposure + levothyroxine (EMF + L-T4), and EMF exposure without levothyroxine administration (EMF). All rats were treated with L-T4 (100 mg/day) except those in control and EMF groups. After 12 weeks, the results obtained from bone mineral density analyses and bone mechanical measurements showed significant differences between L-T4 and EMF + L-T4 groups. Micro CT and bone histomorphometric analyses indicated that trabecular bone mass and architecture in distal femur and proximal tibia were augmented and restored partially in EMF + L-T4 group. In addition, bone thyroid hormone receptors (THR) expression of hyperthyroidism rats was attenuated in EMF + L-T4 group, compared to control group, which was not observed in L-T4 group. According to these results, we concluded that 15 Hz/1 mT EMF significantly inhibited bone loss and micro architecture deterioration in hyperthyroidism rats, which might occur due to reduced THR expression caused by EMF exposure. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:137-150, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Novel Peripherally Restricted Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Selective Antagonist TXX-522 with Prominent Weight-Loss Efficacy in Diet Induced Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical development of the first generation of globally active cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R antagonists was suspended because of their adverse neuropsychiatric effects. Selective blockade of peripheral CB1Rs has the potential to provide a viable strategy for the treatment of severe obesity while avoiding these central nervous system side effects. In the current study, a novel compound (TXX-522 was rationally designed based on the parent nucleus of a classical CB1R-selective antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant (SR141716A. Docking assays indicate that TXX-522 was bound with the CB1R in a mode similar to that of SR141716A. TXX-522 showed good binding, CB1R-selectivity (over the CB2R, and functional antagonist activities in a range of in vitro molecular and cellular assays. In vivo analysis of the steady state distribution of TXX-522 in the rat brain and blood tissues and the assay of its functional effects on CB1R activity collectively showed that TXX-522 showed minimal brain penetration. Moreover, the in vivo pharmacodynamic study further revealed that TXX-522 had good oral bioavailability and a potent anti-obesity effect, and ameliorated insulin resistance in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. No impact on food intake was observed in this model, confirming the limited brain penetration of this compound. Thus, the current study indicates that TXX-522 is a novel and potent peripherally acting selective CB1R antagonist with the potential to control obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  14. Evaluation of Iron Loss in Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Consideration of Rotational Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Sanada, Masayuki; Morimoto, Shigeo; Takeda, Yoji; Kaido, Chikara; Wakisaka, Takeaki

    Loss evaluation is an important issue in the design of electrical machines. Due to the complicate structure and flux distribution, it is difficult to predict the iron loss in the machines exactly. This paper studies the iron loss in interior permanent magnet synchronous motors based on the finite element method. The iron loss test data of core material are used in the fitting of the hysteresis and eddy current loss constants. For motors in practical operation, additional iron losses due to the appearance of rotation of flux density vector and harmonic flux density distribution makes the calculation data deviates from the measured ones. Revision is made to account for these excess iron losses which exist in the practical operating condition. Calculation results show good consistence with the experimental ones. The proposed method provides a possible way to predict the iron loss of the electrical machine with good precision, and may be helpful in the selection of the core material which is best suitable for a certain machine.

  15. Improved Eddy-current Field Loss Model and Scaling Index for Magnets of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives detailed systematic researches on the mechanism and key factors of eddy-current losses in rotor magnets of high power-density permanent magnet synchronous motors(PMSMs. Firstly, this paper establishes quantitative mathematic model of eddy-current losses for surface-mounted PMSM based on eddy current field model and Maxwell equations. Then, a scaling index is put forward to weigh the key factors relevant to the eddy-current losses in magnets. At the same time, the principles of eddy-current losses in prototype PMSM are analyzed by the finite element analysis (FEA software. The contents researched in the paper have practical reference values for design and reliability analysis of PMSMs.

  16. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure does not modulate Toll-like receptor signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, de S.; Bouwens, M.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.; Cuppen, J.J.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Hermans, P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on human health remain unclear. It has been reported that ELF-EMF may modulate the innate immune response to microorganisms in animal models and mammalian cell-lines. With the recently gained insight in innate immune signaling

  17. Acute peripheral joint injury: cost and effectiveness of low-field-strength MR imaging--results of randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikken, J.J.; Oei, E.H.; Ginai, A.Z.; Krestin, G.P.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Vugt, A.B. van; Hunink, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess prospectively if a short imaging examination performed with low-field-strength dedicated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in addition to radiography is effective and cost saving compared with the current diagnostic imaging strategy (radiography alone) in patients with recent acute

  18. Determination of the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on the percentages of peripheral blood leukocytes and histology of lymphoid organs of the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicekcibasi, Aynur E.; Salbacak, A.; Buyukmumcu, M.; Okudan, N.; Celik, I.; Ozkan, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to determine the effects of very weak, extremely low frequency (50Hz) electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on the relative spleen weight, lymphoid organ histology, peripheral blood leukocyte and alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase positive (ANAE-positive) lymphocyte percentages of mouse. The study was carried out in the Scientific Research and Application Center of Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey in 2005. A total of 120 Swiss albino mice were divided into 6 groups (20 in each group). The experimental animals were exposed to 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 uT flux intensities (rms) of EMF at 50 Hz for 40 days. In the exposure groups with 20 animals, the body weight (BW) increased gradually in higher field intensities and reached at peak level in the 4 uT and then slightly decreased. The relative spleen weight (% of BW) was not affected. The ELF-EMF treatment did not cause any significant change in lymphocyte, monocyte and ANA-positive lymphocyte ratios, whereas percentages of neutropholis and basophiles changed non-linearly. Any change in the lymphoid organ histology which attributable to the field effect, was not observed in the exposure groups. Extremely frequency-EMF exposure with the flux intensities between 1-5 uT for 40 days did not cause any effect on the relative spleen weight, lymphoid organ histology, leukocyte and ANAE-positive lymphocyte percentages of the mouse. (author)

  19. The Mars Crustal Magnetic Field Control of Plasma Boundary Locations and Atmospheric Loss: MHD Prediction and Comparison with MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohua; Ma, Yingjuan; Masunaga, Kei; Dong, Chuanfei; Brain, David; Halekas, Jasper; Lillis, Robert; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Connerney, Jack; Grebowsky, Joseph; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present results from a global Mars time-dependent MHD simulation under constant solar wind and solar radiation impact considering inherent magnetic field variations due to continuous planetary rotation. We calculate the 3-D shapes and locations of the bow shock (BS) and the induced magnetospheric boundary (IMB) and then examine their dynamic changes with time. We develop a physics-based, empirical algorithm to effectively summarize the multidimensional crustal field distribution. It is found that by organizing the model results using this new approach, the Mars crustal field shows a clear, significant influence on both the IMB and the BS. Specifically, quantitative relationships have been established between the field distribution and the mean boundary distances and the cross-section areas in the terminator plane for both of the boundaries. The model-predicted relationships are further verified by the observations from the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. Our analysis shows that the boundaries are collectively affected by the global crustal field distribution, which, however, cannot be simply parameterized by a local parameter like the widely used subsolar longitude. Our calculations show that the variability of the intrinsic crustal field distribution in Mars-centered Solar Orbital itself may account for approx.60% of the variation in total atmospheric loss, when external drivers are static. It is found that the crustal field has not only a shielding effect for atmospheric loss but also an escape-fostering effect by positively affecting the transterminator ion flow cross-section area.

  20. Carrot Loss during Primary Production : Field Waste and Pack House Waste.

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, Rebekka

    2016-01-01

    Background: it has been suggested that roughly one-third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally. The reduction of loss and waste is seen as an important societal issue with considerable ethical, ecological and economic implications. Fruit and vegetables have the highest wastage rates of any food products; (45 %). And a big part of this waste occurs during production, but empirical data on loss during primary production is limited. Carrots are an important hortic...

  1. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between $^{208}$Pb$^{82+}$ ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J.M.; Bocian, D.; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of Pb ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the ALICE interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal Pb operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  2. Losses of neutral injected fast ions due to adiabaticity breaking processes in a field-reversed configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshiki; Inoue, Koji; Ishizuka, Takashi; Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Iwasawa, Naotaka

    2004-02-01

    Losses of neutral beam (NB) injected fast ions from the confinement region of a Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) with a strong magnetic mirror are numerically analyzed for parameters relevant to NB injection experiments on the FIX (FRC injection experiment) device [T. Asai et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2294 (2000)]. Ionization processes of beam particles are calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The confinement of beam ions is discussed with the concept of accessible regions that restrict the ion excursion and are determined from two constants of motion, the kinetic energy and canonical angular momentum, in the case of an axisymmetric and a steady state FRC without an electrostatic field. From the calculation of the accessible regions, it is found that all the fast ions suffer from the orbit loss on the wall surface and/or the end loss. Single particle orbits are also calculated to find a difference of confinement properties from the results by employing the accessible regions. The magnetic moment is observed to show non-adiabatic motions of the beam ions, which cause a gradual orbit loss on the wall even in a case that a strong magnetic mirror is applied. The results show that the correlation of the magnetic moment disappears as the fast ions experience the density gradient around the separatrix surface and the field-null points. (author)

  3. Effectiveness of conventional versus virtual reality based vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of dizziness, gait and balance impairment in adults with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Meldrum

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unilateral peripheral vestibular loss results in gait and balance impairment, dizziness and oscillopsia. Vestibular rehabilitation benefits patients but optimal treatment remains unkown. Virtual reality is an emerging tool in rehabilitation and provides opportunities to improve both outcomes and patient satisfaction with treatment. The Nintendo Wii Fit Plus® (NWFP is a low cost virtual reality system that challenges balance and provides visual and auditory feedback. It may augment the motor learning that is required to improve balance and gait, but no trials to date have investigated efficacy. Methods/Design In a single (assessor blind, two centre randomised controlled superiority trial, 80 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular loss will be randomised to either conventional or virtual reality based (NWFP vestibular rehabilitation for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure is gait speed (measured with three dimensional gait analysis. Secondary outcomes include computerised posturography, dynamic visual acuity, and validated questionnaires on dizziness, confidence and anxiety/depression. Outcome will be assessed post treatment (8 weeks and at 6 months. Discussion Advances in the gaming industry have allowed mass production of highly sophisticated low cost virtual reality systems that incorporate technology previously not accessible to most therapists and patients. Importantly, they are not confined to rehabilitation departments, can be used at home and provide an accurate record of adherence to exercise. The benefits of providing augmented feedback, increasing intensity of exercise and accurately measuring adherence may improve conventional vestibular rehabilitation but efficacy must first be demonstrated. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT01442623

  4. Performance of an iPad Application to Detect Moderate and Advanced Visual Field Loss in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris A; Thapa, Suman; George Kong, Yu Xiang; Robin, Alan L

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and efficiency of Visual Fields Easy (VFE), a free iPad app, for performing suprathreshold perimetric screening. Prospective, cross-sectional validation study. We performed screening visual fields using a calibrated iPad 2 with the VFE application on 206 subjects (411 eyes): 210 normal (NL), 183 glaucoma (GL), and 18 diabetic retinopathy (DR) at Tilganga Institute of Ophthalmology, Kathmandu, Nepal. We correlated the results with a Humphrey Field Analyzer using 24-2 SITA Standard tests on 373 of these eyes (198 NL, 160 GL, 15 DR). The number of missed locations on the VFE correlated with mean deviation (MD, r = 0.79), pattern standard deviation (PSD, r = 0.60), and number of locations that were worse than the 95% confidence limits for total deviation (r = 0.51) and pattern deviation (r = 0.68) using SITA Standard. iPad suprathreshold perimetry was able to detect most visual field deficits with moderate (MD of -6 to -12 dB) and advanced (MD worse than -12 dB) loss, but had greater difficulty in detecting early (MD better than -6 dB) loss, primarily owing to an elevated false-positive response rate. The average time to perform the Visual Fields Easy test was 3 minutes, 18 seconds (standard deviation = 16.88 seconds). The Visual Fields Easy test procedure is a portable, fast, effective procedure for detecting moderate and advanced visual field loss. Improvements are currently underway to monitor eye and head tracking during testing, reduce testing time, improve performance, and eliminate the need to touch the video screen surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Peripheral Neuropathy – Clinical and Electrophysiological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae; Prasad, Kalpana; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a primer on the pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of peripheral neuropathy for the radiologist. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) has utility in the diagnosis of many focal peripheral nerve lesions. When combined with history, examination, electrophysiology, and laboratory data, future advancements in high-field MRN may play an increasingly important role in the evaluation of patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24210312

  6. Perdas auditivas em paralisia facial periférica após cirurgia de descompressão Hearing loss in peripheral facial palsy after decompression surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Augusto Kroskinsque Palombo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A paralisia facial pode resultar de uma variedade de etiologias, sendo a mais comum a idiopática. A avaliação e o tratamento são particularmente complexos. O tratamento da paralisia facial aguda pode envolver cirurgia de descompressão do nervo facial. Qualquer estrutura perto do trajeto do nervo facial está em risco durante a cirurgia de descompressão via transmastoidea. OBJETIVO: Estudo retrospectivo que irá avaliar a perda auditiva após descompressão via transmastoidea e a evolução do grau de paralisia nos casos idiopáticos dos últimos 15 anos. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram selecionados prontuários de 33 pacientes submetidos à descompressão do nervo facial via transmastoidea nos últimos 15 anos e avaliou-se a perda auditiva e a paralisia facial. RESULTADOS: Observou-se alta porcentagem (61% dos pacientes com algum grau de perda auditiva após o procedimento e, em todos os casos, houve melhora da paralisia. CONCLUSÃO: O procedimento cirúrgico não é isento de riscos. Indicações, riscos e benefícios devem ser esclarecidos aos pacientes por meio de consentimento informado.Facial paralysis can result from a variety of etiologies; the most common is the idiopathic type. Evaluation and treatment are particularly complex. The treatment of acute facial paralysis may require facial nerve decompression surgery. Any structure near the path of the facial nerve is at risk during transmastoid decompression surgery. AIM: This is a retrospective study, carried out in order to evaluate hearing loss after transmastoid decompression and how idiopathic cases evolved in terms of their degree of paralysis in the last 15 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We selected the charts from 33 patients submitted to transmastoid facial nerve decompression in the past 15 years and we assessed their hearing loss and facial paralysis. RESULTS: There was a high percentage (61% of patients with some degree of hearing loss after the procedure and in all cases there

  7. Investigation of energy losses in low-coercivity resin-bonded magnets in alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milov, E. V.; Sipin, I. A.; Milov, V. N.; Andreenko, A. S.; Balan, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    Energy losses during alternating remagnetization of low-coercitivity resin-bonded magnets and commercially produced electrical steels were studied experimentally. The studies were conducted on several samples of resin-bonded magnets with different manufacturing technologies and samples of electrical steel sheets of various thicknesses. The static and dynamic magnetic properties of the samples were measured on a vibration magnetometer and a specially designed apparatus, respectively. It was found that the studied samples of bonded magnets have a relatively high level of hysteresis losses associated with high coercivity, which reaches a value of 4-5 Oe. At the same time, the remagnetization losses due to the Foucault currents in the bonded magnets are considerably lower than in electrical steels. The measurement results show that bonded magnets at high frequencies of remagnetization, especially in high-rpm motors, can be competitive in comparison with electrical steels.

  8. Evaluation of a cryostable low-loss conductor for pulsed field applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollan, J.J.; Walker, M.S.; Zeitlin, B.A.; Pollack, D.A.; Shen, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    A cryostable, low loss conductor as the basic strand in a 50 kA cable for a 20 MJ prototype, tokamak induction heating coil has been developed, fabricated, and evaluated. The conductor has a copper matrix multifilamentary NbTi core surrounded by a CuNi ring and stabilizing copper segmented by radial CuNi fins. Pulsed loss measurements have been made up to 2.2 T and for decay times from 0.7 to 278 ms. Measurements made on samples with various twists and portions etched away have allowed accurate evaluation of the loss components. Stability measurements were also made on insulated and uninsulated single strands and on subcables. Measured recovery heat flux for the bare strand is about 0.3 W/cm 2 ; however, the application of a 0.0005 in. layer of Omega insulation increases the value to about 0.5 W/cm 2

  9. Continuous infusion versus intermittent flushing to prevent loss of function of peripheral intravenous catheters used for drug administration in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, A; McIntosh, D; Davies, M W

    2005-10-19

    The use of peripheral intravenous cannulae is common in newborn babies. Many of them require an intravenous line only for medications and not for fluid. Currently there is little uniformity in methods used to maintain cannula patency. The object of this review was to determine which method was better for maintaining intravenous lines used in neonates for intravenous medication only: intermittent flushing or continuous infusion We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2004), CINAHL (from 1982 to June 2004) and MEDLINE (from 1966 to June 2004) . Randomised controlled trials comparing continuous infusion to intermittent flushing to maintain patency of intravenous cannulas. Units of randomisation might include individual catheters or individual babies. Three reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Two studies were eligible for inclusion. In one study only one of our primary outcomes was available: the duration of cannula patency for the first cannula used per infant was slightly longer in the continuous infusion group, but not significantly so, with a mean difference of -4.3 hours (95% CI -18.2 to 9.7). In the second study, only one of our primary outcomes was available: the mean (SD) number cannulas used per infant in the first 48 hours was less in the intermittent flush group with a mean difference of -0.76 cannulas (95% CI -1.37 to -0.15). No results were available for any of our other primary outcomes: in the published report, results were reported per catheter rather than per infant, a number of infants received more than one intravenous catheter (39 infants received an unknown number of catheters). The overall duration of cannula patency was significantly longer in the intermittent flush group with a mean duration of patency in the intermittent flush group of 2.1 days (SD 1.0) compared with the continuous infusion group where the mean duration of patency was 1.0 days (SD 0

  10. Impact of Genetic Reduction of NMNAT2 on Chemotherapy-Induced Losses in Cell Viability In Vitro and Peripheral Neuropathy In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Slivicki

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferases (NMNATs are essential neuronal maintenance factors postulated to preserve neuronal function and protect against axonal degeneration in various neurodegenerative disease states. We used in vitro and in vivo approaches to assess the impact of NMNAT2 reduction on cellular and physiological functions induced by treatment with a vinca alkaloid (vincristine and a taxane-based (paclitaxel chemotherapeutic agent. NMNAT2 null (NMNAT2-/- mutant mice die at birth and cannot be used to probe functions of NMNAT2 in adult animals. Nonetheless, primary cortical cultures derived from NMNAT2-/- embryos showed reduced cell viability in response to either vincristine or paclitaxel treatment whereas those derived from NMNAT2 heterozygous (NMNAT2+/- mice were preferentially sensitive to vincristine-induced degeneration. Adult NMNAT2+/- mice, which survive to adulthood, exhibited a 50% reduction of NMNAT2 protein levels in dorsal root ganglia relative to wildtype (WT mice with no change in levels of other NMNAT isoforms (NMNAT1 or NMNAT3, NMNAT enzyme activity (i.e. NAD/NADH levels or microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2 or neurofilament protein levels. We therefore compared the impact of NMNAT2 knockdown on the development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy induced by vincristine and paclitaxel treatment using NMNAT2+/- and WT mice. NMNAT2+/- did not differ from WT mice in either the development or maintenance of either mechanical or cold allodynia induced by either vincristine or paclitaxel treatment. Intradermal injection of capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in hot chili peppers, produced equivalent hypersensitivity in NMNAT2+/- and WT mice receiving vehicle in lieu of paclitaxel. Capsaicin-evoked hypersensitivity was enhanced by prior paclitaxel treatment but did not differ in either NMNAT2+/- or WT mice. Thus, capsaicin failed to unmask differences in nociceptive behaviors in either

  11. Iron Loss Prediction Using Modified IEM-Formula during the Field Weakening for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Asef

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During field weakening operation time (FWOT, the total iron loss rises and affects the accuracy of loss prediction and efficiency, especially if a large range of FWOT exists due to a large voltage drop that was rooted from the resistance of the used material. Iron loss prediction is widely employed in investigations for a fast electrical machine analysis using 2D finite element analysis (FEA. This paper proposes harmonic loss analytically by a steady-state equivalent circuit with a novel procedure. Consideration of skin effects and iron saturation are utilized in order to examine the accuracy through the relative error distribution in the frequency domain of each model from 50 to 700 Hz. Additionally, this comparative study presents a torque-frequency-field density calculation over each single term of the modified institute of electrical machines formula (IEM-Formula. The proposed analytical calculation is performed using 2D FEA for a classic and modified IEM-Formula along with experimental verifications on a surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG for a wind generation application.

  12. Flux loss and heating during the formation of a field-reversed configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgro, A.G.; Armstrong, W.T.; Lipson, J.; Tuszewski, M.G.; Cochrane, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The simulated time evolution of magnetic field profiles and trapped flux in a field-reversed configuration, when compared with the experiment, implies that the rapid decay of the initial reversed flux is due to a resistivity that is anomalously enhanced over its classical value. A tenuous plasma between the field-reversed configuration and the wall carries a significant fraction of the current, and about half of the anomalous Joule heating must be deposited directly in the ions in order to calculate the correct ion temperature. The fractional flux retention is most sensitive to an increase of applied bias field

  13. Preliminary Analysis on Linac Oscillation Data LI05-19 and Wake Field Energy Loss in FACET Commissioning 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    In this note, preliminary analysis on linac ocsillation data in FACET linac LI05-09 plus LI11-19 is presented. Several quadrupoles are identified to possibly have different strength, compared with their designed strength in the MAD optics model. The beam energy loss due to longitudinal wake fields in the S-band linac is also analytically calculated, also by LITRACK numerical simulations.

  14. Seven-Day Mortality Can Be Predicted in Medical Patients by Blood Pressure, Age, Respiratory Rate, Loss of Independence, and Peripheral Oxygen Saturation (the PARIS Score)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Knudsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    university hospital and included all adult (≥15 years) patients. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify the clinical variables that best predicted the endpoint. From this, we developed a simplified model that can be calculated without specialized tools or loss of predictive ability......-day mortality of acutely admitted medical patients using routinely collected variables obtained within the first minutes after arrival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This observational prospective cohort study used three independent cohorts at the medical admission units at a regional teaching hospital and a tertiary...... associated with the endpoint (full model). Based on this, we developed a simple score (range 0-5), ie, the PARIS score, by dichotomizing the variables. The ability to identify patients at increased risk (discriminatory power and calibration) was excellent for all three cohorts using both models. For patients...

  15. Prevention of Paclitaxel-induced allodynia by Minocycline: Effect on loss of peripheral nerve fibers and infiltration of macrophages in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wen-Jun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although paclitaxel is a frontline antineoplastic agent for treatment of solid tumors, the paclitaxel-evoked pain syndrome is a serious problem for patients. There is currently no valid drug to prevent or treat the paclitaxel-induced allodynia, partly due to lack of understanding regarding the cellular mechanism. Studies have shown that minocycline, an inhibitor of microglia/macrophage, prevented neuropathic pain and promoted neuronal survival in animal models of neurodegenerative disease. Recently, Cata et al also reported that minocycline inhibited allodynia induced by low-dose paclitaxel (2 mg/kg in rats, but the mechanism is still unclear. Results Here, we investigate by immunohistochemistry the change of intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF in the hind paw glabrous skin, expression of macrophage and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 in DRG at different time points after moderate-dose paclitaxel treatment (cumulative dose 24 mg/kg; 3 × 8 mg/kg in rats. Moreover, we observe the effect of minocycline on the IENF, macrophages and ATF3. The results showed that moderate-dose paclitaxel induced a persisted, gradual mechanical allodynia, which was accompanied by the loss of IENF in the hind paw glabrous skin and up-regulation of macrophages and ATF3 in DRG in rats. The expressions of ATF3 mainly focus on the NF200-positive cells. More importantly, we observed that pretreatment of minocycline at dose of 30 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg, but not 5 mg/kg, prevented paclitaxel-evoked allodynia. The evidence from immunohistochemistry showed that 30 mg/kg minocycline rescued the degeneration of IENF, attenuated infiltration of macrophages and up-regulation of ATF3 induced by paclitaxel treatment in rats. Conclusions Minocycline prevents paclitaxel-evoked allodynia, likely due to its inhibition on loss of IENF, infiltration of macrophages and up-regulation of ATF3 in rats. The finding might provide potential target for preventing paclitaxel

  16. Near-field characterization of low-loss photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V. S.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Borel, Peter Ingo

    2005-01-01

    -nm-period lattices with different filling factors (0.76 and 0.82) and connected to access ridge waveguides. Using the near-field optical images we investigate the light propagation along PCWs for TM and TE polarization (the electric field is perpendicular/parallel to the sample surface). Efficient...

  17. Peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant S Kamat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumors (DGCT are uncommon lesions mainly with rare peripheral types. This report presents a case of peripheral DGCT on the left side of the mandibular alveolar ridge of a heavy smoker, a 68-year-old man, with main presenting feature as a mild pain. Submandibular lymphadenopathy and radiological "saucerization" were evident. Differential diagnosis included fibroma, neurofibroma, peripheral ameloblastoma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, and peripheral giant cell granuloma. Histologically, ameloblastoma-like epithelial elements were seen in association with grouped ghost cells. Proliferating polyhedral cells and stellate reticulum-like cells with various densities were spread over a wide range of the field. The lesion was curetted and after 2 years of follow up, it did not recur.

  18. Field-incidence noise transmission loss of general aviation aircraft double wall configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical formulations have been developed to describe the transmission of reverberant sound through an infinite, semi-infinite and a finite double panel structure. The model incorporates the fundamental resonance frequencies of each of the panels, the mass-air-mass resonances of the structure, the standing wave resonances in the cavity between the panels and finally the coincidence resonance regions, where the exciting sound pressure wave and flexural waves of each of the panels coincide. It is shown that phase cancellation effects of pressure waves reflected from the cavity boundaries back into the cavity allows the transmission loss of a finite double panel structure to be approximated by a finite double panel mounted in an infinite baffle having no cavity boundaries. Comparison of the theory with high quality transmission loss data yields good agreement in the mass-controlled frequency region. It is shown that the application of acoustic blankets to the double panel structure does not eliminate the mass-air-mass resonances if those occur at low frequencies. It is concluded that this frequency region of low noise transmission loss is a potential interior noise problem area for propeller driven aircraft having a double panel fuselage construction.

  19. The measurement of power losses at high magnetic field densities or at small cross-section of test specimen using the averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gorican, V; Hamler, A; Nakata, T

    2000-01-01

    It is difficult to achieve sufficient accuracy of power loss measurement at high magnetic field densities where the magnetic field strength gets more and more distorted, or in cases where the influence of noise increases (small specimen cross section). The influence of averaging on the accuracy of power loss measurement was studied on the cast amorphous magnetic material Metglas 2605-TCA. The results show that the accuracy of power loss measurements can be improved by using the averaging of data acquisition points.

  20. Flux loss during the equilibrium phase of field-reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Bartsch, R.R.; Chrien, R.E.; Cochrane, J.C. Jr.; Kewish, R.W. Jr.; Klingner, P.; Linford, R.K.; McKenna, K.F.; Rej, D.J.; Sherwood, E.G.; Siemon, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Field-reversed configurations are consistently formed at low filling pressures in the FRX-C device, with decay time of the trapped flux after formation much larger than the stable period. This contrasts with previous experimental observations

  1. Flux loss during the equilibrium phase of field-reversed configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Bartsch, R.R.; Chrien, R.E.; Cochrane, J.C. Jr.; Kewish, R.W. Jr.; Klingner, P.; Linford, R.K.; McKenna, K.F.; Rej, D.J.; Sherwood, E.G.; Siemon, R.E.

    1982-10-01

    Field-reversed configurations are consistently formed at low filling pressures in the FRX-C device, with decay time of the trapped flux after formation much larger than the stable period. This contrasts with previous experimental observations.

  2. Effect of dc field on ac-loss peak in a commercial Bi:2223/Ag tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Ali; Düzgün, İbrahim; Çelebi, Selahattin

    2017-12-01

    Measurements of the ac susceptibility in a commercial Bi:2223/Ag tape for some different ac magnetic field amplitudes, Hac, in the presence of bias magnetic field Hdc directed along Hac are reported. It is found that the peak values of the imaginary component of ac susceptibility χ″max versus Hac trace a valley for the orientation where applied field Ha perpendicular to wide face of the tape total. We note that the observation of the valley depends on various parameters such as field dependence parameter n in the critical current density, in the simple power law expression jc = α(T)/Bn, choice of the bias field Hdc together with selected ac field amplitudes Hac, and dimension and geometry of sample studied. Our calculations based on critical state model with jc = α(1 - T/Tcm)p/Bn using the fitting parameters of n = 0.25, p = 2.2, Tcm = 108 K gives quite good results to compare the experimental and calculated curves.

  3. Simulating water and nitrogen loss from an irrigated paddy field under continuously flooded condition with Hydrus-1D model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Tong, Juxiu; Hu, Bill X; Li, Jiayun; Wei, Wenshuo

    2017-06-01

    Agricultural non-point source pollution is a major factor in surface water and groundwater pollution, especially for nitrogen (N) pollution. In this paper, an experiment was conducted in a direct-seeded paddy field under traditional continuously flooded irrigation (CFI). The water movement and N transport and transformation were simulated via the Hydrus-1D model, and the model was calibrated using field measurements. The model had a total water balance error of 0.236 cm and a relative error (error/input total water) of 0.23%. For the solute transport model, the N balance error and relative error (error/input total N) were 0.36 kg ha -1 and 0.40%, respectively. The study results indicate that the plow pan plays a crucial role in vertical water movement in paddy fields. Water flow was mainly lost through surface runoff and underground drainage, with proportions to total input water of 32.33 and 42.58%, respectively. The water productivity in the study was 0.36 kg m -3 . The simulated N concentration results revealed that ammonia was the main form in rice uptake (95% of total N uptake), and its concentration was much larger than for nitrate under CFI. Denitrification and volatilization were the main losses, with proportions to total consumption of 23.18 and 14.49%, respectively. Leaching (10.28%) and surface runoff loss (2.05%) were the main losses of N pushed out of the system by water. Hydrus-1D simulation was an effective method to predict water flow and N concentrations in the three different forms. The study provides results that could be used to guide water and fertilization management and field results for numerical studies of water flow and N transport and transformation in the future.

  4. Combined effects of space charge and energetic disorder on photocurrent efficiency loss of field-dependent organic photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sangcheol; Hwang, Inchan; Park, Byoungchoo

    2015-01-01

    The loss of photocurrent efficiency by space-charge effects in organic solar cells with energetic disorder was investigated to account for how energetic disorder incorporates space-charge effects, utilizing a drift-diffusion model with field-dependent charge-pair dissociation and suppressed bimolecular recombination. Energetic disorder, which induces the Poole–Frenkel behavior of charge carrier mobility, is known to decrease the mobility of charge carriers and thus reduces photovoltaic performance. We found that even if the mobilities are the same in the absence of space-charge effects, the degree of energetic disorder can be an additional parameter affecting photocurrent efficiency when space-charge effects occur. Introducing the field-dependence parameter that reflects the energetic disorder, the behavior of efficiency loss with energetic disorder can differ depending on which charge carrier is subject to energetic disorder. While the energetic disorder that is applied to higher-mobility charge carriers decreases photocurrent efficiency further, the efficiency loss can be suppressed when energetic disorder is applied to lower-mobility charge carriers. (paper)

  5. Long-term loss rates of radioisotopes of cobalt, zinc, ruthenium, caesium and silver by Mytilus edulis under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgaard, H.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term loss rates of cobalt, zinc, ruthenium, caesium and silver by Mytilus edulis soft parts as well as shells were measured under field conditions in the Mediterranean Sea at Monaco during a period of 13 months after experimental contamination. For all 5 elements, the loss could be described by two exponential functions for the soft parts and one for the shells. Biological half lives for the long-lived compartment ranged from ∼20 days for caesium to 100 - 200 days for cobalt, zinc, ruthenium and silver for soft parts as well as for shells. A comparison with results from similar experiments performed under very different environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea indicated that caesium and maybe silver had a faster turnover in the warm and saline Mediterranean, whereas loss rates for cobalt and zinc were comparable. It is argued, that reliable deduction of loss rates require experiments running over several months to a year, and it is pointed out that shorter term experiments - even up to 3 months - may give biased results. (author)

  6. The Potential to Reduce Nitrogen Loss Through Rotating Different Sorghum Varieties in Greenhouse Vegetable Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KANG Ling-yun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In North China plain, excessive fertilization in vegetable greenhouse always results in nitrate accumulation in soil and possible nitrogen leaching with potential environmental risk. It is necessary to rotate appropriate catch crop to absorb surplus nitrogen in fallow season and reduce rootzone nitrate level. An experiment was carried out to select suitable sorghum variety as catch crop to reduce nitrogen loss in Beijing suburb. Six common varieties were used in the experiment as conventional catch crop, sweet corn as the control. The results indicated that the biomass, root growth and nitrogen accumulation in shoots of sorghum Jinza 12 were highest in the catch crops. It demonstrated that the variety Jinza 12 was an appropriate catch crop for reducing nitrogen accumulation in surface soil layer compared with sweet corn. Meanwhile, variety Jiliang 2 maintained highest proportion of soil NH4+-N content after urea application, which might be related to the biological nitrification inhibitors (BNI released by the root system of sorghum. It implied that sorghum could be used as catch crop to reduce nitrogen loss through plant extraction i.e. nitrogen uptake and stabilization i.e. BNI inhibition, in comparison with sweet corn.

  7. SOUND TRANSMISSION LOSS OF A DOUBLE-LEAF PARTITION WITH MICRO-PERFORATED PLATE INSERTION UNDER DIFFUSE FIELD INCIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Putra

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In noise control applications, a double-leaf partition has been applied widely as a lightweight structure for noise insulation, such as in car doors, train bodies, and aircraft fuselages. Unfortunately, the insulation performance deteriorates significantly at mass-air-mass resonance due to coupling between the panels and the air in the gap. This paper investigates the effect of a micro-perforated panel (MPP, inserted in the conventional double-panel partition, on sound transmission loss at troublesome resonant frequencies. It is found that the transmission loss improves at this resonance if the MPP is located at a distance of less than half that of the air gap. A mathematical model is derived for the diffuse field incidence of acoustic loading.

  8. Application of polyacrylamide to reduce phosphorus losses from a Chinese purple soil: a laboratory and field investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Teng, Lingling; Wei, Shiqiang; Deng, Lili; Luo, Zaibo; Chen, Yupeng; Flanagan, Dennis C

    2010-07-01

    Use of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) to control phosphorus (P) losses from a Chinese purple soil was studied in both a laboratory soil column experiment and a field plot experiment on a steep slope (27%). Treatments in the column study were a control, and PAM mixed uniformly into the soil at rates of 0.02, 0.05, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.20%. We found that PAM had an important inhibitory effect on vertical P transport in the soil columns, with the 0.20% PAM treatment having the greatest significant reduction in leachate soluble P concentrations and losses resulting from nine leaching periods. Field experiments were conducted on 5m wide by 21m long natural rainfall plots, that allowed collection of both surface runoff and subsurface drainage water. Wheat was planted and grown on all plots with typical fertilizer applied. Treatments included a control, dry PAM at 3.9 kg ha(-1), dry PAM at 3.9 kg ha(-1) applied together with lime (CaCO(3) at 4.9 t ha(-1)), and dry PAM at 3.9 kg ha(-1) applied together with gypsum (CaSO(4).2H(2)O at 4 t ha(-1)). Results from the field plot experiment in which 5 rainfall events resulted in measurable runoff and leachate showed that all PAM treatments significantly reduced runoff volume and total P losses in surface runoff compared to the control. The PAM treatments also all significantly reduced water volume leached to the tile drain. However, total P losses in the leachate water were not significantly different due to the treatments, perhaps due to the low PAM soil surface application rate and/or high experimental variability. The PAM alone treatment resulted in the greatest wheat growth as indicated by the plant growth indexes of wheat plant height, leaf length, leaf width, grain number per head, and dried grain mass. Growth indexes of the PAM with Calcium treatments were significantly lesser. These results indicate that the selection and use of soil amendments need to be carefully determined based upon the most important management goal at a

  9. Whole-field macro- and micro-deformation characteristic of unbound water-loss in dentin hard tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenning; Nadeau, Bobby; Yu, Kevin; Shao, Xinxing; He, Xiaoyuan; Goh, M Cynthia; Kishen, Anil

    2018-04-06

    High-resolution deformation measurements in a functionally graded hard tissue such as human dentin are essential to understand the unbound water-loss mediated changes and their role in its mechanical integrity. Yet a whole-field, 3-dimensional (3D) measurement and characterization of fully hydrated dentin in both macro- and micro-scales remain to be a challenge. This study was conducted in 2 stages. In stage-1, a stereo-digital image correlation approach was utilized to determine the water-loss and load-induced 3D deformations of teeth in a sagittal section over consecutively acquired frames, from a fully hydrated state to nonhydrated conditions for a period up to 2 hours. The macroscale analysis revealed concentrated residual deformations at the dentin-enamel-junction and the apical regions of root in the direction perpendicular to the dentinal tubules. Significant difference in the localized deformation characteristics was observed between the inner and outer aspects of the root dentin. During quasi-static loadings, further increase in the residual deformation was observed in the dentin. In stage-2, dentin microstructural variations induced by dynamic water-loss were assessed with environmental scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), showing that the dynamic water-loss induced distention of dentinal tubules with concave tubular edges, and concurrent contraction of intertubular dentin with convex profile. The findings from the current macro- and micro-scale analysis provided insight on the free-water-loss induced regional deformations and ultrastructural changes in human dentin. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Grain yield losses in yellow-rusted durum wheat estimated using digital and conventional parameters under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Vergara-Diaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The biotrophic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is the causal agent of the yellow rust in wheat. Between the years 2010–2013 a new strain of this pathogen (Warrior/Ambition, against which the present cultivated wheat varieties have no resistance, appeared and spread rapidly. It threatens cereal production in most of Europe. The search for sources of resistance to this strain is proposed as the most efficient and safe solution to ensure high grain production. This will be helped by the development of high performance and low cost techniques for field phenotyping. In this study we analyzed vegetation indices in the Red, Green, Blue (RGB images of crop canopies under field conditions. We evaluated their accuracy in predicting grain yield and assessing disease severity in comparison to other field measurements including the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, leaf chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance, and canopy temperature. We also discuss yield components and agronomic parameters in relation to grain yield and disease severity. RGB-based indices proved to be accurate predictors of grain yield and grain yield losses associated with yellow rust (R2 = 0.581 and R2 = 0.536, respectively, far surpassing the predictive ability of NDVI (R2 = 0.118 and R2 = 0.128, respectively. In comparison to potential yield, we found the presence of disease to be correlated with reductions in the number of grains per spike, grains per square meter, kernel weight and harvest index. Grain yield losses in the presence of yellow rust were also greater in later heading varieties. The combination of RGB-based indices and days to heading together explained 70.9% of the variability in grain yield and 62.7% of the yield losses.

  11. Bilateral occipital lobe infarction with altitudinal field loss following radiofrequency cardiac catheter ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Celia S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bilateral stroke following radiofrequency catheter ablation is an unusual complication and may result in bilateral altitudinal visual field defects. Bilateral altitudinal visual field defects usually result from prechiasmal pathology causing damage to both retinas or optic nerves and rarely from bilateral symmetric damage to the post chiasmal visual pathways. Case presentation A 48-year-old man complained of visual disturbance on wakening following radiofrequency catheter ablation. The patient had a CHADS score of 1 pre-operatively and no complications were noted intra-operatively. Examination revealed a bilateral superior altitudinal defect and MRI of the brain showed multifocal areas of infarction predominantly involving the occipital lobes which correlated to with the visual deficits. Conclusion While the risk of thromboembolism and perioperative stroke during radiofrequency catheter ablation is small, it is not insignificant.

  12. Hearing loss and potential hazards of metallic middle-ear implants in NMR-magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettenbrink, K.B.

    1987-01-01

    Concurrent with the expanding clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, patients with metallic middle-ear implants will certainly be exposed to this strong magnetic field in the future. To determine potential hazards, associated with movements of steel- or Platinium stapes-prostheses, several tests were performed in a 0.5 tesla NMR unit and the induced forces were calculated. Although the commonly used paramagnetic steel-wire or platinium-alloys will not dislodge in vivo, ferromagnetic prostheses may present a hazardous risk. Prior to exposure to the magnetic field, information about the implanted material should therefore be obtained. A side-effect of the induced current flow is the attenuation of the sound-vibrations of the stapes prosthesis. This, 5-10 dB impairment of transmission develops only at a certain position of the patient's head, when the prosthesis vibrates perpendicularly to the magnetic field's Z-axis. Patients with a metallic prosthesis should be informed about this purely physical, harmless phenomenon prior to entering the NMR-cylinder. (orig.) [de

  13. Seven-day mortality can be predicted in medical patients by blood pressure, age, respiratory rate, loss of independence, and peripheral oxygen saturation (the PARIS score: a prospective cohort study with external validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Brabrand

    Full Text Available Most existing risk stratification systems predicting mortality in emergency departments or admission units are complex in clinical use or have not been validated to a level where use is considered appropriate. We aimed to develop and validate a simple system that predicts seven-day mortality of acutely admitted medical patients using routinely collected variables obtained within the first minutes after arrival.This observational prospective cohort study used three independent cohorts at the medical admission units at a regional teaching hospital and a tertiary university hospital and included all adult (≥ 15 years patients. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify the clinical variables that best predicted the endpoint. From this, we developed a simplified model that can be calculated without specialized tools or loss of predictive ability. The outcome was defined as seven-day all-cause mortality. 76 patients (2.5% met the endpoint in the development cohort, 57 (2.0% in the first validation cohort, and 111 (4.3% in the second. Systolic blood Pressure, Age, Respiratory rate, loss of Independence, and peripheral oxygen Saturation were associated with the endpoint (full model. Based on this, we developed a simple score (range 0-5, ie, the PARIS score, by dichotomizing the variables. The ability to identify patients at increased risk (discriminatory power and calibration was excellent for all three cohorts using both models. For patients with a PARIS score ≥ 3, sensitivity was 62.5-74.0%, specificity 85.9-91.1%, positive predictive value 11.2-17.5%, and negative predictive value 98.3-99.3%. Patients with a score ≤ 1 had a low mortality (≤ 1%; with 2, intermediate mortality (2-5%; and ≥ 3, high mortality (≥ 10%.Seven-day mortality can be predicted upon admission with high sensitivity and specificity and excellent negative predictive values.

  14. Understanding deposition rate loss in high power impulse magnetron sputtering: I. Ionization-driven electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenning, N; Huo, C; Raadu, M A; Lundin, D; Helmersson, U; Vitelaru, C; Stancu, G D; Minea, T

    2012-01-01

    The lower deposition rate for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) compared with direct current magnetron sputtering for the same average power is often reported as a drawback. The often invoked reason is back-attraction of ionized sputtered material to the target due to a substantial negative potential profile, sometimes called an extended presheath, from the location of ionization toward the cathode. Recent studies in HiPIMS devices, using floating-emitting and swept-Langmuir probes, show that such extended potential profiles do exist, and that the electric fields E z directed toward the target can be strong enough to seriously reduce ion transport to the substrate. However, they also show that the potential drops involved can vary by up to an order of magnitude from case to case. There is a clear need to understand the underlying mechanisms and identify the key discharge variables that can be used for minimizing the back-attraction. We here present a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the problem of electric fields E z in the ionization region part of HiPIMS discharges, and their effect on the transport of ionized sputtered material. In particular, we have investigated the possibility of a ‘sweet spot’ in parameter space in which the back-attraction of ionized sputtered material is low. It is concluded that a sweet spot might possibly exist for some carefully optimized discharges, but probably in a rather narrow window of parameters. As a measure of how far a discharge is from such a window, a Townsend product Π Townsend is proposed. A parametric analysis of Π Townsend shows that the search for a sweet spot is complicated by the fact that contradictory demands appear for several of the externally controllable parameters such as high/low working gas pressure, short/long pulse length, high/low pulse power and high/low magnetic field strength. (paper)

  15. Hysteresis losses in MgB2 superconductors exposed to combinations of low AC and high DC magnetic fields and transport currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, N.; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Liu, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    MgB2 superconductors are considered for generator field coils for direct drive wind turbine generators. In such coils, the losses generated by AC magnetic fields may generate excessive local heating and add to the thermal load, which must be removed by the cooling system. These losses must...... a simplified theoretical treatment of the hysteresis losses based on available models in the literature with the aim of setting the basis for estimation of the allowable magnetic fields and current ripples in superconducting generator coils intended for large wind turbine direct drive generators. The resulting...

  16. Biological transfer and loss of 36Cl-labeled DDT in an old-field ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterle, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    An enclosed 10-acre old-field plot treated in June 1969, with chlorine-36 labeled DDT was sampled each year from 1969 through 1974 to monitor the fate of the insecticide in the soil and biota. In order to provide data on compartmentalization of DDT in the vegetation, invertebrates and vertebrates inhabiting the plot, sampling was carried out to estimate both body burdens of DDT and biomass of populations. Another aspect of this study, the determination of rates of accumulation of residues by invertebrates and vertebrates, has been reported previously (Forsyth and Peterle 1973; Forsyth et al. 1975; Peterle 1975). This report describes (a) temporal patterns of DDT residues in soil and biota from 1969 through 1974 and (b) quantities of DDT held in the soil and biotic compartments of the ecosystem. Part II of the report is concerned with translocation and accumulation of 14 C-DDT

  17. Charge Losses in Silicon Sensors and Electric-Field Studies at the Si-SiO$_2$ Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    Electric fields and charge losses in silicon sensors before and after irradiation with x-rays, protons, neutrons or mixed irradiation are studied in charge-collection measurements. Electron-hole pairs ($eh$ pairs) are generated at different positions in the sensor using sub-ns pulsed laser light of different wavelengths. Light of 1063 nm, 830 nm and 660 nm wavelength is used to generate $eh$ pairs along the whole sensor depth, a few $\\mu$m below the surface and very close to the surface, respectively. Segmented p$^+$n silicon strip sensors are used to study the electric field below the SiO$_2$ separating the strip implants. The sensors are investigated before and after irradiation with 12 keV x-rays to a dose of 1 MGy. It is found that the electric field close to the Si-SiO$_2$ interface depends on both the irradiation dose and the biasing history. For the non-irradiated sensors the observed dependence of the electric field on biasing history and humidity is qualitatively as expected from simulations of the...

  18. [Clinico-statistical study on availability of Esterman disability score for assessment of mobility difficulty in patients with visual field loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yoshitaka; Terada, Yuko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Mimura, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    The visual efficiency scale currently adopted to determine the legal grade of visual disability associated with visual field loss in Japan is not appropriate for the evaluation of disability regarding daily living activities. We investigated whether Esterman disability score (EDS) is suitable for the assessment of mobility difficulty in patients with visual field loss. The correlation between the EDS calculated from Goldmann's kinetic visual field and the degree of subjective mobility difficulty determined by a questionnaire was investigated in 164 patients with visual field loss. The correlation between the EDS determined using a program built into the Humphrey field analyzer and that calculated from Goldmann's kinetic visual field was also investigated. The EDS based on the kinetic visual field was correlated well with the degree of subjective mobility difficulty, and the EDS measured using the Humphrey field analyzer could be estimated from the kinetic visual field-based EDS. Instead of the currently adopted visual efficiency scale, EDS should be employed for the assessment of mobility difficulty in patients with visual field loss, also to establish new judgment criteria concerning the visual field.

  19. The loss rates of O+ in the inner magnetosphere caused by both magnetic field line curvature scattering and charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Y.; Shen, C.

    2014-03-01

    With consideration of magnetic field line curvature (FLC) pitch angle scattering and charge exchange reactions, the O+ (>300 keV) in the inner magnetosphere loss rates are investigated by using an eigenfunction analysis. The FLC scattering provides a mechanism for the ring current O+ to enter the loss cone and influence the loss rates caused by charge exchange reactions. Assuming that the pitch angle change is small for each scattering event, the diffusion equation including a charge exchange term is constructed and solved; the eigenvalues of the equation are identified. The resultant loss rates of O+ are approximately equal to the linear superposition of the loss rate without considering the charge exchange reactions and the loss rate associated with charge exchange reactions alone. The loss time is consistent with the observations from the early recovery phases of magnetic storms.

  20. The loss rates of O{sup +} in the inner magnetosphere caused by both magnetic field line curvature scattering and charge exchange reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Y., E-mail: yji@spaceweather.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); College of Earth Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shen, C. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-15

    With consideration of magnetic field line curvature (FLC) pitch angle scattering and charge exchange reactions, the O{sup +} (>300 keV) in the inner magnetosphere loss rates are investigated by using an eigenfunction analysis. The FLC scattering provides a mechanism for the ring current O{sup +} to enter the loss cone and influence the loss rates caused by charge exchange reactions. Assuming that the pitch angle change is small for each scattering event, the diffusion equation including a charge exchange term is constructed and solved; the eigenvalues of the equation are identified. The resultant loss rates of O{sup +} are approximately equal to the linear superposition of the loss rate without considering the charge exchange reactions and the loss rate associated with charge exchange reactions alone. The loss time is consistent with the observations from the early recovery phases of magnetic storms.

  1. Soil organic carbon loss and selective transportation under field simulated rainfall events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiaodong; Li, Zhongwu; Huang, Jinquan; Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Wenming; Hu, Yanbiao; Zeng, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    The study on the lateral movement of soil organic carbon (SOC) during soil erosion can improve the understanding of global carbon budget. Simulated rainfall experiments on small field plots were conducted to investigate the SOC lateral movement under different rainfall intensities and tillage practices. Two rainfall intensities (High intensity (HI) and Low intensity (LI)) and two tillage practices (No tillage (NT) and Conventional tillage (CT)) were maintained on three plots (2 m width × 5 m length): HI-NT, LI-NT and LI-CT. The rainfall lasted 60 minutes after the runoff generated, the sediment yield and runoff volume were measured and sampled at 6-min intervals. SOC concentration of sediment and runoff as well as the sediment particle size distribution were measured. The results showed that most of the eroded organic carbon (OC) was lost in form of sediment-bound organic carbon in all events. The amount of lost SOC in LI-NT event was 12.76 times greater than that in LI-CT event, whereas this measure in HI-NT event was 3.25 times greater than that in LI-NT event. These results suggest that conventional tillage as well as lower rainfall intensity can reduce the amount of lost SOC during short-term soil erosion. Meanwhile, the eroded sediment in all events was enriched in OC, and higher enrichment ratio of OC (ERoc) in sediment was observed in LI events than that in HI event, whereas similar ERoc curves were found in LI-CT and LI-NT events. Furthermore, significant correlations between ERoc and different size sediment particles were only observed in HI-NT event. This indicates that the enrichment of OC is dependent on the erosion process, and the specific enrichment mechanisms with respect to different erosion processes should be studied in future.

  2. Radiographs and low field MRI (0.2T) as predictors of efficacy in a weight loss trial in obese women with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, Henrik; Boesen, Mikael; Christensen, Robin

    2011-01-01

    To study the predictive value of baseline radiographs and low-field (0.2T) MRI scans for the symptomatic outcome of clinically significant weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis.......To study the predictive value of baseline radiographs and low-field (0.2T) MRI scans for the symptomatic outcome of clinically significant weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis....

  3. Assessment of patient perception of glaucomatous visual field loss and its association with disease severity using Amsler grid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Fujitani

    Missing/White and Blurry/Gray (-17.86±10.31 dB, Missing/White (-11.92±6.76 dB, Blurry/Gray (-10.55±7.03 dB, and Not Aware (-3.91±4.05 dB (p<0.001.Paracentral vision loss in glaucoma is perceived by patients. As the perception of scotomas and the variety of terms to describe scotomas are related to glaucoma severity, clinicians should pay attention to patients' subjective descriptions of their glaucomatous VF loss. The historical notion that glaucoma patients lose their peripheral vision first and eventually look through a black tunnel needs to be updated to reflect the true perception of glaucoma.

  4. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  5. Hysteresis losses in MgB{sub 2} superconductors exposed to combinations of low AC and high DC magnetic fields and transport currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, N., E-mail: niklas.magnusson@sintef.no [SINTEF Energy Research, NO-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Abrahamsen, A.B. [DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Liu, D. [Electrical Power Processing Group, TU Delft, Mekelweg 4, NL-2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Runde, M. [SINTEF Energy Research, NO-7465 Trondheim (Norway); Polinder, H. [Electrical Power Processing Group, TU Delft, Mekelweg 4, NL-2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A method for calculating hysteresis losses in the low AC – high DC magnetic field and transport current range has been shown. • The method can be used in the design of wind turbine generators for calculating the losses in the generator DC rotor. • First estimates indicate tolerable current ripple in the 0.1% range for a 4 T DC MgB{sub 2} generator rotor coil. - Abstract: MgB{sub 2} superconductors are considered for generator field coils for direct drive wind turbine generators. In such coils, the losses generated by AC magnetic fields may generate excessive local heating and add to the thermal load, which must be removed by the cooling system. These losses must be evaluated in the design of the generator to ensure a sufficient overall efficiency. A major loss component is the hysteresis losses in the superconductor itself. In the high DC – low AC current and magnetic field region experimental results still lack for MgB{sub 2} conductors. In this article we reason towards a simplified theoretical treatment of the hysteresis losses based on available models in the literature with the aim of setting the basis for estimation of the allowable magnetic fields and current ripples in superconducting generator coils intended for large wind turbine direct drive generators. The resulting equations use the DC in-field critical current, the geometry of the superconductor and the magnitude of the AC magnetic field component as parameters. This simplified approach can be valuable in the design of MgB{sub 2} DC coils in the 1–4 T range with low AC magnetic field and current ripples.

  6. Occurrence of CYP1B1 Mutations in Juvenile Open-Angle Glaucoma With Advanced Visual Field Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Hayes, Melanie; Zhou, Tiger; Siggs, Owen M; Ridge, Bronwyn; Awadalla, Mona S; Smith, James E H; Ruddle, Jonathan B; Elder, James E; Mackey, David A; Hewitt, Alex W; Healey, Paul R; Goldberg, Ivan; Morgan, William H; Landers, John; Dubowsky, Andrew; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E

    2015-07-01

    Juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) is a severe neurodegenerative eye disorder in which most of the genetic contribution remains unexplained. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic CYP1B1 sequence variants in an Australian cohort of patients with JOAG and severe visual field loss. For this cohort study, we recruited 160 patients with JOAG classified as advanced (n = 118) and nonadvanced (n = 42) through the Australian and New Zealand Registry of Advanced Glaucoma from January 1, 2007, through April 1, 2014. Eighty individuals with no evidence of glaucoma served as a control group. We defined JOAG as diagnosis before age 40 years and advanced JOAG as visual field loss in 2 of the 4 central fixation squares on a reliable visual field test result. We performed direct sequencing of the entire coding region of CYP1B1. Data analysis was performed in October 2014. Identification and characterization of CYP1B1 sequence variants. We identified 7 different pathogenic variants among 8 of 118 patients with advanced JOAG (6.8%) but none among the patients with nonadvanced JOAG. Three patients were homozygous or compound heterozygous for CYP1B1 pathogenic variants, which provided a likely basis for their disease. Five patients were heterozygous. The allele frequency among the patients with advanced JOAG (11 in 236 [4.7%]) was higher than among our controls (1 in 160 [0.6%]; P = .02; odds ratio, 7.8 [95% CI, 0.02-1.0]) or among the control population from the Exome Aggregation Consortium database (2946 of 122 960 [2.4%]; P = .02; odds ratio, 2.0 [95% CI, 0.3-0.9]). Individuals with CYP1B1 pathogenic variants, whether heterozygous or homozygous, had worse mean (SD) deviation on visual fields (-24.5 [5.1] [95% CI, -31.8 to -17.2] vs -15.6 [10.0] [95% CI, -17.1 to -13.6] dB; F1,126 = 5.90; P = .02; partial ηp2 = 0.05) and were younger at diagnosis (mean [SD] age, 23.1 [8.4] [95% CI, 17.2-29.1] vs 31.5 [8.0] [95% CI, 30.1-33.0] years; F1,122 = 7

  7. Surface runoff and subsurface tile drain losses of neonicotinoids and companion herbicides at edge-of-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrétien, François; Giroux, Isabelle; Thériault, Georges; Gagnon, Patrick; Corriveau, Julie

    2017-05-01

    With their application as seed coatings, the use of neonicotinoid insecticides increased dramatically during the last decade. They are now frequently detected in aquatic ecosystems at concentrations susceptible to harm aquatic invertebrates at individual and population levels. This study intent was to document surface runoff and subsurface tile drain losses of two common neonicotinoids (thiamethoxam and clothianidin) compared to those of companion herbicides (atrazine, glyphosate, S-metolachlor and mesotrione) at the edge of a 22.5-ha field under a corn-soybean rotation. A total of 14 surface runoff and tile drain discharge events were sampled over two years. Events and annual unit mass losses were computed using flow-weighted concentrations and total surface runoff and tile drain flow volumes. Detection frequencies close to 100% in edge-of-field surface runoff and tile drain water samples were observed for thiamethoxam and clothianidin even though only thiamethoxam had been applied in the first year. In 2014, thiamethoxam median concentrations in surface runoff and tile drain samples were respectively 0.46 and 0.16 μg/L, while respective maximum concentrations of 2.20 and 0.44 μg/L were measured in surface runoff and tile drain samples during the first post-seeding storm event. For clothianidin, median concentrations in surface runoff and tile drain samples were 0.02 and 0.01, μg/L, and respective maximum concentrations were 0.07 μg/L and 0.05 μg/L. Surface runoff and tile drain discharge were key transport mechanisms with similar contributions of 53 and 47% of measured mass losses, respectively. Even if thiamethoxam was applied at a relatively low rate and had a low mass exportation value (0.3%), the relative toxicity was one to two orders of magnitude higher than those of the other chemicals applied in 2014 and 2015. Companion herbicides, except glyphosate in tile drains, exceeded their water quality guideline during one sampling campaign after

  8. Peripheral degenerative joint diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilzio Antonio da Silva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is the most commonrheumatic disorder mainly in a geriatric population. Manifestationsare pain, stiffness and functional loss in the affected joint.According to etiology it is classifi ed as primary (or idiopathicand secondary. Some risk factors for disease development aregenetics, race, age, sex, obesity, occupational activities andarticular biomechanics. Pathogenesis is the same for any cause orlocalization, being catabolic alterations, with synthesis, inhibitionand reparing intent of the cartilage matrix. Metalloproteinases andcytokines (IL-1,IL-6,TNF-α actions promote infl ammatory reactionand cartilage degradation. Pain, the most important symptom,does not correlate with radiologic fi ndings. Peripheral osteoarthritisoccurs predominantly in the knee, hip and hand. Diagnosis is basedon clinical features, laboratorial tests and radiological changes.Rheumatological associations’ guidelines for treatment includenon-pharmacologic (education, physiotherapy, assistive devices,and pharmacologic (analgesics, anti-infl ammatory drugs therapyand surgery. Arthroplasty seems to work better than medicines, butshould be used if other treatments have failed.

  9. Study of the Effect of Transport Current and Combined Transverse and Longitudinal Fields on the AC Loss in NET Prototype Conductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, Arend; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1994-01-01

    AC losses in cables carrying DC as well as AC transport currents at different DC background fields up to 2T have been measured on three types of Nb3Sn subcables in a new test facility. In this facility it is possible to apply sinusoidal transverse AC fields up to dB/dt=5T/s and longitudinal AC

  10. Assessment of the Bordas-Carnot Losses within the diffuser of tidal turbines using far-field and near-field CFD models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajaali, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    This project has for ambition to analyse and further the general understanding on cross-flows interactions and behaviours at the mouth of a mini/small tidal hydropower plant and a river. Although, the study of these interactions could benefit and find applications in multiple hydraulic problems, this project concentrates its focus on the influence of the transposed turbulences generated by the cross-flow into the diffuser. These eddies affect the overall performance and efficiency of the bulb-turbines by minimizing the pressure recovery. In the past, these turbulences were accounted with the implementation of the Bordas-Carnot losses coefficient for the design of tidal project using bulb-turbines. The bulb turbine technology has been the interest and subject of many scientific papers but most of them concentrate and narrow their focus on the design of the rotor, blades and combiner. This project wants to focus the design of the diffuser by performing an analysis on the development of eddies and the turbulences using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models. The Severn estuary is endowed with one of the highest tidal range around the hemisphere. The first part of the research requires to select case studies sites such as Briton-Ferry to virtually design mini-tidal plant in 0-Dimentional (D), 2D and 3D modelling to study development and behaviour of turbulences within the diffuser. The far-field model represents the marine environment prior and after the structure where bulb turbines are located. The near-field modelling has allowed researcher to study at much higher resolution and precision the design of a single turbine feeding model with predetermined and fix boundary condition. For this reason, a near-field model is required to study in depth the behaviour and evolution of the turbulence with the diffuser. One of the main challenge and advancement of this research is to find a methodology and system to link the far-field and near-field modelling to produce an

  11. The Colorado Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (CUTE): a dedicated cubesat mission for the study of exoplanetary mass loss and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Brian T.; France, Kevin; Nell, Nicholas; Kohnert, Richard; Pool, Kelsey; Egan, Arika; Fossati, Luca; Koskinen, Tommi; Vidotto, Aline A.; Hoadley, Keri; Desert, Jean-Michel; Beasley, Matthew; Petit, Pascal

    2017-08-01

    The Colorado Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (CUTE) is a near-UV (2550 - 3300 Å) 6U cubesat mission designed to monitor transiting hot Jupiters to quantify their atmospheric mass loss and magnetic fields. CUTE will probe both atomic (Mg and Fe) and molecular (OH) lines for evidence of enhanced transit absorption, and to search for evidence of early ingress due to bow shocks ahead of the planet's orbital motion. As a dedicated mission, CUTE will observe > 60 spectroscopic transits of hot Jupiters over a nominal seven month mission. This represents the equivalent of > 700 orbits of the only other instrument capable of these measurements, the Hubble Space Telescope. CUTE efficiently utilizes the available cubesat volume by means of an innovative optical design to achieve a projected effective area of ˜ 22 cm2 , low instrumental background, and a spectral resolving power of R ˜ 3000 over the entire science bandpass. These performance characteristics enable CUTE to discern a transit depth of motivation and expected results, and an overview of the projected fabrication, calibration and launch timeline.

  12. Colorado Ultraviolet Transit Experiment: a dedicated CubeSat mission to study exoplanetary mass loss and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Brian T.; France, Kevin; Nell, Nicholas; Kohnert, Richard; Pool, Kelsey; Egan, Arika; Fossati, Luca; Koskinen, Tommi; Vidotto, Aline A.; Hoadley, Keri; Desert, Jean-Michel; Beasley, Matthew; Petit, Pascal M.

    2018-01-01

    The Colorado Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (CUTE) is a near-UV (2550 to 3300 Å) 6U CubeSat mission designed to monitor transiting hot Jupiters to quantify their atmospheric mass loss and magnetic fields. CUTE will probe both atomic (Mg and Fe) and molecular (OH) lines for evidence of enhanced transit absorption, and to search for evidence of early ingress due to bow shocks ahead of the planet's orbital motion. As a dedicated mission, CUTE will observe ≳100 spectroscopic transits of hot Jupiters over a nominal 7-month mission. This represents the equivalent of >700 orbits of the only other instrument capable of these measurements, the Hubble Space Telescope. CUTE efficiently utilizes the available CubeSat volume by means of an innovative optical design to achieve a projected effective area of ˜28 cm2, low instrumental background, and a spectral resolving power of R˜3000 over the primary science bandpass. These performance characteristics enable CUTE to discern transit depths between 0.1% and 1% in individual spectral absorption lines. We present the CUTE optical and mechanical design, a summary of the science motivation and expected results, and an overview of the projected fabrication, calibration, and launch timeline.

  13. Optical Dark-Field and Electron Energy Loss Imaging and Spectroscopy of Symmetry-Forbidden Modes in Loaded Nanogap Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brintlinger, Todd; Herzing, Andrew A; Long, James P; Vurgaftman, Igor; Stroud, Rhonda; Simpkins, B S

    2015-06-23

    We have produced large numbers of hybrid metal-semiconductor nanogap antennas using a scalable electrochemical approach and systematically characterized the spectral and spatial character of their plasmonic modes with optical dark-field scattering, electron energy loss spectroscopy with principal component analysis, and full wave simulations. The coordination of these techniques reveal that these nanostructures support degenerate transverse modes which split due to substrate interactions, a longitudinal mode which scales with antenna length, and a symmetry-forbidden gap-localized transverse mode. This gap-localized transverse mode arises from mode splitting of transverse resonances supported on both antenna arms and is confined to the gap load enabling (i) delivery of substantial energy to the gap material and (ii) the possibility of tuning the antenna resonance via active modulation of the gap material's optical properties. The resonant position of this symmetry-forbidden mode is sensitive to gap size, dielectric strength of the gap material, and is highly suppressed in air-gapped structures which may explain its absence from the literature to date. Understanding the complex modal structure supported on hybrid nanosystems is necessary to enable the multifunctional components many seek.

  14. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Van Boekel

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug.

  15. Charge losses in silicon sensors and electric-field studies at the Si-SiO2 interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Electric fields and charge losses in silicon sensors before and after irradiation with x-rays, protons, neutrons or mixed irradiation are studied in charge-collection measurements. Electron-hole pairs (eh pairs) are generated at different positions in the sensor using sub-ns pulsed laser light of different wavelengths. Light of 1063 nm, 830 nm and 660 nm wavelength is used to generate eh pairs along the whole sensor depth, a few μm below the surface and very close to the surface, respectively. Segmented p + n silicon strip sensors are used to study the electric field below the SiO 2 separating the strip implants. The sensors are investigated before and after irradiation with 12 keV X-rays to a dose of 1 MGy. It is found that the electric field close to the Si-SiO 2 interface depends on both the irradiation dose and the biasing history. For the non-irradiated sensors the observed dependence of the electric field on biasing history and humidity is qualitatively as expected from simulations of the electrostatic potential for different boundary conditions at the surface. Depending on the biasing history incomplete collection of electrons, full charge collection or incomplete collection of holes is observed. After the bias voltage is changed, the amount of observed charge losses is time dependent with time constants being a function of humidity. For the irradiated sensors an increased effective oxide charge density and more electron losses are observed compared to the non-irradiated sensors. Due to positive oxide charges which are always present at the Si-SiO 2 interface an electronaccumulation layer forms, if the oxide charge is not compensated by charges on top of the passivation. If negative charges overcompensate the oxide charge, a hole-accumulation layer forms. In both cases the number of accumulated charges can be temporarily increased by incomplete charge collection of either electrons or holes. How many additional charge carriers can be added to the

  16. Charge losses in silicon sensors and electric-field studies at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    2013-07-15

    Electric fields and charge losses in silicon sensors before and after irradiation with x-rays, protons, neutrons or mixed irradiation are studied in charge-collection measurements. Electron-hole pairs (eh pairs) are generated at different positions in the sensor using sub-ns pulsed laser light of different wavelengths. Light of 1063 nm, 830 nm and 660 nm wavelength is used to generate eh pairs along the whole sensor depth, a few {mu}m below the surface and very close to the surface, respectively. Segmented p{sup +}n silicon strip sensors are used to study the electric field below the SiO{sub 2} separating the strip implants. The sensors are investigated before and after irradiation with 12 keV X-rays to a dose of 1 MGy. It is found that the electric field close to the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface depends on both the irradiation dose and the biasing history. For the non-irradiated sensors the observed dependence of the electric field on biasing history and humidity is qualitatively as expected from simulations of the electrostatic potential for different boundary conditions at the surface. Depending on the biasing history incomplete collection of electrons, full charge collection or incomplete collection of holes is observed. After the bias voltage is changed, the amount of observed charge losses is time dependent with time constants being a function of humidity. For the irradiated sensors an increased effective oxide charge density and more electron losses are observed compared to the non-irradiated sensors. Due to positive oxide charges which are always present at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface an electronaccumulation layer forms, if the oxide charge is not compensated by charges on top of the passivation. If negative charges overcompensate the oxide charge, a hole-accumulation layer forms. In both cases the number of accumulated charges can be temporarily increased by incomplete charge collection of either electrons or holes. How many additional charge carriers can be

  17. Exploring the effects of nitrogen fertilization management alternatives on nitrate loss and crop yields in tile-drained fields in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hanseok; Bhattarai, Rabin

    2018-05-01

    It is vital to manage the excessive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer in corn production, the single largest consumer of N fertilizer in the United States, in order to achieve more sustainable agroecosystems. This study comprehensively explored the effects of N fertilization alternatives on nitrate loss and crop yields using the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) in tile-drained fields in central Illinois. The RZWQM was tested for the prediction of tile flow, nitrate loss, and crop yields using eight years (1993-2000) of observed data and showed satisfactory model performances from statistical and graphical evaluations. Our model simulations demonstrated the maximum return to nitrogen (MRTN) rate (193 kgha -1 ), a newly advised N recommendation by the Illinois Nutrient Loss Reduction Strategy (INLRS), can be further reduced. Nitrate loss was reduced by 10.3% and 29.8%, but corn yields decreased by 0.3% and 1.9% at 156 and 150 kgha -1 of N fertilizer rate in the study sites A and E, respectively. Although adjustment of N fertilization timing presented a further reduction in nitrate loss, there was no optimal timing to ensure nitrate loss reduction and corn productivity. For site A, 100% spring application was the most productive and 40% fall, 10% pre-plant, and 50% side dress application generated the lowest nitrate loss. For site E, the conventional N application timing was verified as the best practice in both corn production and nitrate loss reduction. Compared to surface broadcast placement, injected N fertilizer in spring increased corn yield, but may also escalate nitrate loss. This study presented the need of an adaptive N fertilizer management due to the heterogeneity in agricultural systems, and raised the importance of timing and placement of N fertilizer, as well as further reduction in fertilizer rate to devise a better in-field N management practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset ... 10 percent disabling by VA's rating regulations. About peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of the peripheral ...

  19. The effect of air flow, panel curvature, and internal pressurization on field-incidence transmission loss. [acoustic propagation through aircraft fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    In the context of sound transmission through aircraft fuselage panels, equations for the field-incidence transmission loss (TL) of a single-walled panel are derived that include the effects of external air flow, panel curvature, and internal fuselage pressurization. These effects are incorporated into the classical equations for the TL of single panels, and the resulting double integral for field-incidence TL is numerically evaluated for a specific set of parameters.

  20. Peripheral doses from pediatric IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Maserang, Beth; Wood, Roy; Mansur, David

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral dose (PD) data exist for conventional fields (≥10 cm) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery to standard adult-sized phantoms. Pediatric peripheral dose reports are limited to conventional therapy and are model based. Our goal was to ascertain whether data acquired from full phantom studies and/or pediatric models, with IMRT treatment times, could predict Organ at Risk (OAR) dose for pediatric IMRT. As monitor units (MUs) are greater for IMRT, it is expected IMRT PD will be higher; potentially compounded by decreased patient size (absorption). Baseline slab phantom peripheral dose measurements were conducted for very small field sizes (from 2 to 10 cm). Data were collected at distances ranging from 5 to 72 cm away from the field edges. Collimation was either with the collimating jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC) oriented either perpendicular or along the peripheral dose measurement plane. For the clinical tests, five patients with intracranial or base of skull lesions were chosen. IMRT and conventional three-dimensional (3D) plans for the same patient/target/dose (180 cGy), were optimized without limitation to the number of fields or wedge use. Six MV, 120-leaf MLC Varian axial beams were used. A phantom mimicking a 3-year-old was configured per Center for Disease Control data. Micro (0.125 cc) and cylindrical (0.6 cc) ionization chambers were appropriated for the thyroid, breast, ovaries, and testes. The PD was recorded by electrometers set to the 10 -10 scale. Each system set was uniquely calibrated. For the slab phantom studies, close peripheral points were found to have a higher dose for low energy and larger field size and when MLC was not deployed. For points more distant from the field edge, the PD was higher for high-energy beams. MLC orientation was found to be inconsequential for the small fields tested. The thyroid dose was lower for IMRT delivery than that predicted for conventional (ratio of IMRT/cnventional ranged from

  1. Study of the effects of intensive radiation fields and dis comfortable conditions of labour at the 'Ukrytie' in combination on the peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senyuk, O.F.

    1998-01-01

    It has been found that the personnel of the 'Ukrytie' depending on complex and configuration of work harmfulness (including level of accumulated dose of general exposure) has specific picture of peripheral blood that accounts for presence of adaptive reactions of increased and steady activation type. Taking into consideration that the latter easily transforms into stress one it is necessary to develop undertakings to prevent occurrences and progress of acute and chronic stress reactions in the personnel, especially when at the Object. It has been shown that certain part of the staff is infected with hepatitis C. There are strong grounds to believe that this factor is essentially higher as compared to those infected at the Kiev blood transfusion station

  2. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean's critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  3. Electromagnetic field analyses of two-layer power transmission cables consisting of coated conductors with magnetic and non-magnetic substrates and AC losses in their superconductor layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahata, Masaaki; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic field analyses were undertaken using two representative cross sections of two-layer cables consisting of coated conductors with magnetic and non-magnetic substrates. The following two arrangements were used for the coated conductors between the inner and outer layers: (1) tape-on-tape and (2) alternate. The calculated magnetic flux profile around each coated conductor was visualized. In the case of the non-magnetic substrate, the magnetic field to which coated conductors in the outer layer are exposed contains more perpendicular component to the conductor wide face (perpendicular field component) when compared to that in the inner layer. On the other hand, for the tape-on-tape arrangement of coated conductors with a magnetic substrate, the reverse is true. In the case of the alternate arrangement of the coated conductor with a magnetic substrate, the magnetic field to which the coated conductors in the inner and outer layers are exposed experiences a small perpendicular field component. When using a non-magnetic substrate, the AC loss in the superconductor layer of the coated conductors in the two-layer cables is dominated by that in the outer layer, whereas the reverse is true in the case of a magnetic substrate. When comparing the AC losses in superconductor layers of coated conductors with non-magnetic and magnetic substrates in two-layer cables, the latter is larger than the former, but the influence of the magnetism of substrates on AC losses in superconductor layers is not remarkable

  4. Self-field AC losses and critical currents in multi-tube Ag-Bi-2223 conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciszek, M; Ashworth, S P; Campbell, A M [IRC in Superconductivity, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); James, M P; Glowacki, B A [IRC in Superconductivity, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Garre, R; Conti, S [Centro Ricerche Europa Metalli, Fornaci di Barga, LU (Italy)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of different technological treatments of silver sheathed Bi-2223 tapes on the critical current density and the AC transport losses. The tapes were produced using the 'tube-in-tube' technique, by including a silver rod in the centre of the superconducting powder during packing of the silver tube. The aim of the process is to increase the silver to superconductor surface area and thus also the alignment at the centre of the conductor ceramic core. AC transport losses were measured by means of an electrical method using sinusoidally varying currents in the frequency range 30-180 Hz. In this range the power losses are hysteretic. The measured variation in losses from those predicted by a critical state model is attributed to the complex geometry of superconducting regions existing in these tapes. (author)

  5. Comprehensive management of presbycusis: central and peripheral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Kourosh; Lin, Frank R; Coelho, Daniel H; Sataloff, Robert T; Gates, George A

    2013-04-01

    The prevailing otolaryngologic approach to treatment of age-related hearing loss (ARHL), presbycusis, emphasizes compensation of peripheral functional deficits (ie, hearing aids and cochlear implants). This approach does not address adequately the needs of the geriatric population, 1 in 5 of whom is expected to consist of the "old old" in the coming decades. Aging affects both the peripheral and central auditory systems, and disorders of executive function become more prevalent with advancing age. Growing evidence supports an association between age-related hearing loss and cognitive decline. Thus, to facilitate optimal functional capacity in our geriatric patients, a more comprehensive management strategy of ARHL is needed. Diagnostic evaluation should go beyond standard audiometric testing and include measures of central auditory function, including dichotic tasks and speech-in-noise testing. Treatment should include not only appropriate means of peripheral compensation but also auditory rehabilitative training and counseling.

  6. A new loss mechanism in graphene nanoresonators due to the synthetic electric fields caused by inherent out-of-plane membrane corrugations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsova, N E; Firsov, Yu A

    2012-01-01

    For the first time the influence of out-of-plane deformations, which always exist in graphene, on the non-stationary processes is considered for the case of a monolayer graphene nanoresonator. A new loss mechanism for this device caused by dissipative intra-valley currents stipulated by synthetic electric fields is studied. These fields are generated by time-dependent gauge fields arising in a graphene membrane due to its intrinsic out-of-plane distortions and the influence of the external periodic electromotive force. The corresponding formula for the quality factor has a quantum mechanical origin and includes quantum mechanical parameters. This loss mechanism accounts for an essential part (about 40%) of losses in a graphene nanoresonator and it is specific just for graphene. The ways of minimization of this kind of dissipation (an increase in the quality factor of the electromechanical system) are discussed. It is explained why one can enhance the quality factor by correctly choosing a combination of strains (by strain engineering). In addition, it is shown that the quality factor can be increased by switching on a magnetic field perpendicular to the graphene membrane.

  7. Relationship between the Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer (RNFL parameters and Visual field loss in established glaucoma patients in South Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elangovan Suma, Puri K Sanjeev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Optical coherence tomography (OCT and Scanning LASER polarimetry (GDX-VCC are newer techniques to analyse retinal nerve fibre loss in glaucoma. This study aims to evaluate the relationship between the Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer(RNFL parameters measured using Stratus-OCT and GDx-VCC and visual field loss by Octopus interzeag perimetry in established glaucoma patients in South Indian Population. Materials and methods: Prospectively planned cross sectional study of 67 eyes of 34 established glaucoma patients on medical management. The mean age of patients was 46.911 years (SD+13.531. A complete ophthalmic examination, automated perimetry with octopus interzeag 1-2-3 perimeter, retinal nerve fibre analysis with GDx VCC and Stratus OCT was done. The differences between the mean RNFL parameters in the presence or absence of field defects were evaluated. Results: The data analysed were mean deviation, loss variance, OCT total average nerve fibre thickness, GDX VCC- TSNIT average and Nerve fibre indicator (NFI.The data were split into two subgroups on the basis of presence or absence of visual field defect and analysed. The difference between the mean value of NFI between the subgroups was highly significant with a p value < 0.01.The OCT parameter Total average nerve fiber layer thickness differed significantly between the two subgroups (p value <0.05. The mean GDx TSNIT average did not differ significantly between the two subgroups. Conclusion: The total average nerve fibre thickness by OCT correlated better with visual field loss than the GDX TSNIT average .Among the GDx parameters, the NFI was found to be a better indicator of visual field damage than the average thickness.

  8. Comparison of MHD pressure losses of liquid-lithium flows in coaxial and parallel ducts, passing through strong transverse magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trommer, G.

    1979-08-01

    This report deals with theoretical calculations of MHD pressure losses of liquid-lithium flows in tubes of circular cross-section exposed to strong magnetic fields. Some simplifying assumptions were introduced, yielding an analytical solution which allows the pressure drop and losses in double tubes of coaxial geometry to be compared with those in normal flow pipes. The investigations show that coaxial ducts require much more pumping power than normal ones under similar conditions. This great difference of the properties of the two duct types will decrease if the pipes are embedded in materials of good electrical conductivity. In this case the normal duct will afford a drastic increase in the pressure drop, while the coaxial one will be nearly unaffected. But even under these conditions the losses of the latter will dominate. (orig.)

  9. Effect of ion orbit loss on the structure in the H-mode tokamak edge pedestal profiles of rotation velocity, radial electric field, density, and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of ion orbit loss of thermal ions and the compensating return ion current directly on the radial ion flux flowing in the plasma, and thereby indirectly on the toroidal and poloidal rotation velocity profiles, the radial electric field, density, and temperature profiles, and the interpretation of diffusive and non-diffusive transport coefficients in the plasma edge, is described. Illustrative calculations for a high-confinement H-mode DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] plasma are presented and compared with experimental results. Taking into account, ion orbit loss of thermal ions and the compensating return ion current is found to have a significant effect on the structure of the radial profiles of these quantities in the edge plasma, indicating the necessity of taking ion orbit loss effects into account in interpreting or predicting these quantities

  10. The effects of degeneracy of the carrier ensemble on the energy loss rate and the high field mobility characteristics under the conditions of low lattice temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, A.; Das, B.; Middya, T.R.; Bhattacharya, D.P.

    2017-01-01

    The rate of loss of energy of the non-equilibrium electrons to the acoustic mode lattice vibration in a degenerate semiconductor is obtained under the condition, when the lattice temperature is low enough, so that the traditional approximations like the elastic nature of the electron-phonon collisions and the truncation of the phonon distribution to the equipartition law are not valid any more. Using the results of the energy loss rate, the non-ohmic mobility is then calculated. Evaluating the loss rate and the non-ohmic mobility in degenerate samples of Si and Ge we find that significant changes in both the characteristics have been effected compared to that in the non-degenerate samples, in the regime of lower energy and for relatively lower fields. The effected changes are more significant the lower the lattice temperature is.

  11. Driving with binocular visual field loss? A study on a supervised on-road parcours with simultaneous eye and head tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enkelejda Kasneci

    Full Text Available Post-chiasmal visual pathway lesions and glaucomatous optic neuropathy cause binocular visual field defects (VFDs that may critically interfere with quality of life and driving licensure. The aims of this study were (i to assess the on-road driving performance of patients suffering from binocular visual field loss using a dual-brake vehicle, and (ii to investigate the related compensatory mechanisms. A driving instructor, blinded to the participants' diagnosis, rated the driving performance (passed/failed of ten patients with homonymous visual field defects (HP, including four patients with right (HR and six patients with left homonymous visual field defects (HL, ten glaucoma patients (GP, and twenty age and gender-related ophthalmologically healthy control subjects (C during a 40-minute driving task on a pre-specified public on-road parcours. In order to investigate the subjects' visual exploration ability, eye movements were recorded by means of a mobile eye tracker. Two additional cameras were used to monitor the driving scene and record head and shoulder movements. Thus this study is novel as a quantitative assessment of eye movements and an additional evaluation of head and shoulder was performed. Six out of ten HP and four out of ten GP were rated as fit to drive by the driving instructor, despite their binocular visual field loss. Three out of 20 control subjects failed the on-road assessment. The extent of the visual field defect was of minor importance with regard to the driving performance. The site of the homonymous visual field defect (HVFD critically interfered with the driving ability: all failed HP subjects suffered from left homonymous visual field loss (HL due to right hemispheric lesions. Patients who failed the driving assessment had mainly difficulties with lane keeping and gap judgment ability. Patients who passed the test displayed different exploration patterns than those who failed. Patients who passed focused longer on

  12. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  13. Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Amini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary systemic vasculitis in pre-capillary arteries is associated with peripheral neuropathy. In some types of systematic vasculitis about 60 % of patients have peripheral nervous system (PNS involvement. In vasculitic peripheral neuropathies (VPN a necrotizing and inflammatory process leads to narrowing of vasa nervorum lumen and eventually the appearance of ischemic lesions in peripheral nerves. Some features might be suggestive of VPN, like: axonal nerve degeneration, wallerian-like degeneration, and diameter irregularity of nerve. Peripheral nervous system (PNS destruction during systemic vasculitides should be considered, due to its frequency and early occurrence in vasculitis progression. The first line treatment of non systematic VPNs is corticosteroid agents, but these drugs might worsen the VPNs or systemic vasculitis.

  14. Enhancing the Efficacy of Teacher Incentives through Loss Aversion: A Field Experiment. NBER Working Paper No. 18237

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Roland G., Jr.; Levitt, Steven D.; List, John; Sadoff, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Domestic attempts to use financial incentives for teachers to increase student achievement have been ineffective. In this paper, we demonstrate that exploiting the power of loss aversion--teachers are paid in advance and asked to give back the money if their students do not improve sufficiently--increases math test scores between 0.201 (0.076) and…

  15. The mean energy loss by neutrino with magnetic moment in strong magnetic field with consideration of positronium contribution to photon dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosichkin, A. F.

    2017-11-01

    The process of radiative decay of the neutrino with a magnetic moment in a strong magnetic field with consideration of positronium influence on photon dispersion has been studied. Positronium contribution to the photon polarization operator induces significant modifications of the photon dispersion law and neutrino radiative decay amplitude. It has been shown that the mean energy loss of a neutrino with magnetic a moment significantly increases, when the positronium contribution to photon dispersion is taken into account.

  16. An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

  17. Structure-based capacitance modeling and power loss analysis for the latest high-performance slant field-plate trench MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kenya; Sudo, Masaki; Omura, Ichiro

    2018-04-01

    Field-plate trench MOSFETs (FP-MOSFETs), with the features of ultralow on-resistance and very low gate–drain charge, are currently the mainstream of high-performance applications and their advancement is continuing as low-voltage silicon power devices. However, owing to their structure, their output capacitance (C oss), which leads to main power loss, remains to be a problem, especially in megahertz switching. In this study, we propose a structure-based capacitance model of FP-MOSFETs for calculating power loss easily under various conditions. Appropriate equations were modeled for C oss curves as three divided components. Output charge (Q oss) and stored energy (E oss) that were calculated using the model corresponded well to technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, and we validated the accuracy of the model quantitatively. In the power loss analysis of FP-MOSFETs, turn-off loss was sufficiently suppressed, however, mainly Q oss loss increased depending on switching frequency. This analysis reveals that Q oss may become a significant issue in next-generation high-efficiency FP-MOSFETs.

  18. Electromagnetic ion-cyclotron instability in the presence of a parallel electric field with general loss-cone distribution function - particle aspect analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ahirwar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of parallel electric field on the growth rate, parallel and perpendicular resonant energy and marginal stability of the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC wave with general loss-cone distribution function in a low β homogeneous plasma is investigated by particle aspect approach. The effect of the steepness of the loss-cone distribution is investigated on the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron wave. The whole plasma is considered to consist of resonant and non-resonant particles. It is assumed that resonant particles participate in the energy exchange with the wave, whereas non-resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave. The wave is assumed to propagate parallel to the static magnetic field. The effect of the parallel electric field with the general distribution function is to control the growth rate of the EMIC waves, whereas the effect of steep loss-cone distribution is to enhance the growth rate and perpendicular heating of the ions. This study is relevant to the analysis of ion conics in the presence of an EMIC wave in the auroral acceleration region of the Earth's magnetoplasma.

  19. Low power loss and field-insensitive permeability of Fe-6.5%Si powder cores with manganese oxide-coated particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junnan, E-mail: junnanli1991@163.com, E-mail: rzhgong@hust.edu.cn; Wang, Xian; Xu, Xiaojun; Gong, Rongzhou, E-mail: junnanli1991@163.com, E-mail: rzhgong@hust.edu.cn; Feng, Zekun [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Yajie; Harris, V. G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Fe-6.5%Si alloy powders coated with manganese oxides using an innovative in situ process were investigated. The in-situ coating of the insulating oxides was realized with a KMnO{sub 4} solution by a chemical process. The insulating manganese oxides with mixed valance state were verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The thickness of the insulating layer on alloy particles was determined to be in a range of 20–210 nm, depending upon the KMnO{sub 4} concentration. The powder core loss and the change in permeability under a DC-bias field were measured at frequencies ranging from 50 to 100 kHz. The experiments indicated that the Fe-6.5%Si powder cores with a 210 nm-thick manganese oxide layer not only showed a low core loss of 459 mW/cm{sup 3} at 100 kHz but also showed a small reduction in permeability (μ(H)/μ(0) = 85% for μ = 42) at a DC-bias field of 80 Oe. This work has defined a novel pathway to realizing low core loss and field-insensitive permeability for Fe-Si powder cores.

  20. Peripheral Auditory Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, J; Hubbard, A; Neely, S; Tubis, A

    1986-01-01

    How weIl can we model experimental observations of the peripheral auditory system'? What theoretical predictions can we make that might be tested'? It was with these questions in mind that we organized the 1985 Mechanics of Hearing Workshop, to bring together auditory researchers to compare models with experimental observations. Tbe workshop forum was inspired by the very successful 1983 Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Delft [1]. Boston University was chosen as the site of our meeting because of the Boston area's role as a center for hearing research in this country. We made a special effort at this meeting to attract students from around the world, because without students this field will not progress. Financial support for the workshop was provided in part by grant BNS- 8412878 from the National Science Foundation. Modeling is a traditional strategy in science and plays an important role in the scientific method. Models are the bridge between theory and experiment. Tbey test the assumptions made in experim...

  1. Functional visual fields: relationship of visual field areas to self-reported function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, Hikmat; Latham, Keziah; Myint, Joy; Crossland, Michael D

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to relate areas of the visual field to functional difficulties to inform the development of a binocular visual field assessment that can reflect the functional consequences of visual field loss. Fifty-two participants with peripheral visual field loss undertook binocular assessment of visual fields using the 30-2 and 60-4 SITA Fast programs on the Humphrey Field Analyser, and mean thresholds were derived. Binocular visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and near reading performance were also determined. Self-reported overall and mobility function were assessed using the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory. Greater visual field loss (0-60°) was associated with worse self-reported function both overall (R 2 = 0.50; p function (R 2 = 0.61, p function in multiple regression analyses. Superior and inferior visual field areas related similarly to mobility function (R 2 = 0.56, p function in multiple regression analysis. Mean threshold of the binocular visual field to 60° eccentricity is a good predictor of self-reported function overall, and particularly of mobility function. Both the central (0-30°) and peripheral (30-60°) mean threshold are good predictors of self-reported function, but the peripheral (30-0°) field is a slightly better predictor of mobility function, and should not be ignored when considering functional consequences of field loss. The inferior visual field is a slightly stronger predictor of perceived overall and mobility function than the superior field. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  2. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this page My Cart Donating peripheral blood stem cells Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is a nonsurgical procedure to collect ... Donating bone marrow Donor experiences videos Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is one of two methods of ...

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Utah Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... more slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  4. Investigation of some locally water-soluble natural polymers as circulation loss control agents during oil fields drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Alsabagh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Eliminating or controlling lost circulation during drilling process is costly and time-consuming. Polymers play an important role in mud loss control for their viscosity due to their high molecular weight. In this paper, three natural cellulosic polymers (carboxymethyl cellulose, guar gum and potato starch were investigated as lost circulation control material by measuring different filtration parameters such as; spurt loss, fluid loss and permeability plugging tester value according to the American Petroleum Institute (API standard. The experiments were conducted in a permeability plugging apparatus (PPA at a differential pressure of 100 and 300 psi, using 10, 60 and 90 ceramic discs. From the obtained data, it was found that the 0.1% from the carboxymethyl cellulose exhibited the best results in the filtration parameters among 0.3% guar gum and 0.6% potato starch. At the same time the carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC enhanced the rheological properties of the drilling mud better than the two other used natural polymers in the term of gel strength, thixotropy, plastic and apparent viscosity. These results were discussed in the light of the adsorption and micellar formation.

  5. Drag with external and pressure drop with internal flows: a new and unifying look at losses in the flow field based on the second law of thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herwig, Heinz; Schmandt, Bastian

    2013-01-01

    Internal and external flows are characterized by friction factors and drag coefficients, respectively. Their definitions are based on pressure drop and drag force and thus are very different in character. From a thermodynamics point of view in both cases dissipation occurs which can uniformly be related to the entropy generation in the flow field. Therefore we suggest to account for losses in the flow field by friction factors and drag coefficients that are based on the overall entropy generation due to the dissipation in the internal and external flow fields. This second law analysis (SLA) has been applied to internal flows in many studies already. Examples of this flow category are given together with new cases of external flows, also treated by the general SLA-approach. (paper)

  6. Correlation between local glaucomatous visual field defects and loss of nerve fiber layer thickness measured with polarimetry and spectral domain OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Folkert K; Mardin, Christian Y; Laemmer, Robert; Baleanu, Delia; Juenemann, Anselm M; Kruse, Friedrich E; Tornow, Ralf P

    2009-05-01

    To study the correlation between local perimetric field defects and glaucoma-induced thickness reduction of the nerve layer measured in the peripapillary area with scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SOCT) and to compare the results with those of a theoretical model. The thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer was determined in 32 sectors (11.25 degrees each) by using SLP with variable cornea compensation (GDxVCC; Laser Diagnostics, San Diego, CA) and the newly introduced high-resolution SOCT (Spectralis; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany). Eighty-eight healthy subjects served as control subjects, to determine the thickness deviation in patients with glaucoma. The relationship between glaucomatous nerve fiber reduction and visual field losses was calculated in six nerve fiber bundle-related areas. Sixty-four patients at different stages of open-angle glaucoma and 26 patients with ocular hypertension underwent perimetry (Octopus G1; Haag-Streit, Köniz, Switzerland) and measurements with the two morphometric techniques. Sector-shaped analyses between local perimetric losses and reduction of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness showed a significant association for corresponding areas except for the central visual field in SLP. Correlation coefficients were highest in the area of the nasal inferior visual field (SOCT, -0.81; SLP, -0.57). A linear model describes the association between structural and functional damage. Localized perimetric defects can be explained by reduced nerve fiber layer thickness. The data indicate that the present SOCT is useful for determining the functional-structural relationship in peripapillary areas and that association between perimetric defects and corresponding nerve fiber losses is stronger for SOCT than for the present SLP. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00494923.).

  7. Comparison of Threshold Saccadic Vector Optokinetic Perimetry (SVOP) and Standard Automated Perimetry (SAP) in Glaucoma. Part II: Patterns of Visual Field Loss and Acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTrusty, Alice D; Cameron, Lorraine A; Perperidis, Antonios; Brash, Harry M; Tatham, Andrew J; Agarwal, Pankaj K; Murray, Ian C; Fleck, Brian W; Minns, Robert A

    2017-09-01

    We compared patterns of visual field loss detected by standard automated perimetry (SAP) to saccadic vector optokinetic perimetry (SVOP) and examined patient perceptions of each test. A cross-sectional study was done of 58 healthy subjects and 103 with glaucoma who were tested using SAP and two versions of SVOP (v1 and v2). Visual fields from both devices were categorized by masked graders as: 0, normal; 1, paracentral defect; 2, nasal step; 3, arcuate defect; 4, altitudinal; 5, biarcuate; and 6, end-stage field loss. SVOP and SAP classifications were cross-tabulated. Subjects completed a questionnaire on their opinions of each test. We analyzed 142 (v1) and 111 (v2) SVOP and SAP test pairs. SVOP v2 had a sensitivity of 97.7% and specificity of 77.9% for identifying normal versus abnormal visual fields. SAP and SVOP v2 classifications showed complete agreement in 54% of glaucoma patients, with a further 23% disagreeing by one category. On repeat testing, 86% of SVOP v2 classifications agreed with the previous test, compared to 91% of SAP classifications; 71% of subjects preferred SVOP compared to 20% who preferred SAP. Eye-tracking perimetry can be used to obtain threshold visual field sensitivity values in patients with glaucoma and produce maps of visual field defects, with patterns exhibiting close agreement to SAP. Patients preferred eye-tracking perimetry compared to SAP. This first report of threshold eye tracking perimetry shows good agreement with conventional automated perimetry and provides a benchmark for future iterations.

  8. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oval in shape. Diagnosis A doctor's evaluation Sometimes culture The diagnosis of peripheral ulcerative keratitis is suspected when the doctor sees the affected cornea in a person who also has a severe and/or long- ...

  9. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  10. Promoting peripheral myelin repair

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the ...

  11. Fast phosphorus loss by sediment resuspension in a re-established shallow lake on former agricultural fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Theis; Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Petersen, Kathrine

    2017-01-01

    Lake restoration on fertilized agricultural fields can lead to extensive nutrient release from flooded soils which can maintain a poor ecological quality in the new lake. The period with high sediment release is poorly understood due to few detailed lake restorations studies. We conducted such a ...

  12. Fast phosphorus loss by sediment resuspension in a re-established shallow lake on former agricultural fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Theis; Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Petersen, Kathrine

    2017-01-01

    Lake restoration on fertilized agricultural fields can lead to extensive nutrient release from flooded soils which can maintain a poor ecological quality in the new lake. The period with high sediment release is poorly understood due to few detailed lake restorations studies. We conducted...

  13. Fast pyrobolometers for measurements of plasma heat fluxes and radiation losses in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiksel, G.; Frank, J.; Holly, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of fast bolometers are described for the plasma energy transport study in the Madison Symmetric Torus plasma confinement device. Both types use pyrocrystals of LiTaO 3 or LiNbO 3 as the sensors. One type is used for measurements of the radiated heat losses and is situated at the vacuum shell inner surface. Another type is insertable in the plasma and measures the plasma particle heat flux. The frequency response of the bolometers is measured to be in the 150--200 kHz range. The range of the measured power fluxes is 0.1 W/cm 2 10 kW/cm 2 and can be adjusted by changing the size of the entrance aperture. The lower limit is determined by the amplifier noise and the frequency bandwidth, the higher limit by destruction of the bolometer sensor

  14. GENERAL P, TYPE-I S, AND TYPE-II S WAVES IN ANELASTIC SOLIDS; INHOMOGENEOUS WAVE FIELDS IN LOW-LOSS SOLIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Wennerberg, Leif

    1985-01-01

    The physical characteristics for general plane-wave radiation fields in an arbitrary linear viscoelastic solid are derived. Expressions for the characteristics of inhomogeneous wave fields, derived in terms of those for homogeneous fields, are utilized to specify the characteristics and a set of reference curves for general P and S wave fields in arbitrary viscoelastic solids as a function of wave inhomogeneity and intrinsic material absorption. The expressions show that an increase in inhomogeneity of the wave fields cause the velocity to decrease, the fractional-energy loss (Q** minus **1) to increase, the deviation of maximum energy flow with respect to phase propagation to increase, and the elliptical particle motions for P and type-I S waves to approach circularity. Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous type-I S waves is shown to be greater than that for type-II S waves, with the deviation first increasing then decreasing with inhomogeneity. The mean energy densities (kinetic, potential, and total), the mean rate of energy dissipation, the mean energy flux, and Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous waves are shown to be greater than corresponding characteristics for homogeneous waves, with the deviations increasing as the inhomogeneity is increased for waves of fixed maximum displacement amplitude.

  15. [Refractory CD20-positive peripheral T-cell lymphoma showing loss of CD20 expression after rituximab therapy and gain of CD20 expression after administration of vorinostat and gemcitabine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Kazuaki; Ohyagi, Hideaki; Kume, Masaaki; Takahashi, Satsuki; Saito, Masahiro; Takahashi, Naoto

    A 79-year-old male patient presented with systemic lymphadenopathy. A lymph node biopsy revealed effacement of the normal nodal architecture with diffuse proliferation of medium-sized atypical lymphoid cells. Southern blot analyses demonstrated rearrangement of the T-cell receptor gene but not the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene. He was diagnosed with CD20-positive peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), NOS. Although he achieved partial remission after six cycles of R-CHOP, he relapse occurred after 2 months. CD20-negative conversion was confirmed in the lymph node, which was positive for CCR4, and the skin at the time of relapse. The patient received the GDP regimen as salvage therapy with the addition of vorinostat for skin involvement; however, he failed to respond, and the disease systemically progressed. Furthermore, he also exhibited progression in the skin after stopping vorinostat due to hematologic toxicity. A lymph node biopsy at progression revealed CD20 re-expression by immunohistochemistry. At progression, the patient received mogamulizumab but failed to respond, and he died owing to disease progression 8 months after relapse. In this case, we demonstrated CD20-negative conversion following rituximab and CD20-positive reversion after using vorinostat and gemcitabine.

  16. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG. EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG. Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them.

  17. Aerobic Exercise Increases Peripheral and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Gert-Jan; Toffolo, Gianna; Manesso, Erica; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Data are limited on the effects of controlled aerobic exercise programs (without weight loss) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in children and adolescents. Objective: To determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves peripheral and

  18. Comparison of AC losses, magnetic field/current distributions and critical currents of superconducting circular pancake coils and infinitely long stacks using coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Weijia; Campbell, A M; Hong, Z; Ainslie, M D; Coombs, T A, E-mail: wy215@cam.ac.u [Electronic, Power and Energy Conversion Group, Electrical Engineering Division, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    A model is presented for calculating the AC losses, magnetic field/current density distribution and critical currents of a circular superconducting pancake coil. The assumption is that the magnetic flux lines will lie parallel to the wide faces of tapes in the unpenetrated area of the coil. Instead of using an infinitely long stack to approximate the circular coil, this paper gives an exact circular coil model using elliptic integrals. A new efficient numerical method is introduced to yield more accurate and fast computation. The computation results are in good agreement with the assumptions. For a small value of the coil radius, there is an asymmetry along the coil radius direction. As the coil radius increases, this asymmetry will gradually decrease, and the AC losses and penetration depth will increase, but the critical current will decrease. We find that if the internal radius is equal to the winding thickness, the infinitely long stack approximation overestimates the loss by 10% and even if the internal radius is reduced to zero, the error is still only 60%. The infinitely long stack approximation is therefore adequate for most practical purposes. In addition, the comparison result shows that the infinitely long stack approximation saves computation time significantly.

  19. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  20. Effect of buffer strips and soil texture on runoff losses of flufenacet and isoxaflutole from maize fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Marco; Ferrero, Aldo; Letey, Marilisa; De Palo, Fernando; Vidotto, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The influence of buffer strips and soil texture on runoff of flufenacet and isoxaflutole was studied for two years in Northern Italy. The efficacy of buffer strips was evaluated on six plots characterized by different soil textures; two plots had Riva soil (18.6% sand, 63.1% silt, 18.3% clay) while the remaining four plots had Tetto Frati (TF) soil (37.1% sand, 57% silt, 5.9% clay). Additionally, the width of the buffer strips, constituted of spontaneous vegetation grown after crop sowing, was also compared for their ability to abate runoff waters. Chemical residues in water following runoff events were investigated, as well as their dissipation in the soil. After the first runoff events, concentrations of herbicides in water samples collected from Riva plots were as much as four times lower in waters from TF plots. On average of two growing seasons, the field half-life of flufenacet in the upper soil layer (5 cm) ranged between 8.1 and 12.8 days in Riva soil, 8.5 and 9.3 days in TF soil. Isoxaflutole field half-life was less than 1 day. The buffer strip was very affective by the uniformity of the vegetative cover, particularly, at the beginning of the season. In TF plots, concentration differences were generally due to the presence or absence of the buffer strip, regardless of its width.

  1. Reduction of soil erosion and mercury losses in agroforestry systems compared to forests and cultivated fields in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béliveau, Annie; Lucotte, Marc; Davidson, Robert; Paquet, Serge; Mertens, Frédéric; Passos, Carlos J; Romana, Christine A

    2017-12-01

    In addition to causing physical degradation and nutrient depletion, erosion of cultivated soils in the Amazon affects aquatic ecosystems through the release of natural soil mercury (Hg) towards lakes and rivers. While traditional agriculture is generally cited as being among the main causes of soil erosion, agroforestry practices are increasingly appreciated for soil conservation. This study was carried out in family farms of the rural Tapajós region (Brazil) and aimed at evaluating soil erosion and associated Hg release for three land uses. Soils, runoff water and eroded sediments were collected at three sites representing a land cover gradient: a recently burnt short-cycle cropping system (SCC), a 2-year-old agroforestry system (AFS) and a mature forest (F). At each site, two PVC soil erosion plots (each composed of three 2 × 5 m isolated subplots) were implemented on steep and moderate slopes respectively. Sampling was done after each of the 20 rain events that occurred during a 1-month study period, in the peak of the 2011 rain season. Runoff volume and rate, as well as eroded soil particles with their Hg and cation concentrations were determined. Total Hg and cation losses were then calculated for each subplot. Erosion processes were dominated by land use type over rainfall or soil slope. Eroded soil particles, as well as the amount of Hg and cations (CaMgK) mobilized at the AFS site were similar to those at the F site, but significantly lower than those at the SCC site (p agroforestry systems, even in their early stages of implementation, are characterized by low erosion levels resembling those of local forest environments, thus contributing to the maintenance of soil integrity and to the reduction of Hg and nutrient mobility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Development of Peripheral Vision in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guez, Jean R.

    This study investigated the extent of infant peripheral vision, specifically the extent of infants' constricted field, or tunnel vision. Thirteen infants, 2 to 5 months old, were tested using a psychophysical procedure to obtain contrast sensitivity thresholds at four retinal loci (-40, -15, +15, +40 deg.). Infants were placed in an infant bed in…

  3. Long term dynamics of nitrate concentrations and leaching losses in tile drainage water from cultivated clayey till at field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Vibeke; Olsen, Preben; Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    of application). Furthermore, the standard climatic conditions (e.g. temperature, precipitation) as well as soil moisture and temperature to a depth of approx. 2 meter were measured. Concentrations of nitrate in the drainage and groundwater, recharge of water through the drainage system as well as depth......Since 1985, several political agreements have been adopted to protect the aquatic environment and nature in Denmark. The farmers have repeatedly been ordered to reduce the consumption of nitrogen in their agricultural production. The reductions have been imposed nation-wide regardless of e.......g. climate, soil type and local hydraulic conditions. By the end of 2013, the Danish Commission of Nature and Agriculture issued a report which recommend that for the future protection of surface nitrogen regulations should be locally adapted, and if possible, at the level of field scale. This kind...

  4. A Small Disc Area Is a Risk Factor for Visual Field Loss Progression in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Yasushi; Tanito, Masaki; Yokoyama, Yu; Nitta, Koji; Katai, Maki; Omodaka, Kazuko; Nakazawa, Toru

    2018-01-01

    The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study, a cross-sectional multicenter collaborative study, used a stereo fundus camera (nonmyd WX) to assess various morphological parameters of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucoma patients. We compared the associations of each parameter between the visual field loss progression group and no-progression group. The study included 187 eyes of 187 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or normal-tension glaucoma. We divided the mean deviation (MD) slope values of all patients into the progression group (field progression and patient characteristics or each ONH parameter were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. The MD slope averages in the progression group and no-progression group were -0.58 ± 0.28 dB/year and 0.05 ± 0.26 dB/year, respectively. Among disc parameters, vertical disc width (diameter), disc area, cup area, and cup volume in the progression group were significantly less than those in the no-progression group. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between the visual field progression and disc area (odds ratio 0.49/mm 2 disc area). A smaller disc area may be associated with more rapid glaucomatous visual field progression.

  5. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  6. Peripheral neuropathy in HIV: prevalence and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Scott R.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Chen, Huichao; Yeh, Tzu-min; Lee, Anthony J.; Schifitto, Giovanni; Wu, Kunling; Bosch, Ronald J.; McArthur, Justin C.; Simpson, David M.; Clifford, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate neuropathic sign/symptom rates with initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV-infected ART-naive patients, and to investigate risk factors for: peripheral neuropathy and symptomatic peripheral neuropathy (SPN), recovery from peripheral neuropathy/SPN after neurotoxic ART (nART) discontinuation, and the absence of peripheral neuropathy/SPN while on nART. Design AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trial participants who initiated cART in randomized trials for ART-naive patients were annually screened for symptoms/signs of peripheral neuropathy. ART use and disease characteristics were collected longitudinally. Methods Peripheral neuropathy was defined as at least mild loss of vibration sensation in both great toes or absent/hypoactive ankle reflexes bilaterally. SPN was defined as peripheral neuropathy and bilateral symptoms. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression was used to estimate associations. Results Two thousand, one hundred and forty-one participants were followed from January 2000 to June 2007. Rates of peripheral neuropathy/SPN at 3 years were 32.1/8.6% despite 87.1% with HIV-1RNA 400 copies/ml or less and 70.3% with CD4 greater than 350 cells/µl. Associations with higher odds of peripheral neuropathy included older patient age and current nART use. Associations with higher odds of SPN included older patient age, nART use, and history of diabetes mellitus. Associations with lower odds of recovery after nART discontinuation included older patient age. Associations with higher odds of peripheral neuropathy while on nART included older patient age and current protease inhibitor use. Associations with higher odds of SPN while on nART included older patient age, history of diabetes, taller height, and protease inhibitor use. Conclusion Signs of peripheral neuropathy remain despite virologic/immunologic control but frequently occurs without symptoms. Aging is a risk factor for

  7. Injectable systems and implantable conduits for peripheral nerve repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yen-Chih; Marra, Kacey G

    2012-01-01

    Acute sensory problems following peripheral nerve injury include pain and loss of sensation. Approximately 360 000 people in the United States suffer from upper extremity paralytic syndromes every year. Restoration of sufficient functional recovery after long-gap peripheral nerve damage remains a clinical challenge. Potential nerve repair therapies have increased in the past decade as the field of tissue engineering expands. The following review describes the use of biomaterials in nerve tissue engineering. Namely, the use of both synthetic and natural biomaterials, including non-degradable and degradable nerve grafts, is addressed. The enhancement of axonal regeneration can be achieved by further modification of the nerve guides. These approaches include injectable hydrogel fillers, controlled drug delivery systems, and cell incorporation. Hydrogels are a class of liquid–gel biomaterials with high water content. Injectable and gelling hydrogels can serve as growth factor delivery vehicles and cell carriers for tissue engineering applications. While natural hydrogels and polymers are suitable for short gap nerve repair, the use of polymers for relatively long gaps remains a clinical challenge. (paper)

  8. Hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decreased hearing; Deafness; Loss of hearing; Conductive hearing loss; Sensorineural hearing loss; Presbycusis ... Symptoms of hearing loss may include: Certain sounds seeming too loud Difficulty following conversations when two or more people are talking ...

  9. Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure High blood cholesterol Coronary heart disease Stroke Metabolic syndrome Screening and Prevention Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) and its complications. Know your family history of health problems related to P.A. ...

  10. Promoting peripheral myelin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the target of myelin repair strategies in acute injuries and chronic diseases, such as hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. In one approach, the endogenous regenerative capacity of Schwann cells is enhanced through interventions such as exercise, electrical stimulation or pharmacological means. Alternatively, Schwann cells derived from healthy nerves, or engineered from different tissue sources have been transplanted into the PNS to support remyelination. These transplant approaches can then be further enhanced by exercise and/or electrical stimulation, as well as by the inclusion of biomaterial engineered to support glial cell viability and neurite extension. Advances in our basic understanding of peripheral nerve biology, as well as biomaterial engineering, will further improve the functional repair of myelinated peripheral nerves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reducing loss in lateral charged-particle equilibrium due to air cavities present in x-ray irradiated media by using longitudinal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, Shahid A.; Li, X. Allen; Ramahi, Shada W.; Chu, James C.; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2001-01-01

    The underdosing of lesions distal to air cavities, such as those found in upper respiratory passages, occurs due to the loss in lateral charged-particle equilibrium (CPE). The degree of underdosing worsens for smaller field sizes, resulting in more frequent recurrence of the cancer treated. Higher photon energies further aggravate the outcome by producing longer second build-up regions beyond the cavity. Besides underdosing, the larger lateral spread of secondary electron fluence in the air cavity produces diffuse dose distributions at the tissue-air interface for shaped or intensity modulated fields. These disequilibrium effects create undesirable deviations from the intended treatment. The clinical concern is further intensified by the failure of traditional treatment planning systems to even account for such defects. In this work, the use of longitudinal magnetic fields on the order of 0.5 T is proposed for alleviating lateral electronic disequilibrium due to the presence of air cavities in the irradiated volume. The magnetic field enforces lateral CPE by restricting the lateral range of electrons in the air cavity. The problem is studied in a simple water-air-water slab geometry using EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations for 6 MV photons. Electronic disequilibrium is evaluated for beams of various sizes, shapes and intensity distributions constructed by linear superposition of the dose distributions for 0.5x0.5 cm 2 beamlets. Comparison is also made with 60 Co irradiation. The results indicate that the lateral confinement of secondary electrons in the air cavity by sub-MRI strength longitudinal fields is effective in reducing deterioration of dose distributions near tissue-air interfaces. This can potentially reduce recurrence rates of cancers such as the larynx carcinoma

  12. Peripheral dose outside applicators in electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, James C L; Grigorov, Grigor N

    2006-01-01

    The peripheral dose outside the applicators in electron beams was studied using a Varian 21 EX linear accelerator. To measure the peripheral dose profiles and point doses for the applicator, a solid water phantom was used with calibrated Kodak TL films. Peak dose spot was observed in the 4 MeV beam outside the applicator. The peripheral dose peak was very small in the 6 MeV beam and was ignorable at higher energies. Using the 10 x 10 cm 2 cutout and applicator, the dose peak for the 4 MeV beam was about 12 cm away from the field central beam axis (CAX) and the peripheral dose profiles did not change with depths measured at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 cm. The peripheral doses and profiles were further measured by varying the angle of obliquity, cutout and applicator size for the 4 MeV beam. The local peak dose was increased with about 3% per degree angle of obliquity, and was about 1% of the prescribed dose (angle of obliquity equals zero) at 1 cm depth in the phantom using the 10 x 10 cm 2 cutout and applicator. The peak dose position was also shifted 7 mm towards the CAX when the angle of obliquity was increased from 0 to 15 deg. (note)

  13. Peripheral iridotomy for pigmentary glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelessi, Manuele; Lindsley, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell death resulting in damage to the optic nerve head and the retinal nerve fiber layer. Pigment dispersion syndrome is characterized by a structural disturbance in the iris pigment epithelium (the densely pigmented posterior surface of the iris) that leads to dispersion of the pigment and its deposition on various structures within the eye. Pigmentary glaucoma is a specific form of open-angle glaucoma found in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. Topcial medical therapy is usually the first-line treatment; however, peripheral laser iridotomy has been proposed as an alternate treatment. Peripheral laser iridotomy involves creating an opening in the iris tissue to allow drainage of fluid from the posterior chamber to the anterior chamber and vice versa. Equalizing the pressure within the eye may help to alleviate the friction that leads to pigment dispersion and prevent visual field deterioration. However, the effectiveness of peripheral laser iridotomy in reducing the development or progression of pigmentary glaucoma is unknown. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of peripheral laser iridotomy compared with other interventions, including medication, trabeculoplasty, and trabeculectomy, or no treatment, for pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Search methods We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE and clinical trials websites such as (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov. We last searched the electronic databases on 2 November 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that had compared peripheral laser iridotomy versus no treatment or other treatments for pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures for systematic reviews. Two review authors independently screened articles for eligibility

  14. A Small Disc Area Is a Risk Factor for Visual Field Loss Progression in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Kitaoka

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The Glaucoma Stereo Analysis Study, a cross-sectional multicenter collaborative study, used a stereo fundus camera (nonmyd WX to assess various morphological parameters of the optic nerve head (ONH in glaucoma patients. We compared the associations of each parameter between the visual field loss progression group and no-progression group. Methods. The study included 187 eyes of 187 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or normal-tension glaucoma. We divided the mean deviation (MD slope values of all patients into the progression group (<−0.3 dB/year and no-progression group (≧−0.3 dB/year. ONH morphological parameters were calculated with prototype analysis software. The correlations between glaucomatous visual field progression and patient characteristics or each ONH parameter were analyzed with Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results. The MD slope averages in the progression group and no-progression group were −0.58 ± 0.28 dB/year and 0.05 ± 0.26 dB/year, respectively. Among disc parameters, vertical disc width (diameter, disc area, cup area, and cup volume in the progression group were significantly less than those in the no-progression group. Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between the visual field progression and disc area (odds ratio 0.49/mm2 disc area. Conclusion. A smaller disc area may be associated with more rapid glaucomatous visual field progression.

  15. Peripheral orbit model

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, Yasuo

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral orbit model, in which an incoming hadron is assumed to revolve in a peripheral orbit around a target hadron, is discussed. The non-diffractive parts of two-body reaction amplitudes of hadrons are expressed in terms of the radius, width an absorptivity of the orbit. The radius of the orbit is about 1 fm and the width of the orbit is determined by the range of the interaction between the hadrons. The model reproduces all available experimental data on differential cross-sections and polarizations of $K^{-}p\\to K^{-}p$ and $\\bar K^{\\circ}n$ reactions for all angles successfully. This contribution is not included in the proceedings since it will appear in Progress of Theoretical Physics Vol. 51 (1974) No 2. Any person interested in the subject may apply for reprints to the author.

  16. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  17. Pregnancy Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy loss Pregnancy loss is a harsh reality faced ... have successful pregnancies. Expand all | Collapse all Why pregnancy loss happens As many as 10 to 15 ...

  18. Mast cell degranulation breaks peripheral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, V C; Wasiuk, A; Bennett, K A; Benson, M J; Elgueta, R; Waldschmidt, T J; Noelle, R J

    2009-10-01

    Mast cells (MC) have been shown to mediate regulatory T-cell (T(reg))-dependent, peripheral allograft tolerance in both skin and cardiac transplants. Furthermore, T(reg) have been implicated in mitigating IgE-mediated MC degranulation, establishing a dynamic, reciprocal relationship between MC and T(reg) in controlling inflammation. In an allograft tolerance model, it is now shown that intragraft or systemic MC degranulation results in the transient loss of T(reg) suppressor activities with the acute, T-cell dependent rejection of established, tolerant allografts. Upon degranulation, MC mediators can be found in the skin, T(reg) rapidly leave the graft, MC accumulate in the regional lymph node and the T(reg) are impaired in the expression of suppressor molecules. Such a dramatic reversal of T(reg) function and tissue distribution by MC degranulation underscores how allergy may causes the transient breakdown of peripheral tolerance and episodes of acute T-cell inflammation.

  19. Reciprocal effects of treatment-induced increases in exercise and improved eating, and their psychosocial correlates, in obese adults seeking weight loss: a field-based trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A better understanding of interrelations of exercise and improved eating, and their psychosocial correlates of self-efficacy, mood, and self-regulation, may be useful for the architecture of improved weight loss treatments. Theory-based research within field settings, with samples possessing high probabilities of health risks, might enable rapid application of useful findings. Methods Adult volunteers with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] 35–50 kg/m2; age = 43.0 ± 9.5 y; 83% female) were randomly assigned to six monthly cognitive-behavioral exercise support sessions paired with either group-based nutrition education (n = 145) or cognitive behavioral methods applied to improved eating (n = 149). After specification of mediation models using a bias-corrected bootstrapping procedure, a series of reciprocal effects analyses assessed: a) the reciprocal effects of changes in exercise and fruit and vegetable intake, resulting from the treatments, b) the reciprocal effects of changes in the three psychosocial variables tested (i.e. self-efficacy, mood, and self-regulation) and fruit and vegetable change, resulting from change in exercise volume, and c) the reciprocal effects of changes in the three psychosocial variables and exercise change, resulting from change in fruit and vegetable intake. Results Mediation analyses suggested a reciprocal effect between changes in exercise volume and fruit and vegetable intake. After inclusion of psychosocial variables, also found were reciprocal effects between change in fruit and vegetable intake and change in mood, self-efficacy for controlled eating, and self-regulation for eating; and change in exercise volume and change in mood and exercise-related self-regulation. Conclusion Findings had implications for behavioral weight-loss theory and treatment. Specifically, results suggested that treatments should focus upon, and leverage, the transfer effects from each of the primary weight-loss

  20. Daspsone Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Sarojini

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24 year old lady being treated with 300 mg of dapsone daily for dermatitits herpetiformis, developed weakness and wasting of muscles of feet with claw hand deformity and t drop, 2 months tater. Neurological examination and nerve conduction studies conformed the presence of a peripheral motor neuropathy. Dapsone was discontinued and the patient was treated with cotrimatoxazole, gluten-free diet and supportive therapy. This satisfactorily controlled the dermatological lesion without adversely affecting the resolution of her neuropthy. Symptomatic improvement reported by the patient was confirmed by EMG and nerve conduction studies.

  1. Peripheral ossifying fibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameet Mani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF is an exophytic gingival mass of fibrous connective tissue covered with a surface epithelium associated with the formation of randomly dispersed foci of a mineralized product consisting of bone, cementum-like tissue, or dystrophic calcifications having a recurrent rate of nearly 20%. It is one of the most common reactive gingival lesions, which have often been called by the generic term "epulis." This case report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of POF, its differential diagnosis, and treatment.

  2. Auditory attention activates peripheral visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D Cate

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent neuroimaging studies have revealed that putatively unimodal regions of visual cortex can be activated during auditory tasks in sighted as well as in blind subjects. However, the task determinants and functional significance of auditory occipital activations (AOAs remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined AOAs in an intermodal selective attention task to distinguish whether they were stimulus-bound or recruited by higher-level cognitive operations associated with auditory attention. Cortical surface mapping showed that auditory occipital activations were localized to retinotopic visual cortex subserving the far peripheral visual field. AOAs depended strictly on the sustained engagement of auditory attention and were enhanced in more difficult listening conditions. In contrast, unattended sounds produced no AOAs regardless of their intensity, spatial location, or frequency. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Auditory attention, but not passive exposure to sounds, routinely activated peripheral regions of visual cortex when subjects attended to sound sources outside the visual field. Functional connections between auditory cortex and visual cortex subserving the peripheral visual field appear to underlie the generation of AOAs, which may reflect the priming of visual regions to process soon-to-appear objects associated with unseen sound sources.

  3. Excitation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves by energetic electrons with a loss cone distribution in a field-aligned potential drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    1994-01-01

    The electron cyclotron maser instability (CMI) driven by momentum space anisotropy (df/dp (sub perpendicular) greater than 0) has been invoked to explain many aspects, such as the modes of propagation, harmonic emissions, and the source characteristics of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). Recent satellite observations of AKR sources indicate that the source regions are often imbedded within the auroral acceleration region characterized by the presence of a field-aligned potential drop. In this paper we investigate the excitation of the fundamental extraordinary mode radiation due to the accelerated electrons. The momentum space distribution of these energetic electrons is modeled by a realistic upward loss cone as modified by the presence of a parallel potential drop below the observation point. On the basis of linear growth rate calculations we present the emission characteristics, such as the frequency spectrum and the emission angular distribution as functions of the plasma parameters. We will discuss the implication of our results on the generation of the AKR from the edges of the auroral density cavities.

  4. Peripheral neuropathy of dietary riboflavin deficiency in racing pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y; Kondo, H; Itakura, C

    1996-02-01

    An occurrence of peripheral neuropathy in nine 14- to 55-day-old racing pigeons was documented. The predominant clinical signs were diarrhea, and leg and wing paralysis. Grossly, there was discoloration and swelling of all the peripheral nerve trunks. Microscopic lesions comprising swelling, fragmentation and demyelination of myelin sheaths, and proliferation of Schwann cells, were seen in the peripheral nerves of all birds examined. These changes were associated with moderate to severe swelling, fragmentation, atrophy and loss of axons. The peripheral nerve lesions in these cases were similar to those of dietary riboflavin deficiency in chickens. An analysis of the diet given to the pigeons indicated that the riboflavin concentration was only 0.9 mg/kg feed.

  5. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical...... substance used in the treatment, cure, prevention or diagnosis of a disease. Optic neuropathy is included in this definition. A distinction between DIPN and other aetiologies of peripheral neuropathy is often quite difficult and thus, the aim of this MiniReview is to discuss the major agents associated...

  6. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  7. Case of Unilateral Peripheral Cone Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Mochizuki

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Peripheral cone dystrophy is a subgroup of cone dystrophy, and only 4 cases have been reported. We present a patient with unilateral peripheral cone dysfunction and report the functional changes determined by electrophysiological tests and ultrastructural changes determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Case: A 34-year-old woman complained of blurred vision in both eyes. Our examination showed that her visual acuity was 0.05 OD and 0.2 OS. A relative afferent pupillary defect was present in her right eye. The results of slit-lamp examination, ophthalmoscopy, and fluorescein angiography were normal except for pallor of the right optic disc. SD-OCT showed a diffuse thinning of the retina in the posterior pole of the right eye. A severe constriction of the visual fields was found in both eyes but more in the right eye. The photopic full-field electroretinograms (ERGs were reduced in the right eye but normal in the left eye. The multifocal ERGs were severely reduced throughout the visual field except in the central area of the right eye. The multifocal ERGs from the left eye were normal. The pattern visual evoked responses were within the normal range in both eyes. She had a 5-year history of sniffing paint thinner. Results: Although the visual dysfunction was initially suspected to be due to psychological problems from the results of subjective tests, objective tests indicated a peripheral cone dysfunction in the right eye. The pathophysiological mechanism and the relationship with thinner sniffing were not determined. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that peripheral cone dysfunction can occur unilaterally. Electrophysiology and SD-OCT are valuable tests to perform to determine the pathogenesis of unusual ocular findings objectively.

  8. Effects of Hypotensive Anesthesia on Reducing Intraoperative Blood Loss, Duration of Operation, and Quality of Surgical Field During Orthognathic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Susie; McKenna, Samuel J; Yao, Chuan-Fong; Chen, Yu-Ray; Chen, Chit

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of hypotensive anesthesia in reducing intraoperative blood loss, decreasing operation time, and improving the quality of the surgical field during orthognathic surgery. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials addressing these issues were carried out. An electronic database search was performed. The risk of bias was evaluated with the Jadad Scale and Delphi List. The inverse variance statistical method and a random-effects model were used. Ten randomized controlled trials were included for analysis. Our meta-analysis indicated that hypotensive anesthesia reduced intraoperative blood loss by a mean of about 169 mL. Hypotensive anesthesia was not shown to reduce the operation time for orthognathic surgery, but it did improve the quality of the surgical field. Subgroup analysis indicated that for blood loss in double-jaw surgery, the weighted mean difference favored the hypotensive group, with a reduction in blood loss of 175 mL, but no statistically significant reduction in blood loss was found for anterior maxillary osteotomy. If local anesthesia with epinephrine was used in conjunction with hypotensive anesthesia, the reduction in intraoperative blood loss was increased to 254.93 mL. Hypotensive anesthesia was effective in reducing blood loss and improving the quality of the surgical field, but it did not reduce the operation time for orthognathic surgery. The use of local anesthesia in conjunction with hypotensive general anesthesia further reduced the amount of intraoperative blood loss for orthognathic surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Odontogenic keratocyst: a peripheral variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, H; Vij, R; Gupta, V; Sengupta, S

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst, which is developmental in nature, is an intraosseous lesion though on rare occasions it may occur in an extraosseous location. The extraosseous variant is referred to as peripheral odontogenic keratocyst. Though, clinically, peripheral odontogenic keratocyst resembles the gingival cyst of adults, it has histologic features that are pathognomonic of odontogenic keratocyst. This article presents a case of this uncommon entity.

  10. Stage of visual field loss and age at diagnosis in 1988 patients with different glaucomas: implications for glaucoma screening and driving ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramer, Gwendolyn; Gramer, Eugen

    2018-04-01

    To compare stage of visual field loss (VFL) and age at diagnosis between patients with different types of glaucoma with regard to glaucoma screening and driving ability. In a cross-sectional study of 1988 consecutive patients with different types of glaucoma VFL at diagnosis and age at diagnosis were assessed. Patients with binocular advanced or severe VFL were classified unable, patients with no VFL in one eye and VFL I-V (Aulhorn classification) in the other eye able, all other constellations questionably able to drive. There were significant differences in age at diagnosis between different glaucomas and between patients with different stages of VFL at diagnosis. Age-related assessment of VFL at diagnosis in normal tension glaucoma (NTG) compared to primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) showed that NTG is not a disease of the elderly but a disease with late diagnosis at severe VFL. In POAG a solely age-related glaucoma screening, e.g. from the age of 50 years, does not sufficiently lead to diagnosis at an early stage of the disease. In POAG solely based on binocular VFL 11.5% of patients were judged unable, 29.2% questionably able to drive, in NTG 19.6%/43.1%, pigmentary glaucoma 16%/22%, pseudoexfoliation glaucoma 9.1%/16.7%, and in primary angle-closure glaucoma 14.6%/30%. Depending on type of glaucoma more than 50% of patients require counselling regarding safe driving as part of clinical care. A disease-specific, age-related perimetric examination considering additional risk factors like family history of glaucoma is essential for early detection of glaucoma and road safety.

  11. Peripheral refraction in normal infant rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Huang, Juan; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Smith, Earl L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize peripheral refractions in infant monkeys. Methods Cross-sectional data for horizontal refractions were obtained from 58 normal rhesus monkeys at 3 weeks of age. Longitudinal data were obtained for both the vertical and horizontal meridians from 17 monkeys. Refractive errors were measured by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at eccentricities of 15, 30, and 45 degrees. Axial dimensions and corneal power were measured by ultrasonography and keratometry, respectively. Results In infant monkeys, the degree of radial astigmatism increased symmetrically with eccentricity in all meridians. There were, however, initial nasal-temporal and superior-inferior asymmetries in the spherical-equivalent refractive errors. Specifically, the refractions in the temporal and superior fields were similar to the central ametropia, but the refractions in the nasal and inferior fields were more myopic than the central ametropia and the relative nasal field myopia increased with the degree of central hyperopia. With age, the degree of radial astigmatism decreased in all meridians and the refractions became more symmetrical along both the horizontal and vertical meridians; small degrees of relative myopia were evident in all fields. Conclusions As in adult humans, refractive error varied as a function of eccentricity in infant monkeys and the pattern of peripheral refraction varied with the central refractive error. With age, emmetropization occurred for both central and peripheral refractive errors resulting in similar refractions across the central 45 degrees of the visual field, which may reflect the actions of vision-dependent, growth-control mechanisms operating over a wide area of the posterior globe. PMID:18487366

  12. The role of peripheral vision in saccade planning: learning from people with tunnel vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Vargas-Martin, Fernando; Peli, Eli

    2008-12-22

    Both visually salient and top-down information are important in eye movement control, but their relative roles in the planning of daily saccades are unclear. We investigated the effect of peripheral vision loss on saccadic behaviors in patients with tunnel vision (visual field diameters 7 degrees-16 degrees) in visual search and real-world walking experiments. The patients made up to two saccades per second to their pre-saccadic blind areas, about half of which had no overlap between the post- and pre-saccadic views. In the visual search experiment, visual field size and the background (blank or picture) did not affect the saccade sizes and direction of patients (n = 9). In the walking experiment, the patients (n = 5) and normal controls (n = 3) had similar distributions of saccade sizes and directions. These findings might provide a clue about the large extent of the top-down mechanism influence on eye movement control.

  13. The groningen longitudinal glaucoma study III. The predictive value of frequency-doubling perimetry and GDx nerve fibre analyser test results for the development of glaucomatous visual field loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, G. P.; Jansonius, N. M.

    Purpose To investigate whether frequency-doubling perimetry (FDT) and nerve fibre analyser (GDx) test results are able to predict glaucomatous visual field loss in glaucoma suspect patients. Methods A large cohort of glaucoma suspect patients (patients with ocular hypertension or a positive family

  14. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy

  15. Advances in potential formation and findings in sheared radial electric-field effects on turbulence and loss suppression in GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Higaki, H.; Hirata, M.; Hojo, H.; Ichimura, M.; Ishii, K.; Islam, M.K.; Itakura, A.; Katanuma, I.; Kohagura, J.; Nakashima, Y.; Numakura, T.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yoshikawa, M.; Yoshida, M.; Imai, T.; Pastukhov, V.P.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Following the Lyon IAEA Conference, (1) a factor of three progress up to 2.1 kV in the formation of ion-confining potential heights in comparison to those attained 1992-2002 is achieved for tandem-mirror plasmas in the hot-ion mode with ion temperatures of several keV. (2) The advance in the potential formation gives bases for a finding of the remarkable effects of radially produced shear of electric fields E r , or non-uniform sheared plasma rotation Ω r =E r /(r c B) on the suppression of turbulent fluctuations for the first time in GAMMA 10. (Here, r c denotes a radius mapped to the central-cell.) (2-i) Such a shear effect on the central-cell plasmas is highlighted visually by x-ray tomography diagnostics; that is, spatially and temporally fluctuated vortex-like structures are clearly observed in plasmas produced by ICH alone [having a quite weak shear]. (2-ii) However, during the application of plug ECH into the ICH plasmas, an associated potential rise produces a stronger shear [E r =several 10 kV/m 2 ]. In this case, the disappearance of the turbulent vortices on the basis of such a high-potential formation due to ECH is found in association with plasma confinement improvement. In fact, the associated temperature rise and transverse loss suppression are observed. (3) From the viewpoints of both (i) a conventional idea of higher and better potential confinement in the axial direction [i.e., E z effects] and (ii) the present new finding of a turbulent vortex disappearance due to a strong radial electric shear [i.e., E r effects] in the transverse direction, simultaneously, such a high potential formation is found to play an essential role in providing stably improved plasma confinement both radially and axially. (4) For the physics interpretations and control of such potential [or the associated E r or Ψ r shear] formation, the validity of our proposed theory of the potential formation is extendedly tested under the conditions with auxiliary heatings. The

  16. Experiencing Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Younis, Tarek; Hassani, Amani

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how Islam, minority status and refugee experiencesintersect in shaping meaning-making processes following bereavement. We do this througha phenomenological analysis of a biographical account of personal loss told by Aisha, a Muslim Palestinian refugee living in Denmark......, who narrates her experience of losing herhusband to lung cancer. By drawing on a religious framework, Aisha creates meaning fromher loss, which enables her to incorporate this loss into her life history and sustain agency.Her narrative invites wider audiences to witness her tale of overcoming loss...

  17. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma T-Cell Lymphoma Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Young Adult Lymphoma Overview Treatment Options Relapsed/Refractory Long-term ...

  18. Network node for peripheral sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbitt, J.; Johnson, M.

    1977-01-01

    A module which enables several independent computer systems to share the peripherals (graphics display and line printer) of a PDP-11 computer is described. The module requires no software support in the PDP-11

  19. Chiral dynamics and peripheral transverse densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos G. [Uppsala University (Sweden); Weiss, Christian [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the partonic (or light-front) description of relativistic systems the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent charge and magnetization densities in transverse space. This formulation allows one to identify the chiral components of nucleon structure as the peripheral densities at transverse distances b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and compute them in a parametrically controlled manner. A dispersion relation connects the large-distance behavior of the transverse charge and magnetization densities to the spectral functions of the Dirac and Pauli form factors near the two--pion threshold at timelike t = 4 M{ sub {pi}}{sup 2}, which can be computed in relativistic chiral effective field theory. Using the leading-order approximation we (a) derive the asymptotic behavior (Yukawa tail) of the isovector transverse densities in the "chiral" region b = O(M{sub {pi}}{sup -1}) and the "molecular" region b = O(M{sub N}{sup 2}/M{sub {pi}}{sup 3}); (b) perform the heavy-baryon expansion of the transverse densities; (c) explain the relative magnitude of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities in a simple mechanical picture; (d) include Delta isobar intermediate states and study the peripheral transverse densities in the large-N{ sub c} limit of QCD; (e) quantify the region of transverse distances where the chiral components of the densities are numerically dominant; (f) calculate the chiral divergences of the b{sup 2}-weighted moments of the isovector transverse densities (charge and anomalous magnetic radii) in the limit M{sub {pi}} -> 0 and determine their spatial support. Our approach provides a concise formulation of the spatial structure of the nucleon's chiral component and offers new insights into basic properties of the chiral expansion. It relates the information extracted from low-t elastic form factors to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  20. Memory loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... barbiturates or ( hypnotics ) ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) (most often short-term memory loss) Epilepsy that is not well controlled Illness that ... appointment. Medical history questions may include: Type of memory loss, such as short-term or long-term Time pattern, such as how ...

  1. Deployment of spatial attention to words in central and peripheral vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Stéphanie; Grainger, Jonathan

    2007-05-01

    Four perceptual identification experiments examined the influence of spatial cues on the recognition of words presented in central vision (with fixation on either the first or last letter of the target word) and in peripheral vision (displaced left or right of a central fixation point). Stimulus location had a strong effect on word identification accuracy in both central and peripheral vision, showing a strong right visual field superiority that did not depend on eccentricity. Valid spatial cues improved word identification for peripherally presented targets but were largely ineffective for centrally presented targets. Effects of spatial cuing interacted with visual field effects in Experiment 1, with valid cues reducing the right visual field superiority for peripherally located targets, but this interaction was shown to depend on the type of neutral cue. These results provide further support for the role of attentional factors in visual field asymmetries obtained with targets in peripheral vision but not with centrally presented targets.

  2. The contribution of radio-frequency rectification to field-aligned losses of high-harmonic fast wave power to the divertor in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R. J., E-mail: rperkins@pppl.gov; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Diallo, A.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); McLean, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Sabbagh, S. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) can exhibit a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power along scrape-off layer (SOL) field lines passing in front of the antenna, resulting in bright and hot spirals on both the upper and lower divertor regions. One possible mechanism for this loss is RF sheaths forming at the divertors. Here, we demonstrate that swept-voltage Langmuir probe characteristics for probes under the spiral are shifted relative to those not under the spiral in a manner consistent with RF rectification. We estimate both the magnitude of the RF voltage across the sheath and the sheath heat flux transmission coefficient in the presence of the RF field. Although precise comparison between the computed heat flux and infrared (IR) thermography cannot yet be made, the computed heat deposition compares favorably with the projections from IR camera measurements. The RF sheath losses are significant and contribute substantially to the total SOL losses of HHFW power to the divertor for the cases studied. This work will guide future experimentation on NSTX-U, where a wide-angle IR camera and a dedicated set of coaxial Langmuir probes for measuring the RF sheath voltage directly will quantify the contribution of RF sheath rectification to the heat deposition from the SOL to the divertor.

  3. Motivation for Weight-Loss Diets: A Clustering, Longitudinal Field Study Using Self-Esteem and Self-Determination Theory Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Manolis M.; Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Stavrou, Nektarios A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Gradual elevation of body weight leads numerous individuals to dieting and weight loss behaviours. Nevertheless, the prevalence of obesity continues to rise in industrialised countries. The examination of the motivational determinants of dietary modification ("dieting") in order to identify clusters of individuals in the…

  4. [The 8-year follow-up study for clinical diagnostic potentials of frequency-doubling technology perimetry for perimetrically normal eyes of open-angle glaucoma patients with unilateral visual field loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X; Wu, L L; Xiao, G G; Ma, Z Z; Liu, F

    2018-03-11

    Objective: To analyze potentials of frequency-doubling technology perimetry (FDP) for diagnosing open-angle glaucoma (OAG) in perimetrically normal eyes of OAG patients diagnosed with standard automated perimetry (SAP) and relating factors from abnormalities on FDP to visual field loss on SAP. Methods: A prospective cohort study. Sixty-eight eyes of 68 OAG patients visiting the ophthalmic clinic of Peking University Third Hospital during November 2003 and October 2007 [32 primary open-angle glaucoma patients and 36 normal tension glaucoma patients, 32 males and 36 females, with an average age of (59±13) years] with unilateral field loss detected by SAP (Octopus101 tG2 program) were examined with the FDP N-30 threshold program (Humphrey Instruments) at baseline. Two groups, FDP positive group and FDP negative group, were divided based on the FDP results, and visual field examinations were followed by a series of SAP examinations for the perimetrically normal eyes over 8 years. During the follow-up, the difference of the converting rate of SAP tests between the two groups was analyzed. Differences between "convertors" and "non-convertors" of SAP tests in the FDP positive group, such as the cup-to-disk ratio and glaucomatous optic neuropathy rate, were also compared with the independent-sample t test or Wilcoxon two-sample test for continuous variable data and the χ(2) test or Fisher exact test for classified variable data and rates. Results: Forty-eight perimetrically normal eyes of 48 participants had complete data and a qualifying follow-up. Baseline FDP results were positive in 33 eyes and negative in 15 eyes. Of the eyes with positive FDP results, 22 eyes developed abnormal SAP results after 4.0 to 90.0 months (median 14.5 months) , whereas none of the eyes with negative FDP results developed abnormal SAP results. For perimetrically normal eyes in the FDP positive group, "converters" showed a greater cup-to-disk ratio (0.73±0.09 vs . 0.63±0.14, Wilcoxon two

  5. Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor ... Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home ...

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogiparthi, S N; Muralidhar, K; Seshadri, K G; Rangarajan, S

    2017-01-01

    There is a rise in number of people diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus. The incidence is rising in modern Indian society because of Industrial development and drastically changing lifestyles. Diabetic neuropathies are microvascular disorders that are usually associated with the duration of Diabetes. Among the various forms, the most common is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. The disease if neglected leads to chronic ulcer formation leading to amputations frequently. Hence the aim of this study is to document the early cutaneous changes and create an early awareness in the importance of controlling Diabetes. The study consisted of 205 patients with Type 2 DM. Participant's neuropathy status was determined based on Neuropathy Disability Score and Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom Score. Among the Skin changes documented, the common changes seen were: Peripheral hair loss in 185 (90.2%), Xerosis in 168 (82%), Anhydrosis in 162 (79%), Plantar Fissures in 136 (66.3%), Plantar Ulcer in 80 (39%), common nail changes documented were Onychomycosis in 165 (80.5%) and Onychauxis in 53 (25.8%) patients in relation to the occupation and duration of Diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, it is important to control glycemic levels in the all stages of Diabetes and institute foot care measures to prevent the complications of neuropathy.

  7. Aberrant phenotypes in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, N; Ralfkiaer, E; Pallesen, G

    1989-01-01

    Seventy six peripheral T cell lymphomas were examined immunohistologically to test their reactivity with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against 11 T cell associated antigens (CD1-8, CD27, UCHL1, and the T cell antigen receptor). Sixty two (82%) lymphomas showed aberrant phenotypes, and four main categories were distinguished as follows: (i) lack of one or several pan-T cell antigens (49, 64% of the cases); (ii) loss of both the CD4 and CD8 antigens (11, 15% of the cases); (iii) coexpression of the CD4 and CD8 antigens (13, 17% of the cases); and (iv) expression of the CD1 antigen (eight, 11% of the cases). No correlation was seen between the occurrence of aberrant phenotypes and the histological subtype. It is concluded that the demonstration of an aberrant phenotype is a valuable supplement to histological assessment in the diagnosis of peripheral T cell lymphomas. It is recommended that the panel of monoclonal antibodies against T cell differentiation antigens should be fairly large, as apparently any antigen may be lost in the process of malignant transformation. Images Figure PMID:2469701

  8. Linear and non-linear aspects of the field-dependent microwave losses in YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville, A. (Lab. d' Electronique des Milieux Condenses, Univ. de Provence, 13 Marseille (France)); Fawaz, H. (Lab. d' Electronique des Milieux Condenses, Univ. de Provence, 13 Marseille (France)); Gaillard, B. (Lab. d' Electronique des Milieux Condenses, Univ. de Provence, 13 Marseille (France))

    1993-07-01

    We have measured the surface resistance in a static magnetic field, between 0 and 2 T, at a fixed temperature below T[sub c]. We compare the results with those using a modulation field, and discuss them within existing theories. (orig.).

  9. Peripheral arterial disease and revascularization of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, R O; Brownrigg, J; Hinchliffe, R J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease with many serious potential sequelae, including large vessel arterial disease and microvascular dysfunction. Peripheral arterial disease is a common large vessel complication of diabetes, implicated in the development of tissue loss in up to half of patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In addition to peripheral arterial disease, functional changes in the microcirculation also contribute to the development of a diabetic foot ulcer, along with other factors such as infection, oedema and abnormal biomechanical loading. Peripheral arterial disease typically affects the distal vessels, resulting in multi-level occlusions and diffuse disease, which often necessitates challenging distal revascularisation surgery or angioplasty in order to improve blood flow. However, technically successful revascularisation does not always result in wound healing. The confounding effects of microvascular dysfunction must be recognised--treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer and peripheral arterial disease should address this complex interplay of pathophysiological changes. In the case of non-revascularisable peripheral arterial disease or poor response to conventional treatment, alternative approaches such as cell-based treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the use of vasodilators may appear attractive, however more robust evidence is required to justify these novel approaches. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Weight loss is effective for symptomatic relief in obese subjects with knee osteoarthritis independently of joint damage severity assessed by high-field MRI and radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbergsen, H.; Boesen, M.; Lohmander, L. S.

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing prevalence of older and obese citizens, the problems of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) will escalate. Weight loss is recommended for obese KOA patients and in a majority of cases this leads to symptomatic relief. We hypothesized that pre-treatment structural status of the knee joint......, assessed by radiographs, 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and knee-joint alignment, may influence the symptomatic changes following a significant weight reduction....

  11. Estimation of the degree of soil P saturation from Brazilian Mehlich-1 P data and field investigations on P losses from agricultural sites in Minas Gerais.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, P; Pöthig, R; Gücker, B; Venohr, M

    The degree of phosphorus saturation (DPS) of agricultural soils is studied worldwide for risk assessment of phosphorus (P) losses. In previous studies, DPS could be reliably estimated from water-soluble P (WSP) for European and Brazilian soils. In the present study, we correlated measured WSP and Mehlich-1 P (M1P) from soils of Minas Gerais (MG) and Pernambuco (PE) (R(2) = 0.94, n = 59) to create a DPS map from monitoring data. The resulting DPS map showed high spatial variability and low values of DPS (54 ± 22%, mean and standard deviation; n = 1,827). Measured soil DPS values amounted to 63 ± 14% and resulted in relatively low dissolved P concentrations measured in a surface runoff study in MG. However, fertilizer grains on the soil surface led to high WSP values (>30 mg/kg) indicating high risks of dissolved P losses. We suppose that small Oxisol particles with Fe and Al hydroxides sorbed most of the dissolved fertilizer P in runoff so that P was mainly exported in particulate form. In soils with lower contents of P sorption and binding partners, e.g. Entisols in PE, this effect may be less dominant. Consequently, superficial fertilizer effects have to be considered in addition to DPS in risk assessment of P losses from agricultural areas in Brazil.

  12. Field evaluation of a self-propelled sprayer and effects of the application rate on spray deposition and losses to the ground in greenhouse tomato crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hermosilla, Julián; Rincón, Víctor J; Páez, Francisco; Agüera, Francisco; Carvajal, Fernando

    2011-08-01

    In the greenhouses of south-eastern Spain, plant protection products are applied using mainly sprayers at high pressures and high volumes. This results in major losses on the ground and less than uniform spray deposition on the canopy. Recently, self-propelled vehicles equipped with vertical spray booms have appeared on the market. In this study, deposition on the canopy and the losses to the ground at different spray volumes have been compared, using a self-propelled vehicle with vertical spray booms versus a gun sprayer. Three different spray volumes have been tested with a boom sprayer, and two with a spray gun. The vehicle with the vertical spray boom gave similar depositions to those made with the gun, but at lower application volumes. Also, the distribution of the vertical spray boom was more uniform, with lower losses to the ground. The vertical spray booms used in tomato crops improve the application of plant protection products with respect to the spray gun, reducing the application volumes and the environmental risks of soil pollution. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Peripheral Atherectomy: Applications and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittleider, Derek; Russell, Erich

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral atherectomy is a class of procedures that is rapidly increasing in volume. Multiple classes of devices exist, and newer variants are added to the market annually. The devices see wide application for de novo lesions, in-stent restenosis, and adjunctive therapy for drug-coated balloons. The body of evidence supporting atherectomy is less robust than for many other peripheral therapies. The frequency and severity of complications from atherectomy can be significant compared with angioplasty and stenting, and familiarity with preventative and bailout techniques is essential for the interventionalist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Atherectomy for peripheral arterial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Louise Skovgaard; Høgh, Annette Langager; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2015-04-13

    Symptomatic peripheral arterial disease is managed according to national and international guidelines and the number of vascular reconstructions performed each year has increased over the past decade mainly due to an increasing frequency of endovascular procedures. Atherectomy as an alternative to the established treatment of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease has recently been analysed in a Cochrane review. In Denmark, atherectomy is not performed and so far the evidence is poor as the method is not an alternative to the established treatment in this country.

  15. Imaging of the peripheral retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Kernt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The technical progress of the recent years has revolutionized imaging in ophthalmology. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO, digital angiography, optical coherence tomography (OCT, and detection of fundus autofluorescence (FAF have fundamentally changed our understanding of numerous retinal and choroidal diseases. Besides the tremendous advances in macular diagnostics, there is more and more evidence that central pathologies are often directly linked to changes in the peripheral retina. This review provides a brief overview on current posterior segment imaging techniques with a special focus on the peripheral retina.

  16. Peripheral dose in photon beams from a linear accelerator with a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lope Lope, R.; Lozano Flores, F.; Gracia Sorrosal, J.; Font Gomez, J.A.; Hernandez Vitoria, A.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation doses outside the radiotherapy treatment field are of radiation protection interest when anatomical structures with very low dose tolerances might be involved. One of the major sources of peripheral dose, scatter from secondary collimators, depends on the configuration of the collimator. In this study, peripheral dose was measured at two depths for 6 and 18 MV photons from a linac Primus (Siemens) with a multileaf collimator (MLC). Comparative measurements were made both with leaves and with the upper jaw positioned at the field edge near to the detector. Configuring the MLC leaves at the field edge yielded a reduction in peripheral dose. (author)

  17. Hidden loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Johansen, Karen Lise Gaardsvig

    2013-01-01

    to participate. RESULTS: All children were affected by their parents' ABI and the altered family situation. The children's expressions led the authors to identify six themes, including fear of losing the parent, distress and estrangement, chores and responsibilities, hidden loss, coping and support. The main......PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to listen to and learn from children showing high levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms after parental acquired brain injury (ABI), in order to achieve an in-depth understanding of the difficulties the children face in their everyday lives...... finding indicates that the children experienced numerous losses, many of which were often suppressed or neglected by the children to protect the ill parents. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that the children seemed to make a special effort to hide their feelings of loss and grief in order to protect...

  18. Stratifying patients with peripheral neuropathic pain based on sensory profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    In a recent cluster analysis, it has been shown that patients with peripheral neuropathic pain can be grouped into 3 sensory phenotypes based on quantitative sensory testing profiles, which are mainly characterized by either sensory loss, intact sensory function and mild thermal hyperalgesia and...... populations that need to be screened to reach a subpopulation large enough to conduct a phenotype-stratified study. The most common phenotype in diabetic polyneuropathy was sensory loss (83%), followed by mechanical hyperalgesia (75%) and thermal hyperalgesia (34%, note that percentages are overlapping...

  19. CNS infiltration of peripheral immune cells: D-Day for neurodegenerative disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Gate, David; Town, Terrence

    2009-12-01

    While the central nervous system (CNS) was once thought to be excluded from surveillance by immune cells, a concept known as "immune privilege," it is now clear that immune responses do occur in the CNS-giving rise to the field of neuroimmunology. These CNS immune responses can be driven by endogenous (glial) and/or exogenous (peripheral leukocyte) sources and can serve either productive or pathological roles. Recent evidence from mouse models supports the notion that infiltration of peripheral monocytes/macrophages limits progression of Alzheimer's disease pathology and militates against West Nile virus encephalitis. In addition, infiltrating T lymphocytes may help spare neuronal loss in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. On the other hand, CNS leukocyte penetration drives experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a mouse model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis) and may also be pathological in both Parkinson's disease and human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis. A critical understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for trafficking of immune cells from the periphery into the diseased CNS will be key to target these cells for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby allowing neuroregenerative processes to ensue.

  20. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  1. MEGACARYOCYTES IN THE PERIPHERAL CIRCULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minot, George R.

    1922-01-01

    A megacaryocyte is seen commonly as an occasional cell in the peripheral blood of patients with myelogenous leucemia. Less commonly they appear in relatively large numbers. These giant cells also may occur in the blood under other conditions. Their presence is indicative of a bone marrow under intense strain. PMID:19868650

  2. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Bias in Peripheral Depression Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Brunoni, André R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To aid in the differentiation of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) from healthy controls, numerous peripheral biomarkers have been proposed. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the existence of bias favoring the publication of significant results or inflating effect...

  4. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or bluish color to the skin A lower temperature in one leg compared to the other leg Poor nail growth on the toes and decreased hair growth on the legs Erectile dysfunction, especially among men who have diabetes Diagnosis Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) is diagnosed based ...

  5. Invited paper: measurements and model of the coupled particle loss and fluid acceleration in the boundary layer of the zt-40m reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.; Burkhardt, C.; Rusbridge, G.

    1983-01-01

    Coordinated measurements of density fluctuations, using a 10-chord forward scattering array, and of poloidal voltage fluctuations (for frequencies lower than the liner's skin frequency) have led to a consistent account of fluid acceleration associated with pulsed particle loss. The fluctuations involved in this mechanism are present from the beginning of the discharge, and are not obviously related to termination percursor phenomena observed in ZT-40M and discussed elsewhere. The dominant density fluctuation in ZT-40M is an impulsive (risetime about 5 μs) poloidally symmetric cavitation occurring in an annulus (Δr approx. = 0.02-0.04 m) near the liner (r = a = 0.2 m). The pulsed disturbance is primarily due to radial loss of plasma to the liner rather than to toroidal convection. The peak ion flux to the liner is GAMMA /sub i/ greater than or equal to 10 22 m -2 s -1 during an impulse. The cavitations leave an imprint in the density profile that propagates toroidally (against I /sub PHI/ ) with a speed about (1-2) x 10 4 m/s. Another important fluctuating quantity, the poloidal voltage at the plasma boundary, is dominated by impulsive spikes whose full-width is similar to the density-cavitations risetime. The spikes propagate toroidally (against I /sub PHI/ ) with a speed about 3 x 10 4 m/s and survive for a pathlength less than or equal to 1 m. The voltage spikes and density cavitations are highly correlated

  6. High peripheral temperatures in king penguins while resting at sea: thermoregulation versus fat deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewden, Agnès; Enstipp, Manfred R; Picard, Baptiste; van Walsum, Tessa; Handrich, Yves

    2017-09-01

    Marine endotherms living in cold water face an energetically challenging situation. Unless properly insulated, these animals will lose heat rapidly. The field metabolic rate of king penguins at sea is about twice that on land. However, when at sea, their metabolic rate is higher during extended resting periods at the surface than during foraging, when birds descend to great depth in pursuit of their prey. This is most likely explained by differences in thermal status. During foraging, peripheral vasoconstriction leads to a hypothermic shell, which is rewarmed during extended resting bouts at the surface. Maintaining peripheral perfusion during rest in cold water, however, will greatly increase heat loss and, therefore, thermoregulatory costs. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the maintenance of a normothermic shell during surface rest: (1) to help the unloading of N 2 accumulated during diving; and (2) to allow the storage of fat in subcutaneous tissue, following the digestion of food. We tested the latter hypothesis by maintaining king penguins within a shallow seawater tank, while we recorded tissue temperature at four distinct sites. When king penguins were released into the tank during the day, their body temperature immediately declined. However, during the night, periodic rewarming of abdominal and peripheral tissues occurred, mimicking temperature patterns observed in the wild. Body temperatures, particularly in the flank, also depended on body condition and were higher in 'lean' birds (after 10 days of fasting) than in 'fat' birds. While not explicitly tested, our observation that nocturnal rewarming persists in the absence of diving activity during the day does not support the N 2 unloading hypothesis. Rather, differences in temperature changes throughout the day and night, and the effect of body condition/mass supports the hypothesis that tissue perfusion during rest is required for nutritional needs. © 2017. Published by The Company of

  7. Nerve ultrasound shows subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleman, Johan A; Stellingwerff, Menno D; Brekelmans, Geert J; Visser, Leo H

    2018-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is mainly associated with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Peripheral nerve involvement is described in symptomatic patients, but evidence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement is scarce. We conducted a cross-sectional pilot study in 2 asymptomatic and 3 minimally symptomatic patients with NF2 to detect subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. Patients underwent clinical examination, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS). A total of 30 schwannomas were found, divided over 20 nerve segments (33.9% of all investigated nerve segments). All patients had at least 1 schwannoma. Schwannomas were identified with HRUS in 37% of clinically unaffected nerve segments and 50% of nerve segments with normal NCS findings. HRUS shows frequent subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in NF2. Clinicians should consider peripheral nerve involvement as a cause of weakness and sensory loss in the extremities in patients with this disease. Muscle Nerve 57: 312-316, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Time-domain numerical computations of electromagnetic fields in cylindrical co-ordinates using the transmission line matrix: evaluation of radiaion losses from a charge bunch passing through a pill-box resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, J.; Robson, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    The two dimensional transmission line matrix (TLM) numerical method has been adapted to compute electromagnetic field distributions in cylindrical co-ordinates and it is applied to evaluate the radiation loss from a charge bunch passing through a 'pill-box' resonator. The computer program has been developed to calculate not only the total energy loss to the resonator but also that component of it which exists in the TM 010 mode. The numerically computed results are shown to agree very well with the analytically derived values as found in the literature which, therefore, established the degree of accuracy that is obtained with the TLM method. The particular features of computational simplicity, numerical stability and the inherently time-domain solutions produced by the TLM method are cited as additional, attractive reasons for using this numerical procedure in solving such problems. (Auth.)

  9. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA. Technique and contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Yousef W.; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency. Using optimized technique and a stable MRI contrast agent, peripheral CE-MRA is a safe procedure with diagnostic accuracy close to that of conventional catheter X

  10. Demographic processes of developmentally peripheral areas in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pénzes János

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigates the demographic processes and challenges of the Hungarian developmentally peripheral settlements. Demographic challenges can be regarded as important consequences of the social and economic disadvantages in spatial terms. However, the interrelating negative demographic tendencies cause even more backward situation blocking or hindering the development. The objective of the current analysis is to discover the demographic characteristics of the peripheral settlements, to detect the spatial disparities and to point out the correlation between backwardness and the investigated demographic phenomena with the help of the census databases 1980-2011 and local datasets on Roma population. Using methods of multivariate statistical analysis, seven indicators were selected in order to achieve the goals of the paper. Backward areas are primarily characterized by population decrease with significant disparities, but there were growing communities among them as well. Some small villages in Northern and Southwestern Hungary will foreseeably face complete depopulation within few years. Primarily small sized villages faced intense decrease in rate of natural change, but dynamic population growth was also detected. Migration loss tends to correlate with the extent of peripherality, as increasing values of migration balance accompany decreasing ratio of peripheral settlements in the area. The ratio of elderly population shows an expressively two-faced character, with the extremely aging and very juvenile settlements. The ratios of Roma population reflect the scale of peripherality. Extended ethnic change could be predicted in Northeastern and Southwestern Hungary and near the Middle Tisza valley. Presented demographic processes will make the backwardness of most of the peripheral settlements stable.

  11. Temperature dependence of the minimum in AC power losses of (Nb/sub 0.99/Zr/sub 0.01/)3Sn in parallel AC and DC magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovachev, V.T.

    1980-01-01

    ac losses P/sub L/ of bronze-processed (Nb/sub 0.99/Zr/sub 0.01/) 3 Sn strips have been measured between 4.2 and 16.5 K in the presence of a dc magnetic field H 0 . The measurements were performed using an electronic wattmeter with both ac and dc fields parallel to the long flat surfaces of the sample. A minimum in the function P/sub L/(H 0 ) was observed for fixed ac amplitudes h 0 . This minimum was found to occur in the entire temperature range between 4.2 and 16.5 K. A similar minimum was recently reported in Nb 3 Ge [Thompson et al., J. Appl. Phys. 50, 3514 (1979)] at 4.2 K. The position of the minimum is explained here by the same physical model as in Thompson et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 50, 3514 (1979)]; and Clem (ibid. 3518), but extending the model to include the temperature dependence of the entry surface shielding fields ΔH/sub en/(B,T) for flux density in the sample B=0. It is also shown here that loss minimum measurements can be used for the determination of ΔH/sub en/(0,T) in the temperature range 4.2--16.5 K

  12. Evidence for a Peripheral Olfactory Memory in Imprinted Salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Gabrielle A.; Dittman, Andrew H.; Quinn, Thomas P.; Moody, William J., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The remarkable homing ability of salmon relies on olfactory cues, but its cellular basis is unknown. To test the role of peripheral olfactory receptors in odorant memory retention, we imprinted coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to micromolar concentrations of phenyl ethyl alcohol during parr-smolt transformation. The following year, we measured phenyl ethyl alcohol responses in the peripheral receptor cells using patch clamp. Cells from imprinted fish showed increased sensitivity to phenyl ethyl alcohol compared either to cells from naive fish or to sensitivity to another behaviorally important odorant (L-serine). Field experiments verified an increased behavioral preference for phenyl ethyl alcohol by imprinted salmon as adults. Thus, some component of the imprinted olfactory homestream memory appears to be retained peripherally.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Yasumasa; Hara, Yuki; Yoshii, Yuichi; Kokubu, Yukihiro; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Niitsu, Mamoru

    2008-01-01

    Development of microscopy coil (MC) in MRI has accomplished high resolution imaging to observe small objects like the minute peripheral nerves and this paper describes authors' experience with the coil of peripheral neuropathy. Subjects are 15 hands of 13 female patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (mean age, 64.2 y) and 15 hands of 15 control healthy females (52.5 y). Imaging of extending and bending digits is done with Philips 1.5 T MRI machine using 47 mm MC fixed by a sandbag through modes of T1W, T2W and T2W-fast field echo to evaluate the morphology of flexor tendon and median nerve (and its diameters and area), extension of flexor retinaculum, and area of soft carpal tunnel. It is found the MRI is useful in diagnosis of anterior interosseous neuroparalysis by seeing the morphology above and by detecting fascicles with abnormal brightness and diameter in the median nerve. Future improvement of the MRI technology is promising for progress of the diagnosis and evaluation of the pathogenesis of the disease. (R.T.)

  14. CFD modelling of the wall friction velocity field in the ITER tokamak resulting from airflow during a loss of vacuum accident—Consequences for particle resuspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gélain, T., E-mail: thomas.gelain@irsn.fr; Rondeau, A.; Peillon, S.; Sabroux, J.C.; Gensdarmes, F.

    2015-11-15

    During a loss of vacuum accident (LOVA), dusts that will be present in the future tokamak ITER are likely to be re-suspended. Such aerosols formed may present a risk for explosion and airborne contamination. This article presents parameters that govern the forces affecting particles deposited on a wall and subject to airflow. It is shown the influence of three parameters in the dust mobilization mechanism, i.e.: the particles diameter, the fluid density and the friction velocity. From numerical simulations, it is determined the evolution of wall friction velocities in the vacuum vessel (VV) of ITER during a LOVA. The numerical calculations performed with ANSYS CFX code provide average friction velocities in the lower part of the tokamak between 12 m s{sup −1} at a pressure of 150 Pa, and 0.5 m s{sup −1} at a pressure of 10{sup 5} Pa.

  15. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000234.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge To use the sharing ... peripheral artery). You may have also had a stent placed. To perform the procedure: Your doctor inserted ...

  16. Hypothyroidism: Can It Cause Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypothyroidism: Can it cause peripheral neuropathy? Can hypothyroidism cause peripheral neuropathy and, if so, how is it treated? Answers from Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D. Hypothyroidism — a condition in which your ...

  17. Experimental study on the losses and magnetic fields of coils inside a metallic liner for T.T.M.P. heating application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossaud, J.; Perin, J.P.; Rey, G.

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of this work is the improvement of the T.T.M.P. configuration in the Tokamak PETULA in the case of one or three wavelengths. The variation of the magnetic field distribution and the electrical characteristics coils (R//,Q, L) inside a metallic liner have been studied as functions of: position and number of coils, radius and width of coils, number of wavelengths along the axis of torus [fr

  18. Coaching Peripheral Vision Training for Soccer Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Nelson Kautzner, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Brazilian Soccer began developing its current emphasis on peripheral vision in the late 1950s, by initiative of coach of the Canto do Rio Football Club, in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, a pioneer in the development of peripheral vision training in soccer players. Peripheral vision training gained world relevance when a young talent from Canto do Rio,…

  19. Peripheral vision benefits spatial learning by guiding eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Philbeck, John W

    2013-01-01

    The loss of peripheral vision impairs spatial learning and navigation. However, the mechanisms underlying these impairments remain poorly understood. One advantage of having peripheral vision is that objects in an environment are easily detected and readily foveated via eye movements. The present study examined this potential benefit of peripheral vision by investigating whether competent performance in spatial learning requires effective eye movements. In Experiment 1, participants learned room-sized spatial layouts with or without restriction on direct eye movements to objects. Eye movements were restricted by having participants view the objects through small apertures in front of their eyes. Results showed that impeding effective eye movements made subsequent retrieval of spatial memory slower and less accurate. The small apertures also occluded much of the environmental surroundings, but the importance of this kind of occlusion was ruled out in Experiment 2 by showing that participants exhibited intact learning of the same spatial layouts when luminescent objects were viewed in an otherwise dark room. Together, these findings suggest that one of the roles of peripheral vision in spatial learning is to guide eye movements, highlighting the importance of spatial information derived from eye movements for learning environmental layouts.

  20. Monitoring sweep in peripheral waterflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouser, B.J.; Al-Askar, Y.A.; Hassoun, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the techniques used and the results obtained in monitoring the water advance in a peripheral waterflood of a carbonate reservoir. The peripheral pattern used in the subject reservoir gives a water advanced similar to that obtained in a water drive reservoir. However, monitoring this particular reservoir is complicated by the use of a low salinity brine for flooding and the areal shape of the reservoir. The use of pulsed neutron capture logging in conjunction with production logging has been effective in differentiating between oil and water in porous zones in existing producers. The use of the two logs has been successful despite the problems normally encountered when logging open hole completions in a reservoir being flooded with a low salinity brine. Results have been confirmed and enhanced by open hole logs of new wells being drilled in the water invaded areas

  1. Radioimmunological progesteron determination in peripheral bovine blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ender, M.

    1974-01-01

    A radioimmunological method of determination of the progesterone level in peripheral bovine blood is described which enables a monitoring of the corpus luteum function under varying conditions. There is no dependence of the corpus luteum function on the pituitary gland after endogenous prolactin inhibition with a synthetic prolactin inhibitor in the oestrus cycle and in the end-phase of gravidity. In hysterectomized animals, however, the inhibition of endogenous LH leads to luteolysis. The release of endogenous LH, induced by the administration of an LH release hormone, causes a short increase in progesterone production in the middle phase of the cycle only. The administration of exogenous glucocorticoids during the oestrus cycle did not influence the corpus luteum function. The method described is used in a field test to determine the right time for artificial insemination. There is a significant difference between the progesterone values of impregnated and non-pregnant animals at 16-18 days after insemination. (BSC/AK) [de

  2. Significant correlations between optic nerve head microcirculation and visual field defects and nerve fiber layer loss in glaucoma patients with myopic glaucomatous disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu Yokoyama, Naoko Aizawa, Naoki Chiba, Kazuko Omodaka, Masahiko Nakamura, Takaaki Otomo, Shunji Yokokura, Nobuo Fuse, Toru NakazawaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, JapanBackground: Eyes with glaucoma are characterized by optic neuropathy with visual field defects in the areas corresponding to the optic disk damage. The exact cause for the glaucomatous optic neuropathy has not been determined. Myopia has been shown to be a risk factor for glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a significant correlation existed between the microcirculation of the optic disk and the visual field defects and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT in glaucoma patients with myopic optic disks.Methods: Sixty eyes of 60 patients with myopic disks were studied; 36 eyes with glaucoma (men:women = 19:17 and 24 eyes with no ocular diseases (men:women = 14:10. The mean deviation (MD determined by the Humphrey field analyzer, and the peripapillary RNFLT determined by the Stratus-OCT were compared between the two groups. The ocular circulation was determined by laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG, and the mean blur rate (MBR was compared between the two groups. The correlations between the RNFLT and MBR of the corresponding areas of the optic disk and between MD and MBR of the optic disk in the glaucoma group were determined by simple regression analyses.Results: The average MBR for the entire optic disk was significantly lower in the glaucoma group than that in the control group. The differences of the MBR for the tissue in the superior, inferior, and temporal quadrants of the optic disk between the two groups were significant. The MBR for the entire optic disk was significantly correlated with the MD (r = 0.58, P = 0.0002 and the average RNFLT (r = 0.53, P = 0.0008. The tissue MBR of the optic disk was significantly correlated with the RNFLT in the superior, inferior, and temporal quadrants

  3. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    LM, de Crombrugghe B. Some recent advances in the chemistry and biology of trans- forming growth factor-beta. J Cell Biol 1987;105:1039e45. 12. Hao Y...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In current war trauma, 20-30% of all extremity injuries and >80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve...through both axonal advance and in revascularization of the graft following placement. We are confident that this technology may allow us to

  4. Communication, Consumption and Peripheral Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NÍZIA VILLAÇA

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyses central/peripheral dynamics and its new semantics in the big scenario of globalization. The processes of hybridization between the local and the global spaces are discussed focusing the strategies of inclusion and exclusion through some examples from media and cultural industry. The methodology helps to reflect about the theme using elements of epistemology communication, consumer society and cultural studies.

  5. Peripheral facial palsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Unsal; Cubukçu, Duygu; Yılmaz, Tuba Sevim; Akıncı, Gülçin; Ozcan, Muazzez; Güzel, Orkide

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and clinical characteristics of peripheral facial palsy in children. The hospital charts of children diagnosed with peripheral facial palsy were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 81 children (42 female and 39 male) with a mean age of 9.2 ± 4.3 years were included in the study. Causes of facial palsy were 65 (80.2%) idiopathic (Bell palsy) facial palsy, 9 (11.1%) otitis media/mastoiditis, and tumor, trauma, congenital facial palsy, chickenpox, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, enlarged lymph nodes, and familial Mediterranean fever (each 1; 1.2%). Five (6.1%) patients had recurrent attacks. In patients with Bell palsy, female/male and right/left ratios were 36/29 and 35/30, respectively. Of them, 31 (47.7%) had a history of preceding infection. The overall rate of complete recovery was 98.4%. A wide variety of disorders can present with peripheral facial palsy in children. Therefore, careful investigation and differential diagnosis is essential. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. The Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS): 12. Baseline risk factors for sustained loss of visual field and visual acuity in patients with advanced glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    To examine the relationships between baseline risk factors and sustained decrease of visual field (SDVF) and sustained decrease of visual acuity (SDVA). Cohort study of participants in the Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS). This multicenter study enrolled patients between 1988 and 1992 and followed them until 2001; 789 eyes of 591 patients with advanced glaucoma were randomly assigned to one of two surgical sequences, argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT)-trabeculectomy-trabeculectomy (ATT) or trabeculectomy-ALT-trabeculectomy (TAT). This report is based on data from 747 eyes. Eyes were offered the next intervention in the sequence upon failure of the previous intervention. Failure was based on recurrent intraocular pressure elevation, visual field defect, and disk rim criteria. Study visits occurred every 6 months; potential follow-up ranged from 8 to 13 years. For each intervention sequence, Cox multiple regression analyses were used to examine the baseline characteristics for association with two vision outcomes: SDVF and SDVA. The magnitude of the association is measured by the hazard ratio (HR), where HR for binary variables is the relative change in the hazard (or risk) of the outcome in eyes with the factor divided by the hazard in eyes without the factor, and HR for continuous variables is the relative change in the hazard (or risk) of the outcome in eyes with a unit increase in the factor. Characteristics associated with increased SDVF risk in the ATT sequence are: less baseline visual field defect (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.86, P <.001, 95% CI = 0.82-0.90), male gender (HR = 2.23, P <.001, 1.54-3.23), and worse baseline visual acuity (HR = 0.96, P =.001, 0.94-0.98); in the TAT sequence: less baseline visual field defect (HR = 0.93, P =.001, 0.89-0.97) and diabetes (HR = 1.87, P =.007, 1.18-2.97). Characteristics associated with increased SDVA risk in both treatment sequences are better baseline acuity (ATT: HR = 1.05, P <.001, 1.02-1.09; TAT: HR = 1

  7. Foveal Processing Under Concurrent Peripheral Load in Profoundly Deaf Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Development of the visual system typically proceeds in concert with the development of audition. One result is that the visual system of profoundly deaf individuals differs from that of those with typical auditory systems. While past research has suggested deaf people have enhanced attention in the visual periphery, it is still unclear whether or not this enhancement entails deficits in central vision. Profoundly deaf and typically hearing adults were administered a variant of the useful field of view task that independently assessed performance on concurrent central and peripheral tasks. Identification of a foveated target was impaired by a concurrent selective peripheral attention task, more so in profoundly deaf adults than in the typically hearing. Previous findings of enhanced performance on the peripheral task were not replicated. These data are discussed in terms of flexible allocation of spatial attention targeted towards perceived task demands, and support a modified “division of labor” hypothesis whereby attentional resources co-opted to process peripheral space result in reduced resources in the central visual field. PMID:26657078

  8. Missing data in randomized clinical trials for weight loss: scope of the problem, state of the field, and performance of statistical methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai A Elobeid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dropouts and missing data are nearly-ubiquitous in obesity randomized controlled trails, threatening validity and generalizability of conclusions. Herein, we meta-analytically evaluate the extent of missing data, the frequency with which various analytic methods are employed to accommodate dropouts, and the performance of multiple statistical methods.We searched PubMed and Cochrane databases (2000-2006 for articles published in English and manually searched bibliographic references. Articles of pharmaceutical randomized controlled trials with weight loss or weight gain prevention as major endpoints were included. Two authors independently reviewed each publication for inclusion. 121 articles met the inclusion criteria. Two authors independently extracted treatment, sample size, drop-out rates, study duration, and statistical method used to handle missing data from all articles and resolved disagreements by consensus. In the meta-analysis, drop-out rates were substantial with the survival (non-dropout rates being approximated by an exponential decay curve (e(-lambdat where lambda was estimated to be .0088 (95% bootstrap confidence interval: .0076 to .0100 and t represents time in weeks. The estimated drop-out rate at 1 year was 37%. Most studies used last observation carried forward as the primary analytic method to handle missing data. We also obtained 12 raw obesity randomized controlled trial datasets for empirical analyses. Analyses of raw randomized controlled trial data suggested that both mixed models and multiple imputation performed well, but that multiple imputation may be more robust when missing data are extensive.Our analysis offers an equation for predictions of dropout rates useful for future study planning. Our raw data analyses suggests that multiple imputation is better than other methods for handling missing data in obesity randomized controlled trials, followed closely by mixed models. We suggest these methods supplant last

  9. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...... surgical techniques and better outcome after peripheral nerve injury. Decision making in peripheral nerve surgery continues to be a complex challenge, where the mechanism of injury, repeated clinical evaluation, neuroradiological and neurophysiological examination, and detailed knowledge of the peripheral...... nervous system response to injury are prerequisite to obtain the best possible outcome. Surgery continues to be the primary treatment modality for peripheral nerve tumors and advances in adjuvant oncological treatment has improved outcome after malignant peripheral nerve tumors. The present chapter...

  10. Hepatic abscess versus peripheral cholangiocarcinoma: Sonographic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hwan Hoon; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kang, Chang Ho; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hee [Kunkuk University College of Medicine, Chung-Ju Hospital, Chung-Ju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    To find out the sonographic findings that are useful to differentiate hepatic abscess from peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-two hepatic abscesses and 22 peripheral cholangiocarcinomas which had been confirmed histologically were included in this study. Objective points were echo characteristics of the lesion, internal septation, presence of peripheral low echoic rim, demarcation from normal liver(well or poorly defined), posterior enhancement, multiplicity, dilatation of bile duct(obstructive or non-obstructive), intrahepatic duct stone, pleural effusion, and intra-abdominal fluid collection. Echo characteristics of the lesion were classified in-to four types. Type I; Predominantly echogenic with hypoechoic portion, type II; Echogenic without hypoechoic portion, type III; Predominantly hypoechoic with echogenic portion, type IV; Hypoechoic without echogenic portion. 1)Nine abscesses and 2 peripheral cholangiocarcinomas were type I(p=0.037), 2)One abscess and 18 peripheral cholangiocarcinomas were type II(p=0.001), 3)Seven abscesses and none of peripheral cholangiocarcinomas were type III(p=0.001), 4)Five abscesses and 2 peripheral cholangiocarcinomas were type IV(p=0.410). Only 7 abscesses showed internal septations(p=0.013). One abscess and 9 peripheral cholangiocarcinomas showed peripheral hypoechoic halos(p=0.012). Only 9 peripheral cholangiocarcinomas showed obstructive bile duct dilatation (p=0.001). There were no statistically significant differences between abscess and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma on other objective points. Predominantly echogenic with hypoechoic portion, predominantly hypoechoic with echogenic portion, and internal septation are the features suggestive of hepatic abscess, and echogenic without hypoechoic portion, peripheral hypoechoic halo, obstructive bile duct dilatation are suggestive of peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Therefore these sonographic findings are helpful to differentiate hepatic abscess from peripheral

  11. Symptomatic reversal of peripheral neuropathy in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochman, Alan B; Carnegie, Dale H; Burke, Thomas J

    2002-03-01

    Forty-nine consecutive subjects with established diabetic peripheral neuropathy were treated with monochromatic near-infrared photo energy (MIRE) to determine if there was an improvement of sensation. Loss of protective sensation characterized by Semmes-Weinstein monofilament values of 4.56 and above was present in 100% of subjects (range, 4.56 to 6.45), and 42 subjects (86%) had Semmes-Weinstein values of 5.07 or higher. The ability to discriminate between hot and cold sensation was absent (54%) or impaired (46%) in both groups prior to the initiation of MIRE treatment. On the basis of Semmes-Weinstein monofilament values, 48 subjects (98%) exhibited improved sensation after 6 treatments, and all subjects had improved sensation after 12 treatments. Therefore, MIRE may be a safe, drug-free, noninvasive treatment for the consistent and predictable improvement of sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy of the feet.

  12. Epidemiology, classification, and modifiable risk factors of peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas W Shammas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W ShammasMidwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, Cardiovascular Medicine, PC, Davenport, IA, USAAbstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is part of a global vascular problem of diffuse atherosclerosis. PAD patients die mostly of cardiac and cerebrovascular-related events and much less frequently due to obstructive disease of the lower extremities. Aggressive risk factors modification is needed to reduce cardiac mortality in PAD patients. These include smoking cessation, reduction of blood pressure to current guidelines, aggressive low density lipoprotein lowering, losing weight, controlling diabetes and the use of oral antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel. In addition to quitting smoking and exercise, cilostazol and statins have been shown to reduce claudication in patients with PAD. Patients with critical rest limb ischemia or severe progressive claudication need to be treated with revascularization to minimize the chance of limb loss, reduce symptoms, and improve quality of life.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, epidemiology, risk factors, classification

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Canta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial dysfunction has a critical role in several disorders including chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies (CIPN. This is due to a related dysregulation of pathways involving calcium signalling, reactive oxygen species and apoptosis. Vincristine is able to affect calcium movement through the Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG neuronal mitochondrial membrane, altering its homeostasis and leading to abnormal neuronal excitability. Paclitaxel induces the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in axons followed by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, increased reactive oxygen species generation, ATP level reduction, calcium release and mitochondrial swelling. Cisplatin and oxaliplatin form adducts with mitochondrial DNA producing inhibition of replication, disruption of transcription and morphological abnormalities within mitochondria in DRG neurons, leading to a gradual energy failure. Bortezomib is able to modify mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial respiratory chain. Moreover, the expression of a certain number of genes, including those controlling mitochondrial functions, was altered in patients with bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  14. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canta, Annalisa; Pozzi, Eleonora; Carozzi, Valentina Alda

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial dysfunction has a critical role in several disorders including chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathies (CIPN). This is due to a related dysregulation of pathways involving calcium signalling, reactive oxygen species and apoptosis. Vincristine is able to affect calcium movement through the Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG) neuronal mitochondrial membrane, altering its homeostasis and leading to abnormal neuronal excitability. Paclitaxel induces the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in axons followed by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, increased reactive oxygen species generation, ATP level reduction, calcium release and mitochondrial swelling. Cisplatin and oxaliplatin form adducts with mitochondrial DNA producing inhibition of replication, disruption of transcription and morphological abnormalities within mitochondria in DRG neurons, leading to a gradual energy failure. Bortezomib is able to modify mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial respiratory chain. Moreover, the expression of a certain number of genes, including those controlling mitochondrial functions, was altered in patients with bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:29056658

  15. Mass loss on the Asymptotic Giant Branch

    OpenAIRE

    Zijlstra, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Mass loss on the Asymptotic Giant Branch provides the origin of planetary nebulae. This paper reviews several relevant aspects of AGB evolution: pulsation properties, mass loss formalisms and time variable mass loss, evidence for asymmetries on the AGB, binarity, ISM interaction, and mass loss at low metallicity. There is growing evidence that mass loss on the AGB is already asymmetric, but with spherically symmetric velocity fields. The origin of the rings may be in pulsational instabilities...

  16. Peripheral Mechanisms of Ischemic Myalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Queme

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal pain due to ischemia is present in a variety of clinical conditions including peripheral vascular disease (PVD, sickle cell disease (SCD, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, and even fibromyalgia (FM. The clinical features associated with deep tissue ischemia are unique because although the subjective description of pain is common to other forms of myalgia, patients with ischemic muscle pain often respond poorly to conventional analgesic therapies. Moreover, these patients also display increased cardiovascular responses to muscle contraction, which often leads to exercise intolerance or exacerbation of underlying cardiovascular conditions. This suggests that the mechanisms of myalgia development and the role of altered cardiovascular function under conditions of ischemia may be distinct compared to other injuries/diseases of the muscles. It is widely accepted that group III and IV muscle afferents play an important role in the development of pain due to ischemia. These same muscle afferents also form the sensory component of the exercise pressor reflex (EPR, which is the increase in heart rate and blood pressure (BP experienced after muscle contraction. Studies suggest that afferent sensitization after ischemia depends on interactions between purinergic (P2X and P2Y receptors, transient receptor potential (TRP channels, and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs in individual populations of peripheral sensory neurons. Specific alterations in primary afferent function through these receptor mechanisms correlate with increased pain related behaviors and altered EPRs. Recent evidence suggests that factors within the muscles during ischemic conditions including upregulation of growth factors and cytokines, and microvascular changes may be linked to the overexpression of these different receptor molecules in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG that in turn modulate pain and sympathetic reflexes. In this review article, we will discuss the

  17. Isotopic diagnosis of peripheral thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornu, Pierre; Scalet, Michel

    1975-01-01

    Radio-isotope diagnosis of peripheral venous thrombosis, using tracer doses of iodine-labelled fibrinogen, provides an important contribution to the solution of the worrying problem of pulmonary embolism due to latent phlebitis. This elegant and precise technique permits early diagnosis of venous thrombosis of the lower limbs at a subclinical stage. It has permitted determination of the frequency, both after surgery and after myocardial infarction, and above all, it provides an objective criterion for assessment of the efficacy of prophylactic measures proposed [fr

  18. Bortezomib-induced painful peripheral neuropathy: an electrophysiological, behavioral, morphological and mechanistic study in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina A Carozzi

    Full Text Available Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor with significant antineoplastic activity for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma as well as other hematological and solid neoplasms. Peripheral neurological complications manifesting with paresthesias, burning sensations, dysesthesias, numbness, sensory loss, reduced proprioception and vibratory sensitivity are among the major limiting side effects associated with bortezomib therapy. Although bortezomib-induced painful peripheral neuropathy is clinically easy to diagnose and reliable models are available, its pathophysiology remains partly unclear. In this study we used well-characterized immune-competent and immune-compromised mouse models of bortezomib-induced painful peripheral neuropathy. To characterize the drug-induced pathological changes in the peripheral nervous system, we examined the involvement of spinal cord neuronal function in the development of neuropathic pain and investigated the relevance of the immune response in painful peripheral neuropathy induced by bortezomib. We found that bortezomib treatment induced morphological changes in the spinal cord, dorsal roots, dorsal root ganglia (DRG and peripheral nerves. Neurophysiological abnormalities and specific functional alterations in Aδ and C fibers were also observed in peripheral nerve fibers. Mice developed mechanical allodynia and functional abnormalities of wide dynamic range neurons in the dorsal horn of spinal cord. Bortezomib induced increased expression of the neuronal stress marker activating transcription factor-3 in most DRG. Moreover, the immunodeficient animals treated with bortezomib developed a painful peripheral neuropathy with the same features observed in the immunocompetent mice. In conclusion, this study extends the knowledge of the sites of damage induced in the nervous system by bortezomib administration. Moreover, a selective functional vulnerability of peripheral nerve fiber subpopulations

  19. Peripheral Endocannabinoid System Activity in Patients Treated With Sibutramine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeli, Stefan; Heusser, Karsten; Janke, Jürgen; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judith; Luft, Friedrich C.; Jordan, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Objective The endocannabinoid system (ECS) promotes weight gain and obesity-associated metabolic changes. Weight loss interventions may influence obesity-associated risk indirectly through modulation of the peripheral ECS. We investigated the effect of acute and chronic treatment with sibutramine on components of the peripheral ECS. Methods and Procedures Twenty obese otherwise healthy patients received randomized, double-blind, crossover treatment with placebo and 15 mg/day sibutramine for 5 days each, followed by 12 weeks open-label sibutramine treatment. We determined circulating anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol and expression levels of endocannabinoid genes in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsies. Results Body weight was stable during the acute treatment period and decreased by 6.0 ± 0.8 kg in those patients completing 3 months of sibutramine treatment (P sibutramine treatment. Discussion The ECS is activated in obesity. We did not find any influence of 5% body weight loss induced by sibutramine on circulating levels of endocannabinoids and adipose-tissue expression of endocannabinoid genes in obese subjects. These data confirm our previous findings on dietary weight loss and suggest that the dysregulation of the ECS may be a cause rather than a consequence of obesity. PMID:18356837

  20. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  1. Emerging nanotechnology approaches in tissue engineering for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Carla; Panseri, Silvia; Antonini, Stefania

    2011-02-01

    Effective nerve regeneration and functional recovery subsequent to peripheral nerve injury is still a clinical challenge. Autologous nerve graft transplantation is a feasible treatment in several clinical cases, but it is limited by donor site morbidity and insufficient donor tissue, impairing complete functional recovery. Tissue engineering has introduced innovative approaches to promote and guide peripheral nerve regeneration by using biomimetic conduits creating favorable microenvironments for nervous ingrowth, but despite the development of a plethora of nerve prostheses, few approaches have as yet entered the clinic. Promising strategies using nanotechnology have recently been proposed, such as the use of scaffolds with functionalized cell-binding domains, the use of guidance channels with cell-scale internally oriented fibers, and the possibility of sustained release of neurotrophic factors. This review addresses the fabrication, advantages, drawbacks, and results achieved by the most recent nanotechnology approaches in view of future solutions for peripheral nerve repair. Peripheral nerve repair strategies are very limited despite numerous advances on the field of neurosciences and regenerative medicine. This review discusses nanotechnology based strategies including scaffolds with functionalized cell binding domains, the use of guidance channels, and the potential use of sustained release neurotropic factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Live Entertainment in a Fairytale Art-Peripheral Tourist Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila EL-Mahgary

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a multidisciplinary study in which the different fields of musicology, social sciences and children’s ‘fairytale’ literature blend together. The interest in this topic came from a lack of attention in past studies on the art-peripheral performers’ and audiences’ experiences with the more popular form of entertainment in art-peripheral tourist settings. Another fundamental purpose for this research is to explore the important role of the art-peripheral ‘fairytale’ settings in transforming the different groups of hosts’ and guests’ everyday rational characters and performances, as they transgress from their cultural norms, and move through the liminal spaces of the sea. Consequently, new identities in Hurghada’s hotels’ fairytale scenes are being formed, and which are the outcome of localized and western, cultural, political, economic, and social constructions. The empirical method in this study puts emphasis on the texts of classical fairytale stories, which are used as an architextual model developed in the course of earlier research undertaken by the author. It is also well worth mentioning, that Hurghada’s art-peripheral hotel settings generate cultural tourism from the simple consumption of entertainment and popular music.

  3. Peripheral vision of youths with low vision: motion perception, crowding, and visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadin, Duje; Nyquist, Jeffrey B; Lusk, Kelly E; Corn, Anne L; Lappin, Joseph S

    2012-08-24

    Effects of low vision on peripheral visual function are poorly understood, especially in children whose visual skills are still developing. The aim of this study was to measure both central and peripheral visual functions in youths with typical and low vision. Of specific interest was the extent to which measures of foveal function predict performance of peripheral tasks. We assessed central and peripheral visual functions in youths with typical vision (n = 7, ages 10-17) and low vision (n = 24, ages 9-18). Experimental measures used both static and moving stimuli and included visual crowding, visual search, motion acuity, motion direction discrimination, and multitarget motion comparison. In most tasks, visual function was impaired in youths with low vision. Substantial differences, however, were found both between participant groups and, importantly, across different tasks within participant groups. Foveal visual acuity was a modest predictor of peripheral form vision and motion sensitivity in either the central or peripheral field. Despite exhibiting normal motion discriminations in fovea, motion sensitivity of youths with low vision deteriorated in the periphery. This contrasted with typically sighted participants, who showed improved motion sensitivity with increasing eccentricity. Visual search was greatly impaired in youths with low vision. Our results reveal a complex pattern of visual deficits in peripheral vision and indicate a significant role of attentional mechanisms in observed impairments. These deficits were not adequately captured by measures of foveal function, arguing for the importance of independently assessing peripheral visual function.

  4. Peripheral Vision of Youths with Low Vision: Motion Perception, Crowding, and Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadin, Duje; Nyquist, Jeffrey B.; Lusk, Kelly E.; Corn, Anne L.; Lappin, Joseph S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Effects of low vision on peripheral visual function are poorly understood, especially in children whose visual skills are still developing. The aim of this study was to measure both central and peripheral visual functions in youths with typical and low vision. Of specific interest was the extent to which measures of foveal function predict performance of peripheral tasks. Methods. We assessed central and peripheral visual functions in youths with typical vision (n = 7, ages 10–17) and low vision (n = 24, ages 9–18). Experimental measures used both static and moving stimuli and included visual crowding, visual search, motion acuity, motion direction discrimination, and multitarget motion comparison. Results. In most tasks, visual function was impaired in youths with low vision. Substantial differences, however, were found both between participant groups and, importantly, across different tasks within participant groups. Foveal visual acuity was a modest predictor of peripheral form vision and motion sensitivity in either the central or peripheral field. Despite exhibiting normal motion discriminations in fovea, motion sensitivity of youths with low vision deteriorated in the periphery. This contrasted with typically sighted participants, who showed improved motion sensitivity with increasing eccentricity. Visual search was greatly impaired in youths with low vision. Conclusions. Our results reveal a complex pattern of visual deficits in peripheral vision and indicate a significant role of attentional mechanisms in observed impairments. These deficits were not adequately captured by measures of foveal function, arguing for the importance of independently assessing peripheral visual function. PMID:22836766

  5. Peripheral neuropathy: an often-overlooked cause of falls in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J K; Ashton-Miller, J A

    1996-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is common in the elderly and results in impairments in distal proprioception and strength that hinder balance and predispose them to falls. The loss of heel reflexes, decreased vibratory sense that improves proximally, impaired position sense at the great toe, and inability to maintain unipedal stance for 10 seconds in three attempts all suggest functionally significant peripheral neuropathy. Physicians can help their patients with peripheral neuropathy to prevent falls by teaching them and their families about peripheral nerve dysfunction and its effects on balance and by advising patients to substitute vision for the lost somatosensory function, correctly use a cane, wear proper shoes and orthotics, and perform balance and upper extremity strengthening exercises.

  6. Megaloblastic anemia with peripheral neuropathy, a misleading initial presentation in POEMS syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iadarilang Tiewsoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available POEMS (peripheral neuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, skin changes syndrome is a rare multisystem paraneoplastic disorder that occurs in the setting of a plasma cell dyscrasia. A 57-year-old male with initial presentation of peripheral neuropathy of lower limbs and a peripheral blood picture of megaloblastic anemia, presented with progressive lower motor neuron weakness over few months; followed by additional features of skin hyperpigmentation, generalized lymphadenopathy, erectile dysfunction, weight loss, and an attack of cerebrovascular accident (stroke infarct which recovered. On further evaluation with time, there were presence of hepatosplenomegaly, Castleman′s disease of the lymph node on biopsy, serum electrophoresis suggestive of monoclonal gammopathy with light band lambda chain, and endocrinopathy (hypothyroidism and hypogonadism. His bone marrow was suggestive of plasmacytosis. This case report describes a patient who presented with initial picture of peripheral neuropathy with megaloblastic anemia, but when followed-up there were diverse clinical manifestations fulfilling the diagnostic clinical criteria of POEMS Syndrome.

  7. Benign Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in a Wild Toco Toucan ( Ramphastos toco ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marcelo P N; Fernandes, Natalia C C A; Nemer, Viviane C; Neto, Ramiro N Dias; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Miranda, Bruna S; Mamprim, Maria J; Catão-Dias, José L; Réssio, Rodrigo A

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that comprise neurofibromas, schwannomas, neurilemmomas, and perineuromas. In animals, peripheral nerve sheath neoplasms are most commonly diagnosed in dogs and cattle, followed by horses, goats, and cats, but their occurrence is uncommon in birds. An adult, free-living, male toco (common) toucan ( Ramphastos toco ) was admitted to the zoo animal clinic with weight loss, dehydration, and presence of a soft nodule adhered to the medial portion of the left pectoral muscle. Clinical, cytologic, and computed tomography scan results were indicative of a neoplasm. The toucan died during surgical resection of the mass. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the diagnosis of benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. To our knowledge, benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor has not previously been reported in a toucan or any other species in the order Piciformes.

  8. Intraoperative Ultrasound for Peripheral Nerve Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsey, Matthew; Wilson, Thomas J; Henning, Phillip Troy; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2017-10-01

    Offering real-time, high-resolution images via intraoperative ultrasound is advantageous for a variety of peripheral nerve applications. To highlight the advantages of ultrasound, its extraoperative uses are reviewed. The current intraoperative uses, including nerve localization, real-time evaluation of peripheral nerve tumors, and implantation of leads for peripheral nerve stimulation, are reviewed. Although intraoperative peripheral nerve localization has been performed previously using guide wires and surgical dyes, the authors' approach using ultrasound-guided instrument clamps helps guide surgical dissection to the target nerve, which could lead to more timely operations and shorter incisions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...... are associated with distinctive disease of the peripheral vestibular tissue structures, suggesting anterograde degeneration and that dizziness in these patients may be caused by deficient peripheral vestibular nerve fibers, neurons, and end organs. In smaller tumors, a highly localized disease occurs, which...

  10. Peripheral refractive correction and automated perimetric profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, J M; Wood, J M; Crews, S J

    1988-06-01

    The effect of peripheral refractive error correction on the automated perimetric sensitivity profile was investigated on a sample of 10 clinically normal, experienced observers. Peripheral refractive error was determined at eccentricities of 0 degree, 20 degrees and 40 degrees along the temporal meridian of the right eye using the Canon Autoref R-1, an infra-red automated refractor, under the parametric conditions of the Octopus automated perimeter. Perimetric sensitivity was then undertaken at these eccentricities (stimulus sizes 0 and III) with and without the appropriate peripheral refractive correction using the Octopus 201 automated perimeter. Within the measurement limits of the experimental procedures employed, perimetric sensitivity was not influenced by peripheral refractive correction.

  11. Peripheral visual performance enhancement by neurofeedback training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Wenya; Wan, Feng; Lou, Chin Ian; Vai, Mang I; Rosa, Agostinho

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral visual performance is an important ability for everyone, and a positive inter-individual correlation is found between the peripheral visual performance and the alpha amplitude during the performance test. This study investigated the effect of alpha neurofeedback training on the peripheral visual performance. A neurofeedback group of 13 subjects finished 20 sessions of alpha enhancement feedback within 20 days. The peripheral visual performance was assessed by a new dynamic peripheral visual test on the first and last training day. The results revealed that the neurofeedback group showed significant enhancement of the peripheral visual performance as well as the relative alpha amplitude during the peripheral visual test. It was not the case in the non-neurofeedback control group, which performed the tests within the same time frame as the neurofeedback group but without any training sessions. These findings suggest that alpha neurofeedback training was effective in improving peripheral visual performance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show evidence for performance improvement in peripheral vision via alpha neurofeedback training.

  12. Living with vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes - vision loss; Retinopathy - vision loss; Low vision; Blindness - vision loss ... of visual aids. Some options include: Magnifiers High power reading glasses Devices that make it easier to ...

  13. Atherectomy for peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Graeme K; Radwan, Rami; Hayes, Paul D; Twine, Christopher P

    2014-03-17

    Symptomatic peripheral arterial disease may be treated by a number of options including exercise therapy, angioplasty, stenting and bypass surgery. Atherectomy is an alternative technique where atheroma is excised by a rotating cutting blade. The objective of this review was to analyse randomised controlled trials comparing atherectomy against any established treatment for peripheral arterial disease in order to evaluate the effectiveness of atherectomy. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (last searched November 2013) and CENTRAL (2013, Issue 10). Trials databases were searched for details of ongoing or unpublished studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing atherectomy and other established treatments were selected for inclusion. All participants had symptomatic peripheral arterial disease with either claudication or critical limb ischaemia and evidence of lower limb arterial disease. Two review authors (GA and CT) screened studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed the quality of the trials. Any disagreements were resolved through discussion. Four trials were included with a total of 220 participants (118 treated with atherectomy, 102 treated with balloon angioplasty) and 259 treated vessels (129 treated with atherectomy, 130 treated with balloon angioplasty). All studies compared atherectomy with angioplasty. No study was properly powered or assessors blinded to the procedures and there was a high risk of selection, attrition, detection and reporting biases.The estimated risk of success was similar between the treatment modalities although the confidence interval (CI) was compatible with small benefits of either treatment for the initial procedural success rate (Mantel-Haenszel risk ratio (RR) 0.92, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.91, P = 0.82), patency at six months (Mantel-Haenszel RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.66, P = 0.79) and patency at 12 months (Mantel-Haenszel RR 1.17, 95% CI 0

  14. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2012-01-01

    MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic......-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged...... intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal...

  15. Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roser Velasco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Taxane-derived agents are chemotherapy drugs widely employed in cancer treatment. Among them, paclitaxel and docetaxel are most commonly administered, but newer formulations are being investigated. Taxane antineoplastic activity is mainly based on the ability of the drugs to promote microtubule assembly, leading to mitotic arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. Peripheral neurotoxicity is the major non-hematological adverse effect of taxane, often manifested as painful neuropathy experienced during treatment, and it is sometimes irreversible. Unfortunately, taxane-induced neurotoxicity is an uncertainty prior to the initiation of treatment. The present review aims to dissect current knowledge on real incidence, underlying pathophysiology, clinical features and predisposing factors related with the development of taxane-induced neuropathy.

  16. Peripheral ischaemic retinopathy and neovascularisation in a patient with subacute streptococcus mitis-induced bacterial endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Leysen, LS; Kreps, EO; De Schryver, I; Hoornaert, KP; Smith, V; De Zaeytijd, J

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe a patient with peripheral retinal ischaemia and neovascularisation who was diagnosed with streptococcus mitis-induced bacterial endocarditis. Methods: Retrospective analysis of case report. A 57-year-old man presented with a history of a rapidly progressive, bilateral, painless visual loss. He also suffered from pain in the neck and lower back and a weight loss of 10 kg. He underwent a full ophthalmologic work-up, laboratory investigations, and imaging of the spine.R...

  17. Physics of Ultra-Peripheral Collisions at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Yılmaz Şengül

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The creation of electron-positron pairs from the vacuum by strong electromagnetic fields is a fundamental and one of the most fascinating processes of relativistic quantum mechanics. Fields sufficiently strong to induce pair creation can be produced, for example, in collisions of bare ions. The process has been studied intensively both in theory and experiment since the 1980s. In peripheral relativistic heavy-ion collisions electromagnetic fields are very strong and interact with each other for a very short time. In these strong fields, probabilities of various electromagnetic processes such as free pair production, bound-free pair production and excitation are large and increase with the Lorentz factor γ. Measurement of cross sections and other relevant distributions are very important for understanding the strong field effect.

  18. Peripheral Glial Cells in the Development of Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Nádia Pereira; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Pallesen, Lone Tjener

    2018-01-01

    The global prevalence of diabetes is rapidly increasing, affecting more than half a billion individuals within the next few years. As diabetes negatively affects several physiological systems, this dramatic increase represents not only impaired quality of life on the individual level but also a huge socioeconomic challenge. One of the physiological consequences affecting up to half of diabetic patients is the progressive deterioration of the peripheral nervous system, resulting in spontaneous pain and eventually loss of sensory function, motor weakness, and organ dysfunctions. Despite intense research on the consequences of hyperglycemia on nerve functions, the biological mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathy are still largely unknown, and treatment options lacking. Research has mainly focused directly on the neuronal component, presumably from the perspective that this is the functional signal-transmitting unit of the nerve. However, it is noteworthy that each single peripheral sensory neuron is intimately associated with numerous glial cells; the neuronal soma is completely enclosed by satellite glial cells and the length of the longest axons covered by at least 1,000 Schwann cells. The glial cells are vital for the neuron, but very little is still known about these cells in general and especially how they respond to diabetes in terms of altered neuronal support. We will discuss current knowledge of peripheral glial cells and argue that increased research in these cells is imperative for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathy. PMID:29770116

  19. Peripheral neuropathy in prediabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Albert G

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a major cause of disability worldwide. Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy, accounting for 50% of cases. Over half of people with diabetes develop neuropathy, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major cause of reduced quality of life due to pain, sensory loss, gait instability, fall-related injury, and foot ulceration and amputation. Most patients with non-diabetic neuropathy have cryptogenic sensory peripheral neuropathy (CSPN). A growing body of literature links prediabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome to the risk of both DPN and CSPN. This association might be particularly strong in type 2 diabetes patients. There are no effective medical treatments for CSPN or DPN, and aggressive glycemic control is an effective approach to neuropathy risk reduction only in type 1 diabetes. Several studies suggest lifestyle-based treatments that integrate dietary counseling with exercise might be a promising therapeutic approach to early DPN in type 2 diabetes and CSPN associated with prediabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Neural tissue engineering options for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Williams, David F

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs) have emerged as a potential alternative to autologous nerve grafts, the gold standard for peripheral nerve repair. Typically, TENGs are composed of a biomaterial-based template that incorporates biochemical cues. A number of TENGs have been used experimentally to bridge long peripheral nerve gaps in various animal models, where the desired outcome is nerve tissue regeneration and functional recovery. So far, the translation of TENGs to the clinic for use in humans has met with a certain degree of success. In order to optimize the TENG design and further approach the matching of TENGs with autologous nerve grafts, many new cues, beyond the traditional ones, will have to be integrated into TENGs. Furthermore, there is a strong requirement for monitoring the real-time dynamic information related to the construction of TENGs. The aim of this opinion paper is to specifically and critically describe the latest advances in the field of neural tissue engineering for peripheral nerve regeneration. Here we delineate new attempts in the design of template (or scaffold) materials, especially in the context of biocompatibility, the choice and handling of support cells, and growth factor release systems. We further discuss the significance of RNAi for peripheral nerve regeneration, anticipate the potential application of RNAi reagents for TENGs, and speculate on the possible contributions of additional elements, including angiogenesis, electrical stimulation, molecular inflammatory mediators, bioactive peptides, antioxidant reagents, and cultured biological constructs, to TENGs. Finally, we consider that a diverse array of physicochemical and biological cues must be orchestrated within a TENG to create a self-consistent coordinated system with a close proximity to the regenerative microenvironment of the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Peripheral Developing Odontoma or Peripheral Ameloblastic Fibroodontoma: A Rare Challenging Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saede Atarbashi Moghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral odontogenic lesions are considered to be rare within the classification of odontogenic tumors. They share the same microscopic characteristics of their central counterparts. Here, we report an ulcerated mass of the maxillary gingiva that on histopathological examination was diagnosed as peripheral developing odontoma or peripheral ameloblastic fibroodontoma. The diagnosis of this tumor is challenging and may lead to unnecessary treatment.

  2. Sympathetic mediated vasomotion and skin capillary permeability in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefrandt, JD; Hoeven, JH; Roon, AM; Smit, AJ; Hoogenberg, K

    Aims/hypothesis. A loss of sympathetic function could lead to changes in capillary fluid filtration in diabetic patients. We investigated whether a decreased sympathetically mediated vasomotion in the skin in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy is associated with an abnormal capillary

  3. Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Hair loss Overview Hereditary hair loss: Millions of men ... of hair loss can often be successfully treated. Hair loss: Overview Also called alopecia (al-o-PEE- ...

  4. Imaging of the peripheral vascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, S.A.; Pond, G.D.; Pinsky, S.; Moss, G.S.; Srikantaswamy, S.; Ryo, U.Y.

    1984-01-01

    This book is limited neither to the peripheral vascular system nor to diagnostic imaging techniques. Its 18 chapters cover nonimaging blood-flow techniques (Doppler ultrasound, plethysmography) as well as noninvasive and invasive imaging techniques (ultrasound, computed tomography, radionuclide digital-subtraction angiography, and contrast angiography). These are applied not only to the peripheral vascular system but also to the aorta and vena cava

  5. Beauty and cuteness in peripheral vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraguchi, Kana; Ashida, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Guo et al. (2011) showed that attractiveness was detectable in peripheral vision. Since there are different types of attractiveness (Rhodes, 2006), we investigated how beauty and cuteness are detected in peripheral vision with a brief presentation. Participants (n = 45) observed two Japanese female faces for 100 ms, then were asked to respond which face was more beautiful (or cuter). The results indicated that both beauty and cuteness were detectable in peripheral vision, but not in the same manner. Discrimination rates for judging beauty were invariant in peripheral and central vision, while discrimination rates for judging cuteness declined in peripheral vision as compared with central vision. This was not explained by lower resolution in peripheral vision. In addition, for male participants, it was more difficult to judge cuteness than beauty in peripheral vision, thus suggesting that gender differences can have a certain effect when judging cuteness. Therefore, central vision might be suitable for judging cuteness while judging beauty might not be affected by either central or peripheral vision. This might be related with the functional difference between beauty and cuteness. PMID:25999883

  6. Ac losses of transposed superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, D.; Enderlein, G.; Lange, F.

    1975-01-01

    Eastham and Rhodes published results of loss measurements on transposed superconducting NbTi cables and concluded basing on an extrapolation to very large numbers of wires that transposed superconductors could be used favorably in cables for power transmission. There are some reasons to question the correctness of their extrapolation. Losses were calculated for transposed superconductors in self field and got results different from those of Eastham and Rhodes. Loss measurements were performed the results of which give evidence for the correctness of our calculations. The results lead to the conclusion that the use of transposed cables of irreversible type 2 superconductors for power transmission is not advantageous

  7. Peripherally applied opioids for postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B N; Henneberg, S W; Schmiegelow, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids applied peripherally at the site of surgery may produce postoperative analgesia with few side effects. We performed this systematic review to evaluate the analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids for acute postoperative pain. METHODS: We searched PubMed (1966 to June...... 2013), Embase (1980 to June 2013), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6). Randomized controlled trials investigating the postoperative analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids vs. systemic opioids or placebo, measured by pain intensity...... difference -5 mm, 95% CI: -7 to -3) for peripherally applied opioids vs. placebo and statistically significant increased time to first analgesic (mean difference 153 min, 95% CI: 41-265). When preoperative inflammation was reported (five studies), peripherally applied opioids significantly improved...

  8. Role of syllable segmentation processes in peripheral word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jean-Baptiste; Calabrèse, Aurélie; Castet, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies of foveal visual word recognition provide evidence for a low-level syllable decomposition mechanism occurring during the recognition of a word. We investigated if such a decomposition mechanism also exists in peripheral word recognition. Single words were visually presented to subjects in the peripheral field using a 6° square gaze-contingent simulated central scotoma. In the first experiment, words were either unicolor or had their adjacent syllables segmented with two different colors (color/syllable congruent condition). Reaction times for correct word identification were measured for the two different conditions and for two different print sizes. Results show a significant decrease in reaction time for the color/syllable congruent condition compared with the unicolor condition. A second experiment suggests that this effect is specific to syllable decomposition and results from strategic, presumably involving attentional factors, rather than stimulus-driven control.

  9. Cold induced peripheral vasodilation at high altitudes- a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ruiten, H.J.A. van

    2000-01-01

    A significant reduction in cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is observed at high altitudes. No agreement is found in the literature about acclimatization effects on CIVD. Two studies were performed to investigate the effect of altitude acclimatization on CIVD. In the first study 13 male subjects

  10. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy between Octopus 900 and Goldmann Kinetic Visual Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona J. Rowe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine diagnostic accuracy of kinetic visual field assessment by Octopus 900 perimetry compared with Goldmann perimetry. Methods. Prospective cross section evaluation of 40 control subjects with full visual fields and 50 patients with known visual field loss. Comparison of test duration and area measurement of isopters for Octopus 3, 5, and 10°/sec stimulus speeds. Comparison of test duration and type of visual field classification for Octopus versus Goldmann perimetry. Results were independently graded for presence/absence of field defect and for type and location of defect. Statistical evaluation comprised of ANOVA and paired t test for evaluation of parametric data with Bonferroni adjustment. Bland Altman and Kappa tests were used for measurement of agreement between data. Results. Octopus 5°/sec perimetry had comparable test duration to Goldmann perimetry. Octopus perimetry reliably detected type and location of visual field loss with visual fields matched to Goldmann results in 88.8% of results (K=0.775. Conclusions. Kinetic perimetry requires individual tailoring to ensure accuracy. Octopus perimetry was reproducible for presence/absence of visual field defect. Our screening protocol when using Octopus perimetry is 5°/sec for determining boundaries of peripheral isopters and 3°/sec for blind spot mapping with further evaluation of area of field loss for defect depth and size.

  11. Nitrogen loss from high N-input vegetable fields - a) direct N2O emissions b) Spatiotemporal variability of N species (N2O, NH4+, NO3-) in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfab, H.; Ruser, R.; Palmer, I.; Fiedler, S.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrous oxide is a climate relevant trace gas. It contributes 7.9 % to the total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission and it is also involved in stratospheric ozone depletion. Approximately 85 % of the anthropogenic N2O emissions result from agricultural activities, more than 50 % are produced during microbial N-turnover processes in soils. Especially soils with high N-input (N-fertilizer and high amount of N in plant residues) like vegetable cropped soils are assumed to cause high N2O losses. The aims of the study presented were (i) to quantify the N2O loss from a vegetable field (lettuce-cauliflower crop rotation), (ii) to calculate an emission factor for the study site in Southwest Germany and to compare this factor with the default value provided by the IPCC (2006) and (iii) to test the emission reduction potential (Ammonium Sulfate Nitrate fertilizer, ASN either by reduced N-fertilization) in comparison with common N doses used for good agricultural practice or by the use of a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), a banded N-application (lettuce) or a depot fertilization measure (pseudo-CULTAN in order to suppress nitrification). N2O fluxes determined with the closed chamber method were highly variable in time with strongly increased flux rates after N-fertilization in combination with rainfall or irrigation measures and after the incorporation of cauliflower crop residues. Using the mean soil nitrate contents of the top soil of our investigated treatments (0-25 cm depth), we could explain approximately 60 % of the variability of the cumulative N2O losses during the vegetation period of lettuce and cauliflower. The cumulative N2O emissions ranged between 0,99 kg N2O-N ha-1 from the unfertilized control plots (vegetation period) and 6,81 kg N2O-N ha-1 from the plots with the highest N-dose. Based on the guidelines of the IPCC (2006), we calculated an emission factor around 0,9 % for the cropping season. This value is in good agreement with the default value of the

  12. Sudden visual loss after cardiac resynchronization therapy device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vitis, Luigi A; Marchese, Alessandro; Giuffrè, Chiara; Carnevali, Adriano; Querques, Lea; Tomasso, Livia; Baldin, Giovanni; Maestranzi, Gisella; Lattanzio, Rosangela; Querques, Giuseppe; Bandello, Francesco

    2017-03-10

    To report a case of sudden decrease in visual acuity possibly due to a cardiogenic embolism in a patient who underwent cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device implantation. A 62-year-old man with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and a left bundle branch block was referred to our department because of a sudden decrease in visual acuity. Nine days earlier, he had undergone cardiac transapical implantation of a CRT device, which was followed, 2 days later, by an inflammatory reaction. The patient underwent several general and ophthalmologic examinations, including multimodal imaging. At presentation, right eye (RE) best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was counting fingers and RE pupil was hyporeactive. Fundus examination revealed white-centered hemorrhagic dots suggestive of Roth spots. Fluorescein angiography showed delay in vascular perfusion during early stage, late hyperfluorescence of the macula and optic disk, and peripheral perivascular leakage. The first visual field test showed complete loss of vision RE and a normal left eye. Due to suspected giant cell arteritis, temporal artery biopsy was performed. Thirty minutes after the procedure, an ischemic stroke with right hemisyndrome and aphasia occurred. The RE BCVA worsened to hands motion. Four months later, RE BCVA did not improve, despite improvement in fluorescein angiography inflammatory sign. We report a possible cardiogenic embolism secondary to undiagnosed infective endocarditis causing monocular visual loss after CRT device implantation. It remains unclear how the embolus caused severe functional damage without altering the retinal anatomical structure.

  13. Entrance and peripheral dose measurements during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Kappas, K.; Theodorou, K.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo dosimetry of entrance dose was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in order to evaluate the clinical application of the build up caps in patient dose measurements and for different treatment techniques. Peripheral dose (thyroid and skin) was measured for patients during breast radiotherapy to evaluate the probability of secondary cancer induction. TLD-100 chips were used with different Copper build up caps (for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams from two linear accelerators. Entrance doses were measured for patients during radiotherapy course for breast, head and neck, abdomen and pelvis malignancies. The measured entrance dose for the different patients for 6 MV beams is found to be within the ±2.6% compared to the dose derived from theoretical estimation (normalized dose at D max ). The same measurements for 15 MV beams are found to be ±3 %. The perturbation value can reach up to 20% of the D max , which acts as a limitation for entrance dose measurements. An average thyroid skin dose of 3.7% of the prescribed dose was measured per treatment session while the mean skin dose breast treatment session is estimated to be 42% of D max , for both internal and external fields. These results are comparable in those of the in vivo of reported in literature. The risk of fatality due to thyroid cancer per treatment course is 3x10 -3

  14. Biomarkers and Genetics in Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Surovi; Annex, Brian H

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is highly prevalent and there is considerable diversity in the initial clinical manifestation and disease progression among individuals. Currently, there is no ideal biomarker to screen for PAD, to risk stratify patients with PAD, or to monitor therapeutic response to revascularization procedures. Advances in human genetics have markedly enhanced the ability to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches across a host of human diseases, but such developments in the field of PAD are lagging. In this article, we will discuss the epidemiology, traditional risk factors for, and clinical presentations of PAD. We will discuss the possible role of genetic factors and gene-environment interactions in the development and/or progression of PAD. We will further explore future avenues through which genetic advances can be used to better our understanding of the pathophysiology of PAD and potentially find newer therapeutic targets. We will discuss the potential role of biomarkers in identifying patients at risk for PAD and for risk stratifying patients with PAD, and novel approaches to identification of reliable biomarkers in PAD. The exponential growth of genetic tools and newer technologies provides opportunities to investigate and identify newer pathways in the development and progression of PAD, and thereby in the identification of newer biomarkers and therapies. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  15. Optical stimulation of peripheral nerves in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathon D.

    This dissertation documents the emergence and validation of a new clinical tool that bridges the fields of biomedical optics and neuroscience. The research herein describes an innovative method for direct neurostimulation with pulsed infrared laser light. Safety and effectiveness of this technique are first demonstrated through functional stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve in vivo. The Holmium:YAG laser (lambda = 2.12 mum) is shown to operate at an optimal wavelength for peripheral nerve stimulation with advantages over standard electrical neural stimulation; including contact-free stimulation, high spatial selectivity, and lack of a stimulation artifact. The underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for transient optical nerve stimulation appears to be a small, absorption driven thermal gradient sustained at the axonal layer of nerve. Results explicitly prove that low frequency optical stimulation can reliably stimulate without resulting in tissue thermal damage. Based on the positive results from animal studies, these optimal laser parameters were utilized to move this research into the clinic with a combined safety and efficacy study in human subjects undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy. The clinical Holmium:YAG laser was used to effectively stimulate human dorsal spinal roots and elicit functional muscle responses recorded during surgery without evidence of nerve damage. Overall these results predict that this technology can be a valuable clinical tool in various neurosurgical applications.

  16. Ghrelin: Central and Peripheral Implications in Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu eMéquinion

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Food intake and associated disorders are gaining large emphasis in our societies due to their dramatic physiological and psychological consequences on health. Chronic food restriction is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN patients. This disease, mostly observed in young women is the third cause of chronic illness in teenagers. It leads to central and/or peripheral reprogramming that permits the organism to endure the reduced energy supplies. These drastic conditions induce severe weight loss, metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia and osteoporosis. Moreover, increasing number of arguments consider AN as an addictive behaviour to food deprivation or weight loss or physical activity, usually associated with mood disorders. This suggests a potential alteration of the central reward system. Significant changes in hormones involved in energy metabolism, regulation of feeding behaviours and bone formation are described in AN patients, but also in animal models presenting a strong face validity. Surprisingly, the plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone, are increased. This hormone acts centrally to modulate food intake, but also peripherally mainly to maintain blood glucose and to regulate gastric motility. Such increase in plasma ghrelin levels seems paradoxical in light of the restrained eating adopted by these AN patients, but adaptive. The aim of this review is to describe the role played by ghrelin in AN focusing on its central vs peripheral action. The chronic food restriction induces both in AN patients and in rodent models a profound alteration in the « ghrelin » signal integration that lead to the development of inappropriate behaviours like hyperactivity or addiction to food starvation and therefore a greater depletion in energy reserves. The question of a transient insensitivity to ghrelin and/or a potential metabolic reprogramming is discussed in regard of new clinical treatments currently

  17. Elevated peripheral visfatin levels in narcoleptic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Dahmen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Narcolepsy is a severe sleep disorder that is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexies and a tendency towards obesity. Recent discoveries indicate that the major pathophysiology is a loss of hypocretin (orexin producing neurons due to immunologically mediated degeneration. Visfatin is a recently described proinflammatory adipokine. It is identical to the immune modulating pre-B-cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF. Our study examines the hypothesis that visfatin levels are altered in narcoleptic patients. METHODS: For the analysis, a total of n = 54 patients (n = 18 males and n = 36 females with the diagnosis of narcolepsy according to DSM-IV and the International Classification of Sleep Disorders were examined (BMI mean 30.3+/-5.5, age mean 52.5+/-16.1 years. As a control group 39 unrelated (n = 12 males and n = 27 females healthy volunteers with no sleep disorder according to DSM-IV were included (BMI mean 28.5+/-4.6, age mean 51.1+/-13.6 years. Peripheral visfatin levels were measured using a commercial enzyme immunoassay kit with a measurement range from 0.1-1000 ng/ml. Narcolepsy symptoms, severity and frequency of symptoms as well as the total duration of various aspects of the symptomatology were assessed by unstructured and structured clinical interviews in including the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy Sleep Inventory. RESULTS: Circulating visfatin was found to be significantly increased in HLA DR2 positive narcoleptic patients compared to controls. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our results add to the evidence of disturbed immunological regulation in patients with narcolepsy.

  18. Carvedilol prevents functional deficits in peripheral nerve mitochondria of rats with oxaliplatin-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Areti, Aparna; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-01-01

    Oxaliplatin use as chemotherapeutic agent is frequently limited by cumulative neurotoxicity which may compromise quality of life. Reports relate this neurotoxic effect to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Carvedilol is an antihypertensive drug, has also been appreciated for its antioxidant and mitoprotective properties. Carvedilol co-treatment did not reduce the anti-tumor effects of oxaliplatin in human colon cancer cells (HT-29), but exhibited free radical scavenging activity against oxaliplatin-induced oxidative stress in neuronal cells (Neuro-2a). Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of carvedilol in the experimental model of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Oxaliplatin reduced the sensory nerve conduction velocity and produced the thermal and mechanical nociception. Carvedilol significantly (P < 0.001) attenuated these functional and sensorimotor deficits. It also counteracted oxidative/nitrosative stress by reducing the levels of nitrotyrosine and improving the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression in both sciatic nerve and DRG tissues. It improved the mitochondrial function and prevented the oxaliplatin-induced alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential in sciatic nerve thus prevented loss of intra epidermal nerve fiber density in the foot pads. Together the results prompt the use of carvedilol along with chemotherapy with oxaliplatin to prevent the peripheral neuropathy. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation neuroprotective mechanisms of carvedilol in oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. - Highlights: • Oxaliplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction causes neurotoxicity. • Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to bioenergetic and functional deficits. • Carvedilol alleviated oxaliplatin-induced behavioural and functional changes. • Targeting mitochondria with carvedilol attenuated neuropathic pain.

  19. Carvedilol prevents functional deficits in peripheral nerve mitochondria of rats with oxaliplatin-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Areti, Aparna; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: ashutosh.niperhyd@gov.in

    2017-05-01

    Oxaliplatin use as chemotherapeutic agent is frequently limited by cumulative neurotoxicity which may compromise quality of life. Reports relate this neurotoxic effect to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Carvedilol is an antihypertensive drug, has also been appreciated for its antioxidant and mitoprotective properties. Carvedilol co-treatment did not reduce the anti-tumor effects of oxaliplatin in human colon cancer cells (HT-29), but exhibited free radical scavenging activity against oxaliplatin-induced oxidative stress in neuronal cells (Neuro-2a). Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of carvedilol in the experimental model of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Oxaliplatin reduced the sensory nerve conduction velocity and produced the thermal and mechanical nociception. Carvedilol significantly (P < 0.001) attenuated these functional and sensorimotor deficits. It also counteracted oxidative/nitrosative stress by reducing the levels of nitrotyrosine and improving the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression in both sciatic nerve and DRG tissues. It improved the mitochondrial function and prevented the oxaliplatin-induced alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential in sciatic nerve thus prevented loss of intra epidermal nerve fiber density in the foot pads. Together the results prompt the use of carvedilol along with chemotherapy with oxaliplatin to prevent the peripheral neuropathy. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation neuroprotective mechanisms of carvedilol in oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy. - Highlights: • Oxaliplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction causes neurotoxicity. • Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to bioenergetic and functional deficits. • Carvedilol alleviated oxaliplatin-induced behavioural and functional changes. • Targeting mitochondria with carvedilol attenuated neuropathic pain.

  20. Ionic mechanisms in peripheral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransén, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain constitutes an important and growing problem in society with large unmet needs with respect to treatment and clear implications for quality of life. Computational modeling is used to complement experimental studies to elucidate mechanisms involved in pain states. Models representing the peripheral nerve ending often address questions related to sensitization or reduction in pain detection threshold. In models of the axon or the cell body of the unmyelinated C-fiber, a large body of work concerns the role of particular sodium channels and mutations of these. Furthermore, in central structures: spinal cord or higher structures, sensitization often refers not only to enhanced synaptic efficacy but also to elevated intrinsic neuronal excitability. One of the recent developments in computational neuroscience is the emergence of computational neuropharmacology. In this area, computational modeling is used to study mechanisms of pathology with the objective of finding the means of restoring healthy function. This research has received increased attention from the pharmaceutical industry as ion channels have gained increased interest as drug targets. Computational modeling has several advantages, notably the ability to provide mechanistic links between molecular and cellular levels on the one hand and functions at the systems level on the other hand. These characteristics make computational modeling an additional tool to be used in the process of selecting pharmaceutical targets. Furthermore, large-scale simulations can provide a framework to systematically study the effects of several interacting disease parameters or effects from combinations of drugs. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Peripheral dose measurement for CyberKnife radiosurgery with upgraded linac shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Cynthia F.; Larson, David A.; Zytkovicz, Andrea; Smith, Vernon; Petti, Paula L.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the peripheral dose reduction for CyberKnife radiosurgery treatments after the installation of a linac shielding upgrade. As in a previous investigation, the authors considered two treatment plans, one for a hypothetical target in the brain and another for a target in the thorax, delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. The results of the prior investigation showed that the CyberKnife delivered significantly higher peripheral doses than comparable model C Gamma Knife or IMRT treatments. Current measurements, after the linac shielding upgrade, demonstrate that the additional shielding decreased the peripheral dose, expressed as a percentage of the delivered monitor units (MU), by a maximum of 59%. The dose reduction was greatest for cranial-caudal distances from the field edge less than 30 cm, and at these distances, the CyberKnife peripheral dose, expressed as a percentage of the delivered MU, is now comparable to that measured for the other treatment modalities in our previous investigation. For distances between 30 and 70 cm from the field edge, the additional shielding reduced the peripheral dose by between 20% and 55%. At these distances, the CyberKnife peripheral dose remains higher than doses measured in our previous study for the model C Gamma Knife and IMRT

  2. Peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma of maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Ajmera, Neha; Singh, Amit

    2010-07-01

    Peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma is a reactive gingival overgrowth occurring frequently in anterior maxilla. It is a slow-growing benign tumor which may lead to pathologic migration and other periodontal problems, so it should be excised as soon as possible. The recurrence rate of peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma is reported to be 8% to 20%, so a close postoperative follow-up is required. Herein, we are reporting a similar case of peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma in the maxillary anterior region.

  3. CT characteristics of peripheral organizing pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seong Oh; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Myung Joon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hyung Sik; Jun, Young Hwan; Park, Yong Koo

    1988-01-01

    Diagnostic dilemma of persistent mass-forming parenchymal opacity in the lung periphery occurs occasionally in the realm of diagnostic radiology. Until recently, literature on the role of computed tomography in peripheral organizing pneumonia, which is difficult to differentiate from malignancy, has little been published. We experienced one case of pathologically proven organizing pneumonia diagnosed preoperatively by chest CT. When it comes to solitary peripheral mass density in the lung, we think that CT can be proved useful in the diagnosis of benign organizing pneumonia by showing regular and smoothly corrugate margin, peripheral contrast enhancement with inner low density, and air-trapping by intervening normal lung parenchyma.

  4. Peripheral facial nerve dysfunction: CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disbro, M.A.; Harnsberger, H.R.; Osborn, A.G.

    1985-06-01

    Peripheral facial nerve dysfunction may have a clinically apparent or occult cause. The authors reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of 36 patients with peripheral facial nerve dysfunction to obtain information on the location of the suspected lesion and the number, sequence, and type of radiographic evaluations performed. Inadequate clinical evaluations before computed tomography (CT) was done and unnecessary CT examinations were also noted. They have suggested a practical clinical and radiographic scheme to evaluate progressive peripheral facial dysfunction with no apparent cause. If this scheme is applied, unnecessary radiologic tests and delays in diagnosis and treatment may be avoided.

  5. The glucuronyltransferase GlcAT-P is required for stretch growth of peripheral nerves in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Pandey

    Full Text Available During development, the growth of the animal body is accompanied by a concomitant elongation of the peripheral nerves, which requires the elongation of integrated nerve fibers and the axons projecting therein. Although this process is of fundamental importance to almost all organisms of the animal kingdom, very little is known about the mechanisms regulating this process. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of novel mutant alleles of GlcAT-P, the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian glucuronyltransferase b3gat1. GlcAT-P mutants reveal shorter larval peripheral nerves and an elongated ventral nerve cord (VNC. We show that GlcAT-P is expressed in a subset of neurons in the central brain hemispheres, in some motoneurons of the ventral nerve cord as well as in central and peripheral nerve glia. We demonstrate that in GlcAT-P mutants the VNC is under tension of shorter peripheral nerves suggesting that the VNC elongates as a consequence of tension imparted by retarded peripheral nerve growth during larval development. We also provide evidence that for growth of peripheral nerve fibers GlcAT-P is critically required in hemocytes; however, glial cells are also important in this process. The glial specific repo gene acts as a modifier of GlcAT-P and loss or reduction of repo function in a GlcAT-P mutant background enhances VNC elongation. We propose a model in which hemocytes are required for aspects of glial cell biology which in turn affects the elongation of peripheral nerves during larval development. Our data also identifies GlcAT-P as a first candidate gene involved in growth of integrated peripheral nerves and therefore establishes Drosophila as an amenable in-vivo model system to study this process at the cellular and molecular level in more detail.

  6. The glucuronyltransferase GlcAT-P is required for stretch growth of peripheral nerves in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rahul; Blanco, Jorge; Udolph, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    During development, the growth of the animal body is accompanied by a concomitant elongation of the peripheral nerves, which requires the elongation of integrated nerve fibers and the axons projecting therein. Although this process is of fundamental importance to almost all organisms of the animal kingdom, very little is known about the mechanisms regulating this process. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of novel mutant alleles of GlcAT-P, the Drosophila ortholog of the mammalian glucuronyltransferase b3gat1. GlcAT-P mutants reveal shorter larval peripheral nerves and an elongated ventral nerve cord (VNC). We show that GlcAT-P is expressed in a subset of neurons in the central brain hemispheres, in some motoneurons of the ventral nerve cord as well as in central and peripheral nerve glia. We demonstrate that in GlcAT-P mutants the VNC is under tension of shorter peripheral nerves suggesting that the VNC elongates as a consequence of tension imparted by retarded peripheral nerve growth during larval development. We also provide evidence that for growth of peripheral nerve fibers GlcAT-P is critically required in hemocytes; however, glial cells are also important in this process. The glial specific repo gene acts as a modifier of GlcAT-P and loss or reduction of repo function in a GlcAT-P mutant background enhances VNC elongation. We propose a model in which hemocytes are required for aspects of glial cell biology which in turn affects the elongation of peripheral nerves during larval development. Our data also identifies GlcAT-P as a first candidate gene involved in growth of integrated peripheral nerves and therefore establishes Drosophila as an amenable in-vivo model system to study this process at the cellular and molecular level in more detail.

  7. High frequency oscillations evoked by peripheral magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, S; Simon, L; Fiedler, P; Strohmeier, D; Haueisen, J

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) and / or fields (SEF) is a well-established and important tool for investigating the functioning of the peripheral and central human nervous system. A standard technique to evoke SEPs / SEFs is the stimulation of the median nerve by using a bipolar electrical stimulus. We aim at an alternative stimulation technique enabling stimulation of deep nerve structures while reducing patient stress and error susceptibility. In the current study, we apply a commercial transcranial magnetic stimulation system for peripheral magnetic stimulation of the median nerve. We compare the results of simultaneously recorded EEG signals to prove applicability of our technique to evoke SEPs including low frequency components (LFC) as well as high frequency oscillations (HFO). Therefore, we compare amplitude, latency and time-frequency characteristics of the SEP of 14 healthy volunteers after electric and magnetic stimulation. Both low frequency components and high frequency oscillations were detected. The HFOs were superimposed onto the primary cortical response N20. Statistical analysis revealed significantly lower amplitudes and increased latencies for LFC and HFO components after magnetic stimulation. The differences indicate the inability of magnetic stimulation to elicit supramaximal responses. A psycho-perceptual evaluation showed that magnetic stimulation was less unpleasant for 12 out of the 14 volunteers. In conclusion, we showed that LFC and HFO components related to median nerve stimulation can be evoked by peripheral magnetic stimulation.

  8. Energy losses on tokamak startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1983-01-01

    During the startup of a tokamak reactor using poloidal field (PF) coils to induce plasma currents, the conducting structures carry induced currents. The associated energy losses in the circuits must be provided by the startup coils and the PF system. This paper provides quantitative and comparitive values for the energies required as a function of the thickness or resistivity of the torus shells

  9. EDITORIAL MODERN TECHNOLOGY IN PERIPHERAL HEALTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-06-01

    Jun 1, 2004 ... new technology to peripheral health care systems in developing countries. ... and maintenance of medical equipment in Africa, citing information ... operating laboratory equipment, and for emergency lighting for operating ...

  10. Haemopoietic progenitor cells in human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation reported is to purify haemopoietic progenitor cells from human peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation in order to isolate a progenitor cell fraction without immunocompetent cells. The purification technique of peripheral blood flow colony forming unit culture (CFU-c) by means of density gradient centrifugation and a combined depletion of various rosettes is described. The results of several 'in vitro' characteristics of purified CFU-c suspensions and of the plasma clot diffusion chamber culture technique are presented. Irradiation studies revealed that for both human bone marrow and peripheral blood the CFU-c were less radioresistant than clusters. Elimination of monocytes (and granulocytes) from the test suspensions induced an alteration in radiosensitivity pararmeters. The results obtained with the different techniques are described by analysing peripheral progenitor cell activity in myeloproliferative disorders. (Auth.)

  11. Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Harvest

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Harvest. Mobilization protocol. G-CSF 10 mcg/Kg / day for 5 days. Pheresis. Cobe Spectra; Haemonetics mcs+. Enumeration. CD34 counts; Cfu-GM assays.

  12. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  13. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007393.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries To use the sharing features ... inside the arteries and block blood flow. A stent is a small, metal mesh tube that keeps ...

  14. Peripheral myelin protein 22 alters membrane architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorf, Kathleen F.; Marinko, Justin T.; Hampton, Cheri M.; Ke, Zunlong; Hadziselimovic, Arina; Schlebach, Jonathan P.; Law, Cheryl L.; Li, Jun; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Sanders, Charles R.; Ohi, Melanie D.

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is highly expressed in myelinating Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system. PMP22 genetic alterations cause the most common forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD), which is characterized by severe dysmyelination in the peripheral nerves. However, the functions of PMP22 in Schwann cell membranes remain unclear. We demonstrate that reconstitution of purified PMP22 into lipid vesicles results in the formation of compressed and cylindrically wrapped protein-lipid vesicles that share common organizational traits with compact myelin of peripheral nerves in vivo. The formation of these myelin-like assemblies depends on the lipid-to-PMP22 ratio, as well as on the PMP22 extracellular loops. Formation of the myelin-like assemblies is disrupted by a CMTD-causing mutation. This study provides both a biochemical assay for PMP22 function and evidence that PMP22 directly contributes to membrane organization in compact myelin. PMID:28695207

  15. Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Peripheral Arterial Disease Can Be a Killer Past Issues / ... Color changes in skin, paleness, or blueness Lower temperature in one leg compared to the other leg ...

  16. Fingertip touch improves postural stability in patients with peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, R; Shupert, C L; Horak, F B

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine whether fingertip touch on a stable surface could improve postural stability during stance in subjects with somatosensory loss in the feet from diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The contribution of fingertip touch to postural stability was determined by comparing postural sway in three touch conditions (light, heavy and none) in eight patients and eight healthy control subjects who stood on two surfaces (firm or foam) with eyes open or closed. In the light touch condition, fingertip touch provided only somatosensory information because subjects exerted less than 1 N of force with their fingertip to a force plate, mounted on a vertical support. In the heavy touch condition, mechanical support was available because subjects transmitted as much force to the force plate as they wished. In the no touch condition, subjects held the right forefinger above the force plate. Antero-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) root mean square (RMS) of center of pressure (CoP) sway and trunk velocity were larger in subjects with somatosensory loss than in control subjects, especially when standing on the foam surface. The effects of light and heavy touch were similar in the somatosensory loss and control groups. Fingertip somatosensory input through light touch attenuated both AP and ML trunk velocity as much as heavy touch. Light touch also reduced CoP sway compared to no touch, although the decrease in CoP sway was less effective than with heavy touch, particularly on the foam surface. The forces that were applied to the touch plate during light touch preceded movements of the CoP, lending support to the suggestion of a feedforward mechanism in which fingertip inputs trigger the activation of postural muscles for controlling body sway. These results have clinical implications for understanding how patients with peripheral neuropathy may benefit from a cane for postural stability in stance.

  17. Accommodative loss after retinal cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Tsuyoshi; Okuyama, Michiko; Tanabe, Tatsuro; Kawamura, Ryosuke; Ideta, Hidenao

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effects of peripheral retinal cryotherapy on accommodative amplitude in patients with retinal lattice degeneration. Prospective, observational case series. We studied 92 eyes in 69 patients (age range, 13 to 79 years) treated with cryotherapy for lattice degeneration between December 2001 and September 2004. Pretreatment and posttreatment accommodative amplitudes were measured. Acute accommodative loss was calculated from the difference between accommodative amplitudes before treatment and one week after treatment. We investigated the time course of accommodative amplitudes, acute accommodative loss in different age groups and in pretreatment accommodative amplitude groups, the influence of cryotherapy numbers on accommodative amplitude, and the influence of cryotherapy sites on accommodative amplitude. No significant difference was noted between pretreatment and posttreatment accommodative amplitudes in the overall subject cohort. Dividing subjects by age revealed significant decreases in accommodative amplitude only among patients in their 10s and 20s at one and three weeks after treatment. Accommodative amplitude was lowest among those in their 10s, followed by that among those in their 20s (P < .01). Accommodative amplitudes recovered to pretreatment level by six weeks. Acute accommodative loss was greatest in those in their 10s compared with other age groups (P < .01). A significant correlation was observed between acute accommodative loss and cryotherapy numbers (P = .03; r = 0.41). The decrease in accommodative amplitude was greatest at one week after treatment and recovered to pretreatment levels after six weeks. Accommodative amplitude showed the greatest decrease after cryotherapy among patients in their 10s and 20s. A decrease in accommodative amplitude was observed with increased numbers of cryotherapy spots administered.

  18. Meeting report on the first Iranian congress of electrodiagnosis in peripheral nerve lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahrami Hasan M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Department of Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation and Electrodiagnosis of Shaheed Beheshti Medical University in collaboration with the Iranian Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (ISPMR held the 1st Congress of Electrodiagnostic Medicine in Peripheral Nerve Lesions on December 21–22, 2006. Electrodiagnostic medicine is a specific branch of medicine used by specialist physicians in the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation and/or neurology to diagnose, prognosticate and plan treatment options of peripheral nerve lesions. This meeting was hold to discuss multidisciplinary approaches to this common and important topic in the medical field.

  19. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell?s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the...

  20. Atherectomy in Peripheral Artery Disease: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Tariq M; Afari, Maxwell E; Garcia, Lawrence A

    2017-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a clinical manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The physiological force and shear stress from angioplasty and stenting have made PAD treatment challenging. Atherectomy devices have continued to emerge as a major therapy in the management of peripheral vascular disease. This article presents a review of the current literature for the atherectomy devices used in PAD.

  1. Passive Scalar Evolution in Peripheral Region

    OpenAIRE

    Lebedev, V. V.; Turitsyn, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    We consider evolution of a passive scalar (concentration of pollutants or temperature) in a chaotic (turbulent) flow. A universal asymptotic behavior of the passive scalar decay (homogenization) related to peripheral regions (near walls) is established. The passive scalar moments and its pair correlation function in the peripheral region are analyzed. A special case investigated in our paper is the passive scalar decay along a pipe.

  2. Peripheral Circulatory Features during High-Frequency Jet Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kontorovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of a study of peripheral circulatory features during high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV. The main specific features of peripheral circulation and oxygen transport during HFJV are formulated on the basis of a study of cardiac output (impedance cardiography, peripheral vascular resistance, peripheral vascular blood filling (photoplethysmogram analysis, adaptive peripheral blood flow reactions (spectral analysis of peripheral vascular pulsation. HFJV gives rise to the peculiar pattern of peripheral hemodynamics and tissue gas exchange, which is characterized by higher oxygen uptake without a decrease in mixed venous blood saturation, with normal extraction coefficient and preserved low peripheral vascular resistance. During HFJV, unlike traditional ventilation, the main peripheral hemodynamic feature is the increased capillary bed blood volume caused by the blood flow involvement of reserve capillaries under control of volume (parasympathetic regulation of adaptive peripheral hemodynamic reactions. Key words: high-frequency jet ventilation, oxygen transport, peripheral hemodynamics.

  3. Understanding Grief and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the process of adapting to life after a loss. It is influenced by each person’s society, culture, and religion. Bereavement is the state of having experienced a loss. Common grief reactions Reactions to loss are called ...

  4. Mini-review: Far peripheral vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    The region of far peripheral vision, beyond 60 degrees of visual angle, is important to the evaluation of peripheral dark shadows (negative dysphotopsia) seen by some intraocular lens (IOL) patients. Theoretical calculations show that the limited diameter of an IOL affects ray paths at large angles, leading to a dimming of the main image for small pupils, and to peripheral illumination by light bypassing the IOL for larger pupils. These effects are rarely bothersome, and cataract surgery is highly successful, but there is a need to improve the characterization of far peripheral vision, for both pseudophakic and phakic eyes. Perimetry is the main quantitative test, but the purpose is to evaluate pathologies rather than characterize vision (and object and image regions are no longer uniquely related in the pseudophakic eye). The maximum visual angle is approximately 105 0 , but there is limited information about variations with age, race, or refractive error (in case there is an unexpected link with the development of myopia), or about how clear cornea, iris location, and the limiting retina are related. Also, the detection of peripheral motion is widely recognized to be important, yet rarely evaluated. Overall, people rarely complain specifically about this visual region, but with "normal" vision including an IOL for >5% of people, and increasing interest in virtual reality and augmented reality, there are new reasons to characterize peripheral vision more completely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Casandra J; Watson, James C

    2015-02-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy impairs quality of life and can be difficult to treat. To discuss current treatment recommendations for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Literature review. Systematic review of the literature discussing treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Existing treatment guidelines were studied and compared. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in about one in six people with diabetes. This condition impairs quality of life and increases healthcare costs. Treatment recommendations exist, but individual patient therapy can require a trial-and-error approach. Many treatment options have adjuvant benefits or side effects which should be considered prior to initiating therapy. Often, a combination of treatment modalities with various mechanisms of action is required for adequate pain control. Adequate medication titration and a reasonable trial period should be allowed. The treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy can be challenging, but effective management can improve patient's quality of life. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy impairs quality of life and can be difficult to treat. Many treatment options have adjuvant benefits or side effects which should be considered prior to initiating therapy. Often, a combination of treatment modalities with various mechanisms of action is required for adequate pain control. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  6. Neutron emission in peripheral heavy ion collisions in the system Ho + Ne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orf, H.

    1983-01-01

    In the present thesis peripheral collision processes in the system 165 Ho + 20 Ne were studied. The measurement of the neutrons in coincidence with projectile-like fragments should answer the central question whether at incident energies of approx.=15 respectively 20 MeV/nucleon a thermal equilibrium is reached yet during the interaction time. The analysis of the neutron spectra resulted that the largest part of the neutrons was evaporated just after reaching the thermal equilibrium from the fragments fully accelerated in the Coulomb field. About 10% of the neutrons however were emitted during the interaction time and showed the same spectral shape as the pre-equilibrium neutrons in central collisions. A further hint for pre-equilibrium effects yielded the result that the temperatures of the projectile-like fragments were larger than those of the target-like. This could be explained for quasi-elastic processes by assuming a fluctuation in the partition of the excitation energy. For deep inelastic processes such explanation wasn't possible. At neon fragment with low energy loss furthermore direct processes could be observed in which the projectile has picked up a neutron from the target nucleus without excitation of it. From the known width of the observed state in 21 Ne the reaction time could be fixed to values lower than 6x10 -21 s. (HSI) [de

  7. Vascular access in neonatology: peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Lienemann

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to present aspects of peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter, highlighting important points in choosing the type of access. For the passage of peripherally inserted central catheter is previously performing specific course necessary, while the primary indication occurs when it is necessary to access the patient's stay for a long period of time. Whereas peripheral venipuncture is the most appropriate in cases of needing an IV line quickly and safely, for the administration of fluids, blood collection, blood transfusion and other.

  8. Economic Loan Loss Provision and Expected Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hlawatsch

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The intention of a loan loss provision is the anticipation of the loan's expected losses by adjusting the book value of the loan. Furthermore, this loan loss provision has to be compared to the expected loss according to Basel II and, in the case of a difference, liable equity has to be adjusted. This however assumes that the loan loss provision and the expected loss are based on a similar economic rationale, which is only valid conditionally in current loan loss provisioning methods according to IFRS. Therefore, differences between loan loss provisions and expected losses should only result from different approaches regarding the parameter estimation within each model and not due to different assumptions regarding the outcome of the model. The provisioning and accounting model developed in this paper overcomes the before-mentioned shortcomings and is consistent with an economic rationale of expected losses. Additionally, this model is based on a close-to-market valuation of the loan that is in favor of the basic idea of IFRS. Suggestions for changes in current accounting and capital requirement rules are provided.

  9. Training improves reading speed in peripheral vision: is it due to attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Won; Kwon, Miyoung; Legge, Gordon E; Gefroh, Joshua J

    2010-06-01

    Previous research has shown that perceptual training in peripheral vision, using a letter-recognition task, increases reading speed and letter recognition (S. T. L. Chung, G. E. Legge, & S. H. Cheung, 2004). We tested the hypothesis that enhanced deployment of spatial attention to peripheral vision explains this training effect. Subjects were pre- and post-tested with 3 tasks at 10° above and below fixation-RSVP reading speed, trigram letter recognition (used to construct visual-span profiles), and deployment of spatial attention (measured as the benefit of a pre-cue for target position in a lexical-decision task). Groups of five normally sighted young adults received 4 days of trigram letter-recognition training in upper or lower visual fields, or central vision. A control group received no training. Our measure of deployment of spatial attention revealed visual-field anisotropies; better deployment of attention in the lower field than the upper, and in the lower-right quadrant compared with the other three quadrants. All subject groups exhibited slight improvement in deployment of spatial attention to peripheral vision in the post-test, but this improvement was not correlated with training-related increases in reading speed and the size of visual-span profiles. Our results indicate that improved deployment of spatial attention to peripheral vision does not account for improved reading speed and letter recognition in peripheral vision.

  10. Regional Extent of Peripheral Suppression in Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Raiju J; Clavagnier, Simon; Bobier, William R; Thompson, Benjamin; Hess, Robert F

    2017-04-01

    Previously, we have mapped amblyopic eye suppression within the central 20° of the visual field and observed a gradient of suppression that is strongest in central vision and weakens with increasing eccentricity. In this study, using a large dichoptic display, we extend our novel suppression mapping approach further into the periphery (from 20°-60°) to assess whether suppression continues to decline with eccentricity or plateaus. Sixteen participants with amblyopia (10 with strabismus, 6 with anisometropia without strabismus; mean age: 37.9 ± 11 years) and six normal observers (mean age: 28.3 ± 5 years) took part. The visual stimulus (60° diameter), viewed from 57 cm, was composed of four concentric annuli (5° radius) with alternate contrast polarities starting from an eccentricity of 10°. Each annulus was divided into eight sectors subtending 45° of visual angle. Participants adjusted the contrast of a single sector presented to the fellow eye to match the perceived contrast of the remaining stimulus elements that were presented to the amblyopic eye. A matching contrast that was lower in the fellow eye than the amblyopic eye indicated suppression. Patients with strabismus exhibited significantly stronger interocular suppression than controls across all eccentricities (P = 0.01). Patients with anisometropia did not differ from controls (P = 0.58). Suppression varied significantly with eccentricity (P = 0.005) but this effect did not differ between patient groups (P = 0.217). In amblyopia, suppression is present beyond the central 10° in patients with strabismus. Suppression becomes weaker at greater eccentricities and this may enable peripheral fusion that could be used by binocular treatment methods.

  11. A new dynamic visual acuity test to assess peripheral vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, Domenic; Hegemann, Stefan C A; Straumann, Dominik; Bergamin, Oliver; Bockisch, Christopher J; Angehrn, Dominik; Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Probst, Rudolf

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate a novel test for dynamic visual acuity (DVA) that uses an adaptive algorithm for changing the size of Landolt rings presented during active or passive head impulses, and to compare the results with search-coil head impulse testing. Prospective study in healthy individuals and patients with peripheral vestibular deficits. Tertiary academic center. One hundred neuro-otologically healthy individuals (age range, 19-80 years) and 15 patients with bilateral (n = 5) or unilateral (n = 10) peripheral vestibular loss (age range, 27-72 years). Testing of static visual acuity (SVA), DVA during active and passive horizontal head rotations (optotype presentation at head velocities >100 degrees/s and >150 degrees/s), and quantitative horizontal head impulse testing with scleral search coils. Difference between SVA and DVA, that is, visual acuity loss (VA loss), gain of the high-acceleration vestibulo-ocular reflex. Passive head impulses and higher velocities were more effective than active impulses and lower velocities. Using passive head impulses and velocities higher than 150 degrees/s, the DVA test discriminated significantly (P test sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 94%, and accuracy was 95%, with search-coil head impulse testing used as a reference. In healthy individuals, VA loss increased significantly with age (P testing with Landolt rings that are adaptively changed in size enables detection of peripheral vestibular dysfunction in a fast and simple way.

  12. Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Rysová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Title of bachelor's thesis: Case report of a patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy Summary: Teoretical part of bachelor's thesis contains theoretical foundation of peripheral facial nerve palsy. Practical part of bachelor's thesis contains physiotherapeutic case report of patient with peripheral facial nerve palsy. Key words: peripheral facial nerve palsy, casuistry, rehabilitation

  13. Vector Control Using Series Iron Loss Model of Induction, Motors and Power Loss Minimization

    OpenAIRE

    Kheldoun Aissa; Khodja Djalal Eddine

    2009-01-01

    The iron loss is a source of detuning in vector controlled induction motor drives if the classical rotor vector controller is used for decoupling. In fact, the field orientation will not be satisfied and the output torque will not truck the reference torque mostly used by Loss Model Controllers (LMCs). In addition, this component of loss, among others, may be excessive if the vector controlled induction motor is driving light loads. In this paper, the series iron loss model ...

  14. Protective Effect of a Mitochondria-Targeted Peptide against the Development of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Satoshi; Shimoyama, Naohito; Szeto, Hazel H; Schiller, Peter W; Shimoyama, Megumi

    2018-04-18

    Several chemotherapeutic agents used for cancer treatment induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy that compromises patients' quality of life and limits cancer treatment. Recently, mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to be involved in the mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. SS-20 is a mitochondria-targeted peptide that promotes mitochondrial respiration and restores mitochondrial bioenergetics. In the present study, we examined the protective effect of SS-20 against the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy utilizing a murine model of peripheral neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin, a first-line chemotherapy agent for colon cancer. Weekly administrations of oxaliplatin induced peripheral neuropathy as demonstrated by the development of neuropathic pain and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in the hind paw. Continuous administration of SS-20 protected against the development of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain and mitigated the loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers to normal levels. Our findings suggest that SS-20 may be a drug candidate for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  15. Misdiagnosis of acute peripheral vestibulopathy in central nervous ischemic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Eva Maria; Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Ropposch, Thorsten; Nemetz, Ulrike; Lackner, Andreas; Walch, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Vertigo is a very common symptom at otorhinolaryngology (ENT), neurological, and emergency units, but often, it is difficult to distinguish between vertigo of peripheral and central origin. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a hospital database, including all patients admitted to the ENT University Hospital Graz after neurological examination, with a diagnosis of peripheral vestibular vertigo and subsequent diagnosis of central nervous infarction as the actual cause for the vertigo. Twelve patients were included in this study. All patients with acute spinning vertigo after a thorough neurological examination and with uneventful computed tomographic scans were referred to our ENT department. Nine of them presented with horizontal nystagmus. Only 1 woman experienced additional hearing loss. The mean diagnostic delay to the definite diagnosis of a central infarction through magnetic resonance imaging was 4 days (SD, 2.3 d). A careful otologic and neurological examination, including the head impulse test and caloric testing, is mandatory. Because ischemic events cannot be diagnosed in computed tomographic scans at an early stage, we strongly recommend to perform cranial magnetic resonance imaging within 48 hours from admission if vertigo has not improved under conservative treatment.

  16. Genetic biomarkers for neoplastic colorectal cancer in peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Mirela; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Ionescu, Cristina; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gologan, Serban; Teiusanu, Adriana; Arbanas, Tudor; Mircea, Diculescu

    2011-04-01

    Loss of genomic stability appears as a key step in colorectal carcinogenesis. Micronucleus (MN) designates a chromosome fragment or an entire chromosme which lags behind mitosis. MN may be noticed as an additional nucleus within the cytoplasm cell during the intermediate mitosis phases. We tested the hypothesis that MN and its related anomalies may be associated with the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured and microscopically examined. The frequency of micronuclei (FMN) and the presence of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) in binucleated cells were compared in patients with of without colorectal neoplastic lesions. We included 45 patients undergoing colonoscopy, 23 males and 22 females, with a median age of 59. 17 patients had polyps, 11 colorectal cancer (CRC) and 17 had a normal colonoscopy. The FMN was significantly higher in women than in men (8.14 vs 4.17, p=0.008); NPB were significantly less frequent in patients with advanced adenomas (>10mm or vilous) or CRC (p=0.044) when compared with patients with normal colonoscopy, hiperplastic polyps or non-advanced adenomas. Micronuclei are more frequent in women, but its frequency was not significantly different in patients with advanced adenomas or CRC. Null or low frequency values for nucleoplasmic bridges presence in peripheral lymphocyte may be predictive for advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer.

  17. Evaluation of Peripheral Neuropathy of Unknown Origin in an Outpatient Foot and Ankle Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sandra E; Chu, Jennifer; McCormick, Jeremy J; Johnson, Jeffrey E

    2015-09-01

    The foot and ankle surgeon can see peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of foot and ankle conditions. The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the demographics and presenting complaints of patients diagnosed with idiopathic peripheral neuropathy during an examination by a foot and ankle surgeon and (2) to identify the type and frequency of subsequent diagnosis of medical causes of neuropathy. This was a retrospective study of patients diagnosed with idiopathic peripheral neuropathy in our practice between January 1997 and December 2008. Ninety-five patients were identified, and demographic data, presenting complaints, and medical comorbidities were extracted from the medical record. Examination findings of decreased sensation to Semmes Weinstein 5.07 monofilament testing were documented, and electromyogram and nerve conduction study results were reviewed when available. Laboratory values were noted, as were neurologic evaluations performed to diagnose medical conditions associated with peripheral neuropathy. The most common presentation was foot pain, in 36 patients (38%). Ninety-one patients had Semmes Weinstein 5.07 monofilament testing, with loss of protective sensation reported in 75 of the 91 tested (82%). Only 30 of the 95 patients had electromyogram and nerve conduction study results available, with a test positive for peripheral neuropathy in 20 of the 30 tested. Thirty-two patients were evaluated by a neurologist. A specific cause was identified in 12 of the 32 seen by a neurologist. Of the total group of 95 patients, 31 patients (33%) were diagnosed with a condition that may be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Thirty-three percent of the patients presenting to our clinic and given a diagnosis of idiopathic peripheral neuropathy were ultimately diagnosed with a medical cause of neuropathy-most commonly, diabetes. For those patients with idiopathic neuropathy, a spectrum of disease was encountered, including pain, ulcer, infection, and Charcot

  18. Peripheral i.v. analysis (PIVA) of venous waveforms for volume assessment in patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, K M; Alvis, B D; Baudenbacher, F; Boyer, R; Brophy, C M; Beer, I; Eagle, S

    2017-12-01

    The assessment of intravascular volume status remains a challenge for clinicians. Peripheral i.v. analysis (PIVA) is a method for analysing the peripheral venous waveform that has been used to monitor volume status. We present a proof-of-concept study for evaluating the efficacy of PIVA in detecting changes in fluid volume. We enrolled 37 hospitalized patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD) as a controlled model for intravascular volume loss. Respiratory rate (F0) and pulse rate (F1) frequencies were measured. PIVA signal was obtained by fast Fourier analysis of the venous waveform followed by weighing the magnitude of the amplitude of the pulse rate frequency. PIVA was compared with peripheral venous pressure and standard monitoring of vital signs. Regression analysis showed a linear correlation between volume loss and change in the PIVA signal (R2=0.77). Receiver operator curves demonstrated that the PIVA signal showed an area under the curve of 0.89 for detection of 20 ml kg-1 change in volume. There was no correlation between volume loss and peripheral venous pressure, blood pressure or pulse rate. PIVA-derived pulse rate and respiratory rate were consistent with similar numbers derived from the bio-impedance and electrical signals from the electrocardiogram. PIVA is a minimally invasive, novel modality for detecting changes in fluid volume status, respiratory rate and pulse rate in spontaneously breathing patients with peripheral i.v. cannulas. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Peripheral biomarkers revisited: integrative profiling of peripheral samples for psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Vawter, Marquis P; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2014-06-15

    Peripheral samples, such as blood and skin, have been used for decades in psychiatric research as surrogates for central nervous system samples. Although the validity of the data obtained from peripheral samples has been questioned and other state-of-the-art techniques, such as human brain imaging, genomics, and induced pluripotent stem cells, seem to reduce the value of peripheral cells, accumulating evidence has suggested that revisiting peripheral samples is worthwhile. Here, we re-evaluate the utility of peripheral samples and argue that establishing an understanding of the common signaling and biological processes in the brain and peripheral samples is required for the validity of such models. First, we present an overview of the available types of peripheral cells and describe their advantages and disadvantages. We then briefly summarize the main achievements of omics studies, including epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome analyses, as well as the main findings of functional cellular assays, the results of which imply that alterations in neurotransmission, metabolism, the cell cycle, and the immune system may be partially responsible for the pathophysiology of major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Finally, we discuss the future utility of peripheral samples for the development of biomarkers and tailor-made therapies, such as multimodal assays that are used as a battery of disease and trait pathways and that might be potent and complimentary tools for use in psychiatric research. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  20. Unconsciously perceived fear in peripheral vision alerts the limbic system: a MEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri J Bayle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In ecological situations, threatening stimuli often come out from the peripheral vision. Such aggressive messages must trigger rapid attention to the periphery to allow a fast and adapted motor reaction. Several clues converge to hypothesize that peripheral danger presentation can trigger off a fast arousal network potentially independent of the consciousness spot. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present MEG study, spatio-temporal dynamics of the neural processing of danger related stimuli were explored as a function of the stimuli position in the visual field. Fearful and neutral faces were briefly presented in the central or peripheral visual field, and were followed by target faces stimuli. An event-related beamformer source analysis model was applied in three time windows following the first face presentations: 80 to 130 ms, 140 to 190 ms, and 210 to 260 ms. The frontal lobe and the right internal temporal lobe part, including the amygdala, reacted as soon as 80 ms of latency to fear occurring in the peripheral vision. For central presentation, fearful faces evoked the classical neuronal activity along the occipito-temporal visual pathway between 140 and 190 ms. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the high spatio-temporal resolution of MEG allowed disclosing a fast response of a network involving medial temporal and frontal structures in the processing of fear related stimuli occurring unconsciously in the peripheral visual field. Whereas centrally presented stimuli are precisely processed by the ventral occipito-temporal cortex, the related-to-danger stimuli appearing in the peripheral visual field are more efficient to produce a fast automatic alert response possibly conveyed by subcortical structures.

  1. Intravenous Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Enhance Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M. Matthes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury is a common and devastating complication after trauma and can cause irreversible impairment or even complete functional loss of the affected limb. While peripheral nerve repair results in some axonal regeneration and functional recovery, the clinical outcome is not optimal and research continues to optimize functional recovery after nerve repair. Cell transplantation approaches are being used experimentally to enhance regeneration. Intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs into spinal cord injury and stroke was shown to improve functional outcome. However, the repair potential of intravenously transplanted MSCs in peripheral nerve injury has not been addressed yet. Here we describe the impact of intravenously infused MSCs on functional outcome in a peripheral nerve injury model. Rat sciatic nerves were transected followed, by intravenous MSCs transplantation. Footprint analysis was carried out and 21 days after transplantation, the nerves were removed for histology. Labelled MSCs were found in the sciatic nerve lesion site after intravenous injection and regeneration was improved. Intravenously infused MSCs after acute peripheral nerve target the lesion site and survive within the nerve and the MSC treated group showed greater functional improvement. The results of study suggest that nerve repair with cell transplantation could lead to greater functional outcome.

  2. Reversal of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and new wound incidence: the role of MIRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mark W; Carnegie, Dale E; Burke, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    To determine if improved foot sensitivity to the Semmes-Weinstein 10-g (5.07) monofilament, originally impaired because of diabetic peripheral neuropathy, might be associated with a reduced incidence of new diabetic foot wounds. Retrospective cohort study using a health status questionnaire. Sixty-eight individuals over age 64 with diabetes, diabetic peripheral neuropathy, and loss of protective sensation who had clinically demonstrable increases in foot sensation to the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament after treatment with monochromatic near infrared photo energy. After reversal of diabetic peripheral neuropathy following treatment with monochromatic near infrared photo energy, only 1 of 68 patients developed a new diabetic foot wound, for an incidence of 1.5%. Comparatively, the incidence previously reported in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes was 7.3%. Improved foot sensitivity to the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament in patients previously suffering from loss of protective sensation due to diabetic neuropathy appears to be associated with a lower incidence of new diabetic foot ulcers when compared with the expected incidence in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes. Therapeutic interventions that effectively improve foot sensitivity that has been previously diminished due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy may substantially reduce the incidence of new foot wounds in the Medicare-aged population with diabetes.

  3. Hair loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfmann, Katya L; Bechtel, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Hair loss is a common cause of morbidity for many women. As a key member of the woman's health care team, the obstetrician/gynecologist may be the first person to evaluate the complaint of hair loss. Common types of nonscarring hair loss, including female pattern hair loss and telogen effluvium, may be diagnosed and managed by the obstetrician/gynecologist. A systematic approach to diagnosis and management of these common forms of hair loss is presented.

  4. Neuromuscular deficits after peripheral joint injury: a neurophysiological hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Sarah; Pearce, Alan J; Pietrosimone, Brian; Bennell, Kim; Clark, Ross; Bryant, Adam L

    2015-03-01

    In addition to biomechanical disturbances, peripheral joint injuries (PJIs) can also result in chronic neuromuscular alterations due in part to loss of mechanoreceptor-mediated afferent feedback. An emerging perspective is that PJI should be viewed as a neurophysiological dysfunction, not simply a local injury. Neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies have provided some evidence for central nervous system (CNS) reorganization at both the cortical and spinal levels after PJI. The novel hypothesis proposed is that CNS reorganization is the underlying mechanism for persisting neuromuscular deficits after injury, particularly muscle weakness. There is a lack of direct evidence to support this hypothesis, but future studies utilizing force-matching tasks with superimposed transcranial magnetic stimulation may be help clarify this notion. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Increasing mass loss from Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Bent; Mernild, S.H.; Knudsen, N.T.

    2011-01-01

    Warming in the Arctic during the past several decades has caused glaciers to thin and retreat, and recent mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet is well documented. Local glaciers peripheral to the ice sheet are also retreating, but few mass-balance observations are available to quantify that ret...... a local phenomenon, but are indicative of glacier changes in the broader region. Mass-balance observations for the MG therefore provide unique documentation of the general retreat of Southeast Greenland's local glaciers under ongoing climate warming....

  6. Ghrelin: Central and Peripheral Implications in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Langlet, Fanny; Zgheib, Sara; Dickson, Suzanne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Increasing clinical and therapeutic interest in the neurobiology of eating disorders reflects their dramatic impact on health. Chronic food restriction resulting in severe weight loss is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, and they also suffer from metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. Restrictive AN, mostly observed in young women, is the third largest cause of chronic illness in teenagers of industrialized countries. From a neurobiological perspective, AN-linked behaviors can be considered an adaptation that permits the endurance of reduced energy supply, involving central and/or peripheral reprograming. The severe weight loss observed in AN patients is accompanied by significant changes in hormones involved in energy balance, feeding behavior, and bone formation, all of which can be replicated in animals models. Increasing evidence suggests that AN could be an addictive behavior disorder, potentially linking defects in the reward mechanism with suppressed food intake, heightened physical activity, and mood disorder. Surprisingly, the plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone that drives food-motivated behavior, are increased. This increase in plasma ghrelin levels seems paradoxical in light of the restrained eating adopted by AN patients, and may rather result from an adaptation to the disease. The aim of this review is to describe the role played by ghrelin in AN focusing on its central vs. peripheral actions. In AN patients and in rodent AN models, chronic food restriction induces profound alterations in the « ghrelin » signaling that leads to the development of inappropriate behaviors like hyperactivity or addiction to food starvation and therefore a greater depletion in energy reserves. The question of a transient insensitivity to ghrelin and/or a potential metabolic reprograming is discussed in regard of new clinical treatments currently investigated. PMID:23549309

  7. Neuro-otological and peripheral nerve involvement in Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carmona

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease (FD is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease, with multisystemic glycosphingolipids deposits. Neuro-otological involvement leading to hearing loss and vestibular dysfunctions has been described, but there is limited information about the frequency, site of lesion, or the relationship with peripheral neuropathy. The aim was to evaluate the presence of auditory and vestibular symptoms, and assess neurophysiological involvement of the VIII cranial nerve, correlating these findings with clinical and neurophysiological features of peripheral neuropathy. We studied 36 patients with FD with a complete neurological and neuro-otological evaluation including nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory testing (to evaluate small fiber by warm and cold threshold detection and cold and heat pain, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, videonistagmography, audiometry and brainstem auditory evoked potentials. Neuro-otologic symptoms included hearing loss (22.2%, vertigo (27.8% or both (25%. An involvement of either cochlear or vestibular function was identified in most patients (75%. In 70% of our patients the involvement of both cochlear and vestibular function could not be explained by a neural or vascular mechanism. Small fiber neuropathy was identified in 77.7%. There were no significant associations between neurootological and QST abnormalities. Neuro-otologic involvement is frequent and most likely under-recognized in patients with FD. It lacks a specific neural or vascular pattern, suggesting multi-systemic, end organ damage. Small fiber neuropathy is an earlier manifestation of FD, but there is no correlation between the development of neuropathy and neuro-otological abnormalities.

  8. Improved loss calculations for the HDM magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, G.T. Jr.; Carr, W.J.; Krefta, M.P.; Johnson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Losses due to ramped fields and currents, quite adequate for the initial design, were calculated previously by Snitchler, Jayakumar, Kovachev, and Orrell for the high energy booster magnets to be used in the SSC. The present analysis considers the loss problem in more detail

  9. Mechanism and kinetics of the loss of poorly soluble drugs from liposomal carriers studied by a novel flow field-flow fractionation-based drug release-/transfer-assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinna, Askell Hvid; Hupfeld, Stefan; Kuntsche, Judith; Bauer-Brandl, Annette; Brandl, Martin

    2016-06-28

    Liposomes represent a versatile drug formulation approach e.g. for improving the water-solubility of poorly soluble drugs but also to achieve drug targeting and controlled release. For the latter applications it is essential that the drug remains associated with the liposomal carrier during transit in the vascular bed. A range of in vitro test methods has been suggested over the years for prediction of the release of drug from liposomal carriers. The majority of these fail to give a realistic prediction for poorly water-soluble drugs due to the intrinsic tendency of such compounds to remain associated with liposome bilayers even upon extensive dilution. Upon i.v. injection, in contrast, rapid drug loss often occurs due to drug transfer from the liposomal carriers to endogenous lipophilic sinks such as lipoproteins, plasma proteins or membranes of red blood cells and endothelial cells. Here we report on the application of a recently introduced in vitro predictive drug transfer assay based on incubation of the liposomal drug carrier with large multilamellar liposomes, the latter serving as a biomimetic model sink, using flow field-flow fractionation as a tool to separate the two types of liposomes. By quantifying the amount of drug remaining associated with the liposomal drug carrier as well as that transferred to the acceptor liposomes at distinct times of incubation, both the kinetics of drug transfer and release to the water phase could be established for the model drug p-THPP (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)21H,23H-porphine). p-THPP is structurally similar to temoporfin, a photosensitizer which is under clinical evaluation in a liposomal formulation. Mechanistic insights were gained by varying the donor-to-acceptor lipid mass ratio, size and lamellarity of the liposomes. Drug transfer kinetics from one liposome to another was found rate determining as compared to redistribution from the outermost to the inner concentric bilayers, such that the overall

  10. MRI features of tuberculosis of peripheral joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawlani, V.; Chandra, T.; Mishra, R.N.; Aggarwal, A.; Jain, U.K.; Gujral, R.B. E-mail: gujralrb@sgpgi.ac.in

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this article is to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of peripheral tubercular arthritis. The clinical presentation of peripheral tubercular arthritis is variable and simulates other chronic inflammatory arthritic disorders. MRI is a highly sensitive technique which demonstrates fine anatomical details and identifies the early changes of arthritis, which are not visible on radiographs. The MRI features of tubercular arthritis include synovitis, effusion, central and peripheral erosions, active and chronic pannus, abscess, bone chips and hypo-intense synovium. These imaging features in an appropriate clinical setting may help in the diagnosis of tubercular arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively eliminate the long-term morbidity of joints affected by tuberculosis.

  11. MRI features of tuberculosis of peripheral joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawlani, V.; Chandra, T.; Mishra, R.N.; Aggarwal, A.; Jain, U.K.; Gujral, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of peripheral tubercular arthritis. The clinical presentation of peripheral tubercular arthritis is variable and simulates other chronic inflammatory arthritic disorders. MRI is a highly sensitive technique which demonstrates fine anatomical details and identifies the early changes of arthritis, which are not visible on radiographs. The MRI features of tubercular arthritis include synovitis, effusion, central and peripheral erosions, active and chronic pannus, abscess, bone chips and hypo-intense synovium. These imaging features in an appropriate clinical setting may help in the diagnosis of tubercular arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively eliminate the long-term morbidity of joints affected by tuberculosis

  12. Intraoperative digital angiography: Peripheral vascular applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, K.; Reifsteck, J.E.; Binet, E.F.; Fleisher, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative digital angiography is the procedure of choice for the peripheral vascular surgeon who wishes to evaluate his results before terminating anesthesia. Two operating suites at the John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital are equipped with permanent ceiling-mounted Philips C-arm fluoroscopes and share an ADAC 4100 digital angiographic system. In the last 18 months, 40 peripheral vascular intraoperative digital angiographic procedures have been performed, in all but two cases using direct arterial puncture. In 65% of cases, the intraoperative study showed no significant abnormality. In 12.5%, minor abnormalities not requiring reoperation were seen. In 22.5% of cases, the intraoperative digital angiogram revealed a significant abnormality requiring immediate operative revision. None of the patients who underwent reoperation experienced postoperative sequelae. Intraoperative digital angiography is useful in identifying complications of peripheral vascular operations

  13. [Peripheral retinal degenerations--treatment recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joussen, A M; Kirchhof, B

    2004-10-01

    This report reviews the clinical appearance of degenerative diseases of the peripheral retina in relationship to the risk of developing a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. We present recommendations for preventive treatment in eyes at increased risk of developing retinal detachment. Retinal degenerations are common lesions involving the peripheral retina but most of them are clinically insignificant. Lattice degeneration, degenerative retinoschisis, cystic retinal tufts, and very rarely zonular traction tufts can result in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Therefore, these lesions have been considered for prophylactic treatment; however, adequate studies have not been performed to date. Most of the peripheral retinal degenerations may not require treatment except in rare, high-risk situations. According to current knowledge there is no higher incidence of secondary pucker or other side effects after laser coagulation. Therefore, generous laser indication is recommended if risk factors apply.

  14. Vitamin B supplementation for diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, Bhavani; Low, Lian Leng

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with significant neurological pathology, especially peripheral neuropathy. This review aims to examine the existing evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin B12 supplementation for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all relevant randomised controlled trials was conducted in December 2014. Any type of therapy using vitamin B12 or its coenzyme forms was assessed for efficacy and safety in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Changes in vibration perception thresholds, neuropathic symptoms and nerve conduction velocities, as well as the adverse effects of vitamin B12 therapy, were assessed. Four studies comprising 363 patients met the inclusion criteria. This review found no evidence that the use of oral vitamin B12 supplements is associated with improvement in the clinical symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported no improvement in the electrophysiological markers of nerve conduction. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  15. Contrast media and pain during peripheral arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, B.; Clauss, W.

    1982-01-01

    Some contrast media (CM) were for inducing pain and heat by an intraindividual comparison in 60 patients with occlusive peripheral arterial disease. A dolorimeter and calorimeter (graduated scales) were employed to register and differentiate the subjective sensations experienced by the patient, while objective reactions (peripheral motoric reactions, circulatory parameters) were recorded by the trialist at the same time. Ioxaglate, an ionic dimer, was distinctly superior to Ioglicinate, an ionic CM. However, the differences were less marked in the comparison with a Ioglicinate-Lidocaine-mixture. Emphasis is given to the fact osmolality is the most important parameter in the development of pain. Potential points at which the intraarterially administered local anaesthetic could attack are discussed. The clinical conclusions include consideration of the cost-effectivity ratios of the tested CM's and a discussion of whether or not modern stanards still justify general anaesthesia for peripheral angiography. (orig.)

  16. Nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries: a 5-year bibliometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in biomedical methods, tissue-engineered materials have developed rapidly as an alternative to nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. However, the materials selected for use in the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, in particular multiple injuries and large-gap defects, must be chosen carefully. Various methods and materials for protecting the healthy tissue and repairing peripheral nerve injuries have been described, and each method or material has advantages and disadvantages. Recently, a large amount of research has been focused on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. Using the keywords "pe-ripheral nerve injury", "autotransplant", "nerve graft", and "biomaterial", we retrieved publications using tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries appearing in the Web of Science from 2010 to 2014. The country with the most total publications was the USA. The institutions that were the most productive in this field include Hannover Medical School (Germany, Washington University (USA, and Nantong University (China. The total number of publications using tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries grad-ually increased over time, as did the number of Chinese publications, suggesting that China has made many scientific contributions to this field of research.

  17. Loss of ions in cavity ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, N.; Tran, N.T.; Kim, E.; Marsoem, P.; Kurosawa, T.; Koyama, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Ion losses due to initial recombination, volume recombination, and back diffusion were each determined by measurements and calculations for different size cylindrical ionization chambers and spherical ionization chambers. By measuring signal currents from these ionization chambers irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays, two groups of ion losses were obtained. (Group 1) Ion loss due to initial recombination and diffusion, which changes proportionally to the inverse of the voltage applied to the ionization chambers; (and group 2) ion loss due to volume recombination, which changes proportionally to the inverse of the square of the applied voltage. The diffusion loss was obtained separately by computing electric field distributions in the ionization chambers. It was found that diffusion loss is larger than initial recombination loss for the cylindrical ionization chambers and vise versa for the spherical ionization chambers

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Prem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the fourth leading cause of death world-wide and a further increase in the prevalence as well as mortality of the disease is predicted for coming decades. There is now an increased appreciation for the need to build awareness regarding COPD and to help the thousands of people who suffer from this disease and die prematurely from COPD or its associated complication(s. Peripheral neuropathy in COPD has received scanty attention despite the fact that very often clinicians come across COPD patients having clinical features suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. Electrophysiological tests like nerve conduction studies are required to distinguish between axonal and demyelinating type of disorder that cannot be analyzed by clinical examination alone. However, various studies addressing peripheral neuropathy in COPD carried out so far have included patients with COPD having markedly varying baseline characteristics like severe hypoxemia, elderly patients, those with long duration of illness, etc. that are not uniform across the studies and make it difficult to interpret the results to a consistent conclusion. Almost one-third of COPD patients have clinical evidence of peripheral neuropathy and two-thirds have electrophysiological abnormalities. Some patients with no clinical indication of peripheral neuropathy do have electrophysiological deficit suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. The more frequent presentation consists of a polyneuropathy that is subclinical or with predominantly sensory signs, and the neurophysiological and pathological features of predominantly axonal neuropathy. The presumed etiopathogenic factors are multiple: chronic hypoxia, tobacco smoke, alcoholism, malnutrition and adverse effects of certain drugs.

  19. PREGNANCY LOSS IN MARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibary A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy loss is an important aspect of equine practice due to the economic and emotional loss that it engenders. Pregnancy loss is often divided in two categories: early pregnancy loss (EPL or embryonic death (ED (first 42 days and fetal losses (after 42 days. Diagnosis of the causes of pregnancy loss is often very challenging. Many of the causes of EPL remain poorly documented but studies on embryo development and embryo-uterine interaction have been able to shed some light on predisposing factors. Fetal losses or abortions are dominated by infectious causes and particularly bacterial placentitis. Detailed reviews of pregnancy loss were recently published by the authors (Tibary et al., 2012; Tibary and Pearson, 2012; Tibary et al., 2014. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and prevention of pregnancy loss in the mare.

  20. Classic Peripheral Signs of Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yooyoung Chong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old female patient with visual disturbances was referred for further evaluation of a heart murmur. Fundoscopy revealed a Roth spot in both eyes. A physical examination showed peripheral signs of infective endocarditis, including Osler nodes, Janeway lesions, and splinter hemorrhages. Our preoperative diagnosis was subacute bacterial endocarditis with severe aortic regurgitation. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and was treated with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks postoperatively. The patient made a remarkable recovery and was discharged without complications. We report this case of subacute endocarditis with all 4 classic peripheral signs in a patient who presented with visual disturbance.

  1. Classic Peripheral Signs of Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yooyoung; Han, Sung Joon; Rhee, Youn Ju; Kang, Shin Kwang; Yu, Jae Hyeon; Na, Myung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old female patient with visual disturbances was referred for further evaluation of a heart murmur. Fundoscopy revealed a Roth spot in both eyes. A physical examination showed peripheral signs of infective endocarditis, including Osler nodes, Janeway lesions, and splinter hemorrhages. Our preoperative diagnosis was subacute bacterial endocarditis with severe aortic regurgitation. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and was treated with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks postoperatively. The patient made a remarkable recovery and was discharged without complications. We report this case of subacute endocarditis with all 4 classic peripheral signs in a patient who presented with visual disturbance. PMID:27734006

  2. Peripheral phlebitis: a point-prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Georgita T; Barrett, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine the factors influencing peripheral phlebitis in the adult medical-surgical population. The authors would then be able to use those data to determine whether a change in practice was warranted. Data collection and analysis of 188 intravenous sites revealed that females with higher doses of medications in intravenous sites of longer dwell times and suboptimal nutrition were at greater risk of developing peripheral phlebitis. The point prevalence was greater than the recommended 5%, which led the authors to review their facility's patient care and documentation practices.

  3. Laser peripheral iridoplasty for angle-closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai Siene; Ang, Ghee Soon; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2012-02-15

    Angle-closure glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Treatment is aimed at opening the anterior chamber angle and lowering the IOP with medical and/or surgical treatment (e.g. trabeculectomy, lens extraction). Laser iridotomy works by eliminating pupillary block and widens the anterior chamber angle in the majority of patients. When laser iridotomy fails to open the anterior chamber angle, laser iridoplasty may be recommended as one of the options in current standard treatment for angle-closure. Laser peripheral iridoplasty works by shrinking and pulling the peripheral iris tissue away from the trabecular meshwork. Laser peripheral iridoplasty can be used for crisis of acute angle-closure and also in non-acute situations.   To assess the effectiveness of laser peripheral iridoplasty in the treatment of narrow angles (i.e. primary angle-closure suspect), primary angle-closure (PAC) or primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in non-acute situations when compared with any other intervention. In this review, angle-closure will refer to patients with narrow angles (PACs), PAC and PACG. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (January 1950 to January 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 5 January 2012. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this review. Patients with narrow angles, PAC or PACG were eligible. We excluded studies that included only patients with acute presentations

  4. [Degenerative lesions of the peripheral retina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conart, J-B; Baron, D; Berrod, J-P

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative lesions of the peripheral retina are present from teenage years onwards and increase with age. These abnormabilities are frequent, some of them being benign while others predispose to retinal tears and detachment. In the latter case, the lesions are rhegmatogenous and may justify prophylactic treatment by laser photocoagulation. We distinguish congenital lesions of the peripheral retina and intraretinal, chorioretinal and vitreoretinal degenerations. The holes and tears observed in 2% of the population consist of round atrophic holes, "horseshoe" tears, oral dialyses and giant tears. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation injury to peripheral and cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giese, W.L.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the results of laboratory and clinical investigations regarding the radiosensitivity of peripheral nerve are presented. Before outlining this research the authors briefly review peripheral neuroanatomy and physiology and then discuss variables associated with injury. It is important to remember that radiation injury is multifactorial in nature, and that the relative importance of individual factors is not well understood. Reports up through the middle of this century were fraught with rudimentary dosimetry, primitive investigative methods, and arbitrary endpoints that resulted in widely conflicting conclusions that continue to date

  6. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  7. Extension to AC Loss Minimisation in High Temperature Superconductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Archie

    2004-01-01

    ...: (a) Measure the AC losses of appropriate Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) samples with strong potential for minimizing losses at high frequencies and magnetic fields with the existing equipment. (b...

  8. SU-F-T-473: Evaluation of Off-Axis And Peripheral Dose Using Different Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, B; Prakasarao, A; Singaravelu, G [Anna University, Chennai, TamilNadu (India); Palraj, T; Rai, R [Dr. Rai Memorial Cancer Institute, Chennai, TamilNadu (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, measurement of off-axis and peripheral dose is a tedious task. The dose distribution along the beam central axis give only part of the information required for an accurate dose description inside the patient. Dose distributions in 2-D and 3-D are determined with central axis data in conjunction with off-axis dose profiles. Combining a central axis dose distribution with off-axis data results in volume dose matrix that provides 2-D and 3-D information on dose distribution. By considering the importance of these two parameters this study investigates and compares the off axis and peripheral dose measurement using Ionization chamber, MOSFET, Radiochromic film and EDR2 film. Methods: In the measurement of off-axis and peripheral doses 0.6cc farmer type chamber, EDR-2 film, MD-55 radiochromic film and MOSFET detectors were used for both 6MV and 15MV beams. The off-axis and peripheral dose was measured at every 1 cm interval by changing the position of the couch without disturbing the other experimental setup in particular, the phantom with detector position. Results: Readings were obtained for both 6MV and 15MV photon beams at SSD technique for various field size using MOSFET, Ionization chamber and Radiochromic film. The results shows the percentage difference between various detectors for various field sizes. For Peripheral dose measurement were taken from the edge of the field size and for off axis it is measured form central axis dose. Conclusion: In conclusion, our study shows that no detector is ideal and only a comparison between different detectors highlights the weaknesses of each detector. MOSFET provides adequate dose assessment in off-axis and peripheral regions in 6MV and 15MV photon beams. Film dosimetry in general a convenient method to generate one- and two-dimensional dose distributions. The result of this indicates that MOSFET is flexible tool for relative dosimetry as films.

  9. Polyarteritis nodosa presenting as peripheral vascular disease and acute limb ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute limb ischemia and peripheral vascular disease (PVD are unusual presentations of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN. Here, we present a case with PVD of both lower limbs leading to foot claudication. Digital subtraction angiography showed narrowing, irregularity, and occlusion of both lower limb arteries with no involvement of the abdomen visceral arteries. Based on significant weight loss, diastolic blood pressure >90 mmHg, myalgia, testicular pain, and angiographic abnormalities in medium-sized arteries, he was diagnosed as having PAN. He was treated with corticosteroid and bolus intravenous cyclophosphamide following which he had prompt and near-complete recovery of the symptoms without any tissue loss.

  10. Tunnel Vision Prismatic Field Expansion: Challenges and Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, Henry; Peli, Eli

    2015-12-01

    No prismatic solution for peripheral field loss (PFL) has gained widespread acceptance. Field extended by prisms has a corresponding optical scotoma at the prism apices. True expansion can be achieved when each eye is given a different view (through visual confusion). We analyze the effects of apical scotomas and binocular visual confusion in different designs to identify constraints on any solution that is likely to meet acceptance. Calculated perimetry diagrams were compared to perimetry with PFL patients wearing InWave channel prisms and Trifield spectacles. Percept diagrams illustrate the binocular visual confusion. Channel prisms provide no benefit at primary gaze. Inconsequential extension was provided by InWave prisms, although accessible with moderate gaze shifts. Higher-power prisms provide greater extension, with greater paracentral scotoma loss, but require uncomfortable gaze shifts. Head turns, not eye scans, are needed to see regions lost to the apical scotomas. Trifield prisms provide field expansion at all gaze positions, but acceptance was limited by disturbing effects of central binocular visual confusion. Field expansion when at primary gaze (where most time is spent) is needed while still providing unobstructed central vision. Paracentral multiplexing prisms we are developing that superimpose shifted and see-through views may accomplish that. Use of the analyses and diagramming techniques presented here will be of value when considering prismatic aids for PFL, and could have prevented many unsuccessful designs and the improbable reports we cited from the literature. New designs must likely address the challenges identified here.

  11. Telogen Effluvium Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Telogen Effluvium Hair Loss Share | It is normal to lose up to ... months after the "shock". This sudden increase in hair loss, usually described as the hair coming out in ...

  12. Recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerup, P; Kolte, A M; Larsen, E C

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is there a different prognostic impact for consecutive and non-consecutive early pregnancy losses in women with secondary recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL)? SUMMARY ANSWER: Only consecutive early pregnancy losses after the last birth have a statistically significant negative prognostic...... impact in women with secondary RPL. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The risk of a new pregnancy loss increases with the number of previous pregnancy losses in patients with RPL. Second trimester losses seem to exhibit a stronger negative impact than early losses. It is unknown whether the sequence of pregnancy...... losses plays a role for the prognosis in patients with a prior birth. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: This retrospective cohort study of pregnancy outcome in patients with unexplained secondary RPL included in three previously published, Danish double-blinded placebo-controlled trials of intravenous...

  13. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  14. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet & Menopause Bone Loss How are bone loss and menopause related? Throughout life your body keeps a balance between the ... lose bone faster than it can be replaced. Menopause—the time when menstrual periods end, which usually ...

  15. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signals normally to the brain. In addition, hearing losses are classified according to the degree of severity: • Mild, • Moderate, • Severe, • Profound. Hearing losses are also classified according to the sound frequency ...

  16. Early Pregnancy Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... go on to have successful pregnancies. Repeated pregnancy losses are rare. Testing and evaluation can be done ... find a cause if you have several pregnancy losses. Even if no cause is found, most couples ...

  17. Occupational hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001048.htm Occupational hearing loss To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Occupational hearing loss is damage to the inner ear from noise ...

  18. Pregnancy Loss and Miscarriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D linked to miscarriage among women with prior pregnancy loss Release: Anti-HIV drug combination does not increase preterm birth risk, study suggests Release: Elevated blood pressure before pregnancy may increase chance of pregnancy loss All related ...

  19. Coping with Memory Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Coping With Memory Loss Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... be evaluated by a health professional. What Causes Memory Loss? Anything that affects cognition—the process of ...

  20. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight ... obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food you ...

  1. Myopic loss aversion revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Blavatskyy, Pavlo; Pogrebna, Ganna

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we reexamine several experimental papers on myopic loss aversion by analyzing individual rather than aggregate choice patterns. We find that the behavior of the majority of subjects is inconsistent with the hypothesis of myopic loss aversion.

  2. Ultra-peripheral collisions of heavy ions at RHIC and the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nystrand, J

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with so-called Ultra-Peripheral Collisions (UPCs) of heavy ions. These can be defined as collisions in which no hadronic interactions occur because of the large spatial separation between the projectile and target. The interactions are instead mediated by the electromagnetic field. Two types of ultra-peripheral collisions can be distinguished: purely electro-magnetic interactions (two-photon interactions) and photonuclear interactions, in which a photon from the projectile interacts with the hadronic component of the target.

  3. Ion heat conduction losses in Extrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennfors, E.

    1989-08-01

    The classical ion heat conduction losses in Extrap discharges are calculated using polynomial magnetic field profiles and compared to the power input. For polynomials matched to magnetic field profiles measured in present experiments, these losses are small. By varying the coefficients of the polynomials, a region is found, where the power input can balance the classical heat conduction losses. Each set of coefficients corresponds to values of the parameters F and Θ used in RFP physics. The region determines a region in an F-Θ diagram, including the usual RFP region but extending to higher values of Θ and βΘ

  4. Magnetoneurographic evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.D.L. Kuypers (Paul)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWhen a peripheral nerve is reconstructed after it has been damaged. it is important to assess, in an early stage, whether the nerve is regenerating across the lesion. However, at present for this purpose an adequate method is not available. In this study short term changes in the

  5. Peripheral Protein Unfolding Drives Membrane Bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaw, Hew Ming Helen; Raghunath, Gokul; Dyer, R Brian

    2018-06-20

    Dynamic modulation of lipid membrane curvature can be achieved by a number of peripheral protein binding mechanisms such as hy-drophobic insertion of amphipathic helices and membrane scaffolding. Recently, an alternative mechanism was proposed in which crowding of peripherally bound proteins induces membrane curvature through steric pressure generated by lateral collisions. This effect was enhanced using intrinsically disordered proteins that possess high hydrodynamic radii, prompting us to explore whether membrane bending can be triggered by the folding-unfolding transition of surface-bound proteins. We utilized histidine-tagged human serum albumin bound to Ni-NTA-DGS containing liposomes as our model system to test this hypothesis. We found that reduction of the disulfide bonds in the protein resulted in unfolding of HSA, which subsequently led to membrane tubule formation. The frequency of tubule formation was found to be significantly higher when the proteins were unfolded while being localized to a phase-separated domain as opposed to randomly distributed in fluid phase liposomes, indicating that the steric pressure generated from protein unfolding is directly responsible for membrane deformation. Our results are critical for the design of peripheral membrane protein-immobilization strategies and open new avenues for exploring mechanisms of membrane bending driven by conformational changes of peripheral membrane proteins.

  6. Creating social presence through peripheral awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter, de B.E.R.; Huijnen, C.A.G.J.; Markopoulos, P.; IJsselsteijn, W.A.; Stephanidis, C.; Jacko, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental assessment of affective user benefits that may result from peripheral awareness of a remote friend or group of friends during a shared viewing of a televised event. The experiment suggests that awareness supported through a visual display enhances the level of

  7. Habitual Physical Activity, Peripheral Neuropathy, Foot Deformities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Habitual physical activity index (3.2 ± 0.83) was highest in work-related activities; 69 (26.1 %) patients presented with peripheral neuropathy and 52 (19. 7%) had the lowest limb function. Pes planus was the most prevalent foot deformity (20.1%). Significant differences existed in physical activity indices across ...

  8. Non malignant peripheral lymphadenopathy in Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis should be suspected and ruled out in patients who present with PL, particularly in rural areas with no access to histopathology services. Keywords: Peripheral lymphadenopathy, Tuberculosis, Toxoplasmosis, Lymphadenitis. Résumé La lymphadenopathie périphérique persistante (PL) qui n'est pas associée ...

  9. Facilitating Cluster Evolution in Peripheral Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Lindgaard; Störring, Dagmara

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility and dilemmas in stimulating high-tech clusters in peripheral regions. In recent years innovation and cluster policy to a large extend has been focused upon stimulating collective learning processes and building social capital. This has in turn accentuated a ne...

  10. Peripheral cold acclimatization in Antarctic scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgman, S A

    1991-08-01

    Peripheral acclimatization to cold in scuba divers stationed at the British Antarctic Survey's Signy Station was investigated during a year in Antarctica. Five divers and five non-diver controls underwent monthly laboratory tests of index finger immersion in cold water for 30 min. Index finger pulp temperature and time of onset of cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) were measured. Pain was recorded with verbal and numerical psychophysical subjective pain ratings. Average finger temperatures and median finger pain from 6-30 min of immersion, maximum finger temperatures during the first CIVD cycle, and finger temperatures at the onset of CIVD were calculated. Comparison of the variables recorded from divers and non-divers were performed with analysis of variance. No significant differences were found among the variables recorded from divers and non-divers. From a review of the literature, divers have responses typical of non-cold-adapted Caucasians. There is, therefore, no evidence that Signy divers peripherally acclimatized to cold. We suggest that these findings occur because either the whole body cooling which divers undergo inhibits peripheral acclimatization or because of insufficiently frequent or severe cold exposure while diving. Further basic studies on the duration, frequency and severity of cold exposure necessary to induce peripheral cold acclimatization are required before this question can be satisfactorily answered.

  11. Peripheral blood flow control in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik

    1991-01-01

    Long term diabetes has a profound effect on the peripheral circulation. This has been demonstrated to be due to the presence of angiopathy and autonomic neuropathy, affecting autoregulation and distensibility of the vessels as well as local and central reflex regulation of the vascular resistance...

  12. PERIPHERAL BLOOD FILM - A REVIEW FEATURE ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    be abreast with its clinical utility and proper application of the reports in the management of patients. Keywords: Peripheral blood smear, Preparation, Examination, Interpretation, Reporting, Blood cells morphology. FEATURE ARTICLES. Ann Ibd. Pg. Med 2014. Vol.12, No.2 71-79. Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine.

  13. Habitual physical activity, peripheral neuropathy, foot deformities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    joint or leg pain), lack of equipment, and exercise partner(s).20. Yet, many of these ... peripheral neuropathy and lower limb functions among a group of Nigerian .... scale for inpatients of an orthopaedic rehabilitation ward found that interclass ...

  14. Losses in German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abinger, R.

    1982-01-01

    The author illustrates the special features of engineering insurance for nuclear power plants. The shares of the Allianz Versicherungs-AG in the insurance of construction and erection work and in machinery insurance are dealt with. Risk estimation is usually based on statistical analysis of losses. Loss analysis in the conventional sector of nuclear power plants shows typical characteristics of traditional erection and machinery losses. In the nuclear field, however, costs are greatly increased by added safety measures. For this reason, additional cover is allocated and incorporated in premium assessment. Examples from erection and machinery reveal the greater costs involved in handling losses. (orig.) [de

  15. Help! It's Hair Loss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hair Loss KidsHealth / For Kids / Hair Loss What's in this ... head are in the resting phase. What Causes Hair Loss? Men, especially older men, are the ones who ...

  16. Proven Weight Loss Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Proven Weight Loss Methods What can weight loss do for you? Losing weight can improve your health in a number of ways. It can lower ... at www.hormone.org/Spanish . Proven Weight Loss Methods Fact Sheet www.hormone.org

  17. Ripple induced trapped particle loss in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.

    1996-05-01

    The threshold for stochastic transport of high energy trapped particles in a tokamak due to toroidal field ripple is calculated by explicit construction of primary resonances, and a numerical examination of the route to chaos. Critical field ripple amplitude is determined for loss. The expression is given in magnetic coordinates and makes no assumptions regarding shape or up-down symmetry. An algorithm is developed including the effects of prompt axisymmetric orbit loss, ripple trapping, convective banana flow, and stochastic ripple loss, which gives accurate ripple loss predictions for representative Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor equilibria. The algorithm is extended to include the effects of collisions and drag, allowing rapid estimation of alpha particle loss in tokamaks

  18. Heat loss from an open cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

  19. Long term clinical outcome of peripheral nerve stimulation in patients with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calenbergh, F. Van; Gybels, J.; Laere, K. Van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic neuropathic pain after injury to a peripheral nerve is known to be resistant to treatment. Peripheral nerve stimulation is one of the possible treatment options, which is, however, not performed frequently. In recent years we have witnessed a renewed interest for PNS. The aim...... of the present study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy of PNS in a group of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain treated with PNS since the 1980s. METHODS: Of an original series of 11 patients, 5 patients could be invited for clinical examination, detailed assessment of clinical pain and QST...... functioning) also showed positive effects. Quantitative Sensory Testing results did not show significant differences in cold pain and heat pain thresholds between the "ON" and "OFF" conditions. CONCLUSION: In selected patients with peripheral neuropathic pain PNS remains effective even after more than 20...

  20. Studies of peripheral sensory nerves in paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy: Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Flatters, Sarah J.L.; Bennett, Gary J.

    2006-01-01

    Paclitaxel chemotherapy frequently induces neuropathic pain during and often persisting after therapy. The mechanisms responsible for this pain are unknown. Using a rat model of paclitaxel-induced painful peripheral neuropathy, we have performed studies to search for peripheral nerve pathology. Paclitaxel-induced mechano-allodynia and mechano-hyperalgesia were evident after a short delay, peaked at day 27 and finally resolved on day 155. Paclitaxel- and vehicle-treated rats were perfused on d...