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Sample records for periodically releases hydrogen

  1. Hydrogen purification by periodic adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barg, Christian; Secchi, Argimiro R.; Trierweiler, Jorge O. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: cbarg@enq.ufrgs.br; arge@enq.ufrgs.br; jorge@enq.ufrgs.br

    2000-07-01

    The periodic adsorption processes have been widely used for industrial applications, mainly because it spends less energy than the usual gas separation processes, like the cryogenic distillation. The largest commercial application of periodic adsorption processes is the pressure swing adsorption (PSA) applied to hydrogen purification. Although its wide use in the chemical and petrochemical industry, there are no reports in the open literature about complete modeling studies of a complex commercial unit, with multiple adsorbents and multiple beds and several feed components. This study has as objective the modeling, optimization and dynamical analysis of an industrial PSA unit for hydrogen purification. (author)

  2. Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2013-02-19

    A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

  3. Hydrogen retention and release from uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, D.F.

    1987-08-01

    The ceramic samples (UO 2 ) are exposed to high pressure hydrogen gas at a fixed temperature for a time sufficient to achieve equilibrium. After rapid quenching, the hydrogen-saturated sample is transferred to a vacuum-outgassing furnace. The sample is outgassed in a linear temperature ramp and the released hydrogen is detected by an in-situ mass spectrometer. This technique measures the rate of release of hydrogen with a sensitivity level of about 2 ng of hydrogen (as D 2 ) per hour. In this study, experiments were conducted on both polycrystalline and single-crystal UO 2 . Experimental variables included temperature (1000 to 1600 0 C) and infusion pressure (5 to 32 atm D 2 ), and for the polycrystalline specimen, stoichiometry. Dissolution of H 2 in both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 was found to obey Seivert's law. The Sievert's law constant of deuterium in single-crystal UO 2 was determined to be: 3.0 x 10 7 exp(-235 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm and for polycrystalline UO 2 : 5.5 x 10 4 exp(-100 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm. The solubility of hydrogen in hypostoichiometric urania was found to be up to three orders of magnitude greater than in stoichiometric UO 2 depending on the O/U ratios, implying the anion vacancy is the primary solution site in the UO 2 lattice. The release-rate curves for the single crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 specimens exhibited multiple peaks, with most of the deuterium released between 600 and 1200 0 C for the polycrystalline samples, and between 700 and 1800 0 C in the single-crystal specimens. This release of hydrogen from UO 2 could not be adequately modeled as diffusion or diffusion with trapping and resolution. It was determined that release was governed by release from traps in both the polycrystalline and single crystal UO 2 specimens. 40 refs., 72 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Release enhancement of tritium from graphite by addition of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Masakatsu; Masaki, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release behavior of tritium from graphite was studied in pure He and He + H 2 atmosphere. The release from powdered graphite was significantly enhanced in hydrogen environment. Apparent diffusion coefficients of tritium in graphite also became much higher in an atmosphere containing hydrogen than values obtained in pure helium atmosphere. A careful investigation of the release processes resulted in the conclusion that the most important process of tritium behaviour in graphite was diffusion, but the desorption process of tritium from the surface played a significant role. The enhancement of the desorption process was controlled by atomic hydrogen. (orig.)

  5. 75 FR 19319 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment Period... reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical Abstracts Service Number (CAS No.) 7783-06-4) (75 FR... may be potentially affected by this action if you manufacture, process, or otherwise use hydrogen...

  6. Hydrogen release from irradiated elastomers measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagielski, J., E-mail: jacek.jagielski@itme.edu.pl [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-926 Warszawa (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland); Ostaszewska, U. [Institute for Engineering of Polymer Materials & Dyes, Division of Elastomers & Rubber Technology, Harcerska 30, 05-820 Piastow (Poland); Bielinski, D.M. [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Polymer & Dye Technology, Stefanowskiego 12/16, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Grambole, D. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, PO Box 51 01 19, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Romaniec, M.; Jozwik, I.; Kozinski, R. [Institute for Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-926 Warszawa (Poland); Kosinska, A. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, A. Soltana 7, 05-400 Swierk/Otwock (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    Ion irradiation appears as an interesting method of modification of elastomers, especially friction and wear properties. Main structural effect caused by heavy ions is a massive loss of hydrogen from the surface layer leading to its smoothening and shrinking. The paper presents the results of hydrogen release from various elastomers upon irradiation with H{sup +}, He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} studied by using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) method. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that the hydrogen release is controlled by inelastic collisions between ions and target electrons. The last part of the study was focused on preliminary analysis of mechanical properties of irradiated rubbers.

  7. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing... (EPCRA) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical...

  8. Kinetics of hydrogen release from dissolutions of ammonia borane in different ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero-Pedraza, María José; Martín-Cortés, Alexandra; Navarrete, Alexander; Bermejo, María Dolores; Martín, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia borane is a promising hydrogen storage material that liberates hydrogen by thermolysis at moderate temperatures, but it also presents major limitations for practical applications including a long induction time before the initiation of hydrogen release and a difficult regeneration. Previous works have demonstrated that by dissolution of ammonia borane into several ionic liquids, and particularly in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride bmimCl, the induction period at the beginning of the thermolysis is eliminated, but some problems persist, including foaming and the formation of a residue after thermolysis that is insoluble in the ionic liquid. In this work, the release of hydrogen from ammonia borane dissolved in different ionic liquids has been analyzed, measuring the kinetics of hydrogen release, visually following the evolution of the sample during the process using pressure glass tube reactors, and analyzing the residue by spectroscopic techniques. While dissolutions of ammonia borane in most ionic liquids analyzed show similar properties as dissolutions in bmimCl, using ionic liquids with bis(trifluoromethylsulfanyl)imide Tf_2N anion the foaming problem is reduced, and in some cases the residue remains dissolved in the ionic liquid, while with ionic liquids with choline anion higher hydrogen yields are achieved that indicate that the decomposition of ammonia borane proceeds through a different path. - Highlights: • Hydrogen release from ammonia borane dissolved in 13 ionic liquids has been studied. • Induction time is shortened and hydrogen release rate is accelerated in all cases. • The best results are obtained using ionic liquids with Tf_2N anion. • Ch cation ionic liquids enable higher H_2 yield, but cyclotriborazane is produced.

  9. Periodic orbits of the hydrogen molecular ion and their quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Y.; Yuan, J.; Bao, C.

    1995-01-01

    In a classical study of the hydrogen molecular ion beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA), we have found that segments of trajectories resemble that of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation periodic orbits. The importance of this fact to the classical understanding of chemical bonding leads us to a systematic study of the periodic orbits of the planar hydrogen molecular ion within the BOA. Besides introducing a classification scheme for periodic orbits, we discuss the convergence properties of families of periodic orbits and their bifurcation patterns according to their types. Semiclassical calculations of the density of states based on these periodic orbits yield results in agreement with the exact quantum eigenvalues of the hydrogen molecular ion system

  10. The effects of incubation period and temperature on the Hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of incubation period and temperature on the Hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) technique for detection of faecal contamination in water. ... African Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. Journal Home ... A total of 171 water samples from 3 sources were analyzed for the presence of faecal contamination by

  11. Bulk-scaffolded hydrogen storage and releasing materials and methods for preparing and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Gutowska, Anna [Richland, WA; Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; Li, Xiaohong S [Richland, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA

    2011-06-21

    Compositions are disclosed for storing and releasing hydrogen and methods for preparing and using same. These hydrogen storage and releasing materials exhibit fast release rates at low release temperatures without unwanted side reactions, thus preserving desired levels of purity and enabling applications in combustion and fuel cell applications.

  12. Analysis of hydrogen sulfide releases in heavy water production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Cornelia; Dumitrescu, Maria; Preda, Irina; Lazar, Roxana

    1996-01-01

    Safety analyses conducted at ICIS concern primarily the heavy water production installations. The quantitative risk assessment needs the frequency calculation of accident sequences and consequences. In heavy water plants which obtain primary isotopic concentration of water by H 2 O - H 2 S exchange, large amounts of hydrogen sulfide which is a toxic, inflammable and explosive gas, are circulated. The first stage in calculating the consequences consists in potential analysis of H 2 S release. This work presents a study of this types of releases for pilot installations of the heavy water production at ICIS (Plant 'G' at Rm. Valcea). The installations which contain and maneuver large quantities of H 2 S and the mathematical models for different types of releases are presented. The accidents analyzed are: catastrophic column, container, spy-hole failures or gas-duct rupture and wall cracks in the installation. The main results are given as tables while the time variations of the flow rate and quantities of H 2 O released by stack disposal are plotted

  13. Release of hydrogen isotopes from carbon based fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainonen-Ahlgren, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the annealing behavior of hydrogen isotopes in carbon based materials. Also, the density of the material and structural changes after thermal treatment and ion irradiation are examined. The study of hydrogen diffusion in diamondlike carbon films revealed an activation energy of 2.0 eV, while the deuterium diffusion, due to better measuring sensitivity, is found to be concentration dependent with the effective diffusion coefficient becoming smaller with decreasing deuterium concentration. To explain the experimentally observed profiles, a model according to which atomic deuterium diffuses and deuterium in clusters is immobile is developed. The concentration of immobile D was assumed to be an analytical function of the total D concentration. To describe the annealing behavior of D incorporated in diamondlike carbon films during the deposition process, a model taking into account diffusion of free D and thermal detrapping and trapping of D was developed. The difference in the analysis explains the disagreement of activation energy (1.5 ± 0.2 eV) with the value of 2,9± 0.1 eV obtained for D implanted samples earlier. The same model was applied to describe the experimental profiles in Si doped diamondlike carbon films. Si affects the retention of D in diamondlike carbon films. The amount of D depends on Si content in the co-deposited but not implanted samples. Besides, Si incorporation into carbon coating decreases to some extent the graphitization of the films and leads to formation of a structure which is stable under thermal treatment and ion irradiation. Hydrogen migration in the hydrogen and methane co-deposited films was also studied. In samples produced in methane atmosphere and annealed at different temperatures, the hydrogen concentration level decreases in the bulk, with more pronounced release at the surface region. In the case of coatings deposited by a methane ion beam, the H level also decreases with increasing

  14. Hydrogen Storage and Release Properties of Transition Metal-Added Magnesium Hydride Alloy Fabricated by Grinding in a Hydrogen Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Sung Nam; Song, Myoung Youp [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hye Ryoung [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    90 wt% MgH{sub 2}+5 wt% Ni+2.5 wt% Fe+2.5 wt% Ti (called MgH{sub 2}+Ni+Fe+Ti), a hydrogen storage and release material, was fabricated by grinding in a hydrogen atmosphere, and then its quantities of stored and released hydrogen as a function of time were examined. A nanocrystalline MgH{sub 2}+Ni+Fe+Ti specimen was made by grinding in a hydrogen atmosphere and subsequent hydrogen storage-release cycling. The crystallite size of Mg and the strain of the Mg crystallite after ten hydrogen storage-release cycles, which were obtained using the Williamson-Hall method, were 38.6 (±1.4) nm and 0.025 (±0.0081) %, respectively. The MgH{sub 2}+Ni+Fe+Ti sample after the process of grinding in a hydrogen atmosphere was highly reactive with hydrogen. The sample exhibited an available storage capacity of hydrogen (the amount of hydrogen stored during 60 minutes) of about 5.7 wt%. At the first cycle, the MgH2+Ni+Fe+Ti sample stored hydrogen of 5.53 wt% in 5 minutes, 5.66 wt% in 10 minutes and 5.73 wt% in 60 minutes at 573 K and 12 bar of hydrogen. The MgH{sub 2}+Ni+Fe+Ti after activation released hydrogen of 0.56 wt% in 5 minutes, 1.26 wt% in 10 minutes, 2.64 wt% in 20 minutes, 3.82 wt% in 30 minutes, and 5.03 wt% in 60 minutes.

  15. Simulation of startup period of hydrogen isotope separation distillation column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazonov, A.B.; Kagramanov, Z.G.; Magomedbekov, Eh.P.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic procedure for the mathematical simulation of start-up regime of rectification columns for molecular hydrogen isotope separation was developed. Nonstationary state (start-up period) of separating column for rectification of multi-component mixture was calculated. Full information on equilibrium and kinetic physicochemical properties of components in separating mixtures was used for the calculations. Profile of concentration of components by height of column in task moment of time was calculated by means of differential equilibriums of nonstationary mass transfer. Calculated results of nonstationary state of column by the 2 m height, 30 mm diameter during separation of the mixture: 5 % protium, 70 % deuterium, 25 % tritium were illustrated [ru

  16. Aqueous studies of hydrogen sulfide releases from a heavy water extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1979-03-01

    Upsets in the operation of the wastewater strippers in the 400 Area of the Savannah River Plant have released hydrogen sulfide in quantities as large as 1800 kg to the effluent stream. Fish kills in the swamp area of Beaver Dam Creek have occurred following the large releases. A literature survey revealed volatilization and oxidation as the major loss mechanisms of H 2 S. Laboratory investigations supported the literature survey. The computer code for pollutant transport in a stream, LODIPS, has an option to account for sink-source effects in a stream. Volatilization and oxidation rate constants were developed for the sink option from two H 2 S releases (18 kg and 118 kg) and results were predicted with LODIPS. Based on the predicted concentration-time profiles for various hypothetical cases, releases as small as 568 kg if discharged over a 30-minute period or releases as large as 1818 kg if discharged over a 360-minute period or less are lethal to swamp fish

  17. High and rapid hydrogen release from thermolysis of ammonia borane near PEM fuel cell operating temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Arvind; Hwang, Hyun Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    A system for generating and purifying hydrogen. To generate hydrogen, the system includes inlets configured to receive a hydrogen carrier and an inert insulator, a mixing chamber configured to combine the hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, a heat exchanger configured to apply heat to the mixture of hydrogen carrier and the inert insulator, wherein the applied heat results in the generation of hydrogen from the hydrogen carrier, and an outlet configured to release the generated hydrogen. To purify hydrogen, the system includes a primary inlet to receive a starting material and an ammonia filtration subassembly, which may include an absorption column configured to absorb the ammonia into water for providing purified hydrogen at a first purity level. The ammonia filtration subassembly may also include an adsorbent member configured to adsorb ammonia from the starting material into an adsorbent for providing purified hydrogen at a second purity level.

  18. Hydrogen release at metal-oxide interfaces: A first principle study of hydrogenated Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jianqiu, E-mail: jianqiu@vt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tea, Eric; Li, Guanchen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hin, Celine [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road-MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen release process at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface has been investigated. • A mathematical model that estimates the hydrogen release potential has been proposed. • Al atoms, Al−O bonds, and Si−Al bonds are the major hydrogen traps at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interface. • Hydrogen atoms are primarily release from Al−H and O−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. - Abstract: The Anode Hydrogen Release (AHR) mechanism at interfaces is responsible for the generation of defects, that traps charge carriers and can induce dielectric breakdown in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors. The AHR has been extensively studied at Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces but its characteristics at metal-silica interfaces remain unclear. In this study, we performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the hydrogen release mechanism at the typical Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. We found that interstitial hydrogen atoms can break interfacial Al−Si bonds, passivating a Si sp{sup 3} orbital. Interstitial hydrogen atoms can also break interfacial Al−O bonds, or be adsorbed at the interface on aluminum, forming stable Al−H−Al bridges. We showed that hydrogenated O−H, Si−H and Al−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces are polarized. The resulting bond dipole weakens the O−H and Si−H bonds, but strengthens the Al−H bond under the application of a positive bias at the metal gate. Our calculations indicate that Al−H bonds and O−H bonds are more important than Si−H bonds for the hydrogen release process.

  19. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide; Correction. SUMMARY: The... Administrative Stay of the reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide. The Office of the Federal Register...

  20. Quantitative estimation of hydrogen concentration on the Ni3Al specimens surface in the process of hydrogen release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katano, Gen; Sano, Shogo; Saito, Hideo; Mori, Minoru

    2000-01-01

    The method to calculate the hydrogen concentration in metal specimens is given by tritium counts with the liquid scintillation counter. As segments to measure, Ni 3 Al intermetallic compound crystals were used. Tritium was charged to crystals with the method of cathode charging. The charged tritium was transported by diffusion and released from specimen surface. The tritium releasing rate was calculated from the increasing rate of tritium activity. Then the concentration of hydrogen at the surface was calculated from tritium counts. The outcome showed that the hydrogen concentration decreases at specimens surface by elapsed time. Then, the behavior of tritium diffusion was affected by doped boron (up to 0.235 atom% B and 0.470 atom% B) in Ni 3 Al crystals. As the amount of boron increased, the tritium diffusion coefficient decreased. And the hydrogen concentration varied with the amount of boron. After passing enough time, the hydrogen concentration in crystals with boron was much larger than the one without boron. Since it is very likely that the hydrogen concentration is affected by the number of hydrogen sites in the crystal, it is obvious judging by these phenomena, that by doping boron, numbers of hydrogen trapping sites were created. As the hydrogen distribution becomes homogenous after passing enough time, it is possible to measure the hydrogen concentration in all the crystals from β-ray counts at specimens surface. (author)

  1. Release of hydrogen peroxide and antioxidants by the coral Stylophora pistillata to its external milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoza-Zvuloni, R.; Shaked, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a common reactive oxygen species, plays multiple roles in coral health and disease. Elevated H2O2 production by the symbiotic algae during stress may result in symbiosis breakdown and bleaching of the coral. We have recently reported that various Red Sea corals release H2O2 and antioxidants to their external milieu, and can influence the H2O2 dynamics in the reef. Here, we present a laboratory characterization of H2O2 and antioxidant activity release kinetics by intact, non-stressed Stylophora pistillata. Experimenting with bleached and non-bleached corals and different stirring speeds, we explored the sources and modes of H2O2 and antioxidant release. Since H2O2 is produced and degraded simultaneously, we developed a methodology for resolving the actual H2O2 concentrations released by the corals. H2O2 and antioxidant activity steadily increased in the water surrounding the coral over short periods of 1-2 h. Over longer periods of 5-7 h, the antioxidant activity kept increasing with time, while H2O2 concentrations were stabilized at ~ 1 μM by 1-3 h, and then gradually declined. Solving for H2O2 release, corals were found to release H2O2 at increasing rates over 2-4 h, and then to slow down and stop by 5-7 h. Stirring was shown to induce the release of H2O2, possibly since the flow reduces the thickness of the diffusive boundary layer of the coral, and thus increases H2O2 mass flux. Antioxidant activity was released at similar rates by bleached and non-bleached corals, suggesting that the antioxidants did not originate from the symbiotic algae. H2O2, however, was not released from bleached corals, implying that the symbiotic algae are the source of the released H2O2. The observed flow-induced H2O2 release may aid corals in removing some of the internal H2O2 produced by their symbiotic algae, and may possibly assist in preventing coral bleaching under conditions of elevated temperature and irradiance.

  2. 46 CFR 185.740 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic release units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic servicing of hydrostatic release units. 185.740... Equipment § 185.740 Periodic servicing of hydrostatic release units. (a) Each hydrostatic release unit... specified by the Commandant. (b) Each disposable hydrostatic release unit must be marked with an expiration...

  3. 46 CFR 131.585 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units. 131.585... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 131.585 Periodic servicing of hydrostatic-release units. (a) Except a disposable hydrostatic-release unit with an expiration date, each hydrostatic-release unit must...

  4. Experiments to Measure Hydrogen Release from Graphite Walls During Disruptions in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, E.M.; Pablant, N.A.; Rudakov, D.L.; Boedo, J.A.; Brooks, N.H.; Jernigan, Thomas C.; Pigarov, A.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopy and wall the bake-out measurements are performed in the DIII-D tokamak to estimate the amount of hydrogen stored in and released from the walls during disruptions. Both naturally occurring disruptions and disruptions induced by massive gas injection (MGI) are investigated. The measurements indicate that both types of disruptions cause a net release of order 10(21) hydrogen (or deuterium) atoms from the graphite walls. This is comparable to the pre-disruptions plasma particle inventory, so the released hydrogen is important for accurate modeling of disruptions. However, the amount of hydrogen released is small compared to the total saturated wall inventory of order 10(22)-10(23), So it appears that many disruptions are necessary to provide full pump-out of the vessel walls. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Ignition during hydrogen release from high pressure into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszczak, P.; Wolanski, P.

    2010-12-01

    The first investigations concerned with a problem of hydrogen jet ignition, during outflow from a high-pressure vessel were carried out nearly 40 years ago by Wolanski and Wojcicki. The research resulted from a dramatic accident in the Chorzow Chemical Plant Azoty, where the explosion of a synthesis gas made up of a mixture composed of three moles of hydrogen per mole of nitrogen, at 300°C and 30 MPa killed four people. Initial investigation had excluded potential external ignition sources and the main aim of the research was to determine the cause of ignition. Hydrogen is currently considered as a potential fuel for various vehicles such as cars, trucks, buses, etc. Crucial safety issues are of potential concern, associated with the storage of hydrogen at a very high pressure. Indeed, the evidence obtained nearly 40 years ago shows that sudden rupture of a high-pressure hydrogen storage tank or other component can result in ignition and potentially explosion. The aim of the present research is identification of the conditions under which hydrogen ignition occurs as a result of compression and heating of the air by the shock wave generated by discharge of high-pressure hydrogen. Experiments have been conducted using a facility constructed in the Combustion Laboratory of the Institute of Heat Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology. Tests under various configurations have been performed to determine critical conditions for occurrence of high-pressure hydrogen ignition. The results show that a critical pressure exists, leading to ignition, which depends mainly on the geometric configuration of the outflow system, such as tube diameter, and on the presence of obstacles.

  6. 46 CFR 122.740 - Periodic servicing of hydrostatic release units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic servicing of hydrostatic release units. 122.740... hydrostatic release units. (a) Each hydrostatic release unit, other than a disposable unit, must be serviced... hydrostatic release unit must be marked in clearly legible letters with an expiration date of two years after...

  7. Hydrogen release from vanadium alloy V-4Cr-4Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepikov, A.Kh; Kulsartov, T.V.; Chikhray, E.V.; Romanenko, O.G.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    The experiments on hydrogen loading of vanadium alloy with the following thermodesorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements were carried out with the sample of the V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy (Russia production). Hydrogen solubility was calculated from experimental TDS curves, obtained after equilibrium loading of the sample at the temperatures 673, 773, 873, 973, and 1073 K. The range of loading pressures was 10-100 Pa. The experiments carried out had an objective to determine the regimes (loading time, temperatures and pressures) for the experiment on in-pile loading of the vanadium alloy. (author)

  8. Hydrogen sulfide release from dairy manure storages containing gypsum bedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recycled gypsum products can provide a cost-effective bedding alternative for dairy producers. Manufacturers report reduced odors, moisture and bacteria in the stall environment when compared to traditional bedding. Gypsum provides a sulfate source that can be converted to hydrogen sulfide under ana...

  9. Fuel behaviour and fission product release under realistic hydrogen conditions comparisons between HEVA 06 test results and Vulcain computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, J.M.; Lhiaubet, G.

    1989-07-01

    The HEVA 06 test was designed to simulate the conditions existing at the time when fission products are released from irradiated fuel under hydrogen conditions occurring in a PWR core at low pressure. The test conditions were defined from results provided by the core degradation module of the ESCADRE system (1): VULCAIN. This computer code has been recently used to analyse the early core degradation of a 900 MWe PWR in the AF accident sequence (as defined in WASH - 1400, USNRC - 1975). In this scenario, the core would begin to uncover about one day after scram with the system pressure at about 0.4 MPa. The fission product release starts 70 minutes after core dewatering. The F.P. are transferred to the core outlet in an increasingly hydrogen-rich steam atmosphere. The carrier gas is nearly pure hydrogen in the time period 100 - 130 minutes after core uncovering. A large release of F.P. is predicted in the upper part of the core when the steam starvation occurs. At that time, two thirds of the cladding have been oxidised on an average. Before each HEVA test a fuel sample with a burn-up of 36 GWd/tU is reirradiated in order to observe the release of short-lived fission products. A pre-oxidation was primarely conducted in the HEVA 06 test at a temperature of 1300 0 C and controlled to reach a 2/3 cladding oxidation state. Then the steam was progressively replaced by hydrogen and a heat-up rate of 1.5 0 C/s was induced to reach a temperature of 2100 0 C. The fuel was maintained at this temperature for half an hour in hydrogen. The volatile F.P. release kinetics were observed by on-line gamma spectrometry. Pre test calculations of F.P. release kinetics performed with the EMIS module based on the CORSOR models (3) are compared with the test results. Measured releases of cesium and iodine are really lower than those predicted. Axial and radial F.P. distributions in the fuel pellets are available from gamma tomography measurements performed after the test. Tellurium seems

  10. Hydrogen radiolytic release from zeolite 4A/water systems under γ irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frances, Laëtitia; Grivet, Manuel; Renault, Jean-Philippe; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; Ducret, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Although the radiolysis of bulk water is well known, some questions remain in the case of adsorbed or confined water, especially in the case of zeolites 4A, which are used to store tritiated water. An enhancement of the production of hydrogen is described in the literature for higher porous structures, but the phenomenon stays unexplained. We have studied the radiolysis of zeolites 4A containing different quantities of water under 137 Cs gamma radiation. We focused on the influence of the water loading ratio. The enhancement of hydrogen production compared with bulk water radiolysis has been attributed to the energy transfer from the zeolite to the water, and to the influence of the water structure organization in the zeolite. Both were observed separately, with a maximum efficiency for energy transfer at a loading ratio of about 13%, and a maximum impact of structuration of water at a loading ratio of about 4%. - Highlights: • We irradiated samples of zeolites 4A which contained different quantities of water. • We measured the quantity of hydrogen released. • Hydrogen radiolytic yields, present two maxima, for two water loading ratios. • Hydrogen release is enhanced by the strength of the zeolite/water interaction. • Hydrogen release is enhanced by the quantity of water interacting with the zeolite

  11. Two step novel hydrogen system using additives to enhance hydrogen release from the hydrolysis of alane and activated aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    A system for the generation of hydrogen for use in portable power systems is set forth utilizing a two-step process that involves the thermal decomposition of AlH.sub.3 (10 wt % H.sub.2) followed by the hydrolysis of the activated aluminum (Al*) byproduct to release additional H.sub.2. Additionally, a process in which water is added directly without prior history to the AlH.sub.3:PA composite is also disclosed.

  12. Development of biological and nonbiological explanations for the Viking label release data. [hydrogen peroxide theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The plausibility that hydrogen peroxide, widely distributed within the Mars surface material, was responsible for the evocative response obtained by the Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment on Mars was investigated. Although a mixture of gamma Fe2O3 and silica sand stimulated the LR nutrient reaction with hydrogen peroxide and reduced the rate of hydrogen decomposition under various storage conditions, the Mars analog soil prepared by the Viking Inorganic Analysis Team to match the Mars analytical data does not cause such effects. Nor is adequate resistance to UV irradiation shown. On the basis of the results and consideration presented while the hydrogen peroxide theory remains the most, if not only, attractive chemical explanation of the LR data, it remains unconvincing on critical points. Until problems concerning the formation and stabilization of hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Mars can be overcome, adhere to the scientific evidence requires serious consideration of the biological theory.

  13. Accumulation and release of implanted hydrogen from blisters in Si during the thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, P.A.; Baranova, E.K.; Baranova, I.V.; Budaragin, V.V.; Litvinov, V.L.

    2004-01-01

    The processes of accumulation of ion implanted hydrogen in blisters in silicon and its release during the thermal treatment at 350-1020 deg C have been studied by optical techniques. It is established that accumulation of gaseous hydrogen inside blisters takes place at temperatures lower than ∼ 450-500 deg C and is accompanied by the growth of blisters thickness and deformation of their caps. At higher temperatures hydrogen leaves cavities and dissolves in silicon. Due to internal pressure dropping the elasticity deformed top layer partially relaxes, and the blister thickness decreases. Etching of the surface layer reveals the agglomerations of small voids ( [ru

  14. Hydrogen Release From 800-MeV Proton-Irradiated Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Brian M.; Venhaus, Thomas J.; Causey, Rion A.; Garner, Francis A.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2002-01-01

    Tungsten irradiated in spallation neutron sources such as those proposed for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, or in proposed fusion reactors, will contain large quantities of generated helium and hydrogen gas. In the APT, spallation neutrons would be generated by the interaction of high energy (∼1 GeV) protons with solid tungsten rods or cylinders. In fusion reactors, tungsten used in a tokamak diverter will contain hydrogen, as well as deuterium and tritium diffusing in from the plasma-facing surface. The release kinetics of these gases during various off-normal scenarios involving loss of coolant and afterheat-induced rises in temperature is of particular interest for both applications. To determine the release kinetics of hydrogen from tungsten, tungsten rods irradiated with 800 MeV protons in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANCE) to high exposures as part of the APT project have been examined. Hydrogen evolution from the tungsten was measured using a dedicated mass spectrometer system by subjecting the specimens to an essentially linear temperature ramp from ∼323 K to ∼1473 K. Release profiles are compared with predictions obtained using the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP4). Input parameters for the modeling, consisting of diffusivity, recombination rate coefficient, and trapping, are discussed. The measurements show that for high proton doses, the majority of the hydrogen is released gradually, starting at about 900 K and reaching a maximum at about 1400 K, where it drops fairly rapidly. Comparisons with TMAP show reasonable agreement at high proton dose using a trap value of 1.4 eV and a trap density of 3%. There is also a small release fraction occurring at ∼600 K which predominates at lower proton doses, and which is relatively independent of dose. This lower-temperature release is predicted by TMAP if no traps are assumed, suggesting that this release may represent an adsorbed surface component

  15. Control of accidental releases of hydrogen selenide in vented storage cabinets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fthenakis, V. M.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Sproull, R. D.

    1988-07-01

    Highly toxic hydrogen selenide and hydrogen sulfide gases are used in the production of copper-indium-diselenide photovoltaic cells by reactive sputtering. In the event of an accident, these gases may be released to the atmosphere and pose hazards to public and occupational safety and health. This paper outlines an approach for designing systems for the control of these releases given the uncertainty in release conditions and lack of data on the chemical systems involved. Accidental releases of these gases in storage cabinets can be controlled by either a venturi and packed-bed scrubber and carbon adsorption bed, or containment scrubbing equipment followed by carbon adsorption. These systems can effectively reduce toxic gas emissions to levels needed to protect public health. The costs of these controls (˜0.012/Wp) are samll in comparison with current (˜6/Wp) and projected (˜I/Wp) production costs.

  16. Some remarks on hydrogen release from nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, S.

    1980-01-01

    After a survey of the literature on generalisable statements on β, γ-radiolysis of water and salty solutions, an attempt is made to summarize and evaluate existing measurements in connection with the formation of H 2 in nitrous fission product solutions (or corresponding simulates). It is seen that laboratory experiments with such fission products show rather uniform and plausible G(H 2 )-values in the region -3 . It is also seen, however, that G(H 2 )-values and steady H 2 -release rates are not suitable to describe technical systems (HAW stores). Either H 2 is carried away by purge air or it is, in a non-operating system, consumed again in situ, obviously by back reactions. (orig.) [de

  17. Dicyclopentadiene Hydrogenation in Trickle Bed Reactor under Forced Periodic Control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skála, D.; Hanika, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2008), s. 215-218 ISSN 1336-7242 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA/039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : periodic control * trickle -bed reactor * dicyclopentadiene Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  18. Prototypic corium oxidation and hydrogen release during the Fuel-Coolant Interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tyrpekl, J.; Piluso, P.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Nižňanský, D.; Rehspringer, J.L.; Bezdička, Petr; Dugne, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 75, JAN (2015), s. 210-218 ISSN 0306-4549 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Corium * Fuel -Coolant Interaction * Hydrogen release * Material effect * Nuclear reactor severe accident Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.174, year: 2015

  19. Organosulphide profile and hydrogen sulphide-releasing activity of garlic fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tocmo, Restituto; Lai, Abigail Nianci; Wu, Yuchen; Liang, Dong; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Huang, Dejian

    2017-01-01

    Blanched and unblanched garlic were fermented using L. plantarum for investigation of organosulphide profiles, hydrogen sulphide-releasing activity, pH, titratable activity and microbial growth. Both raw and blanched garlic preparations allowed growth of L. plantarum with corresponding lowering of

  20. Correlation between hydrogen release and degradation of limestone concrete exposed to hot liquid sodium in inert atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, F.C.; Das, S.K.; Sharma, A.K.; Ramesh, S.S.; Somayajulu, P.A.; Kannan, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Concrete is used as a structural material in a Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) plant for the construction of its foundation, containment, radiation shield and equipment support structures. An accidental leakage of hot sodium on these civil structures can bring about thermo-chemical reactions, with concrete producing hydrogen gas and causing structural degradation. The concrete damage and hydrogen generation take place concurrently due to conduction of heat from sodium into the concrete and migration of steam / moisture in counter current direction towards sodium. In a series of experiments conducted with limestone concrete for two different types of design corresponding to composition and geometry, were exposed to liquid sodium (∼2 kg) at initial temperatures varying from 180 deg. C to 500 deg. C in an inerted test vessel (Capacity = 203 L). Immersion heater was employed to heat the sodium pool on the concrete cavity during the test period in some test runs. On-line continuous measurement of pressure, temperature, hydrogen gas and oxygen gas was carried out. Pre- and post- test nondestructive testing such as colour photography, spatial profiling of ultrasonic pulse velocity and measurement of dimensions were also conducted. Solid samples were collected from sodium debris by manual core drilling machine and from concrete block by hand held electric drilling machine. These samples were subjected to chemical analysis for the determination of free and bound water along with unburnt and burnt sodium. The hydrogen generation parameters such as average and peak release rate as well as release efficiency are derived from measured test variables. These test variables include temperature, pressure and hydrogen concentration in the argon atmosphere contained in the test vessel. The concrete degradation parameters encompass percentage reduction in ultrasonic pulse velocity, depth of physical and chemical dehydration and sodium penetration. These

  1. Analysis of jet flames and unignited jets from unintended releases of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houf, W.G.; Evans, G.H.; Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    A combined experimental and modeling program is being carried out at Sandia National Laboratories to characterize and predict the behavior of unintended hydrogen releases. In the case where the hydrogen leak remains unignited, knowledge of the concentration field and flammability envelope is an issue of importance in determining consequence distances for the safe use of hydrogen. In the case where a high-pressure leak of hydrogen is ignited, a classic turbulent jet flame forms. Knowledge of the flame length and thermal radiation heat flux distribution is important to safety. Depending on the effective diameter of the leak and the tank source pressure, free jet flames can be extensive in length and pose significant radiation and impingement hazard, resulting in consequence distances that are unacceptably large. One possible mitigation strategy to potentially reduce the exposure to jet flames is to incorporate barriers around hydrogen storage equipment. The reasoning is that walls will reduce the extent of unacceptable consequences due to jet releases resulting from accidents involving high-pressure equipment. While reducing the jet extent, the walls may introduce other hazards if not configured properly. The goal of this work is to provide guidance on configuration and placement of these walls to minimize overall hazards using a quantitative risk assessment approach. The program includes detailed CFD calculations of jet flames and unignited jets to predict how hydrogen leaks and jet flames interact with barriers, complemented by an experimental validation program that considers the interaction of jet flames and unignited jets with barriers. As a first step in this work on barrier release interaction the Sandia CFD model has been validated by computing the concentration decay of unignited turbulent free jets and comparing the results with the classic concentration decay laws for turbulent free jets taken from experimental data. Computations for turbulent hydrogen

  2. Global analysis and parametric dependencies for potential unintended hydrogen-fuel releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harstad, Kenneth; Bellan, Josette [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, M/S 125-109, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Global, simplified analyses of gaseous-hydrogen releases from a high-pressure vessel and liquid-hydrogen pools are conducted for two purposes: (1) establishing order-of-magnitude values of characteristic times and (2) determining parametric dependencies of these characteristic times on the physical properties of the configuration and on the thermophysical properties of hydrogen. According to the ratio of the characteristic release time to the characteristic mixing time, two limiting configurations are identified: (1) a rich cloud exists when this ratio is much smaller than unity, and (2) a jet exists when this ratio is much larger than unity. In all cases, it is found that the characteristic release time is proportional to the total released mass and inversely proportional to a characteristic area. The approximate size, convection velocity, and circulation time of unconfined burning-cloud releases scale with the cloud mass at powers 1/3, 1/6, and 1/6, respectively, multiplied by an appropriately dimensional constant; the influence of cross flow can only be important if its velocity exceeds that of internal convection. It is found that the fireball lifetime is approximately the maximum of the release time and thrice the convection-associated characteristic time. Transition from deflagration to detonation can occur only if the size of unconfined clouds exceeds by a factor of O(10) that of a characteristic detonation cell, which ranges from 0.015 m under stoichiometric conditions to approximately 1 m under extreme rich/lean conditions. For confined vapor pockets, transition occurs only for pocket sizes larger than the cell size. In jets, the release time is inversely proportional to the initial vessel pressure and has a square root dependence on the vessel temperature. Jet velocities are a factor of 10 larger than convective velocities in fireballs and combustion is possible only in the subsonic, downstream region where entrainment may occur.

  3. Circatrigintan instead of lunar periodicity of larval release in a brooding coral species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Bart; Huisman, Jef; Rinkevich, Baruch

    2018-04-04

    Larval release by brooding corals is often assumed to display lunar periodicity. Here, we show that larval release of individual Stylophora pistillata colonies does not comply with the assumed tight entrainment by the lunar cycle, and can better be classified as a circatrigintan pattern. The colonies exhibited three distinct reproductive patterns, characterized by short intervals, long intervals and no periodicity between reproductive peaks, respectively. Cross correlation between the lunar cycle and larval release of the periodic colonies revealed an approximately 30-day periodicity with a variable lag of 5 to 10 days after full moon. The observed variability indicates that the lunar cycle does not provide a strict zeitgeber. Other factors such as water temperature and solar radiation did not correlate significantly with the larval release. The circatrigintan patterns displayed by S. pistillata supports the plasticity of corals and sheds new light on discussions on the fecundity of brooding coral species.

  4. Hydrogen release from 800 MeV proton-irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, B. M.; Venhaus, T. J.; Causey, R. A.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    Tungsten irradiated in spallation neutron sources, such as those proposed for the accelerator production of tritium (APT) project, will contain large quantities of generated helium and hydrogen gas. Tungsten used in proposed fusion reactors will also be exposed to neutrons, and the generated protium will be accompanied by deuterium and tritium diffusing in from the plasma-facing surface. The release kinetics of these gases during various off-normal scenarios involving loss of coolant and after heat-induced rises in temperature are of particular interest for both applications. To determine the release kinetics of hydrogen from tungsten, tungsten rods irradiated with 800 MeV protons in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to high exposures as part of the APT project have been examined. Hydrogen evolution from the tungsten has been measured using a dedicated mass-spectrometer system by subjecting the specimens to an essentially linear temperature ramp from ˜300 to ˜1500 K. Release profiles are compared with predictions obtained using the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP4). The measurements show that for high proton doses, the majority of the hydrogen is released gradually, starting at about 900 K and reaching a maximum at about 1400 K, where it drops fairly rapidly. Comparisons with TMAP show quite reasonable agreement using a trap energy of 1.4 eV and a trap density of ˜7%. There is a small additional release fraction occurring at ˜550 K, which is believed to be associated with low-energy trapping at or near the surface, and, therefore, was not included in the bulk TMAP model.

  5. Hydrogen release from 800 MeV proton-irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, B.M.; Venhaus, T.J.; Causey, R.A.; Garner, F.A.; Maloy, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Tungsten irradiated in spallation neutron sources, such as those proposed for the accelerator production of tritium (APT) project, will contain large quantities of generated helium and hydrogen gas. Tungsten used in proposed fusion reactors will also be exposed to neutrons, and the generated protium will be accompanied by deuterium and tritium diffusing in from the plasma-facing surface. The release kinetics of these gases during various off-normal scenarios involving loss of coolant and after heat-induced rises in temperature are of particular interest for both applications. To determine the release kinetics of hydrogen from tungsten, tungsten rods irradiated with 800 MeV protons in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to high exposures as part of the APT project have been examined. Hydrogen evolution from the tungsten has been measured using a dedicated mass-spectrometer system by subjecting the specimens to an essentially linear temperature ramp from ∼300 to ∼1500 K. Release profiles are compared with predictions obtained using the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP4). The measurements show that for high proton doses, the majority of the hydrogen is released gradually, starting at about 900 K and reaching a maximum at about 1400 K, where it drops fairly rapidly. Comparisons with TMAP show quite reasonable agreement using a trap energy of 1.4 eV and a trap density of ∼7%. There is a small additional release fraction occurring at ∼550 K, which is believed to be associated with low-energy trapping at or near the surface, and, therefore, was not included in the bulk TMAP model

  6. Hydrogen release from 800 MeV proton-irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, B.M. E-mail: brian.oliver@pnl.gov; Venhaus, T.J.; Causey, R.A.; Garner, F.A.; Maloy, S.A

    2002-12-01

    Tungsten irradiated in spallation neutron sources, such as those proposed for the accelerator production of tritium (APT) project, will contain large quantities of generated helium and hydrogen gas. Tungsten used in proposed fusion reactors will also be exposed to neutrons, and the generated protium will be accompanied by deuterium and tritium diffusing in from the plasma-facing surface. The release kinetics of these gases during various off-normal scenarios involving loss of coolant and after heat-induced rises in temperature are of particular interest for both applications. To determine the release kinetics of hydrogen from tungsten, tungsten rods irradiated with 800 MeV protons in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to high exposures as part of the APT project have been examined. Hydrogen evolution from the tungsten has been measured using a dedicated mass-spectrometer system by subjecting the specimens to an essentially linear temperature ramp from {approx}300 to {approx}1500 K. Release profiles are compared with predictions obtained using the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP4). The measurements show that for high proton doses, the majority of the hydrogen is released gradually, starting at about 900 K and reaching a maximum at about 1400 K, where it drops fairly rapidly. Comparisons with TMAP show quite reasonable agreement using a trap energy of 1.4 eV and a trap density of {approx}7%. There is a small additional release fraction occurring at {approx}550 K, which is believed to be associated with low-energy trapping at or near the surface, and, therefore, was not included in the bulk TMAP model.

  7. Air exposure and sample storage time influence on hydrogen release from tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshkunov, K.A., E-mail: moshkunov@gmail.co [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPhI' , Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Schmid, K.; Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kurnaev, V.A.; Gasparyan, Yu.M. [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPhI' , Kashirskoe sh. 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-30

    In investigations of hydrogen retention in first wall components the influence of the conditions of the implanted target storage prior to analysis and the storage time is often neglected. Therefore we have performed a dedicated set of experiments. The release of hydrogen from samples exposed to ambient air after irradiation was compared to samples kept in vacuum. For air exposed samples significant amounts of HDO and D{sub 2}O are detected during TDS. Additional experiments have shown that heavy water is formed by recombination of releasing D and H atoms with O on the W surface. This water formation can alter hydrogen retention results significantly, in particular - for low retention cases. In addition to the influence of ambient air exposure also the influence of storage time in vacuum was investigated. After implantation at 300 K the samples were stored in vacuum for up to 1 week during which the retained amount decreased significantly. The subsequently measured TDS spectra showed that D was lost from both the high and low energy peaks during storage at ambient temperature of {approx}300 K. An attempt to simulate this release from both peaks during room temperature storage by TMAP 7 calculations showed that this effect cannot be explained by conventional diffusion/trapping models.

  8. Air exposure and sample storage time influence on hydrogen release from tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshkunov, K.A.; Schmid, K.; Mayer, M.; Kurnaev, V.A.; Gasparyan, Yu.M.

    2010-01-01

    In investigations of hydrogen retention in first wall components the influence of the conditions of the implanted target storage prior to analysis and the storage time is often neglected. Therefore we have performed a dedicated set of experiments. The release of hydrogen from samples exposed to ambient air after irradiation was compared to samples kept in vacuum. For air exposed samples significant amounts of HDO and D 2 O are detected during TDS. Additional experiments have shown that heavy water is formed by recombination of releasing D and H atoms with O on the W surface. This water formation can alter hydrogen retention results significantly, in particular - for low retention cases. In addition to the influence of ambient air exposure also the influence of storage time in vacuum was investigated. After implantation at 300 K the samples were stored in vacuum for up to 1 week during which the retained amount decreased significantly. The subsequently measured TDS spectra showed that D was lost from both the high and low energy peaks during storage at ambient temperature of ∼300 K. An attempt to simulate this release from both peaks during room temperature storage by TMAP 7 calculations showed that this effect cannot be explained by conventional diffusion/trapping models.

  9. Air exposure and sample storage time influence on hydrogen release from tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkunov, K. A.; Schmid, K.; Mayer, M.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Gasparyan, Yu. M.

    2010-09-01

    In investigations of hydrogen retention in first wall components the influence of the conditions of the implanted target storage prior to analysis and the storage time is often neglected. Therefore we have performed a dedicated set of experiments. The release of hydrogen from samples exposed to ambient air after irradiation was compared to samples kept in vacuum. For air exposed samples significant amounts of HDO and D 2O are detected during TDS. Additional experiments have shown that heavy water is formed by recombination of releasing D and H atoms with O on the W surface. This water formation can alter hydrogen retention results significantly, in particular - for low retention cases. In addition to the influence of ambient air exposure also the influence of storage time in vacuum was investigated. After implantation at 300 K the samples were stored in vacuum for up to 1 week during which the retained amount decreased significantly. The subsequently measured TDS spectra showed that D was lost from both the high and low energy peaks during storage at ambient temperature of ˜300 K. An attempt to simulate this release from both peaks during room temperature storage by TMAP 7 calculations showed that this effect cannot be explained by conventional diffusion/trapping models.

  10. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report is the second in a series concerned with the evaluation of the consequences to the public of an accidental release of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) to the atmosphere following a pipe or pressure envelope failure, or some other process upset, at a heavy water plant. It consists of documentation of the code GASPROB, which has been developed to provide consequence probabilities for a range of postulated releases. The code includes mathematical simulations of initial gas behaviour upon release to the atmosphere, such as gravitational settling of a cold release and the rise of jets and flares, subsequent atmospheric dispersion under a range of weather conditions, and the toxic effects on the exposed population. The code makes use of the site-specific dispersion climatology, topography and population distribution, as well as the probabilistic lethal dose data for the released gas. Output for a given postulated release can be provided in terms of the concentration of the gas at ground level around the point of release, projected numbers of fatalities within specified areas and the projected total fatalities regardless of location. This report includes a general description of GASPROB, and specifics of the code structure, the function of each subroutine, input and output data, and the permanent data files established. Three appendices to the report contain a complete code listing, detailed subroutine descriptions and a sample output

  11. Sustained drug release and electrochemical performance of ethyl cellulose-magnesium hydrogen phosphate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Faruq, E-mail: fmohammad@ksu.edu.sa [Surfactant Research chair, Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Arfin, Tanvir, E-mail: t_arfin@neeri.res.in [Environmental Materials Division, CSIR-National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-NEERI), Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440020 (India); Al-Lohedan, Hamad A. [Surfactant Research chair, Department of Chemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-01

    In this, a sol-gel method was applied to prepare ethyl cellulose-magnesium hydrogen phosphate (EC-MgHPO{sub 4}) composite that can have potential applications in the sensory, pharmaceutical, and biomedical sectors. The formed composite was thoroughly characterized by making use of the instrumental analysis such as UV–Vis, FT-IR, HRTEM, EDAX, SEM and XRD. For the composite, the other parameters determined includes the water uptake, porosity, thickness, bulk and tapped densities, angle of repose, Carr's index and Hausner ratio. From the results, the material found to exhibit good flowing properties with a Carr's index of 11.11%, Hausner ratio of 1.125, and angle of response of 33°. The EDAX spectrum and HRTEM analysis confirmed for the composite formation and the particles size is investigated to be around 52 nm. The surface porosity due to the EC matrices was confirmed by the SEM analysis, which further used for the loading of drug, Proguanil. In addition, the material's conductivity was studied by taking uni-univalent electrolyte solution (KCl and NaCl) indicated that the conductivity follows the order of KCl > NaCl, while the activation energy obtained from Arrhenius method resembled that the conductivity is strongly influenced by the electrolyte type used. We found from the analysis that, with a decrease in the size of hydrated radii of ions, the conductivity of EC-MgHPO{sub 4} material also observed to be decreased in the order K{sup +} > Na{sup +} and the material proved to be mechanically stable and can be operated over a range of pHs, temperatures, and electrolyte solutions. Further, the drug loading and efficiency studies indicated that the material can trap up to 80% of Proguanil (antimalarial drug) applied for its loading. The Proguanil drug release profiles confirmed for the controlled and sustained release from the EC-MgHPO{sub 4} matrix, as the material can release up to 87% of its total loaded drug over a 90 min period. Finally, the

  12. Sustained drug release and electrochemical performance of ethyl cellulose-magnesium hydrogen phosphate composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, Faruq; Arfin, Tanvir; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.

    2017-01-01

    In this, a sol-gel method was applied to prepare ethyl cellulose-magnesium hydrogen phosphate (EC-MgHPO 4 ) composite that can have potential applications in the sensory, pharmaceutical, and biomedical sectors. The formed composite was thoroughly characterized by making use of the instrumental analysis such as UV–Vis, FT-IR, HRTEM, EDAX, SEM and XRD. For the composite, the other parameters determined includes the water uptake, porosity, thickness, bulk and tapped densities, angle of repose, Carr's index and Hausner ratio. From the results, the material found to exhibit good flowing properties with a Carr's index of 11.11%, Hausner ratio of 1.125, and angle of response of 33°. The EDAX spectrum and HRTEM analysis confirmed for the composite formation and the particles size is investigated to be around 52 nm. The surface porosity due to the EC matrices was confirmed by the SEM analysis, which further used for the loading of drug, Proguanil. In addition, the material's conductivity was studied by taking uni-univalent electrolyte solution (KCl and NaCl) indicated that the conductivity follows the order of KCl > NaCl, while the activation energy obtained from Arrhenius method resembled that the conductivity is strongly influenced by the electrolyte type used. We found from the analysis that, with a decrease in the size of hydrated radii of ions, the conductivity of EC-MgHPO 4 material also observed to be decreased in the order K + > Na + and the material proved to be mechanically stable and can be operated over a range of pHs, temperatures, and electrolyte solutions. Further, the drug loading and efficiency studies indicated that the material can trap up to 80% of Proguanil (antimalarial drug) applied for its loading. The Proguanil drug release profiles confirmed for the controlled and sustained release from the EC-MgHPO 4 matrix, as the material can release up to 87% of its total loaded drug over a 90 min period. Finally, the cell viability and

  13. Investigation into periodic process of hydrogen isotope separation by counterflow method in the hydrogen-palladium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, B.M.; Selivanenko, I.L.; Vedeneev, A.I.; Golubkov, A.N.; Tenyaev, B.N.

    1999-01-01

    The key diagram and results of the investigation into working conditions of the pilot plant for hydrogen isotope separation embodying the concept of continuous counterflow separation in the hydrogen-palladium system are shown. The counterflow of phases in the plant is attained under the motion of palladium solid hydride phase relative to stationary blocks of flow rotation. The column separator is defined as section type one. The plant performs in periodic regime with accumulating vessels for light and heavy components of the separated mixture. Maximum concentration of the separated tritium ranged up to ∼ 96 % in the experiments of the deuterium-tritium separation. Minimum concentration of the residual tritium in the mixture ranged up to ∼ 0.1 %. The plant provides to reprocessing 4.5 moles of the gas a day [ru

  14. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux ≅ 1 x 10 18 ions s -1 cm -2 to a fluence of the order of 10 21 ions/cm 2 and at temperatures around 800 0 C. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10 18 H/cm 2 at temperatures below 100 0 C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV. The graphite temperature was varied between 15 and 480 0 C. Due to the plasma particle pumping capability, hydrogen recycling from the activated graphite surface is significantly reduced, relative to that from a pre-saturated surface. A pre-saturated surface was also observed to reproducibly pump a hydrogen plasma to a concentration of 9.5 x 10 17 H/cm 2 . The hydrogen retention capacity of graphite is found to decrease with increasing temperature. A transient pumping mechanism associated with the sponge-like surface morphology is conjectured to explain the large hydrogen retention capacity. Hydrogen release behavior under helium and argon plasma bombardment was also investigated, and the result indicated the possibility of some in-pore retrapping effect. 43 refs., 11 figs

  15. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynes, C.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report provides a summary of work carried out on behalf of the Atomic Energy Control Board, concerned with the consequences of accidental releases to the atmosphere of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) at a heavy water plant. In this study, assessments of consequences are made in terms of the probabilities of a range of possible outcomes, i.e., numbers of fatalities, given a certain release scenario. The report describes the major features of a computer model which was developed to calculate the consequences and their associated probabilities, and the major input data used in applying the model to a consequence assessment of the Bruce heavy water plant (HWP) in Ontario. The results of the sensitivity analyses of the model are summarized. Finally, the results of the consequence assessments of 43 accidental release scenarios at the Bruce HWP are summarized, together with a number of conclusions which were drawn from these results regarding the predicted consequences and the factors which influence them

  16. Hydrogen Gas Retention and Release from WTP Vessels: Summary of Preliminary Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bontha, Jagannadha R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Daniel, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rassat, Scot D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wells, Beric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bao, Jie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boeringa, Gregory K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buchmiller, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burns, Carolyn A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Karri, Naveen K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Li, Huidong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tran, Diana N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently being designed and constructed to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in the 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. A number of technical issues related to the design of the pretreatment facility (PTF) of the WTP have been identified. These issues must be resolved prior to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) reaching a decision to proceed with engineering, procurement, and construction activities for the PTF. One of the issues is Technical Issue T1 - Hydrogen Gas Release from Vessels (hereafter referred to as T1). The focus of T1 is identifying controls for hydrogen release and completing any testing required to close the technical issue. In advance of selecting specific controls for hydrogen gas safety, a number of preliminary technical studies were initiated to support anticipated future testing and to improve the understanding of hydrogen gas generation, retention, and release within PTF vessels. These activities supported the development of a plan defining an overall strategy and approach for addressing T1 and achieving technical endpoints identified for T1. Preliminary studies also supported the development of a test plan for conducting testing and analysis to support closing T1. Both of these plans were developed in advance of selecting specific controls, and in the course of working on T1 it was decided that the testing and analysis identified in the test plan were not immediately needed. However, planning activities and preliminary studies led to significant technical progress in a number of areas. This report summarizes the progress to date from the preliminary technical studies. The technical results in this report should not be used for WTP design or safety and hazards analyses and technical results are marked with the following statement: “Preliminary Technical Results for Planning – Not to be used for WTP Design

  17. Tritium release from advanced beryllium materials after loading by tritium/hydrogen gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, Rolf; Moeslang, Anton; Kurinskiy, Petr; Vladimirov, Pavel [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Dorn, Christopher [Materion Beryllium & Composites, 6070 Parkland Boulevard, Mayfield Heights, OH 44124-4191 (United States); Kupriyanov, Igor [Bochvar Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova str., 5, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • A major tritium release peak for beryllium samples occurs at temperatures higher than 1250 K. • A beryllium grade with comparatively smaller grain size has a comparatively higher tritium release compared to the grade with larger grain size. • The pebbles of irregular shape with the grain size of 10–30 μm produced by the crushing method demonstrate the highest tritium release rate. - Abstract: Comparison of different beryllium samples on tritium release and retention properties after high-temperature loading by tritium/hydrogen gas mixture and following temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) tests has been performed. The I-220-H grade produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) having the smallest grain size, the pebbles of irregular shape with the smallest grain size (10–30 μm) produced by the crushing method (CM), and the pebbles with 1 mm diameter produced by the fluoride reduction method (FRM) having a highly developed inherent porosity show the highest release rate. Grain size and porosity are considered as key structural parameters for comparison and ranking of different beryllium materials on tritium release and retention properties.

  18. Release of hydrogen sulfide under intermittent flow conditions – the potential of simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matias, Natércia; Matos, Rita Ventura; Ferreira, Filipa

    2018-01-01

    For engineering purposes it is especially useful to be able to predict and control sewer corrosion rates and odor impacts as well as to design effective measures aiming to reduce effects related to hydrogen sulfide formation and release. Doing so, it is important to use modeling tools that are ca......For engineering purposes it is especially useful to be able to predict and control sewer corrosion rates and odor impacts as well as to design effective measures aiming to reduce effects related to hydrogen sulfide formation and release. Doing so, it is important to use modeling tools...... to evaluate the effects of transitions between pressure mains and gravity sewers in the air–liquid mass transfer of hydrogen sulfide at the Ericeira sewer system in Portugal. This network is known to have odor and corrosion problems, especially during summer. Despite the unavoidable uncertainties due...... to the unsteady flow rate and the quantification of air velocity and turbulence, the simulation results obtained with both models have been shown to adequately predict the overall behavior of the system....

  19. Final Report for the DOE-BES Program Mechanistic Studies of Activated Hydrogen Release from Amine-Boranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Sneddon; R. Thomas Baker

    2013-01-13

    Effective storage of hydrogen presents one of the most significant technical gaps to successful implementation of the hydrogen economy, particularly for transportation applications. Amine boranes, such as ammonia borane H3NBH3 and ammonia triborane H3NB3H7, have been identified as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage media containing potentially readily released protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens. At the outset of our studies, dehydrogenation of ammonia borane had been studied primarily in the solid state, but our DOE sponsored work clearly demonstrated that ionic liquids, base-initiators and/or metal-catalysts can each significantly increase both the rate and extent of hydrogen release from amine boranes under moderate conditions. Our studies also showed that depending upon the activation method, hydrogen release from amine boranes can occur by very different mechanistic steps and yield different types of spent-fuel materials. The fundamental understanding that was developed during this grant of the pathways and controlling factors for each of these hydrogen-release mechanisms is now enabling continuing discovery and optimization of new chemical-hydride based hydrogen storage systems.

  20. Catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongkia, Atittahn; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai; Suriye, Kongkiat; Nonkhamwong, Anuwat

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in a trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation. The effects of cycle period and split on relative conversion, which is defined as styrene conversion obtained from periodic operation over that from steady state operation, were examined at various operating conditions including gas and average liquid flow rates, pressure and temperature. The experimental results reveal that both cycle period and split have strong influence on the catalytic performance. The fast mode (short cycle period) is a favorable condition. The improvement by the periodic operation becomes less pronounced for operations at high average liquid flow rate, pressure and temperature. From this study, a maximum improvement of styrene conversion of 18% is observed

  1. Catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongkia, Atittahn; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Suriye, Kongkiat; Nonkhamwong, Anuwat [SCG Chemicals Co. Ltd., Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-03-15

    We investigated the catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in a trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation. The effects of cycle period and split on relative conversion, which is defined as styrene conversion obtained from periodic operation over that from steady state operation, were examined at various operating conditions including gas and average liquid flow rates, pressure and temperature. The experimental results reveal that both cycle period and split have strong influence on the catalytic performance. The fast mode (short cycle period) is a favorable condition. The improvement by the periodic operation becomes less pronounced for operations at high average liquid flow rate, pressure and temperature. From this study, a maximum improvement of styrene conversion of 18% is observed.

  2. Hydrogen bonding between hydrides of the upper-right part of the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simončič, Matjaž; Urbic, Tomaz

    2018-05-01

    One of the most important electrostatic interactions between molecules is most definitely the hydrogen bond. Understanding the basis of this interaction may offer us the insight needed to understand its effect on the macroscopic scale. Hydrogen bonding is for example the reason for anomalous properties in compounds like water and naturally life as we know it. The strength of the bond depends on numerous factors, among them the electronegativity of participating atoms. In this work we calculated the strength of hydrogen bonds between hydrides of the upper-right part of the periodic table (C, N, O, F, P, S, Cl, As, Se, Br) using quantum-chemical methods. The aim was to determine what influences the strength of strong and weak hydrogen bonds in simple hydrides. Various relationships were checked. A relation between the strength of the bond and the electronegativity of the participating atoms was found. We also observed a correlation between the strength of hydrogen bonds and the inter-atomic distances, along with the dependence on the charge transfer on the atom of the donor. We also report characteristic geometries of different dimers.

  3. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel.

  4. Storage and release of hydrogen cyanide in a chelicerate (Oribatula tibialis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Adrian; Raspotnig, Günther; Wehner, Katja; Meusinger, Reinhard; Norton, Roy A.; Heethoff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cyanogenesis denotes a chemical defensive strategy where hydrogen cyanide (HCN, hydrocyanic or prussic acid) is produced, stored, and released toward an attacking enemy. The high toxicity and volatility of HCN requires both chemical stabilization for storage and prevention of accidental self-poisoning. The few known cyanogenic animals are exclusively mandibulate arthropods (certain myriapods and insects) that store HCN as cyanogenic glycosides, lipids, or cyanohydrins. Here, we show that cyanogenesis has also evolved in the speciose Chelicerata. The oribatid mite Oribatula tibialis uses the cyanogenic aromatic ester mandelonitrile hexanoate (MNH) for HCN storage, which degrades via two different pathways, both of which release HCN. MNH is emitted from exocrine opisthonotal oil glands, which are potent organs for chemical defense in most oribatid mites. PMID:28289203

  5. Novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine, prevents STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Xin [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Xinghui [Departments of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Shanghai College of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ma, Fenfen; Luo, Shanshan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ge, Ruowen [Departmentof Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Zhu, Yizhun, E-mail: zhuyz@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Departmentof Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-05-13

    In this work, we demonstrated for the first time that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC, also named as ZYZ-802), a novel hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S)-releasing compound, had renoprotective effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic kidney injury. SPRC treatment significantly reduced the level of creatinine, kidney to body weight ratio and in particular, markedly decreased 24-h urine microalbuminuria excretion. SPRC suppressed the mRNA expression of fibronectin and type IV collagen. In vitro, SPRC inhibited mesangial cells over-proliferation and hypertrophy induced by high glucose. Additionally, SPRC attenuated inflammation in diabetic kidneys. SPRC also reduced transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling and expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3) pathway. Moreover, SPRC inhibited phosphorylation of ERK, p38 protein. Taken together, SPRC was demonstrated to be a potential therapeutic candidate to suppress diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • We synthesized a novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC). • SPRC was preliminarily demonstrated to prevent STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy (DN). • SPRC may exert potential therapeutic candidate to suppress DN.

  6. Novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine, prevents STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xin; Li, Xinghui; Ma, Fenfen; Luo, Shanshan; Ge, Ruowen; Zhu, Yizhun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated for the first time that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC, also named as ZYZ-802), a novel hydrogen sulfide (H_2S)-releasing compound, had renoprotective effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic kidney injury. SPRC treatment significantly reduced the level of creatinine, kidney to body weight ratio and in particular, markedly decreased 24-h urine microalbuminuria excretion. SPRC suppressed the mRNA expression of fibronectin and type IV collagen. In vitro, SPRC inhibited mesangial cells over-proliferation and hypertrophy induced by high glucose. Additionally, SPRC attenuated inflammation in diabetic kidneys. SPRC also reduced transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) signaling and expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3) pathway. Moreover, SPRC inhibited phosphorylation of ERK, p38 protein. Taken together, SPRC was demonstrated to be a potential therapeutic candidate to suppress diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • We synthesized a novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing compound, S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC). • SPRC was preliminarily demonstrated to prevent STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy (DN). • SPRC may exert potential therapeutic candidate to suppress DN.

  7. Boiling enriches the linear polysulfides and the hydrogen sulfide-releasing activity of garlic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tocmo, Restituto; Wu, Yuchen; Liang, Dong; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Huang, Dejian

    2017-01-01

    Garlic is rich in polysulfides, and some of them can be H2S donors. This study was conducted to explore the effect of cooking on garlic's organopolysulfides and H2S-releasing activity. Garlic bulbs were crushed and boiled for a period ranging from 3 to 30 min and the solvent extracts were analyzed

  8. Effects of various catalysts on hydrogen release and uptake characteristics of LiAlH{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resan, Mirna; Hampton, Michael D.; Lomness, Janice K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2366 (United States); Slattery, Darlene K. [Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Rd., Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    The effects of various catalysts on the hydrogen release characteristics of LiAlH{sub 4} were studied. The catalysts were incorporated into the alanate by ball milling. The catalysts studied included elemental titanium, TiH{sub 2}, TiCl{sub 4}, TiCl{sub 3}, AlCl{sub 3}, FeCl{sub 3}, elemental iron, elemental nickel, elemental vanadium, and carbon black. Dehydriding/rehydriding properties were characterized by using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with pressure measurement and X-ray diffraction. The addition of TiCl{sub 3} and TiCl{sub 4} to LiAlH{sub 4} eliminated the first step of hydrogen evolution and significantly lowered decomposition temperature of the second step. Doping with elemental iron caused only a slight decrease in the amount of hydrogen released and did not eliminate the first step of hydrogen evolution. Ball milling in the absence of the catalyst was found to decrease the release temperature of hydrogen, while doping with elemental iron did not have any additional effect on the temperature of hydrogen release of LiAlH{sub 4}. (author)

  9. Updated on effluents releases of the CEA nuclear fuel cycle facilities - 1995 to 2010 period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Nelson Luiz Dias [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The environmental impact assessment of the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) facilities has been presented in a former work, based on the measured effluent releases data, for the period from 1995 to 2007. This work shows the update up to 2010. The effluents releases to the environment result from the routine operation of CEA nuclear fuel cycle facilities (LEI - Isotopic Enrichment Laboratory, USIDE - Pilot Plant for Industrial Verification of Uranium Enrichment and LABMAT - Nuclear Materials Laboratory). Basically, this work presents the radioactive release source terms, as described at the CEA Effluent Report sent to the National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN) each semester, and a historical assessment of the critical group annual doses from 1995 up to 2010. The assessed doses are compared to the maximum dose constraint as well as to the exemption level specified by CNEN. (author)

  10. Updated on effluents releases of the CEA nuclear fuel cycle facilities - 1995 to 2010 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Nelson Luiz Dias

    2011-01-01

    The environmental impact assessment of the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) facilities has been presented in a former work, based on the measured effluent releases data, for the period from 1995 to 2007. This work shows the update up to 2010. The effluents releases to the environment result from the routine operation of CEA nuclear fuel cycle facilities (LEI - Isotopic Enrichment Laboratory, USIDE - Pilot Plant for Industrial Verification of Uranium Enrichment and LABMAT - Nuclear Materials Laboratory). Basically, this work presents the radioactive release source terms, as described at the CEA Effluent Report sent to the National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN) each semester, and a historical assessment of the critical group annual doses from 1995 up to 2010. The assessed doses are compared to the maximum dose constraint as well as to the exemption level specified by CNEN. (author)

  11. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel hydrogen sulfide releasing capsaicin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingxiang; Li, Jinyu; Nie, Cunbin; Song, Beibei; Yan, Lin; Qian, Hai

    2018-05-15

    Capsaicin (CAP), the prototypical TRPV1 agonist, is the major active component in chili peppers with health-promoting benefits. However, its use is limited by the low bioavailability and irritating quality. In this study, for improving the activity of CAP and alleviating its irritating effects, a series of H 2 S-releasing CAPs were designed and synthesized by combining capsaicin and dihydro capsaicin with various hydrogen sulfide donors. The resulting compounds were evaluated their TRPV1 agonist activity, analgesic activity, anticancer activities, H 2 S-releasing ability, and gastric mucosa irritation. Biological evaluation indicated that the most active compound B 9 , containing 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione moiety as H 2 S donor, had better analgesic activity and displayed more potent cytotoxic effects on the test cell lines than the lead compound CAP. Furthermore, the preferred compound, B 9 reduced rat gastric mucosa irritation caused by CAP. Notably, the improved properties of this derivative are associated with its H 2 S-releasing capability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on metal ion release from dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salehi, S K; Hatton, P V; Johnson, A; Cox, A G; McLeod, C

    2008-04-01

    There are concerns that tooth bleaching agents may adversely affect dental materials. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) are more effective than water at increasing metal ion release from two typical dental casting alloys during bleaching. Discs (n = 28 for each alloy) were prepared by casting and heat treated to simulate a typical porcelain-firing cycle. Discs (n = 7) of each alloy were immersed in either 0%, 3%, 10% or 30% (w/v) HP solutions for 24 h at 37 degrees C. Samples were taken for metal ion release determination using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and the data analysed using a two-way anova followed by a one-way anova. The surface roughness of each disc was measured using a Talysurf contact profilometer before and after bleaching and the data analysed using a paired t-test. With the exception of gold, the differences in metal ion concentration after treatment with 0% (control) and each of 3%, 10% and 30% HP (w/v) were statistically significant (P alloys increased with increasing HP concentrations (over 3000% increase in Ni and 1400% increase in Pd ions were recorded when HP concentration increased from 0% to 30%). Surface roughness values of the samples before and after bleaching were not significantly different (P > 0.05) Exposure of the two dental casting alloys to HP solutions increased metal ion release of all the elements except gold.

  13. The Behaviour of Gas Bubble during Rest Period of Pulse-Activated Electrolysis Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilasmongkolchai Thanet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulse-activated electrolyzer has been developed and used for several years. With the capability of enhancing the efficiency of an electrolytic process and easy operation, this technique becomes an interesting process for hydrogen production. Unfortunately during electrolytic reaction, the creation of bubbles becomes a reaction inhibitor and consumes energy. This paper aims to study the proper rest period that gives the bubble free rise-off the solution without additional bubble created. The mathematical method and acoustic emission method were used for investigation of bubble’s rising velocity. The result shows that the variation of rest period on pulse-activated makes production efficiency enhanced. For the practicality of use and set control parameters, duty cycle and frequency were demonstrated instead of rest period.

  14. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

  15. Involvement of intracellular free Ca2+ in enhanced release of herpes simplex virus by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa Yuzo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was reported that elevation of the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i by a calcium ionophore increased the release of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1. Freely diffusible hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is implied to alter Ca2+ homeostasis, which further enhances abnormal cellular activity, causing changes in signal transduction, and cellular dysfunction. Whether H2O2 could affect [Ca2+]i in HSV-1-infected cells had not been investigated. Results H2O2 treatment increased the amount of cell-free virus and decreased the proportion of viable cells. After the treatment, an elevation in [Ca2+]i was observed and the increase in [Ca2+]i was suppressed when intracellular and cytosolic Ca2+ were buffered by Ca2+ chelators. In the presence of Ca2+ chelators, H2O2-mediated increases of cell-free virus and cell death were also diminished. Electron microscopic analysis revealed enlarged cell junctions and a focal disintegration of the plasma membrane in H2O2-treated cells. Conclusion These results indicate that H2O2 can elevate [Ca2+]i and induces non-apoptotic cell death with membrane lesions, which is responsible for the increased release of HSV-1 from epithelial cells.

  16. Linear and nonlinear susceptibilities from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo: application to periodic hydrogen chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, P; Marzari, Nicola

    2009-09-07

    We calculate the linear and nonlinear susceptibilities of periodic longitudinal chains of hydrogen dimers with different bond-length alternations using a diffusion quantum Monte Carlo approach. These quantities are derived from the changes in electronic polarization as a function of applied finite electric field--an approach we recently introduced and made possible by the use of a Berry-phase, many-body electric-enthalpy functional. Calculated susceptibilities and hypersusceptibilities are found to be in excellent agreement with the best estimates available from quantum chemistry--usually extrapolations to the infinite-chain limit of calculations for chains of finite length. It is found that while exchange effects dominate the proper description of the susceptibilities, second hypersusceptibilities are greatly affected by electronic correlations. We also assess how different approximations to the nodal surface of the many-body wave function affect the accuracy of the calculated susceptibilities.

  17. [The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electrochemical corrosion properties and metal ions release of nickel-chromium dental alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Qiao, Guang-yan

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electrochemical corrosion and metal ions release of nickel-chromium dental alloys. The corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium dental alloys was compared by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curve (PD) methods in artificial saliva after immersed in different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for 112 h. The metal ions released from nickel-chromium dental alloys to the artificial saliva were detected after electrochemical measurements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The data was statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SPSS 13.0 software package. The electrochemical experiment showed that the sequence of polarization resistance in equivalent circuit (Rct), corrosion potential (Ecorr), pitting breakdown potential (Eb), and the difference between Ecorr and Eb representing the "pseudo-passivation" (δE) of nickel-chromium alloys in artificial saliva was 30% alloys to the artificial saliva, and the order of the concentrations of metal ions was 0% corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium dental alloys decrease after immersed in different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for 112 h. Nickel-chromium dental alloys are more prone to corrosion in the artificial saliva with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased, and more metal ions are released in the artificial saliva.

  18. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This report is concerned with the evaluation of the consequences to the public of an accidental release of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) to the atmosphere following a pipe or pressure envelope failure, or some other process upset, at a heavy water plant. It covers the first stage of a programme in which the nature of the problem was analyzed and recommendations made for the implementation of a computer model. The concepts of risk assessment and consequence assessment are discussed and a methodology proposed for combining the various elements of the problem into an overall consequence model. These elements are identified as the 'Initiating Events', 'Route to Receptor' and 'Receptor Response' and each is studied in detail in the report. Such phenomena as the blowdown of H 2 S from a rupture, the initial gas cloud behaviour, atmospheric dispersion and the toxicity of H 2 S and sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) are addressed. Critical factors are identified and modelling requirements specified, with special reference to the Bruce heavy water plant. Finally, an overall model is recommended for implementation at the next stage of the programme, together with detailed terms of reference for the remaining work

  19. Redox-controlled release dynamics of thallium in periodically flooded arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić-Mladenović, Svetlana; Frohne, Tina; Kresović, Mirjana; Stärk, Hans-Joachim; Savić, Dubravka; Ličina, Vlado; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first work to mechanistically study the impact of the redox potential (E H ) and principal factors, such as pH, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), chlorides (Cl - ) and sulfates (SO 4 2- ), on the release dynamics of thallium (Tl) in periodically flooded soil. We simulated flooding using an automated biogeochemical microcosm system that allows for systematical control of pre-defined redox windows. The E H value was increased mechanistically at intervals of approximately 100 mV from reducing (-211 mV) to oxidizing (475 mV) conditions. Soluble Tl levels (0.02-0.28 μg L -1 ) increased significantly with increases in E H (r = 0.80, p Thallium mobilization was found to be related to several simultaneous processes involving the gradual oxidation of Tl-bearing sulfides, reductive dissolution of Fe-Mn oxides and desorption from mineral sorbents. Manganese oxides did not appear to have a considerable effect on Tl retention under oxidizing conditions. Before conducting the microcosm experiment, Tl geochemical fractionation was assessed using the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure. The BCR revealed a majority of Tl in the residual fraction (77.7%), followed by reducible (13.3%) and oxidizable fractions (5.9%). By generating high levels of Tl toxicity at low doses, Tl released under oxidizing conditions may pose an environmental threat. In the future, similar studies should be conducted on various soils along with a determination of the Tl species and monitoring of the Tl content in plants to achieve more detailed insight into soluble Tl behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In-situ investigation of the hydrogen release mechanism in bulk Mg2NiH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Xuan Quy; McDonald, Stuart D.; Gu, Qinfen; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Shigematsu, Koji; Aso, Kohei; Tanaka, Eishi; Matsumura, Syo; Nogita, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen storage is an important aspect to enable the so-called hydrogen economy. Mg-Ni alloys are among the most promising candidates for solid-state hydrogen storage systems yet many questions remain unanswered regarding the hydriding/dehydriding mechanism of the alloys. Mg2NiH4 particularly has received much attention both for its potential as a hydrogen storage medium and also exhibits interesting properties relating to its different polymorphs. Here, the dehydriding mechanism in bulk Mg2NiH4 is investigated using in-situ ultra-high voltage transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). We find that the hydrogen release is based on a mechanism of nucleation and growth of Mg2NiHx (x∼0-0.3) solid solution grains and is greatly enhanced in the presence of crystal defects occurring as a result of the polymorphic phase transformation. Also importantly, with atomic resolution TEM imaging a high density of stacking faults is identified in the dehydrided Mg2NiHx (x∼0-0.3) lattices.

  1. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, KyoungHui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H + (H 2 O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m 3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement of metals. A bibliography with abstracts. Search period covered: 1964--August 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.F.

    1975-10-01

    The research covers the hydrogen embrittlement of both ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys and includes nuclear technology, aircraft metallurgy, mechanical properties, testing, electroplating, fatigue, corrosion and fracture. Contains 230 abstracts

  3. Hydrogen release from irradiated vanadium alloy V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepikov, A.Kh. E-mail: klepikov@ietp.alma-ata.su; Romanenko, O.G.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.; Longhurst, G.R. E-mail: gxl@inel.gov

    2000-11-01

    The present work is an attempt to obtain data concerning the influence of neutron and {gamma} irradiation upon hydrogen retention in V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy. The experiments on in-pile loading of vanadium alloy specimens at the neutron flux density 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} s, hydrogen pressure of 80 Pa, and temperatures of 563, 613 and 773 K were carried out using the IVG.1M reactor of the Kazakhstan National Nuclear Center. A preliminary set of loading/degassing experiments with non-irradiated material has been carried out to obtain data on hydrogen interaction with vanadium alloy. The, data presented in this work are related both to non-irradiated and irradiated samples.

  4. Hydrogen release from irradiated vanadium alloy V-4Cr-4Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepikov, A.Kh.; Romanenko, O.G.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.; Longhurst, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The present work is an attempt to obtain data concerning the influence of neutron and γ irradiation upon hydrogen retention in V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy. The experiments on in-pile loading of vanadium alloy specimens at the neutron flux density 10 14 n/cm 2 s, hydrogen pressure of 80 Pa, and temperatures of 563, 613 and 773 K were carried out using the IVG.1M reactor of the Kazakhstan National Nuclear Center. A preliminary set of loading/degassing experiments with non-irradiated material has been carried out to obtain data on hydrogen interaction with vanadium alloy. The, data presented in this work are related both to non-irradiated and irradiated samples

  5. Simulation of hydrogen releases from fuel-cell vehicles in tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houf, William G.; Evans, Greg H.; James, Scott C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Merilo, Erik; Groethe, Mark [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Simulation results for a hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle in a full-scale tunnel have been performed for the case where hydrogen gas is vented from the vehicle as a result of thermal activation of the pressure relief device (PRD). The same modeling approach used in the full-scale tunnel modeling was validated in a scaled model by comparing simulated results with measured results from a series of scaled-tunnel test experiments performed at the SRI Corral Hollow test facility. Results of the simulations were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, a rudimentary risk analysis indicated that the level of potential risk from hydrogen vehicles accidents involving thermally activated PRDs in tunnels does not appear to significantly increase the current level of individual risk to the public from everyday life. (orig.)

  6. Release of hydrogen sulfide in a sewer system under intermittent flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matias, Natércia; Matos, Rita Ventura; Ferreira, Filipa

    2017-01-01

    The presence and fate of hydrogen sulfide in wastewater systems were studied in two stretches of an intercepting sewer system located in a coastal village, in Portugal. A range of hydraulic parameters were obtained and liquid and gas phase measurements were carried out, both continuously and thro......The presence and fate of hydrogen sulfide in wastewater systems were studied in two stretches of an intercepting sewer system located in a coastal village, in Portugal. A range of hydraulic parameters were obtained and liquid and gas phase measurements were carried out, both continuously...... authors’ publications addressing relatively small pipes and moderate water flows....

  7. 75 FR 8889 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ..., or (ii) Serious or irreversible-- (I) Reproductive dysfunctions, (II) Neurological disorders, (III...., Gross, E.A., Dorman, D.C., ``Olfactory neuron loss in adult male CD rats following subchronic inhalation...., ``Chronic exposure to low concentrations of hydrogen sulfide produces abnormal growth in developing Purkinje...

  8. Hydrogen distribution in a containment with a high-velocity hydrogen-steam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, G.R.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Postma, A.K.; Claybrook, S.W.

    1982-09-01

    Hydrogen mixing and distribution tests are reported for a modeled high velocity hydrogen-steam release from a postulated small pipe break or release from a pressurizer relief tank rupture disk into the lower compartment of an Ice Condenser Plant. The tests, which in most cases used helium as a simulant for hydrogen, demonstrated that the lower compartment gas was well mixed for both hydrogen release conditions used. The gas concentration differences between any spatial locations were less than 3 volume percent during the hydrogen/steam release period and were reduced to less than 0.5 volume percent within 20 minutes after termination of the hydrogen source. The high velocity hydrogen/steam jet provided the dominant mixing mechanism; however, natural convection and forced air recirculation played important roles in providing a well mixed atmosphere following termination of the hydrogen source. 5 figures, 4 tables

  9. Impacts of a massive release of methane and hydrogen sulfide on oxygen and ozone during the late Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiho, Kunio; Koga, Seizi

    2013-08-01

    The largest mass extinction of animals and plants in both the ocean and on land occurred in the late Permian (252 Ma), largely coinciding with the largest flood basalt volcanism event in Siberia and an oceanic anoxic/euxinic event. We investigated the impacts of a massive release of methane (CH4) from the Siberian igneous province and the ocean and/or hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from the euxinic ocean on oxygen and ozone using photochemical model calculations. Our calculations indicated that an approximate of 14% decrease in atmospheric O2 levels would have occurred in the case of a large combined CH4 and H2S flux to the atmosphere, whereas an approximate of 8 to 10% decrease would have occurred from the CH4 flux and oxidation of all H2S in the ocean. The slight decrease in atmospheric O2 levels may have contributed to the extinction event. We demonstrate for the first time that a massive release of CH4 from the Siberian igneous province and a coincident massive release of CH4 and H2S did not cause ozone collapse. A collapse of stratospheric ozone leading to an increase in UV is not supported by the maximum model input levels for CH4 and H2S. These conclusions on O2 and O3 are correspondent to every H2S release percentages from the ocean to the atmosphere.

  10. Development of a Hydrogen Uptake-Release Mg-Based Alloy by Adding a Polymer CMC (Carboxymethylcellulose, Sodium Salt) via Reaction-Accompanying Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Young Jun; Choi, Eunho; Song, Myoung Youp

    2018-03-01

    The addition of carboxymethylcellulose, sodium salt (CMC) might improve the hydrogen uptake and release properties of Mg since it has a relatively low melting point and the melting of CMC during milling in hydrogen (reaction-accompanying milling) may make the milled samples be in good states to absorb and release hydrogen rapidly and to have a large hydrogen-storage capacity. Samples with compositions of 95 w/o Mg + 5 w/o CMC (named Mg-5CMC) and 90 w/o Mg + 10 w/o CMC (named Mg-10CMC) were prepared by adding CMC via reaction-accompanying milling. Activation of Mg-10CMC was completed after about 3 hydrogen uptake-release cycles. Mg-10CMC had a higher initial hydrogen uptake rate and a larger amount of hydrogen absorbed in 60 min, U (60 min), than Mg-5CMC before and after activation. At the cycle number of three (CN = 3), Mg-10CMC had a very high initial hydrogen uptake rate (1.56 w/o H/min) and a large U (60 min) (5.57 w/o H) at 593 K in hydrogen of 12 bar, showing that the activated Mg-10CMC has an effective hydrogen-storage capacity of about 5.6 w/o at 593 K in hydrogen of 12 bar at CN = 3. At CN = 2, Mg-10CMC released 1.00 w/o H in 2.5 min, 4.67 w/o H in 10 min, and 4.76 w/o H in 60 min at 648 K in hydrogen of 1.0 bar. The milling in hydrogen of Mg with CMC is believed to generate imperfections and cracks and reduce the particle size. The addition of 10 w/o CMC was more effective on the initial hydrogen uptake rate and U (60 min) compared with the 10 w/o additions of NbF5, TaF5, Fe2O3, and MnO, and the 10 w/o simultaneous addition of Ni, Fe, and Ti. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first in which a polymer CMC is added to Mg by reaction-accompanying milling to improve the hydrogen storage properties of Mg.

  11. Contribution of envelope periodicity to release from speech-on-speech masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus; MacDonald, Ewen; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Masking release (MR) is the improvement in speech intelligibility for a fluctuating interferer compared to stationary noise. Reduction in MR due to vocoder processing is usually linked to distortions in the temporal fine structure of the stimuli and a corresponding reduction in the fundamental fr...

  12. Hydrogen trapping in and release from tungsten: modeling and comparison with graphite with regard to its use as fusion reactor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Plank, H.; Alimov, V.Kh.

    1997-01-01

    Trapping and release of deuterium implanted in tungsten is investigated by modeling the results of reemission, thermal and isothermal desorption experiments. Rate coefficients and activation energies for diffusion, trapping and detrapping are derived. Hydrogen atoms are able to diffuse deep into tungsten, establishing a solute amount of the same order of magnitude as the trapped one. This 'diffusion zone' exceeds the implantation zone by more than two orders of magnitude, even at room temperature. The solute amount of hydrogen in tungsten depends only slightly on the incident ion energy, but scales with implantation fluence. This high amount of solute hydrogen is the main difference of tungsten compared to graphite where nearly all hydrogen is trapped in the implantation zone, the solute amount being orders of magnitude lower. The resulting unlimited accumulation of hydrogen in tungsten deep in the material down to the backward surface disadvantages tungsten as fusion reactor material with regard to hydrogen recycling properties. (orig.)

  13. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  14. Characterization and consequences from CEA nuclear fuel cycle facilities effluents releases - 1995 up to 2007 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Nelson Luiz Dias; Fonseca, Lizandra Pereira de Souza

    2009-01-01

    Discharges to the environment of airborne and/or liquid radioactive effluents from the normal operation of nuclear facilities can become a potential source of radiation exposure to humans. The highest exposed members of the public are defined as the critical group. The requirements for the control and monitoring of radioactive discharges to the environment and the degree of environmental monitoring required are linked to the assessed critical group dose. The assessed dose can be compared to dose constraint, which is a fraction of the annual effective dose to members of the public, as well as the level of exemption specified by the National Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN). Effluents releases from the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) facilities are registered and described at CEA Effluent Report, semestrally sent to CNEN. Basically, that report provides information related to the type and the quantity of chemical and radioactive substances released to the environment due the routine operation of CEA nuclear fuel cycle facilities (LEI - Isotopic Enrichment Laboratory, USIDE - Pilot Plant for Industrial Verification of Uranium Enrichment and LABMAT - Nuclear Materials Laboratory). CEA Annual Effluent Report includes assessment of the annual effective doses for members of the critical group for the CEA site. This work presents the characterization of the radioactive release source terms and a historical of the critical group annual doses from 1995 up to 2007. (author)

  15. A NEW SUB-PERIOD-MINIMUM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE WITH PARTIAL HYDROGEN DEPLETION AND EVIDENCE OF SPIRAL DISK STRUCTURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlefield, C.; Garnavich, P.; Magno, K.; Applegate, A.; Pogge, R.; Irwin, J.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R.; Vinkó, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry of CSS 120422:111127+571239 (=SBS 1108+574), a recently discovered SU UMa-type dwarf nova whose 55 minute orbital period is well below the cataclysmic variable (CV) period minimum of ∼78 minutes. In contrast with most other known CVs, its spectrum features He I emission of comparable strength to the Balmer lines, implying a hydrogen abundance less than 0.1 of long-period CVs—but still at least 10 times higher than that in AM CVn stars. Together, the short orbital period and remarkable helium-to-hydrogen ratio suggest that mass transfer in CSS 120422 began near the end of the donor star's main-sequence lifetime, meaning that this CV is a strong candidate progenitor of an AM CVn system as described by Podsiadlowski et al. Moreover, a Doppler tomogram of the Hα line reveals two distinct regions of enhanced emission. While one is the result of the stream-disk impact, the other is probably attributable to spiral disk structure generated when material in the outer disk achieves a 2:1 orbital resonance with respect to the donor.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.

  17. Effects of modified surfaces produced at plasma-facing surface on hydrogen release behavior in the LHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Nobuta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an additional deuterium (D ion irradiation was performed against long-term samples mounted on the helical coil can and in the outer private region in the LHD during the 17th experimental campaign. Based on the release behavior of the D and hydrogen (H retained during the experimental campaign, the difference of release behavior at the top surface and in bulk of modified surfaces is discussed. Almost all samples on the helical coil can were erosion-dominant and some samples were covered with boron or carbon, while a very thick carbon films were formed in the outer private region. In the erosion-dominant area, the D desorbed at much lower temperatures compared to that of H retained during the LHD plasma operation. For the samples covered with boron, the D tended to desorb at lower temperatures compared to H. For the carbon deposition samples, the D desorbed at much higher temperatures compared to no deposition and boron-covered samples, which was very similar to that of H. The D retention capabilities at the top surface of carbon and boron films were 2–3 times higher than no deposition area. The results indicate that the retention and release behavior at the top surface of the modified layer can be different from that of bulk substrate material.

  18. Exercise in cold air and hydrogen peroxide release in exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, E; Volke, J; Mückenhoff, K; Platen, P; Marek, W

    2013-01-01

    Athletes have changes in the lung epithelial cells caused by inhalation of cold and dry air. The exhaled breath condensate contains a number of mediators from the respiratory system and H(2)O(2) is described as a marker of airways inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of exercise combined with cold air on the H(2)O(2) release in the exhaled breath. Twelve males (23.1 ± 1.5 years) were randomly assigned at 2 different days (1 day rest) to perform a 50 min run (75-80% of their max. heart rate) under normal (N) laboratory (18.1 ± 1.1°C) or cold (C) field condition (-15.2 ± 3.1°C). Before and immediately after each run, the EBC was collected under laboratory conditions and was analyzed amperometrically. Prior to the two runs, H(2)O(2) concentrations were 145.0 ± 31.0 (N) and 160.0 ± 49.1 nmol/L (C) and theoretical release was 70.3 ± 37.1 (N) and 82.6 ± 27.1 pmol/min (C) (p > 0.05). After each run, H(2)O(2) concentration increased significantly to 388.0 ± 22.8 nmol/L (N) and 622.1 ± 44.2 nmol/L (C) (p release: 249.2 ± 35.7 pmol/min (N) and 400.9 ± 35.7 pmol/min (C) (p release of H(2)O(2) into the EBC takes place under both resting conditions and after exercise. The concentration and release of H(2)O(2) increased after exercise in cold air compared to resting and laboratory conditions, which points to an increase in inflammatory and oxidative stress.

  19. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Labombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux ∼ 1 x 10 18 ions s -1 cm -2 to a fluence of the order of 10 21 ions/cm 2 and at temperatures around 800 degree C. The plasma bombarding energy was varied between 100 and 200 eV. The gettering speed of the activated graphite surface is estimated to be as large as 25 liters s -1 cm -2 at total pressures between 10 -6 and 10 -7 torr. The gettering capacity estimated is 0.025 torr-liter/cm 2 at room temperature. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10 18 H/cm 2 at temperatures below 100 degree C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV

  1. Timing of pollen release and stigma receptivity period of Piper vicosanum: New insights into sexual reproduction of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Silva, Adriano; Coelho, Victor Peçanha de Miranda; Ventrella, Marília Contin; Vieira, Milene Faria

    2015-04-01

    Dichogamy is a common characteristic among angiosperms, including Piper species. In this genus, the tiny flowers are morphologically similar and have an asynchronous stamen development. However, there is no information on the duration of stigma receptivity and whether it overlaps with pollen release. To better understand mechanisms of floral function in Piper vicosanum, we provide a detailed characterization of the timing of pollen release from the four stamens and the period of stigma receptivity and exposure mode of the receptive areas. We investigated plants of a natural population in a semideciduous seasonal forest (Viçosa, Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil), based on chemical tests, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy analyses. Incomplete protogyny-a mechanism that favors outcrossing-was recorded. The period of stigma receptivity was long (14 d), and the sequential exposure and senescence of stigmatic papillae occurred gradually and in a basipetal direction. Pollen release began 2-6 d after the beginning of the pistillate phase, with an average pollen viability of 87.7%, during the bisexual flower phase. Pollen was released for up to 6 d and occurred in one stamen at a time. The fruit set observed in tests of self-pollination indicated self-compatibility. The gradual and sequential exposure of stigmatic papillae in P. vicosanum flowers is described here as the mechanism for the long duration of receptivity. Anther development and pollen release were also sequential. These findings are yet unreported reproductive characteristics of the genus and offer new perspectives for future studies on the floral biology of other Piper species. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  2. Experimental Assessment of Water Sprays Utilization for Controlling Hydrogen Sulfide Releases in Confined Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfeng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reported the utilization of water spray for controlling H2S release in a confined space, which is especially important in industry. A typical spray tower was modified to simulate the confined space for people's enterable routine operation (e.g., pump room, in which the dilution capacity of water sprays can also be evaluated. This work consists of two parts: the first part focuses on the influences of different operating conditions on chemical dilution capacities of water sprays in mechanisms; the second one is comparison between two nozzle configurations for evaluating their feasibilities of practical application. Water sprays express eligible performance for H2S release control even though their dilution capacity was weakened at high gaseous concentrations and rates of releases. The presence of Na2CO3 can significantly improve absorption effectiveness of H2S in water and the optimal Na2CO3 additive was found to be 1.0 g·L−1 in this test. Compared with Na2CO3, adjusting water flow rate may be an effective strategy in enhancing dilution capacity of water sprays due to the fact that larger flow rate led to both less dilution time (TD and dilution concentration (CD. Furthermore, multinozzle configuration is more efficient than single-nozzle configuration under the same water consumption.

  3. Experimental Investigation In The PANDA Facility Of The Impact Of A Hydrogen Release On Passive Containment Cooling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auban, O.; Paladino, D.; Candreia, P.; Huggenberger, M.; Strassberger, H.J

    2003-03-01

    The large-scale, thermal-hydraulics PANDA facility has been used in the past for investigating passive decay-heat removal systems and related containment phenomena for a number of next-generation Light Water Reactors. Passive Containment Condenser (PCC) systems operate by transferring heat via steam condensation from inside the containment to outside, and serve to mitigate pressure build-up in the event of steam discharge from the primary circuit. Five new integral tests have recently been performed in the context of the 5th European Framework Program project TEMPEST. One main objective was to assess the influence of a light gas (hydrogen) on the performance of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). Hydrogen release in the case of a severe accident is simulated in PANDA by injecting helium with steam into the Drywell. In addition, the impact of a new accident-mitigating design feature, the Drywell Gas Re-Circulation System (DGRS), on the long-term containment behaviour was tested. Another important objective was also to provide relevant data for the validation of modern 3/4 mainly Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) 3/4 codes. The paper reports main observations from two of these new integral tests in which standard PANDA instrumentation has provided important data concerning system response when helium is released in the course of the transient. The results show that some important stratification phenomena have occurred, as a result of the buoyant flow generated by the helium injection. The resulting temperature and concentration measurements show how helium is being distributed in the Drywell (DW) volume during the helium injection phase, and how helium is retained or vented out of these vessels once the injection stops. The paper includes some discussion concerning the influence of gas mixing and stratification and the effect of the DGRS on PCC performance and system pressure build-up. (author)

  4. Nitric oxide-releasing flurbiprofen reduces formation of proinflammatory hydrogen sulfide in lipopolysaccharide-treated rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Farhana; Whiteman, Matthew; Siau, Jia Ling; Kwong, Shing Erl; Bhatia, Madhav; Moore, Philip K

    2006-01-01

    The biosynthesis of both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is increased in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected mice and rats but their interaction in these models is not known. In this study we examined the effect of the NO donor, nitroflurbiprofen (and the parent molecule flurbiprofen) on NO and H2S metabolism in tissues from LPS-pretreated rats. Administration of LPS (10 mg kg−1, i.p.; 6 h) resulted in an increase (PFlurbiprofen (21 mg kg−1, i.p.) was without effect. These results show for the first time that nitroflurbiprofen downregulates the biosynthesis of proinflammatory H2S and suggest that such an effect may contribute to the augmented anti-inflammatory activity of this compound. These data also highlight the existence of ‘crosstalk' between NO and H2S in this model of endotoxic shock. PMID:16491094

  5. Tandem mass spectrometry of nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirins: a hint into activity behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Chiavarino, Barbara; Guglielmo, Stefano; Lilla, Valentina; Fornarini, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is the most popular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. However, due to its action on cyclooxygenase and its acid nature, aspirin is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. In an effort to minimize these side effects, NO-donor and H2S-donor ASA co-drugs have been designed and tested. Their mass spectrometric behavior is now analyzed and reported. Positive ions were obtained by electrospray ionization involving protonation or alkali metal attachment. Their dissociation processes have been studied by collision induced dissociation in a triple quadrupole instrument. High mass accuracy measurements have been recorded on a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The protonated molecules dissociate by an exclusive or largely prevailing path leading to acetyloxy-substituted benzoyl cation, namely an ASA unit. The process is reminiscent of the enzymatic hydrolysis, releasing intact ASA to a large extent. Only at higher collision energy does the formal ketene loss disrupt the ASA moiety. The gas phase chemistry of protonated ASA-releasing drugs develops along elementary dissociation steps analogous to the reactive processes in complex biological environments. This notion may provide a tool for preliminary testing of new compounds.

  6. Energy research programmes on hydrogen and fuel cells for the period 2008 - 2011; Energieforschungsprogramme Wasserstoff und Brennstoffzellen fuer die Jahre 2008-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gut, A.; Luzzi, A.; Spirig, M.

    2007-12-15

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on the concept for research in Switzerland in the area of hydrogen and fuel cells for the period 2008 - 2011. The starting position is noted with a short review of the vision of a 'hydrogen economy'. The present-day production of hydrogen for non-energetic purposes is noted and the current state-of-the-art is discussed. The potential in Switzerland for the production of hydrogen and the use of fuel cells is discussed, as are research efforts and pilot projects in these areas. Private and public expenditure in the area is reviewed. The aims and the focal points of research during the period 2008 - 2011 are discussed, as are potentials both in Switzerland as well as world-wide. Further topics dealt with include system integration and hydrogen storage, service life, reliability and cost factors.

  7. Release of Methane from Bering Sea Sediments During the Last Glacial Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mea Cook; Lloyd Keigwin

    2007-11-30

    Several lines of evidence suggest that during times of elevated methane flux the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) was positioned near the sediment-water interface. We studied two cores (from 700 m and 1457 m water depth) from the Umnak Plateau region. Anomalously low d13C and high d18O in benthic and planktonic foraminifera in these cores are the consequence of diagenetic overgrowths of authigenic carbonates. There are multiple layers of authigenic-carbonate-rich sediment in these cores, and the stable isotope compositions of the carbonates are consistent with those formed during anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The carbonate-rich layers are associated with biomarkers produced by methane-oxidizing archaea, archaeol and glyceryl dibiphytanyl glyceryl tetraether (GDGT). The d13C of the archaeol and certain GDGTs are isotopically depleted. These carbonate- and AOM-biomarker-rich layers were emplaced in the SMTZ during episodes when there was a high flux of methane or methane-rich fluids upward in the sediment column. The sediment methane in the Umnak Plateau region appears to have been very dynamic during the glacial period, and interacted with the ocean-atmosphere system at millennial time scales. The upper-most carbonate-rich layers are in radiocarbon-dated sediment deposited during interstitials 2 and 3, 28-20 ka, and may be associated with the climate warming during this time.

  8. Mechanical stress and stress release channels in 10–350 nm palladium hydrogen thin films with different micro-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Stefan; Kramer, Thilo; Uchida, Helmut; Dobron, Patrik; Cizek, Jakub; Pundt, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    For thin metal films adhered to rigid substrates hydrogen uptake results in compressive stresses in the GPa range. Stresses affect the thermodynamics as well as the durability of thin films, but many films can release stress above critical stress values. Depending on the films' thickness, microstructure and adhesion to the substrate, which determine the energy available in the nano-sized system, stress release is conducted via different release mechanisms. To evaluate the different mechanisms, Palladium thin films ranging from 10 nm to 350 nm and with three different types of microstructures (nanocrystalline, multi-oriented epitaxy and three-fold epitaxy) are studied with special focus on the mechanical stress. In-situ substrate curvature measurements, XRD stress analyses and acoustic emission (AE) measurements are conducted to determine intrinsic stresses, hydrogen-induced stress changes and stress release signals. By this complementary experimental approach, different stress release mechanisms (named channels) are identified. Discrete stress relaxation (DSR) events are found already within the overall linear elastic stress-strain regime. Energies to stimulate DSRs lay well below the formation energy of dislocations, and may allow the movement of defects pre-existing in the films. For higher strain energies, all studied films can release stress by the formation of new dislocations and plastic deformation. When the adhesion to the substrate is small, an alternative release channel of film buckling opens for thick films.

  9. Hydrogen sulphide-releasing diclofenac derivatives inhibit breast cancer-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and prevent osteolysis ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzias, J; Logan, J G; Mollat, P; Sparatore, A; Del Soldato, P; Ralston, S H; Idris, A I

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) and prostaglandins are both involved in inflammation, cancer and bone turnover, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and H(2)S donors exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour properties. H(2)S-releasing diclofenac (S-DCF) derivatives are a novel class of NSAIDs combining the properties of a H(2)S donor with those of a conventional NSAID. We studied the effects of the S-DCF derivatives ACS15 and ACS32 on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and activity in vitro, human and mouse breast cancer cells support for osteoclast formation and signalling in vitro, and osteolysis ex vivo. The S-diclofenac derivatives ACS15 and ACS32 inhibited the increase in osteoclast formation induced by human MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 and mouse 4T1 breast cancer cells without affecting breast cancer cell viability. Conditioned media from human MDA-MB-231 cells enhanced IκB phosphorylation and osteoclast formation and these effects were significantly inhibited following treatment by ACS15 and ACS32, whereas the parent compound diclofenac had no effects. ACS15 and ACS32 inhibited receptor activator of NFκB ligand-induced osteoclast formation and resorption, and caused caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in mature osteoclasts via a mechanism dependent on IKK/NFκB inhibition. In calvaria organ culture, human MDA-MB-231 cells caused osteolysis, and this effect was completely prevented following treatment with ACS15 and ACS32. S-diclofenac derivatives inhibit osteoclast formation and activity, suppress breast cancer cell support for osteoclastogenesis and prevent osteolysis. This suggests that H(2)S-releasing diclofenac derivatives exhibit anti-resorptive properties, which might be of clinical value in the treatment of osteolytic bone disease. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Combustion of Biogas Released from Palm Oil Mill Effluent and the Effects of Hydrogen Enrichment on the Characteristics of the Biogas Flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ehsan Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas released from palm oil mill effluent (POME could be a source of air pollution, which has illustrated negative effects on the global warming. To protect the environment from toxic emissions and use the energy of POME biogas, POME is conducted to the closed digestion systems and released biogas is captured. Since POME biogas upgrading is a complicated process, it is not economical and thus new combustion techniques should be examined. In this paper, POME biogas (40% CO2 and 60% CH4 has been utilized as a fuel in a lab-scale furnace. A computational approach by standard k-ε combustion and turbulence model is applied. Hydrogen is added to the biogas components and the impacts of hydrogen enrichment on the temperature distribution, flame stability, and pollutant formation are studied. The results confirm that adding hydrogen to the POME biogas content could improve low calorific value (LCV of biogas and increases the stability of the POME biogas flame. Indeed, the biogas flame length rises and distribution of the temperature within the chamber is uniform when hydrogen is added to the POME biogas composition. Compared to the pure biogas combustion, thermal NOx formation increases in hydrogen-enriched POME biogas combustion due to the enhancement of the furnace temperature.

  11. Periodic density functional theory study of ethylene hydrogenation over Co3O4 (1 1 1) surface: The critical role of oxygen vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinhui; Song, JiaJia; Niu, Hongling; Pan, Lun; Zhang, Xiangwen; Wang, Li; Zou, Ji-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Recently, metal oxides are attracting increasing interests as hydrogenation catalyst. Herein we studied the hydrogenation of ethylene on perfect and oxygen defective Co3O4 (1 1 1) using periodic density functional theory. The energetics and pathways of ethylene hydrogenation to ethane were determined. We have demonstrated that (i) H2 dissociation on Co3O4 is a complicated two-step process through a heterolytic cleavage, followed by the migration of H atom and finally yields the homolytic product on both perfect and oxygen defective Co3O4 (1 1 1) surfaces easily. (ii) After introducing the surface oxygen vacancy, the stepwise hydrogenation of ethylene by atomic hydrogen is much easier than that on perfect surface due to the weaker bond strength of OH group. The strength of Osbnd H bond is a crucial factor for the hydrogenation reaction which involves the breakage of Osbnd H bond. The formation of oxygen vacancy increases the electronic charges at the adjacent surface O, which reduces its capability of further gaining electrons from adsorbed atomic hydrogen and then weakens the strength of Osbnd H bond. These results emphasize the importance of the oxygen vacancies for hydrogenation on metal oxides.

  12. Periodic density functional theory study of ethylene hydrogenation over Co3O4 (1 1 1) surface: The critical role of oxygen vacancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jinhui; Song, JiaJia; Niu, Hongling; Pan, Lun; Zhang, Xiangwen; Wang, Li; Zou, Ji-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • H 2 dissociates in heterolytic way following H atoms migration to form O−H bond. • H 2 dissociation occurs at low temperature on perfect and oxygen defective Co 3 O 4 . • Oxygen vacancy promotes hydrogenation thermodynamically and kinetically. • O−H bond is weakened on oxygen defective surface. • Hydrogenation requires compromise between H−H activation and O−H breakage. - Abstract: Recently, metal oxides are attracting increasing interests as hydrogenation catalyst. Herein we studied the hydrogenation of ethylene on perfect and oxygen defective Co 3 O 4 (1 1 1) using periodic density functional theory. The energetics and pathways of ethylene hydrogenation to ethane were determined. We have demonstrated that (i) H 2 dissociation on Co 3 O 4 is a complicated two-step process through a heterolytic cleavage, followed by the migration of H atom and finally yields the homolytic product on both perfect and oxygen defective Co 3 O 4 (1 1 1) surfaces easily. (ii) After introducing the surface oxygen vacancy, the stepwise hydrogenation of ethylene by atomic hydrogen is much easier than that on perfect surface due to the weaker bond strength of OH group. The strength of O−H bond is a crucial factor for the hydrogenation reaction which involves the breakage of O−H bond. The formation of oxygen vacancy increases the electronic charges at the adjacent surface O, which reduces its capability of further gaining electrons from adsorbed atomic hydrogen and then weakens the strength of O−H bond. These results emphasize the importance of the oxygen vacancies for hydrogenation on metal oxides.

  13. Photoelectrocatalytic Glucose Oxidation to Promote Hydrogen Production over Periodically Ordered TiO2 Nanotube Arrays Assembled of Pd Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yajun; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Huijie; Zhang, Ya-nan; Huang, Wenna; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar-driven PEC glucose oxidation to promote hydrogen production was presented. • The excellent PEC activity of Pd QDs@TNTAs was investigated. • The rate of hydrogen production from glucose was about 15 times than water. • A low-cost and efficient method in renewables-to-hydrogen conversion was put forward. - Abstract: The development of highly efficient and low-cost approaches for catalytic hydrogen production from renewable energy is of tremendous importance for a truly sustainable hydrogen-based energy carrier in future life. Herein, the probability of utilizing solar light to product hydrogen from biomass derivative, glucose, was systematically demonstrated by using the periodically ordered TiO 2 nanotube arrays (TNTAs) assembled of Palladium quantum dots (Pd QDs), i.e. Pd QDs@ TNTAs as photoanode. The results showed that remarkably increased photocurrent density was obtained in the glucose solution compared to the pure KOH electrolyte over as-prepared photoelectrode, which indicated that the glucose could be faster oxidized than water oxidation, and thus could promote the hydrogen production on Pt cathode. The yield of hydrogen production from glucose oxidation reached as high as 164.8 μmol cm −1 over Pd QDs@TNTAs photoanode and Pt cathode system (denoted as Pd QDs@TNTAs/Pt) under the solar light irradiation for 6 h, which was about 15 times higher than that from pure water splitting. The superior hydrogen production performance could be attributed to the less endergonic process of the glucose oxidation than water, as well as the efficient synergistic photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) glucose oxidation over Pd QDs@TNTAs photoanode which possesses excellent photoelectrochemical performance and structure characteristics. Moreover, a probable mechanism for the PEC hydrogen production from biomass derivatives oxidation was proposed and discussed

  14. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing naproxen suppresses colon cancer cell growth and inhibits NF-κB signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodela R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ravinder Kodela,1 Niharika Nath,2 Mitali Chattopadhyay,1 Diandra E Nesbitt,1 Carlos A Velázquez-Martínez,3 Khosrow Kashfi11Department of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City University of New York Medical School, 2Department of Life Sciences, New York Institute of Technology, New York, NY, USA; 3Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of death due to cancer and the third most common cancer in men and women in the USA. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB is known to be activated in CRC and is strongly implicated in its development and progression. Therefore, activated NF-κB constitutes a bona fide target for drug development in this type of malignancy. Many epidemiological and interventional studies have established nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs as a viable chemopreventive strategy against CRC. Our previous studies have shown that several novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing NSAIDs are promising anticancer agents and are safer derivatives of NSAIDs. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effect of a novel H2S-releasing naproxen (HS-NAP, which has a repertoire as a cardiovascular-safe NSAID, for its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle phase transitions, and apoptosis using HT-29 human colon cancer cells. We also investigated its effect as a chemopreventive agent in a xenograft mouse model. HS-NAP suppressed the growth of HT-29 cells by induction of G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis and downregulated NF-κB. Tumor xenografts in mice were significantly reduced in volume. The decrease in tumor mass was associated with a reduction of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and decreases in NF-κB levels in vivo. Therefore, HS-NAP demonstrates strong anticancer potential in CRC. Keywords: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cell cycle, apoptosis, xenograft, NF

  15. Bi-module sensing device to in situ quantitatively detect hydrogen peroxide released from migrating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yu

    Full Text Available Cell migration is one of the key cell functions in physiological and pathological processes, especially in tumor metastasis. However, it is not feasible to monitor the important biochemical molecules produced during cell migrations in situ by conventional cell migration assays. Herein, for the first time a device containing both electrochemical sensing and trans-well cell migration modules was fabricated to sensitively quantify biochemical molecules released from the cell migration process in situ. The fully assembled device with a multi-wall carbon nanotube/graphene/MnO2 nanocomposite functionalized electrode was able to successfully characterize hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production from melanoma A375 cells, larynx carcinoma HEp-2 cells and liver cancer Hep G2 under serum established chemotaxis. The maximum concentration of H2O2 produced from A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2 in chemotaxis was 130 ± 1.3 nM, 70 ± 0.7 nM and 63 ± 0.7 nM, respectively. While the time required reaching the summit of H2O2 production was 3.0, 4.0 and 1.5 h for A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2, respectively. By staining the polycarbonate micropore membrane disassembled from the device, we found that the average migration rate of the A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2 cells were 98 ± 6%, 38 ± 4% and 32 ± 3%, respectively. The novel bi-module cell migration platform enables in situ investigation of cell secretion and cell function simultaneously, highlighting its potential for characterizing cell motility through monitoring H2O2 production on rare samples and for identifying underlying mechanisms of cell migration.

  16. Anaerobic fermentation combined with low-temperature thermal pretreatment for phosphorus-accumulating granular sludge: Release of carbon source and phosphorus as well as hydrogen production potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jinte; Li, Yongmei

    2016-10-01

    Releases of organic compounds and phosphorus from phosphorus-accumulating granular sludge (PGS) and phosphorus-accumulating flocculent sludge (PFS) during low-temperature thermal pretreatment and anaerobic fermentation were investigated. Meanwhile, biogas production potential and microbial community structures were explored. The results indicate that much more soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and phosphorus were released from PGS than from PFS via low-temperature thermal pretreatment because of the higher extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content in PGS and higher ratio of phosphorus reserved in EPS. Furthermore, PGS contains more anaerobes and dead cells, resulting in much higher SCOD and volatile fatty acids release from PGS than those from PFS during fermentation. PGS fermentation facilitated the n-butyric acid production, and PGS exhibited the hydrogen production potential during fermentation due to the presence of hydrogen-producing bacteria. Therefore, anaerobic fermentation combined with low-temperature thermal pretreatment can facilitate the recovery of carbon and phosphorus as well as producing hydrogen from PGS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide present or released in teeth bleaching kits and hair cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Pascal; Bousquet, Claudine; Lassu, Nelly; Maggio, Annie-Françoise; Civade, Corinne; Brenier, Charlotte; Lempereur, Laurent

    2015-03-25

    This manuscript presents an HPLC/UV method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide present or released in teeth bleaching products and hair products. The method is based on an oxidation of triphenylphosphine into triphenylphosphine oxide by hydrogen peroxide. Triphenylphosphine oxide formed is quantified by HPLC/UV. Validation data were obtained using the ISO 12787 standard approach, particularly adapted when it is not possible to make reconstituted sample matrices. For comparative purpose, hydrogen peroxide was also determined using ceric sulfate titrimetry for both types of products. For hair products, a cross validation of both ceric titrimetric method and HPLC/UV method using the cosmetic 82/434/EEC directive (official iodometric titration method) was performed. Results obtained for 6 commercialized teeth whitening products and 5 hair products point out similar hydrogen peroxide contain using either the HPLC/UV method or ceric sulfate titrimetric method. For hair products, results were similar to the hydrogen peroxide content using the cosmetic 82/434/EEC directive method and for the HPLC/UV method, mean recoveries obtained on spiked samples, using the ISO 12787 standard, ranges from 100% to 110% with a RSDhydrogen peroxide contents higher than the regulated limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Profound Chemopreventative Effects of a Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing NSAID in the APCMin/+ Mouse Model of Intestinal Tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Paul-Clark

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal cancers, but the propensity of these drugs to cause ulcers and bleeding limits their use. H2S has been shown to be a powerful cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory substance in the digestive system. This study explored the possibility that a H2S-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ATB-346 would be effective in a murine model of hereditary intestinal cancer (APCMin+ mouse and investigated potential mechanisms of action via transcriptomics analysis. Daily treatment with ATB-346 was significantly more effective at preventing intestinal polyp formation than naproxen. Significant beneficial effects were seen with a treatment period of only 3-7 days, and reversal of existing polyps was observed in the colon. ATB-346, but not naproxen, significantly decreased expression of intestinal cancer-associated signaling molecules (cMyc, β-catenin. Transcriptomic analysis identified 20 genes that were up-regulated in APCMin+ mice, 18 of which were reduced to wild-type levels by one week of treatment with ATB-346. ATB-346 is a novel, gastrointestinal-sparing anti-inflammatory drug that potently and rapidly prevents and reverses the development of pre-cancerous lesions in a mouse model of hereditary intestinal tumorigenesis. These effects may be related to the combined effects of suppression of cyclooxygenase and release of H2S, and correction of most of the APCMin+-associated alterations in the transcriptome. ATB-346 may represent a promising agent for chemoprevention of tumorigenesis in the GI tract and elsewhere.

  19. Assessment of predictive models for the failure of titanium and ferrous alloys due to hydrogen effects. Report for the period of June 16 to September 15, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archbold, T.F.; Bower, R.B.; Polonis, D.H.

    1982-04-01

    The 1977 version of the Simpson-Puls-Dutton model appears to be the most amenable with respect to utilizing known or readily estimated quantities. The Pardee-Paton model requires extensive calculations involving estimated quantities. Recent observations by Koike and Suzuki on vanadium support the general assumption that crack growth in hydride forming metals is determined by the rate of hydride formation, and their hydrogen atmosphere-displacive transformation model is of potential interest in explaining hydrogen embrittlement in ferrous alloys as well as hydride formers. The discontinuous nature of cracking due to hydrogen embrittlement appears to depend very strongly on localized stress intensities, thereby pointing to the role of microstructure in influencing crack initiation, fracture mode and crack path. The initiation of hydrogen induced failures over relatively short periods of time can be characterized with fair reliability using measurements of the threshold stress intensity. The experimental conditions for determining K/sub Th/ and ΔK/sub Th/ are designed to ensure plane strain conditions in most cases. Plane strain test conditions may be viewed as a conservative basis for predicting delayed failure. The physical configuration of nuclear waste canisters may involve elastic/plastic conditions rather than a state of plane strain, especially with thin-walled vessels. Under these conditions, alternative predictive tests may be considered, including COD and R-curve methods. The double cantilever beam technique employed by Boyer and Spurr on titanium alloys offers advantages for examining hydrogen induced delayed failure over long periods of time. 88 references

  20. An Analysis of the Effects of Tectonic Release on Short-Period P Waves Observed from Shagan River Explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    possible effects of tectonic release on the mb values determined for underground explosions conducted at the Russian nuclear test site near Semipalatinsk ...traditionally associated with the Shagan River test site . Thus, the currently availablej4aa"do not exclude the possibility that tectonic release may be...from explosions at this test site in an attempt to identify any effects which may correlate with tectonic release and to evaluate the results of

  1. Diel periodicity of pheromone release by females of Planococcus citri and Planococcus ficus and the temporal flight activity of their conspecific males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi-Zada, Anat; Fefer, Daniela; David, Maayan; Eliyahu, Miriam; Franco, José Carlos; Protasov, Alex; Dunkelblum, Ezra; Mendel, Zvi

    2014-08-01

    The diel periodicity of sex pheromone release was monitored in two mealybug species, Planococcus citri and Planococcus ficus (Hemiptera; Pseudococcidae), using sequential SPME/GCMS analysis. A maximal release of 2 ng/h pheromone by 9-12-day-old P. citri females occurred 1-2 h before the beginning of photophase. The highest release of pheromone by P. ficus females was 1-2 ng/2 h of 10-20-day-old females, approximately 2 h after the beginning of photophase. Mating resulted in termination of the pheromone release in both mealybug species. The temporal flight activity of the males was monitored in rearing chambers using pheromone baited delta traps. Males of both P. citri and P. ficus displayed the same flight pattern and began flying at 06:00 hours when the light was turned on, reaching a peak during the first and second hour of the photophase. Our results suggest that other biparental mealybug species display also diel periodicities of maximal pheromone release and response. Direct evaluation of the diel periodicity of the pheromone release by the automatic sequential analysis is convenient and will be very helpful in optimizing the airborne collection and identification of other unknown mealybug pheromones and to study the calling behavior of females. Considering this behavior pattern may help to develop more effective pheromone-based management strategies against mealybugs.

  2. Hydrogen isotope technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogen pumping speeds on panels of molecular sieve types 5A and Na-Y were compared for a variety of sieve (and chevron) temperatures between 10 and 30 K. Although pumping speeds declined with time, probably because of the slow diffusion of hydrogen from the surface of the sieve crystals into the internal regions, the different sieve materials and operating conditions could be compared using time-averaged pump speeds. The (average) pumping speeds declined with increasing temperature. Under some conditions, the Na-Y sieve performed much better than the 5A sieve. Studies of the effect of small concentrations (approx. 4%) of hydrogen on helium pumping indicate that compound cryopumps in fusion reactors will not have to provide complete screening of hydrogen from helium panels. The concentrations of hydrogen did not lower effective helium pumping speeds or shorten the helium operating period between instabilities. Studies of tritium recovery from blankets of liquid lithium focused on design and construction of a flowing-lithium test system and on ultimate removal of tritium from yttrium sorbents. At 505 0 C, tritium release from yttrium behaves as a diffusion-controlled process, but the release rates are very low. Apparently, higher temperatures will be required for effective sorbent regeneration. An innovative technique for separating hydrogen isotopes by using bipolar electrolysis with permeable electrodes was analyzed to determine its potential usefulness in multistage separation

  3. Characterization of endocrine events during the periestrous period in sheep after estrous synchronization with controlled internal drug release (CIDR) device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cleeff, J; Karsch, F J; Padmanabhan, V

    1998-01-01

    The Controlled Internal Drug Releasing (CIDR) device is an intravaginal pessary containing progesterone (P4) designed for synchronizing estrus in ruminants. To date, there has been little information available on the timing, duration, and quality of the follicular phase after CIDR removal and how those characteristics compare with natural periovulatory endocrine events. The present communication relates the results of methods we used to characterize the endocrine events that followed CIDR synchronization. Breeding-season ewes were given an injection (10 mg) of Lutalyse (PGF2 alpha), and then studied during three consecutive estrous cycles, beginning in the luteal phase after the estrus induced by PGF2 alpha. Cycle 1 estrus was synchronized with 1 CIDR (Type G) inserted for 8 d beginning 10 d after PGF2 alpha. Cycles 2 and 3 were synchronized with two CIDRs for 8 d beginning 10 d after previous CIDR removal. Cycle 1 estrous behavior and serum gonadotropins showed a follicular phase (the interval from CIDR withdrawal to gonadotropin surge [surge] peak) of 38.2 +/- 1.5 hr. Two CIDRs lengthened the interval to 46.2 +/- 1.5 hr (P synchronization concentrated surges within a 24-hr period in 92% of the ewes in Cycles 1 and 2. Cycles 3 ewes were euthanized at estimated luteal, early follicular, late follicular, LH surge, and secondary FSH rise timepoints. Endocrine data and ovaries showed that 88% of the ewes synchronized with two CIDRs were in the predicted stage of the estrous cycle. These data demonstrate that the CIDR device applied during the luteal phase effectively synchronizes estrus and results in a CIDR removal-to-surge interval of similar length to a natural follicular phase.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide release and acid-base status in exhaled breath condensate at rest and after maximal exercise in young, healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, E; Platen, P; Volke, J; Mückenhoff, K; Marek, W

    2009-12-07

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) contains among a large number of mediators hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a marker of airway inflammation and oxidative stress. Similarly EBC pH also changes in respiratory diseases. It was the aim of our investigation to prove if hydrogen peroxide release and changes in pH of EBC changes with exercise. EBC was collected from 100 litres exhaled air along with samples of arterialized blood of 16 healthy subjects (9 males, 7 females, age 23 +/- 1 years). EBC hydrogen peroxide was analyzed with EcoCheck amperometer (FILT, Berlin). The rate of H(2)O(2) release was calculated from the concentration and collection time. pH and PCO(2) in blood and in EBC were measured with the Radiometer blood gas analyzer, EBC was equilibrated with a gas mixture (5% CO(2) in O(2)). The bicarbonate concentration was calculated according to the law of mass action for CO(2) and HCO(3)(-) (pK = 6.1). H(2)O(2) concentration in EBC was 190 +/- 109 nmol/l, and H (2)O(2) release at rest was 31.0 +/- 18.3 pmol/min. At maximal exercise, the H(2)O(2) concentration in EBC increased to 250 +/- 120 nmol/l, and H(2)O(2) release significantly increased at maximal exercise to 84.4 +/- 39.9 pmol/min (Pexercise, pH 6.18 +/- 0.17 and [HCO(3)(-)] 1.23 +/- 0.30 mmol/l remained almost unaltered. The rate of H(2)O(2) release in EBC increased during exhausting exercise (external load: 300 Watt) by a factor of 2, whereas the pH and the bicarbonate concentration of the EBC, equilibrated with 5% CO(2) at 37 degrees C were not significantly altered. It has to be proven by further experiments whether there is a linear relationship between the rates of H(2)O(2) release in EBC in graded submaximal exercise.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide release and acid-base status in exhaled breath condensate at rest and after maximal exercise in young, healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Exhaled breath condensate (EBC contains among a large number of mediators hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as a marker of airway inflammation and oxidative stress. Similarly EBC pH also changes in respiratory diseases. It was the aim of our investigation to prove if hydrogen peroxide release and changes in pH of EBC changes with exercise. Methods EBC was collected from 100 litres exhaled air along with samples of arterialized blood of 16 healthy subjects (9 males, 7 females, age 23 ± 1 years. EBC hydrogen peroxide was analyzed with EcoCheck amperometer (FILT, Berlin. The rate of H2O2 release was calculated from the concentration and collection time. pH and PCO2 in blood and in EBC were measured with the Radiometer blood gas analyzer, EBC was equilibrated with a gas mixture (5% CO2 in O2. The bicarbonate concentration was calculated according to the law of mass action for CO2 and HCO3- (pK = 6.1. Results H2O2 concentration in EBC was 190 ± 109 nmol/l, and H2O2 release at rest was 31.0 ± 18.3 pmol/min. At maximal exercise, the H2O = concentration in EBC increased to 250 ± 120 nmol/l, and H2O2 release significantly increased at maximal exercise to 84.4 ± 39.9 pmol/min (P 2 equilibrated EBC was at 6.08 ± 0.23 and the [HCO3 -] was 1.03 ± 0.40 mmol/l. At maximum exercise, pH 6.18 ± 0.17 and [HCO3-] 1.23 ± 0.30 mmol/l remained almost unaltered. Conclusions The rate of H2O2 release in EBC increased during exhausting exercise (external load: 300 Watt by a factor of 2, whereas the pH and the bicarbonate concentration of the EBC, equilibrated with 5% CO2 at 37°C were not significantly altered. It has to be proven by further experiments whether there is a linear relationship between the rates of H2O2 release in EBC in graded submaximal exercise.

  6. Offshore hydrocarbon releases statistics, 1996. For the period 1.10.92 to 31.3.96 inclusive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    Data on offshore hydrocarbon release incidents, which occurred between 1 October 1992 and 31 March 1996 and which were voluntarily reported to the United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive are included in this report. It aims to provide data from the Hydrocarbon Releases Database for the offshore industry to use in its Offshore Safety Cases, and especially in cases where quantified risk assessment (QRA) is involved. (UK)

  7. Vibrational signatures of cation-anion hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids: a periodic density functional theory and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-02-05

    Hydrogen bonding in alkylammonium based protic ionic liquids was studied using density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. Normal-mode analysis within the harmonic approximation and power spectra of velocity autocorrelation functions were used as tools to obtain the vibrational spectra in both the gas phase and the crystalline phases of these protic ionic liquids. The hydrogen bond vibrational modes were identified in the 150-240 cm(-1) region of the far-infrared (far-IR) spectra. A blue shift in the far-IR mode was observed with an increasing number of hydrogen-bonding sites on the cation; the exact peak position is modulated by the cation-anion hydrogen bond strength. Sub-100 cm(-1) bands in the far-IR spectrum are assigned to the rattling motion of the anions. Calculated NMR chemical shifts of the acidic protons in the crystalline phase of these salts also exhibit the signature of cation-anion hydrogen bonding.

  8. Production of Hydrogen by Superadiabatic Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide - Final Technical Report for the Period June 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachid B. Slimane; Francis S. Lau; Javad Abbasian

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this program is to develop an economical process for hydrogen production, with no additional carbon dioxide emission, through the thermal decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in H{sub 2}S-rich waste streams to high-purity hydrogen and elemental sulfur. The novel feature of the process being developed is the superadiabatic combustion (SAC) of part of the H{sub 2}S in the waste stream to provide the thermal energy required for the decomposition reaction such that no additional energy is required. The program is divided into two phases. In Phase 1, detailed thermochemical and kinetic modeling of the SAC reactor with H{sub 2}S-rich fuel gas and air/enriched air feeds is undertaken to evaluate the effects of operating conditions on exit gas products and conversion efficiency, and to identify key process parameters. Preliminary modeling results are used as a basis to conduct a thorough evaluation of SAC process design options, including reactor configuration, operating conditions, and productivity-product separation schemes, with respect to potential product yields, thermal efficiency, capital and operating costs, and reliability, ultimately leading to the preparation of a design package and cost estimate for a bench-scale reactor testing system to be assembled and tested in Phase 2 of the program. A detailed parametric testing plan was also developed for process design optimization and model verification in Phase 2. During Phase 2 of this program, IGT, UIC, and industry advisors UOP and BP Amoco will validate the SAC concept through construction of the bench-scale unit and parametric testing. The computer model developed in Phase 1 will be updated with the experimental data and used in future scale-up efforts. The process design will be refined and the cost estimate updated. Market survey and assessment will continue so that a commercial demonstration project can be identified.

  9. Antifouling effect of hydrogen peroxide release from enzymatic marine coatings: Exposure testing under equatorial and Mediterranean conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, S.M.; Kristensen, J.B.; Laursen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Mediterranean and equatorial climatic conditions, is investigated. During seawater exposure of the coatings, starch is first converted to glucose by glucoamylase (rate-controlling step) and subsequently glucose is rapidly oxidised by hexose oxidase in a reaction producing hydrogen peroxide. The coatings...

  10. Protein S-glutathionylation lowers superoxide/hydrogen peroxide release from skeletal muscle mitochondria through modification of complex I and inhibition of pyruvate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Gill

    Full Text Available Protein S-glutathionylation is a reversible redox modification that regulates mitochondrial metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS production in liver and cardiac tissue. However, whether or not it controls ROS release from skeletal muscle mitochondria has not been explored. In the present study, we examined if chemically-induced protein S-glutathionylation could alter superoxide (O2●-/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 release from isolated muscle mitochondria. Disulfiram, a powerful chemical S-glutathionylation catalyst, was used to S-glutathionylate mitochondrial proteins and ascertain if it can alter ROS production. It was found that O2●-/H2O2 release rates from permeabilized muscle mitochondria decreased with increasing doses of disulfiram (100-500 μM. This effect was highest in mitochondria oxidizing succinate or palmitoyl-carnitine, where a ~80-90% decrease in the rate of ROS release was observed. Similar effects were detected in intact mitochondria respiring under state 4 conditions. Incubation of disulfiram-treated mitochondria with DTT (2 mM restored ROS release confirming that these effects were associated with protein S-glutathionylation. Disulfiram treatment also inhibited phosphorylating and proton leak-dependent respiration. Radiolabelled substrate uptake experiments demonstrated that disulfiram inhibited pyruvate import but had no effect on carnitine uptake. Immunoblot analysis of complex I revealed that it contained several protein S-glutathionylation targets including NDUSF1, a subunit required for NADH oxidation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that O2●-/H2O2 release from muscle mitochondria can be altered by protein S-glutathionylation. We attribute these changes to the protein S-glutathionylation complex I and inhibition of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier.

  11. Hydrogen compatibility of structural materials for energy storage and transmission applications. Semiannual report for period through October 1, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.L. (comp.)

    1976-12-01

    Substantial support activities for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have been completed since the initiation of this program. The suitability of commercial alloys for containment of hydride-dehydride reactions have been assessed, and recommendations for materials selection based upon tensile and slow crack growth tests have been made. We have also prepared and installed in a test chamber at BNL a series of in-situ test specimens to be exposed to a cyclic iron-titanium hydride environment. Future BNL support activities will include welding/joining specification development and a post-mortem examination of the in-situ test specimens. Efforts are becoming more oriented to materials development and to the development of specifications for the use of structural steels in hydrogen environment. BNL's hydride storage program has been supported during the last six months by supplying 80 self-loaded tensile specimens for accelerated testing in an FeTiH/sub x/ test bed. A preliminary welding specification for containment of hydrogen in structural mild steels has been developed. Hydrogen permeation resistant coatings, applied by pyrolysis of silane, and by brush electroplating, have been developed. Environmentally assisted, cyclic fatigue in high-pressure hydrogen has been identified as a potential hazard to the integrity of flawed pressure vessels in materials where slow crack growth under constant load is not expected.

  12. Experimental study of combustion behavior during continuous hydrogen injection with an operating igniter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Zhe, E-mail: zhe.liang@cnl.ca; Clouthier, Tony; Thomas, Bryan

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Combustion during continuous hydrogen release. • Periodical slow burning with a low release rate or weak turbulence. • Fast global burning with stratified hydrogen or strong turbulence. • Initiation of standing flame. - Abstract: Deliberate hydrogen ignition systems have been widely installed in many water cooled nuclear power plants to mitigate hydrogen risk in a loss-of-coolant accident. Experimental studies were performed at a large scale facility to simulate a post-accident containment scenario, where hydrogen is released into a volume (not closed) with an energized igniter. The test chamber had a volume of 60 m{sup 3}. The test parameters included hydrogen injection mass flow rate, injection elevation, igniter elevation, and level of turbulence in the chamber. Several dynamic combustion behaviors were observed. Under certain conditions, slow burning occurred periodically or locally without significant pressurization, and the hydrogen concentration could be maintained near the lean hydrogen flammability limit or a steady hydrogen distribution profile could be formed with a maximum hydrogen concentration less than 9 vol.%. Under other conditions, a global fast burn or a burn moving along the hydrogen dispersion pathway was observed and was followed by an immediate initiation of a standing flame. The study provided a better understanding of the dynamic combustion behavior induced by a deliberate igniter during a continuous hydrogen release. The data can be used for validation of combustion models used for hydrogen safety analysis.

  13. Prediction of E. coli release from streambed to water column during base flow periods using SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial water quality in streams is of importance for recreation, irrigation, and other uses. The streambed sediment has been shown to harbor large fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) population that can be released to water column during high-flow events when sediments are resuspended. There have been...

  14. Global status of hydrogen research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakeman, J.B.; Browning, D.J.

    2001-07-01

    This report surveys the global status of hydrogen research and identifies technological barriers to the implementation of a global hydrogen economy. It is concluded that there will be a 30 year transition phase to the full implementation of the hydrogen economy. In this period, hydrogen will be largely produced by the reformation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane. It will be necessary to ensure that any carbonaceous oxides (and other unwanted species) formed as by-products will be trapped and not released into the atmosphere. Following the transition phase, hydrogen should be largely produced from renewable energy sources using some form of water cracking, largely electrolysis. Target performances and costs are identified for key technologies. The status of hydrogen research in the UK is reviews and it is concluded that the UK does not have a strategy for the adoption of the hydrogen economy, nor does it have a coherent and co-ordinated research and development strategy addressing barriers to the hydrogen economy. Despite this fact, because of the long transition phase, it is still possible for the UK to formulate a coherent strategy and make a significant contribution to the global implementation of the hydrogen economy, as there are still unresolved technology issues. The report concludes with a number of recommendations. (Author)

  15. Tetrapeptide-coumarin conjugate 3D networks based on hydrogen-bonded charge transfer complexes: gel formation and dye release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zongxia; Gong, Ruiying; Jiang, Yi; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-08-14

    Oligopeptide-based derivatives are important synthons for bio-based functional materials. In this article, a Gly-(L-Val)-Gly-(L-Val)-coumarin (GVGV-Cou) conjugate was synthesized, which forms 3D networks in ethanol. The gel nanostructures were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and TEM. It is suggested that the formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes between the coumarin moieties is the main driving force for the gel formation. The capability of the gel to encapsulate and release dyes was explored. Both Congo Red (CR) and Methylene Blue (MB) can be trapped in the CT gel matrix and released over time. The present gel might be used as a functional soft material for guest encapsulation and release.

  16. The influence of short-term concentration peaks on exposure risks in the vicinity of an episodic release of hydrogen sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In order to propose a methodology by which the influence of short-term concentration peaks on exposure risks could be estimated in the vicinity of an atmospheric release of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S), an extensive and up-to-date review of H 2 S toxicity was conducted, with emphasis on acute and sub-acute poisoning. The literature on animal studies and cases of human exposure were used to derive a lethal dose relationship(concentration-exposure time) appropriate for the general population. A statistical model was developed which calculates the probability of short-term concentrations exceeding the lethal level given the downwind range from the release, the short-term averaging time of interest, the long-term average concentration, and metereological and terrain conditions . Results were obtained for passive releases of H 2 S under a range of hypothetical conditions. Interpretation of these results is given in terms of the overall probability of lethal exposure during a 30-minute episode. The likely influence of heavy water plant gas dispersion systems is also addressed. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the responsiveness of pituitary gland to thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) in rats in the period of 8:00 to 12:00 a.m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghi, V.C.; Nicolau, W.; Bojarczuk, C.; Pieroni, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The functional pituitary capacity for the secretion thyrotropin in rats, in relation to the period of time 8:00-12:00 a.m. was studied by means of the administration of synthetic TRH (thyrotropin releasing hormone). The highest pituitary response to the hypothalamic hormone attains its peak between 9:50 and 10:30 a.m., a time in which the gland denotes a high and practically constant level of TSH secretion [pt

  18. Vaccination improves survival of Baltic salmon ( Salmo salar ) smolts in delayed release sea ranching (net-pen period)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchmann, Kurt; Dalsgaard, Inger; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    1997-01-01

    Baltic salmon (Salmo salar) of the Finnish Iijoki stock were hatched and reared in freshwater in a salmon hatchery on the Danish island of Bornholm in the Baltic sea. Salmon parr were divided in three groups each comprising 22 000 fish. One group was vaccinated by intraperitoneal injection....... In contrast, no increase of titres was seen in the bath vaccinated and untreated groups. Marked cellular reactions in the abdominal cavity of injected fish were registered. A total of 3000 fish have been tagged and released to evaluate the effect of vaccination on the recapture rate. The implications...

  19. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide and Ultrasound on Biomass Reduction and Toxin Release in the Cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Lürling

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms are expected to increase, and the toxins they produce threaten human health and impair ecosystem services. The reduction of the nutrient load of surface waters is the preferred way to prevent these blooms; however, this is not always feasible. Quick curative measures are therefore preferred in some cases. Two of these proposed measures, peroxide and ultrasound, were tested for their efficiency in reducing cyanobacterial biomass and potential release of cyanotoxins. Hereto, laboratory assays with a microcystin (MC-producing cyanobacterium (Microcystis aeruginosa were conducted. Peroxide effectively reduced M. aeruginosa biomass when dosed at 4 or 8 mg L−1, but not at 1 and 2 mg L−1. Peroxide dosed at 4 or 8 mg L−1 lowered total MC concentrations by 23%, yet led to a significant release of MCs into the water. Dissolved MC concentrations were nine-times (4 mg L−1 and 12-times (8 mg L−1 H2O2 higher than in the control. Cell lysis moreover increased the proportion of the dissolved hydrophobic variants, MC-LW and MC-LF (where L = Leucine, W = tryptophan, F = phenylalanine. Ultrasound treatment with commercial transducers sold for clearing ponds and lakes only caused minimal growth inhibition and some release of MCs into the water. Commercial ultrasound transducers are therefore ineffective at controlling cyanobacteria.

  20. Post-synthesis amine borane functionalization of metal-organic framework and its unusual chemical hydrogen release phenomenon

    KAUST Repository

    Berke, Heinz

    2017-05-11

    We report a novel strategy for post-synthesis amine borane functionalization of MOFs under gas-solid phase transformation utilizing gaseous diborane. The covalently confined amine borane derivative decorated on the framework backbone is stable when preserved at low temperature, but spontaneously liberates soft chemical hydrogen at room temperature leading to the development of an unusual borenium type species (-NH=BH2+) ion-paired with hydroborate anion. Furthermore, the unsaturated amino borane (-NH=BH2) and the -iminodiborane ((--NHB2H5) were detected as final products. A combination of DFT based molecular dynamics simulations and solid state NMR spectroscopy, utilizing isotopically enriched materials, were undertaken to unequivocally elucidate the mechanistic pathways for H2 liberation.

  1. Worth the Wait? Using Past Patterns to Determine Wait Periods for E-Books Released after Print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Karen

    2018-01-01

    This paper asks if there is an optimal wait period for e-books that balances libraries' desire to acquire books soon after their publication with the frequent desire to purchase books electronically whenever feasible. Analyzing 13,043 titles that Temple University Libraries received on its e-preferred approval plan in 2014-15, the author looks at…

  2. Effects of the kinematic viscosity and surface tension on the bubble take-off period in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Satoshi; Iida, Yoshinori

    2009-06-01

    The effect of kinematic viscosity and surface tension of the solution was investigated by adding catalase, glucose oxidase, or glucose on the bubble movement in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system. The kinematic viscosity was measured using a Cannon-Fenske kinematic viscometer. The surface tension of the solution was measured by the Wilhelmy method using a self-made apparatus. The effects of the hole diameter/cell wall thickness, catalase concentration, glucose concentration, and glucose oxidase concentration on the kinematic viscosity, surface tension, and bubble take-off period were investigated. With our system, the effects of the changes in the solution materiality on the bubble take-off period were proven to be very small in comparison to the change in the oxygen-producing rate.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide concentration in Beaver Dam Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Concentration-time profiles calculated with LODIPS for various hypothetical releases of hydrogen sulfide from the heavy water extraction facility predict lethal conditions for swamp fish from releases as small as 568 kg discharged over a period of 30 minutes or from releases of 1818 kg discharged over a period of 6 hours or less. The necessary volatilization and oxidation coefficients for LODIPS were derived from field measurements following planned releases of H 2 S. Upsets in the operation of the wastewater strippers in the Girdler-Sulfide (GS) heavy water extraction facility in D Area have released significant amounts of dissolved H 2 S to Beaver Dam Creek. Because H 2 S is toxic to fish in concentrations as low as 1 mg/liter, the downstream environmental impact of H 2 S releases from D Area was evaluated

  4. On the phase between pressure and heat release fluctuations for propane/hydrogen flames and its role in mode transitions

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Seunghyuck

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation into mode-transitions observed in a 50-kW, atmospheric pressure, backward-facing step combustor burning lean premixed C3H8/H2 fuel mixtures over a range of equivalence ratios, fuel compositions and preheat temperatures. The combustor exhibits distinct acoustic response and dynamic flame shape (collectively referred to as "dynamic modes") depending on the operating conditions. We simultaneously measure the dynamic pressure and flame chemiluminescence to examine the phase between pressure (p\\') and heat release fluctuations (q\\') in the observed dynamic modes. Results show that the heat release is in phase with the pressure oscillations (θqp≈0) at the onset of a dynamic mode, while as the operating conditions change within the mode, the phase grows until it reaches a critical value θqp=θc, at which the combustor switches to another dynamic mode. According to the classical Rayleigh criterion, this critical phase (θc) should be π/2, whereas our data show that the transition occurs well below this value. A linear acoustic energy balance shows that this critical phase marks the point where acoustic losses across the system boundaries equal the energy addition from the combustion process to the acoustic field. Based on the extended Rayleigh criterion in which the acoustic energy fluxes through the system boundaries as well as the typical Rayleigh source term (p\\'q\\') are included, we derive an extended Rayleigh index defined as Re=θqp/θc, which varies between 0 and 1. This index, plotted against a density-weighted strained consumption speed, indicates that the impact of the operating parameters on the dynamic mode selection of the combustor collapses onto a family of curves, which quantify the state of the combustor within a dynamic mode. At Re=0, the combustor enters a mode, and switches to another as Re approaches 1. The results provide a metric for quantifying the instability margins of fuel

  5. The Influence of Irradiation Regimes on Retention Hydrogen Isotopes in Structural Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzhnyi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the present work was investigated the influence of irradiation regimes on retention hydrogen isotopes in samples of austenitic steel during heating. The samples of studied materials were irradiated both in the reactor and by hydrogen isotopes ions of different energies and fluencies bombardment in an accelerator. Kinetic of hydrogen release from the samples worked with deuterium plasma was investigated. The following results were obtained. Heating the irradiate d samples of steel (irradiated in the reactor or by hydrogen isotopes ions bombardment), which have been kept in normal temperature during quite a long period after the irradiation, a shift of the diffusion peak of hydrogen release to higher temperatures, comparing to no irradiated samples, was observed. It means that atoms of hydrogen in the irradiated sample were caught by radiation defects, which are very effective as traps for hydrogen atoms till quite high temperatures (700 K). The worked out analysis of the received results supposes that vacancy complexes. On thermodesorption curves of hydrogen release from irradiated samples of austenitic steels a high temperature peak (900-1000 K) was observed because of dissociation of hydrogen containing compounds in micro pores. During investigations of hydrogen release from irradiated samples of austenitic steel, after it had been saturated with hydrogen plasma, abnormally big blisters were registered with cover thickness of about 1 mkm. Three peaks were observed on the thermodesorption curves of hydrogen release from irradiated samples, contained blisters. The low temperature spike (∼500 K) was showed to correspond to hydrogen release because of its resolution from blisters, where it was in molecular form. The high temperature peak (∼900 K) corresponds to hydrogen release from dissociating blisters, which contain hydrocarbons. The mechanism of abnormal blisters generation is offered. Inasmuch methane is not soluble in

  6. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  7. Exploring the dynamics of hydrogen atom release from the radical-radical reaction of O(3P) with C3H5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Sun-Kyu; Kwon, Lee-Kyoung; Lee, Hohjai; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2004-01-01

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction dynamics of O( 3 P)+C 3 H 5 →H( 2 S)+C 3 H 4 O was studied at an average collision energy of 6.4 kcal/mol in a crossed beam configuration. The ground-state atomic oxygen [O( 3 P)] and allyl radicals (C 3 H 5 ) were generated by the photolysis of NO 2 and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of allyl iodide, respectively. Nascent hydrogen atom products were probed by the vacuum-ultraviolet-laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the Lyman-α region centered at 121.6 nm. With the aid of the CBS-QB3 level of ab initio theory, it has been found that the barrierless addition of O( 3 P) to C 3 H 5 forms the energy-rich addition complexes on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, which are predicted to undergo a subsequent direct decomposition step leading to the reaction products H+C 3 H 4 O. The major counterpart C 3 H 4 O of the probed hydrogen atom is calculated to be acrolein after taking into account the factors of barrier height, reaction enthalpy, and the number of intermediates involved along the reaction pathway. The nascent H-atom Doppler profile analysis shows that the average center-of-mass translational energy of the H+C 3 H 4 O products and the fraction of the total available energy released as the translational energy were determined to be 3.83 kcal/mol and 0.054, respectively. On the basis of comparison with statistical calculations, the reaction proceeds through the formation of short-lived addition complexes rather than statistical, long-lived intermediates, and the polyatomic acrolein product is significantly internally excited at the moment of the decomposition

  8. Exploring the dynamics of hydrogen atom release from the radical-radical reaction of O(3P) with C3H5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sun-Kyu; Kwon, Lee-Kyoung; Lee, Hohjai; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2004-05-01

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction dynamics of O(3P)+C3H5→H(2S)+C3H4O was studied at an average collision energy of 6.4 kcal/mol in a crossed beam configuration. The ground-state atomic oxygen [O(3P)] and allyl radicals (C3H5) were generated by the photolysis of NO2 and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of allyl iodide, respectively. Nascent hydrogen atom products were probed by the vacuum-ultraviolet-laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy in the Lyman-α region centered at 121.6 nm. With the aid of the CBS-QB3 level of ab initio theory, it has been found that the barrierless addition of O(3P) to C3H5 forms the energy-rich addition complexes on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, which are predicted to undergo a subsequent direct decomposition step leading to the reaction products H+C3H4O. The major counterpart C3H4O of the probed hydrogen atom is calculated to be acrolein after taking into account the factors of barrier height, reaction enthalpy, and the number of intermediates involved along the reaction pathway. The nascent H-atom Doppler profile analysis shows that the average center-of-mass translational energy of the H+C3H4O products and the fraction of the total available energy released as the translational energy were determined to be 3.83 kcal/mol and 0.054, respectively. On the basis of comparison with statistical calculations, the reaction proceeds through the formation of short-lived addition complexes rather than statistical, long-lived intermediates, and the polyatomic acrolein product is significantly internally excited at the moment of the decomposition.

  9. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  10. Graphene oxide directed in-situ synthesis of Prussian blue for non-enzymatic sensing of hydrogen peroxide released from macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Weiwei; Zhu, Qionghua; Gao, Fei; Gao, Feng [College of Chemistry and Environment, Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Morden Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Huang, Jiafu; Pan, Yutian [College of Biological Science and Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Wang, Qingxiang, E-mail: axiang236@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environment, Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Morden Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2017-03-01

    A novel electrochemical non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) sensor has been developed based on Prussian blue (PB) and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO). The GO was covalently modified on glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and utilized as a directing platform for in-situ synthesis of electroactive PB. Then the GO was electrochemically treated to reduction form to improve the effective surface area and electroactivity of the sensing interface. The fabrication process was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the rich oxygen containing groups play a crucial role for the successful synthesis of PB, and the obtained PB layer on the covalently immobilized GO has good stability. Electrochemical sensing assay showed that the modified electrode had tremendous electrocatalytic property for the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The steady-state current response increased linearly with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations from 5 μM to 1 mM with a fast response time (less than 3 s). The detection limit was estimated to be 0.8 μM. When the sensor was applied for determination of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released from living cells of macrophages, satisfactory results were achieved. - Highlights: • Covalent method was applied for immobilization of GO on glassy carbon electrode. • GO directed in-situ synthesis of electroactive PB. • PB-ERGO composite shows high electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • The modified biosensor is capable of detecting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released from living macrophages.

  11. MoS2/Pt nanocomposite-functionalized microneedle for real-time monitoring of hydrogen peroxide release from living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin-Xiu; Tang, Li-Na; Yang, Fan; Liang, Feng-Xia; Wang, Hua; Li, Yu-Tao; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2017-11-06

    This work describes the adaptive use of a conventional stainless steel acupuncture needle as the electrode substrate for construction of a molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) and platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) layer-modified microneedle sensor for real-time monitoring of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) release from living cells. To construct the nanocomposite-functionalized microneedle, the needle surface was first coated with a gold film by ion sputtering to enhance the conductivity. Subsequently, an electrochemical deposition method was successfully employed to deposit MoS 2 nanosheet and Pt nanoparticles on the needle tip as the sensing interface. Electrochemical study demonstrated that the MoS 2 /PtNPs nanocomposite-modified needle exhibited excellent catalytic performance and low over-potential toward the reduction of H 2 O 2 . Not only did the microneedle achieve a wide linear range from 1 to 100 μmol L -1 with a limit of detection down to 0.686 μmol L -1 , but it also realized the highly specific detection of H 2 O 2 . Owing to these remarkable analytical advantages, the prepared microneedle was applied to determine H 2 O 2 release from living cells with satisfactory results. The MoS 2 /PtNPs nanocomposite-functionalized microneedle sensor is simple and affordable, and can serve as a promising electrochemical nonenzymatic sensing platform. Moreover, this superfine needle sensor shows great potential for real-time monitoring of reactive oxygen species in vivo with minimal damage.

  12. Heat and Mass Transfer during Hydrogen Generation in an Array of Fuel Bars of a BWR Using a Periodic Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Romero-Paredes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents, the numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer during hydrogen generation in an array of fuel cylinder bars, each coated with a cladding and a steam current flowing outside the cylinders. The analysis considers the fuel element without mitigation effects. The system consists of a representative periodic unit cell where the initial and boundary-value problems for heat and mass transfer were solved. In this unit cell, we considered that a fuel element is coated by a cladding with steam surrounding it as a coolant. The numerical simulations allow describing the evolution of the temperature and concentration profiles inside the nuclear reactor and could be used as a basis for hybrid upscaling simulations.

  13. High Sensitive and Selective Sensing of Hydrogen Peroxide Released from Pheochromocytoma Cells Based on Pt-Au Bimetallic Nanoparticles Electrodeposited on Reduced Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxia Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a high sensitive and selective hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 sensor was successfully constructed with Pt-Au bimetallic nanoparticles (Pt-Au NPs/reduced graphene sheets (rGSs hybrid films. Various molar ratios of Au to Pt and different electrodeposition conditions were evaluated to control the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Pt-Au bimetallic nanoparticles. Upon optimal conditions, wide linear ranges from 1 µM to 1.78 mM and 1.78 mM to 16.8 mM were obtained, with a detection limit as low as 0.31 µM. Besides, due to the synergetic effects of the bimetallic NPs and rGSs, the amperometric H2O2 sensor could operate at a low potential of 0 V. Under this potential, not only common anodic interferences induced from ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine, but also the cathodic interference induced from endogenous O2 could be effectively avoided. Furthermore, with rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC 12 as model, the proposed sensor had been successfully used in the detection of H2O2 released from the cancer cells. This method with wide linear ranges and excellent selectivity can provide a promising alternative for H2O2 monitoring in vivo in the fields of physiology, pathology and diagnosis.

  14. Diffusion of hydrogen in yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyov, V.V.; Ryabchikov, L.N.

    1966-01-01

    In this work the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in yttrium were determined from the rate at which the hydrogen was released from yttrium samples under a vacuum at temperatures of 450 to 850 0 C and from the quantity of hydrogen retained by yttrium at hydrogen pressures below 5 x 10 - 4 mm Hg in the same temperature range

  15. NOSH-NBP, a Novel Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide- Releasing Hybrid, Attenuates Ischemic Stroke-Induced Neuroinflammatory Injury by Modulating Microglia Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ji

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available NOSH-NBP, a novel nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S-releasing hybrid, protects brain from ischemic stroke. This study mainly aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of NOSH-NBP on ischemic stroke and the underlying mechanisms. In vivo, transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO was performed in C57BL/6 mice, with NO-NBP and H2S-NBP as controls. NO and H2S scavengers, carboxy-PTIO and BSS, respectively, were used to quench NO and H2S of NOSH-NBP. In vitro, BV2 microglia/BMDM were induced to the M1/2 phenotype, and conditioned medium (CM experiments in BV2 microglia, neurons and b.End3 cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (ECs were performed. Microglial/macrophage activation/polarization was assessed by flow cytometry, Western blot, RT-qPCR, and ELISA. Neuronal and EC survival was measured by TUNEL, flow cytometry, MTT and LDH assays. Transmission electron microscopy, EB extravasation, brain water content, TEER measurement and Western blot were used to detect blood–brain barrier (BBB integrity and function. Interestingly, NOSH-NBP significantly reduced cerebral infarct volume and ameliorated neurological deficit, with superior effects compared with NO-NBP and/or H2S-NBP in mice after tMCAO. Both NO and H2S-releasing groups contributed to protection by NOSH-NBP. Additionally, NOSH-NBP decreased neuronal death and attenuated BBB dysfunction in tMCAO-treated mice. Furthermore, NOSH-NBP promoted microglia/macrophage switch from an inflammatory M1 phenotype to the protective M2 phenotype in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway and NLRP3 inflammasome were involved in the inhibitory effects of NOSH-NBP on M1 polarization, while peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma signaling contributed to NOSH-NBP induced M2 polarization. These findings indicated that NOSH-NBP is a potential therapeutic agent that preferentially promotes microglial/macrophage M1–M2 switch in ischemic stroke.

  16. High capacity hydrogen storage nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2017-12-12

    A novel hydrogen absorption material is provided comprising a mixture of a lithium hydride with a fullerene. The subsequent reaction product provides for a hydrogen storage material which reversibly stores and releases hydrogen at temperatures of about 270.degree. C.

  17. Spectrally resolved measurement of the ion feature in the scattered spectrum of a hydrogen plasma obtained with a periodically pulsed Nd3+: YAG-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasparek, W.

    Ion temperature and density in a magnetically stabilized hydrogen arc were determined with laser scattering from collective electron density fluctuations. A 90 0 -scattering experiment was set up using a periodically pulsed Nd 3+ : YAG-laser, an IR-photomultiplier and synchronous signal detection. A spectral resolution of 0.3 Angstroem was achieved by narrowing the laser line width and by using a Fabry-Perot-interferometer in combination with a monochromator as spectrometer. The data obtained from the scattered spectra (Tsub(i) = 1,1 ... 1,8 eV, nsub(e) = 2 ... 6 x 10 21 m -3 ) agree well with those obtained by other methods. The achieved high resolution also allowed to measure separately the ion features of two ion species with different mass, which are spectrally distinguished from each other. The results confirm the theoretical model of Evans. Demixing effects in a H 2 /A mixture as well as a temperature difference between the ion sorts are deduced. (orig.) 891 HT/orig. 892 HIS

  18. GOTHIC analysis of post-accident hydrogen mixing behaviour in CANDU fuelling machine vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, K.; Wong, R.C.; Fluke, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The GOTHIC code was used to assess the post-accident hydrogen gas mixing patterns in a CANDU reactor containment and demonstrate the acceptability of Ontario Hydro Nuclear's hydrogen mitigation methods. The fuelling machine vault, being a small volume room containing major reactor piping, is the room of most concern with respect to hydrogen concentrations. Detailed three dimensional modelling of the gas mixing patterns in the fuelling machine vault was completed. Results showed that, even without forced air circulation, there is enough dispersion of hydrogen to other parts of containment to preclude the build-up of sensitive mixtures in the vault. For a brief time during the peak period of hydrogen release, hydrogen concentrations rise to close to the lower ignition limit in a small portion of the vault, but these hydrogen-steam-air mixtures are considered acceptable. Natural mixing alone is sufficient to preclude damaging hydrogen burns. (author)

  19. Consideration on hydrogen explosion scenario in APR 1400 containment building during small breakup loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kweonha, E-mail: khpark@kmou.ac.kr [Division of Mechanical & Energy Systems Engineering, Korea Maritime University, Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-gu, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Khor, Chong Lee, E-mail: itachi_829@hotmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Maritime University, Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-gu, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogen behavior in the containment building of APR1400 nuclear plant up to 15 h after the failure happened. • The risk of hydrogen explosion largely depends on the combination of air, hydrogen and steam in the containment. • Hydrogen explosion risk at different locations in the containment was analyzed. - Abstract: This paper describes the analytical result of the potential risk of hydrogen gas up to 15 h after the failure takes place. The major cause of the disaster occurred in Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor was the detonation of accumulated hydrogen in the containment by highly increased reactor core temperatures after the failure of the emergency cooling system. The hydrogen risk should be considered in severe accident strategies in current and future NPPs. A hydrogen explosion scenario is proposed. Hydrogen is accumulated on top of the dome during the hydrogen release period. At this point, there are no risk of explosion due to the steam that resides in upper part of the dome. As the hydrogen concentration increase, substantial amount of steams are released. Subsequently, hydrogen is forced into the lower part of the building with high air density—small explosion and dormant steam condensation phase are possible. The light hydrogen rises up slowly with air, gathering on top of the building with high air density. Massive hydrogen explosion is anticipated upon ignition at this stage.

  20. Kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrogen absorption and release in {beta}-titanium alloys; Kinetik und Thermodynamik der Wasserstoffaufnahme und -abgabe von {beta}-Titanlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, M.; Christ, H.J. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik

    1998-12-31

    The work reported was intended to yield results allowing to describe as completely as possible the processes of interaction of {beta}-titanium and hydrogen. Three alloys have been selected for the experiments which suitably differ in stability of the {beta} phase. The characterisation of the hydrogen/metal interactions is primarily based on gravimetric measurements. A method was found to determine the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen, which is a significant variable for quantitative characterisation of the hydrogen absorption rate. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In der Arbeit wird eine moeglichst vollstaendige Beschreibung der Wechselwirkung von {beta}-Titanlegierungen mit Wasserstoff angestrebt. Hierfuer wird mit drei Legierungen gearbeitet, die sich hinsichtlich der Stabilitaet der {beta}-Phase in sinnvoll abgestufter Weise unterscheiden. Fuer die Charakterisierung der Wasserstoff/Metall-Wechselwirkung wurden insbesondere gravimetrische Messungen eingesetzt. Weiterhin wurde die fuer eine quantitative Beschreibung der Wasserstoffaufnahmegeschwindigkeit wichtige Groesse des Diffusionskoeffizienten von Wasserstoff mit einem Verfahren bestimmt. (orig./MM)

  1. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  2. Hydrogen effect on the properties of the heat affected zone metal of welded joints of quenchable steel within a hold-up period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosov, V.A.; Borovushkin, I.V.; Pocheptsov, A.V.

    1976-01-01

    The work of failure of the heat-affected zone after welding changes non-monotonously with time: at first it increases, then decreases down to the minimum, and increases again. This is related to a simultaneous action of the 'rest' process of the tempered structure and hydrogen distribution in a weld joint. Hydrogen enters the heat-affected zone during the welding. This is seen from the fact that the level of the work of failure is different as soon as the welding is performed a content of hydrogen in the weld being different. Redistribution of hydrogen in a weld joint of the investigated steel with a ferrite weld in the process of ag is as follows. The initial concentration of hydrogen in the weld decreases monotonously with time; in the heat-affected zone near the melting boundary the total concentration of hydrogen increases and reaches the maximum and then gradually decreases. A decrease in the rate of loading reduces the work of failure of the weld joint in the heat-affected zone

  3. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-12-01

    OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily

  4. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-10-19

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  5. Hydrogen and its challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schal, M.

    2008-01-01

    The future of hydrogen as a universal fuel is in jeopardy unless we are able to produce it through an environment-friendly way and at a competitive cost. Today almost all the hydrogen used in the world is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. This process releases 8 tonnes of CO 2 per tonne of hydrogen produced. Other means of producing hydrogen are the hydrolysis, the very high temperature hydrolysis, and the direct chemical dissociation of water, these processes are greener than steam reforming but less efficient. About one hundred buses in the world operate on fuel cells fed by hydrogen, but it appears that the first industrial use of hydrogen at great scale will be for the local generation of electricity. Globally the annual budget for research concerning hydrogen is 4.4 milliard (10 9 ) euros worldwide. (A.C.)

  6. Measures for removing hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baukal, W.; Koehling, A.; Langer, G.; Poeschel, E.

    1984-01-01

    Basis for the investigation is a 1300-MW-PWR. The evolution of hydrogen was studied in design-basis and three hypothetical accident scenarios, the loss-of-coolant accident, the failure of emergency cooling system and core meltdown. It was shown that in the case of release rates of 4m 3 H 2 /h, the known post-accident hydrogen removal systems can be used and at medium rates up to 80 m 3 H 2 /h recombines of nuclear and non-nuclear industries are suitable under certain conditions. In the case of larger release rates it appears useful to apply a small recombiner of the type of the post-accident hydrogen removal system combined with an other hydrogen countermeasures. Recommendations are being made for the installation of an accident-proof hydrogen measuring system. (DG) [de

  7. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  8. Stress release and defect occurrence in V1-xFe x films upon hydrogen loading: H-induced superabundant vacancies, movement and creation of dislocations

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota; Dobroň, Patrik; Čí žek, Jakub; Pundt, Astrid A.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced elastic/plastic deformation was studied in V 1-xFex (x = 0.02-0.08) films with thicknesses between 10 and 400 nm and prepared at different temperatures. The combination of several in situ techniques such as X-ray diffraction, acoustic emission, electromotive force and substrate curvature techniques allows sensitive studies of defects generated in these thin films. As well as conventional out-of-plane linear elastic film expansion and in-plane compressive stress increase during hydrogen absorption, the investigations uncovered new details: as soon as hydrogen predominately solved in interstitial lattice sites, discrete stress relaxation (DSR) events were detected, after which the film continued to behave in a linear elastic manner. DSRs were interpreted by uncorrelated movement of pre-existing dislocations. Particularly in the case of films deposited at higher temperatures, in-plane tensile stress was found at very small H concentrations of less than 0.005 H/V. Upon further H uptake, this turned into compressive stress. However, this stress increase differed from theoretical predictions. This behavior is explained by the generation of superabundant vacancies. Dislocation emission and plastic deformation are linked to the formation of the hydride phase in the V1-xFex films. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stress release and defect occurrence in V1-xFe x films upon hydrogen loading: H-induced superabundant vacancies, movement and creation of dislocations

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen-induced elastic/plastic deformation was studied in V 1-xFex (x = 0.02-0.08) films with thicknesses between 10 and 400 nm and prepared at different temperatures. The combination of several in situ techniques such as X-ray diffraction, acoustic emission, electromotive force and substrate curvature techniques allows sensitive studies of defects generated in these thin films. As well as conventional out-of-plane linear elastic film expansion and in-plane compressive stress increase during hydrogen absorption, the investigations uncovered new details: as soon as hydrogen predominately solved in interstitial lattice sites, discrete stress relaxation (DSR) events were detected, after which the film continued to behave in a linear elastic manner. DSRs were interpreted by uncorrelated movement of pre-existing dislocations. Particularly in the case of films deposited at higher temperatures, in-plane tensile stress was found at very small H concentrations of less than 0.005 H/V. Upon further H uptake, this turned into compressive stress. However, this stress increase differed from theoretical predictions. This behavior is explained by the generation of superabundant vacancies. Dislocation emission and plastic deformation are linked to the formation of the hydride phase in the V1-xFex films. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-01-01

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH 3 BH 3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H 2 , and ammonia triborane NH 3 B 3 H 7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H 2 , were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H 2 -release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H 2 -release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H 2 -release, the tunability of both their H 2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These

  11. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also

  12. Cost estimation of hydrogen and DME produced by nuclear heat utilization system. Joint research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2003-09-01

    Research of hydrogen energy has been performed in order to spread use of the hydrogen energy in 2020 or 2030. It will take, however, many years for the hydrogen energy to be used very easily like gasoline, diesel oil and city gas in all of countries. During the periods, low CO 2 release liquid fuels would be used together with hydrogen. Recently, di-methyl-either (DME) has been noticed as one of the substitute liquid fuels of petroleum. Such liquid fuels can be produced from the mixed gas such as hydrogen and carbon oxide which are produced by steam reforming hydrogen generation system by the use of nuclear heat. Therefore, the system would be one of the candidates of future system of nuclear heat utilization. In the present study, we focused on the production of hydrogen and DME. Economic evaluation was estimated for hydrogen and DME production in commercial and nuclear heat utilization plant. At first, heat and mass balance of each process in commercial plant of hydrogen production was estimated and commercial prices of each process were derived. Then, price was estimated when nuclear heat was used instead of required heat of commercial plant. Results showed that the production prices produced by nuclear heat were cheaper by 10% for hydrogen and 3% for DME. With the consideration of reduction effect of CO 2 release, utilization of nuclear heat would be more effective. (author)

  13. Palladium coated fibre Bragg grating based hydrogen sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasinathan, M.; Sosamma, S.; Kishore, S.; Elumalai, V.; Krishnan, R.; Babu Rao, C.; Dash, Sitaram; Murali, N.; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of steam generator leaks in fast nuclear reactors is carried out by monitoring hydrogen in argon cover-gas. Hydrogen released during sodium cleaning of fast reactor components is required to be monitored. Hydrogen sensors with good sensitivity, stability and response time are required for all the above applications. We report a new type of hydrogen sensor with a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) coated with palladium thin film which is used to detect the leak of hydrogen gas in the Steam Generator (SG) module of the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). If water leaks into sodium, it results in sodium-water reaction. In this reaction hydrogen and sodium hydroxide are formed. Due to the explosive risk of hydrogen system, hydrogen sensors are of great interest in this case. It is known that hydrogen forms an explosive mixture with air once its concentration exceeds beyond the explosion limit of four percent. The advantages of FBG based hydrogen sensor over the other hydrogen sensors are its inherent property of safety from sparking, immunity to ambient electromagnetic interference. The sensing mechanism in this device is based on mechanical strain that is induced in the palladium coating when it absorbs hydrogen. This process physically stretches the grating and causes the grating period and grating's refractive index, to change. The Bragg wavelength shift is directly proportional to the strain induced and can be directly related to the percentage of hydrogen exposure. The online monitoring of palladium thin film coating on FBG is carried out and recorded the wavelength change and strain induced on the FBG. A hydrogen sensor set up have been fabricated which consists of SS vessel of capacity 10 litres, provided with pressure gauge, Argon filling line with a valve, Hydrogen injection line with flange, a vent line with valve and Hydrogen sensor fixing point. The Palladium coated FBG based Hydrogen sensor is tested in this experimental facility in the exposure of hydrogen in

  14. Halite as a Methane Sequestration Host: A Possible Explanation for Periodic Methane Release on Mars, and a Surface-accessible Source of Ancient Martian Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M. D.; Steele, Andrew; Hynek, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the hypothesis that halite may play a role in methane sequestration on the martian surface. In terrestrial examples, halite deposits sequester large volumes of methane and chloromethane. Also, examples of chloromethane-bearing, approximately 4.5 Ga old halite from the Monahans meteorite show that this system is very stable unless the halite is damaged. On Mars, methane may be generated from carbonaceous material trapped in ancient halite deposits and sequestered. The methane may be released by damaging its halite host; either by aqueous alteration, aeolian abrasion, heating, or impact shock. Such a scenario may help to explain the appearance of short-lived releases of methane on the martian surface. The methane may be of either biogenic or abiogenic origin. If this scenario plays a significant role on Mars, then martian halite deposits may contain samples of organic compounds dating to the ancient desiccation of the planet, accessible at the surface for future sample return missions.

  15. Canadian hydrogen safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIntyre, I.; Tchouvelev, A.V.; Hay, D.R.; Wong, J.; Grant, J.; Benard, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes and Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates trade through fair insurance policies and rates, effective and efficient regulatory approval procedures and accommodation of the interests of the general public. The Program integrates a consistent quantitative risk assessment methodology with experimental (destructive and non-destructive) failure rates and consequence-of-release data for key hydrogen components and systems into risk assessment of commercial application scenarios. Its current and past six projects include Intelligent Virtual Hydrogen Filling Station (IVHFS), Hydrogen clearance distances, comparative quantitative risk comparison of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) refuelling options; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling validation, calibration and enhancement; enhancement of frequency and probability analysis, and Consequence analysis of key component failures of hydrogen systems; and fuel cell oxidant outlet hydrogen sensor project. The Program projects are tightly linked with the content of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety. (author)

  16. Retention and release of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten plasma-facing components: the role of grain boundaries and the native oxide layer from a joint experiment-simulation integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodille, E. A.; Ghiorghiu, F.; Addab, Y.; Založnik, A.; Minissale, M.; Piazza, Z.; Martin, C.; Angot, T.; Gallais, L.; Barthe, M.-F.; Becquart, C. S.; Markelj, S.; Mougenot, J.; Grisolia, C.; Bisson, R.

    2017-07-01

    Fusion fuel retention (trapping) and release (desorption) from plasma-facing components are critical issues for ITER and for any future industrial demonstration reactors such as DEMO. Therefore, understanding the fundamental mechanisms behind the retention of hydrogen isotopes in first wall and divertor materials is necessary. We developed an approach that couples dedicated experimental studies with modelling at all relevant scales, from microscopic elementary steps to macroscopic observables, in order to build a reliable and predictive fusion reactor wall model. This integrated approach is applied to the ITER divertor material (tungsten), and advances in the development of the wall model are presented. An experimental dataset, including focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, isothermal desorption, temperature programmed desorption, nuclear reaction analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy, is exploited to initialize a macroscopic rate equation wall model. This model includes all elementary steps of modelled experiments: implantation of fusion fuel, fuel diffusion in the bulk or towards the surface, fuel trapping on defects and release of trapped fuel during a thermal excursion of materials. We were able to show that a single-trap-type single-detrapping-energy model is not able to reproduce an extended parameter space study of a polycrystalline sample exhibiting a single desorption peak. It is therefore justified to use density functional theory to guide the initialization of a more complex model. This new model still contains a single type of trap, but includes the density functional theory findings that the detrapping energy varies as a function of the number of hydrogen isotopes bound to the trap. A better agreement of the model with experimental results is obtained when grain boundary defects are included, as is consistent with the polycrystalline nature of the studied sample. Refinement of this grain boundary model is discussed as well as the inclusion

  17. Preparation of Zn(BH4)2 and diborane and hydrogen release properties of Zn(BH4)2+xMgH2 (x=1, 5, 10, and 15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Young Jun; Kwon, Sung Nam; Song, Myoung Youp

    2015-09-01

    Zn(BH4)2 was prepared by milling ZnCl2 and NaBH4 in a planetary ball mill under Ar atmosphere, and Zn(BH4)2+xMgH2 (x=1, 5, 10, and 15) samples were prepared. Diborane (B2H6) and hydrogen release characteristics of the Zn(BH4)2 and Zn(BH4)2+xMgH2 samples were studied. The samples synthesized by milling ZnCl2 and NaBH4 contained Zn(BH4)2 and NaCl, together with small amounts of ZnCl2 and NaBH4. We designated these samples as Zn(BH4)2(+NaCl). The weight loss up to 400 °C of the Zn(BH4)2(+NaCl) sample synthesized by milling 4 h was 11.2 wt%. FT-IR analysis showed that Zn(BH4)2 was formed in the Zn(BH4)2(+NaCl) samples. MgH2 was also milled in a planetary ball mill, and mixed with the Zn(BH4)2(+NaCl) synthesized by milling for 4 h in a mortar and pestle. The weight loss up to 400 °C of Zn(BH4)2(+NaCl)+MgH2 was 8.2 wt%, corresponding to the weight % of diborane and hydrogen released from the Zn(BH4)2(+NaCl)+MgH2 sample, with respect to the sample weight. DTA results of Zn(BH4)2(+NaCl)+xMgH2 showed that the decomposition peak of Zn(BH4)2 was at about 61 °C, and that of MgH2 was at about 370-389 °C.

  18. New hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the overall hydrogen system. There are separate sections for production, distribution, transport, storage; and applications of hydrogen. The most important methods for hydrogen production are steam reformation of natural gas and electrolysis of water. Of the renewable energy options, production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from wind turbines or by gasification of biomass were found to be the most economic for Finland. Direct use of this electricity or the production of liquid fuels from biomass will be competing alternatives. When hydrogen is produced in the solar belt or where there is cheap hydropower it must be transported over long distances. The overall energy consumed for the transport is from 25 to 40 % of the initial available energy. Hydrogen storage can be divided into stationary and mobile types. The most economic, stationary, large scale hydrogen storage for both long and short periods is underground storage. When suitable sites are not available, then pressure vessels are the best for short period and liquid H 2 for long period. Vehicle storage of hydrogen is by either metal hydrides or liquid H 2 . Hydrogen is a very versatile energy carrier. It can be used to produce heat directly in catalytic burners without flame, to produce electricity in fuel cells with high efficiency for use in vehicles or for peak power shaving, as a fuel component with conventional fuels to reduce emissions, as a way to store energy and as a chemical reagent in reactions

  19. Role of silica nanoparticles in monitoring and prolonging release of drug-eluting polyelectrolyte coatings using long-period fiber grating platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tian, F.; Kaňka, Jiří; Yang, F.; Min, J.; Hammond, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 252, November (2017), s. 831-839 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Long period gratings * Sensor * Layer-by-layer assembly Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 5.401, year: 2016

  20. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F [Northville, MI; Nakamura, Kenji [Toyota, JP; Au, Ming [Martinez, GA; Zidan, Ragaiy [Alken, SC

    2012-01-31

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  1. 1/12-Scale mixing interface visualization and buoyant particle release tests in support of Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschbach, E.J.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In support of tank waste safety programs, visualization tests were performed in the 1/12-scale tank facility, using a low-viscosity simulant. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain video records of the transient jet-sludge interaction. The intent is that these videos will provide useful qualitative data for comparison with model predictions. Two tests were initially planned: mixing interface visualization (MIV) and buoyant particle release (BPR). Completion of the buoyant particle release test was set aside in order to complete additional MIV tests. Rheological measurements were made on simulant samples before testing, and the simulant was found to exhibit thixotropic behavior. Shear vane measurements were also made on an in-situ analog of the 1/12-scale tank simulant. Simulant shear strength has been observed to be time dependent. The primary objective of obtaining video records of jet-sludge interaction was satisfied, and the records yielded jet location information which may be of use in completing model comparisons. The modeling effort is not part of this task, but this report also discusses test specific instrumentation, visualization techniques, and shear vane instrumentation which would enable improved characterization of jet-sludge interaction and simulant characteristics.

  2. 1/12-Scale mixing interface visualization and buoyant particle release tests in support of Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschbach, E.J.; Enderlin, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In support of tank waste safety programs, visualization tests were performed in the 1/12-scale tank facility, using a low-viscosity simulant. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain video records of the transient jet-sludge interaction. The intent is that these videos will provide useful qualitative data for comparison with model predictions. Two tests were initially planned: mixing interface visualization (MIV) and buoyant particle release (BPR). Completion of the buoyant particle release test was set aside in order to complete additional MIV tests. Rheological measurements were made on simulant samples before testing, and the simulant was found to exhibit thixotropic behavior. Shear vane measurements were also made on an in-situ analog of the 1/12-scale tank simulant. Simulant shear strength has been observed to be time dependent. The primary objective of obtaining video records of jet-sludge interaction was satisfied, and the records yielded jet location information which may be of use in completing model comparisons. The modeling effort is not part of this task, but this report also discusses test specific instrumentation, visualization techniques, and shear vane instrumentation which would enable improved characterization of jet-sludge interaction and simulant characteristics

  3. Hydrogen energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okken, P.A.

    1992-10-01

    For the Energy and Material consumption Scenarios (EMS), by which emission reduction of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases can be calculated, calculations are executed by means of the MARKAL model (MARket ALlocation, a process-oriented dynamic linear programming model to minimize the costs of the energy system) for the Netherlands energy economy in the period 2000-2040, using a variable CO 2 emission limit. The results of these calculations are published in a separate report (ECN-C--92-066). The use of hydrogen can play an important part in the above-mentioned period. An overview of several options to produce or use hydrogen is given and added to the MARKAL model. In this report techno-economical data and estimates were compiled for several H 2 -application options, which subsequently also are added to the MARKAL model. After a brief chapter on hydrogen and the impact on the reduction of CO 2 emission attention is paid to stationary and mobile applications. The stationary options concern the mixing of natural gas with 10% hydrogen, a 100% substitution of natural gas by hydrogen, the use of a direct steam generator (combustion of hydrogen by means of pure oxygen, followed by steam injection to produce steam), and the use of fuel cells. The mobile options concern the use of hydrogen in the transportation sector. In brief, attention is paid to a hydrogen passenger car with an Otto engine, and a hydrogen passenger car with a fuel cell, a hybrid (metal)-hydride car, a hydrogen truck, a truck with a methanol fuel cell, a hydrogen bus, an inland canal boat with a hydrogen fuel cell, and finally a hydrogen airplane. 2 figs., 15 tabs., 1 app., 26 refs

  4. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H(2)S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H(2)S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC(50)s of 45.5 ± 2.5, 19.7 ± 3.3, and 7.7 ± 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G(0)/G(1) cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. NOSH–aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NOSH–aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H 2 S releasing hybrid. ► Its IC 50 for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. ► Structure–activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. ► NOSH–aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H 2 S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH–aspirin, which is an NO- and H 2 S-releasing agent. NOSH–aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC 50 s of 45.5 ± 2.5, 19.7 ± 3.3, and 7.7 ± 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH–aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G 0 /G 1 cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure–activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH–aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH–aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH–ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH–aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  6. Simulation of hydrogen distribution in an Indian Nuclear Reactor Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhudharwadkar, Deoras M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai (India); Iyer, Kannan N., E-mail: kiyer@iitb.ac.i [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai (India); Mohan, Nalini; Bajaj, Satinder S. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Mumbai (India); Markandeya, Suhas G. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: This work addresses hydrogen dispersion in commercial nuclear reactor containment. The numerical tool used for simulation is first benchmarked with experimental data. Parametric results are then carried out for different release configurations. Results lead to the conclusion that the dispersal is buoyancy dominated. Also, the hydrogen concentration is high enough to demand mitigation devices. - Abstract: The management of hydrogen in a Nuclear Reactor Containment after LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) is of practical importance to preserve the structural integrity of the containment. This paper presents the results of systematic work carried out using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT to assess the concentration distribution of hydrogen in a typical Indian Nuclear Reactor Containment. In order to obtain an accurate estimate of hydrogen concentration distribution, a suitable model for turbulence closure is required to be selected. Using guidelines from the previous studies reported in the literature and a comparative simulation study using simple benchmark problems, the most suitable turbulence model for hydrogen mixing prediction was identified. Subsequently, unstructured meshes were generated to represent the containment of a typical Indian Nuclear Reactor. Analyses were carried out to quantify the hydrogen distribution for three cases. These were (1) Uniform injection of hydrogen for a given period of time at room temperature, (2) Time varying injection as has been computed from an accident analysis code, (3) Time varying injection (as used in case (2)) at a high temperature. A parametric exercise was also carried out in case (1) where the effect of various inlet orientations and locations on hydrogen distribution was studied. The results indicate that the process of hydrogen dispersal is buoyancy dominated. Further for typical injection rates encountered following LOCA, the dispersal is quite poor and most

  7. Simulation of hydrogen distribution in an Indian Nuclear Reactor Containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhudharwadkar, Deoras M.; Iyer, Kannan N.; Mohan, Nalini; Bajaj, Satinder S.; Markandeya, Suhas G.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → This work addresses hydrogen dispersion in commercial nuclear reactor containment. → The numerical tool used for simulation is first benchmarked with experimental data. → Parametric results are then carried out for different release configurations. → Results lead to the conclusion that the dispersal is buoyancy dominated. → Also, the hydrogen concentration is high enough to demand mitigation devices. - Abstract: The management of hydrogen in a Nuclear Reactor Containment after LOCA (Loss Of Coolant Accident) is of practical importance to preserve the structural integrity of the containment. This paper presents the results of systematic work carried out using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT to assess the concentration distribution of hydrogen in a typical Indian Nuclear Reactor Containment. In order to obtain an accurate estimate of hydrogen concentration distribution, a suitable model for turbulence closure is required to be selected. Using guidelines from the previous studies reported in the literature and a comparative simulation study using simple benchmark problems, the most suitable turbulence model for hydrogen mixing prediction was identified. Subsequently, unstructured meshes were generated to represent the containment of a typical Indian Nuclear Reactor. Analyses were carried out to quantify the hydrogen distribution for three cases. These were (1) Uniform injection of hydrogen for a given period of time at room temperature, (2) Time varying injection as has been computed from an accident analysis code, (3) Time varying injection (as used in case (2)) at a high temperature. A parametric exercise was also carried out in case (1) where the effect of various inlet orientations and locations on hydrogen distribution was studied. The results indicate that the process of hydrogen dispersal is buoyancy dominated. Further for typical injection rates encountered following LOCA, the dispersal is

  8. Theory of hydrogen shell flashes on accreting white dwarfs. II. The stable shell burning and the recurrence period of shell flashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, M.Y.

    1982-01-01

    By means of analytical solutions of the envelope, thermal properties of hydrogen shell burning on accreting white dwarfs are studied and a general picture for their progress is presented which is described by two parameters, the accretion rate and the mass of the white dwarf. On a white dwarf, the thermal behavior of gas in the burning shell depends on the configuration of the envelope, which gives birth to two distinct types of stable configurations in thermal equilibrium, a high and a low state. In the high state, the nuclear shell burning makes up for the energy loss from the surface. There exists the lower limit to the envelope mass for this state. The nuclear burning rate lies in a narrow range of about a factor of 2.5, irrespective of the mass of the white dwarf, while the range itself varies greatly with the latter. In the low state, the nuclear burning is extinct, and yet the compressional heating by accreted gas balances with the cooling through the diffusion of heat. Therefore, the structure depends on the accretion rate. Thermal instability of nuclear burning sets the upper limit to the envelope mass of this state

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Releasing 2-Mercaptoacrylic Acid-Based Derivative Possesses Cytoprotective Activity in a Small Intestine of Rats with Medication-Induced Enteropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Sklyarova

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal injury is known to be one of the most commonly appearing pathologies, resulting in the use of medications such as: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, antitumor drugs and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors. The principal objective of this study is to evaluate the action of a novel mercaptoacrylic acid derivative able to release H2S on parameters of NO-synthase system and oxidative stress. Inducing enteropathy, three types of medications were used: indomethacin, an NSAID (35 mg/kg; methotrexate, an antitumor drug (10 mg/kg; and enalapril, an ACE inhibitor (2 mg/kg/day. 2-[(4-chlorophenyl-carbamoyl-methyl]-3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl-acrylic acid (2C3DHTA was introduced based on the background of medication-induced enteropathy (10 mg/kg/day. The survey showed that malondialdehyde (MDA concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, and NO-synthases (NOS were determined in the small intestinal mucosa. The increase in inducible NO-synthase (iNOS activity was due to indomethacin and methotrexate administration. Constitutive NO-synthase (cNOS activity was decreased by an ACE-inhibitor. The cytoprotective effect was demonstrated by 2C3DHTA, which returned iNOS activity to its control level and increased cNOS activity. The enterotoxic action of studied medication was accompanied by the development of oxidative stress manifested, activity of MPO was increased. MPO activity and manifestations of oxidative stress were decreased by 2C3DHTA. Effects of 2C3DHTA can be explained by the action of H2S, released from this compound in the gastrointestinal (GI system.

  10. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  11. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  12. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pez, Guido Peter [Allentown, PA; Cooper, Alan Charles [Macungie, PA; Scott, Aaron Raymond [Allentown, PA

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  13. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  14. A novel biosensor based on boronic acid functionalized metal-organic frameworks for the determination of hydrogen peroxide released from living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongxia; Lü, Wenjuan; Zuo, Xianwei; Zhu, Qian; Pan, Congjie; Niu, Xiaoying; Liu, Juanjuan; Chen, HongLi; Chen, Xingguo

    2017-09-15

    In this work, we report a durable and sensitive H 2 O 2 biosensor based on boronic acid functionalized metal-organic frameworks (denoted as MIL-100(Cr)-B) as an efficient immobilization matrix of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). MIL-100(Cr)-B features a hierarchical porous structure, extremely high surface area, and sufficient recognition sites, which can significantly increase HRP loading and prevent them from leakage and deactivation. The H 2 O 2 biosensor can be easily achieved without any complex processing. Meanwhile, the immobilized HRP exhibited enhanced stability and remarkable catalytic activity towards H 2 O 2 reduction. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed a fast response time (less than 4s) to H 2 O 2 in a wide linear range of 0.5-3000μM with a low detection limit of 0.1μM, as well as good anti-interference ability and long-term storage stability. These excellent performances substantially enable the proposed biosensor to be used for the real-time detection of H 2 O 2 released from living cells with satisfactory results, thus showing the potential application in the study of H 2 O 2 -involved dynamic pathological and physiological process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  16. The Energy Efficiency of Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Vestbø, Andreas Peter; Li, Qingfeng

    2007-01-01

    A number of the most common ways of storing hydrogen are reviewed in terms of energy efficiency. Distinction is made between energy losses during regeneration and during hydrogen liberation. In the latter case, the energy might have to be provided by part of the released hydrogen, and the true...

  17. Hydrogen behaviour in PWR containment evaluated with MAAP4.0.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic-Zabric, T.; Basic, I.; Spiler, J.

    2004-01-01

    The possible impacts of the non-uniform hydrogen distribution and the consequent fast burning should be assessed in the light of newer research information on hydrogen management. The review should include the hydrogen source term, both for the in-vessel and ex-vessel period, and investigate the potential effects on the hydrogen management strategy. NPP Krsko will repeat MAAP 4.0.5 calculation for the most important Rx vessel failure sequences taken from Individual Plant Examination Project (with molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) and with no MCCI) including wet cavity strategy. Mass and energy gases releases of analyzed sequences will be used to assess the non-uniform hydrogen distribution and the consequent fast burning by GOTHIC 7.1 (3-D).(author)

  18. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha S [Tampa, FL; Niemann, Michael U [Venice, FL; Goswami, D Yogi [Tampa, FL; Stefanakos, Elias K [Tampa, FL

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  19. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder [Department of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City University of New York Medical School, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Olson, Kenneth R. [Department of Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States); Kashfi, Khosrow, E-mail: kashfi@med.cuny.edu [Department of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience, Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, City University of New York Medical School, New York, NY 10031 (United States)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  20. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Ming [Augusta, GA

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  1. Operational experience in mitigating flammable gas releases from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Kirch, N.W.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases consisting of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and methane are periodically released from Hanford Site waste tank 241-SY-101 at concentrations above the flammable limit. A large mixer pump installed in the tank in 1993 has effectively mitigated this problem by continuously releasing small amounts of the flammable gases at the rate they are generated. Tank 241-SY-101 is also equipped with multiple high-sensitivity gas monitoring systems and level detection systems to measure the quantity of gas that is retained in and released from the waste

  2. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  3. Possibilities of hydrogen removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.; Koehling, A.; Nikodem, H.

    1982-12-01

    In the event of hypothetical severe accidents in light-water reactors, considerable amounts of hydrogen may be produced and released into the containment. Combustion of the hydrogen may jeopardize the integrity of the containment. The study reported here aimed to identify methods to mitigate the hydrogen problem. These methods should either prevent hydrogen combustion, or limit its effects. The following methods have been investigated: pre-inerting; chemical oxygen absorption; removal of oxygen by combustion; post-inerting with N 2 , CO 2 , or halon; aqueous foam; water fog; deliberate ignition; containment purging; and containment venting. The present state of the art in both nuclear and non-nuclear facilities, has been identified. The assessment of the methods was based on accident scenarios assuming significant release of hydrogen and the spectrum of requirements derived from these scenarios was used to determine the advantages and drawbacks of the various methods, assuming their application in a pressurized-water reactor of German design. (orig.) [de

  4. Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueking, Angela [State College, PA; Narayanan, Deepa [Redmond, WA

    2011-03-08

    A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

  5. Synthesis of Ni/Graphene Nanocomposite for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyu; Szpunar, Jerzy A; Cui, Xiaoyu

    2016-06-22

    We have designed a Ni-graphene composite for hydrogen storage with Ni nanoparticles of 10 nm in size, uniformly dispersed over a graphene substrate. This system exhibits attractive features like high gravimetric density, ambient conditions, and low activation temperature for hydrogen release. When charged at room temperature and an atmospheric hydrogen pressure of 1 bar, it could yield a hydrogen capacity of 0.14 wt %. When hydrogen pressure increased to 60 bar, the sorbent had a hydrogen gravimetric density of 1.18 wt %. The hydrogen release could occur at an operating temperature below 150 °C and completes at 250 °C.

  6. Hydrogen pellet injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Masahiro.

    1992-01-01

    In a hydrogen pellet injection device, a nozzle block having a hydrogen gas supply channel is disposed at the inner side of a main cryogenic housing, and an electric resistor is attached to the block. Further, a nozzle block and a hydrogen gas introduction pipe are attached by way of a thermal insulating spacer. Electric current is supplied to the resistor to positively heat the nozzle block and melt remaining solid hydrogen in the hydrogen gas supply channel. Further, the effect of temperature elevation due to the resistor is prevented from reaching the side of the hydrogen gas introduction pipe by the thermal insulation spacer. That is, the temperature of the nozzle block is directly and positively elevated, to melt the solid hydrogen rapidly. Preparation operation from the injection of the hydrogen pellet to the next injection can be completed in a shorter period of time compared with a conventional case thereby enabling to make the test more efficient. Further, only the temperature of the nozzle block is elevated with no effect of temperature elevation due to the resistor to other components by the thermal insulation flange. (N.H.)

  7. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  8. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-12

    A container is described for storage, shipping and and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same. The container is compact, safe against fracture or accident, and is reusable. It consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and is retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  9. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A container is described for storage, shipping and and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same. The container is compact, safe against fracture or accident, and is reusable. It consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and is retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates

  10. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  11. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby

    2010-01-01

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  12. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid has enhanced chemo-preventive properties compared to aspirin, is gastrointestinal safe with all the classic therapeutic indications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is chemopreventive; however, side effects preclude its long-term use. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel hybrid that releases nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide, was designed to be a safer alternative. Here we compare the gastrointestinal safety, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, anti-platelet, and chemopreventive properties of aspirin and NBS-1120 administered orally to rats at equimolar doses. Gastrointestinal safety: 6h post-administration, the number and size of hemorrhagic lesions in stomachs were counted; tissue samples were frozen for PGE2, SOD, and MDA determination. Anti-inflammatory: 1h after drug administration, the volume of carrageenan-induced rat paw edemas was measured for 5h. Anti-pyretic: fever was induced by LPS (ip) an hour before administration of the test drugs, core body temperature was measured hourly for 5h. Analgesic: time-dependent analgesic effects were evaluated by carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. Antiplatelet: anti-aggregatory effects were studied on collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma. Chemoprevention: Nude mice were gavaged daily for 25 days with vehicle, aspirin or NBS-1120. After one week, each mouse was inoculated subcutaneously in the right flank with HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Both agents reduced PGE2 levels in stomach tissue; however, NBS-1120 did not cause any stomach ulcers, whereas aspirin caused significant bleeding. Lipid peroxidation induced by aspirin was higher than that exerted by NBS-1120. SOD activity was significantly inhibited by aspirin but increased by NBS-1120. Both agents showed similar anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-pyretic, and anti-platelet activities. Aspirin increased plasma TNFα more than NBS-1120-treated animals. NBS-1120 was better than aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; it dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth and tumor mass. PMID:26394025

  13. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  14. Cost estimation of hydrogen and DME produced by nuclear heat utilization system II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2004-09-01

    Utilization and production of hydrogen has been studied in order to spread utilization of the hydrogen energy in 2020 or 2030. It will take, however, many years for the hydrogen energy to be used very easily like gasoline, diesel oil and city gas in the world. During the periods, low CO 2 release liquid fuels would be used together with hydrogen. Recently, di-methyl-ether (DME). has been noticed as one of the substitute liquid fuels of petroleum. Such liquid fuels can be produced from the mixed gas such as hydrogen and carbon oxide which are produced from natural gas by steam reforming. Therefore, the system would become one of the candidates of future system of nuclear heat utilization. Following the study in 2002, we performed economic evaluation of the hydrogen and DME production by nuclear heat utilization plant where heat generated by HTGR is completely consumed for the production. The results show that hydrogen price produced by nuclear was about 17% cheaper than the commercial price by increase in recovery rate of high purity hydrogen with increased in PSA process. Price of DME in indirect method produced by nuclear heat was also about 17% cheaper than the commercial price by producing high purity hydrogen in the DME producing process. As for the DME, since price of DME produced near oil land in petroleum exporting countries is cheaper than production in Japan, production of DME by nuclear heat in Japan has disadvantage economically in this time. Trial study to estimate DME price produced by direct method was performed. From the present estimation, utilization of nuclear heat for the production of hydrogen would be more effective with coupled consideration of reduction effect of CO 2 release. (author)

  15. A Single-Dose, Single-Period Pharmacokinetic Assessment of an Extended-Release Orally Disintegrating Tablet of Methylphenidate in Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Ann; Newcorn, Jeffrey; Stark, Jeffrey G; McMahen, Russ; Tengler, Mark; Sikes, Carolyn

    2016-08-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of a proprietary formulation of methylphenidate (MPH) in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a phase 1 study. Methylphenidate extended-release orally disintegrating tablets (MPH XR-ODTs) combine two technologies in a single-tablet formulation-an extended-release profile that was designed for once-daily dosing in an ODT that does not require water or chewing for ingestion. This was a single-dose, open-label, single-period, single-treatment study, in which 32 children with ADHD who were receiving MPH in doses of 40 or 60 mg before beginning the study each received a 60-mg dose (2 × 30 mg) of MPH XR-ODT. The following plasma PK parameters of MPH were determined for participants grouped by age (6-7, 8-9, 10-12, and 13-17 years old): maximum concentration (Cmax), time to maximum concentration (Tmax), elimination half-life (T½), area under the curve from 0 hours to infinity (AUCinf), oral clearance (CL/F), and volume of distribution in the terminal phase (Vz/F). Safety and tolerability were also assessed. A total of 32 participants received the study drug. For all participants, plasma concentration-time profiles of MPH exhibited a broad peak after administration of MPH XR-ODT through ∼8 hours, indicating extended release from the formulation, followed by an apparent first-order elimination phase. As age increased, MPH exposure decreased and mean estimates of CL/F increased; however, weight-normalized CL/F values were comparable across age groups. Similarly, mean estimates of Vz/F increased with age, but weight-normalization decreased differences across age groups, with the exception of the youngest age group, which had higher values. All adverse events (AEs) were mild. This XR-ODT formulation of MPH demonstrated weight-normalized clearance rates that were consistent across all age groups, a PK profile consistent with once-daily dosing, and an AE profile consistent with

  16. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  17. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  18. Recyclable hydrogen storage system composed of ammonia and alkali metal hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hikaru [Department of Quantum Matter, AdSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Miyaoka, Hiroki; Hino, Satoshi [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Nakanishi, Haruyuki [Higashi-Fuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Misyuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Ichikawa, Takayuki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu [Department of Quantum Matter, AdSM, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) reacts with alkali metal hydrides MH (M = Li, Na, and K) in an exothermic reaction to release hydrogen (H{sub 2}) at room temperature, resulting that alkali metal amides (MNH{sub 2}) which are formed as by-products. In this work, hydrogen desorption properties of these systems and the condition for the recycle from MNH{sub 2} back to MH were investigated systematically. For the hydrogen desorption reaction, the reactivities of MH with NH{sub 3} were better following the atomic number of M on the periodic table, Li < Na < K. It was confirmed that the hydrogen absorption reaction of all the systems proceeded under 0.5 MPa of H{sub 2} flow condition below 300 C. (author)

  19. Hybrid fiber gratings coated with a catalytic sensitive layer for hydrogen sensing in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Debliquy, Marc; Lahem, Driss; Megret, Patrice

    2008-10-13

    Using hydrogen as fuel presents a potential risk of explosion and requires low cost and efficient leak sensors. We present here a hybrid sensor configuration consisting of a long period fiber grating (LPFG) and a superimposed uniform fiber Bragg grating (FBG). Both gratings are covered with a sensitive layer made of WO(3) doped with Pt on which H(2) undergoes an exothermic reaction. The released heat increases the temperature around the gratings. In this configuration, the LPFG favors the exothermic reaction thanks to a light coupling to the sensitive layer while the FBG reflects the temperature change linked to the hydrogen concentration. Our sensor is very fast and suitable to detect low hydrogen concentrations in air whatever the relative humidity level and for temperatures down to -50 degrees C, which is without equivalent for other hydrogen optical sensors reported so far.

  20. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  1. First Principles Based Simulation of Reaction-Induced Phase Transition in Hydrogen Storage and Other Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Qingfeng [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    2014-08-31

    This major part of this proposal is simulating hydrogen interactions in the complex metal hydrides. Over the period of DOE BES support, key achievements include (i) Predicted TiAl3Hx as a precursor state for forming TiAl3 through analyzing the Ti-doped NaAlH4 and demonstrated its catalytic role for hydrogen release; (ii) Explored the possibility of forming similar complex structures with other 3d transition metals in NaAlH4 as well as the impact of such complex structures on hydrogen release/uptake; (iii) Demonstrated the role of TiAl3 in hydriding process; (iv) Predicted a new phase of NaAlH4 that links to Na3AlH6 using first-principles metadynamics; (v) Examined support effect on hydrogen release from supported/encapsulated NaAlH4; and (vi) Expanded research scope beyond hydrogen storage. The success of our research is documented by the peer-reviewed publications.

  2. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirscher, M; Becher, M

    2003-01-01

    The article gives a comprehensive overview of hydrogen storage in carbon nanostructures, including experimental results and theoretical calculations. Soon after the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991, different research groups succeeded in filling carbon nanotubes with some elements, and, therefore, the question arose of filling carbon nanotubes with hydrogen by possibly using new effects such as nano-capillarity. Subsequently, very promising experiments claiming high hydrogen storage capacities in different carbon nanostructures initiated enormous research activity. Hydrogen storage capacities have been reported that exceed the benchmark for automotive application of 6.5 wt% set by the U.S. Department of Energy. However, the experimental data obtained with different methods for various carbon nanostructures show an extreme scatter. Classical calculations based on physisorption of hydrogen molecules could not explain the high storage capacities measured at ambient temperature, and, assuming chemisorption of hydrogen atoms, hydrogen release requires temperatures too high for technical applications. Up to now, only a few calculations and experiments indicate the possibility of an intermediate binding energy. Recently, serious doubt has arisen in relation to several key experiments, causing considerable controversy. Furthermore, high hydrogen storage capacities measured for carbon nanofibers did not survive cross-checking in different laboratories. Therefore, in light of today's knowledge, it is becoming less likely that at moderate pressures around room temperature carbon nanostructures can store the amount of hydrogen required for automotive applications.

  3. Hydrogen distribution analysis for CANDU 6 containment using the GOTHIC containment analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.H.; Collins, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen may be generated in the reactor core by the zircaloy-steam reaction for a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenario with loss of emergency core cooling (ECC). It is important to predict hydrogen distribution within containment in order to determine if flammable mixtures exist. This information is required to determine the best locations in containment for the placement of mitigation devices such as igniters and recombiners. For large break loss coolant accidents, hydrogen is released after the break flow has subsided. Following this period of high discharge the flow in the containment building undergoes transition from forced flow to a buoyancy driven flow (particularly when local air coolers (LACS) are not credited). One-dimensional computer codes (lumped parameter) are applicable during the initial period when a high degree of mixing occurs due to the forced flow generated by the break. However, during the post-blowdown phase the assumption of homogeneity becomes less accurate, and it is necessary to employ three-dimensional codes to capture local effects. This is particularly important for purely buoyant flows which may exhibit stratification effects. In the present analysis a three-dimensional model of CANDU 6 containment was constructed with the GOTHIC computer code using a relatively coarse mesh adequate enough to capture the salient features of the flow during the blowdown and hydrogen release periods. A 3D grid representation was employed for that portion of containment in which the primary flow (LOCA and post-LOCA) was deemed to occur. The remainder of containment was represented by lumped nodes. The results of the analysis indicate that flammable concentrations exist for several minutes in the vicinity of the break and in the steam generator enclosure. This is due to the fact that the hydrogen released from the break is primarily directed upwards into the steam generator enclosure due to buoyancy effects. Once hydrogen production ends

  4. Detonation of hydrogen-air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.S.; Knystautas, R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The detonation of a hydrogen-air cloud subsequent to an accidental release of hydrogen into ambient surroundings cannot be totally ruled out in view of the relative sensitivity of the hydrogen-air system. The present paper investigates the key parameters involved in hydrogen-air detonations and attempts to establish quantitative correlations between those that have important practical implications. Thus, for example, the characteristic length scale lambda describing the cellular structure of a detonation front is measured for a broad range of hydrogen-air mixtures and is quantitatively correlated with the key dynamic detonation properties such as detonability, transmission and initiation

  5. Experiments for post accident hydrogen dispersion in F.M. vault using helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, S.S.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Mishra, S.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain postulated accident scenarios involving a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simultaneous with impairment of Emergency Core Cooling (ECC), generation of hydrogen due to reaction between the zirconium clad and coolant is predicted in the coolant channel. The hydrogen generated in the coolant channels would eventually get released either in Fuelling Machine (FM) vault or in the pump room atmosphere depending on the location of the break. Analytical studies carried out so far to estimate the time dependent hydrogen concentration in the accident FM Vault consider the entire vault as a single volume. Tests were, therefore, planned to assess the mixing within the FM vault atmosphere with and without the availability of cooling fan units by releasing a known quantity of helium (instead of hydrogen) at selected locations and monitoring the relative concentration of helium in air at various locations. Test was conducted by releasing about 360 1 helium over a period of to 4 minutes at preselected locations and by measuring the relative concentration (leak rates indicated by helium leak detectors) at various locations in the FM vault. The results of cases with fans operating indicate repeatable and consistent trends of good mixing in the vault. For other cases (non turbulent, still condition) the results are sensitive to various factors including orientation of release. The former set of cases (turbulent. fans operating) are more relevant for postulated accident conditions. (author). 1 tab., 18 figs

  6. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  7. Hydrogen application dynamics and networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E. [Air Liquide Large Industries, Champigny-sur-Marne (France)

    2010-12-30

    The Chemical Industry consumes large volumes of hydrogen as raw material for the manufacture of numerous products (e.g. polyamides and polyurethanes account for 60% of hydrogen demand). The hydrogen demand was in the recent past and will continue to be driven by the polyurethane family. China will host about 60% of new hydrogen needs over the period 2010-2015 becoming the first hydrogen market next year and reaching 25% of market share by 2015 (vs. only 4% in 2001). Air Liquide supplies large volumes of Hydrogen (and other Industrial Gases) to customers by on-site plants and through pipeline networks which offer significant benefits such as higher safety, reliability and flexibility of supply. Thanks to its long term strategy and heavy investment in large units and pipeline networks, Air Liquide is the Industrial Gas leader in most of the world class Petrochemical basins (Rotterdam, Antwerp, US Gulf Coast, Yosu, Caojing,..) (orig.)

  8. Novel developments in hydrogen storage, hydrogen activation and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroodian, Amir

    2010-12-03

    This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Recently, metal-free hydrogen activation using phosphorous compounds has been reported in science magazine. We have investigated the interaction between hydrogen and phosphorous compounds in presence of strong Lewis acids (chapter one). A new generation of metal-free hydrogen activation, using amines and strong Lewis acids with sterically demanding nature, was already developed in our group. Shortage of high storage capacity using large substitution to improve sterical effect led us to explore the amine borane derivatives, which are explained in chapter two. Due to the high storage capacity of hydrogen in aminoborane derivatives, we have explored these materials to extend hydrogen release. These compounds store hydrogen as proton and hydride on adjacent atoms or ions. These investigations resulted in developing hydrogen storage based on ionic liquids containing methyl guanidinium cation. Then we have continued to develop ionic liquids based on methyl guanidinium cation with different anions, such as tetrafluoro borate (chapter three). We have replaced these anions with transition metal anions to investigate hydrogen bonding and catalytic activity of ionic liquids. This chapter illustrates the world of ionic liquid as a green solvent for organic, inorganic and catalytic reactions and combines the concept of catalysts and solvents based on ionic liquids. The catalytic activity is investigated particularly with respect to the interaction with CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  9. Deciphering the "chemical" nature of the exotic isotopes of hydrogen by the MC-QTAIM analysis: the positively charged muon and the muonic helium as new members of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2014-04-14

    This report is a primarily survey on the chemical nature of some exotic species containing the positively charged muon and the muonic helium, i.e., the negatively charged muon plus helium nucleus, as exotic isotopes of hydrogen, using the newly developed multi-component quantum theory of atoms in molecules (MC-QTAIM) analysis, employing ab initio non-Born-Oppenhiemer wavefunctions. Accordingly, the "atoms in molecules" analysis performed on various asymmetric exotic isotopomers of the hydrogen molecule, recently detected experimentally [Science, 2011, 331, 448], demonstrates that both the exotic isotopes are capable of forming atoms in molecules and retaining the identity of hydrogen atoms. Various derived properties of atomic basins containing the muonic helium cast no doubt that apart from its short life time, it is a heavier isotope of hydrogen while the properties of basins containing the positively charged muon are more remote from those of the orthodox hydrogen basins, capable of appreciable donation of electrons as well as large charge polarization. However, with some tolerance, they may also be categorized as hydrogen basins though with a smaller electronegativity. All in all, the present study also clearly demonstrates that the MC-QTAIM analysis is an efficient approach to decipher the chemical nature of species containing exotic constituents, which are difficult to elucidate by experimental and/or alternative theoretical schemes.

  10. Nuclear hydrogen production and its safe handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Paek, Seungwoo; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Ahn, Do-Hee; Lee, Minsoo; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the hydrogen related research presently undertaken at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. These encompass nuclear hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and the safe handling of hydrogen, High temperature gas-cooled reactors can play a significant role, with respect to large-scale hydrogen production, if used as the provider of high temperature heat in fossil fuel conversion or thermochemical cycles. A variety of potential hydrogen production methods for high temperature gas-cooled reactors were analyzed. They are steam reforming of natural gas, thermochemical cycles, etc. The produced hydrogen should be stored safely. Titanium metal was tested primarily because its hydride has very low dissociation pressures at normal storage temperatures and a high capacity for hydrogen, it is easy to prepare and is non-reactive with air in the expected storage conditions. There could be a number of potential sources of hydrogen evolution risk in a nuclear hydrogen production facility. In order to reduce the deflagration detonation it is necessary to develop hydrogen control methods that are capable of dealing with the hydrogen release rate. A series of experiments were conducted to assess the catalytic recombination characteristics of hydrogen in an air stream using palladium catalysts. (author)

  11. The hydrogen issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  12. Hydrogen from Biomass for Urban Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, William

    2008-02-18

    The objective of this project was to develop a method, at the pilot scale, for the economical production of hydrogen from peanut shells. During the project period a pilot scale process, based on the bench scale process developed at NREL (National Renewable Energy Lab), was developed and successfully operated to produce hydrogen from peanut shells. The technoeconomic analysis of the process suggests that the production of hydrogen via this method is cost-competitive with conventional means of hydrogen production.

  13. Hydrogen transport in the containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.; Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.

    1995-01-01

    For the description of transport phenomena in water vapor/hydrogen mixtures released in nuclear meltdown accidents, an integrated analytical model is being developed for LWR containments. Thermal and mechanical loads due to recombination and combustion are to be calculable. The 3-dimensional GASFLOW code was taken over from LANL in exchange for HDR experimental results and Battelle BMC program results. (orig.)

  14. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  15. A prison mental health in-reach model informed by assertive community treatment principles: evaluation of its impact on planning during the pre-release period, community mental health service engagement and reoffending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Brian; Skipworth, Jeremy; Tapsell, Rees; Madell, Dominic; Pillai, Krishna; Simpson, Alexander; Cavney, James; Rouse, Paul

    2015-12-01

    It is well recognised that prisoners with serious mental illness (SMI) are at high risk of poor outcomes on return to the community. Early engagement with mental health services and other community agencies could provide the substrate for reducing risk. To evaluate the impact of implementing an assertive community treatment informed prison in-reach model of care (PMOC) on post-release engagement with community mental health services and on reoffending rates. One hundred and eighty prisoners with SMI released from four prisons in the year before implementation of the PMOC were compared with 170 such prisoners released the year after its implementation. The assertive prison model of care was associated with more pre-release contacts with community mental health services and contacts with some social care agencies in some prisons. There were significantly more post-release community mental health service engagements after implementation of this model (Z = -2.388, p = 0.02). There was a trend towards reduction in reoffending rates after release from some of the prisons (Z =1.82, p = 0.07). Assertive community treatment applied to prisoners with mental health problems was superior to 'treatment as usual', but more work is needed to ensure that agencies will engage prisoners in pre-release care. The fact that the model showed some benefits in the absence of any increase in resources suggests that it may be the model per se that is effective. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  17. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A container for the storage, shipping and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same which has compactness, which is safe against fracture or accident, and which is reusable is described. The container consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example, of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and will be retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates

  18. Pharmacokinetic comparison of sustained- and immediate-release oral formulations of cilostazol in healthy Korean subjects: a randomized, open-label, 3-part, sequential, 2-period, crossover, single-dose, food-effect, and multiple-dose study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghwan; Lim, Lay Ahyoung; Jang, Seong Bok; Lee, Yoon Jung; Chung, Jae Yong; Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Kiyoon; Park, Jin Woo; Yoon, Hosang; Lee, Jaeyong; Park, Min Soo; Park, Kyungsoo

    2011-12-01

    A sustained-release (SR) formulation of cilostazol was recently developed in Korea and was expected to yield a lower C(max) and a similar AUC to the immediate-release (IR) formulation. The goal of the present study was to compare the pharmacokinetic profiles of a newly developed SR formulation and an IR formulation of cilostazol after single- and multiple-dose administration and to evaluate the influence of food in healthy Korean subjects. This study was developed as part of a product development project at the request of the Korean regulatory agency. This was a randomized, 3-part, sequential, open-label, 2-period crossover study. Each part consisted of different subjects between the ages of 19 and 55 years. In part 1, each subject received a single dose of SR (200 mg × 1 tablet, once daily) and IR (100 mg × 2 tablets, BID) formulations of cilostazol orally 7 days apart in a fasted state. In part 2, each subject received a single dose of the SR (200 mg × 1 tablet, once daily) formulation of cilostazol 7 days apart in a fasted and a fed state. In part 3, each subject received multiple doses of the 2 formulations for 8 consecutive days 21 days apart. Blood samples were taken for 72 hours after the dose. Cilostazol pharmacokinetics were determined for both the parent drug and its metabolites (OPC-13015 and OPC-13213). Adverse events were evaluated through interviews and physical examinations. Among the 92 enrolled subjects (66 men, 26 women; part 1, n = 26; part 2, n = 26; part 3, n = 40), 87 completed the study. In part 1, all the primary pharmacokinetic parameters satisfied the criterion for assumed bioequivalence both in cilostazol and its metabolites, yielding 90% CI ratios of 0.9624 to 1.2323, 0.8873 to 1.1208, and 0.8919 to 1.1283 for C(max) and 0.8370 to 1.0134, 0.8204 to 0.9807, and 0.8134 to 0.9699 for AUC(0-last) of cilostazol, OPC-13015, and OPC-13213, respectively. In part 2, food intake increased C(max) and AUC significantly (P food and 23 with a high

  19. Viability analysis for use of hydrogen as fuel in logistics centers

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente Jul, María del Carmen; Fúnez Guerra, Carlos; Nieto Calderón, Beatriz; Jaén Caparros, María; Sendarrubias Carbonero, Vanessa; Reyes Bozo, Lorenzo; Godoy-faúndez, Álex; Vyhmeister, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    The electricity cost in battery logistic center is cheaper (access to electricity grid with three period contract) that green hydrogen cost in hydrogen logistic center (hydrogen production plant, hydrogen transport and hydrogen refueling station in logistic center). The investment cost of hydrogen logistic center is cheaper (hydrogen forklift) than battery logistic center (battery forklift, second battery, battery charger and batteries area). The operation and maintenance cost for hydrogen lo...

  20. 21 CFR 173.275 - Hydrogenated sperm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydrogenated sperm oil. 173.275 Section 173.275... CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.275 Hydrogenated sperm oil. The food additive hydrogenated sperm oil may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed...

  1. Microfabricated hydrogen sensitive membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, A.; Kraetz, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern (Germany); Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S.; Hessel, V. [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Faqir, N. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Bart, H.J.

    2009-01-15

    Thin, defect-free palladium, palladium/copper and palladium/silver hydrogen absorbing membranes were microfabricated. A dual sputtering technique was used to deposit the palladium alloy membranes of only 1 {mu}m thickness on a nonporous silicon substrate. Advanced silicon etching (ASE) was applied on the backside to create a mechanically stable support structure for the thin films. Performance evaluation was carried out for different gases in a temperature range of 20 C to 298 C at a constant differential pressure of 110 kPa at the two sides of the membrane. The composite membranes show an excellent permeation rate of hydrogen, which appears to be 0.05 Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} and 0.01.10{sup -3} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 20 C for the microfabricated 23 % silver and the 53 % copper composite membranes, respectively. The selectivity to hydrogen over a gas mixture containing, in addition to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen was measured. The mass spectrometer did not detect any CO{sub 2} or CO, showing that the membrane is completely hydrogen selective. The microfabricated membranes exhibit both high mechanical strength (they easily withstand pressures up to 4 bar) and high thermal stability (up to 650 C). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Prospects for hydrogen storage in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Valentina; Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2013-01-07

    Hydrogen-based fuel cells are promising solutions for the efficient and clean delivery of electricity. Since hydrogen is an energy carrier, a key step for the development of a reliable hydrogen-based technology requires solving the issue of storage and transport of hydrogen. Several proposals based on the design of advanced materials such as metal hydrides and carbon structures have been made to overcome the limitations of the conventional solution of compressing or liquefying hydrogen in tanks. Nevertheless none of these systems are currently offering the required performances in terms of hydrogen storage capacity and control of adsorption/desorption processes. Therefore the problem of hydrogen storage remains so far unsolved and it continues to represent a significant bottleneck to the advancement and proliferation of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Recently, however, several studies on graphene, the one-atom-thick membrane of carbon atoms packed in a honeycomb lattice, have highlighted the potentialities of this material for hydrogen storage and raise new hopes for the development of an efficient solid-state hydrogen storage device. Here we review on-going efforts and studies on functionalized and nanostructured graphene for hydrogen storage and suggest possible developments for efficient storage/release of hydrogen under ambient conditions.

  3. Development of a Practical Hydrogen Storage System Based on Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers and a Homogeneous Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States); Brayton, Daniel [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States); Jorgensen, Scott W. [General Motors, LLC, Warren, MI (United States). Research and Development Center. Chemical and Material Systems Lab.; Hou, Peter [General Motors, LLC, Warren, MI (United States). Research and Development Center. Chemical and Material Systems Lab.

    2017-03-24

    The objectives of this project were: 1) optimize a hydrogen storage media based on LOC/homogeneous pincer catalyst (carried out at Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC) and 2) develop space, mass and energy efficient tank and reactor system to house and release hydrogen from the media (carried out at General Motor Research Center).

  4. Interaction of hydrogen and its isotopes with irradiated beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Pomanenko, O.G.; Chikhraj, E.V.; Kenzhin, E.A.; Zverev, V.V.; Kolbanenkov, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    In the article the results of experiments on hydrogen and its isotopes accumulation and gas-release from irradiated beryllium are presented. The irradiation was conducted at different media and temperatures in the RA and IVG.1M reactors. The measurements were carried out by thermal desorption method. Hydrogen release from beryllium samples saturated at different conditions were calculated. Dependence of hydrogen confinement character in beryllium from grain orientation in the sample, temperature and irradiation rate was revealed

  5. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  6. Controlling hydrogen behavior in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullingford, H.S.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the aftermath of the incident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a new and different treatment of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) risks is needed for public safety because of the specific events involving hydrogen generation, transport, and behavior following the core damage. Hydrogen behavior in closed environments such as the TMI-2 containment building is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Hence, an engineering approach is presented for prevention of loss of life, equipment, and environment in case of a large hydrogen generation in an LWR. A six-level defense strategy is described that minimizes the possibility of ignition of released hydrogen gas and otherwise mitigates the consequences of hydrogen release. Guidance is given to reactor manufacturers, utility companies, regulatory agencies, and research organizations committed to reducing risk factors and insuring safety of life, equipment, and environment

  7. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, David H [Aptos, CA; Bonner, Brian P [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  8. Hydrogen production from biomass by biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharifan, H.R.; Qader, S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is seen as a future energy carrier, not involved in 'greenhouse' gas and its released energy in combustion can be converted to electric power. Biological system with low energy can produce hydrogen compared to electrochemical hydrogen production via solar battery-based water splitting which requires the use of solar batteries with high energy requirements. The biological hydrogen production occurs in microalgae and cyanobacteria by photosynthesis. They consume biochemical energy to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogen in some algae is an anaerobic production in the absence of light. In cyanobacteria the hydrogen production simultaneously happens with nitrogen fixation, and also catalyzed by nitrogenase as a side reaction. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic bacteria is mediated by nitrogenase activity, although hydrogenases may be active for both hydrogen production and hydrogen uptake under some conditions. Genetic studies on photosynthetic microorganisms have markedly increased in recent times, relatively few genetic engineering studies have focused on altering the characteristics of these microorganisms, particularly with respect to enhancing the hydrogen-producing capabilities of photosynthetic bacteria and cyanobacteria. (author)

  9. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  10. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  11. Production of hydrogen from by-products of food industries by rhodospirillaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reh, U.

    1983-11-01

    The decomposition of organic substances from food-by-products as whey, beet sugar molasses, cane-sugar-molasses and potato-water by the Rhodospirillaceae Rp. capsulata, Rp. acidophila, Rm. vannielii, Rs. rubrum, and Rs. tenue to hydrogen and carbon dioxide were tested. In a pre-cultivation Lactobacillus bulgaricus converted the sugars of the by-products into lactic acid, which is easier in handling. Rs. rubrum was superior in producing hydrogen from this nutrient. It released from whey up to 56% of the substrate hydrogen, from beet sugar molasses 42%, from cane-sugar-molasses 89% and from potato-water 19%. Out-door-researches were made to evaluate the decrease of hydrogen yield under the influence of weather as well as day and night periods compared to the homogeneous conditions of the laboratory. From 200 m/sup 3/ whey, the daily output of a dairy, 4000 m/sup 3/ hydrogen corresponding to an energy equivalent of 1000 l fuel oil could be produced. To achieve this, 130 000 m/sup 2/ have to be covered with batch fermenters. These results show, that there is nearly no hope to decompose food by-products by Rhodospirillaceae in large scale technology, unless a new processing technology using a flow-fermenter and raising the hydrogen production significantly will be found.

  12. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  13. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Aiken, SC; Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Wang, Jun [Columbia, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  14. Boron-Based Hydrogen Storage: Ternary Borides and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    DOE continues to seek reversible solid-state hydrogen materials with hydrogen densities of ≥11 wt% and ≥80 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at moderate temperatures (≤100 °C) and pressures (≤100 bar) enabling incorporation into hydrogen storage systems suitable for transportation applications. Boron-based hydrogen storage materials have the potential to meet the density requirements given boron’s low atomic weight, high chemical valance, and versatile chemistry. However, the rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based compounds are thus far much too slow for practical applications. Although contributing to the high hydrogen densities, the high valance of boron also leads to slow rates of hydrogen exchange due to extensive boron-boron atom rearrangements during hydrogen cycling. This rearrangement often leads to multiple solid phases occurring over hydrogen release and recharge cycles. These phases must nucleate and react with each other across solid-solid phase boundaries leading to energy barriers that slow the rates of hydrogen exchange. This project sought to overcome the slow rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based hydrogen storage materials by minimizing the number of solid phases and the boron atom rearrangement over a hydrogen release and recharge cycle. Two novel approaches were explored: 1) developing matched pairs of ternary borides and mixed-metal borohydrides that could exchange hydrogen with only one hydrogenated phase (the mixed-metal borohydride) and only one dehydrogenated phase (the ternary boride); and 2) developing boranes that could release hydrogen by being lithiated using lithium hydride with no boron-boron atom rearrangement.

  15. Controlling Hydrogenation of Graphene on Ir(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Andersen, Mie; Jørgensen, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    Combined fast X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations reveal the presence of two types of hydrogen adsorbate structures at the graphene/ Ir(111) interface, namely, graphane-like islands and hydrogen dimer structures. While the former give rise to a periodic...... pattern, dimers tend to destroy the periodicity. Our data reveal distinctive growth rates and stability of both types of structures, thereby allowing one to obtain well-defined patterns of hydrogen clusters. The ability to control and manipulate the formation and size of hydrogen structures on graphene...

  16. A Simple Decontamination Approach Using Hydrogen ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal article To evaluate the use of relatively low levels of hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) for the inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores within an indoor environment. Methods and Results: Laboratory-scale decontamination tests were conducted using bacterial spores of both B. anthracis Ames and Bacillus atrophaeus inoculated onto several types of materials. Pilot-scale tests were also conducted using a larger chamber furnished as an indoor office. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) humidifiers filled with aqueous solutions of 3% or 8% hydrogen peroxide were used to generate the HPV inside the mock office. The spores were exposed to the HPV for periods ranging from 8 hours up to one week. Conclusions: Four to seven day exposures to low levels of HPV (average air concentrations of approximately 5-10 parts per million) were effective in inactivating B. anthracis spores on multiple materials. The HPV can be generated with COTS humidifiers and household H2O2 solutions. With the exception of one test/material, B. atrophaeus spores were equally or more resistant to HPV inactivation compared to those from B. anthracis Ames. Significance and Impact of Study: This simple and effective decontamination method is another option that could be widely applied in the event of a B. anthracis spore release.

  17. Microalgal hydrogen production - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetkorn, Wanthanee; Rastogi, Rajesh P; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Lindblad, Peter; Madamwar, Datta; Pandey, Ashok; Larroche, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Bio-hydrogen from microalgae including cyanobacteria has attracted commercial awareness due to its potential as an alternative, reliable and renewable energy source. Photosynthetic hydrogen production from microalgae can be interesting and promising options for clean energy. Advances in hydrogen-fuel-cell technology may attest an eco-friendly way of biofuel production, since, the use of H 2 to generate electricity releases only water as a by-product. Progress in genetic/metabolic engineering may significantly enhance the photobiological hydrogen production from microalgae. Manipulation of competing metabolic pathways by modulating the certain key enzymes such as hydrogenase and nitrogenase may enhance the evolution of H 2 from photoautotrophic cells. Moreover, biological H 2 production at low operating costs is requisite for economic viability. Several photobioreactors have been developed for large-scale biomass and hydrogen production. This review highlights the recent technological progress, enzymes involved and genetic as well as metabolic engineering approaches towards sustainable hydrogen production from microalgae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.

    1982-03-01

    The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada is assessed for the period 1980 to 2025 for large-scale uses only. Present uses of hydrogen, and specifically electrolytic hydrogen, are discussed briefly and hydrogen production processes are summarized. Only hydrogen derived from natural gas, coal, or electrolysis of sater are considered. Cost estimates of electrolytic hydrogen are obtained from a parametric equation, comparing values for unipolar water elecctrklyser technologies with those for bipolar electrolysers. Both by-products of electrolytic hydrogen production, namely heavy water and oxygen, are evaluated. Electrolytic hydrogen, based on non-fossil primary energy sources, is also considered as ankther 'liquid fuel option' for Canada along with the alcohols. The market potential for hydrogen in general and electrolytic hydrogen is assessed. Results show that the market potential for electrolytic hydrogen is large by the year 2025

  19. Hydrogen behavior in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.; Cummings, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident resulted in the generation of an estimated 150 to 600 kg of hydrogen, some of which burned inside the containment building, causing a transient pressure rise of roughly 200 kPa (2 atm). With this accident as the immediate impetus and the improved safety of reactors as the long-term goal, the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research programs to study hydrogen behavior and control during accidents at nuclear plants. Several fundamental questions and issues arise when the hydrogen problem for light-water-reactor plants is examined. These relate to four aspects of the problem: hydrogen production; hydrogen transport, release, and mixing; hydrogen combustion; and prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion. Although much has been accomplished, some unknowns and uncertainties still remain, for example, the rate of hydrogen production during a degraded-core or molten-core accident, the rate of hydrogen mixing, the effect of geometrical structures and scale on combustion, flame speeds, combustion completeness, and mitigation-scheme effectiveness. This article discusses the nature and extent of the hydrogen problem, the progress that has been made, and the important unresolved questions

  20. Hydrogen Analyses in the EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worapittayaporn, S.; Eyink, J.; Movahed, M.

    2008-01-01

    In severe accidents with core melting large amounts of hydrogen may be released into the containment. The EPR provides a combustible gas control system to prevent hydrogen combustion modes with the potential to challenge the containment integrity due to excessive pressure and temperature loads. This paper outlines the approach for the verification of the effectiveness and efficiency of this system. Specifically, the justification is a multi-step approach. It involves the deployment of integral codes, lumped parameter containment codes and CFD codes and the use of the sigma criterion, which provides the link to the broad experimental data base for flame acceleration (FA) and deflagration to detonation transition (DDT). The procedure is illustrated with an example. The performed analyses show that hydrogen combustion at any time does not lead to pressure or temperature loads that threaten the containment integrity of the EPR. (authors)

  1. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  2. Research report of FY 1996 on development of new hydrogen energy demonstration technology. 2. Results in the extension period of FY 1996; 1996 nendo kenkyu hokokusho. Shinsuiso energy jissho gijutsu kaihatsu (1996 nendo kikan enchobun)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this project is to clarify the possibility of new hydrogen energy as a future energy source. The new hydrogen energy is obtained from the excess heat generation phenomenon through the electrolysis of heavy water using palladium metal as an electrode. The excess heat measurements were conducted through the excess heat confirmation tests using a fuel cell-type electrolytic cell up to November 1997. As a result, it was found that the excess heat measured by the calibration method can not be measured by the flow calorimetric method. In order to investigate the possibility of systematic errors of the both methods, the sensitivity, accuracy and responsibility, and the conditions of the excess heat generation, research activities based on new facts from scientific information and fundamental research supporting projects have been mainly performed. Among these, were performed the excess heat measurement tests by the cataphoresis method, absorption tests by the high-pressure and high-temperature charging method, gas plasma loading, in-situ X-ray detection, and reactant detection tests using Au/Pd/PdO heterogeneous structural body. 5 refs., 59 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Problem Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ovary syndrome. Read our information on PCOS for teens , and see your doctor if you think you may have PCOS. Major weight loss. Girls who have anorexia will often stop having periods. When to see ...

  4. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  5. Novel Methods of Hydrogen Leak Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpinder S Puri

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of the fuel cell technology and a drive for clean fuel, hydrogen gas is emerging as a leading candidate for the fuel of choice. For hydrogen to become a consumer fuel for automotive and domestic power generation, safety is paramount. It is, therefore, desired to have a method and system for hydrogen leak detection using odorant which can incorporate a uniform concentration of odorant in the hydrogen gas, when odorants are mixed in the hydrogen storage or delivery means. It is also desired to develop methods where the odorant is not added to the bulk hydrogen, keeping it free of the odorization additives. When odorants are not added to the hydrogen gas in the storage or delivery means, methods must be developed to incorporate odorant in the leaking gas so that leaks can be detected by small. Further, when odorants are not added to the stored hydrogen, it may also be desirable to observe leaks by sight by discoloration of the surface of the storage or transportation vessels. A series of novel solutions are proposed which address the issues raised above. These solutions are divided into three categories as follows: 1. Methods incorporating an odorant in the path of hydrogen leak as opposed to adding it to the hydrogen gas. 2. Methods where odorants are generated in-situ by chemical reaction with the leaking hydrogen 3. Methods of dispensing and storing odorants in high pressure hydrogen gas which release odorants to the gas at a uniform and predetermined rates. Use of one or more of the methods described here in conjunction with appropriate engineering solutions will assure the ultimate safety of hydrogen use as a commercial fuel. (authors)

  6. Hydrogen isotope inventory in the graphite divertor tiles of ASDEX Upgrade as measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Behrisch, R.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Schleussner, D.; Roesler, D.; Becker, J.; Knapp, W.; Edelmann, C.

    1997-01-01

    The hydrogen and deuterium inventories of the ASDEX Upgrade divertor tiles were measured after the experimental period from December 1994 to July 1995 by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) of samples cut out of the divertor tiles. The samples were heated by electron bombardment up to 2100 K; the released gases were measured by means of a calibrated quadrupole mass spectrometer. The measured hydrogen or deuterium inventories are of the order of 10 23 m -2 . They are larger for samples of the inner divertor than of the outer divertor by a factor of about 2. The largest inventory was found at the separatrix position of the inner divertor. Most of the released hydrogen (H) can be attributed to water adsorbed in the near surface region during the air exposure prior to the TDS measurements. The total inventories measured by TDS exceed the inventories in the near surface region (< 25 μm) measured by ion beam analysis methods by a factor of up to 10. Hence, the total hydrogen retention is governed by the diffusion out of the near surface region deep into the material. The hydrogen and deuterium inventories decreased with increasing surface temperature. (author). 64 refs, 12 figs, 2 tabs

  7. Measures for ensuring hydrogen fire and explosion safety for VVER-440/230

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezlepkin, V.; Semashko, S.; Svetlov, S.; Sidorov, V.; Ivkov, I.; Krylov, Yu.; Kukhtevich, V.

    2004-01-01

    integral release (as compared to a small leak accident). In the course of propagating the said accident, dangerous local concentrations of hydrogen may occur (with a possibility of rapid deflagration combustion) in the places which are closely located to the leakage. In this case, maximum volume of the boxes, where fast deflagration combustion may occur is commensurate with the volumes of main rooms. In case of 20 mm small primary leak and of a failure of the emergency makeup system, maximum emissions of hydrogen would be significantly lower than peak emissions during 500 mm large break accident, anyhow an integral release into the tight rooms would be drastically higher. Capacity of the hydrogen removal system has therefore been selected based on possible peak emissions of hydrogen, on the one hand, and a necessity of removing of huge amount of hydrogen within a long period of time, on the other. Avoidance of such combustion conditions whose loads may lead to a destruction of civil structures and of localizing safety systems has been the key criterion for selecting the locations and capacity of the recombiners. Analysis of various arrangements of recombiners allows to design the hydrogen removal system in such a way that the concentration of hydrogen in combination with aqueous steam and air would turn out to be lower than the concentration limits of fire propagation throughout the entire calculation range of changing the parameters of medium within the rooms during the accidents under review. The concentration monitoring system is built up so that operator would have representative information on the changes in the concentration of hydrogen within the tight rooms. Sensors are located in the places where hydrogen may very probably occur and such places have been determined based on the findings of calculation analysis. Thus, the measures aimed at removal and monitoring of hydrogen recommended on the basis of the presented calculation analyses are in full compliance with

  8. Release characteristics of tritium from high-purity lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kula, K.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Rates of tritium release from neutronirradiated lithium oxide were determined from isothermal release experiments. High-purity, monocrystalline lithium oxide was purged ex-reactor with helium and helium-hydrogen gas streams. Overall release was found to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion, and was predominantly in the form of condensible species. The result of an independent concentration profile analysis at 923 K was in agreement with the gas release diffusion coefficient. Sweeping the Li 2 O with hydrogen-containing gas was found to enhance tritium removal during the early stage of each run

  9. The hydrogen economy - an opportunity for gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederbaum, J.; Martin, G.; O'Neill, C.

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas could play a pivotal role in any transition to a hydrogen economy-that is one of the findings of the recently-released National Hydrogen Study, commissioned by the Commonwealth Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources, and undertaken by the consulting firms ACIL Tasman and Parsons Brinckerhoff. The key benefits of hydrogen include zero emissions at the point of combustion (water is the main by-product) and its abundance Hydrogen can be produced from a range of primary energy sources including gas and coal, or through the electrolysis of water. Depending on the process used to manufacture hydrogen (especially the extent to which any associated carbon can be captured and sequestered), life-cycle emissions associated with its production and use can be reduced or entirely eliminated

  10. Fission-product release during accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.; Cox, D.S.

    1991-09-01

    One of the aims when managing a reactor accident is to minimize the release of radioactive fission products. Release is dependent not only on the temperature, but also on the partial pressure of oxygen. Strongly oxidizing atmospheres, such as those that occurred during the Chernobyl accident, released semi-volatile elements like ruthenium, which has volatile oxides. At low temperatures, UO 2 oxidization to U 3 O 8 can result in extensive breakup of the fuel, resulting in the release of non-volatile fission products as aerosols. Under less oxidizing conditions, when hydrogen accumulates from the zirconium-water reaction, the resulting low oxygen partial pressure can significantly reduce these reactions. At TMI-2, only the noble gases and volatile fission products were released in significant quantities. A knowledge of the effect of atmosphere as well as temperature on the release of fission products from damaged reactor cores is therefore a useful, if not necessary, component of information required for accident management

  11. Hydrogen in semiconductors II

    CERN Document Server

    Nickel, Norbert H; Weber, Eicke R; Nickel, Norbert H

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise that this tradition ...

  12. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2011-01-01

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp3 C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehydrogenation that appears to involve a significant reconstruction and relaxation of the lattice. PMID:21282617

  13. Hydrogen: a clean energy for tomorrow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artero, V.; Guillet, N.; Fruchart, D.; Fontecave, M.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen has a strong energetic potential. In order to exploit this potential and transform this energy into electricity, two chemical reactions could be used which do not release any greenhouse effect gas: hydrogen can be produced by water electrolysis, and then hydrogen and oxygen can be combined to produce water and release heat and electricity. Hydrogen can therefore be used to store energy. In Norway, the exceeding electricity produced by wind turbines in thus stored in fuel cells, and the energy of which is used when the wind weakens. About ten dwellings are thus supplied with only renewable energy. Similar projects are being tested in Corsica and in the Reunion Island. The main challenges for this technology are its cost, its compactness and its durability. The article gives an overview of the various concepts, apparatus and systems involved in hydrogen and energy production. Some researches are inspired by bacteria which produce hydrogen with enzymes. The objective is to elaborate better catalysts. Another explored perspective is the storage of solid hydrogen

  14. Hydrogen Storage Performance in Pd/Graphene Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyu; Szpunar, Jerzy A

    2016-10-05

    We have developed a Pd-graphene nanocomposite for hydrogen storage. The spherically shaped Pd nanoparticles of 5-45 nm in size are homogeneously distributed over the graphene matrix. This new hydrogen storage system has favorable features like desirable hydrogen storage capacity, ambient conditions of hydrogen uptake, and low temperature of hydrogen release. At a hydrogen charging pressure of 50 bar, the material could yield a gravimetric density of 6.7 wt % in the 1% Pd/graphene nanocomposite. As we increased the applied pressure to 60 bar, the hydrogen uptake capacity reached 8.67 wt % in the 1% Pd/graphene nanocomposite and 7.16 wt % in the 5% Pd/graphene nanocomposite. This system allows storage of hydrogen in amounts that exceed the capacity of the gravimetric target announced by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. System design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truitt, R.W.; Pounds, T.S.; Smith, S.O.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the hardware subsystems of the data acquisition and control system (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste tank, directed at certain angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. The SY-101 tank has experienced recurrent periodic gas releases of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and (recently discovered) methane. The hydrogen gas represents a danger, as some of the releases are in amounts above the lower flammability limit (LFL). These large gas releases must be mitigated. Several instruments have been added to the tank to monitor the gas compositions, the tank level, the tank temperature, and other parameters. A mixer pump has been developed to stir the tank waste to cause the gases to be released at a slow rate. It is the function of the DACS to monitor those instruments and to control the mixer pump in a safe manner. During FY93 and FY94 the mixer pump was installed with associated testing operations support equipment and a mitigation test project plan was implemented. These activities successfully demonstrated the mixer pump's ability to mitigate the SY-101 tank hydrogen gas hazard

  16. Effects of External Hydrogen on Hydrogen Transportation and Distribution Around the Fatigue Crack Tip in Type 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyang; Zhou, Chengshuang; Cai, Xiao; Zheng, Jinyang; Zhang, Lin

    2017-10-01

    The effects of external hydrogen on hydrogen transportation and distribution around the fatigue crack tip in type 304 stainless steel were investigated by using hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and thermal desorption spectrometry. HMT results show that some silver particles induced by hydrogen release are located near the fatigue crack and more silver particles are concentrated around the crack tip, which indicates that hydrogen accumulates in the vicinity of the crack tip during the crack growth in hydrogen gas environment. Along with the crack propagation, strain-induced α' martensite forms around the crack tip and promotes hydrogen invasion into the matrix, which will cause the crack initiation and propagation at the austenite/ α' martensite interface. In addition, the hydrogen content in the vicinity of the crack tip is higher than that at the crack edge far away from the crack tip, which is related to the stress state and strain-induced α' martensite.

  17. Destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrisse, H; Dufour, L

    1929-01-21

    Oils of high boiling point, e.g. gas oil, lamp oil, schist oil, brown coal tar etc., are converted into motor benzine by heating them at 200 to 500/sup 0/C under pressure of 5 to 40 kilograms/cm/sup 2/ in the presence of ferrous chloride and gases such as hydrogen, or water gas, the desulfurization of the oils proceeding simultaneously. One kilogram of lamp oil and 100 g. ferrous chloride are heated in an autoclave in the presence of water gas under a pressure of 18 kg/cm/sup 2/ to 380 to 400/sup 0/C. The gaseous products are allowed to escape intermittently and are replaced by fresh water gas. A product distilling between 35 and 270/sup 0/C is obtained.

  18. DETERMINATION OF METAL IONS RELEASED BY STAINLESS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amounts of cobalt, iron, manganese, nickel and chromium ions released from new and reused stainless steel arch bar used for maxillomandibular fixation was determined in Hank's solutions of different hydrogen and chloride ions concentrations, whole blood serum and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in vitro, over a ...

  19. Tritium release reduction and radiolysis gas formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batifol, G.; Douche, Ch.; Sejournant, Ch. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2008-07-15

    At CEA Valduc, the usual tritiated waste container is the steel drum. It allows good release reduction performance for middle activity waste but in some cases tritium outgassing from the waste drums is too high. It was decided to over-package each drum in a tighter container called the over-drum. According to good safety practices it was also decided to measure gas composition evolution into the over-drum in order to defect hydrogen formation over time. After a few months, a significant release reduction was observed. Additionally there followed contamination reduction in the roof storage building rainwater. However hydrogen was also observed in some over-drums, in addition to other radiolysis products. Catalyst will be added to manage the hydrogen risk in the over-drums. (authors)

  20. Nanodiamond for hydrogen storage: temperature-dependent hydrogenation and charge-induced dehydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2012-02-21

    Carbon-based hydrogen storage materials are one of hottest research topics in materials science. Although the majority of studies focus on highly porous loosely bound systems, these systems have various limitations including use at elevated temperature. Here we propose, based on computer simulations, that diamond nanoparticles may provide a new promising high temperature candidate with a moderate storage capacity, but good potential for recyclability. The hydrogenation of nanodiamonds is found to be easily achieved, in agreement with experiments, though we find the stability of hydrogenation is dependent on the morphology of nanodiamonds and surrounding environment. Hydrogenation is thermodynamically favourable even at high temperature in pure hydrogen, ammonia, and methane gas reservoirs, whereas water vapour can help to reduce the energy barrier for desorption. The greatest challenge in using this material is the breaking of the strong covalent C-H bonds, and we have identified that the spontaneous release of atomic hydrogen may be achieved through charging of hydrogenated nanodiamonds. If the degree of induced charge is properly controlled, the integrity of the host nanodiamond is maintained, which indicates that an efficient and recyclable approach for hydrogen release may be possible. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. Simultaneous purification and storage of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Weber, R.; Carlson, E. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Specially coated magnesium particles have been shown to selectively absorb hydrogen from a hydrogen-rich gas stream such as reformate. These coated magnesium particles can store the absorbed hydrogen as required and subsequently deliver pure hydrogen, just as uncoated magnesium particles can. These coated magnesium particles could be used in a device that accepts a steady stream of reformate, as from a methane reformer, stores the selectively absorbed hydrogen indefinitely, and delivers purified hydrogen on demand. Unfortunately, this coating (magnesium nitride) has been shown to degrade over a period of several weeks, so that the magnesium within evidences progressively lower storage capacity. The authors are investigating two other coatings, one of which might be applicable to hydridable metals other than magnesium, to replace magnesium nitride.

  2. The evaluation of hydrogen peroxide bleaching of Gonometa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide bleaching on Gonometa postica silk and the influence that temperature, pH and time duration had on hydrogen peroxide release , colour change, breaking load and stiffness were determined. The best bleaching (81 delta E) of the Gonometa postica silk fabric was obtained with 60 minutes ...

  3. Preparing valuable hydrocarbons by hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M

    1930-08-22

    A process is described for the preparation of valuable hydrocarbons by treatment of carbonaceous materials, like coal, tars, minerals oils, and their distillation and conversion products, and for refining of liquid hydrocarbon mixture obtained at raised temperature and under pressure, preferably in the presence of catalysts, by the use of hydrogen-containing gases, purified and obtained by distilling solid combustibles, characterized by the purification of the hydrogen-containing gases being accomplished for the purpose of practically complete removal of the oxygen by heating at ordinary or higher pressure in the presence of a catalyst containing silver and oxides of metals of group VI of the periodic system.

  4. Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    An improvement in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor is provided wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release

  5. Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Terry R. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-04-01

    An improvement in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release.

  6. Calculation of LUEC using HEEP Software for Nuclear Hydrogen Production Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongho; Lee, Kiyoung; Kim, Minhwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To achieve the hydrogen economy, it is very important to produce a massive amount of hydrogen in a clean, safe and efficient way. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow massive production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding environments pollution by reducing the release of carbon dioxide. A Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is considered as an efficient reactor to couple with the thermo-chemical Sulfur Iodine (SI) cycle to achieve the hydrogen economy. HEEP(Hydrogen Economy Evaluation Program) is one of the software tools developed by IAEA to evaluate the economy of the nuclear hydrogen production system by estimating unit hydrogen production cost. In this paper, the LUHC (Levelized Unit Hydrogen Cost) is calculated by using HEEP for nuclear hydrogen production plant, which consists of 4 modules of 600 MWth VHTR coupled with SI process. The levelized unit hydrogen production cost(LUHC) was calculated by the HEEP software.

  7. Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sams, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    Long Abstract. Full Text. The purpose of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation (DSGRE-AE) is to evaluate the postulated hypothesis that a hydrogen GRE may occur in Hanford tanks containing waste sludges at levels greater than previously experienced. There is a need to understand gas retention and release hazards in sludge beds which are 200 -300 inches deep. These sludge beds are deeper than historical Hanford sludge waste beds, and are created when waste is retrieved from older single-shell tanks (SST) and transferred to newer double-shell tanks (DST).Retrieval of waste from SSTs reduces the risk to the environment from leakage or potential leakage of waste into the ground from these tanks. However, the possibility of an energetic event (flammable gas accident) in the retrieval receiver DST is worse than slow leakage. Lines of inquiry, therefore, are (1) can sludge waste be stored safely in deep beds; (2) can gas release events (GRE) be prevented by periodically degassing the sludge (e.g., mixer pump); or (3) does the retrieval strategy need to be altered to limit sludge bed height by retrieving into additional DSTs? The scope of this effort is to provide expert advice on whether or not to move forward with the generation of deep beds of sludge through retrieval of C-Farm tanks. Evaluation of possible mitigation methods (e.g., using mixer pumps to release gas, retrieving into an additional DST) are being evaluated by a second team and are not discussed in this report. While available data and engineering judgment indicate that increased gas retention (retained gas fraction) in DST sludge at depths resulting from the completion of SST 241-C Tank Farm retrievals is not expected and, even if gas releases were to occur, they would be small and local, a positive USQ was declared (Occurrence Report EM-RP--WRPS-TANKFARM-2012-0014, 'Potential Exists for a Large Spontaneous Gas Release Event in Deep Settled Waste Sludge'). The purpose of this technical

  8. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99 Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  9. Performance and emission characteristics of a turbocharged spark-ignition hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas engine under wide open throttle operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Fanhua; Wang, Mingyue; Jiang, Long; Deng, Jiao; Chen, Renzhe; Naeve, Nashay; Zhao, Shuli [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-11-15

    This paper investigates the effect of various hydrogen ratios in HCNG (hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas) fuels on performance and emission characteristics at wide open throttle operating conditions using a turbocharged spark-ignition natural gas engine. The experimental data was taken at hydrogen fractions of 0%, 30% and 55% by volume and was conducted under different excess air ratio ({lambda}) at MBT operating conditions. It is found that under various {lambda}, the addition of hydrogen can significantly reduce CO, CH{sub 4} emissions and the NO{sub x} emission remain at an acceptable level when ignition timing is optimized. Using the same excess air ratio, as more hydrogen is added the power, exhaust temperatures and max cylinder pressure decrease slowly until the mixture's lower heating value remains unchanged with the hydrogen enrichment, then they rise gradually. In addition, the early flame development period and the flame propagation duration are both shorter, and the indicated thermal efficiency and maximum heat release rate both increase with more hydrogen addition. (author)

  10. Safety issues of nuclear production of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piera, Mireia; Martinez-Val, Jose M.; Jose Montes, Ma

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is not an uncommon issue in Nuclear Safety analysis, particularly in relation to severe accidents. On the other hand, hydrogen is a household name in the chemical industry, particularly in oil refineries, and is also a well known chemical element currently produced by steam reforming of natural gas, and other methods (such as coal gasification). In the not-too-distant future, hydrogen will have to be produced (by chemical reduction of water) using renewable and nuclear energy sources. In particular, nuclear fission seems to offer the cheapest way to provide the primary energy in the medium-term. Safety principles are fundamental guidelines in the design, construction and operation both of hydrogen facilities and nuclear power plants. When these two technologies are integrated, a complete safety analysis must consider not only the safety practices of each industry, but any interaction that could be established between them. In particular, any accident involving a sudden energy release from one of the facilities can affect the other. Release of dangerous substances (chemicals, radiotoxic effluents) can also pose safety problems. Although nuclear-produced hydrogen facilities will need specific approaches and detailed analysis on their safety features, a preliminary approach is presented in this paper. No significant roadblocks are identified that could hamper the deployment of this new industry, but some of the hydrogen production methods will involve very demanding safety standards

  11. LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHULTZ, K.R.; BROWN, L.C.; BESENBRUCH, G.E.; HAMILTON, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 LARGE-SCALE PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN BY NUCLEAR ENERGY FOR THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY. The ''Hydrogen Economy'' will reduce petroleum imports and greenhouse gas emissions. However, current commercial hydrogen production processes use fossil fuels and releases carbon dioxide. Hydrogen produced from nuclear energy could avoid these concerns. The authors have recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-splitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen and to select one for further detailed consideration. The authors selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle, In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this paper

  12. Liberação de peróxido de hidrogênio por fagócitos de glândulas mamárias bovinas hígidas e infectadas Hydrogen peroxide release by phagocytes from healthy and infected bovine mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Alves Brasil

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a capacidade de liberação de peróxido de hidrogênio (H2O2 por fagócitos oriundos de glândulas mamárias bovinas sadias e infectadas. Desse modo, 73 amostras de leite provenientes das glândulas mamárias foram classificadas em sadias e infectadas de acordo com a cultura bacteriológica e a contagem de células somáticas (CCS. Após o isolamento das células do leite, procedeu-se à contagem diferencial de leucócitos e determinação da liberação de H2O2 pela oxidação da solução de vermelho fenol. Foi observada menor liberação de H2O2 pelos fagócitos oriundos dos quartos mamários infectados, assim como houve correlação negativa entre a liberação de H2O2 por fagócitos e a CCS (r=-0,34; P=0,0025, e a porcentagem de neutrófilos (r=-0,24; P=0,04. Além disso, houve tendência de menor liberação de H2O2 pelos fagócitos estimulados por forbol 12-miristato 13-acetato nas glândulas mamárias infectadas. Entretanto, observou-se maior liberação de H2O2 pelos fagócitos em 1mL de leite nos quartos mamários infectados, ao considerar a CCS mL-1. Pode-se concluir que fagócitos de quartos mamários infectados apresentaram menor liberação de H2O2, o que indica menor capacidade microbicida. Por outro lado, observou-se maior liberação de H2O2 pelos fagócitos em 1mL de leite nos quartos infectados, fato que pode contribuir com o maior recrutamento de leucócitos para a glândula mamária e/ou a persistência do processo inflamatório.The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 release by phagocytes from infected and uninfected mammary glands in dairy cows. Thus, milk samples from 73 quarters were divided in healthy and infected samples according to bacteriological culture and somatic cell count (SCC. After separation of milk cells, the samples were submitted to differential SCC and hydrogen peroxide release by oxidation of phenol red. There was a lower H2

  13. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  14. Status and integration of the gas generation studies performed for the Hydrogen Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

    1993-02-01

    Waste in Tank 241-SY-101 on the Hanford Site generates and periodically releases hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gases. Studies have been conducted at several laboratories to determine the chemical mechanisms for the gas generation and release. Results from these studies are presented and integrated in an attempt to describe current understanding of the physical properties of the waste and the mechanisms of gas generation and retention. Existing tank data are consistent with the interpretation that gases are uniformly generated in the tank, released continuously from the convecting layer, and stored in the nonconvecting layer. Tank temperature measurements suggest that the waste consists of ''gobs'' of material that reach neutral buoyancy at different times. The activation energy of the rate limiting step of the gas generating process was calculated to be about 7 kJ/mol but measured in the laboratory at 80 to 100 kJ/mol. Based on observed temperature changes in the tank the activation energy is probably not higher than about 20 kJ/mol. Several simulated waste compositions have been devised for use in laboratory studies in the place of actual waste from Tank 241-SY-101. Data from these studies can be used to predict how the actual waste might behave when heated or diluted. Density evaluations do not confirm that heating waste at the bottom of the tank would induce circulation within the waste; however, heating may release gas bubbles by dissolving the solids to which the bubbles adhere. Gas generation studies on simulated wastes indicated that nitrous oxide and hydrogen yields are not particularly coupled. Solubility studies of nitrous oxide, the most soluble of the principal gaseous products, indicate it is unlikely that dissolved gases contribute substantially to the quantity of gas released during periodic events

  15. Review of theoretical calculations of hydrogen storage in carbon-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meregalli, V.; Parrinello, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    In this paper we review the existing theoretical literature on hydrogen storage in single-walled nanotubes and carbon nanofibers. The reported calculations indicate a hydrogen uptake smaller than some of the more optimistic experimental results. Furthermore the calculations suggest that a variety of complex chemical processes could accompany hydrogen storage and release. (orig.)

  16. Process chemistry related to hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Matae; Ogata, Yukio

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes, that is, protium, deuterium and tritium, are all related deeply to energy in engineering region. Deuterium and tritium exist usually as water in extremely thin state. Accordingly, the improvement of the technology for separating these isotopes is a large engineering subject. Further, tritium is radioactive and its half-life period is 12.26 years, therefore, it is desirable to fix it in more stable form besides its confinement in the handling system. As the chemical forms of hydrogen, the molecular hydrogen with highest reactivity, metal hydride, carbon-hydrogen-halogen system compounds, various inorganic hydrides, most stable water and hydroxides are enumerated. The grasping of the behavior from reaction to stable state of these hydrogen compounds and the related materials is the base of process chemistry. The reaction of exchanging isotopes between water and hydrogen on solid catalyzers, the decomposition of ethane halide containing hydrogen, the behavior of water and hydroxides in silicates are reported. The isotope exchange between water and hydrogen is expected to be developed as the process of separating and concentrating hydrogen isotopes. (K.I.) 103 refs

  17. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper - Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Aasa [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Sandstroem, Rolf [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Div. of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lilja, Christina [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 {mu}m from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed.

  18. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper-Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinsson, Aasa; Sandstroem, Rolf; Lilja, Christina

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 μm from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed

  19. Hydrogen bonding-mediated dehydrogenation in the ammonia borane combined graphene oxide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Anlong; Liu, Taijuan; Kuang, Minquan; Yang, Ruifeng; Huang, Rui; Wang, Guangzhao; Yuan, Hongkuan; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xiaolan

    2018-03-01

    The dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) adsorbed on three different graphene oxide (GO) sheets is investigated within the ab initio density functional theory. The energy barriers to direct combination the hydrogens of hydroxyl groups and the hydridic hydrogens of AB to release H2 are relatively high, indicating that the process is energetically unfavorable. Our theoretical study demonstrates that the dehydrogenation mechanism of the AB-GO systems has undergone two critical steps, first, there is the formation of the hydrogen bond (O-H-O) between two hydroxyl groups, and then, the hydrogen bond further react with the hydridic hydrogens of AB to release H2 with low reaction barriers.

  20. Destruction of gel sulfonated cation-exchangers of the KU-2 type under the influence of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roginskaya, B.S.; Zavadovskaya, A.S.; Znamenskii, Yu.P.; Paskhina, N.A.; Dobrova, E.I.

    1988-10-20

    The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of interaction of Soviet sulfonated cation-exchangers of the KU-2 type with hydrogen peroxide. It is shown that under the influence of hydrogen peroxide sulfonated cation-exchangers begin, after a certain induction period, to lose capacity and to release destruction products into water; the length of the induction period increases with the degree of cross-linking. In a given time of contact between the resin and the solution the degree of destruction falls with increase of cross-linking. The principal product of destruction of sulfonated cation-exchangers is an aromatic sulfonic acid containing oxidized groups in the side chains.

  1. Thermodynamics and vibrational study of hydrogenated carbon nanotubes: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Rana M. Arif; Hussain, Fayyaz; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Imran, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Thermodynamic stability of the hydrogenated carbon nanotubes has been explored in the chemisorption limit. Statistical physics and density functional theory calculations have been used to predict hydrogen release temperatures at standard pressure in zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes. It is found that hydrogen release temperatures decrease with increase in diameters of hydrogenated zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) but opposite trend is noted in armchair CNTs at standard pressure of 1 bar. The smaller diameter hydrogenated zigzag CNTs have large values of hydrogen release temperature due to the stability of Csbnd H bonds. The vibrational density of states for hydrogenated carbon nanotubes have been calculated to confirm the Csbnd H stretching mode caused by sp3 hybridization.

  2. Tritium behavior intentionally released in the room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Iwai, Y.; Yamanishi, T.; Willms, R. S.; Carlson, R. V.

    2008-01-01

    To construct a fusion reactor with high safety and acceptability, it is necessary to establish and to ensure tritium safe handling technology. Tritium should be well-controlled not to be released to the environment excessively and to prevent workers from excess exposure. It is especially important to grasp tritium behavior in the final confinement area, such as the room and/or building. In order to obtain data for actual tritium behavior in a room and/or building, a series of intentional Tritium Release Experiments (TREs) were planned and carried out within a radiologically controlled area (main cell) at Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) in Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under US-JAPAN collaboration program. These experiments were carried out three times. In these experiments, influence of a difference in the tritium release point and the amount of hydrogen isotope for the initial tritium behavior in the room were suggested. Tritium was released into the main cell at TSTA/LANL. The released tritium reached a uniform concentration about 30 - 40 minutes in all the experiments. The influence of the release point and the amount of hydrogen isotope were not found to be important in these experiments. The experimental results for the initial tritium behavior in the room were also simulated well by the modified three-dimensional eddy flow analysis code FLOW-3D. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomsons, E.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005 the Latvian transport consumed 43 PJ, which makes up 23% of the total priMary resources used in the country. On the world scale this latter figure was 17.6% in 2003. On the 1st October of 2005 in Latvia 808.6 thous. of cars, 119.9 thous. of lorries, 10,7 thous. of buses and 27.1 thous. of motorcycles were registred. The annual growth in the number of light motor cars in the last years was 5.5% on the average. In 2005 the Latvian transport consumed 335 thous. tons of petrol and 542 thous. tons of diesel fuel, which makes up 87.4% of the total resources used (in terms of the combustion heat). In the period of 2002-2005 the annual growth of energy resources consumed by transport was 4.87% on the average. According to forecasts, in 2015 the transports of our country will spend 1.64 times more energy resources as compared with 2005. If the transport of 2015 uses hydrogen, then for Latvia 270 thous. tons of this product will be needed. To obtain 270 thous. tons of hydrogen from water using the up-to-date equipment for electrolysis a considerable amount of electric energy is required. Such amount can be produced by generating stations of the total capacity of 1680 MWe(net). This figure is close to that for the total installed capacity of electric energy production already existing in Latvia. (Author)

  4. Hydrogen for automotive applications and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, U. [Adam Opel GmbH, Ruesselsheim (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    The energy storage system is of decisive importance for all types of electric vehicles, in contrast to the case of vehicles powered by a conventional fossil fuel or bio-fuel based internal combustion engine. Two major alternatives exist and need to be discussed: on the one hand, there is the possibility of electrical energy storage using batteries, whilst on the other hand there is the storage of energy in chemical form as hydrogen and the application of a fuel cell as energy converter. Considering the latter concept, hydrogen is a promising energy carrier in future energy systems. However, storage of hydrogen is a substantial challenge, especially for applications in vehicles with fuel cells that use proton-exchange membranes (PEMs). Different methods for hydrogen storage are discussed, including high-pressure and cryogenic-liquid storage, adsorptive storage on high-surface-area adsorbents, chemical storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides, and storage in boranes. For the latter chemical solutions, reversible options and hydrolytic release of hydrogen with off-board regeneration are both possible. Reforming of liquid hydrogen-containing compounds is also a possible means of hydrogen generation. The advantages and disadvantages of the different systems are compared. (orig.)

  5. On severe accident hydrogen behaviour in Loviisa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okkonen, T.

    1996-02-01

    This study is related to the hydrogen management strategy of the Loviisa ice-condenser containments. A synthetic survey is conducted of the various parts of the subject by using compact 'back-of-the-envelope' analysis methods. The analysed cases are consistent with the principal hydrogen management approaches proposed by the utility Imatran Voima Oy (IVO). The study begins by introduction of the Loviisa plant features and various severe accident types. Hydrogen generation characteristics are analysed mainly for the core degradation phase, but the hydrogen sources from molten fuel-coolant interactions and reflooding of a degraded core are discussed, as well. The hydrogen generation and release rates are compared with the overall gas convection and mixing conditions in order to estimate hydrogen concentrations in the containment. The natural convection currents are examined also from the scaling point of view, concerning the scaled-down VICTORIA tests of IVO. Finally, the potential for large deflagration loadings or local detonations is examined for the Loviisa containments. The study is concluded by preliminary subjective judgments about the most critical factors of the Loviisa hydrogen problematics and about any issues that may require additional confirmative research. (orig.) (47 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.)

  6. Solid Aluminum Borohydrides for Prospective Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgaliuk, Iurii; Safin, Damir A; Tumanov, Nikolay A; Morelle, Fabrice; Moulai, Adel; Černý, Radovan; Łodziana, Zbigniew; Devillers, Michel; Filinchuk, Yaroslav

    2017-12-08

    Metal borohydrides are intensively researched as high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. Aluminum is a cheap, light, and abundant element and Al 3+ can serve as a template for reversible dehydrogenation. However, Al(BH 4 ) 3 , containing 16.9 wt % of hydrogen, has a low boiling point, is explosive on air and has poor storage stability. A new family of mixed-cation borohydrides M[Al(BH 4 ) 4 ], which are all solid under ambient conditions, show diverse thermal decomposition behaviors: Al(BH 4 ) 3 is released for M=Li + or Na + , whereas heavier derivatives evolve hydrogen and diborane. NH 4 [Al(BH 4 ) 4 ], containing both protic and hydridic hydrogen, has the lowest decomposition temperature of 35 °C and yields Al(BH 4 ) 3 ⋅NHBH and hydrogen. The decomposition temperatures, correlated with the cations' ionic potential, show that M[Al(BH 4 ) 4 ] species are in the most practical stability window. This family of solids, with convenient and versatile properties, puts aluminum borohydride chemistry in the mainstream of hydrogen storage research, for example, for the development of reactive hydride composites with increased hydrogen content. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. On severe accident hydrogen behaviour in Loviisa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T. [OTO-Consulting Ay, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-02-01

    This study is related to the hydrogen management strategy of the Loviisa ice-condenser containments. A synthetic survey is conducted of the various parts of the subject by using compact `back-of-the-envelope` analysis methods. The analysed cases are consistent with the principal hydrogen management approaches proposed by the utility Imatran Voima Oy (IVO). The study begins by introduction of the Loviisa plant features and various severe accident types. Hydrogen generation characteristics are analysed mainly for the core degradation phase, but the hydrogen sources from molten fuel-coolant interactions and reflooding of a degraded core are discussed, as well. The hydrogen generation and release rates are compared with the overall gas convection and mixing conditions in order to estimate hydrogen concentrations in the containment. The natural convection currents are examined also from the scaling point of view, concerning the scaled-down VICTORIA tests of IVO. Finally, the potential for large deflagration loadings or local detonations is examined for the Loviisa containments. The study is concluded by preliminary subjective judgments about the most critical factors of the Loviisa hydrogen problematics and about any issues that may require additional confirmative research. (orig.) (47 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs.).

  8. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  9. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  10. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  11. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  12. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  13. Novel Methods of Hydrogen Leak Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpinder S Puri

    2006-01-01

    For hydrogen to become a consumer fuel for automotive and domestic power generation, safety is paramount. Today's hydrogen systems are built with inherent safety measures and multiple levels of protection. However, human senses, in particular, the sense of smell, is considered the ultimate safeguards against leaks. Since hydrogen is an odorless gas, use of odorants to detect leaks, as is done in case of natural gas, is obvious solution. The odorants required for hydrogen used in fuel cells have a unique requirement which must be met. This is because almost all of the commercial odorants used in gas leak detection contain sulfur which acts as poison for the catalysts used in hydrogen based fuel cells, most specifically for the PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane or proton exchange membrane) fuel cells. A possible solution to this problem is to use non-sulfur containing odorants. Chemical compounds based on mixtures of acrylic acid and nitrogen compounds have been adopted to achieve a sulfur-free odorization of a gas. It is, therefore, desired to have a method and system for hydrogen leak detection using odorant which can incorporate a uniform concentration of odorant in the hydrogen gas, when odorants are mixed in the hydrogen storage or delivery means. It is also desired to develop methods where the odorant is not added to the bulk hydrogen, keeping it free of the odorization additives. A series of novel solutions are proposed which address the issues raised above. These solutions are divided into three categories as follows: 1. Methods incorporating an odorant in the path of hydrogen leak as opposed to adding it to the hydrogen gas. 2. Methods where odorants are generated in-situ by chemical reaction with the leaking hydrogen 3. Methods of dispensing and storing odorants in high pressure hydrogen gas which release odorants to the gas at a uniform and predetermined rates. Use of one or more of the methods described here in conjunction with appropriate engineering

  14. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available .J. Cartera,*, L.A. Cornishb aAdvanced Engineering & Testing Services, MATTEK, CSIR, Private Bag X28, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa bSchool of Process and Materials Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, P.O. WITS 2050, South Africa... are contrasted, and an unusual case study of hydrogen embrittlement of an alloy steel is presented. 7 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Hydrogen; Hydrogen-assisted cracking; Hydrogen damage; Hydrogen embrittlement 1. Introduction Hydrogen suC128...

  15. Hydrogen Car Cartridges: A New Strategy for Hydrogen Storage, Delivering and Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosini, Pier Paolo

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to introduce a sustainable model in the automotive field, guarantying the Kyoto agreements. The aim of the project is to develop an innovative hydrogen tank able to power an hydrogen fuel cell car with the same performance of liquid fuelled cars. Most of the system performance are expected to satisfy the Department of Energy (DOE) goals for 2015. The hydrogen releasing system is based on solid NaBH4 which is hydrolyzed with water or steam to obtain hydrogen. Sodium borate is obtained as by-product and it has to be recycled. Pure and humidified hydrogen, ready to be utilized in a fuel cell, is obtained by a simple and sure way. Hydrogen is produced only when it is requested and therefore there is never pressurized hydrogen or hydrogen overproduction The system works at atmospheric pressure avoiding the problems related to handling and storing pressurized gas. The car fuelling could be performed in area like the present service stations. The used cartridges can be removed and substituted by new cartridges. Contemporarily a water tank should be refilled. To improve the total energetic yield it was also proposed a NaBH4 regeneration process directly starting from the products of hydrolysis. (auth)

  16. Innovative hydrogen storage in hollow glass-microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keding, M.; Schmid, G.; Tajmar, M. [Austrian Research Centers, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen storage technologies are becoming increasingly important for a number of future applications. The Austrian Research Centers (ARC) are developing a unique hydrogen storage system that combines the advantages of both hollow glass microsphere and chemical compound hydrogen storage, but eliminates their respective drawbacks. Water is utilized as a functional liquid to carry the hollow glass microspheres that are loaded with up to 700 bar of hydrogen gas. Sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) is then injected together with the glass microspheres into a reaction chamber where the water reacts catalytically with the NaBH{sub 4} producing hydrogen and heat. The heat is then utilized to release the hydrogen from the hollow glass microspheres providing a double hydrogen generation process without any external energy or heat during storage or gas release. The paper described this hydrogen storage system with particular reference to microspheres, the coating process, the experimental facility and NaBH{sub 4} test results. It was concluded that hydrogen storage and production on demand is possible with microspheres and sodium borohydride solution. 9 refs., 16 figs.

  17. Preliminary Cost Estimates for Nuclear Hydrogen Production: HTSE System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    KAERI is now focusing on the research and development of the key technologies required for the design and realization of a nuclear hydrogen production system. As a preliminary study of cost estimates for nuclear hydrogen systems, the hydrogen production costs of the nuclear energy sources benchmarking GTMHR and PBMR are estimated in the necessary input data on a Korean specific basis. G4-ECONS was appropriately modified to calculate the cost for hydrogen production of HTSE (High Temperature Steam Electrolysis) process with VHTR (Very High Temperature nuclear Reactor) as a thermal energy source. The estimated costs presented in this paper show that hydrogen production by the VHTR could be competitive with current techniques of hydrogen production from fossil fuels if CO 2 capture and sequestration is required. Nuclear production of hydrogen would allow large-scale production of hydrogen at economic prices while avoiding the release of CO 2 . Nuclear production of hydrogen could thus become the enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. The major factors that would affect the cost of hydrogen were also discussed

  18. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  19. H2S release rate assessment guidelines and audit forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.; Wilson, T.; Long, R.; Shewan, K.; Nchkalo, H.; Nelson, R.; Morand, M.

    1998-01-01

    Development of a process to evaluate and calculate potential hydrogen sulfide release has been recommended by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers' Drilling and Completion Committee, and the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board. To facilitate the process, CAPP has released guidelines describing a methodology and standard for the industry to calculate the potential hydrogen sulfide release rates of a well, and a standardized format for the documentation and retention of data. The Guidelines describe a four-step process, with each step having an increasing degree of complexity. Step One describes the zone hydrogen sulfide exclusion area maps, defining when reporting is to be used (based on well location and distance from inhabited areas). Step Two provides details of the recommended method for determining hydrogen sulfide release through a data search process. Step Three consists of a series of instructions in the use of geologic analogs, data editing and wellbore design to further refine the cumulative hydrogen sulfide release rate. Step Four contains information designed to assist in detailed geological and reservoir modeling. It is not necessary to use all four steps in all cases. The user, however, is advised to use sound engineering judgement and due diligence in the calculation decisions. Sample calculations are provided for a variety of different situations. Measurement techniques are described in an appendix. A completed example of an audit form is attached. 10 + 6 refs., tabs

  20. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is mobile and can easily move through the material). Hydrogen diffuses ... The determination of the relationship of light-enhanced hydrogen motion to ... term is negligible, and using the thermodynamic relation given below f(c) = kBT .... device-applications problematic but the normal state can be recovered by a thermal an-.

  1. Hydrogen retention in carbon-tungsten co-deposition layer formed by hydrogen RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, K.; Kawasaki, T.; Manabe, Y.; Nagase, H.; Takeishi, T.; Nishikawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-tungsten co-deposition layers (C-W layers) were formed by sputtering method using hydrogen or deuterium RF plasma. The deposition rate of the C-W layer by deuterium plasma was faster than that by hydrogen plasma, where the increase of deposition rate of tungsten was larger than that of carbon. This indicates that the isotope effect on sputtering-depositing process for tungsten is larger than that for carbon. The release curve of hydrogen from the C-W layer showed two peaks at 400 deg. C and 700 deg. C. Comparing the hydrogen release from the carbon deposition layer and the tungsten deposition layer, it is considered that the increase of the release rate at 400 deg. C is affected by tungsten and that at 700 deg. C is affected by carbon. The obtained hydrogen retention in the C-W layers which have over 60 at.% of carbon was in the range between 0.45 and 0.16 as H/(C + W)

  2. NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David L Block; Ali T-Raissi

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the activities and results from 36 hydrogen research projects being conducted over a four-year period by Florida universities for the U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The program entitled 'NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities' is managed by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). FSEC has 22 years of experience in conducting research in areas related to hydrogen technologies and fuel cells. The R and D activities under this program cover technology areas related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. (authors)

  3. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  4. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  5. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  6. Hydrogen Storage Experiments for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course--Clean Energy: Hydrogen/Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Alla; Andrews, Lisa; Khot, Ameya; Rubin, Lea; Young, Jun; Allston, Thomas D.; Takacs, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    Global interest in both renewable energies and reduction in emission levels has placed increasing attention on hydrogen-based fuel cells that avoid harm to the environment by releasing only water as a byproduct. Therefore, there is a critical need for education and workforce development in clean energy technologies. A new undergraduate laboratory…

  7. Nuclear electrolytic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnstaple, A.G.; Petrella, A.J.

    1982-05-01

    An extensive study of hydrogen supply has recently been carried out by Ontario Hydro which indicates that electrolytic hydrogen produced from nuclear electricity could offer the lowest cost option for any future large scale hydrogen supply in the Province of Ontario, Canada. This paper provides a synopsis of the Ontario Hydro study, a brief overview of the economic factors supporting the study conclusion and discussion of a number of issues concerning the supply of electrolytic hydrogen by electric power utilities

  8. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  9. Hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzl, H.; Springer, T.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the alloys of metal crystals with hydrogen. The system niobium-hydrogen and its properties are especially dealt with: diffusion and heat of solution of hydrogen in the host crystal, phase diagram, coherent and incoherent phase separation, application of metal-hydrogen systems in technology. Furthermore, examples from research work in IFF (Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung) of the Nuclear Research Plant, Juelich, in the field of metal-H systems are given in summary form. (GSC) [de

  10. Hydrogen jet recombination under postulated LMFBR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierman, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Certain conditions may be postulated in LMFBR risk assessments for which the potential of hydrogen release to the reactor containment building needs to be evaluated. The inherent self-ignition characteristics of hydrogen jets entering the air atmosphere of the reactor containment building should be understood for such analyses. If hydrogen jets were to self-ignite (recombine) at the source where they enter the reactor containment building, then undesirable hydrogen accumulation would not occur. Therefore, experiments have been conducted investigating the phenomena associated with the recombination of hydrogen jets under conditions similar to those postulated for LMFBR studies. The data presented define the conditions required for self-ignition of the hydrogen jets

  11. Polyaniline as a material for hydrogen storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Nour F; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2013-07-12

    The main challenge of commercialization of the hydrogen economy is the lack of convenient and safe hydrogen storage materials, which can adsorb and release a significant amount of hydrogen at ambient conditions. Finding and designing suitable cost-effective materials are vital requirements to overcome the drawbacks of investigated materials. Because of its outstanding electronic, thermal, and chemical properties, the electrically conducting polyaniline (PANI) has a high potential in hydrogen storage applications. In this review, the progress in the use of different structures of conducting PANI, its nanocomposites as well as activated porous materials based on PANI as hydrogen storage materials is presented and discussed. The effect of the unique electronic properties based on the π-electron system in the backbone of these materials in view of the hydrogen uptake and the relevant mechanisms are highlighted. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Donor level of interstitial hydrogen in GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobaczewski, L.; Bonde Nielsen, K.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Peaker, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    The first data evidencing the existence of the donor level of the interstitial hydrogen in GaAs are presented. The abundant formation of the (0/+) donor level after in situ low-temperature implantation of hydrogen into the depletion layer of GaAs Schottky diodes has been observed and the activation energy and annealing properties have been determined by Laplace DLTS. The activation energy for electron emission of this donor state is 0.14eV. Above 100K the hydrogen deep donor state is unstable, converting to a more stable form when there are electrons available for the capture process. A slightly perturbed form of the hydrogen donor in its neutral charge state can be recovered by illuminating the sample. This process releases twice as many electrons as the ionisation process of the hydrogen donor state itself. This fact, by analogy with the silicon case, evidences the negative-U behaviour of hydrogen in GaAs

  13. Hydrogenation of passivated contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William; Yuan, Hao-Chih; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Pauls; Page, Matthew R.

    2018-03-06

    Methods of hydrogenation of passivated contacts using materials having hydrogen impurities are provided. An example method includes applying, to a passivated contact, a layer of a material, the material containing hydrogen impurities. The method further includes subsequently annealing the material and subsequently removing the material from the passivated contact.

  14. A Study on Methodology of Assessment for Hydrogen Explosion in Hydrogen Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gun Hyo

    2007-02-01

    Due to the exhaustion of fossil fuel as energy sources and international situation insecurity for political factor, unstability of world energy market is rising, consequently, a substitute energy development have been required. Among substitute energy to be discussed, producing hydrogen from water by nuclear energy which does not release carbon is a very promising technology. Very high temperature gas cooled reactor is expected to be utilized since the procedure of producing hydrogen requires high temperature over 1000 .deg. C. Hydrogen production facility using very high temperature gas cooled reactor lies in situation of high temperature and corrosion which makes hydrogen release easily. In case of hydrogen release, there lies a danger of explosion. Moreover explosion not only has a bad influence upon facility itself but very high temperature gas cooled reactor which also result in unsafe situation that might cause serious damage. However, from point of thermal-hydraulics view, long distance makes low efficiency result. In this study, therefore, outlines of hydrogen production using nuclear energy is researched. Several methods for analyzing the effects of hydrogen explosion upon high temperature gas cooled reactor are reviewed. Reliability physics model which is appropriate for assessment is used. Using this model, leakage probability, rupture probability and structure failure probability of very high temperature gas cooled reactor is evaluated classified by detonation volume and distance. Also based on standard safety criteria which is a value of 1x10 -6 , the safety distance between very high temperature and hydrogen production facility is calculated. In the future, assessment for characteristic of very high temperature gas cooled reactor, capacity to resist pressure from outside hydrogen explosion and overpressure for large amount of detonation volume in detail is expected to identify more precise distance using reliability physics model in this paper. This

  15. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  16. Solar Hydrogen Reaching Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongé Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly vast research efforts are devoted to the development of materials and processes for solar hydrogen production by light-driven dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen. Storage of solar energy in chemical bonds resolves the issues associated with the intermittent nature of sunlight, by decoupling energy generation and consumption. This paper investigates recent advances and prospects in solar hydrogen processes that are reaching market readiness. Future energy scenarios involving solar hydrogen are proposed and a case is made for systems producing hydrogen from water vapor present in air, supported by advanced modeling.

  17. Canada's hydrogen energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Canada produces the most hydrogen per capita of any Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country. The majority of this hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming for industrial use (predominantly oil upgrading and fertilizer production). Canada also has a world leading hydrogen and fuel cell sector. This sector is seeking new methods for making hydrogen for its future energy needs. The paper will discuss Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell sector in the context of its capabilities, its demonstration and commercialization activities and its stature on the world stage. (author)

  18. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  19. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors

  1. Metallic hydrogen: The most powerful rocket fuel yet to exist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvera, Isaac F [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Cole, John W, E-mail: silvera@physics.harvard.ed [NASA MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35801 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metastable metallic hydrogen to rocketry. Metastable metallic hydrogen would be a very light-weight, low volume, powerful rocket propellant. One of the characteristics of a propellant is its specific impulse, I{sub sp}. Liquid (molecular) hydrogen-oxygen used in modern rockets has an Isp of {approx}460s; metallic hydrogen has a theoretical I{sub sp} of 1700s. Detailed analysis shows that such a fuel would allow single-stage rockets to enter into orbit or carry economical payloads to the moon. If pure metallic hydrogen is used as a propellant, the reaction chamber temperature is calculated to be greater than 6000 K, too high for currently known rocket engine materials. By diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen or water, the reaction temperature can be reduced, yet there is still a significant performance improvement for the diluted mixture.

  2. Reversible Interconversion between 2,5-Dimethylpyrazine and 2,5-Dimethylpiperazine by Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation for Efficient Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Wada, Tomokatsu; Shiraishi, Takumi

    2017-08-28

    A new hydrogen storage system based on the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of nitrogen heterocyclic compounds, employing a single iridium catalyst, has been developed. Efficient hydrogen storage using relatively small amounts of solvent compared with previous systems was achieved by this new system. Reversible transformations between 2,5-dimethylpyrazine and 2,5-dimethylpiperazine, accompanied by the uptake and release of three equivalents of hydrogen, could be repeated almost quantitatively at least four times without any loss of efficiency. Furthermore, hydrogen storage under solvent-free conditions was also accomplished. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The effects of incubation period and temperature on the Hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    The times when H2S bottles take to turn black is dependent on the number of faecal bacteria, an indicator ... available portable kits that make it possible to carry out .... dilution Bottles (capacity 150 ml) were filled with 50 ml media ..... New York.

  4. Hydrogen concentration profiles and chemical bonding in silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.; Stein, H.J.; Doyle, B.L.; Picraux, S.T.

    1978-01-01

    The complementary technique of nuclear reaction analysis and infrared absorption were used to study the concentration profile and chemical bonding of hydrogen in silicon nitride for different preparation and annealing conditions. Silicon nitride prepared by chemical vapor deposition from ammonia-silane mixtures is shown to have hydrogen concentrations of 8.1 and 6.5 at.% for deposition temperatures of 750 and 900 0 C, respectively. Plasma deposition at 300 0 C from these gases results in hydrogen concentrations of approximately 22 at.%. Comparison of nuclear reaction analysis and infrared absorption measurements after isothermal annealing shows that all of the hydrogen retained in the films remains bonded to either silicon or nitrogen and that hydrogen release from the material on annealing is governed by various trap energies involving at least two N-H and one Si-H trap. Reasonable estimates of the hydrogen release rates can be made from the effective diffusion coefficient obtained from measurements of hydrogen migration in hydrogen implanted and annealed films

  5. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  6. GEWEX SRB Shortwave Release 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. J.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Mikovitz, J. C.; Zhang, T.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) project produces shortwave and longwave surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes for the 1983-near present time period. Spatial resolution is 1 degree. The new Release 4 uses the newly processed ISCCP HXS product as its primary input for cloud and radiance data. The ninefold increase in pixel number compared to the previous ISCCP DX allows finer gradations in cloud fraction in each grid box. It will also allow higher spatial resolutions (0.5 degree) in future releases. In addition to the input data improvements, several important algorithm improvements have been made since Release 3. These include recalculated atmospheric transmissivities and reflectivities yielding a less transmissive atmosphere. The calculations also include variable aerosol composition, allowing for the use of a detailed aerosol history from the Max Planck Institut Aerosol Climatology (MAC). Ocean albedo and snow/ice albedo are also improved from Release 3. Total solar irradiance is now variable, averaging 1361 Wm-2. Water vapor is taken from ISCCP's nnHIRS product. Results from GSW Release 4 are presented and analyzed. Early comparison to surface measurements show improved agreement.

  7. Hydrogen-powered lawn mower: 14 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvon, K.; Lorenzoni, J.-L.

    2006-01-01

    Our hydrogen-powered lawn mower [Yvon K, Lorenzoni J-L. Hydrogen powered lawn mower. Int J Hydrogen Energy 1993; 18, 345-48] has been operated without major interruption during the past 14 years. The commercial model was originally running on gasoline and was adapted to hydrogen by making small adjustments to the carburettor and by installing a hydrogen reservoir containing solid-state metal hydrides. During the evaluation period the only maintenance work was changing the lubricating oil of the engine once a year, and reactivating the metal hydride powder by external heating after an accidental inlet of air into the reservoir. There occurred no technical failure, and there was no safety incident, neither during operation nor during recharging of hydrogen. This demonstrates that a hydrogen-operated device of this type is mature for use by greater public. Cost and marketing issues are discussed. (author)

  8. The use of hydrogen for vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschka, W.

    1992-01-01

    While the currently utilized or other feasible hydrocarbon fuels release about the same amount of CO 2 during combustion per amount of heat produced, hydrogen represents the only practical, technically feasible, carbon free fuel. The state of the art technology of liquid hydrogen represents a suitable base for large scale demonstration projects now. Additional aims of more intense R and D work relate to internal mixture formation and improved engine roadability as well as utility vehicle application including trucks and buses. With respect to fuel costs there will be an increased demand in developing hydrogen production processes free from CO 2 emissions even from fossil energy sources such as crude oil or natural gas. (orig.) [de

  9. Hydrogen behavior in ice condenser containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstroem, P.; Hongisto, O. [Power Plant Lab., Helsinki (Finland); Theofanous, T.G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A new hydrogen management strategy is being developed for the Loviisa ice condenser containment. The strategy relies on containment-wide natural circulations that develop, once the ice condenser doors are forced open, to effectively produce a well-mixed behavior, and a correspondingly slow rise in hydrogen concentration. Levels can then be kept low by a distributed catalytic recombiner system, and (perhaps) an igniter system as a backup, while the associated energy releases can be effectively dissipated in the ice bed. Verification and fine-tuning of the approach is carried out experimentally in the VICTORIA facility and by associated scaling/modelling studies. VICTORIA represents an 1/15th scale model of the Loviisa containment, hydrogen is simulated by helium, and local concentration measurements are obtained by a newly developed instrument specifically for this purpose, called SPARTA. This paper is focused on experimental results from several key experiments that provide a first delineation of key behaviors.

  10. Metallic Hydrogen: A Game Changing Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to produce metallic hydrogen in the laboratory using an innovative approach, and to study its metastability properties. Current theoretical and experimental considerations expect that extremely high pressures of order 4-6 megabar are required to transform molecular hydrogen to the metallic phase. When metallic hydrogen is produced in the laboratory it will be extremely important to determine if it is metastable at modest temperatures, i.e. remains metallic when the pressure is released. Then it could be used as the most powerful chemical rocket fuel that exists and revolutionize rocketry, allowing single-stage rockets to enter orbit and chemically fueled rockets to explore our solar system.

  11. Hydrogen distribution studies relevant to CANDU containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.; Whitehouse, D.R.; Chan, C.K.; Jones, S.C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Following a loss of coolant accident with coincident loss of emergency core cooling, hydrogen may be produced in a CANDU reactor from the in-core Zircaloy-steam reaction, and released into containment. To meet the requirements for predicting containment hydrogen distribution, and to support measures for mitigation, a computer code GOTHIC is used. Simulations of gas mixing were performed using simple well defined experiments in a small-scale compartment, helium being substituted for hydrogen. At the time of the conference, results indicated that GOTHIC could quantitatively predict the stratified gas distribution resulting from buoyant gas injection near the bottom of an unobstructed compartment. When gas was injected near the top, GOTHIC underpredicted maximum gas concentration at the top, and overpredicted mixing. These errors arise from the finite-volume approximation. 2 refs., 11 figs

  12. Hydrogen - From hydrogen to energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    More than a century ago, Jules Verne wrote in 'The Mysterious Island' that water would one day be employed as fuel: 'Hydrogen and oxygen, which constitute it, used singly or together, will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light'. Today, the 'water motor' is not entirely the dream of a writer. Fiction is about to become fact thanks to hydrogen, which can be produced from water and when burned in air itself produces water. Hydrogen is now at the heart of international research. So why do we have such great expectations of hydrogen? 'Hydrogen as an energy system is now a major challenge, both scientifically and from an environmental and economic point of view'. Dominated as it is by fossil fuels (oil, gas and coal), our current energy system has left a dual threat hovering over our environment, exposing the planet to the exhaustion of its natural reserves and contributing to the greenhouse effect. If we want sustainable development for future generations, it is becoming necessary to diversify our methods of producing energy. Hydrogen is not, of course, a source of energy, because first it has to be produced. But it has the twofold advantage of being both inexhaustible and non-polluting. So in the future, it should have a very important role to play. (author)

  13. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  14. Period of an Interrupted Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bradley E.

    2002-11-01

    While demonstrating a classic conservation-of-energy problem to my AP Physics students, I became curious about the periodic motion that ensued for certain initial conditions. The original problem consists of releasing a mass at the end of a string from an initial position horizontal to the plane of a table. The string comes in contact with a peg some distance below the point where the string is attached at the top. One is asked to find what minimum fraction of the string's length should the peg be placed to have the mass complete a circle about the peg. However, when the mass is released from much lower heights, the system undergoes periodic motion that can be thought of as an interrupted pendulum.

  15. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods for extended-release parenteral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J

    2012-07-01

    This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in-vitro drug release testing of extended-release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in-situ depot-forming systems and implants. Extended-release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, 'real-time' in-vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in-vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in-vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended-release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in-vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended-release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in-vitro-in-vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable; however, for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Accelerated in vitro release testing methods for extended release parenteral dosage forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in vitro drug release testing of extended release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in situ depot-forming systems, and implants. Key findings Extended release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, “real-time” in vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Conclusions Accelerated in vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable, however for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. PMID:22686344

  17. Release and attenuation of fluorocarbons in landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    Several halocarbons with very high global warming and ozone depleting potentials have been used as blowing agent for insulation foam in refrigerators and freezers. Many appliances are shredded after the end of their useful life. Release experiments carried out in the laboratory on insulation foam...... blown with CFC-11, HCFC-141b, HFC- 134a, and HFC-245fa revealed that most of the blowing agent is not released to the atmosphere during a six-week period following the shredding process. The fraction which is released in the six-week period is highly dependent on how fine the foam is shredded....... The residual blowing agent remaining after the six-week period may be very slowly released if the integrity of the foam particles with respect to diffusional properties is kept after disposal of the foam waste in landfills. Laboratory experiments simulating attenuation processes in the landfilled waste...

  18. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  19. High density hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    The interest in the properties of very dense hydrogen is prompted by its abundance in Saturn and Jupiter and its importance in laser fusion studies. Furthermore, it has been proposed that the metallic form of hydrogen may be a superconductor at relatively high temperatures and/or exist in a metastable phase at ambient pressure. For ten years or more, laboratories have been developing the techniques to study hydrogen in the megabar region (1 megabar = 100 GPa). Three major approaches to study dense hydrogen experimentally have been used, static presses, shockwave compression, and magnetic compression. Static tchniques have crossed the megabar threshold in stiff materials but have not yet been convincingly successful in very compressible hydrogen. Single and double shockwave techniques have improved the precision of the pressure, volume, temperature Equation of State (EOS) of molecular hydrogen (deuterium) up to near 1 Mbar. Multiple shockwave and magnetic techniques have compressed hydrogen to several megabars and densities in the range of the metallic phase. The net result is that hydrogen becomes conducting at a pressure between 2 and 4 megabars. Hence, the possibility of making a significant amount of hydrogen into a metal in a static press remains a formidable challenge. The success of such experiments will hopefully answer the questions about hydrogen's metallic vs. conducting molecular phase, superconductivity, and metastability. 4 figures, 15 references

  20. The energy carrier hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen to be used as a clean fuel for the production of heat and power, as well as for the propulsion of aeroplanes and vehicles, is described, in particular for Germany. First, attention is paid to the application of hydrogen as a basic material for the (petro)chemical industry, as an indirect energy source for (petro)chemical processes, and as a direct energy source for several purposes. Than the importance of hydrogen as an energy carrier in a large-scale application of renewable energy sources is discussed. Next an overview is given of new and old hydrogen production techniques from fossil fuels, biomass, or the electrolysis of water. Energetic applications of hydrogen in the transportation sector and the production of electric power and heat are mentioned. Brief descriptions are given of techniques to store hydrogen safely. Finally attention is paid to hydrogen research in Germany. Two hydrogen projects, in which Germany participates, are briefly dealt with: the Euro-Quebec project (production of hydrogen by means of hydropower), and the HYSOLAR project (hydrogen production by means of solar energy). 18 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  1. Nuclear reaction analysis of hydrogen in amorphous silicon and silicon carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guivarc'h, A.; Le Contellec, M.; Richard, J.; Ligeon, E.; Fontenille, J.; Danielou, R.

    1980-01-01

    The 1 H( 11 B, α)αα nuclear reaction is used to determine the H content and the density of amorphous semiconductor Si 1 -sub(x)Csub(x)H 2 and SiHsub(z) thin films. Rutherford backscattering is used to determine the x values and infrared transmission to study the hydrogen bonds. We have observed a transfer or/and a release of hydrogen under bombardment by various ions and we show that this last effect must be taken into account for a correct determination of the hydrogen content. An attempt is made to correlate the hydrogen release with electronic and nuclear energy losses. (orig.)

  2. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  3. Development and characterization of controlled release polar lipid microparticles of candesartan cilexetil by solid dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakkannan, V; Puratchikody, A; Ramanathan, L

    2013-01-01

    Candesartan cilexetil (CC) is a newer class of angiotensin II receptor antagonist used for the treatment of hypertension. The solubility of the CC is very poor and its oral bioavailability is only 15%. The controlledrelease polar lipid microparticles of CC (formulations F1, F2, F3 and F4) were prepared using variable erodible lipophilic excipients like hydrogenated castor oil, stearic acid, cetostearyl alcohol and carnauba wax by fusion method. The particle sizes of polar lipid microparticles were less than 50 microns and they were irregular in shape. Drug content ranged between 98.96 ± 2.1 and 101.9 ± 1.6% were present in all the formulations. The formulation F3 showed better drug release throughout the study period in a controlled release manner. Moreover, the in vitro release showed that all the formulations were best fitted to Higuchi model. Accelerated stability studies indicated that there was no significant changes in the chemical and physical characteristics of the formulated drug product during initial and at the end of the study period. The FTIR and DSC studies showed that there was no interaction between the drug and lipophilic excipients and no polymorphic transitions in all formulations. The X-ray diffraction peak of solid dispersion indicated that the crystalline nature of CC disappeared and no new peaks could be observed, suggesting the absence of interaction between drug and excipients. PMID:24019822

  4. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  5. Theoretical Studies of Hydrogen Storage Alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-03-22

    Theoretical calculations were carried out to search for lightweight alloys that can be used to reversibly store hydrogen in mobile applications, such as automobiles. Our primary focus was on magnesium based alloys. While MgH{sub 2} is in many respects a promising hydrogen storage material, there are two serious problems which need to be solved in order to make it useful: (i) the binding energy of the hydrogen atoms in the hydride is too large, causing the release temperature to be too high, and (ii) the diffusion of hydrogen through the hydride is so slow that loading of hydrogen into the metal takes much too long. In the first year of the project, we found that the addition of ca. 15% of aluminum decreases the binding energy to the hydrogen to the target value of 0.25 eV which corresponds to release of 1 bar hydrogen gas at 100 degrees C. Also, the addition of ca. 15% of transition metal atoms, such as Ti or V, reduces the formation energy of interstitial H-atoms making the diffusion of H-atoms through the hydride more than ten orders of magnitude faster at room temperature. In the second year of the project, several calculations of alloys of magnesium with various other transition metals were carried out and systematic trends in stability, hydrogen binding energy and diffusivity established. Some calculations of ternary alloys and their hydrides were also carried out, for example of Mg{sub 6}AlTiH{sub 16}. It was found that the binding energy reduction due to the addition of aluminum and increased diffusivity due to the addition of a transition metal are both effective at the same time. This material would in principle work well for hydrogen storage but it is, unfortunately, unstable with respect to phase separation. A search was made for a ternary alloy of this type where both the alloy and the corresponding hydride are stable. Promising results were obtained by including Zn in the alloy.

  6. The Utilization of Solar Energy by Way of Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested to produce hydrogen gas by photolytic splitting of water, and to feed it into a hydrogen economy. One approach to obtain good yields in photolysis consist in the application of asymmetric membranes that release the different, reactive, primary products of the photochemical reaction on opposite sides of the membranes so that a back reaction is prevented. Through this solar-chemical option a very large part of the energy needs of mankind could be covered in the long run. (author)

  7. Hydrogen gains further momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2017-01-01

    As first industrial production projects should become a reality in the next few years, hydrogen as a source of energy will find important applications with mobility, which momentum is rapid and irresistible. Next steps will be the (large capacity) storage of hydrogen associated to power-to-gas systems and the generalization of renewable energies. This document presents 5 articles, which themes are: Description and explanation of the process of hydrogen production; Presentation of the H2V project for the construction, in Normandy, of the first operational industrial hydrogen production plant using electric power 100 pc generated by renewable energies; The conversion of electric power from renewable energies through hydrogen storage and fuel cells for buildings applications (Sylfen project); The development of a reversible fuel cell at Mines-Paris Tech University, that will be adapted to the storage of renewable electric power; Hydrogen as a lever for the development of zero-emission vehicles, from trucks to cars and bicycles

  8. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    . A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling......This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up...

  9. Hydrogen the fuel for 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, I.P.

    2009-01-01

    Non-Conventional Energy Sources, such as solar and hydrogen energy will remain available for infinite period. One of the reasons of great worry for all of us is reducing sources of conventional energies. The rate of fossil fuel consumption is higher than the rate of the fossil fuel production by the nature. The results will be the scarcity of automobile fuel in the world which will create lot of problems in transport sector. The other aspect is pollution added by these sources in our environment which increases with more use of these sources, resulting in the poor quality of life on this planet. There is constant search of alternate fuel to solve energy shortage which can provide us energy without pollution. Hence most frequently discussed source is hydrogen which when burnt in air produces a clean form of energy. In the last one decade hydrogen has attracted worldwide interest as a secondary energy carrier. This has generated comprehensive investigations on the technology involved and how to solve the problems of production, storage and transportation of hydrogen. The interest in hydrogen as energy of the future is due to it being a clean energy, most abundant element in the universe, the lightest fuel, richest in energy per unit mass and unlike electricity, it can be easily stored. Hydrogen gas is now considered to be the most promising fuel of the future. In future it will be used in various applications, e.g. it can generate Electricity, useful in cooking food, fuel for automobiles, hydrogen powered industries, Jet Planes, Hydrogen Village and for all our domestic energy requirements. Hydrogen as a fuel has already found applications in experimental cars and all the major car companies are in competition to build a commercial car and most probably they may market hydrogen fuel automobiles in near future but at a higher cost compared to gasoline cars but it is expected that with time the cost of hydrogen run cars will decrease with time. Long lasting, light and

  10. Fullerene hydride - A potential hydrogen storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nai Xing Wang; Jun Ping Zhang; An Guang Yu; Yun Xu Yang; Wu Wei Wang; Rui long Sheng; Jia Zhao

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen, as a clean, convenient, versatile fuel source, is considered to be an ideal energy carrier in the foreseeable future. Hydrogen storage must be solved in using of hydrogen energy. To date, much effort has been put into storage of hydrogen including physical storage via compression or liquefaction, chemical storage in hydrogen carriers, metal hydrides and gas-on-solid adsorption. But no one satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. C 60 H 36 , firstly synthesized by the method of the Birch reduction, was loaded with 4.8 wt% hydrogen indicating [60]fullerene might be as a potential hydrogen storage material. If a 100% conversion of C 60 H 36 is achieved, 18 moles of H 2 gas would be liberated from each mole of fullerene hydride. Pure C 60 H 36 is very stable below 500 C under nitrogen atmosphere and it releases hydrogen accompanying by other hydrocarbons under high temperature. But C 60 H 36 can be decomposed to generate H 2 under effective catalyst. We have reported that hydrogen can be produced catalytically from C 60 H 36 by Vasks's compound (IrCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ) under mild conditions. (RhCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ) having similar structure to (IrCl(CO)(PPh 3 ) 2 ), was also examined for thermal dehydrogenation of C 60 H 36 ; but it showed low catalytic activity. To search better catalyst, palladium carbon (Pd/C) and platinum carbon (Pt/C) catalysts, which were known for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds, were tried and good results were obtained. A very big peak of hydrogen appeared at δ=5.2 ppm in 1 H NMR spectrum based on Evans'work (fig 1) at 100 C over a Pd/C catalyst for 16 hours. It is shown that hydrogen can be produced from C 60 H 36 using a catalytic amount of Pd/C. Comparing with Pd/C, Pt/C catalyst showed lower activity. The high cost and limited availability of Vaska's compounds, Pd and Pt make it advantageous to develop less expensive catalysts for our process based on

  11. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology Validation The NREL technology validation team works on validating hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles; hydrogen fueling infrastructure; hydrogen system components; and fuel cell use in early market applications such as

  12. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  13. Hydrogen storage container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Feng, Zhili; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-07

    An apparatus and system is described for storing high-pressure fluids such as hydrogen. An inner tank and pre-stressed concrete pressure vessel share the structural and/or pressure load on the inner tank. The system and apparatus provide a high performance and low cost container while mitigating hydrogen embrittlement of the metal tank. System is useful for distributing hydrogen to a power grid or to a vehicle refueling station.

  14. Hydrogen meter prooftesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Mettler, G.W.

    1976-04-01

    Two diffusion type hydrogen meters have been tested on the Prototype Applications Loop (PAL). The ANL designed unit was used to monitor hydrogen in sodium during FFTF startup and over a wide range of hydrogen concentrations resulting from chemical additions to the sodium and cover gas. A commercially available meter was added and its performance compared with the ANL unit. Details of the test work are described

  15. Photochemical hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Both technical and economic factors affect the cost of producing hydrogen by photochemical processes. Technical factors include the efficiency and the capital and operating costs of the renewable hydrogen conversion system; economic factors include discount rates, economic life, credit for co-product oxygen, and the value of the energy produced. This paper presents technical and economic data for a system that generates on-peak electric power form photochemically produced hydrogen

  16. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Francesch, Judit

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional, or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of bat...

  17. Development of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria using hydrogen from radiolysis or metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, M.F.; Sellier, R.; Marty, V.; Camaro, S.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of many parameters need to be studied to characterize the long term behavior of nuclear waste in a deep repository. These parameters concern the chemical effects, radiolytic effects, mechanical properties, water composition, and microbiological activity. To evaluate microbial activity in such an environment, work was focused on an inventory of key nutrients (C, H, 0, N, P, S) and energy sources required for bacterial growth. The production of hydrogen in the nuclear waste environment leads to the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria, which modify the gas production balance. A deep repository containing bituminized waste drums implies several sources of hydrogen: - water radiolysis; -corrosion of metal containers; - radiolysis of the embedding matrix (bitumen). Two deep geological disposal conditions leading to H 2 production in a bituminized nuclear waste environment were simulated in the present study: - H 2 production by iron corrosion under anaerobic conditions was simulated by adding 10% of H 2 in the atmosphere; - H 2 production by radiolysis of bitumen matrix was approached by subjecting this material to external gamma irradiation with a dose rate near real conditions (6 Gy/h). The presence of dissolved H 2 in water allows the growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria leading to: - CO 2 and N 2 production; - H 2 consumption; - lower NO 3 - concentration caused by reduction to nitrogen. In the first case, hydrogen consumption is limited by the NO 3 - release rate from the bitumen matrix. In the second case, however, under gamma radiation at a low dose rate, hydrogen production is weak, and the hydrogen is completely consumed by microorganisms. Knowledge about these hydrogen oxidizing bacteria is just beginning to emerge. Heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria adapt well to hydrogen metabolism (autotrophic metabolism) by oxidizing H 2 instead of hydrocarbons. (authors)

  18. Pressure releasing device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Mika.

    1994-01-01

    In the present invention, dose rate to public caused by radioactive rare gases can be decreased. That is, a reactor container contains a reactor pressure vessel incorporating a reactor core. There are disposed a pressure releasing system for releasing the pressure in the reactor pressure vessel to the outside, and a burning device for burning gases released from the pressure releasing system. An exhaustion pipe is disposed to the pressure releasing system. A burning device is disposed to the exhaustion pipe. It is effective to dispose a ventilation port at a portion of the exhaustion pipe upstream of the burning device. In addition, the burning device may preferably be disposed in a multi-stage in the axial direction of the exhaustion pipe. With such procedures, hydrogen in gases discharged along with the release of the pressure in the container is burned. Buoyancy is caused to the exhaustion gases by heat energy upon burning. Since the exhaustion gases can reach a higher level by the buoyancy, the dose rate due to the rare gases can be reduced. (I.S.)

  19. In Situ Measurement of Local Hydrogen Production Rate by Bubble-Evolved Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen visibly bubbles during photocatalytic water splitting under illumination with above-bandgap radiation, which provides a direct measurement of local gas-evolving reaction rate. In this paper, optical microscopy of superfield depth was used for recording the hydrogen bubble growth on Cd0.5Zn0.5S photocatalyst in reaction liquid and illuminated with purple light. By analyzing change of hydrogen bubble size as a function of time, we understood that hydrogen bubble growth experienced two periods, which were inertia effect dominated period and diffusion effect dominated period, respectively. The tendency of hydrogen bubble growth was similar to that of the gas bubble in boiling, while the difference in bubble diameter and growth time magnitude was great. Meanwhile, we obtained the local hydrogen production rate on photocatalyst active site by measuring hydrogen bubble growth variation characteristics. This method makes it possible to confirm local actual hydrogen evolution rate quantitatively during photocatalytic water splitting.

  20. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  1. Hydrogen gas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    A differential thermocouple hydrogen gas detector has one thermocouple junction coated with an activated palladium or palladium-silver alloy catalytic material to allow heated hydrogen gas to react with the catalyst and raise the temperature of that junction. The other juction is covered with inert glass or epoxy resin, and does not experience a rise in temperature in the presence of hydrogen gas. A coil heater may be mounted around the thermocouple junctions to heat the hydrogen, or the gas may be passed through a heated block prior to exposing it to the thermocouples

  2. Sustainable hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  3. Purification of hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, U.

    1978-01-01

    A process is described for purifying a hydrogen sulfide gas stream containing carbon dioxide, comprising (a) passing the gas stream through a bed of solid hydrated lime to form calcium hydrosulfide and calcium carbonate and (b) regenerating hydrogen sulfide from said calcium hydrosulfide by reacting the calcium hydrosulfide with additional carbon dioxide. The process is especially applicable for use in a heavy water recovery process wherein deuterium is concentrated from a feed water containing carbon dioxide by absorption and stripping using hydrogen sulfide as a circulating medium, and the hydrogen sulfide absorbs a small quantity of carbon dioxide along with deuterium in each circulation

  4. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, G.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Brighigna, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen fueled vehicles may just be the answer to the air pollution problem in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives. This paper examines the feasibility of hydrogen as an automotive fuel by analyzing the following aspects: the chemical-physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems; current production technologies and commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. With reference to recent trial results being obtained in the USA, an assessment is also made of the feasibility of the use of methane-hydrogen mixtures as automotive fuels. The paper concludes with a review of progress being made by ENEA (the Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) in the development of fuel storage and electronic fuel injection systems for hydrogen powered vehicles

  5. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, D.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Sglavo, V.; ENEA, Rome

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the technical/economic feasibility of the use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel is made based on analyses of the following: the chemical- physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems - with water vapour injection, cryogenic injection, and the low or high pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the combustion chamber; the current commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. The paper concludes that, considering current costs for hydrogen fuel production, distribution and use, at present, the employment of hydrogen fuelled vehicles is feasible only in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives

  6. Palladium Nanoparticle Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pavlovsky

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An innovative hydrogen sensor based on palladium (Pd nanoparticle networks is described in the article. Made by Applied Nanotech Inc. sensor has a fast response time, in the range of seconds, which is increased at 80 °C due to higher hydrogen diffusion rates into the palladium lattice. The low detection limit of the sensor is 10 ppm of H2, and the high limit is 40,000 ppm. This is 100% of a lowest flammability level of hydrogen. This range of sensitivities complies with the requirements that one would expect for a reliable hydrogen sensor.

  7. Atomic hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massip de Turville, C.M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods are discussed of generating heat in an atomic hydrogen reactor which involve; the production of atomic hydrogen by an electrical discharge, the capture of nascent neutrons from atomic hydrogen in a number of surrounding steel alloy tubes having a high manganese content to produce 56 Mn, the irradiation of atomic hydrogen by the high energy antineutrinos from the beta decay of 56 Mn to yield nascent neutrons, and the removal of the heat generated by the capture of nascent neutrons by 55 Mn and the beta decay of 56 Mn. (U.K.)

  8. Minimum period and the gap in periods of Cataclysmic binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paczynski, B.; Sienkiewicz, R.

    1983-01-01

    The 81 minute cutoff to the orbital periods of hydrogen-rich cataclysmic binaries is consistent with evolution of those systems being dominated by angular momentum losses due to gravitational radiation. Unfortunately, many uncertainties, mainly poorly known atmospheric opacities below 2000 K, make is physically impossible to verify the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation by using the observed cutoff at 81 minutes. The upper boundary of the gap in orbital periods observed at about 3 hours is almost certainly due to enhanced angular momentum losses from cataclysmic binaries which have longer periods. The physical mechanism of those losses is not identified, but a possible importance of stellar winds is pointed out. The lower boundary of the gap may be explained with the oldest cataclysmic binaries, whose periods evolved past the minimum at 81 minutes and reached the value of 2 hours within about 12 x 10 9 years after the binary had formed. Those binaries should have secondary components of only 0.02 solar masses, and their periods could be used to estimate ages of the oldest cataclysmic stars, and presumably the age of Galaxy. An alternative explanation for the gap requires that binaries should be detached while crossing the gap. A possible mechanism for this phenomenon is discussed. It requires the secondary components to be about 0.2 solar masses in the binaries just below the gap

  9. On problems of hydrogen load of sponge palladium and determination of hydrogen content in it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittag, E.; Pleis, U.; Roemer, J.

    1977-01-01

    In the process of catalytic dehalogenation applied as a method for preparation of organic compounds labelled with tritium a special importance pertains to the determination of hydrogen (or tritium) bound on the catalyst. Hydrogen contained in palladium black may be determined quantitatively by oxidation with Pd ++ ions and successive potentiometric titration of the released H + ions. The method permits to obtain data on the quality of the catalyst and on the gas losses on the catalyst. Moreover, in connection with the radioactivity measurement, this method may be used for specific activity determination of the tritium gas

  10. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T [Ann Arbor, MI; Li, Yingwel [Ann Arbor, MI; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  11. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the

  12. Determination of the hydrogen content of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, M.; Petriu, F.; Toma, V.

    1995-01-01

    A new method and apparatus are reported for determination of the total hydrogen content by measurements on as-manufactured fuel elements, heated at prescribed temperature values between 200 degrees C and 600 degrees C. The method is based on the catalytic oxidation of the organic compounds and transformation of the hydrogen in the equivalent water quantity which is analysed by a special infrared detector. Different types of measurements for determination of the hydrogen content from graphite coating, UO 2 pellets and filling gas are presented. Also, experimental observation regarding water release and graphite thermal decomposition kinetic are discussed. (author)

  13. Multiscale study on hydrogen mobility in metallic fusion divertor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinola, K.

    2010-01-01

    For achieving efficient fusion energy production, the plasma-facing wall materials of the fusion reactor should ensure long time operation. In the next step fusion device, ITER, the first wall region facing the highest heat and particle load, i.e. the divertor area, will mainly consist of tiles based on tungsten. During the reactor operation, the tungsten material is slowly but inevitably saturated with tritium. Tritium is the relatively short-lived hydrogen isotope used in the fusion reaction. The amount of tritium retained in the wall materials should be minimized and its recycling back to the plasma must be unrestrained, otherwise it cannot be used for fueling the plasma. A very expensive and thus economically not viable solution is to replace the first walls quite often. A better solution is to heat the walls to temperatures where tritium is released. Unfortunately, the exact mechanisms of hydrogen release in tungsten are not known. In this thesis both experimental and computational methods have been used for studying the release and retention of hydrogen in tungsten. The experimental work consists of hydrogen implantations into pure polycrystalline tungsten, the determination of the hydrogen concentrations using ion beam analyses (IBA) and monitoring the out-diffused hydrogen gas with thermodesorption spectrometry (TDS) as the tungsten samples are heated at elevated temperatures. Combining IBA methods with TDS, the retained amount of hydrogen is obtained as well as the temperatures needed for the hydrogen release. With computational methods the hydrogen-defect interactions and implantation-induced irradiation damage can be examined at the atomic level. The method of multiscale modelling combines the results obtained from computational methodologies applicable at different length and time scales. Electron density functional theory calculations were used for determining the energetics of the elementary processes of hydrogen in tungsten, such as diffusivity and

  14. Disestablishing Sex: The Case for Released-Time Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzer, Perry L.

    2011-01-01

    Allowing nonschool organizations to provide sex education in a released-time format would disestablish state-funded sex education and give families a choice in the sex education that would be provided for their children. Released-time programs, as originally conceived and currently practiced, allow students to be released for a period of time…

  15. Periodic table as a powerful tool for radiation education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aratani, Michi; Osanai, Yuko; Uchiumi, Fumiko; Tsushima, Kazuko; Kamayachi, Tei; Kudo, Michiko

    2005-01-01

    The periodic tables ordinarily start with an element of atomic number 1, hydrogen. Hydrogen atoms, however, are derived from neutrons by way of β decay. Consequently, neutron should be located at a zero position of atomic number, which corresponds to the left side and above helium. A periodic table, especially with the zero position for neutron, is essential from present view of matter and serves as a powerful tool for radiation education. (author)

  16. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindin, S. G.; Roberts, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst

  17. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  18. Theoretical study of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alyson C M; Pavão, A C

    2018-05-04

    Adsorption, absorption and desorption energies and other properties of hydrogen storage in palladium and in the metal hydrides AlH 3 , MgH 2 , Mg(BH 4 ) 2 , Mg(BH 4 )(NH 2 ) and LiNH 2 were analyzed. The DFT calculations on cluster models show that, at a low concentration, the hydrogen atom remains adsorbed in a stable state near the palladium surface. By increasing the hydrogen concentration, the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites are sequentially occupied. In the α phase the tetrahedral site releases hydrogen more easily than at the octahedral sites, but the opposite occurs in the β phase. Among the hydrides, Mg(BH 4 ) 2 shows the highest values for both absorption and desorption energies. The absorption energy of LiNH 2 is higher than that of the palladium, but its desorption energy is too high, a recurrent problem of the materials that have been considered for hydrogen storage. The release of hydrogen, however, can be favored by using transition metals in the material structure, as demonstrated here by doping MgH 2 with 3d and 4d-transition metals to reduce the hydrogen atomic charge and the desorption energy.

  19. The developments of international hydrogen and fuel cell technology standards and the response strategies in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso, C.

    2009-01-01

    The application of hydrogen and fuel cells has expanded as the technology in international markets has improved. Leading countries have focused on establishing hydrogen and fuel cell technology standards. Both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) continuously release new hydrogen and fuel cell related standards. Although the government of Taiwan is promoting the development of a hydrogen and fuel cell industry, it may delay the commercialized schedule if there are no hydrogen and fuel cell related standards and regulations in place. Standards and regulations must be established as quickly as possible in order to accelerate the progress of the hydrogen and fuel cell industry. This presentation reviewed the international progress in hydrogen and fuel cell development and explained Taiwan's response strategies regarding the adoption of hydrogen and fuel cell products in niche Taiwanese markets

  20. Mitigation of hydrogen hazards in water cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    Past considerations of hydrogen generated in containment buildings have tended to focus attention on design basis accidents (DBAs) where the extent of the in-core metal-water reaction is limited at low values by the operation of the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS). The radiolysis of water in the core and in the containment sump, together with the possible corrosion of metals and paints in the containment, are all relatively slow processes. Therefore, in DBAs the time scale involved for the generation of hydrogen allows sufficient time for initiation of measures to control the amount of hydrogen in the containment atmosphere and to prevent any burning. Provisions have been made in most plants to keep the local hydrogen concentration below its flammability limit (4% of volume) by means of mixing devices and thermal recombiners. Severe accidents, involving large scale core degradation and possibly even core concrete interactions, raise the possibility of hydrogen release rates greatly exceeding the capacity of conventional DBA hydrogen control measures. The accident at Three Mile Island illustrated the potential of unmitigated hydrogen accumulation to escalate the potential consequences of a severe accident. In a severe accident scenario, local high hydrogen concentrations can be reached in a short time, leading to flammable gas mixtures in containment. Another possibility is that local high steam concentrations will initially create an inert atmosphere and prevent burning for a limited time. While such temporary inerting provides additional time for mixing (dilution) of the hydrogen with containment air, depending on the quantity of hydrogen released, it prevents early intervention by deliberate ignition and sets up conditions for more severe combustion hazards after steam condensation eventually occurs, e.g., by spray initiation or the long term cooling down of the containment atmosphere. As the foregoing example indicates, analysis of the hydrogen threat in

  1. Hydrogen storage in sonicated carbon materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirscher, M.; Becher, M.; Haluska, M.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.; Quintel, A.; Duesberg, G.S.; Choi, Y.J.; Downes, P.; Hulman, M.; Roth, S.; Stepanek, I.; Bernier, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen storage in purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), graphite and diamond powder was investigated at room temperature and ambient pressure. The samples were sonicated in 5 M HNO3 for various periods of time using an ultrasonic probe of the alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The goal of this

  2. Hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the hydrogen and fuel cells. It presents the hydrogen technology from the production to the distribution and storage, the issues as motor fuel and fuel cells, the challenge for vehicles applications and the Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  3. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH 1 ) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon

  4. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  5. Dark hydrogen fermentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The production of hydrogen is a ubiquitous, natural phenomenon under anoxic or anaerobic conditions. A wide variety of bacteria, in swamps, sewage, hot springs, the rumen of cattle etc. is able to convert organic matter to hydrogen, CO2 and metabolites like acetic acid, lactate, ethanol and alanine.

  6. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  7. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  8. Hydrogen from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Vrije, de G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is generally regarded as the energy carrier of the future. The development of a process for hydrogen production from biomass complies with the policy of the Dutch government to obtain more renewable energy from biomass. This report describes the progress of the BWP II project, phase 2 of

  9. Modelling vesicular release at hippocampal synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhita Nadkarni

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We study local calcium dynamics leading to a vesicle fusion in a stochastic, and spatially explicit, biophysical model of the CA3-CA1 presynaptic bouton. The kinetic model for vesicle release has two calcium sensors, a sensor for fast synchronous release that lasts a few tens of milliseconds and a separate sensor for slow asynchronous release that lasts a few hundred milliseconds. A wide range of data can be accounted for consistently only when a refractory period lasting a few milliseconds between releases is included. The inclusion of a second sensor for asynchronous release with a slow unbinding site, and thereby a long memory, affects short-term plasticity by facilitating release. Our simulations also reveal a third time scale of vesicle release that is correlated with the stimulus and is distinct from the fast and the slow releases. In these detailed Monte Carlo simulations all three time scales of vesicle release are insensitive to the spatial details of the synaptic ultrastructure. Furthermore, our simulations allow us to identify features of synaptic transmission that are universal and those that are modulated by structure.

  10. Hydrogen Bearing Material in the Lunar Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, D.; Benna, M.; Colaprete, A.; Retherford, K. D.; Cook, J. C.; Elphic, R. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Killen, R. M.; Sarantos, M.

    2015-12-01

    We report on observations of water and its daughters in the lunar exosphere. Data from LADEE NMS, LADEE UVS, and LRO LAMP indicating the presence of H, H2, OH, and H2O are presented in terms of their relationship to external drivers. These observations point to the roles of solar wind and micrometeoroids in the source and release of hydrogen-bearing atoms and molecules in the exosphere. In particular, the implantation of H via solar wind is found to be the largest contributor to H2 in the moon's exosphere. However, the spatial distribution is more consistent with a release mechanism centered on the morning hemisphere. Thus the data are consistent with H2 created through a 2-step process involving the implantation of solar wind and subsequent release by micrometeoroids. This accounts for >12% of the solar wind H budget, leaving day water cycle occurring on the Moon.

  11. Liquid hydrogen properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. I.; Han, K. Y.; Park, J.H.

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the input data, whose characteristic is thermodynamic and transport, in the form of equation for the thermo-hydraulic calculations using hydrogen as a working substance. The considered data in this report are particularly focused on the properties of para-hydrogen and of equilibrium-hydrogen around the working temperature range of the HANARO-CNS. The discussed properties of hydrogen are, in turn, the pressure of saturated vapors, the density, the heat of vaporization, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and heat capacity. Several equations to fit the above-mentioned experimental data allow calculating the various properties of liquid hydrogen with high accuracy at all considered temperatures

  12. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  13. Hydrogen production methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.

    1982-07-01

    Old, present and new proceses for producing hydrogen are assessed critically. The emphasis throughout is placed on those processes which could be commercially viable before the turn of the century for large-scale hydrogen manufacture. Electrolysis of water is the only industrial process not dependent on fossil resources for large-scale hydrogen production and is likely to remain so for the next two or three decades. While many new processes, including those utilizing sunlight directly or indirectly, are presently not considered to be commercially viable for large-scale hydrogen production, research and development effort is needed to enhance our understanding of the nature of these processes. Water vapour electrolysis is compared with thermochemical processes: the former has the potential for displacing all other processes for producing hydrogen and oxygen from water

  14. Hydrogen storage using borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard BONNETOT; Laetitia LAVERSENNE

    2006-01-01

    The possibilities of hydrogen storage using borohydrides are presented and discussed specially in regard of the recoverable hydrogen amount and related to the recovering conditions. A rapid analysis of storage possibilities is proposed taking in account the two main ways for hydrogen evolution: the dehydrogenation obtained through thermal decomposition or the hydrolysis of solids or solutions. The recoverable hydrogen is related to the dehydrogenation conditions and the real hydrogen useful percentage is determined for each case of use. The high temperature required for dehydrogenation even when using catalyzed compounds lead to poor outlooks for this storage way. The hydrolysis conditions direct the chemical yield of the water consuming, and this must be related to the experimental conditions which rule the storage capacity of the 'fuel' derived from the borohydride. (authors)

  15. Benchmarking the internal combustion engine and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    The internal combustion engine is a cost-effective and highly reliable energy conversion technology. Exhaust emission regulations introduced in the 1970's triggered extensive research and development that has significantly improved in-use fuel efficiency and dramatically reduced exhaust emissions. The current level of gasoline vehicle engine development is highlighted and representative emissions and efficiency data are presented as benchmarks. The use of hydrogen fueling for IC engines has been investigated over many decades and the benefits and challenges arising are well-known. The current state of hydrogen-fueled engine development will be reviewed and evaluated against gasoline-fueled benchmarks. The prospects for further improvements to hydrogen-fueled IC engines will be examined. While fuel cells are projected to offer greater energy efficiency than IC engines and zero emissions, the availability of fuel cells in quantity at reasonable cost is a barrier to their widespread adaptation for the near future. In their current state of development, hydrogen fueled IC engines are an effective technology to create demand for hydrogen fueling infrastructure until fuel cells become available in commercial quantities. During this transition period, hydrogen fueled IC engines can achieve PZEV/ULSLEV emissions. (author)

  16. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch; the reaction mixture also comprising an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; (b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and (c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture. 8 figs.

  17. Investigation of Local Hydrogen Risk in the RDT Compartment of OPR1000 under SBO Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam Kyung; Jeon, Joon Goo; Choi, Won Jun; Song, Kyu Sang; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Kim, Sung Joong

    2016-01-01

    As TMI-2 and Fukushima accidents revealed, a high concentration of hydrogen in a nuclear power plant (NPP) could cause hydrogen combustion. In order to take follow-up measures, an average and local hydrogen concentration in the NPP containment are regulated below 0.1 using hydrogen mitigation system such as igniter and/or passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR). During a severe accident, some compartments of the NPP containment temporarily may show peaks of the local hydrogen concentration over 0.1 depending on the geometry of the containment structure and hydrogen transportation path. For example, the compartment of a reactor drain tank (RDT) is connected to the pressurizer nozzle and if the relieved pressure drives the significant amount of steam and hydrogen, then substantial peaks of the hydrogen concentration can occur. Before the RPV failure under SBO scenario, the RDT compartment was the main region for hydrogen release due to the RDT break. Therefore, confirming the local hydrogen risk in the RDT compartment is very important to verify the integrity of the NPP containment. In this study, the local hydrogen risk in the RDT compartment of OPR1000 under SBO scenario was evaluated using MELCOR 1.8.6 code in terms of the hydrogen volume fraction and the Shapiro diagram. (1) The RDT compartment showed the peaks of the hydrogen volume fraction over 0.1. As a future work, the local hydrogen risk of the compartment of a steam generator (SG) needs to be analyzed under SBLOCA scenario. Because the SG compartment is also a main region of hydrogen release under SBLOCA scenario. In the long run, the analysis for the detailed hydrogen distribution, based on detailed modeling of the whole OPR1000 containment, needs to be performed.

  18. Vancomycin–chitosan composite deposited on post porous hydroxyapatite coated Ti6Al4V implant for drug controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chi-Chuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing, University 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chien-Chung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing, University 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Taichung Armed Force General Hospital, 348, Sec. 2, Jhongshan Road, Taiping City, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Liao, Jiunn-Wang [Graduate Institute of Veterinary Pathobiology, National Chung Hsing, University 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Yen, Shiow-Kang, E-mail: skyen@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing, University 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2013-05-01

    Through the hydrogen bonds and the deprotonation, the vancomycin–chitosan composite has been originally deposited on Ti4Al4V by electrochemical technology. However, the rapid destruction of the hydrogen bonding between them by polar water molecules during immersion tests revealed 80% drug burst in a few hours. In this study, the post porous hydroxyapatite (HA) coated Ti4Al4V is prepared for the subsequent electrolytic deposition of vancomycin–chitosan composite to control the drug release. As expected, the initial burst is reduced to 55%, followed by a steady release about 20% from day 1 to day 5 and a slower release of the retained 25% after day 6, resulting in bacterial inhibition zone diameter of 30 mm which can last for more than a month in antibacterial tests, compared with the coated specimen without HA gradually loosing inhibition zone after 21 days. Besides, the cell culture indicates that the vancomycin–chitosan/HA composite coated has enhanced the proliferation, the differentiation and the mineralization of the osteoblast-like cell. In general, it is helpful for the osteointegration on permanent implants. Consistently, it effectively provides the prophylaxis and therapy of osteomyelitis according to the results of the rabbit infection animal model. - Highlights: ► The releasing curve of the vancomycin–chitosan/HA composite revealed three periods. ► The drug release sustained one month due to the effect of post porous HA coating. ► The composite coating could treat the osteomyelitis in the rabbit infection model.

  19. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F. Hua

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944])

  20. Hydrogen Generation From Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Cohen; Stephen Porter; Oscar Chow; David Henderson

    2009-03-06

    Small-scale (100-500 kg H2/day) electrolysis is an important step in increasing the use of hydrogen as fuel. Until there is a large population of hydrogen fueled vehicles, the smaller production systems will be the most cost-effective. Performing conceptual designs and analyses in this size range enables identification of issues and/or opportunities for improvement in approach on the path to 1500 kg H2/day and larger systems. The objectives of this program are to establish the possible pathways to cost effective larger Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis systems and to identify areas where future research and development efforts have the opportunity for the greatest impact in terms of capital cost reduction and efficiency improvements. System design and analysis was conducted to determine the overall electrolysis system component architecture and develop a life cycle cost estimate. A design trade study identified subsystem components and configurations based on the trade-offs between system efficiency, cost and lifetime. Laboratory testing of components was conducted to optimize performance and decrease cost, and this data was used as input to modeling of system performance and cost. PEM electrolysis has historically been burdened by high capital costs and lower efficiency than required for large-scale hydrogen production. This was known going into the program and solutions to these issues were the focus of the work. The program provided insights to significant cost reduction and efficiency improvement opportunities for PEM electrolysis. The work performed revealed many improvement ideas that when utilized together can make significant progress towards the technical and cost targets of the DOE program. The cell stack capital cost requires reduction to approximately 25% of today’s technology. The pathway to achieve this is through part count reduction, use of thinner membranes, and catalyst loading reduction. Large-scale power supplies are available

  1. Process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas and catalyst assembly therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bithermal, catalytic, hydrogen isotope exchange process between liquid water and hydrogen gas to effect concentration of the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is described. Liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted with one another and with at least one catalytically active metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table; the catalyst body has a water repellent, gas and water vapor permeable, organic polymer or resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone resin coating, so that the isotope exchange takes place by two simultaneously occurring, and closely coupled in space, steps and concentration is effected by operating two interconnected sections containing catalyst at different temperatures. (U.S.)

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Cyanide Salts, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS As...

  3. Fuel morphology effects on fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osetek, D.J.; Hartwell, J.K.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented of fission product release behavior observed during four severe fuel damage tests on bundles of UO 2 fuel rods. Transient temperatures up to fuel melting were obtained in the tests that included both rapid and slow cooldown, low and high (36 GWd/t) burnup fuel and the addition of Ag-In-Cd control rods. Release fractions of major fission product species and release rates of noble gas species are reported. Significant differences in release behavior are discussed between heatup and cooldown periods, low and high burnup fuel and long- and short-lived fission products. Explanations for the observed differences are offered that relate fuel morphology changes to the releases

  4. Effects of hydrogen burning and associated engineered safety features on containment building response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, S.S.; Deem, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    It is established that large amounts of hydrogen can be generated during degraded core events. The burning of this hydrogen can produce resulting loads which may represent a serious challenge to containment integrity. This paper presents some perspectives on hydrogen behavior during various degraded core events for a large dry containment. The analysis addresses the hydrogen transport and its subsequent diffusion once released to the containment. Since the distribution of hydrogen in the containment depends on the rate of release and various driving forces, the effects from various subsystems (i.e. fan coolers, sprays, heat structures, etc.) are examined to determine the sensitivity of each effect on the overall containment response. The sensitivity of results due to subcompartmentalization of the containment is also examined. Effects from localized hydrogen pocketing and burning will be addressed with emphasis on its relative impact on containment integrity

  5. Hydrogen molecules and hydrogen-related defects in crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukata, N.; Sasaki, S.; Murakami, K.; Ishioka, K.; Nakamura, K. G.; Kitajima, M.; Fujimura, S.; Kikuchi, J.; Haneda, H.

    1997-09-01

    We have found that hydrogen exists in molecular form in crystalline silicon treated with hydrogen atoms in the downstream of a hydrogen plasma. The vibrational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 4158 cm-1 for silicon samples hydrogenated between 180 and 500 °C. The assignment of the Raman line is confirmed by its isotope shift to 2990 cm-1 for silicon treated with deuterium atoms. The Raman intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 400 °C. The vibrational Raman line of the hydrogen molecules is broad and asymmetric. It consists of at least two components, possibly arising from hydrogen molecules in different occupation sites in crystalline silicon. The rotational Raman line of hydrogen molecules is observed at 590 cm-1. The Raman band of Si-H stretching is observed for hydrogenation temperatures between 100 and 500 °C and the intensity has a maximum for hydrogenation at 250 °C.

  6. IAHE Hydrogen Civilization Conception for the Humankind Sustainable Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor A Goltsov; Lyudmila F Goltsova; T Nejat Veziroglu

    2006-01-01

    There are generalized of a novel Hydrogen Civilization (HyCi-) conception of the International Association for Hydrogen Energy. The HyCi-Conception states that at this rigorous, severe historical period the humankind still has a real possibility to save the biosphere and makes living out of humanity be possible and real process. The above objective can be achieved by the only way, the way of advantageous all-planetary work along the direction of ecologically clean vector 'Hydrogen energy → Hydrogen economy → Hydrogen civilization'. The HyCi-Conception includes three constituent, mutually conditioned parts: industrially-ecological, humanitarian-cultural and geopolitical-internationally legislative ones. Legislative-economical mechanism of transition to hydrogen civilization is formulated, and the most important possible stages of HyCi-transition are indicated and discussed. (authors)

  7. Influence of adsorbed hydrogen molecules on the hydrogen permeation and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banno, T.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen permeation through a thin iron membrane has been measured using a molecular hydrogen gas and/or a weakly ionized rf-discharge as particle sources. Transient and steady state values of the permeation flux φ p were obtained in the regime where the surface penetration of H and the recombinative release of H 2 are rate-determining. φ p is then proportional to the flux density ψ of the particles which impinge on the membrane upstream. The proportionality factors depend on the nature (atomic or molecular) of the incident particles, on temperature (in particular for a molecular driving gas) and on the ratio of the surface recombinative release rate constants (2σk r ) u and (2σk r ) d up- and downstream, respectively. (orig.)

  8. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-09-14

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors.

  9. Boron-nitrogen based hydrides and reactive composites for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Lars H.; Ley, Morten B.; Lee, Young-Su

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen forms chemical compounds with most other elements and forms a variety of different chemical bonds. This fascinating chemistry of hydrogen has continuously provided new materials and composites with new prospects for rational design and the tailoring of properties. This review highlights...... a range of new boron and nitrogen based hydrides and illustrates how hydrogen release and uptake properties can be improved. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd....

  10. The hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigg, A.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  11. The hydrogen highway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, A. [Fuel Cells Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  12. Hydrogen from biomass: state of the art and research challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, Thomas A; Elam, Carolyn C; Evans, Robert J

    2002-02-01

    The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen, Task 16, Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials. Hydrogen's share in the energy market is increasing with the implementation of fuel cell systems and the growing demand for zero-emission fuels. Hydrogen production will need to keep pace with this growing market. In the near term, increased production will likely be met by conventional technologies, such as natural gas reforming. In these processes, the carbon is converted to CO2 and released to the atmosphere. However, with the growing concern about global climate change, alternatives to the atmospheric release of CO2 are being investigated. Sequestration of the CO2 is an option that could provide a viable near-term solution. Reducing the demand on fossil resources remains a significant concern for many nations. Renewable-based processes like solar- or wind-driven electrolysis and photobiological water splitting hold great promise for clean hydrogen production; however, advances must still be made before these technologies can be economically competitive. For the near-and mid-term, generating hydrogen from biomass may be the more practical and viable, renewable and potentially carbon-neutral (or even carbon-negative in conjunction with sequestration) option. Recently, the IEA Hydrogen Agreement launched a new task to bring together international experts to investigate some of these near- and mid-term options for producing hydrogen with reduced environmental impacts. This review of the state of the art of hydrogen production from biomass was prepared to facilitate in the planning of work that should be done to achieve the goal of near-term hydrogen energy systems. The relevant technologies that convert biomass to hydrogen, with emphasis on thermochemical routes are described. In evaluating the viability of the conversion routes, each must be put in the context of the availability of

  13. Volcano Plot for Bimetallic Catalysts in Hydrogen Generation by Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Anais; Toshikj, Nikola; Hoett, Sandra; Bernaud, Laurent; Demirci, Umit B.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of "hydrogen energy", sodium borohydride (NaBH[subscript 4]) is a potential hydrogen carrier able to release H[subscript 2] by hydrolysis in the presence of a metal catalyst. Our laboratory experiment focuses on this. It is intended for thirdyear undergraduate students in order to have hands-on laboratory experience through…

  14. A green hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, W.W. II [Clark Communications, Beverly Hills, CA (United States). Green Hydrogen Scientific Advisory Committee; Rifkin, J. [The Foundation on Economic Trends (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This paper is the result of over a dozen scholars and practitioners who strongly felt that a hydrogen economy and hence the future is closer than some American politicians and bureaucrats state. Moreover, when seen internationally, there is strong evidence, the most recent and obvious ones are the proliferation of hybrid vehicles, that for any nation-state to be energy independent it must seek a renewable or green hydrogen future in the near term. The State of California has once again taken the lead in this effort for both an energy-independent future and one linked strongly to the hydrogen economy. Then why a hydrogen economy in the first instance? The fact is that hydrogen most likely will not be used for refueling of vehicles in the near term. The number of vehicles to make hydrogen commercially viable will not be in the mass market by almost all estimates until 2010. However, it is less than a decade away. The time frame is NOT 30-40 years as some argue. The hydrogen economy needs trained people, new ventures and public-private partnerships now. The paper points out how the concerns of today, including higher costs and technologies under development, can be turned into opportunities for both the public and private sectors. It was not too long ago that the size of a mobile phone was that of a briefcase, and then almost 10 years ago, the size of a shoe box. Today, they are not only the size of a man's wallet but also often given away free to consumers who subscribe or contract for wireless services. While hydrogen may not follow this technological commercialization exactly, it certainly will be on a parallel path. International events and local or regional security dictate that the time for a hydrogen must be close at hand. (author)

  15. A green hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Woodrow W.; Rifkin, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the result of over a dozen scholars and practitioners who strongly felt that a hydrogen economy and hence the future is closer than some American politicians and bureaucrats state. Moreover, when seen internationally, there is strong evidence, the most recent and obvious ones are the proliferation of hybrid vehicles, that for any nation-state to be energy independent it must seek a renewable or green hydrogen future in the near term. The State of California has once again taken the lead in this effort for both an energy-independent future and one linked strongly to the hydrogen economy. Then why a hydrogen economy in the first instance? The fact is that hydrogen most likely will not be used for refueling of vehicles in the near term. The number of vehicles to make hydrogen commercially viable will not be in the mass market by almost all estimates until 2010. However, it is less than a decade away. The time frame is NOT 30-40 years as some argue. The hydrogen economy needs trained people, new ventures and public-private partnerships now. The paper points out how the concerns of today, including higher costs and technologies under development, can be turned into opportunities for both the public and private sectors. It was not too long ago that the size of a mobile phone was that of a briefcase, and then almost 10 years ago, the size of a shoe box. Today, they are not only the size of a man's wallet but also often given away free to consumers who subscribe or contract for wireless services. While hydrogen may not follow this technological commercialization exactly, it certainly will be on a parallel path. International events and local or regional security dictate that the time for a hydrogen must be close at hand

  16. The Italian hydrogen programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffaele Vellone

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen could become an important option in the new millennium. It provides the potential for a sustainable energy system as it can be used to meet most energy needs without harming the environment. In fact, hydrogen has the potential for contributing to the reduction of climate-changing emissions and other air pollutants as it exhibits clean combustion with no carbon or sulphur oxide emissions and very low nitrogen oxide emissions. Furthermore, it is capable of direct conversion to electricity in systems such as fuel cells without generating pollution. However, widespread use of hydrogen is not feasible today because of economic and technological barriers. In Italy, there is an ongoing national programme to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier. This programme aims to promote, in an organic frame, a series of actions regarding the whole hydrogen cycle. It foresees the development of technologies in the areas of production, storage, transport and utilisation. Research addresses the development of technologies for separation and sequestration of CO 2 , The programme is shared by public organisations (research institutions and universities) and national industry (oil companies, electric and gas utilities and research institutions). Hydrogen can be used as a fuel, with significant advantages, both for electric energy generation/ co-generation (thermo-dynamic cycles and fuel cells) and transportation (internal combustion engine and fuel cells). One focus of research will be the development of fuel cell technologies. Fuel cells possess all necessary characteristics to be a key technology in a future economy based on hydrogen. During the initial phase of the project, hydrogen will be derived from fossil sources (natural gas), and in the second phase it will be generated from renewable electricity or nuclear energy. The presentation will provide a review of the hydrogen programme and highlight future goals. (author)

  17. Environmental system applied to radioactive liquid effluent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisti, Marcelo Bessa

    2009-01-01

    The current environmental administration considers the productive activity as an environmental system, defined as a group of processes, interactions, parameters and factors involved in the production. This mastering dissertation evaluated the release of the liquid radioactive effluents at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), under a systemic environmental study. The study evaluated the source term at IPEN in the period from 2004 to 2008, making use of gamma-ray and alpha spectrometry, instrumental neutron activation analysis, liquid phase scintillation and atomic absorption spectrometry. The employed methodologies were verified using samples from the Intercomparison National Program - PNI/IRD and Reference Materials. The facilities that contributed the most in these releases were the Radiopharmaceutical Center (CR) and the Research Reactor Center (CRPq) with an average of 11,4% and 87,4%, respectively, relative to the present radioactive activity. The sewer system releases were within the radioactive protection regulations, showing the effectiveness of IPEN's Radioactive Effluents Monitoring Program. The concentration of the stable elements Ag, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn was determined in the liquid effluent in ali the samples from the storage tanks TR1 and CR in the period from 2004 to 2008 and in some of the samples of other IPEN's facilities in the period from 2004 to 2007. Among the analyzed effluents, two samples were higher than the stable elements discharge standards established in the state of Sao Paulo, one sample was higher than the required value of the element cadmium and the other higher than required value of the element zinco The storage tank TR1 discharge flow was estimated in 10,9 ± 0,9 m3 h -1 . The dilution factor at discharge point E1 was estimated using a radiotracers the isotopes 3 H, 137 CS, 60 Co, 54 Mn and 65 Zn, which are commonly released into IPEN's sewer system. The executed radiotracer study was carried out

  18. Breeding blanket development. Tritium release from breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Nagao, Yoshiharu

    2006-01-01

    Engineering data on neutron irradiation performance of tritium breeders are needed to design the breeding blanket of fusion reactor. In this study, tritium release experiments of the breeders were carried out to examine the effects of various parameters (such as sweep gas flow rate, hydrogen content in sweep gas, irradiation temperature and thermal neutron flux) on tritium generation and release behavior. Lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) is considered as a candidate tritium breeder in the blanket design of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). As for the shape of the breeder material, a small spherical form is preferred to reduce the thermal stress induced in the breeder. Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles of about 170g in total weight and with 0.3 and 2 mm in diameter were manufactured by a wet process, and an assembly packed with the binary Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles was irradiated in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The tritium was generated in the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed and released from the pebble bed, and was swept downstream using the sweep gas for on-line analysis of tritium content. Concentration of total tritium and gaseous tritium (HT or T 2 gas) released from the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed were measured by ionization chambers, and the ratio of (gaseous tritium)/(total tritium) was evaluated. The sweep gas flow rate was changed from 100 to 900cm 3 /min, and hydrogen content in the sweep gas was changed from 100 to 10000 ppm. Furthermore, thermal neutron flux was changed using a window made of hafnium (Hf) neutron absorber. The irradiation temperature at an outer region of the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed was held between 200 and 400degC. The main results of this experiment are summarized as follows. 1) When the temperature at the outside edge of the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed exceeded 100degC, the tritium release from the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed started. The ratio of the tritium release rate and the tritium generation rate (normalized tritium release rate: R/G) reached

  19. Atmosphere dependence of fission products release: The Vercors 4 and 5 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, B.; Ducros, G.; Tourasse, M.; Ferroud-Plattet, M.P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique; Boulaud, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    Because of the severe consequences, in terms of radiological and biological effects, of a nuclear accident, the international reactor safety authorities initiated, 25 years ago, numerous experimental programs in order to improve the understanding and the prediction of these situations. In France, the Nuclear Protection and Safety Institute (IPSN) in collaboration with Electricite de France (EDF) co-fund the Heva-Vercors program, since 1983. The experiments are conducted in a shielded hot cell of the LAMA facility at Grenoble. The test specimen is a fuel rod section taken from a power reactor operated by EDF and includes three irradiated pellets in their original cladding. The fuel sample is re-irradiated at low power in the Siloe experimental reactor for seven days in order to recreate the short-lived fission products without inducing any in-pile release. Since the experimental sequence is performed less than 40 hours after the end of the reirradiation, direct measurement of radioactive fission products release is possible using gamma spectrometry. The measurements performed during the tests are essentially aimed at characterising the release kinetics and the total release of fission products and structural materials as a function of fuel temperature and oxidising/reducing conditions of the environment. The four last tests (Vercors 3 to Vercors 6), performed at 2600 K, allowed to measure the kinetic of high and low volatile species release, as well as the total released fraction of non volatile species and the transuranic elements. This paper is devoted to the comparison of the Vercors 4 and Vercors 5 tests. The first one has been conducted up to 2600 K under reducing conditions (hydrogen fluid), after an oxidising period at 1670 K. The second one was performed in a pure steam atmosphere after several plateaus at intermediate temperatures in oxidising conditions. The total release of volatile (Sb, Te, I, Cs) is not significantly modified and a higher release of Mo

  20. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, D.P.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Alleinann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to

  1. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

    1999-02-23

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to

  2. Transient shielded liquid hydrogen containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, A.P.; Herring, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen in the liquid phase has been limited in duration due to the thermal performance constraints of conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers available. Conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers lose hydrogen because of their relatively high heat leak and variations in usage pattern of hydrogen due to shutdowns. Local regulations also discourage venting of hydrogen. Long term storage of Liquid Hydrogen without product loss was usually accomplished using Liquid Nitrogen sacrificial shields. This paper reports on a new low heat leak container developed and patented that will extend the storage time of liquid hydrogen by five hundred percent. The principle of operation of the Transient Shields which makes the extraordinary performance of this container feasible is described in this paper. Also covered are the impact of this new container on present applications of hydrogen and the new opportunities afforded to Liquid hydrogen in the world hydrogen market

  3. Hydrogen passivation of silicon sheet solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Milstein, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Significant improvements in the efficiencies of dendritic web and edge-supported-pulling silicon sheet solar cells have been obtained after hydrogen ion beam passivation for a period of ten minutes or less. We have studied the effects of the hydrogen ion beam treatment with respect to silicon material damage, silicon sputter rate, introduction of impurities, and changes in reflectance. The silicon sputter rate for constant ion beam flux of 0.60 +- 0.05 mA/cm 2 exhibits a maximum at approximately 1400-eV ion beam energy

  4. Fire Protection Engineering Design Brief Template. Hydrogen Refueling Station.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Muna, Alice Baca [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Groth, Katrina M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Building a hydrogen infrastructure system is critical to supporting the development of alternate- fuel vehicles. This report provides a methodology for implementing a performance-based design of an outdoor hydrogen refueling station that does not meet specific prescriptive requirements in NFPA 2, The Hydrogen Technologies Code . Performance-based designs are a code-compliant alternative to meeting prescriptive requirements. Compliance is demonstrated by comparing a prescriptive-based fueling station design with a performance-based design approach using Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) methods and hydrogen risk assessment tools. This template utilizes the Sandia-developed QRA tool, Hydrogen Risk Analysis Models (HyRAM), which combines reduced-order deterministic models that characterize hydrogen release and flame behavior with probabilistic risk models to quantify risk values. Each project is unique and this template is not intended to account for site-specific characteristics. Instead, example content and a methodology are provided for a representative hydrogen refueling site which can be built upon for new hydrogen applications.

  5. Electron Charged Graphite-based Hydrogen Storage Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Chinbay Q. Fan; D Manager

    2012-03-14

    The electron-charge effects have been demonstrated to enhance hydrogen storage capacity using materials which have inherent hydrogen storage capacities. A charge control agent (CCA) or a charge transfer agent (CTA) was applied to the hydrogen storage material to reduce internal discharge between particles in a Sievert volumetric test device. GTI has tested the device under (1) electrostatic charge mode; (2) ultra-capacitor mode; and (3) metal-hydride mode. GTI has also analyzed the charge distribution on storage materials. The charge control agent and charge transfer agent are needed to prevent internal charge leaks so that the hydrogen atoms can stay on the storage material. GTI has analyzed the hydrogen fueling tank structure, which contains an air or liquid heat exchange framework. The cooling structure is needed for hydrogen fueling/releasing. We found that the cooling structure could be used as electron-charged electrodes, which will exhibit a very uniform charge distribution (because the cooling system needs to remove heat uniformly). Therefore, the electron-charge concept does not have any burden of cost and weight for the hydrogen storage tank system. The energy consumption for the electron-charge enhancement method is quite low or omitted for electrostatic mode and ultra-capacitor mode in comparison of other hydrogen storage methods; however, it could be high for the battery mode.

  6. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  7. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...... that the particles do not disintegrate is explained by a sintering process at the working temperatures. Exposure to air does not impair the sorption ability; on the contrary, it appears that surface oxidation plays an important role in the reaction. Some handling problems, e.g. the reaction of the hydride with water...

  8. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M; Lien, S; Weaver, P F

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  9. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M.; Lien, S.; Weaver, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  10. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  11. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  12. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure , particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  13. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  14. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  15. Biological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  16. Scaling and extrapolation of hydrogen distribution experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwat, H.

    1986-01-01

    The containment plays an important role in predicting the residual risk to the environment under severe accident conditions. Risk analyses show that massive fission product release from the reactor fuel can occur only if during a loss of coolant the core is severely damaged and a containment failure is anticipated. Large amounts of hydrogen inevitably, are formed during the core degradation and will be released into the containment. More combustible gases are produced later when the coremelt will contact the containment concrete. Thus a potential for an early containment failure exists if a massive hydrogen deflagration cannot be excluded. A more remote cause for early containment failure may be an energetic steam explosion which requires a number of independent conditions when the molten core material contacts residual coolant water. The prediction of the containment loads caused by a hydrogen combustion is dependent on the prediction of the combustion mode. In the paper an attempt is made to identify on basis of a dimensional analysis such areas for which particular care must be exercised when scale experimental evidence is interpreted and extrapolated with the aid of a computer code or a system of computer codes. The study is restricted to fluid dynamic phenomena of the gas distribution process within the containment atmosphere. The gas sources and the mechanical response of containment structures are considered as given boundary conditions under which the containment is to be analyzed

  17. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  18. Production of hydrogen from organic waste via hydrogen sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, M.; Davis, B.R.; Roy, A.; Daugulis, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an integrated process is proposed that converts organic waste to hydrogen via hydrogen sulphide. The designed bioreactor has achieved high volumetric productivities comparable to methanogenic bioreactors. Proposed process has advantages of bio-methane production and is more resilient to process upset. Thermochemical conversion of hydrogen sulphide to hydrogen is exothermic and also requires smaller plant infrastructure

  19. Large scientific releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics

  20. Hydrogen transport in the containment; Wasserstofftransport im Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royl, P.; Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.

    1995-08-01

    For the description of transport phenomena in water vapor/hydrogen mixtures released in nuclear meltdown accidents, an integrated analytical model is being developed for LWR containments. Thermal and mechanical loads due to recombination and combustion are to be calculable. The 3-dimensional GASFLOW code was taken over from LANL in exchange for HDR experimental results and Battelle BMC program results. (orig.)

  1. Hydrogen by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen production by water electrolysis (aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide) is shortly presented with theoretical aspects (thermodynamics and kinetics), and components of the electrolytic cell (structural materials, cathodes, anodes, diaphragms), and examples of industrial processes. (A.B.). 4 figs

  2. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    concepts transferred from the gaseous state. Separation of a ... molecular mass to that calculated by colligative methods. It is important in ... namics is vital in the design and optimization of the materials for hydrogen ... vehicular applications.

  3. Hydrogen storage compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  4. Hydrogen Fire Spectroscopy Issues

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The detection of hydrogen fires is important to the aerospace community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has devoted significant effort to...

  5. Canadian hydrogen strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlie, M.; Scepanovic, V.; Dube, J.; Hammerli, M.; Taylor, J.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' In May of 2004, industry and government embarked on a process to create a strategic plan for development of the 'hydrogen economy' in Canada. The process was undertaken to determine how the development and commercialization of hydrogen technologies could be accelerated to yield a 'visible' reduction in greenhouse gases within the timeframe of Kyoto, while establishing a direction that addresses the necessity of far greater reductions in the future. Starting with a meeting of twenty seven experts drawn from the hydrogen technology, energy and transportation industries and government, a vision and mission for the planning process was developed. Two months later a second meeting was held with a broader group of stakeholders to develop hydrogen transition strategies that could achieve the mission, and from identifying the barriers and enablers for these strategies, an action plan was created. This paper reviews the results from this consultation process and discusses next steps. (author)

  6. Hydrogen in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, G.W.; Davis, J.W.

    1981-04-01

    The titanium alloys that offer properties worthy of consideration for fusion reactors are Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-Si (Ti-6242S) and Ti-5Al-6Sn-2Zr-1Mo-Si (Ti-5621S). The Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S are being considered because of their high creep resistance at elevated temperatures of 500 0 C. Also, irradiation tests on these alloys have shown irradiation creep properties comparable to 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel. These alloys would be susceptible to slow strain rate embrittlement if sufficient hydrogen concentrations are obtained. Concentrations greater than 250 to 500 wppm hydrogen and temperatures lower than 100 to 150 0 C are approximate threshold conditions for detrimental effects on tensile properties. Indications are that at the elevated temperature - low hydrogen pressure conditions of the reactors, there would be negligible hydrogen embrittlement

  7. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  8. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Exposure of many metals to gaseous hydrogen causes losses in elongation, reduction of area, and fracture toughness, and causes increases in slow crack growth rate or fatigue life compared with values obtained in air or vacuum. Hydrogen pressure, temperature, and purity significantly influence deleterious effects. The strength and structural characteristics of the metal influence the degradation of its properties by hydrogen. Several theories have been proposed to explain the loss of properties in hydrogen, but none has gained wide acceptance. The embrittlement mechanism and the role of diffusion are, therefore, open questions and need more quantitative experimental data both to test the proposed theories and to allow the development of realistic preventive measures. (U.S.)

  9. Hydrogen perspectives in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furutani, H.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen energy is considered to present a potential effective options for achieving the greenhouse gas minimization. The MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry) of Japanese Government is promoting the WE-NET (World Energy Network System) Project which envisions (1) construction of a global energy network for effective supply, transportation, storage and utilization of renewable energy using hydrogen as an energy carrier as a long-term options of sustainable energy economy, and (2) promotion of market entry of hydrogen energy in near and/or mid future even before construction of a WE-NET system. In this paper, I would like to report how far the hydrogen energy technology development addressed under Phase I has progressed, and describe the outline of the Phase II Plan. (author)

  10. Hydrogen permeability through metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.A.; Tsvetkov, I.V.; Marenkov, E.D.; Yarko, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of hydrogen permeability through one-layer and multi-layer membranes are considered. The effect of surface roughness, crystal defects, cracks and pores is described. Mathematical description of the processes is given [ru

  11. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  12. Hydrogenizing oils, asphalts, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1925-03-14

    The hydrogenation of carbonaceous solids in presence of combined sulfur, e.g., sulfides as described in the parent specification is applied to the treatment of rock oils, shale oils, resins, ozokerite, asphalt, and the like, or fractions, residues, or acid sludge or other conversion products thereof, alone or mixed. Preferably the hydrogen or other reducing gas is in excess and under pressure, and is either circuited or led through a series of treatment vessels, hydrogen being added for that used. In an example, residues from American crude oil are passed continuously with hydrogen at 200 atmospheres and 450 to 500/sup 0/C over pressed precipitated cobalt sulfide, the issuing gases being cooled to condense the light oil produced.

  13. Mechanochemical synthesis of nanostructured chemical hydrides in hydrogen alloying mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, Z.; Varin, R.A.; Chiu, C.; Czujko, T.; Calka, A.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical alloying of magnesium metal powders with hydrogen in specialized hydrogen ball mills can be used as a direct route for mechanochemical synthesis of emerging chemical hydrides and hydride mixtures for advanced solid-state hydrogen storage. In the 2Mg-Fe system, we have successfully synthesized the ternary complex hydride Mg 2 FeH 6 in a mixture with nanometric Fe particles. The mixture of complex magnesium-iron hydride and nano-iron released 3-4 wt.%H 2 in a thermally programmed desorption experiment at the range 285-295 o C. Milling of the Mg-2Al powder mixture revealed a strong competition between formation of the Al(Mg) solid solution and the β-MgH 2 hydride. The former decomposes upon longer milling as the Mg atoms react with hydrogen to form the hydride phase, and drive the Al out of the solid solution. The mixture of magnesium dihydride and nano-aluminum released 2.1 wt.%H 2 in the temperature range 329-340 o C in the differential scanning calorimetry experiment. The formation of MgH 2 was suppressed in the Mg-B system; instead, a hydrogenated amorphous phase (Mg,B)H x , was formed in a mixture with nanometric MgB 2 . Annealing of the hydrogen-stabilized amorphous mixture produced crystalline MgB 2

  14. Retention of hydrogen isotopes and helium in nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Mitsumasa; Sato, Rikiya; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    In the present study, a thin foil of nickel was irradiated by H{sub 2}{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sup +} to a fluence of 1.2-6.0x10{sup 20}/m{sup 2} using the TBTS (Tritium Beam Test System) apparatus. The thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique was employed to evaluate the total amount of retained hydrogen isotope and helium atoms in nickel. In the spectra, two peaks appeared at 440-585K and 720-735K for helium. Hydrogen isotopes irradiation after helium preirradiation were found to enhance the helium release and to decrease the peak temperatures. Helium irradiation after hydrogen isotopes preirradiation were found to enhance the helium release, but the peak temperature showed little difference from that without preirradiation. (author)

  15. Hydrogen Generation, Combustibility and Mitigation in Nuclear Power Plant Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talha, K.A.; El-Sheikh, B.M.; Gad El-Mawla, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear power plant is provided with features to insure safety. The engineered safety features (ESFs) are devoted to set operating conditions under accident conditions. If ESFs fail to apply in some accidents, this would lead to what called severe accidents, and core damage. In this case hydrogen will be generated from different sources particularly from metal-water reactions. Since the containment is the final barrier to protect the environment from the release of radioactive materials; its integrity should not be threatened. In recent years, hydrogen concentration represents a real problem if it exceeds the combustibility limits. This work is devoted to calculate the amount of hydrogen to be generated, indelicate its combustibility and how to inertize the containment using different gases to maintain its integrity and protect the environment from the release of radioactive materials

  16. Hydrogen formation under gamma and heavy ions irradiation of geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupin, F.; Dannoux-Papin, A.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, J.B.; Ngono Ravache, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the behavior under irradiation of geo-polymer which is not yet well known and attempts to highlight the importance of water radiolysis. For their use as embedding matrices, stability under ionizing radiation as well as low hydrogen gas released must be demonstrated. Different formulations of geo-polymers have been irradiated either with γ-rays ( 60 Co sources) or 75 MeV 36 Ar ions beams and the production of hydrogen released has been quantified. This paper presents the results of gas analysis in order to identify important structural parameters that influence confined water radiolysis. Indeed, a correlation between pore size, water content on one side, and the hydrogen production radiolytic yield (G(H 2 )) on the other side, has been demonstrated. For the 75 MeV 36 Ar ions irradiation, the effect of porosity has not been well emphasized. For both, the results have revealed the water content influence. (authors)

  17. Nuclear power and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Robert.

    1982-06-01

    Ontario has been using CANDU reactors to produce electricity since 1962. The province does not have an electricity shortage, but it does have a shortage of liquid fuels. The government of Ontario is encouraging research into the production of hydrogen using electricity generated by a dedicated nuclear plant, and the safe and economical use of hydrogen both in the production of synthetic petroleum fuels and as a fuel in its own right

  18. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  19. A Rechargeable Hydrogen Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christudas Dargily, Neethu; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Devendrachari, Mruthunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Gautam, Manu; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-04-27

    We utilize proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen storage molecules to unlock a rechargeable battery chemistry based on the cleanest chemical energy carrier molecule, hydrogen. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and spectroelectrochemical analyses evidence the participation of protons during charge-discharge chemistry and extended cycling. In an era of anthropogenic global climate change and paramount pollution, a battery concept based on a virtually nonpolluting energy carrier molecule demonstrates distinct progress in the sustainable energy landscape.

  20. Hydrogen recovery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  1. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Jay P.; Kramer, Robert; Pourpoint, Timothee L.; Ramachandran, P.V.; Varma, Arvind; Zheng, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  2. Comparison of the performance of a spark-ignited gasoline engine blended with hydrogen and hydrogen-oxygen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shuofeng; Ji, Changwei; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This paper compared the effects of hydrogen and hydrogen-oxygen blends (hydroxygen) additions on the performance of a gasoline engine at 1400 rpm and a manifolds absolute pressure of 61.5 kPa. The tests were carried out on a 1.6 L gasoline engine equipped with a hydrogen and oxygen injection system. A hybrid electronic control unit was applied to adjust the hydrogen and hydroxygen volume fractions in the intake increasing from 0% to about 3% and keep the hydrogen-to-oxygen mole ratio at 2:1 in hydroxygen tests. For each testing condition, the gasoline flow rate was adjusted to maintain the mixture global excess air ratio at 1.00. The test results confirmed that engine fuel energy flow rate was decreased after hydrogen addition but increased with hydroxygen blending. When hydrogen or hydroxygen volume fraction in the intake was lower than 2%, the hydroxygen-blended gasoline engine produced a higher thermal efficiency than the hydrogen-blended gasoline engine. Both the additions of hydrogen and hydroxygen help reduce flame development and propagation periods of the gasoline engine. HC emissions were reduced whereas NOx emissions were raised with the increase of hydrogen and hydroxygen addition levels. CO was slightly increased after hydrogen blending, but reduced with hydroxygen addition. -- Highlights: → We compared the effects of hydrogen and hydroxygen additions on the gasoline engine performance. → The hydroxygen should be added into the engine only at low blending levels. → CO is decreased with hydroxygen addition whereas increased with hydrogen blending.

  3. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  4. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  5. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  6. Hydrogen and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, D.J.

    1976-12-01

    This study examines the influence that the market demand for hydrogen might have on the development of world nuclear capacity over the next few decades. In a nuclear economy, hydrogen appears to be the preferred energy carrier over electricity for most purposes, due to its ready substitution and usage for all energy needs, as well as its low transmission costs. The economic factors upon which any transition to hydrogen fuelling will be largely based are seen to be strongly dependent on the form of future energy demand, the energy resource base, and on the status of technology. Accordingly, the world energy economy is examined to identify the factors which might affect the future demand price structure for energy, and a survey of current estimates of world energy resources, particularly oil, gas, nuclear, and solar, is presented. Current and projected technologies for production and utilization of hydrogen are reviewed, together with rudimentary cost estimates. The relative economics are seen to favour production of hydrogen from fossil fuels far into the foreseeable future, and a clear case emerges for high temperature nuclear reactors in such process heat applications. An expanding industrial market for hydrogen, and near term uses in steelmaking and aircraft fuelling are foreseen, which would justify an important development effort towards nuclear penetration of that market. (author)

  7. Metallic hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, T.J.; Hawke, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical studies predict that molecular hydrogen can be converted to the metallic phase at very high density and pressure. These conditions were achieved by subjecting liquid hydrogen to isentropic compression in a magnetic-flux compression device. Hydrogen became electrically conducting at a density of about 1.06 g/cm 3 and a calculated pressure of about 2 Mbar. In the experimental device, a cylindrical liner, on implosion by high explosive, compresses a magnetic flux which in turn isentropically compresses a hydrogen sample; coaxial conical anvils prevent escape of the sample during compression. One anvil contains a coaxial cable that uses alumina ceramic as an insulator; this probe allows continuous measurement of the electrical conductivity of the hydrogen. A flash x-ray radiograph exposed during the experiment records the location of the sample-tube boundaries and permits calculation of the sample density. The theoretical underpinnings of the metallic transition of hydrogen are briefly summarized, and the experimental apparatus and technique, analytical methods, and results are described. 9 figures

  8. The periodic table in Flatland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.

    1995-01-01

    The D-dimensional Coulomb system serves as a starting point for generating generalized atomic shells. These shells are ordered according to a generalized Madelung rule in D dimensions. This rule together with an Aufbau Prinzip is applied to produce a D-dimensional periodic table. A model is developed to rationalize the ordering of the shells predicted by the generalized Madelung rule. This model is based on the introduction of an Hamiltonian, invariant under the q-deformed algebra U q (so(D)), that breaks down the SO (D + 1) dynamical symmetry of the hydrogen atom in D dimensions. The D = 2 case (Flatland) is investigated with some details. It is shown that the neutral atoms and the (moderately) positive ions correspond to the values q = 0.8 and q = 1, respectively, of the deformation parameter q. (authors). 55 refs

  9. A liquid organic carrier of hydrogen as a fuel for automobiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, M.; Taube, P.

    1979-09-01

    A system of storing energy in a hydrogen containing fuel for the motor car is discussed. The recyclable liquid chemical carrier is: (Methylcyclohexane (liquid)) dehydrogenation (Toluene (liquid)) + (hydrogen (gas)). The reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of toluene, occurs in a regional plant connected to a source of hydrogen (electrolysis of water) with a significant by-product being heat at 200 0 C for district heating. The system is able to store hydrogen in liquid form under ambient temperature and pressure even in a small motor car. The concentration of hydrogen is 6.1 % by weight. The release of gaseous hydrogen from the liquid methylcyclohexane needs a chemical catalytic reactor having a temperature of 300 0 C and a pressure of some bars. This reaction has been well studied. The thermal energy for the dehydrogenation is taken from the exhaust gases at 780 0 C. A layout of the most important processes of the system is given. (Auth.)

  10. Removing of oxides from Fe-Ni alloys by hydrogen plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesel, A.; Drenik, A.; Mozetic, M.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma wall interaction is one of the key issues in fusion research for ITER application. The first-wall materials in tokamaks and in other high temperature plasma reactors are subject to and to continuous degradation due to the ion bombardment. Furthermore the release of the eroded wall material leads to their redeposition to other parts of the fusion reactor and they can be even transported into the core plasma where they cause dilution of the plasma fuel and cooling of the plasma itself. One possible solution for removal of deposits formed during operation of the fusion devices is oxygen plasma treatment. A drawback of the oxygen plasma is that it causes formation of oxides on the surface of the materials. These oxides can be reduced by further hydrogen plasma treatment. A study on reduction of an oxide layer from Fe-Ni alloys was performed. The samples were exposed to low pressure weakly ionized hydrogen plasma for different periods. A density of hydrogen plasma was 8x10 15 m -3 , an electron temperature was 6 eV, and a degree of dissociation was about 30%. After plasma treatment the samples were analyzed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The results showed that the complete reduction of an initial oxide layer with the thickness of about 30 nm occurred after 20 s of exposure to hydrogen plasma, when AES showed no more oxygen on the surface of Fe-Ni alloy. During the exposure of the samples to the plasma their temperature was measured. The temperature first rised with time, reached the maximum value, and than dropped as soon as the layer of an oxide on the surface was reduced. (author)

  11. Photochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1978-01-01

    The energy flux in sunlight is 40 000 kW per head of the world population. Theoretically much of this energy can be used to photolyze water, in presence of a sensitizer, to H2 (and 02) for a hydrogen economy. The main difficulty in a homogeneous medium is the back-reaction of the primary products. According to the 'membrane principle', the reducing and the oxidizing primary products are released on opposite sides of asymmetric membranes, and so prevented from back-reacting. In essence, this is the mechanism of the photosynthetic machinery in plants and bacteria. This therefore serves as an example in the artificial construction of suitable asymmetric, 'vectorial', membranes. Relatively small areas of photolytic collectors, e.g. in tropical deserts, could cover the energy needs of large populations through hydrogen. (author)

  12. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Lennart N.

    2004-06-29

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  13. Experimental studies on helium release and stratification within the AIHMS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar, Aneesh; Agrawal, Nilesh; Raghavan, V.; Das, Sarit K.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is generated during core meltdown accidents in nuclear power plants. The study of hydrogen release and mixing within the containment is an important area of safety research. An experimental setup called the AERB-IIT Madras Hydrogen Mixing Studies (AIHMS) facility is setup at IIT Madras to study the distribution of helium (an inert surrogate to hydrogen) subsequent to release as a jet. The present paper gives details of the design, fabrication and instrumentation of the AIHMS facility. It then compares the features of the facility with respect to other facilities existing for hydrogen mitigation studies. Then it gives details of the experiments on concentration build-up studies as a result of injection of gases (air and helium) performed in this experimental facility. (author)

  14. Analysis of Hydrogen Concentration Distribution during an SBO Accident for Shin-Ulchin APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong Wan [Korea Atomic energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    To prohibit the accumulation of hydrogen, the containment volume is considered to reduce the hydrogen concentration, or hydrogen mitigation devices such as PARs or igniters are installed in the containment. In the case of the Fukushima NPPs, the applied strategy for the hydrogen safety is the use of a containment venting system (CVS). In this way, the hydrogen accumulated in the containment vessel is vented into the environment. One of the causes of the hydrogen explosions occurring in the containment buildings of the Fukushima NPPs is expected to be the failure of the venting system. The hydrogen was therefore easily accumulated in the containment building. It is uncertain what the ignition source for the hydrogen combustion was during the accident. However, it is not too conservative to assume that an ignition source exists at any time and any place in a containment during a core-melt accident. Shin-Ulchin 1 and 2, which are construction plants of an APR 1400, are two of the newest NPPs in Korea. They have many features to enhance the safety margin during a design-based and beyond-design-based accident. One of them is the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) located inside the containment. It is used as a sink/source for feed-bleed operation. When the core is damaged along an accident progression, the hydrogen generated in the RPV can be released into the IRWST of the APR1400 with steam and water. From a previous study, it was found that a highly concentrated hydrogen/air mixture can be developed if the hydrogen is released into the IRWST. In the case of Shin-Ulchin 1 and 2, the hydrogen mitigation strategy during a high-pressure accident such as a station blackout (SBO) is changed by installing a 3-way valve. When a severe accident management (SAM) for the plant is initiated, the flow path from a pressurizer to the IRWST is changed into a steam-generator (S/G) compartment by turning the 3-wat valve actively (pilot operated). By doing so, it is

  15. Hydrogen Storage In Nanostructured Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storag...

  16. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  17. Capacity retention in hydrogen storage alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anani, A.; Visintin, A.; Srinivasan, S.; Appleby, A. J.; Reilly, J. J.; Johnson, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of our examination of the properties of several candidate materials for hydrogen storage electrodes and their relation to the decrease in H-storage capacity upon open-circuit storage over time are reported. In some of the alloy samples examined to date, only about 10 percent of the hydrogen capacity was lost upon storage for 20 days, while in others, this number was as high as 30 percent for the same period of time. This loss in capacity is attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) hydrogen desorbed from the electrode due to pressure differences between the cell and the electrode sample; and (2) chemical and/or electrochemical degradation of the alloy electrode upon exposure to the cell environment. The former process is a direct consequence of the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the hydride alloy phase and the partial pressure of hydrogen in the hydride phase in equilibrium with that in the electrolyte environment, while the latter is related to the stability of the alloy phase in the cell environment. Comparison of the equilibrium gas-phase dissociation pressures of these alloys indicate that reversible loss of hydrogen capacity is higher in alloys with P(eqm) greater than 1 atm than in those with P(eqm) less than 1 atm.

  18. Investigation of hydrogen-deformation interactions in β-21S titanium alloy using thermal desorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal-Gutelmacher, E.; Eliezer, D.; Boellinghaus, Th.

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the investigation of the combined influence of hydrogen and pre-plastic deformation on hydrogen's absorption/desorption behavior, the microstructure and microhardness of a single-phased β-21S alloy. In this study, thermal desorption analyses (TDS) evaluation of various desorption and trapping parameters provide further insight on the relationships between hydrogen absorption/desorption processes and deformation, and their mutual influence on the microstructure and the microhardness of β-21S alloy. TDS spectra were supported by other experimental techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, hydrogen quantity analyses and microhardness tests. Pre-plastic deformation, performed before the electrochemical hydrogenation of the alloy, increased significantly the hydrogen absorption capacity. Its influence was also evident on the notably expanded lattice parameter of β-21S alloy after hydrogenation. However, no hydride precipitation was observed. An interesting softening effect of the pre-deformed hydrogenated alloy was revealed by microhardness tests. TDS demonstrated the significant effect of pre-plastic deformation on the hydrogen evolution process. Hydrogen desorption temperature and the activation energy for hydrogen release increased, additional trap states were observed and the amount of desorbed hydrogen decreased

  19. Optical and thermal energy discharge from tritiated solid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnotta, F.; Mapoles, E.R.; Collins, G.W.; Souers, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors are investigating mechanisms of energy storage and release in tritiated solid hydrogens, by a variety of techniques including ESR, NMR and thermal and optical emission. The nuclear decay of a triton in solid hydrogen initiates the conversion of nuclear energy into stored chemical energy by producing unpaired hydrogen atoms which are trapped within the molecular lattice. The ability to store large quantities of atoms in this manner has been demonstrated and can serve as a basis for new forms of high energy density materials. This paper presents preliminary results of a study of the optical emission from solid hydrogen containing tritium over the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral regions. Specifically, they have studied optical emission from DT and T 2 using CCD, silicon diode and germanium diode arrays. 8 refs., 6 figs

  20. Shuttle Gaseous Hydrogen Venting Risk from Flow Control Valve Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Baurle, Robert A.; Gafney, Richard L.; Norris, Andrew T.; Pellett, Gerald L.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a series of studies to assess the potential risk associated with the failure of one of three gaseous hydrogen flow control valves in the orbiter's main propulsion system during the launch of Shuttle Endeavour (STS-126) in November 2008. The studies focused on critical issues associated with the possibility of combustion resulting from release of gaseous hydrogen from the external tank into the atmosphere during assent. The Shuttle Program currently assumes hydrogen venting from the external tank will result in a critical failure. The current effort was conducted to increase understanding of the risk associated with venting hydrogen given the flow control valve failure scenarios being considered in the Integrated In-Flight Anomaly Investigation being conducted by NASA.