WorldWideScience

Sample records for peridotites

  1. The Anita Peridotite, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czertowicz, Tom; Scott, James; Waight, Tod Earle

    2016-01-01

    –93, spinel Cr# of 70, orthopyroxene with low Al2O3, and extremely depleted whole-rock geochemical characteristics indicate that the peridotite body experienced >30% melt extraction, probably within the spinel facies. Mineral compositions show some similarity to those of cratonic peridotitic mantle. Rare Cr....../86Sr (0.705–0.706), eNd ( +6.3 to +11.1), 208Pb/204Pb (37.8–38.9) and eHf ( +5.6 to 36.9) indicate that the metasomatic agent, which caused crystallization of clinopyroxene and plagioclase, had an isotopic composition similar to ocean island basalt. On the basis of isotopic data and mineral chemistry...

  2. Garnet peridotite found in the Greater Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Richard N., Jr.; Draper, Grenville; Keshav, Shantanu

    Although Alpine peridotites are relatively common in collisional orogenic zones, garnet-bearing peridotites are rare and only associated with high pressure/ultra-high pressure or temperature (HP/UHP or T) terranes [Brueckner and Medaris, 2000; Medaris, 1999]. Until recently all reported occurrences of Alpine-type garnet peridotites and HP/UHP terranes were in Eurasia and Africa, with one occurrence in the Seward Peninsula, Alaska [Till, 1981;Lieberman and Till, 1987]. Now a new Alpine-type garnet peridotite locality has been discovered in the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. This discovery is the second of its kind in the Americas.

  3. Orogenic, Ophiolitic, and Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodinier, J.-L.; Godard, M.

    2003-12-01

    "Tectonically emplaced" mantle rocks include subcontinental, suboceanic, and subarc mantle rocks that were tectonically exhumed from the upper mantle and occur:(i) as dispersed ultramafic bodies, a few meters to kilometers in size, in suture zones and mountain belts (i.e., the "alpine," or "orogenic" peridotite massifs - De Roever (1957), Thayer (1960), Den Tex (1969));(ii) as the lower ultramafic section of large (tens of kilometers) ophiolite or island arc complexes, obducted on continental margins (e.g., the Oman Ophiolite and the Kohistan Arc Complex - Coleman (1971), Boudier and Coleman (1981), Burg et al. (1998));(iii) exhumed above the sea level in ocean basins (e.g., Zabargad Island in the Red Sea, St. Paul's islets in the Atlantic and Macquarie Island in the southwestern Pacific - Tilley (1947), Melson et al. (1967), Varne and Rubenach (1972), Bonatti et al. (1981)).The "abyssal peridotites" are samples from the oceanic mantle that were dredged on the ocean floor, or recovered from drill cores (e.g., Bonatti et al., 1974; Prinz et al., 1976; Hamlyn and Bonatti, 1980).Altogether, tectonically emplaced and abyssal mantle rocks provide insights into upper mantle compositions and processes that are complementary to the information conveyed by mantle xenoliths (See Chapter 2.05). They provide coverage to vast regions of the Earth's upper mantle that are sparsely sampled by mantle xenoliths, particularly in the ocean basins and beneath passive continental margins, back-arc basins, and oceanic island arcs.Compared with mantle xenoliths, a disadvantage of some tectonically emplaced mantle rocks for representing mantle compositions is that their original geodynamic setting is not exactly known and their significance is sometimes a subject of speculation. For instance, the provenance of orogenic lherzolite massifs (subcontinental lithosphere versus upwelling asthenosphere) is still debated (Menzies and Dupuy, 1991, and references herein), as is the original setting

  4. High-temperature peridotites - lithospheric or asthenospheric?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hops, J.J.; Gurney, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    High-temperature peridotites by definition yield equilibration temperatures greater than 1100 degrees C. On the basis of temperature and pressure calculations, these high-temperature peridotites are amongst the deepest samples entrained by kimberlites on route to the surface. Conflicting models proposing either a lithospheric or asthenospheric origin for the high-temperature peridotites have been suggested. A detailed study of these xenoliths from a single locality, the Jagersfontein kimberlite in the Orange Free State, has been completed as a means of resolving this controversy. 10 refs., 2 figs

  5. The Sidi Mohamed peridotites (Edough Massif, NE Algeria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We suggest that the Sidi Mohamed ultramafic body was derived directly from the upper mantle and tectonically ... The aim of this paper is to determine the nature of the peridotite .... REE were enriched using the method described by. Zuleger .... Table 1. Chemical composition of the peridotites from Sidi Mohamed outcrop.

  6. Reactive-brittle dynamics in peridotite alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, O.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    The interactions between reactive fluids and brittle solids are critical in Earth dynamics. Implications of such processes are wide-ranging: from earthquake physics to geologic carbon sequestration and the cycling of fluids and volatiles through subduction zones. Peridotite alteration is a common feature in many of these processes, which - despite its obvious importance - is relatively poorly understood from a geodynamical perspective. In particular, alteration reactions are thought to be self-limiting in nature, contradicting observations of rocks that have undergone 100% hydration/carbonation. One potential explanation of this observation is the mechanism of "reaction-driven cracking": that volume changes associated with these reactions are large enough to fracture the surrounding rock, leading to a positive feedback where new reactive surfaces are exposed and fluid pathways are created. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative roles of reaction, elastic stresses and surface tension in alteration reactions. In this regard we derive a system of equations describing reactive fluid flow in an elastically deformable porous media, and explore them via a combination of analytic and numerical solutions. Using this model we show that the final stress state of a dry peridotite that has undergone reaction depends strongly on the rates of reaction versus fluid transport: significant fluid flow driven by pressure and/or surface tension gradients implies higher fractions of serpentinization, leaving behind a highly stressed residuum of partially reacted material. Using a model set-up that mimics a cylindrical triaxial apparatus we predict that the resulting stresses would lead to tensile failure and the generation of radially oriented cracks.

  7. Geochemistry of abyssal peridotites from the super slow-spreading ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Serpentinites exhibit talc veins and major serpentine derived from ...... All trace element data used for this study are listed in table 5 ..... China for Distinguished Young Scholars (Grant. No. .... abyssal peridotites: A new perspective; Earth Planet.

  8. Calcium isotopic composition of mantle peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Kang, J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Ca isotopes are useful to decipher mantle evolution and the genetic relationship between the Earth and chondrites. It has been observed that Ca isotopes can be fractionated at high temperature [1-2]. However, Ca isotopic composition of the mantle peridotites and fractionation mechanism are still poorly constrained. Here, we report Ca isotope composition of 12 co-existing pyroxene pairs in 10 lherzolites, 1 harzburgite, and 1 wehrlite xenoliths collected from Hainan Island (South Eastern China). Ca isotope data were measured on a Triton-TIMS using the double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The long-term external error is 0.12‰ (2SD) based on repeated analyses of NIST SRM 915a and geostandards. δ44Ca of clinopyroxenes except that from the wehrlite ranges from 0.85‰ to 1.14‰, while opx yields a wide range from 0.98‰ up to 2.16‰. Co-existing pyroxene pairs show large Δ44Caopx-cpx (defined as δ44Caopx-δ44Cacpx) ranging from 0 to 1.23‰, reflecting equilibrium fractionation controlled by variable Ca contents in the opx. Notably, clinopyroxene of wehrlite shows extremely high δ44Ca (3.22‰). δ44Ca of the bulk lherzolites and harzburgites range from 0.86‰ to 1.14‰. This can be explained by extracting melts with slightly light Ca isotopic compositions. Finally, the high δ44Ca of the wehrlite (3.22‰) may reflect metasomatism by melt which has preferentially lost light Ca isotopes due to chemical diffusion during upwelling through the melt channel. [1] Amini et al (2009) GGR 33; [2] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292.

  9. Orphan Strontium-87 in Abyssal Peridotites: Daddy Was a Granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Jonathan E.; Hart, Stanley R.; Dick, Henry J. B.

    1993-12-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr ratios in some bulk abyssal and alpine peridotites are too high to be binary mixtures of depleted mantle and seawater components. The apparent excess, or "orphan," 87Sr appears to be separated from its radioactive parent. Such observations were widely held to be analytical artifacts. Study of several occurrences of orphan 87Sr shows that the orphan component in abyssal peridotite is located in the alteration products of olivine and enstatite in the peridotite. The orphan 87Sr is most likely introduced by infiltration of low-temperature (<200^circC) seawater bearing suspended detrital particulates. These particulates include grains of detrital clay that are partly derived from continental (that is, granitic) sources and thus are highly radiogenic. Orphan 87Sr and other radiogenic isotopes may provide a tracer for low-temperature seawater penetrating into the oceanic crust.

  10. Evaluation of the performance of peridotite aggregates for radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinjun; Li, Guofeng; Meng, Dechuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Using peridotite rich in crystal water as aggregates of radiation-shielding concrete. • Performance of peridotite concrete is simulated and compared with ordinary concrete. • Performance of concrete samples is tested. • Neutron shielding performance can be significantly enhanced by peridotite aggregates. - Abstract: Peridotite is a kind of material that is rich in crystal water. In this paper, peridotite is used as fine and coarse aggregates for radiation shielding concrete. The transmission data of different concrete thickness and different energy neutron are calculated using Monte-Carlo method. The neutron shielding performance of the peridotite concrete samples are tested using 241 Am-Be neutron source. The results show that the peridotite is an excellent neutron shielding material

  11. The Friningen Garnet Peridotite (central Swedish Caledonides). A good example of the characteristic PTt path of a cold mantle wedge garnet peridotite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilio, Mattia; Clos, Frediano; van Roermund, Herman L M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068882432

    2015-01-01

    We present pseudosections of Cr-bearing garnet peridotite that together with new mineral–chemical data allow quantification of the early PT conditions of the original lithospheric mantle assemblage (M1) of the Friningen Garnet Peridotite (FGP) located in the central/middle belt of the Seve Nappe

  12. Sulfur and carbon geochemistry of the Santa Elena peridotites: Comparing oceanic and continental processes during peridotite alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Gazel, Esteban; Madrigal, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed on the continent serve as a window into oceanic and continental processes of water-peridotite interaction, so called serpentinization. In both environments there are active carbon and sulfur cycles that contain abiogenic and biogenic processes, which are eventually imprinted in the geochemical signatures of the basement rocks and the calcite and magnesite deposits associated with fluids that issue from these systems. Here, we present the carbon and sulfur geochemistry of ultramafic rocks and carbonate deposits from the Santa Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica. The aim of this study is to leverage the geochemistry of the ultramafic sequence and associated deposits to distinguish between processes that were dominant during ocean floor alteration and those dominant during low-temperature, continental water-peridotite interaction. The peridotites are variably serpentinized with total sulfur concentrations up to 877 ppm that is typically dominated by sulfide over sulfate. With the exception of one sample the ultramafic rocks are characterized by positive δ34Ssulfide (up to + 23.1‰) and δ34Ssulfate values (up to + 35.0‰). Carbon contents in the peridotites are low and are isotopically distinct from typical oceanic serpentinites. In particular, δ13C of the inorganic carbon suggests that the carbon is not derived from seawater, but rather the product of the interaction of meteoric water with the ultramafic rocks. In contrast, the sulfur isotope data from sulfide minerals in the peridotites preserve evidence for interaction with a hydrothermal fluid. Specifically, they indicate closed system abiogenic sulfate reduction suggesting that oceanic serpentinization occurred with limited input of seawater. Overall, the geochemical signatures preserve evidence for both oceanic and continental water-rock interaction with the majority of carbon (and possibly sulfate) being incorporated during continental water-rock interaction. Furthermore, there is

  13. Dating exhumed peridotite with spinel (U-Th)/He chronometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperdock, Emily H. G.; Stockli, Daniel F.

    2018-05-01

    The timing of cooling and exhumation of mantle peridotites in oceanic and continental settings has been challenging to determine using traditional geo- and thermochronometric techniques. Hence, the timing of the exhumation of mantle rocks to the Earth's surface at mid-ocean ridges, rifted and passive continental margins, and within continental volcanic and orogenic systems has remained largely elusive or only loosely constrained by relative age bracketing. Magmatic spinel [(Mg, Fe)(Al,Cr)2O4] is a ubiquitous primary mineral phase in mantle peridotites and is often the only primary mineral phase to survive surface weathering and serpentinization. This work explores spinel (U-Th)/He thermochronology as a novel tool to directly date the exhumation and cooling history of spinel-bearing mantle peridotite. Samples were chosen from a range of tectonic and petrologic settings, including a mid-ocean ridge abyssal peridotite (ODP Leg 209), an orogenic tectonic sliver of sub-continental mantle (Lherz massif, France), and a volcanic-rock hosted mantle xenolith (Green Knobs, NM). Spinel grains were selected based on grain size and morphology, screened for internal homogeneity using X-ray computed tomography, and air abraded to eliminate effects of alpha ejection/implantation. These case studies yield spinel He age results that are reproducible and generally in good agreement with independent age constraints. For ODP Leg 209, a spinel He age of 1.1 ± 0.3 Ma (2 SE) (n = 8) is consistent with independent U-Pb and magnetic anomaly ages for the exhumation of oceanic crust by detachment faulting along this segment of the slow-spreading ridge. Spinel from the Lherz massif yield He ages from 60-70 Ma (n = 3), which correspond well with independent thermochronometric constraints for cooling associated with Pyrenean collisional exhumation. Spinel from a mantle xenolith within a previously undated kimberlite diatreme at Green Knobs, New Mexico, generate a reproducible mean He age of 11

  14. Petrography and mineral chemistry of metamorphosed mantle peridotites of Nain Ophiolite (Central Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Nargess Shirdashtzadeh; Ghodrat Torabi; Ramin Samadi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Study of the petrology of the ophiolites as the relics of ancient oceanic lithosphere, is a powerful tool to reconstruct Earth’s history. Mantle peridotites have mostly undergone alteration and serpentinization to some extent. Thus, the relics of metamorphic signatures from the upper mantle and crustal processes from most of the peridotites have been ruined. Several recent papers deal with the mantle peridotites of Nain Ophiolite (e.g. Ghazi et al., 2010). However, no scientif...

  15. Mantle depletion and metasomatism recorded in orthopyroxene in highly depleted peridotites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, James; Liu, Jingao; Pearson, D. Graham

    2016-01-01

    Although trace element concentrations in clinopyroxene serve as a useful tool for assessing the depletion and enrichment history of mantle peridotites, this is not applicable for peridotites in which the clinopyroxene component has been consumed (~ 25% partial melting). Orthopyroxene persists in ...

  16. Water contents of clinopyroxenes from sub-arc mantle peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michael; Turner, Simon; Blatter, Dawnika; Maury, Rene; Perfit, Michael; Yogodzinski, Gene

    2017-01-01

    One poorly constrained reservoir of the Earth's water budget is that of clinopyroxene in metasomatised, mantle peridotites. This study presents reconnaissance Sensitive High-Resolution, Ion Microprobe–Stable Isotope (SHRIMP–SI) determinations of the H2O contents of (dominantly) clinopyroxenes in rare mantle xenoliths from four different subduction zones, i.e. Mexico, Kamchatka, Philippines, and New Britain (Tabar-Feni island chain) as well as one intra-plate setting (western Victoria). All of the sub-arc xenoliths have been metasomatised and carry strong arc trace element signatures. Average measured H2O contents of the pyroxenes range from 70 ppm to 510 ppm whereas calculated bulk H2O contents range from 88 ppm to 3 737 ppm if the variable presence of amphibole is taken into account. In contrast, the intra-plate, continental mantle xenolith from western Victoria has higher water contents (3 447 ppm) but was metasomatised by alkali and/or carbonatitic melts and does not carry a subduction-related signature. Material similar to the sub-arc peridotites can either be accreted to the base of the lithosphere or potentially be transported by convection deeper into the mantle where it will lose water due to amphibole breakdown.

  17. Serpentinization: Getting water into a low permeability peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar

    2017-04-01

    Fluid consuming rock transformation processes occur in a variety of settings in the Earth's crust. One such process is serpentinization, which involves hydration of ultramafic rock to form serpentine. With peridotite being one of the dominating rocks in the oceanic crust, this process changes physical and chemical properties of the crust at a large scale, increases the amount of water that enters subduction zones, and might even affect plate tectonics te{jamtveit}. A significant number of papers have studied serpentinization in different settings, from reaction fronts progressing over hundreds of meters te{rudge} to the interface scale fracture initiation te{pluemper}. However, the process represents a complicated multi-physics problem which couples external stress, mechanical deformation, volume change, fracture formation, fluid transport, the chemical reaction, heat production and heat flow. Even though it has been argued that fracture formation caused by the volume expansion allows fluid infiltration into the peridotite te{rudge}, it remains unclear how sufficient water can enter the initially low permeability peridotite to pervasively serpentinize the rock at kilometre scale. In this work, we study serpentinization numerically utilizing a thermo-hydro-mechanical model extended with a fluid consuming chemical reaction that increases the rock volume, reduces its density and strength, changes the permeability of the rock, and potentially induces fracture formation. The two-way coupled hydromechanical model is based on a discrete element model (DEM) previously used to study a volume expanding process te{ulven_1,ulven_2} combined with a fluid transport model based on poroelasticity te{ulven_sun}, which is here extended to include fluid unsaturated conditions. Finally, a new model for reactive heat production and heat flow is introduced, to make this probably the first ever fully coupled chemo-thermo-hydromechanical model describing serpentinization. With this model

  18. Extreme Hf-Os Isotope Compositions in Hawaiian Peridotite Xenoliths: Evidence for an Ancient Recycled Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimis, M.; Lassiter, J. C.; Salters, V. J.; Sen, G.; Griselin, M.

    2004-12-01

    We report on the first combined Hf-Os isotope systematics of spinel peridotite xenoliths from the Salt Lake Crater (SLC), Pali and Kaau (PK) vents from the island of Oahu, Hawaii. These peridotites are thought to represent the Pacific oceanic lithosphere beneath Oahu, as residues of MORB-type melting at a paleo-ridge some 80-100Ma ago. Clinopyroxene mineral separates in these peridotites have very similar Nd and Sr isotope compositions with the post erosional Honolulu Volcanics (HV) lavas that bring these xenoliths to the surface. This and their relatively elevated Na and LREE contents suggest that these peridotites are not simple residues of MORB-type melting but have experience some metasomatic enrichment by the host HV lavas. However, the SLC and PK xenoliths show an extreme range in Hf isotope compositions towards highly radiogenic values (ɛ Hf= 7-80), at nearly constant Nd isotope compositions (ɛ Nd= 7-10), unlike any OIB or MORB basalt. Furthermore, these Oahu peridotites show a bimodal distribution in their bulk rock 187Os/186Os ratios: the PK peridotites have similar ratios to the abyssal peridotites (0.130-0.1238), while the SLC peridotites have highly subchondritic ratios (0.1237-0.1134) that yield 500Ma to 2Ga Re-depletion ages. Hf-Os isotopes show a broad negative correlation whereby the samples with the most radiogenic 176Hf/177Hf have the most unradiogenic 187Os/186Os ratios. Based on their combined Hf-Os-Nd isotope and major element compositions, the PK peridotites can be interpreted as fragments of the Hawaiian lithosphere, residue of MORB melting 80-100Ma ago, that have been variably metasomatized by the host HV lavas. In contrast, the extreme Hf-Os isotope compositions of the SLC peridotites suggest that they cannot be the source nor residue of any kind of Hawaiian lavas, and that Hf and Os isotopes survived the metasomatism or melt-rock reaction that has overprinted the Nd and Sr isotope compositions of these peridotites. The ancient (>1Ga

  19. Magnetic properties of serpentinized peridotites from the Zedong ophiolite, Yarlung-Zangbo suture zone, SE Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Zheng, J.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Xiong, Q.; Liu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Serpentinized mantle peridotites are widely supposed to be significant sources of the magnetic, gravity and seismic anomalies in mid-oceanic ridges, forearcs and suture zones. However, the relationship between the magnetic properties of variably serpentinized peridotites and the serpentinization process is still under debate. Ophiolite outcrops commonly comprise peridotites in different stages of serpentinization and these ophiolitic peridotites are ideal to investigate the magnetic signatures of suture zones. The Zedong ophiolite locates in the eastern part of the Yarlung-Zangbo suture zone, SE Tibet (China), and the peridotite massif represents the remnants of the Neo-Tethyan lithospheric mantle. The harzburgite and lherzolite samples show densities between 3.316 and 2.593 g cm-3, and vary from the freshest to >90% serpentinized peridotites. The magnetic susceptibility curves from room temperature to 700ºC mainly show the Curie temperatures of 585ºC for pure magnetite. The low-temperature (20-300 K) demagnetization curves show the Verwey transitions at 115-125 K, suggesting that magnetite is also the dominant remanence-carrying phase. The hysteresis data of the peridotites fall in the region of pseudo-single-domain (PSD) and follow the theoretical trends for mixtures of single domain (SD) and multidomain (MD) magnetite. The first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams suggest that the magnetite is dominantly interacting SD + PSD particles for S 40% serpentinized samples. The susceptibility and saturation magnetization of the Zedong peridotites range from 0.9 to 30.8 × 10‒3 (SI) and 14.1 to 1318 × 10‒3 Am2 kg‒1, respectively, and both show consistent trends with increasing degrees of serpentinization. The S serpentinization of ophiolitic peridotites, whereas the S > 40% peridotites have higher susceptibilities of 0.02-0.03 (SI) and fall in the region of abyssal peridotites. Our results suggest that the Zedong ophiolitic peridotites probably experienced a

  20. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope constraints on hydrothermal alteration of the Trinity peridotite, Klamath Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakhovitch, V.; Quick, J.E.; Gregory, R.T.

    2005-01-01

    The Trinity peridotite represents a rare opportunity to examine a relatively fertile plagioclase peridotite that was exhumed and later subjected to intrusive events in a seafloor environment, followed by its emplacement and incorporation into a continent. Over 250 stable isotopic determinations on whole rocks and minerals elucidate the hydrothermal evolution of the Trinity complex. All three serpentine polymorphs are present in the Trinity peridotite; these separate on the basis of their ??D values: antigorite, -46 serpentinization, or overprinting of earlier low-temperature seafloor serpentinization. Regionally, contours of ??D values exhibit bull's-eye patterns associated with the gabbroic plutons, with ??D maxima coinciding with the blackwall alteration at the margins on the plutons. In contrast to the hydrogen isotope behavior, oxygen isotope values of the three polymorphs are indistinguishable, spanning the range 5.3 history: (1) lithospheric emplacement and cooling of the peridotite in an oceanic environment ??? 472 Ma; (2) intrusion of gabbroic plutons into cold peridotite in an arc environment between 435 and 404 Ma; and finally (3) intrusion of felsic plutons between 171 and 127 Ma, long after the peridotite was incorporated into the continental crust. Copyright ?? 2005 by V. H. Winston & Son, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CO2 injection into fractured peridotites: a reactive percolation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escario, S.; Godard, M.; Gouze, P.; Leprovost, R.; Luquot, L.; Garcia-Rios, M.

    2017-12-01

    Mantle peridotites have the potential to trap CO2 as carbonates. This process observed in ophiolites and in oceanic environments provides a long term and safe storage for CO2. It occurs as a part of a complex suite of fluid-rock reactions involving silicate dissolution and precipitation of hydrous phases, carbonates and minor phases that may in turn modify the hydrodynamic properties and the reactivity of the reacted rocks. The efficiency and lastingness of the process require the renewal of fluids at the mineral-fluid interface. Fractures are dominant flow paths in exhumed mantle sections. This study aims at better understanding the effect of CO2-enriched saline fluids on hydrodynamic and chemical processes through fractured peridotites. Experiments were performed using the reactive percolation bench ICARE Lab 3 - Géosciences Montpellier. It allows monitoring the permeability changes during experiments. Effluents are recurrently sampled for analysing cation concentration, pH and alkalinity. Reacted rock samples were characterized by high resolution X-ray microtomography (ESRF ID19, Grenoble, France) and SEM. Experiments consisted in injecting CO2-enriched brines (NaCl 0.5 M) at a rate of 6 mL.h-1 into artificially fractured cores (9 mm diameter × 20 mm length) of Oman harzburgites at T=170°C and Ptotal = 25 MPa for up to 2 weeks. Fractures are of few µm apertures with rough walls. Three sets of experiments were performed at increasing value of [CO2] (0, 0.1 and 1 mol/kg). All experiments showed a decrease in permeability followed by steady state regime that can be caused by a decrease in the roughness of fracture walls (dissolution dominated process), thus favouring fracture closing, or by the precipitation of secondary phases. Maximum enrichments in Mg, Fe and Ca of the effluent fluids occur during the first 2 hours of the experiments whereas Si displays a maximum enrichment at t = 20 h, suggesting extensive dissolution. Maximum enrichments are observed with

  2. Geochronological Constraints on the Exhumation and Emplacement of Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle Peridotites in the Westernmost Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Carlos J.; Hidas, Károly; Marchesi, Claudio; Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Booth-Rea, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    Exhumation of subcontinental mantle peridotite in the Western Mediterranean has been attributed to different tectonic processes including pure extension, transpression, or alternating contractive and extensional processes related with continental subduction followed by extension, before final their contractive intracrustal emplacement. Any model trying to explain the exhumation and emplacement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle peridotites in the westernmost Mediterranean should take into account the available geochronological constraints, as well as the petrological and geochemical processes that lead to internal tectono-magmatic zoning so characteristic of the Betic and Rif orogenic peridotites. Different studies have suggested a Hercynian, Cenozoic-Mesozoic or an Alpine age for the late tectono-magmatic evolution and intra-crustal emplacement of Betic-Rif peridotites. The pervasive presence of Mesozoic U-Pb zircon ages in Ronda UHP and HP garnet pyroxenites does not support a Hercynian age for the intracrustal emplacement of the peridotite. A hyper-extended margin setting for is in good agreement with the Jurassic extensional event that pervasively affected ALKAPECA terrains (i.e. the Alboran, Kabylides, Peloritani, and Calabria domains) in the western Mediterranean due to the opening of the Piemonte-Ligurian Ocean. However, a Jurassic age and a passive margin tectonic setting do not account, among other observations, for the late Miocene thermochronological ages recorded in zircons rims (U-Pb) and garnets (Lu-Hf) in garnet pyroxenites from the Betic-Rif peridotites, the pervasive Miocene resetting of U-Pb zircon and monazite ages in the overlying Jubrique crustal section, the supra-subduction radiogenic signature of late pyroxenite intrusive dikes in the Ronda peridotite, and the arc tholeiitic affinity of late mantle-derived, gabbroic dykes intruding in the Ronda and Ojen plagioclase lherzolites. These data are more consistent with a supra

  3. Oceanization of the lithospheric mantle: the study case of the spinel peridotites from Monte Maggiore (Corsica, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, G. B.

    2009-04-01

    The Monte Maggiore peridotite body, cropping out within the Alpine Corsica metamorphic belt, is an ophiolite massif derived from the more internal setting of the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys basin. It is mostly composed by spinel and plagioclase peridotites that are cut by MORB gabbroic dykes. The spinel peridotites, similarly to other ophiolitic peridotites from the Internal Ligurides, have been considered, on the basis of their low abundance of fusible components, low Si and high Mg contents, as refractory residua after MORB-type partial melting related to the formation of the Jurassic basin (e.g. Rampone et al., 1997). Recent studies (e.g. Müntener & Piccardo 2003; Rampone et al. 2008) have evidenced that these depleted spinel peridotites show diffuse melt-rock interaction micro-textures and contrasting bulk vs. mineral chemistry features which cannot be simply reconciled with partial melting. Accordingly, these peridotites have been recognized as reactive peridotites, formed by interaction of pristine peridotites with melts percolating by porous flow. Geochemical data have evidenced the depleted MORB signature of the percolating melts. Recent field studies at Monte Maggiore (Piccardo, 2007; Piccardo & Guarnieri, 2009), have revealed: 1) the presence and local abundance of pyroxenite-bearing, cpx-rich spinel lherzolites and 2) the replacement relationships of the reactive peridotites on the pyroxenite-bearing lherzolite rock-types. The pyroxenite-veined spinel lherzolites record a composite history of subsolidus evolution under lithospheric P-T conditions, thus indicating their provenance from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Accordingly, the pristine sub-continental mantle protoliths were infiltrated by MORB melts and transformed by melt-rock interaction to reactive spinel peridotites and refertilized by melt impregnation to plagioclase-enriched peridotites. Available isotopic data on the Mt. Maggiore spinel and plagioclase peridotites and gabbroic rocks

  4. Origin of garnet and clinopyroxene in Kaapvaal low-T peridotite xenoliths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, N.S.C.; Irvine, G.J.; Davies, G.R.; Pearson, D.G.; Carlson, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed petrographic, major and trace element and isotope (Re-Os) study is presented on 18 xenoliths from Northern Lesotho kimberlites. The samples represent typical coarse, low-temperature garnet and spinel peridotites and span a P-T range from ∼60 to 150 km depth. With the exception of one

  5. The force of crystallization and fracture propagation during in-situ carbonation of peridotite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, Reinier; Wolterbeek, Timotheus K.T.; Drury, Martyn R.; Kandianis, Michael T.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Subsurface mineralization of CO2 by injection into (hydro-)fractured peridotites has been proposed as a carbon sequestration method. It is envisaged that the expansion in solid volume associated with the mineralization reaction leads to a build-up of stress, resulting in the opening of further

  6. Tracing alteration of mantle peridotite in the Samail ophiolite using Mg isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Obeso, J. C.; Kelemen, P. B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Magnesium is one of the main constituents of mantle peridotite ( 22.8 wt%), which has a homogeneous Mg isotopic composition (d26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.04 ‰ (2 sd) DSM3, Teng et al 2010 GCA). Mg isotopes are used as tracers of continental and oceanic weathering as they exhibit variable degrees of fractionation during alteration depending on the lithology. Here we report some of the first Mg isotopic compositions of the mantle section of the Samail ophiolite in Oman and its alteration products. The mantle section of the ophiolite is composed mainly of depleted harzburgites and dunites with mantle-like d26Mg (-0.25, -0.21 ‰). Mantle peridotite is far from equilibrium in near surface conditions leading to rapid, extensive serpentinization, carbonation and oxidation, as well as other geochemical changes. Our analyzed samples encompass most of the alteration of peridotite products observed in Oman including listvenites (completely carbonated peridotite) near the basal thrust of the ophiolite, massive magnesite veins within peridotite outcrops, and heavily altered harzburgites. Magnesite listvenites have d26Mg slightly below mantle values (-0.33, -0.33‰) while dolomite listvenites are significantly lighter (-1.46, -0.89‰). This suggests that heavy Mg isotopes were removed from the listvenites during ophiolite emplacement. Heavily altered peridotite from Wadi Fins exhibit alteration halos with drastic changes in composition. The most oxidized areas are enriched in Fe and depleted in Mg compared to the cores of the samples. These variations in Mg concentrations are complemented by a shift to heavy Mg isotopic compositions (0.74, 0.86‰), among the heaviest d26Mg values that have been reported in altered peridotite. Potential sinks for light isotopes removed from such alteration zones are massive magnesite veins with very light compositions (-3.39, -3.14‰). The fractionation of Mg isotopes observed in the mantle section of the ophiolite spans more than 50% of the known

  7. Peridotite carbonation at the leading edge of the mantle wedge: OmDP Site BT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Godard, M.; Johnson, K. T. M.; Okazaki, K.; Manning, C. E.; Urai, J. L.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.; Coggon, J. A.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Phase I Science Party, T. O. D. P.

    2017-12-01

    Hole BT1B sampled 3 layers of carbonated peridotite (listvenite, 0-80, 100-180, 185-197 m) separated by 2 layers of carbonate-bearing serpentinite (80-100, 180-185 m), underlain by 100 m metasediment and metabasalt. Listvenites (magnesite and/or dolomite + quartz + Fe-oxyhydroxides + chromian spinel ± fuchsite rocks) replacing mantle peridotite at and near the base of the Samail ophiolite (Stanger 85, Wilde ea 02, Nasir ea 07, Falk & Kelemen 15: FK15) reveal processes of carbon transfer into the mantle wedge (Kelemen & Manning 15) and suggest methods for CO2 capture and storage (Kelemen ea 11). Near BT1, 10 to 200 m thick tabular listvenites interlayered with partly serpentinized harzburgite have contacts parallel to the basal thrust. Imprecise Rb/Sr and 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate listvenite formed during obduction (FK15). Listvenite-peridotite contacts are gradational over 1-2 m. The listvenite matrix is microcrystalline quartz + magnesite. Quartz recrystallized from opal as in listvenites worldwide (Akbulut ea 06, Boschi ea 09, Jurkovic ea 12, Aftabi & Zarrinkoub 13, Posukhova ea 13, Ulrich ea 14) consistent with 80-120°C from clumped isotopes and phase equilibria (FK15). Thus listvenite formed - and deformed ductilely - at low T. Ubiquitous carbonate-rich veins locally comprise >10% of core sections; many have antitaxial textures consistent with expansion due to crystallization pressure. Carbonate-rich veins cut serpentinite and listvenite; veins formed a mesh, followed by replacement of mesh cores. Despite variability in and around veins, average Mg/Si, Fe/Si, Al/Si, Fe/Mg, and Cr/Al in listvenite (75 whole rocks, 7712 XRF scanner points) are indistinguishable from average Samail peridotite. CaO (average 5 wt%, range 0-40) and strongly correlated Sr were added to peridotite, most likely from subducting sediment. Rare core with >10 vol% dolomite has higher Fe/Mg than peridotite, but the same Mg/Si. Thus Mg, Si, Al and Cr, plus Fe in most rocks, were largely

  8. Negative CO2 emissions via subsurface mineral carbonation in fractured peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Matter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Uptake of CO2 from surface water via mineral carbonation in peridotite can be engineered to achieve negative CO2 emissions. Reaction with peridotite, e.g., CO2 + olivine (A), serpentine (B) and brucite (C), forms inert, non-toxic, solid carbonates such as magnesite. Experimental studies show that A can be 80% complete in a few hours with 30 micron powders and elevated P(CO2) [1,2,3]. B is slower, but in natural systems the rate of B+C is significant [4]. Methods for capture of dilute CO2 via mineral carbonation [4,5,6,7] are not well known, though CO2 storage via mineral carbonation has been discussed for decades [8,9]. Where crushed peridotite is available, as in mine tailings, increased air or water flow could enhance CO2 uptake at a reasonable cost [4,5]. Here we focus on enhancing subsurface CO2 uptake from surface water flowing in fractured peridotite, in systems driven by thermal convection such as geothermal power plants. Return of depleted water to the surface would draw down CO2 from the air [6,7]. CO2 uptake from water, rate limited by flow in input and output wells, could exceed 1000 tons CO2/yr [7]. If well costs minus power sales were 0.1M to 1M and each system lasts 10 years this costs oil industry. Uptake of 1 Gt CO2/yr at 1000 t/well/yr requires 1M wells, comparable to the number of producing oil and gas wells in the USA. Subsurface CO2 uptake could first be applied in coastal, sub-seafloor peridotite with onshore drilling. Sub-seafloor peridotite is extensive off Oman, New Caledonia and Papua New Guinea, with smaller amounts off Spain, Morocco, USA, etc. This would be a regional contribution, used in parallel with other methods elsewhere. To achieve larger scale is conceivable. There is a giant mass of seafloor peridotite along slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges. Could robotic drills enhance CO2 uptake at a reasonable cost, while fabric chimneys transport CO2-depleted water to the sea surface? Does anyone know James Cameron's phone number? [1] O

  9. The Finero phlogopite-peridotite massif: an example of subduction-related metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Alberto; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio; Rivalenti, Giorgio; Vannucci, Riccardo

    The Finero peridotite massif is a harzburgite that suffered a dramatic metasomatic enrichment resulting in the pervasive presence of amphibole and phlogopite and in the sporadic occurrence of apatite and carbonate (dolomite)-bearing domains. Pyroxenite (websterite) dykes also contain phlogopite and amphibole, but are rare. Peridotite bulk-rock composition retained highly depleted major element characteristics, but was enriched in K, Rb, Ba, Sr, LREE (light rare earth elements) (LaN/YbN=8-17) and depleted in Nb. It has high radiogenic Sr (87Sr/86Sr(270)=0.7055-0.7093), low radiogenic Nd (ɛNd(270)=-1 to -3) and EMII-like Pb isotopes. Two pyroxenite - peridotite sections examined in detail show the virtual absence of major and trace element gradients in the mineral phases. In both rock types, pyroxenes and olivines have the most unfertile major element composition observed in Ivrea peridotites, spinels are the richest in Cr, and amphibole is pargasite. Clinopyroxenes exhibit LREE-enriched patterns (LaN/YbN 16), negative Ti and Zr and generally positive Sr anomaly. Amphibole has similar characteristics, except a weak negative Sr anomaly, but incompatible element concentration 1.9 (Sr) to 7.9 (Ti) times higher than that of coexisting clinopyroxene. Marked geochemical gradients occur toward apatite and carbonate-bearing domains which are randomly distributed in both the sections examined. In these regions, pyroxenes and amphibole (edenite) arelower in mg## and higher in Na2O, and spinels and phlogopite are richer in Cr2O3. Both the mineral assemblage and the incompatible trace element characteristics of the mineral phases recall the typical signatures of ``carbonatite'' metasomatism (HFSE depletion, Sr, LILE and LREE enrichment). Clinopyroxene has higher REE and Sr concentrations than amphibole (amph/cpxDREE,Sr=0.7-0.9) and lower Ti and Zr concentrations. It is proposed that the petrographic and geochemical features observed at Finero are consistent with a subduction

  10. Petrology and geochemistry of a peridotite body in Central- Carpathian Paleogene sediments (Sedlice, eastern Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koppa Matúš

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied representative samples from a peridotite body situated NE of Sedlice village within the Central- Carpathian Paleogene sediments in the Central Western Carpathians. The relationship of the peridotite to the surrounding Paleogene sediments is not clear. The fractures of the brecciated peridotite margin are healed with secondary magnesite and calcite. On the basis of the presented bulk-rock and electron microprobe data, the wt. % amounts of mineral phases were calculated. Most of calculated “modal” compositions of this peridotite corresponds to harzburgites composed of olivine (∼70-80 wt. %, orthopyroxene (∼17-24 wt. %, clinopyroxene ( < 5 wt. % and minor spinel ( < 1 wt. %. Harzburgites could originate from lherzolitic protoliths due to a higher degree of partial melting. Rare lherzolites contain porphyroclastic 1-2 mm across orthopyroxene (up to 25 wt. %, clinopyroxene (∼ 5-8 wt. % and minor spinel ( < 0.75 wt. %. On the other hand, rare, olivine-rich dunites with scarce orthopyroxene porphyroclasts are associated with harzburgites. Metamorphic mineral assemblage of low-Al clinopyroxene (3, tremolite, chrysotile, andradite, Cr-spinel to chromite and magnetite, and an increase of fayalite component in part of olivine, indicate low-temperature metamorphic overprint. The Primitive Mantle normalized whole-rock REE patterns suggest a depleted mantle rock-suite. An increase in LREE and a positive Eu anomaly may be consequence of interactive metamorphic fluids during serpentinization. Similar rocks have been reported from the Meliatic Bôrka Nappe overlying the Central Western Carpathians orogenic wedge since the Late Cretaceous, and they could be a potential source of these peridotite blocks in the Paleogene sediments.

  11. Water Content of the Oceanic Lithosphere at Hawaii from FTIR Analysis of Peridotite Xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Bizmis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Although water in the mantle is mostly present as trace H dissolved in minerals, it has a large influence on its melting and rheological properties. The water content of the mantle lithosphere beneath continents is better constrained by abundant mantle xenolith data than beneath oceans where it is mainly inferred from MORB glass analysis. Using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, we determined the water content of olivine (Ol), clinopyroxene (Cpx) and orthopyroxene (Opx) in spinel peridotite xenoliths from Salt Lake Crater, Oahu, Hawaii, which are thought to represent fragments of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere that was refertilized by alkalic Hawaiian melts. Only Ol exhibits H diffusion profiles, evidence of limited H loss during xenolith transport to the surface. Water concentrations (Ol: 9-28 ppm H2O, Cpx: 246-566 ppm H2O, Opx: 116-224 ppm H2O) are within the range of those from continental settings but higher than those from Gakkel ridge abyssal peridotites. The Opx H2O contents are similar to those of abyssal peridotites from Atlantic ridge Leg 153 (170-230 ppm) but higher than those from Leg 209 (10- 14 ppm). The calculated bulk peridotite water contents (94 to 144 ppm H2O) are in agreement with MORB mantle source water estimates and lower than estimates for the source of Hawaiian rejuvenated volcanism (approx 540 ppm H2O) . The water content of Cpx and most Opx correlates negatively with spinel Cr#, and positively with pyroxene Al and HREE contents. This is qualitatively consistent with the partitioning of H into the melt during partial melting, but the water contents are too high for the degree of melting these peridotites experienced. Melts in equilibrium with xenolith minerals have H2O/Ce ratios similar to those of OIB

  12. Implications of spinel compositions for the petrotectonic history of abyssal peridotite from Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Jin, Z.; Wang, Y.; Tao, C.

    2012-12-01

    Abyssal peridotites generate at mid-ocean ridges. Lherzolite and harzburgite are the main rock types of peridotites in the uppermost mantle. The lherzolite subtype, less depleted and less common in ophiolites, characterizes mantle diapirs and slow-spreading ridges. Along the Earth's mid-ocean ridges, abyssal peridotites undergo hydration reactions to become serpentinite minerals, especially in slow to ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridges. Spinel is common in small quantities in peridotites, and its compositions have often been used as petrogenetic indicators [1]. The Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is one of the two ultraslow spreading ridges in the world. The studied serpentinized peridotite sample was collected by the 21st Voyage of the Chinese oceanic research ship Dayang Yihao (aka Ocean No. 1) from a hydrothermal field (63.5°E, 28.0°S, and 3660 m deep) in SWIR. The studied spinels in serpentinized lherzolite have four zones with different compositions: relic, unaltered core is magmatic Al-spinels; micro- to nano- sized ferrichromite zoned particles; narrow and discontinuous magnetite rim; and chlorite aureoles. The values Cr# of the primary Al-spinels indicate the range of melting for abyssal peridotites from SWIR extends from ~4% to ~7% [2]. The alteration rims of ferrichromite have a chemical composition characterized by Fe enrichment and Cr# increase indicating chromite altered under greenschist-amphibolite facies. Magnetites formed in syn- and post- serpentinization. Chlorite (clinochlore) formed at the boundary and crack of spinel indicating it had undergone with low-temperature MgO- and SiO2-rich hydrothermal fluids [3]. It suggests that serpentinized lherzolite from SWIR had undergone poly-stage hydration reactions with a wide range of temperature. Acknowledgments: EMPA experiment was carried out by Xihao Zhu and Shu Zheng in The Second Institute of Oceanography and China University of Geosciences, respectively. The work was supported by NSFC

  13. Experimental Melting Study of Basalt-Peridotite Hybrid Source: Constrains on Chemistry of Recycled Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S.; Takahashi, E.; Matsukage, K. N.; Suzuki, T.; Kimura, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    It is believed that magma genesis of OIB is largely influenced by recycled oceanic crust component involved in the mantle plume (e.g., Hauri et al., 1996; Takahashi & Nakajima., 2002; Sobolev et al., 2007). Mallik & Dasgupta (2012) reported that the wall-rock reaction in MORB-eclogite and peridotite layered experiments produced a spectrum of tholeiitic to alkalic melts. However, the proper eclogite source composition is still under dispute. In order to figure out the geochemistry of recycled component as well as their melting process, we conducted a series of high-P, high-T experiments. Melting experiments (1~10hrs) were performed under 2.9GPa with Boyd-England type piston-cylinder (1460~1540°C for dry experiments, 1400~1500°C for hydrous experiments) and 5GPa with Kawai-type multi-anvil (1550~1650°C for dry experiments, 1350~1550°C for hydrous experiments), at the Magma Factory, Tokyo Tech. Spinel lherzolite KLB-1 (Takahashi 1986) was employed as peridotite component. Two basalts were used as recycled component: Fe-enriched Columbia River basalt (CRB72-180, Takahashi et al., 1998) and N-type MORB (NAM-7, Yasuda et al., 1994). In dry experiments below peridotite dry solidus, melt compositions ranged from basaltic andesite to tholeiite. Opx reaction band generated between basalt and peridotite layer hindered chemical reaction. On the other hand, alkali basalt was formed in hydrous run products because H2O promoted melting process in both layers. Compared with melts formed by N-MORB-peridotite runs, those layered experiments with CRB are enriched in FeO, TiO2, K2O and light REE at given MgO. In other words, melts produced by CRB-peridotite layered experiments are close to alkali basalts in OIB and tholeiite in Hawaii, while those by layered experiments with N-MORB are poor in above elements. Thus we propose that Fe-rich Archean or Proterozoic tholeiite (BVSP 1980) would be a possible candidate for recycled component in OIB source.

  14. Petrology and Geochemistry of Serpentinized Peridotites from a Bonin Fore-arc Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Tuoyu, W.; Dong, Y. H.; Gao, J.; Wu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinites, which contain up to 13 wt.% of water, are an important reservoir for chemical recycling in subduction zones. During the last two decades, many observations documented the occurrence of fore-arc mantle serpentinites in different locations. Here, we present petrology and whole rock chemistry for serpentinized peridotites dredged from the Hahajima Seamount, which is located 20-60 km west of the junction of the Bonin Trench and the Mariana Trench. Combined with published geochemical data of serpentinites from the Torishima Seamount, Conical Seamount and South Chamorro Seamount in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc region, it will allow us to better understand the average composition of serpentinized fore-arc mantle overlying the subducting slab and the role of serpentinized mantle playing in the subduction zone geochemical cycle. The studied ultramafic rocks from the Hahajima Seamount are extensively serpentinized and hydrated (73 to 83%), with loss of ignition values ranging between 13 and 15 wt.%. Our results show that the serpentinized peridotites have Mg number from 88 to 90, and the average MgO/SiO2 is 0.93. The average Al2O3 (0.48 wt.%) and CaO (0.23 wt.%) contents are very low, consistent with low clinopyroxene abundances, and the overall depleted character of the mantle harzburgite protoliths. The serpentinized peridotites from the Hahajima Seamount exhibit similar "U" shape rare earth element (REE) patterns ([La/Sm]N = 3.1-3.6), at higher overall abundances, to the Conical and South Chamorro Seamount suites. One exceptional sample shows the similar REE pattern as serpentinized peridotites from the Torishima Seamount, with depleted light REE concentration ([La/Sm]N =0.7). All the serpentinized peridotites from these four fore-arc seamounts show strong enrichment in fluid-mobile and lithophile elements (U, Pb, Sr and Li). The geochemical signature of the serpentinized peridotites from the seamounts in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc region could be

  15. A Re-Os Study of Depleted Trench Peridotites from Northern Mariana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T.; Snow, J. E.; Heri, A. R.; Brandon, A. D.; Ishizuka, O.

    2017-12-01

    Trench peridotites provide information about the influence of subduction initiation on the extent of mantle wedge melting. They preserve melting records throughout subduction history, and as a result, likely experience multiple melt extraction events leading to successive depletion of melt/fluid mobile major and trace elements. To track melting histories of trench peridotites, Re-Os and PGEs can be used as reliable tracers to constrain early melt extraction or re-fertilization events. The Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, being the largest intra-oceanic subduction system, provides an excellent area to study the formation of supra-subduction zone mantle and crust. Residual peridotite (harzburgite and dunite) samples were collected by dredging from the landward slope of the northern Mariana Trench. The samples are serpentinized to various extents (typical of abyssal peridotites), leaving behind relict grains of spinel, enstatite and olivine embedded within a serpentine matrix along with occasional interstitial diopside. Major element analyses of primary minerals reveal a wide range of variations in Cr# of spinels from 0.31-0.85 indicating 16-20% of melt fraction with dunites apparently experiencing the highest amount of partial melting. For Re-Os and PGE geochemistry, samples with high amounts of spinel (>4 vol %) and variable Cr# were chosen. Initial results show that bulk rock 187Os/188Os ratios range from 0.1113 to 0.1272. All of the samples are sub-chondritic, but in some cases, they are more radiogenic than average abyssal peridotites. Os abundances vary from 1-9 ppb. Sub-chondritic values can be attributed to the samples having evolved from a Re-depleted mantle source indicating a previous melt-extraction event. The cpx-harzburgites, having lower Cr# ( 0.4) are more radiogenic than ultra depleted dunites (Cr# 0.8), which might indicate preferential removal of Os during an apparent higher degree of partial melting experienced by dunites. The higher 187Os/188Os ratios of

  16. The first find of spinel peridotite in the Southern Kazakhstan: Structure, composition, and parameters of high-pressure metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilitsyna, A. V.; Tretyakov, A. A.; Alifirova, T. A.; Degtyarev, K. E.; Kovalchuk, E. V.

    2017-09-01

    Spinel peridotite, metamorphosed in high-pressure conditions, was first described within the Western part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The spinel peridotite has the characteristics of Mg-Cr ultramafites indicating the mantle origin of its protolith. The preliminary estimation of the metamorphism peak for the model system MgO-Al2O3—SiO2-Cr2O3 (MASCr) is 10-19 kbar at 680-800°C.

  17. Ancient mantle in a modern arc: osmium isotopes in izu-bonin-mariana forearc peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson; Hawkesworth; Cohen

    1998-09-25

    Mantle peridotites drilled from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana forearc have unradiogenic 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1193 to 0.1273), which give Proterozoic model ages of 820 to 1230 million years ago. If these peridotites are residues from magmatism during the initiation of subduction 40 to 48 million years ago, then the mantle that melted was much more depleted in incompatible elements than the source of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). This result indicates that osmium isotopes record information about ancient melting events in the convecting upper mantle not recorded by incompatible lithophile isotope tracers. Subduction zones may be a graveyard for ancient depleted mantle material, and portions of the convecting upper mantle may be less radiogenic in osmium isotopes than previously recognized.

  18. The Friningen Garnet Peridotite (central Swedish Caledonides). A good example of the characteristic PTt path of a cold mantle wedge garnet peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Mattia; Clos, Frediano; van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2015-08-01

    We present pseudosections of Cr-bearing garnet peridotite that together with new mineral-chemical data allow quantification of the early PT conditions of the original lithospheric mantle assemblage (M1) of the Friningen Garnet Peridotite (FGP) located in the central/middle belt of the Seve Nappe Complex in central Sweden. Results indicate that the early, coarse grained, olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + "high Cr" garnet assemblage (M1a) was formed at 1100 ± 100 °C and 5.0 ± 0.5 GPa. These metamorphic conditions were followed by an inferred late Proterozoic exhumation event down to 850-900 °C and 1.5 GPa (M1b). The latter PT estimate is based on the breakdown of high-Cr M1a garnet (Cr# = 0.065) + olivine into an orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + spinel (Cr# = 0.15-0.25) ± pargasite kelyphite (M1b) and the exsolution of garnet from Al-rich orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene. The M1b kelyphite is overprinted by an early-Caledonian UHPM mineral assemblage (M2; T = 800 °C and P = 3.0 GPa), equivalent to the earlier discovered UHP assemblage within an eclogitic dyke that cross-cuts FGP. In the garnet peridotite M2 is displayed by low-Cr garnet (Cr# = 0.030) growing together with spinel (Cr# = 0.35-0.45), both these minerals form part of the olivine + orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + garnet + spinel + pargasite M2 assemblage. The formation of plagioclase + diopside symplectites after omphacite and breakdown of kyanite to sapphirine + albite in internal eclogite and the breakdown of M2 olivine + garnet to amphibole + orthopyroxene + spinel assemblages (M3) in garnet peridotite indicate post-UHP isothermal decompression down to 750-800 °C and 0.8-1.0 GPa (= M3). Multiphase solid-and fluid inclusion assemblages composed of Sr-bearing magnesite, dolomite or carbon decorate linear defect structures within M1a-b minerals and/or form subordinate local assemblages together with M2 minerals. The latter are interpreted as evidence for infiltration of early-Caledonian COH

  19. Highly refractory Archaean peridotite cumulates: Petrology and geochemistry of the Seqi Ultramafic Complex, SW Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Szilas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the petrogenesis of the Seqi Ultramafic Complex, which covers a total area of approximately 0.5 km2. The ultramafic rocks are hosted by tonalitic orthogneiss of the ca. 3000 Ma Akia terrane with crosscutting granitoid sheets providing an absolute minimum age of 2978 ± 8 Ma for the Seqi Ultramafic Complex. The Seqi rocks represent a broad range of olivine-dominated plutonic rocks with varying modal amounts of chromite, orthopyroxene and amphibole, i.e. various types of dunite (s.s., peridotite (s.l., as well as chromitite. The Seqi Ultramafic Complex is characterised primarily by refractory dunite, with highly forsteritic olivine with core compositions having Mg# ranging from about 91 to 93. The overall high modal contents, as well as the specific compositions, of chromite rule out that these rocks represent a fragment of Earth's mantle. The occurrence of stratiform chromitite bands in peridotite, thin chromite layers in dunite and poikilitic orthopyroxene in peridotite instead supports the interpretation that the Seqi Ultramafic Complex represents the remnant of a fragmented layered complex or a magma conduit, which was subsequently broken up and entrained during the formation of the regional continental crust.Integrating all of the characteristics of the Seqi Ultramafic Complex points to formation of these highly refractory peridotites from an extremely magnesian (Mg# ∼ 80, near-anhydrous magma, as olivine-dominated cumulates with high modal contents of chromite. It is noted that the Seqi cumulates were derived from a mantle source by extreme degrees of partial melting (>40%. This mantle source could potentially represent the precursor for the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM in this region, which has previously been shown to be ultra-depleted. The Seqi Ultramafic Complex, as well as similar peridotite bodies in the Fiskefjord region, may thus constitute the earliest cumulates that formed during the

  20. A Missing Link in Understanding Mantle Wedge Melting, Higashi-akaishi Peridotite, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, C. B.; Carlson, R. W.; Grove, T. L.; Wallis, S.; Mizukami, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Sanbagawa subduction-type metamorphic belt in SW Japan represents the deepest exposed portion of a Mesozoic accretionary complex along the Japanese island arc. Located on the island of Shikoku, the Higashi-akaishi peridotite body is the largest ultramafic lens within the Sanbagawa belt and is dominantly composed of dunite, lherzolite and garnet clinopyroxenite, interfingered in one locality with quartz-rich eclogite. Previous work indicates the P-T history of the peridotite includes rapid prograde metamorphism with peak temperatures of 700-810°C and pressures of 2.9-3.8 GPa at approximately 110-120 Ma. Here we present major and trace element and isotopic data for samples within the Higashi-akaishi peridotite body that suggest it records subduction zone melting processes. Ultramafic samples range from 40-52 wt. % SiO2 and 21-45 wt. % MgO with olivine and clinopyroxene Mg#s as high as 0.93 and have trace element concentrations diagnostic of subduction zone processes. The quartz-rich eclogite contains 62 wt. % SiO2, 6 wt. % MgO and 13 wt. % Al2O3 and has trace element concentrations that are enriched relative to the ultramafic samples. 87Sr/86Sr (.703237-.704288), 143Nd/144Nd (ɛNd=+2-6) and Pb isotopic compositions are within the range of Japanese arc rocks. 187Os/188Os values range from typical mantle values (0.123-0.129), to slightly elevated (0.133) in one peridotite with an unusually low Os content, to a high of 0.145 in the quartz-rich eclogite. The presence of garnet porphyroblasts that enclose primary euhedral chlorite, together with the chemical evidence, suggest these samples are associated with mantle melting in the presence of H2O near their peak P-T conditions and may represent both residues and trapped melts within a paleo-mantle wedge. The peak P-T conditions of these rocks are also similar to the solidus conditions of H2O-saturated fertile mantle based on experimental determinations. Thus the Higashi-akaishi peridotite may be a real world analog

  1. PYROXENITE VEINS WITHIN SSZ PERIDOTITES – EVIDENCE OF MELT-ROCK INTERACTION (EGIINGOL MASSIF), MAJOR AND TRACE ELEMENT COMPOSITION OF MINERALS

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Karimov; M A. Gornova; V. A. Belyaev

    2017-01-01

    Evidence of melt-rock reaction between suprasubduction zone (SSZ) peridotites and island arc boninititc and tholeiitic melts are identified. This process is the cause of replacive dunites and pyroxenite veins forming, which are represent the ways of island-arc melts migration. The peridotite-melt interaction is confirmed by compositional features of rocks and minerals. Influence of boninitic melt in peridotites of South Sandwich island arc leads to increasing of TiO2 and Cr-number (Cr#) in sp...

  2. Supra-subduction and mid-ocean ridge peridotites from the Piranshahr area, NW Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajialioghli, Robab; Moazzen, Mohssen

    2014-11-01

    The Piranshahr metaperidotites in the northwestern end of the Zagros orogen were emplaced following the closure of the Neotethys ocean. The ophiolitic rocks were emplaced onto the passive margin of the northern edge of the Arabian plate as a result of northeastward subduction and subsequent accretion of the continental fragments. The metaperidotites have compositions ranging from low-clinopyroxene lherzolite to harzburgite and dunite. They are mantle residues with distinct geochemical signatures of both mid-ocean ridge and supra subduction zone (SSZ) affinities. The abyssal peridotites are characterized by high Al2O3 and Cr2O3 contents and low Mg-number in pyroxenes. The Cr-number in the coexisting spinel is also low. The SSZ mantle peridotites are characterized by low Al2O3 contents in pyroxenes as well as low Al2O3 and high Cr-number in spinel. Mineral chemical data indicate that the MOR- and SSZ-type peridotites are the residues from ∼15-20% and ∼30-35% of mantle melting, respectively. Considering petrography, mineralogy and textural evidence, the petrological history of the Piranshahr metaperidotites can be interpreted in three stages: mantle stable stage, serpentinization and metamorphism. The temperature conditions in the mantle are estimated using the Ca-in-orthopyroxene thermometer as 1210 ± 26 °C. The rocks have experienced serpentinization. Based on the textural observations, olivine and pyroxene transformed into lizardite and/or chrysotile with pseudomorphic textures at temperatures below 300 °C during the initial stage of serpentinization. Subsequent orogenic metamorphism affected the rocks at temperatures lower than 600 °C under lower-amphibolite facies metamorphism.

  3. Hf-Nd isotope decoupling in the oceanic lithosphere: constraints from spinel peridotites from Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimis, Michael; Sen, Gautam; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed geochemical investigation on the Hf, Nd and Sr isotope compositions and trace and major element contents of clinopyroxene mineral separates from spinel lherzolite xenoliths from the island of Oahu, Hawaii. These peridotites are believed to represent the depleted oceanic lithosphere beneath Oahu, which is a residue of a MORB-related melting event some 80-100 Ma ago at a mid-ocean ridge. Clinopyroxenes from peridotites from the Salt Lake Crater (SLC) show a large range of Hf isotopic compositions, from ɛHf=12.2 (similar to the Honolulu volcanics series) to extremely radiogenic, ɛHf=65, at nearly constant 143Nd/ 144Nd ratios ( ɛNd=7-8). None of these samples show any isotopic evidence for interaction with Koolau-type melts. A single xenolith from the Pali vent is the only sample with Hf and Nd isotopic compositions that falls within the MORB field. The Hf isotopes correlate positively with the degree of depletion in the clinopyroxene (e.g. increasing Mg#, Cr#, decreasing Ti and heavy REE contents), but also with increasing Zr and Hf depletions relative to the adjacent REE in a compatibility diagram. The Lu/Hf isotope systematics of the SLC clinopyroxenes define apparent ages of 500 Ma or older and these compositions cannot be explained by mixing between any type of Hawaiian melts and the depleted Pacific lithosphere. Metasomatism of an ancient (e.g. 1 Ga or older) depleted peridotite protolith can, in principle, explain these apparent ages and the Nd-Hf isotope decoupling, but requires that the most depleted samples were subject to the least amount of metasomatism. Alternatively, the combined isotope, trace and major element compositions of these clinopyroxenes are best described by metasomatism of the 80-100 Ma depleted oceanic lithosphere by melts products of extensive mantle-melt interaction between Honolulu Volcanics-type melts and the depleted lithosphere.

  4. H Diffusion in Olivine and Pyroxene from Peridotite Xenoliths and a Hawaiian Magma Speedometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Bizimis, M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is present as a trace element in olivine and pyroxene and its content distribution in the mantle results from melting and metasomatic processes. Here we examine how these H contents can be disturbed during decompression. Hydrogen was analyzed by FTIR in olivine and pyroxene of spinel peridotite xenoliths from Salt Lake Crater (SLC) nephelinites which are part of the rejuvenated volcanism at Oahu (Hawaii) [1,2]. H mobility in pyroxene resulting from spinel exsolution during mantle upwelling Most pyroxenes in SLC peridotites exhibit exsolutions, characterized by spinel inclusions. Pyroxene edges where no exsolution are present have less H then their core near the spinel. Given that H does not enter spinel [3], subsolidus requilibration may have concentrated H in the pyroxene adjacent to the spinel exsolution during mantle upwelling. H diffusion in olivine during xenolith transport by its host magma and host magma ascent rates Olivines have lower water contents at the edge and near fractures compared to at their core, while the concentrations of all other chemical elements appear homogeneous. This suggests that some of the initial water has diffused out of the olivine. Water loss from the olivine is thought to occur during host-magma ascent and xenolith transport to the surface [4-6]. Diffusion modeling matches best the data when the initial water content used is that measured at the core of the olivines, implying that mantle water contents are preserved at the core of the olivines. The 3225 cm(sup -1) OH band at times varies independantly of other OH bands, suggesting uneven H distribution in olivine defects likely acquired during mantle metasomatism just prior to eruption and unequilibrated. Diffusion times (1-48 hrs) combined with depths of peridotite equilibration or of magma start of degassing allow to calculate ascent rates for the host nephelinite of 0.1 to 27 m/s.

  5. Seismic anisotropies of the Songshugou peridotites (Qinling orogen, central China) and their seismic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Jung, Haemyeong; Song, Shuguang

    2018-01-01

    Though extensively studied, the roles of olivine crystal preferred orientations (CPOs or fabrics) in affecting the seismic anisotropies in the Earth's upper mantle are rather complicated and still not fully known. In this study, we attempted to address this issue by analyzing the seismic anisotropies [e.g., P-wave anisotropy (AVp), S-wave polarization anisotropy (AVs), radial anisotropy (ξ), and Rayleigh wave anisotropy (G)] of the Songshugou peridotites (dunite dominated) in the Qinling orogen in central China, based on our previously reported olivine CPOs. The seismic anisotropy patterns of olivine aggregates in our studied samples are well consistent with the prediction for their olivine CPO types; and the magnitude of seismic anisotropies shows a striking positive correlation with equilibrium pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions. Significant reductions of seismic anisotropies (AVp, max. AVs, and G) are observed in porphyroclastic dunite compared to coarse- and fine-grained dunites, as the results of olivine CPO transition (from A-/D-type in coarse-grained dunite, through AG-type-like in porphyroclastic dunite, to B-type-like in fine-grained dunite) and strength variation (weakening: A-/D-type → AG-type-like; strengthening: AG-type-like → B-type-like) during dynamic recrystallization. The transition of olivine CPOs from A-/D-type to B-/AG-type-like in the forearc mantle may weaken the seismic anisotropies and deviate the fast velocity direction and the fast S-wave polarization direction from trench-perpendicular to trench-oblique direction with the cooling and aging of forearc mantle. Depending on the size and distribution of the peridotite body such as the Songshugou peridotites, B- and AG-type-like olivine CPOs can be an additional (despite minor) local contributor to the orogen-parallel fast velocity direction and fast shear-wave polarization direction in the orogenic crust such as in the Songshugou area in Qinling orogen.

  6. Sepentinized Peridotite Spinel Composition: Northern Central Indian Ridge at 6°39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, D.; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S. D.; Balaram, V.; Speakman, J.

    2005-12-01

    Exposures of serpentinized peridotites on the seafloor at slow-spreading ridges have been interpreted either as accretion of ridge segments in a magma-starved condition along the non-transform setting or as preferential outcrops at ridge offsets in transform fault setting. Here we present the mineral chemistry and geochemistry of serpentinites and serpentinized spinel peridotites recovered from an off axis region (corner high) at south of Vityaz transform fault (6°39'S), Northern Central Indian Ridge. Our purpose is to use mineral chemical data of serpentine and spinel to investigate the effect of low temperature alteration processes and degree of partial melting. Serpentine composition shows presence of high Mg-rich lizardite and chrysotile pseudomorphs and these rocks mostly preserve `mesh rim', `window' and `hourglass' textures, representing extensive hydration during low temperature hydrothermal alteration. In thin section, serpentine veins (mainly lensoidal, pinch and swell or anastomosing) are common, sometime crosscutting the `mesh rim' textures to attest to the intensity of serpentinization process. In one sample, a 1.9 cm-thick feldspathic vein crosscut the serpentinite as a porphyroblast and this indicates discontinuity in magmatic crust caused due to less magma input at off-axis region facilitate the intrusion of short-living feeder dykes of highly fractionated late magmatic liquids within the peridotite. In addition, in hand specimen, presence of smaller-scale striations analogous to slickenlines on serpentinite surfaces suggests low-angle faulting, which could have enhanced pervasive serpentinization during their subsequent emplacement. Individual serpentine grain displays very low Ca content (0.01 wt%) suggesting possible absence of any secondary Ca-rich phases also verified by very low Sr content (connotation. Limited data on composition of individual spinel porphyroclast exhibits substantial variation in their Mg# (mole [Mg/ Mg+Fe2]) and Cr# (mole

  7. Experimental Melting Study of Basalt-Peridotite Hybrid Source: Melting model of Hawaiian plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, E.; Gao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Eclogite component entrained in ascending plume is considered to be essentially important in producing flood basalts (e.g., Columbia River basalt, Takahashi et al., 1998 EPSL), alkalic OIBs (e.g., Kogiso et al.,2003), ferro-picrites (Tuff et al.,2005) and Hawaiian shield lavas (e.g., Hauri, 1996; Takahashi & Nakajima, 2002, Sobolev et al.,2005). Size of the entrained eclogite, which controls the reaction rates with ambient peridotite, however, is very difficult to constrain using geophysical observation. Among Hawaiian shield volcanoes, Koolau is the most enriched end-member in eclogite component (Frey et al, 1994). Reconstruction of Koolau volcano based on submarine study on Nuuanu landslide (AGU Monograph vol.128, 2002, Takahashi Garcia Lipman eds.) revealed that silica-rich tholeiite appeared only at the last stage (Makapuu stage) of Koolau volcano. Chemical compositions of lavas as well as isotopes change abruptly and coherently across a horizon (Shinozaki et al. and Tanaka et al. ibid.). Based on these observation, Takahashi & Nakajima (2002 ibid) proposed that the Makapuu stage lava in Koolau volcano was supplied from a single large eclogite block. In order to study melting process in Hawaiian plume, high-pressure melting experiments were carried out under dry and hydrous conditions with layered eclogite/peridotite starting materials. Detail of our experiments will be given by Gao et al (2015 AGU). Combined previous field observation with new set of experiments, we propose that variation in SiO2 among Hawaiian tholeiites represent varying degree of wall-rock interaction between eclogite and ambient peridotite. Makapuu stage lavas in Koolau volcano represents eclogite partial melts formed at ~3 GPa with various amount of xenocrystic olivines derived from Pacific plate. In other words, we propose that "primary magma" in the melting column of Hawaiian plume ranges from basaltic andesite to ferro-picrite depending on the lithology of the source. Solidus of

  8. Petrography and mineral chemistry of metamorphosed mantle peridotites of Nain Ophiolite (Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargess Shirdashtzadeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Study of the petrology of the ophiolites as the relics of ancient oceanic lithosphere, is a powerful tool to reconstruct Earth’s history. Mantle peridotites have mostly undergone alteration and serpentinization to some extent. Thus, the relics of metamorphic signatures from the upper mantle and crustal processes from most of the peridotites have been ruined. Several recent papers deal with the mantle peridotites of Nain Ophiolite (e.g. Ghazi et al., 2010. However, no scientific work has been carried out on the metamorphosed mantle peridotites. The study area of the Darreh Deh that is located in the east of the Nain Ophiolite, is composed of huge massifs of metamorphosed mantle peridotites (i.e. lherzolite, clinopyroxene-bearing harzburgite, and harzburgite, and small volumes of dunite, characterized by darker color, higher topographic relief, smaller number of basic intrusives, lower serpentinization degree, and amphibolite-facies metamorphism. In this study, the petrography and mineralogy of metamorphosed peridotites in the Darreh Deh has been considered based on geochemical data. Geological Setting The Mesozoic ophiolitic mélange of Nain is located in the west of CEIM, along the Nain-Baft fault. As a part of a metamorphosed oceanic crust, it is mainly composed of harzburgite, lherzolite, dunite and their serpentinized varieties, chromitite, pyroxenite, gabbro, diabasic dike, spilitized pillow lava, plagiogranite, amphibolite, metaperidotites, schist, skarn, marble, rodingite, metachert and listwaenite (Shirdashtzadeh et al., 2010, 2014a, 2014b. Geochemical investigations indicate a suprasubduction zone in the eastern branch of the Neo-Tethys Ocean (Ghasemi and Talbot, 2006; Shirdashtzadeh et al., 2010, 2014a, 2014b. Materials and Methods Chemical analyses of mineral compositions were carried out using a JEOL JXA8800R wavelength-dispersive electron probe micro-analyzer (accelerating voltage of 15 kV and a beam current of 15 n

  9. Peridotites and mafic igneous rocks at the foot of the Galicia Margin: an oceanic or continental lithosphere? A discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korprobst, J.; Chazot, G.

    2016-10-01

    An ultramafic/mafic complex is exposed on the sea floor at the foot of the Galicia Margin (Spain and Portugal). It comprises various types of peridotites and pyroxenites, as well as amphibole-diorites, gabbros, dolerites and basalts. For chronological and structural reasons (gabbros were emplaced within peridotites before the continental break-up) this unit cannot be assigned to the Atlantic oceanic crust. The compilation of all available petrological and geochemical data suggests that peridotites are derived from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, deeply transformed during Cretaceous rifting. Thus, websterite dykes extracted from the depleted MORB mantle reservoir (DMM), were emplaced early within the lithospheric harzburgites; subsequent boudinage and tectonic dispersion of these dykes in the peridotites, during deformation stages at the beginning of rifting, resulted in the formation of fertile but isotopically depleted lherzolites. Sterile but isotopically enriched websterites, would represent melting residues in the peridotites, after significant partial melting and melt extraction related to the thermal erosion of the lithosphere. The latter melts are probably the source of brown amphibole metasomatic crystallization in some peridotites, as well as of the emplacement of amphibole-diorite dykes. Melts directly extracted from the asthenosphere were emplaced as gabbro within the sub-continental mantle. Mixing these DMM melts together with the enriched melts extracted from the lithosphere, provided the intermediate isotopic melt-compositions - in between the DMM and Oceanic Islands Basalts reservoir - observed for the dolerites and basalts, none of which are characterized by a genuine N-MORB signature. An enriched lithospheric mantle, present prior to rifting of the Galicia margin, is in good agreement with data from the Messejana dyke (Portugal) and more generally, with those of all continental tholeiites of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP

  10. Listvenite formation from peridotite: Insights from Oman Drilling Project hole BT1B and preliminary reaction path model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Obeso, J. C.; Kelemen, P. B.; Manning, C. E.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.

    2017-12-01

    Oman Drilling Project hole BT1B drilled 300 meters through the basal thrust of the Samail ophiolite. The first 200 meters of this hole are dominated by listvenites (completely carbonated peridotites) and serpentinites. Below 200 meters the hole is mainly composed of metasediments and metavolcanics. This core provides a unique record of interaction between (a) mantle peridotite in the leading edge of the mantle wedge and (b) hydrous, CO2 rich fluids derived from subducting lithologies similar to those in the metamorphic sole. We used EQ3/6 to simulate a reaction path in which hydrous fluid in equilibrium with qtz + calcite + feldspar + chlorite or smectite reacts with initially fresh peridotite at 100°C (the estimated temperature of alteration, Falk & Kelemen GCA 2015) and 5 kb. Water was first equilibrated with minerals observed during core description in the metamorphic sole at 100°C and 5kb. This fluid is then reacted with olivine enstatite and diopside (Mg#90) approximating the average composition of residual mantle peridotite (harzburgite) in Oman. Secondary minerals resulting from complete reaction are then reacted again with the initial fluid in an iterative process, up to water/rock > 1000. Water/rock close to 1 results in complete serpentinization of the peridotite, with chrysotile, brucite and magnetite as the only minerals. Water/rock >10 produces carbonates, chlorite and talc. Further increasing water/rock to > 100 produces assemblages dominated by carbonates and quartz with minor muscovite, similar to listvenites of hole BT1B that contain qtz + carbonates + Fe-oxyhydroxides + relict spinel ± chromian muscovite and fuchsite. The results of this preliminary model are consistent with the complex veining history of core from BT1B, with carbonate/iron oxide veins in both listvenites and serpentinites interpreted to be the earliest record of peridotite carbonation after initial serpentinization.

  11. Two Contrasting Fabric Patterns of Olivine Observed in Garnet and Spinel Peridotite from a Mantle-derived Ultramafic Mass Enclosed in Felsic Granulite, the Moldanubian Zone, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamei, A.; Obata, M.; Michibayashi, K.; Hirajima, T.; Svojtka, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, 1/2 (2010), s. 101-123 ISSN 0022-3530 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : garnet peridotite * spinel peridotite * olivine fabrics * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.842, year: 2010

  12. Characterizing and quantifying superparamagnetic magnetite particles in serpentinized mantle peridotite observed in continental ophiolite complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, E.; Vento, N. F. R.; Tominaga, M.; Beinlich, A.; Einsle, J. F.; Buisman, I.; Ringe, E.; Schrenk, M. O.; Cardace, D.

    2017-12-01

    Serpentinization of mantle peridotite has been recognized as one of the most important energy factories for the deep biosphere. To better evaluate the habitability of the deep biosphere, it is crucial to understand the link between in situ peridotite serpentinization processes and associated magnetite and hydrogen production. Previous efforts in correlating magnetite and hydrogen production during serpentinization processes are based primarily on laboratory experiments and numerical modeling, being challenged to include the contribution of superparamagnetic-sized magnetites (i.e., extremely fine-grained magnetite, petrographically observed as a "pepper flake" like texture in many natural serpentinized rock samples). To better estimate the abundance of superparamagnetic grains, we conducted frequency-dependent susceptibility magnetic measurements at the Institute of Rock Magnetism on naturally serpentinized rock samples from the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbial Observatory (CROMO) in California, USA and the Atlin Ophiolite (British Columbia). In addition, we conducted multiscale EDS phase mapping, BackScattered Electron (BSE) scanning, FIB-nanotomography and STEM-EELS to identify and quantify the superparamagnetic minerals that contribute to the measured magnetic susceptibility signals in our rock samples. Utilizing a multidisciplinary approach, we aim to improve the estimation of hydrogen production based on the abundance of magnetite, that includes the contribution of superparamagnetic particle size magnetite, to ultimately provide a more accurate estimation of bulk deep-biomass hosted by in situ serpentinization processes.

  13. Further Sr and Nd isotopic results from peridotites of the Ronda Ultramafic Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisberg, L.; Zindler, A.

    1989-01-01

    Clinopyroxenes derived from peridotites of the spinel and garnet facies of the Ronda Ultramafic Complex yield Sr and Nd isotopic ratios which extend the range of compositions found in the massif to values as depleted as 0.70205 for Sr and 0.51363 for Nd. Large-amplitude, short-wavelength isotopic variations are found to be uniquitous throughout the massif. In the garnet facies, some of these variations are shown to be produced by the tectonic disaggregation of mafic layers in an isotopically depleted peridotite matrix. Ages obtained from garnet-clinopyroxene Sm-Nd isochrons (about 22 m.y.) agree with previous determinations of the time of crustal emplacement. In the plagioclase facies, where the Sr and Nd isotopic compositions have been very strongly affected by recent cryptic metasomatism, detailed study of one sample reveals that intermineral Nd isotopic equilibrium exists between clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and plagioclase. This indicates that the metasomatism occurred at high temperatures, and thus probably within the mantle. A rough correlation between 143 Nd/ 144 Nd and 147 Sm/ 144 N, with an apparent 'age' of 1.3 b.y. and an initial ε Nd (0) value of +6.0, is observed among clinopyroxenes derived from river sediments from throughout the massif. This age is interpreted as the time that the massif left the convecting mantle and became incorporated into the sub-continental lithosphere. (orig.)

  14. The Force of Crystallization and Fracture Propagation during In-Situ Carbonation of Peridotite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinier van Noort

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface mineralization of CO2 by injection into (hydro-fractured peridotites has been proposed as a carbon sequestration method. It is envisaged that the expansion in solid volume associated with the mineralization reaction leads to a build-up of stress, resulting in the opening of further fractures. We performed CO2-mineralization experiments on simulated fractures in peridotite materials under confined, hydrothermal conditions, to directly measure the induced stresses. Only one of these experiments resulted in the development of a stress, which was less than 5% of the theoretical maximum. We also performed one method control test in which we measured stress development during the hydration of MgO. Based on microstructural observations, as well as XRD and TGA measurements, we infer that, due to pore clogging and grain boundary healing at growing mineral interfaces, the transport of CO2, water and solutes into these sites inhibited reaction-related stress development. When grain boundary healing was impeded by the precipitation of silica, a small stress did develop. This implies that when applied to in-situ CO2-storage, the mineralization reaction will be limited by transport through clogged fractures, and proceed at a rate that is likely too slow for the process to accommodate the volumes of CO2 expected for sequestration.

  15. Investigating the effects of abyssal peridotite alteration on Si, Mg and Zn isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P. S.; Wimpenny, J.; Harvey, J.; Yin, Q.; Moynier, F.

    2013-12-01

    Around 1/3 of Earth's divergent ridge system is now classified as "slow" spreading [1], exposing ultramafic rocks (abyssal peridotites) at the seafloor. Such material is often highly altered by serpentinisation and steatisation (talc formation). It is crucial to understand such processes in order to access the original composition of the mantle, and to quantify any impact on ocean composition. Here we examine the effect of both serpentinisation and steatisation on Si, Mg and Zn isotopes. Hydrothermal alteration and seafloor weathering are both sources of oceanic Si [2] and weathering of abyssal peridotites is a source of oceanic Mg [3]; hence isotopic fractionation as a result of seafloor alteration could affect oceanic Si and Mg isotope composition. Zinc isotopes can provide complimentary information; the magnitude and direction of fractionation is highly dependent on complexing ligand [4] and can provide compositional information on the fluids driving metasomatism. For this study, two cores from the well-characterised abyssal peridotites recovered on ODP Leg 209 were examined [5]. Hole 1274a peridotites exhibit variable serpentinisation at ~200°C, whereas samples from Hole 1268a have been comprehensively serpentinised and then subsequently steatised to talc facies at ~350°C, by a low Mg/Si, low pH fluid. The Si, Mg and Zn isotope compositions of 1274a samples are extremely homogeneous, identical to that of pristine mantle rocks (BSE) i.e., serpentinisation at this locality was predominantly isochemical [5]. In contrast, samples from 1268a show greater isotopic variability. In all samples, Mg is enriched in the heavier isotopes relative to BSE, consistent with formation of isotopically heavy secondary phases [6]. For Si, serpentinised samples are slightly enriched in the lighter isotopes compared to BSE, again consistent with the behaviour of Si during formation of secondary phases [7]. Within the steatised samples, some exhibit enrichments in the lighter Si

  16. Water in orthopyroxene from abyssal spinel peridotites of the East Pacific Rise (ODP Leg 147: Hess Deep)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Kirsten T.; Gose, Jürgen; Stalder, Roland; Schmädicke, Esther

    2015-09-01

    Abyssal spinel peridotites from Hess Deep, East Pacific Rise (ODP Leg 147) were investigated concerning their major, minor, and trace element mineral chemistry and the incorporation of structural water in orthopyroxene. The rocks are partially serpentinized harzburgites containing primary minerals of olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and spinel. Orthopyroxene is enstatitic with Mg# (Mg/(Mg + Fe)) between 0.90 and 0.92 and Al2O3 from 0.5 to 2.9 wt.%. The residual harzburgite experienced high degrees of melt removal in the spinel peridotite stability field. The average degree of partial melting was calculated to be 17.5% (range: 16.4-17.8%). Trace element data of ortho- and clinopyroxenes reflect this strong depletion, characteristic for the restitic nature of abyssal peridotites. Mantle re-equilibration temperatures around 1000 °C indicate that, after melt extraction and before exhumation to the ocean floor, the rocks experienced significant cooling in the spinel peridotite facies. Water contents of orthopyroxene range from 86 to 233 wt. ppm H2O with an average concentration of 142 wt. ppm H2O. These results represent the first data on water contents in the sub-pacific mantle obtained by direct measurements of sub-oceanic peridotite. The water contents are not related to mineral chemistry, stratigraphy, melting degree, mantle equilibrium conditions or oxidation state. Calculated post-melt peridotite water contents vary between 40 and 100 wt. ppm H2O. Compared to Mid-Atlantic Ridge peridotites, the East Pacific Rise samples of Leg 147 contain somewhat lower water concentrations than samples from Leg 153 and considerably higher contents than those of Leg 209 (Gose et al., 2009; Schmädicke et al., 2011). In Leg 147, the strongest OH absorbtion band occurs at 3420 cm- 1, wheras orthopyroxene from MAR peridotite (Legs 153 and 209) has its strongest absorbtion band at 3566 and 3522 cm- 1. The mantle equilibrium temperature of Leg 147 peridotites is lower than that

  17. On protolith-, metamorphic overprint, microstructure and rheology of mineral assemblages in orogenic peridotites of the central Scandinavian Caledonides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Mattia; Clos, Frediano; Van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2013-04-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides (SC) are a deeply eroded Alpine-type orogenic belt formed by closure of the Iapetus ocean and collision between Baltica and Laurentia (500-380 Ma). The SC consists of a stack of Nappe Complexes (from bottom to top called Lower, Middle, Upper and Uppermost Allochthons) thrusted to the east over the Baltic Shield (Brueckner and Van Roermund, 2004; Gee et al., 2008). Fossil lithospheric mantle fragments, called orogenic peridotites, have been found within the (upper part of) middle, upper and uppermost Allochthons, as well as in the reworked basement gneisses (a.o Western Gneiss Complex (WGC)) along the Norwegian west coast. They occur as isolated lenses that contain diverse mineral parageneses and/or bulk rock compositions. Crustal incorporation of orogenic peridotite is classically interpreted to be the result of plate collisional processes related to orogeny (Brueckner and Medaris, 2000). The WGC and parts of the upper part of the Middle Allochthon (a.o. Seve Nappe Complex (SNC) in N Jämtland/S Västerbotten, central Sweden), are well known for the occurrence of high (HP) and ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes (of Caledonian age). The (U)HPM evidence clearly demonstrates the deep metamorphic origin of these rocks interpreted to be caused by continental subduction and/or collision. Other metamorphic rocks (of Caledonian age) exposed in allochthonous nappes are solely characterised by greenschist-, amphibolite- and/or MP granulite "facies" mineral assemblages that can be interpreted, in the absence of retrogression, to have formed in less deeply subducted (and/or metamorphic) environments. This duality in metamorphic "facies" allows for a discrimination (at least theoretically) between "deep" versus "shallow" rooted nappes (in central parts of the Scandinavian Caledonides). Conform this reasoning, this duality should also be present within the Caledonian mineral assemblages (= metamorphic overprint) of orogenic peridotites (in

  18. Peridotitic lithosphere metasomatised by volatile-bearing melts, and its association with intraplate alkaline HIMU-like magmatism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, James; Brenna, Marco; Crase, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    The role of lithospheric mantle metasomatized by CO2-bearing melts in the genesis of HIMU-like alkaline intraplate basalts is investigated using a suite of peridotite xenoliths from New Zealand. The xenoliths have Sr–Nd–Pb–Hf isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr =0.7029, eNd = +5 to +6, 206Pb/204Pb = ...

  19. Olivine CPO in non-deformed peridotite due to topotactic replacement of antigorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Wallis, Simon; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Seto, Yusuke; Miyake, Akira; Matsumoto, Megumi

    2014-05-01

    Olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) is thought to be the main cause of seismic anisotropy in the mantle, and its formation is generally considered to be the result of plastic deformation of mantle by dislocation creep. Olivine CPO has been reproduced in laboratory deformation experiments and considerable success has been achieved in understanding the deformation conditions (e.g. stress, temperature and water content) under which different olivine CPO patterns develop. This opens the possibility of mapping conditions in the mantle using seismic anisotropy and has been the subject of considerable study. Here we report an alternative mechanism for olivine CPO without the need for deformation. This process may be important in understanding the seismic properties of mantle in convergent margins. Metamorphic studies show peridotite in the Happo area, central Japan, formed by the dehydration of antigorite-schist related to contact metamorphism around a granite intrusion. Both field and microstructural observations suggest the olivine has not undergone strong plastic deformation. This was confirmed by TEM work that shows the olivine has very low dislocation densities and lacks low angle tilt boundaries. Such tilt boundaries are general stable even after annealing. These features show that peridotite in the Happo area formed in the absence of solid-state deformation. The olivine of the Happo peridotite formed dominantly by the dehydration breakdown of antigorite schist. We propose that the olivine CPO formed as a result of topotactic replacement of antigorite by the newly formed olivine. EBSD measurements in samples where both antigorite and new olivine are present and in contact show a very close crystallographic relationship between the two minerals: the a-axes are parallel, and the b- and c-axes are perpendicular. We conclude the strong olivine CPO in the Happo area was inherited from the original CPO of the antigorite. Such a process is likely to also

  20. Metasomatic processes in the orthogneiss-hosted Archaean peridotites of the Fiskefjord region, SW Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilas, K.; Cruz, M. F.; Grove, M.; Morishita, T.; Pearson, D. G.

    2016-12-01

    Field observations and preliminary geochemical data are presented for large (>500x1000m) peridotite enclaves from the Fiskefjord region of SW Greenland. These ultramafic complexes are dominated by dunite, amphibole-harzburgite, lesser amounts of norite and horizons of stratiform chromitite and are therefore interpreted as cumulate rocks[1]. The ultramafic enclaves are hosted by intrusive tonalitic orthogneiss, which provide U-Pb zircon minimum age constraints of ca. 2980 Ma, whereas preliminary Re-Os isotope data on the dunite and chromitite yield TRD ages of ca. 3300 Ma[2]. Dunite has highly forsteritic olivine compositions with Mg# mostly around 92 to 93, which is uncorrelated with the bulk-rock mg# or modal chromite contents. This indicates that the primary olivine records equilibration with a highly magnesian parental magma, which may have been responsible for the strong depletion of the SCLM in this region. Amphibole and phlogopite is mostly associated with granitoid sheets or infiltrating veins in the dunite and appear to replace chromite. Argon dating (40Ar/39Ar) of the phlogopite yields ages ranging from ca. 3400 Ma to ca. 1750 Ma, with most ages clustering around 3000 Ma. This is consistent with formation of the phlogopite and amphibole by metasomatic processes involving reaction between granitoid-derived siliceous fluids and the ultramafic rocks. The older 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus most plausibly represent excess Ar, potentially inherited from the nearby Itsaq Gneiss Complex (3900 to 3600 Ga) based on its proximity. The youngest 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus on the other hand may potentially signify the closure-age for this system, which could have important implications for determining the exhumation history of the North Atlantic craton. References [1] Szilas, K., Kelemen, P. B., & Bernstein, S. (2015). Peridotite enclaves hosted by Mesoarchaean TTG-suite orthogneisses in the Fiskefjord region of southern West Greenland. GeoResJ, 7, 22-34. [2] Szilas, K., van

  1. Cooling Rates of Mantle Peridotites Estimated from Lithophile Trace Element Diffusion in Orthopyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Handt, A.; Hellebrand, E.; Snow, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    Cooling rates of ocean floor mantle rocks from mid-ocean ridges can potentially provide important information about ridge dynamics, emplacement mechanisms and mantle uplift. There are a growing number of geospeedometric methods to retrieve such cooling rates in various settings. However, few exist for typical four- phase mantle peridotites and they only cover temperatures below 800° C. The down-temperature lithophile trace element exchange between clinopyroxene (cpx) and orthopyroxene (opx) can provide such a high- temperature spinel peridotite geospeedometer. Orthopyroxenes studied by SIMS from two fresh Gakkel Ridge peridotites are zoned in all trace elements while clinopyroxenes are homogeneous. This allows the calculation of equilibrium temperatures [1]. Several profiles in opx cover a range of 1250° C (opx core) to 800° C (opx rim) and are in agreement with straightforward diffusion and closure temperature models. The systematics of REE diffusion in opx deviate from the results of a recent experimental study [2]. The data allow us to estimate diffusion systematics of 16 elements (REE and TE) and their cation distributions in orthopyroxene. The data set is internally coherent as all elements were subjected to the same extrinsic parameters. 1. Decreasing ionic radius increases REE diffusion in opx (as it does in cpx). 2. M2-site diffusion is controlled more by ionic radius than by cationic charge. 3. M1-site diffusion is controlled by both ionic radius and cationic charge. 4. M1-site diffusion is generally slower than M2-site diffusion for isovalent cations, most likely because of higher M1- site energies compared to M2-site. The advantages of this geospeedometer should be its relatively good precision, use of standard analytical methods and its coverage of the important range between solidus temperatures and 800° C. In combination with other geospeedometers it will be possible to retrieve the continuous cooling history of a mantle rock from its solidus down

  2. Transition Metal Systematics of Opx-Enriched Harzburgites From the Cascades Arc With Implications for the Origin of Cratonic Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    A number of peridotite xenoliths collected from the Simcoe volcanic field region of the Cascades arc exhibit notable enrichment of modal orthopyroxene. The process driving this enrichment is most likely metasomatism of the mantle wedge by Si-rich fluids derived ultimately from the underlying slab. By investigating the resultant elemental systematics associated with subduction zone metasomatism of this type, we hope to shed light on the origin of other opx-rich peridotites, such as those seen in many cratonic xenolith suites. The xenoliths found in the Simcoe volcanic field provide a rare opportunity to examine the composition of sub arc mantle, as it is unusual to find mantle xenoliths in volcanic arc lavas. The samples were analyzed using laser ablation ICPMS and their bulk compositions were reconstructed from point-counted mineral modes. Two-pyroxene mineral thermometry of the samples yield temperatures of approximately 1000 degrees C, corresponding to a depth of origin at uppermost mantle pressures if typical arc geotherms are assumed. Most of the peridotites are harzburgites or olivine-orthopyroxenites (Mg#s 0.88-0.9; opx mode 0.15-0.9), with small amounts of clinopyroxene (rare earths, consistent with a metasomatic origin for these opx-rich harzburgites. Of note is the counterintuitive systematics of Zn. Whole-rock Zn decreases with opx, but Zn in olivine also decreases with opx mode while Zn in opx increases with opx mode, hence the decrease in whole- rock Zn is not simply due to mechanical segregation of harzburgite into opx- and ol-rich zones. In summary, the REE signatures suggest the subducting slab as the most likely candidate for the source of the fluids that caused the opx enrichment. The opx-enrichment itself and the unusual trends in Zn suggest a reaction between a silicic fluid and normal harzburgite. Moreover, the concomitant decrease in olivine and whole-rock Zn with opx mode suggests significant leaching of Zn from the peridotite during this

  3. Petrography and mineral chemistry of wehrlites in contact zone of gabbro intrusions and mantle peridotites of the Naein ophiolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ghaseminejad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Geological background Ophiolites have played a major role in our understanding of Earth’s processes ranging from seafloor spreading, melt evolution and magma transport in oceanic spreading centers, and hydrothermal alteration and mineralization of oceanic crust to collision tectonics, mountain building processes, and orogeny. They provide the essential structural, petrological, geochemical, and geochronological evidence to document the evolutionary history of ancient continental margins and ocean basin. Ophiolites include a peridotitic mantle sequence, generally characterized by high-temperature plastic deformation and residual chemistry, and a comagmatic crustal sequence (gabbros, diabase dikes, and submarine basalts, weakly or not deformed. According to this interpretation, ophiolites were allochthonous with respect to their country rocks. They were assembled during a primary accretion stage at an oceanic spreading center, and later tectonically emplaced on a continental margin or island arc (Dilek, 2003. The indigenous dikes of pyroxenites and gabbros that were injected into a melting peridotite, or intrusive dikes of pyroxenite and gabbro that injected when the peridotite was fresh and well below its solidus, are discussed in different ophiolite papers. Pyroxenite formation and contact of gabbro and mantle peridotite are discussed in different articles (Dilek, 2003. When a gabbro intrude a fresh mantle peridotite could not significantly react with it, but if intrusion occurs during the serpentinization, the gabbro will change to rodingite. Geological setting The Naein ophiolitic melanges comprise the following rock units: mantle peridotites (harzburgite, lherzolite, dunite, with associated chromitite, gabbro, pyroxenite, sheeted and swarm dikes, massive basalts, pillow lava, plagiogranite, radiolarian chert, glaubotruncana limestone, rodingite, listvenite, and metamorphic rocks (foliated amphibolitic dike, amphibolite, skarn

  4. Late Palaeozoic to Triassic formations unconformably deposited over the Ronda peridotites (Betic Cordilleras): Evidence for their Variscan time of crustal emplacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz de Galdeano, C.; Ruiz Cruz, M.D.

    2016-07-01

    The age of the emplacement of the Ronda Peridotites has been widely debated during recent decades, and ages ranging from the Palaeozoic to the early Miocene have been proposed, although most of the current interpretations suggest an Oligocene-Miocene age. In this article, we describe two meta-sedimentary formations (the lower one formed by detrital sediments and the upper one by marbles) that were unconformably deposited over the Ronda peridotites and now record low-grade metamorphism. The detrital formation contains layers of acidic rocks with an age of 269±9 Ma and the overlying marbles are assumed to be Triassic. The existence of these unconformable formations over the peridotites is crucial for the dating of the exhumation of the latter. The presence of peridotite clasts in the detrital formation indicates that peridotites were exposed during the Permian and other data suggest that peridotites were exhumed during the late Carboniferous. During the Alpine cycle, the peridotites operated as an element situated at the bottom of the tectonically higher Alpujarride/Sebtide unit (the Jubrique unit) and forming part of it, then being incorporated to the Alpine thrusts of this unit. (Author)

  5. Serpentinization of abyssal peridotites from the MARK area, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Sulfur geochemistry and reaction modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2003-01-01

    The opaque mineralogy and the contents and isotope compositions of sulfur in serpentinized peridotites from the MARK (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Kane Fracture Zone) area were examined to understand the conditions of serpentinization and evaluate this process as a sink for seawater sulfur. The serpentinites contain a sulfur-rich secondary mineral assemblage and have high sulfur contents (up to 1 wt.%) and elevated ??34Ssulfide (3.7 to 12.7???). Geochemical reaction modeling indicates that seawater-peridotite interaction at 300 to 400??C alone cannot account for both the high sulfur contents and high ??34Ssulfide. These require a multistage reaction with leaching of sulfide from subjacent gabbro during higher temperature (???400??C) reactions with seawater and subsequent deposition of sulfide during serpentinization of peridotite at ???300??C. Serpentinization produces highly reducing conditions and significant amounts of H2 and results in the partial reduction of seawater carbonate to methane. The latter is documented by formation of carbonate veins enriched in 13C (up to 4.5???) at temperatures above 250??C. Although different processes produce variable sulfur isotope effects in other oceanic serpentinites, sulfur is consistently added to abyssal peridotites during serpentinization. Data for serpentinites drilled and dredged from oceanic crust and from ophiolites indicate that oceanic peridotites are a sink for up to 0.4 to 6.0 ?? 1012 g seawater S yr-1. This is comparable to sulfur exchange that occurs in hydrothermal systems in mafic oceanic crust at midocean ridges and on ridge flanks and amounts to 2 to 30% of the riverine sulfate source and sedimentary sulfide sink in the oceans. The high concentrations and modified isotope compositions of sulfur in serpentinites could be important for mantle metasomatism during subduction of crust generated at slow spreading rates. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  6. Subduction factory in an ampoule: Experiments on sediment-peridotite interaction under temperature gradient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, A. B.; Bulatov, V. K.; Brey, G. P.; Girnis, A. V.; Höfer, H. E.; Gerdes, A.

    2018-02-01

    To better understand processes above subducted oceanic slabs, we have undertaken experiments with juxtaposed sediment and peridotite layers at pressures of 7.5 and 10.5 GPa at a controlled temperature gradient from ∼100 to ∼500 °C per a sample length of ∼3 mm. The sediment starting material contains H2O (6.9 wt%) and CO2 (5.9 wt%) and has a major-element composition similar to GLOSS (Plank and Langmuir, 1998) doped with trace elements at 10-100 ppm levels. Several experiments were conducted with ∼0.5 wt% Cl or F. The peridotite layer is composed of natural olivine (66 wt%), orthopyroxene (27 wt%) and garnet (7 wt%) mixed with ∼15 wt% graphite. Several experimental configurations were investigated, but the "basic" setup has the sediment layer at the bottom in the cold zone (400-1200 °C) overlain by peridotite at 900-1500 °C. The temperature distribution was determined by two thermocouples and orthopyroxene-garnet thermometry. Features common to many experiments are (1) the development of multiple layers of various lithologies and a pool of hydrous silicate or carbonate-silicate melt in the hottest part of the capsule; (2) replacement of olivine by orthopyroxene in the metaperidotite; (3) preservation and growth of garnet and local development of magnesite in the metaperidotite layer; (4) enrichment in garnet within the metasediment layer at the contact with the metaperidotite; (5) formation of a clinopyroxene-garnet assemblage at the bottom (the coldest part); (6) presence of K-bearing phases (phlogopite or phengite) and carbonates in the metasediment layer only at temperatures Ca are largely retained in the coldest part of the metasediment layer in clinopyroxene, Ca-rich garnet and aragonite. The melt is a product of interaction between partial melt or fluid from the sediment and peridotite. It has a silico-carbonatite composition with variable SiO2, MgO, FeO and CaO contents and low Al2O3. The addition of Cl has almost no effect on element

  7. The production of iron oxide during peridotite serpentinization: Influence of pyroxene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Serpentinization produces molecular hydrogen (H2 that can support communities of microorganisms in hydrothermal fields; H2 results from the oxidation of ferrous iron in olivine and pyroxene into ferric iron, and consequently iron oxide (magnetite or hematite forms. However, the mechanisms that control H2 and iron oxide formation are poorly constrained. In this study, we performed serpentinization experiments at 311 °C and 3.0 kbar on olivine (with <5% pyroxene, orthopyroxene, and peridotite. The results show that serpentine and iron oxide formed when olivine and orthopyroxene individually reacted with a saline starting solution. Olivine-derived serpentine had a significantly lower FeO content (6.57 ± 1.30 wt.% than primary olivine (9.86 wt.%, whereas orthopyroxene-derived serpentine had a comparable FeO content (6.26 ± 0.58 wt.% to that of primary orthopyroxene (6.24 wt.%. In experiments on peridotite, olivine was replaced by serpentine and iron oxide. However, pyroxene transformed solely to serpentine. After 20 days, olivine-derived serpentine had a FeO content of 8.18 ± 1.56 wt.%, which was significantly higher than that of serpentine produced in olivine-only experiments. By contrast, serpentine after orthopyroxene had a slightly higher FeO content (6.53 ± 1.01 wt.% than primary orthopyroxene. Clinopyroxene-derived serpentine contained a significantly higher FeO content than its parent mineral. After 120 days, the FeO content of olivine-derived serpentine decreased significantly (5.71 ± 0.35 wt.%, whereas the FeO content of orthopyroxene-derived serpentine increased (6.85 ± 0.63 wt.% over the same period. This suggests that iron oxide preferentially formed after olivine serpentinization. Pyroxene in peridotite gained some Fe from olivine during the serpentinization process, which may have led to a decrease in iron oxide production. The correlation between FeO content and SiO2 or Al2O3 content in olivine- and

  8. Dynamics of Melting and Melt Migration as Inferred from Incompatible Trace Element Abundance in Abyssal Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q.; Liang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    To better understand the melting processes beneath the mid-ocean ridge, we developed a simple model for trace element fractionation during concurrent melting and melt migration in an upwelling steady-state mantle column. Based on petrologic considerations, we divided the upwelling mantle into two regions: a double- lithology upper region where high permeability dunite channels are embedded in a lherzolite/harzburgite matrix, and a single-lithology lower region that consists of partially molten lherzolite. Melt generated in the single lithology region migrates upward through grain-scale diffuse porous flow, whereas melt in the lherzolite/harzburgite matrix in the double-lithology region is allowed to flow both vertically through the overlying matrix and horizontally into its neighboring dunite channels. There are three key dynamic parameters in our model: degree of melting experienced by the single lithology column (Fd), degree of melting experienced by the double lithology column (F), and a dimensionless melt suction rate (R) that measures the accumulated rate of melt extraction from the matrix to the channel relative to the accumulated rate of matrix melting. In terms of trace element fractionation, upwelling and melting in the single lithology column is equivalent to non-modal batch melting (R = 0), whereas melting and melt migration in the double lithology region is equivalent to a nonlinear combination of non-modal batch and fractional melting (0 abyssal peridotite, we showed, with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, that it is difficult to invert for all three dynamic parameters from a set of incompatible trace element data with confidence. However, given Fd, it is quite possible to constrain F and R from incompatible trace element abundances in residual peridotite. As an illustrative example, we used the simple melting model developed in this study and selected REE and Y abundance in diopside from abyssal peridotites to infer their melting and melt migration

  9. Compositional trends among Kaapvaal Craton garnet peridotite xenoliths and their effects on seismic velocity and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt, Derek; Lesher, Charles

    2010-01-01

    garnet and clinopyroxene enrichment. Using the parameterization of Schutt and Lesher (2006) we show that at cratonic mantle temperatures and pressures, orthopyroxene enrichment results in little change in bulk density (ρbulk) and shear-wave velocity (VS), but decreases compressional wave velocities (VP......We examine the modes and compositions of garnet-bearing peridotite xenoliths from the Kaapvaal Craton to quantify factors governing density and seismic velocity variations within metasomatically altered cratonic mantle. Three distinct compositional trends are resolved by principal component...... analysis. The first reflects differences in residue composition resulting from partial melting. The second is associated with orthopyroxene (opx) enrichment, possibly due to silica addition by subduction zone fluids in the source region of the xenoliths. The third principal component reflects garnet...

  10. Mantle melting and melt refertilization beneath the Southwest Indian Ridge: Mineral composition of abyssal peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Zhu, Jihao; Chu, Fengyou; Dong, Yan-hui; Liu, Jiqiang; Li, Zhenggang; Zhu, Zhimin; Tang, Limei

    2017-04-01

    As one of the slowest spreading ridges of the global ocean ridge system, the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is characterized by discontinued magmatism. The 53°E segment between the Gallieni fracture zone (FZ) (52°20'E) and the Gazelle FZ (53°30'E) is a typical amagmatic segment (crustal thickness 1cm) Opx, and Mg-rich mineral compositions akin to harzburgite xenoliths that sample old continental lithospheric mantle (Kelemen et al., 1998). Melt refertilization model shows that Group 2 peridotites were affected by an enriched low-degree partial melt from the garnet stability field. These results indicate that depleted mantle which experiences ancient melting event are more sensitive to melt refertilization, thus may reduce the melt flux, leading to extremely thin crust at 53°E segment. This research was granted by the National Basic Research Programme of China (973 programme) (grant No. 2013CB429705) and the Fundamental Research Funds of Second Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration (JG1603, SZ1507). References: Johnson K T M, Dick H J B, Shimizu N. Melting in the oceanic upper mantle: An ion microprobe study of diopsides in abyssal peridotites[J]. Journal of Geophysical Research, 1990, 95(B3):2661-2678. Kelemen P B, Hart S R, Bernstein S. Silica enrichment in the continental upper mantle via melt/rock reaction[J]. Earth & Planetary Science Letters, 1998, 164(1-2):387-406. Zhou H, Dick H J. Thin crust as evidence for depleted mantle supporting the Marion Rise.[J]. Nature, 2013, 494(7436):195-200.

  11. Three types of element fluxes from metabasite into peridotite in analogue experiments: Insights into subduction-zone processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchuk, A. L.; Yapaskurt, V. O.; Griffin, W. L.; Shur, M. Yu.; Gain, S. E. M.

    2018-03-01

    Piston-cylinder experiments with natural rocks and mineral separates were carried out at 750-900 °C and 2.9 GPa, conditions relevant to hot subduction zones, to study the mechanisms of metasomatic alteration of mantle-wedge rocks such as dunite and lherzolite, and the transfer of trace elements released from a carbonate-bearing amphibolite during its eclogitization. Element transfer from the slab to the mantle lithologies occurred in porous-, focused- and diffusive-flow regimes that remove melt and carbon, and partially water, from the metabasite layer. Porous flow is recorded by dissolution of clinopyroxene and growth of orthopyroxene ± garnet ± magnesite ± chlorite along grain boundaries in the peridotite layers, but is invisible in the metabasite layers. Porous flow of the same fluids/melts produces harzburgite mineralogy in both dunite and lherzolite. The transformation of lherzolite to harzburgite reflects breakdown of clinopyroxene in the lherzolite and diffusion of the liberated calcium into the metabasite layer, i.e. against the direction of major fluid/melt flow. Focused flow develops along the side walls of the capsules, producing a melt-free omphacite ± phengite ± quartz paragenesis in the metabasite, and melt segregations, separated from the host peridotite layers by newly-formed omphacite ± garnet ± phlogopite + orthopyroxene + magnesite. Diffusive flow leads to the formation of orthopyroxene ± magnesite ± garnet reaction zones at the metabasite-peridotite interface and some melt-peridotite interfaces. Melt segregations in the peridotite layers at 850-900 °C are rich in LREE and LILE, strongly depleted in Y and HREE, and have higher Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios than island arc andesites, dacites and rhyolites. These features, and negative anomalies in Nb-Ta and low Nb/Ta, resemble those of high-silica adakites and TTGs, but K2O is high compared to TTGs. Metasomatism in the dunite layer changes the REE patterns of dunite, recording chromatographic

  12. PYROXENITE VEINS WITHIN SSZ PERIDOTITES – EVIDENCE OF MELT-ROCK INTERACTION (EGIINGOL MASSIF, MAJOR AND TRACE ELEMENT COMPOSITION OF MINERALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Karimov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of melt-rock reaction between suprasubduction zone (SSZ peridotites and island arc boninititc and tholeiitic melts are identified. This process is the cause of replacive dunites and pyroxenite veins forming, which are represent the ways of island-arc melts migration. The peridotite-melt interaction is confirmed by compositional features of rocks and minerals. Influence of boninitic melt in peridotites of South Sandwich island arc leads to increasing of TiO2 and Cr-number (Cr# in spinels [Pearce et al., 2000] e.g. REE patterns of clinopyroxene from Voykar are equilibrium to boninitic melts [Belousov et al., 2009]. We show that pyroxenites are formed sequential, orthopyroxenites are originated firstly, websterites – after, and the main forming process is interaction of SSZ peridotites with percolating boninite-like melts.

  13. Sediment-peridotite interactions in a thermal gradient: mineralogic and geochemical effects and the "sedimentary signature" of arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Alan; Girnis, Andrei; Bulatov, Vadim; Brey, Gerhard; Höfer, Heidi; Gerdes, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Strong thermal and chemical gradients are characteristic of the slab-mantle interface in subduction zones where relatively cold sediments become juxtaposed with hotter peridotite of the mantle wedge. The formation of arc magmas is directly related to mass transfer processes under these conditions. We have undertaken a series of experiments to simulate interactions and mass transfer at the slab-mantle interface. In addition to having juxtaposed sediment and peridotite layers, the experiments were performed under different thermal gradients. The sediment had a composition similar to GLOSS (1) and also served as the source of H2O, CO2 and a large selection of trace elements. The peridotite was a depleted garnet harzburgite formed from a mixture of natural hand-picked olivine, opx and garnet. Graphite was added to this mixture to establish a redox gradient between the two layers. Experiments were performed at 7.5-10 GPa to simulate the processes during deep subduction. The thermal gradient was achieved by displacing the sample capsule (Re-lined Pt) from the center of the pressure cell. The gradient was monitored with separate thermocouples at each end of the capsule and by subsequent opx-garnet thermometry across the sample. Maximum temperatures varied from 1400˚ -900˚ C and gradients ranged from 200˚ -800˚ C. Thus, in some experiments melting occurred in the sediment layer and in others this layer remained subsolidus, only devolatilizing. Major and trace elements were transported both in the direction of melt percolation to the hot zone, as well as down temperature. This leads to the development of zones with discrete phase assemblages. Olivine in the peridotite layer becomes converted to orthopyroxene, which is due to Si addition, but also migration of Mg and Fe towards the sediment. In the coldest part of a sample, the sediment is converted into an eclogitic cpx + garnet assemblage. A thin zone depleted in almost all trace elements is formed in peridotite

  14. Sulfur in serpentinized oceanic peridotites: Serpentinization processes and microbial sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1998-01-01

    The mineralogy, contents, and isotopic compositions of sulfur in oceanic serpentinites reflect variations in temperatures and fluid fluxes. Serpentinization of serpentinization of Iberian Margin peridotites occurred at low temperatures (???20??-200??C) and high water/rock ratios. Complete serpentinization and consumption of ferrous iron allowed evolution to higher fO2. Microbial reduction of seawater sulfate resulted in addition of low-??34S sulfide (-15 to -43???) and formation of higher-sulfur assemblages that include valleriite and pyrite. The high SO4/total S ratio of Hess Deep serpentinites (0.89) results in an increase of total sulfur and high ??34S of total sulfur (mean ??? 8???). In contrast, Iberian Margin serpentinites gained large amounts of 34S-poor sulfide (mean total S = 3800 ppm), and the high sulfide/total S ratio (0.61) results in a net decrease in ??34S of total sulfur (mean ??? -5???). Thus serpentinization is a net sink for seawater sulfur, but the amount fixed and its isotopic composition vary significantly. Serpentinization may result in uptake of 0.4-14 ?? 1012 g S yr-1 from the oceans, comparable to isotopic exchange in mafic rocks of seafloor hydrothermal systems and approaching global fluxes of riverine sulfate input and sedimentary sulfide output.

  15. Experimental Investigation and Simplistic Geochemical Modeling of CO2 Mineral Carbonation Using the Mount Tawai Peridotite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omeid Rahmani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the potential of CO2 mineral carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH2 derived from the Mount Tawai peridotite (forsterite based (Mg2SiO4 to produce thermodynamically stable magnesium carbonate (MgCO3 was evaluated. The effect of three main factors (reaction temperature, particle size, and water vapor were investigated in a sequence of experiments consisting of aqueous acid leaching, evaporation to dryness of the slurry mass, and then gas-solid carbonation under pressurized CO2. The maximum amount of Mg converted to MgCO3 is ~99%, which occurred at temperatures between 150 and 175 °C. It was also found that the reduction of particle size range from >200 to <75 µm enhanced the leaching rate significantly. In addition, the results showed the essential role of water vapor in promoting effective carbonation. By increasing water vapor concentration from 5 to 10 vol %, the mineral carbonation rate increased by 30%. This work has also numerically modeled the process by which CO2 gas may be sequestered, by reaction with forsterite in the presence of moisture. In both experimental analysis and geochemical modeling, the results showed that the reaction is favored and of high yield; going almost to completion (within about one year with the bulk of the carbon partitioning into magnesite and that very little remains in solution.

  16. Petrology of Ortsog-Uul peridotite-gabbro massif in Western Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalova, M.; Tolstykh, N.; Shelepaev, R.; Cherdantseva, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Ortsog-Uul mafic-ultramafic massif of Western Mongolia is located in a tectonic block with overturned bedding. The massif hosts two intrusions: a rhythmically-layered peridotite-gabbro association (Intrusion 1) and massive Bt-bearing amphibole-olivine gabbro (Intrusion 2). Intrusions 1 and 2 have different petrology features. Early Intrusion 1 (278±2.5Ma) is characterized by lower concentrations of alkalis, titanium and phosphorus than late Intrusion 2 (272±2Ma). The chondrite-normalized REE and primitive mantle-normalized rare elements patterns of Ortsog-Uul intrusions have similar curves of elements distribution. However, Intrusion 2 is characterized higher contents of REE and rare elements. High concentrations of incompatible elements are indicative of strong fractionation process. It has been suggested that Intrusions 1 and 2 derived from compositionally different parental melts. Model calculations (COMAGMAT-3.57) show that parental melts of two intrusions were close to high-Mg picrobasaltic magmas. The concentration of MgO in melt is 16.21 (Intrusion 1) and 16.17 (Intrusion 2). Isotopic data of Ortsog-Uul magmatic rocks exhibit different values of εNd (positive and negative) for Intrusion 1 and 2, respectively.

  17. Slab melting beneath the Cascades Arc driven by dehydration of altered oceanic peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walowski, Kristina J; Wallace, Paul J.; Hauri, E.H.; Wada, I.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Water is returned to Earth’s interior at subduction zones. However, the processes and pathways by which water leaves the subducting plate and causes melting beneath volcanic arcs are complex; the source of the water—subducting sediment, altered oceanic crust, or hydrated mantle in the downgoing plate—is debated; and the role of slab temperature is unclear. Here we analyse the hydrogen-isotope and trace-element signature of melt inclusions in ash samples from the Cascade Arc, where young, hot lithosphere subducts. Comparing these data with published analyses, we find that fluids in the Cascade magmas are sourced from deeper parts of the subducting slab—hydrated mantle peridotite in the slab interior—compared with fluids in magmas from the Marianas Arc, where older, colder lithosphere subducts. We use geodynamic modelling to show that, in the hotter subduction zone, the upper crust of the subducting slab rapidly dehydrates at shallow depths. With continued subduction, fluids released from the deeper plate interior migrate into the dehydrated parts, causing those to melt. These melts in turn migrate into the overlying mantle wedge, where they trigger further melting. Our results provide a physical model to explain melting of the subducted plate and mass transfer from the slab to the mantle beneath arcs where relatively young oceanic lithosphere is subducted.

  18. Uranium-thorium disequilibria and partitioning on melting of garnet peridotite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beattie, P.

    1993-01-01

    The abundances of isotopes in the 238 U decay series can be used as both tracers and chronometers of magmatic processes. In the subsolidus asthenosphere, the activity of each daughter isotope (defined as the product of its concentration and decay constant, and denoted by parentheses) is assumed to be equal to that of its parent. By contrast, ( 230 Th/ 238 U) is greater than unity in most recent mid-ocean-ridge and ocean-island basalts, implying that thorium is more incompatible (that is, it is partitioned into the melt phase more strongly) than uranium. Melting of spinel peridotite cannot produce the ( 230 Th) excesses, because measured partition coefficients for pyroxenes and olivine demonstrate that uranium is more incompatible than thorium for this rock. Here I report garnet-melt partitioning data which show that for this mineral-melt pair thorium does behave more incompatibility than uranium, thus supporting the suggestion that mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORB) are produced by melting initiated at depths where garnet is stable. Using these data, I show that the observed ( 230 Th/ 238 U) ratios of MORB and most ocean-island basalts can be explained by slow, near-fractional melting initiated in the garnet stability field. (author)

  19. Microfracturing and fluid pathways in serpentinizing abyssal peridotites along the Southwest Indian Ridge (62°-65°E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouméjon, S.; Cannat, M.; Agrinier, P.; Godard, M.; Andreani, M.

    2013-12-01

    At slow spreading ridges, axial detachment faults exhume mantle-derived peridotites. Their interaction with seawater-derived hydrothermal fluids causes serpentinization down to 2-3km from the fault, as inferred from seismic velocity models. It is commonly proposed that fractures allow penetration of seawater into the fault's footwall. At the microscopic scale, the hydration front progresses from a microfracture network toward the center of olivine relicts and forms the serpentine mesh texture. The origin of these microfractures is a matter of debate: tectonic, anisotropic thermal contraction of olivine during peridotite cooling or hierarchical fracturing of the olivine due to volume increase during serpentinization. In this presentation we use petrology and geochemistry to analyze the links between microfractures and serpentinization in a set of highly serpentinized peridotites dredged along the melt-starved easternmost part of the Southwest Indian Ridge (Smoothseafloor cruise). Our observations suggest that thermal contraction of olivine combines with tectonic stresses to fracture fresh peridotite in the brittle lithosphere. These ~60μm-spaced microfractures constitute the initial sample-scale permeability network for fluid penetration, onset of serpentinization and formation of additional hierarchical fractures. As serpentinization proceeds, the volume increase closes the least-developed planes and preferential pathways for fluid circulation become more distant, forming the 200-500μm-wide polygonal pattern typical of the serpentine mesh texture. In about 20% of the recovered samples the mesh serpentine is partially recrystallized forming rims next to later microfractures and serpentine veins. The spacing of these rims, and the limited proportion of affected samples suggest that the scales of the efficient permeability network in the serpentinites at this stage had increased to decimetric and greater scales. We use geochemical constrains to derive temperature

  20. Subduction initiation and recycling of Alboran domain derived crustal components prior to the intra-crustal emplacement of mantle peridotites in the Westernmost Mediterranean: isotopic evidence from the Ronda peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bosch, Delphine; Marchesi, Claudio Claudio; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Hidas, Károly; Barich, Amel

    2014-05-01

    During Late Oligocene-Early Miocene different domains formed in the region between Iberia and Africa in the westernmost Mediterranean, including thinned continental crust and a Flysch Trough turbiditic deposits likely floored by oceanic crust [1]. At this time, the Ronda peridotite likely constituted the subcontinental lithospheric mantle of the Alboran domain, which mantle lithosphere was undergoing strong thinning and melting [2] [3] coevally with Early Miocene extension in the overlying Alpujárride-Maláguide stacked crust [4, 5]. Intrusive Cr- rich pyroxenites in the Ronda massif records the geochemical processes occurring in the subcontinental mantle of the Alboran domain during the Late Oligocene [6]. Recent isotopic studies of these pyroxenites indicate that their mantle source was contaminated by a subduction component released by detrital crustal sediments [6]. This new data is consistent with a subduction setting for the late evolution of the Alboran lithospheric mantle just prior to its final intracrustal emplacement in the early Miocene Further detailed structural studies of the Ronda plagioclase peridotites-related to the initial stages of ductile emplacement of the peridotite-have led to Hidas et al. [7] to propose a geodynamic model where folding and shearing of an attenuated mantle lithosphere occurred by backarc basin inversion followed by failed subduction initiation that ended into the intracrustal emplacement of peridotite into the Alboran wedge in the earliest Miocene. This hypothesis implies that the crustal component recorded in late, Cr-rich websterite dykes might come from underthrusted crustal rocks from the Flysch and/or Alpujárrides units that might have been involved in the earliest stages of this subduction initiation stage. To investigate the origin of crustal component in the mantle source of this late magmatic event recorded by Cr-pyroxenites, we have carried out a detail Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic study of a variety of Betic

  1. Petrology and Rock Magnetism of the peridotites of Pindos Ophiolite (Greece), insights into the serpentinization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnemains, D.; Carlut, J. H.; Mevel, C.; Andreani, M.; Escartin, J.; Debret, B.

    2015-12-01

    We present a petrological and magnetic study of a suite of serpentinized peridotites from the Pindos ophiolite spanning a wide range in the degree of serpentinization (from ~10 to 100%). The Pindos ophiolite, in Northern Greece, is a portion of Late Triassic oceanic lithosphere obducted during the convergence of the Apulian and Pelagonian micro-continents. This ophiolite is interpreted mainly as the result of a supra-subduction zone spreading process but its complete history remains largely unknown. Therefore, it is not clear when the ultramafic section was exposed to fluid circulation that resulted in its serpentinization. Element partitioning during serpentinization reactions is dependent on parameters such as temperature and water-rock ratio. In particular, they affect the behavior of the iron released by olivine, which can be taken up either by magnetite, serpentine and/or brucite. Analyses of the reaction products are therefore a key to constrain the conditions during the main stage of the alteration. Our study was designed to gain insight on the conditions prevailing during hydration. Our results indicate that even fully serpentinized samples have a very low magnetization and magnetite content. Moreover, microprobe and μXanes results show that serpentine is the main host of iron in the divalent but also trivalent form. These results are compared with a set of data from serpentinized ultramafics sampled from the ocean floors, as well as from various other ophiolites. We suggest that serpentinization at Pindos occurred at relatively low-temperature (less than 200 °C), therefore not at a ridge environment. In addition, we stress that the presence of trivalent iron in serpentine indicates that serpentinization may remain a producer of hydrogen even when very little magnetite is formed.

  2. Experimental constraints on metasomatism of mantle wedge peridotites by hybridized adakitic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corgne, Alexandre; Schilling, Manuel E.; Grégoire, Michel; Langlade, Jessica

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a series of high-pressure (1.5 GPa) and high-temperature (1000-1300 °C) experiments were performed to investigate the petrological imprints of adakitic metasomatism on mantle wedge peridotites. Reaction couples were prepared using a powdered adakite from Cerro Pampa, Argentina (Mg# 0.7) placed in contact with a cored sample of medium-grained protogranular depleted spinel lherzolite from Pali Aike (Chile). Textural and chemical analyses of the run products allow us to identify key features of modal metasomatism by hybridized adakitic melts. The main changes in phase relations are associated with the following metasomatic reactions: incongruent dissolution of olivine and associated precipitation of secondary orthopyroxene, dissolution of primary spinel and subsequent replacement by secondary high-Cr spinel. In experiments with high water contents (9-12 wt%), precipitation of pargasitic amphibole also occurred, possibly at the expense of primary clinopyroxene. Neither phlogopite nor Ti-oxides were precipitated in any of these experiments. As expected, primary pyroxenes do not show evidence of being significantly altered following the interaction with the produced siliceous melts. Within the adakitic portion of the experimental charge, it was also observed the crystallization of secondary Ti-rich, Cr- and Na-poor diopsidic clinopyroxene, andesine plagioclase and, at low temperature, Fe-enriched secondary orthopyroxene. Considering textural criteria, we interpreted the formation of these minerals as crystallization products of the adakite component and not as true products of metasomatic reactions. The experimental results are used to discuss some of the petrological evidences presented to support modal metasomatism by slab-derived melts of mantle xenoliths extracted from several suprasubduction settings located around the Pacific Ring of Fire.

  3. Elastic Wave Velocity Measurements on Mantle Peridotite at High Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistler, G. W.; Ishikawa, M.; Li, B.

    2002-12-01

    With the success of conducting ultrasonic measurements at high pressure and high temperature in large volume high pressure apparatus with in-situ measurement of the sample length by X-ray imaging, it is now possible to measure elastic wave velocities on aggregate samples with candidate compositions of the mantle to the conditions of the Earth's transition zone in the laboratory. These data can be directly compared with seismic data to distinguish the compositional models in debate. In this work, we carried out velocity measurements on natural peridotite KLB-1 at the conditions of the Earth's upper mantle. Fine powered sample of natural KLB-1 was used as starting material. Specimens for ultrasonic measurements were hot-pressed and equilibrated at various pressure and temperature conditions along geotherm up to the transition zone. The recovered samples were characterized with density measurement, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. Bench top P and S wave velocities of KLB-1 sample sintered at 3-4 GPa and 1400 degree centigrade showed a very good agreement with the VRH average of pyrolite. High pressure and high temperature measurements was conducted up to 7 GPa and 800 degree centigrade using ultrasonic interferometric method in a DIA-type high pressure apparatus in conjunction with X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging. The utilization of X-ray imaging technique provides direct measurements of sample lengths at high pressure and high temperature, ensuring a precise determination of velocities. The results of P and S wave velocities at high pressure and high temperature as well as their comparison with calculated pyrolite model will be presented.

  4. Gravimetric structure for the abyssal mantle massif of Saint Peter and Saint Paul peridotite ridge, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean, and its relation to active uplift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KENJI F. MOTOKI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents gravimetric and morphologic analyses based on the satellite-derived data set of EGM2008 and TOPEX for the area of the oceanic mantle massif of the Saint Peter and Saint Paul peridotite ridge, Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The free-air anomaly indicates that the present plate boundary is not situated along the longitudinal graben which cuts peridotite ridge, but about 20 km to the north of it. The high Bouguer anomaly of the peridotite ridge suggests that it is constituted mainly by unserpentinised ultramafic rocks. The absence of isostatic compensation and low-degree serpentinisation of the ultramafic rocks indicate that the peridotite ridge is sustained mainly by active tectonic uplift. The unparallel relation between the transform fault and the relative plate motion generates near north-south compression and the consequent tectonic uplift. In this sense, the peridotite massif is a pressure ridge due to the strike-slip displacement of the Saint Paul Transform Fault.

  5. Serpentinization of mantle-derived peridotites at mid-ocean ridges: Mesh texture development in the context of tectonic exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouméjon, Stéphane; Cannat, Mathilde

    2014-06-01

    At slow spreading ridges, axial detachment faults exhume mantle-derived peridotites and hydrothermal alteration causes serpentinization in a domain extending more than 1 km next to the fault. At the microscopic scale, serpentinization progresses from a microfracture network toward the center of olivine relicts and forms a mesh texture. We present a petrographic study (SEM, EBSD, and Raman) of the serpentine mesh texture in a set of 278 abyssal serpentinized peridotites from the Mid-Atlantic and Southwest Indian Ridges. We show that serpentinization initiated along two intersecting sets of microfractures that have consistent orientations at the sample scale, and in at least one studied location, at the 100 m scale. We propose that these microfractures formed in fresh peridotites due to combined thermal and tectonic stresses and subsequently served as channels for serpentinizing fluids. Additional reaction-induced cracks developed for serpentinization extents <20%. The resulting microfracture network has a typical spacing of ˜60 µm but most serpentinization occurs next to a subset of these microfractures that define mesh cells 100-400 µm in size. Apparent mesh rim thickness is on average 33 ± 19 µm corresponding to serpentinization extents of 70-80%. Published laboratory experiments suggest that mesh rims formation could be completed in a few years (i.e., quasi instantaneous at the plate tectonic timescale). The depth and extent of the serpentinization domain in the detachment fault's footwall are probably variable in time and space and as a result we expect that the serpentine mesh texture at slow spreading ridges forms at variable rates with a spatially heterogeneous distribution.

  6. Evidence of Arc Magma Genesis in a Paleo-Mantle Wedge, the Higashi-Akaishi Peridotite, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, C. B.; Guild, M. R.; Grove, T. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    Located in the Sanbagawa subduction-related high-pressure metamorphic belt in SW Japan on the island of Shikoku, the Higashi-akaishi peridotite body is composed of dunite, lherzolite and garnet clinopyroxenite, interfingered in one locality with quartz-rich eclogite. Previous work indicates the P-T history of the peridotite includes rapid prograde metamorphism with peak temperatures of 700-810°C and pressures of 2.9-3.8 GPa [1] at ~88-89 Ma followed by rapid exhumation at >2.5 cm/yr [2,3]. Major and trace element and isotopic data from samples within the Higashi-akaishi peridotite presented here and in another recent study [4] provide a record of subduction zone melting processes in a paleo-mantle wedge. Ultramafic samples range from 40-52 wt.% SiO2, 1-11 wt.% Al2O3 and 21-45 wt.% MgO with olivine and clinopyroxene Mg#'s as high as 0.93. The quartz-rich eclogite contains 62 wt.% SiO2, 6 wt.% MgO and 13 wt.% Al2O3 with trace element concentrations that are enriched relative to the ultramafic samples. 87Sr/86Sr (.703237-.704288), 143Nd/144Nd (ɛNd=+2 to +6) and Pb isotopic compositions are within the range of previously studied Japanese arc rocks. We interpret the pyroxenites as shallowly crystallized cumulates with varying amounts of trapped hydrous melt and the harzburgites as residues of melting. The peak P-T conditions of these rocks are similar to the solidus conditions of H2O-saturated fertile mantle near the base of the mantle wedge [5,6]. The presence of garnet porphyroblasts that enclose primary euhedral chlorite together with the chemical evidence, suggest these samples are associated with mantle melting in the presence of H2O. Major element modeling suggests the quartz-rich eclogite composition can be reproduced through mixing melts of subducted sediment with wet peridotite melts in the mantle wedge. Thus the Higashi-aikashi rock suite provides an in-situ record of the beginnings of hydrous melting and the mechanisms of metasomatism in the mantle wedge

  7. Accessory priderite and burbankite in multiphase solid inclusions in the orogenic garnet peridotite from the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naemura, K.; Shimizu, I.; Svojtka, Martin; Hirajima, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 1 (2015), s. 20-28 ISSN 1345-6296 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100131203 Program:Program interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : garnet peridotite * Variscan orogeny * multiphase solid inclusion * priderite * burbankite Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.648, year: 2015

  8. An Experimental Study of the Carbonation of Serpentinite and Partially Serpentinised Peridotites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja M. Lacinska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In situ sequestration of CO2 in mantle peridotites has been proposed as a method to alleviate the amount of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere. This study presents the results of 8-month long laboratory fluid-rock experiments on representative mantle rocks from the Oman-United Arab Emirates ophiolite to investigate this process. Small core samples (3 cm long were reacted in wet supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine at 100 bar and 70°C. The extent of carbonate formation, and hence the degree of carbon sequestration, varied greatly depending on rock type, with serpentinite (lizardite-dominated exhibiting the highest capacity, manifested by the precipitation of magnesite MgCO3 and ferroan magnesite (Mg,FeCO3. The carbonate precipitation occurred predominantly on the surface of the core and subordinately within cross-cutting fractures. The extent of the CO2 reactions appeared to be principally controlled by the chemical and mineralogical composition of the rock, as well as the rock texture, with all these factors influencing the extent and rate of mineral dissolution and release of Mg and Fe for subsequent reaction with the CO2. It was calculated that ≈0.7 g of CO2 was captured by reacting ≈23 g of serpentinite, determined by the mass of magnesite formed. This equates to ≈30 kg CO2 per ton of host rock, equivalent to ≈3% carbonation in half a year. However, recycling of carbonate present in veins within the original rock sample could mean that the overall amount is around 2%. The increased reactivity of serpentinite was associated with preferential dissolution of more reactive types of serpentine minerals and brucite that were mainly present in the cross-cutting veins. The bulk of the serpentinite rock was little affected. This study, using relatively short term experiments, suggests that serpentinite might be a good host rock for CO2 sequestration, although long term experiments might prove that dunite and harzburgite could be as

  9. Regolith-geology mapping with support vector machine: A case study over weathered Ni-bearing peridotites, New Caledonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boissieu, Florian; Sevin, Brice; Cudahy, Thomas; Mangeas, Morgan; Chevrel, Stéphane; Ong, Cindy; Rodger, Andrew; Maurizot, Pierre; Laukamp, Carsten; Lau, Ian; Touraivane, Touraivane; Cluzel, Dominique; Despinoy, Marc

    2018-02-01

    Accurate maps of Earth's geology, especially its regolith, are required for managing the sustainable exploration and development of mineral resources. This paper shows how airborne imaging hyperspectral data collected over weathered peridotite rocks in vegetated, mountainous terrane in New Caledonia were processed using a combination of methods to generate a regolith-geology map that could be used for more efficiently targeting Ni exploration. The image processing combined two usual methods, which are spectral feature extraction and support vector machine (SVM). This rationale being the spectral features extraction can rapidly reduce data complexity by both targeting only the diagnostic mineral absorptions and masking those pixels complicated by vegetation, cloud and deep shade. SVM is a supervised classification method able to generate an optimal non-linear classifier with these features that generalises well even with limited training data. Key minerals targeted are serpentine, which is considered as an indicator for hydrolysed peridotitic rock, and iron oxy-hydroxides (hematite and goethite), which are considered as diagnostic of laterite development. The final classified regolith map was assessed against interpreted regolith field sites, which yielded approximately 70% similarity for all unit types, as well as against a regolith-geology map interpreted using traditional datasets (not hyperspectral imagery). Importantly, the hyperspectral derived mineral map provided much greater detail enabling a more precise understanding of the regolith-geological architecture where there are exposed soils and rocks.

  10. Textures in spinel peridotite mantle xenoliths using micro-CT scanning: Examples from Canary Islands and France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, K. K.; Downes, H.; Petrone, C. M.; Humphreys-Williams, E.

    2017-04-01

    Spinel pyroxene-clusters, which are intergrowths of spinel, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene in mantle xenoliths, have been investigated through the use of micro-CT (μ-CT) in this study. Samples have been studied from two different tectonic settings: (1) the northern Massif Central, France, an uplifted and rifted plateau on continental lithosphere and (2) Lanzarote in the Canary Islands, an intraplate volcanic island on old oceanic lithosphere. μ-CT analysis of samples from both locations has revealed a range of spinel textures from small Lanzarote are regions that have experienced significant lithospheric thinning. This process provides a mechanism where the sub-solidus reaction of olivine + garnet = orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene + spinel is satisfied by providing a pathway from garnet peridotite to spinel peridotite. We predict that such textures would only occur in the mantle beneath regions that show evidence of thinning of the lithospheric mantle. Metasomatic reactions are seen around spinel-pyroxene clusters in some Lanzarote xenoliths, so metasomatism post-dated cluster formation.

  11. Origin of Fe-rich lherzolites and wehrlites from Tok, SE Siberia by reactive melt percolation in refractory mantle peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Chanefo, Ingrid; Bodinier, Jean-Louis

    2005-10-01

    Lherzolite-wehrlite (LW) series xenoliths from the quaternary Tok volcanic field in the southeastern Siberian craton are distinguished from the more common lherzolite-harzburgite (LH) series by (a) low Mg numbers (0.84-0.89) at high modal olivine (66-84%) and (b) widespread replacement of orthopyroxene (0-12%) and spinel by clinopyroxene (7-22%). The LW series peridotites are typically enriched in Ca, Fe, Mn and Ti, and depleted in Si, Ni and Cr relative to refractory LH series rocks (Mg number ≥0.89), which are metasomatised partial melting residues. Numerical modelling of Fe-Mg solid/liquid exchange during melt percolation demonstrates that LW series rocks can form by reaction of host refractory peridotites with evolved (Mg numbers 0.6-0.7), silica-undersaturated silicate melts at high melt/rock ratios, which replace orthopyroxene with clinopyroxene and decrease Mg numbers. This process is most likely related to underplating and fractionation of basaltic magma in the shallow mantle, which also produced olivine-clinopyroxene cumulates found among the Tok xenoliths.

  12. Water content within the oceanic upper mantle of the Southwest Indian Ridge: a FTIR analysis of orthopyroxenes of abyssal peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Li, H.; Tao, C.; Jin, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Water can be present in the oceanic upper mantle as structural OH in nominally anhydrous minerals. Such water has marked effects on manlte melting and rheology properties. However, the water content of MORB source is mainly inferred from MORB glass data that the water budget of oceanic upper mantle is poorly constrained. Here we present water analysis of peridotites from different sites on the Southwest Indian Ridge. The mineral assemblages of these peridotites are olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel. As the peridotites have been serpentinized to different degrees, only water contents in orthopyroxnene can be better determined by FTIR spectrometry. The IR absorption bands of all measured orthopyroxenes can be devided into four different groups: (1)3562-3596 cm-1, (2)3515-3520 cm-1, (3)3415-3420 cm-1, (4)3200-3210 cm-1. The positions of these absorption bands are in good agreement with perivious reports. Hydrogen profile measurements performed on larger opx grains in each suite of samples show no obvious variations between core and rims regions, indicating that diffusion of H in orthopyroxene is insignificant. Preliminary measured water contents of orthopyroxene differ by up to one order of magnitude. Opx water contents (80-220 ppm) of most samples are within the range of those found in mantle xenoliths of contentinal settings [1]. Opx water contents of one sample (VM-21V-S9-D5-2: 38-64 ppm) are similar to those from Gakkel Ridge abyssal peridotites (25-60 ppm) [2] but higher than those from Mid-Atlantic Ridge ODP-Leg 209(~15 ppm) [3]. Two other samples show high water concentrations (VM-19ΙΙΙ-S3-TVG2-4: 260-275 ppm, Wb-18-b: 190-265 ppm) which compare well with those from Mid-Atlantic Ridge ODP-Leg 153(160-270 ppm) [4]. Most opx water contents decrease with increasing depletion degree (spl Cr#) consistent with an incompatible behavior of water during partial melting. Recalculated bulk water contents (27-117 ppm) of these peridotites overlap

  13. Lithosphere destabilization by melt percolation during pre-oceanic rifting: Evidence from Alpine-Apennine ophiolitic peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, Giovanni; Ranalli, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Orogenic peridotites from Alpine-Apennine ophiolite Massifs (Lanzo, Voltri, External and Internal Ligurides, - NW Italy, and Mt. Maggiore - Corsica) derive from the mantle lithosphere of the Ligurian Tethys. Field/structural and petrologic/geochemical studies provide constraints on the evolution of the lithospheric mantle during pre-oceanic passive rifting of the late Jurassic Ligurian Tethys ocean. Continental rifting by far-field tectonic forces induced extension of the lithosphere by means of km-scale extensional shear zones that developed before infiltration of melts from the asthenosphere (Piccardo and Vissers, 2007). After significant thinning of the lithosphere, the passively upwelling asthenosphere underwent spinel-facies decompression melting along the axial zone of the extensional system. Silica-undersaturated melt fractions percolated through the lithospheric mantle via diffuse/focused porous flow and interacted with the host peridotite through pyroxenes-dissolving/olivine-precipitating melt/rock reactions. Pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation modified the composition of the primary silica-undersaturated melts into derivative silica-saturated melts, while the host lithospheric spinel lherzolites were transformed into pyroxene-depleted/olivine-enriched reactive spinel harzburgites and dunites. The derivative liquids interacted through olivine-dissolving/orthopyroxene+plagioclase-crystallizing reactions with the host peridotites that were impregnated and refertilized (Piccardo et al., 2015). The saturated melts stagnated and crystallized in the shallow mantle lithosphere (as testified by diffuse interstitial crystallization of euhedral orthopyroxene and anhedral plagioclase) and locally ponded, forming orthopyroxene-rich/olivine-free gabbro-norite pods (Piccardo and Guarnieri, 2011). Reactive and impregnated peridotites are characterized by high equilibration temperatures (up to 1250 °C) even at low pressure, plagioclase-peridotite facies

  14. Fragments of deeper parts of the hanging wall mantle preserved as orogenic peridotites in the central belt of the Seve Nappe Complex, Sweden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clos, F.; Gilio, M.; van Roermund, H.L.M.

    Formation conditions of olivine microstructures are investigated in the Kittelfjäll spinel peridotite (KSP), a fragment of lithospheric mantle which occurs as an isolated body within high grade metamorphic crustal rocks of the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC), southern Västerbotten, central Sweden. The KSP

  15. Immiscible melt droplets in garnet, as represented by ilmenite-magnetite-spinel spheroids in an eclogite-garnet peridotite association, Blanský les Granulite Massif, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrána, S.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Erban, V.; Halodová, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 1 (2016), s. 82-92 ISSN 0003-004X Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : eclogite * Fe-Ti-rich melt * garnet peridotite * garnetite * Ilmenite-magnetite-spinel * Invited Centennial article * Moldanubian Zone * UHP crystallization Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.021, year: 2016

  16. Depletion, cryptic metasomatism, and modal metasomatism (refertilization) of Variscan lithospheric mantle: Evidence from major elements, trace elements, and Sr-Nd-Os isotopes in a Saxothuringian garnet peridotite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medaris Jr., L. G.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Jelínek, E.; Michels, Z. D.; Erban, V.; Kotková, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 226, SI (2015), s. 81-97 ISSN 0024-4937 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : garnet peridotite * Variscan * Bohemian Massif * Sr-Nd-Os isotopes * depletion cryptic metasomatism and refertilization * P-T conditions Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.723, year: 2015

  17. The semi-brittle to ductile transition in peridotite on oceanic faults: mechanisms and P-T condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, C.; Warren, J. M.; Kohli, A. H.; Teyssier, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    Experimental and geological-petrological studies suggest that the transition from brittle faulting to ductile flow of olivine, i.e. from seismic to aseismic behavior of mantle rocks (peridotites), occurs close to 600°C. However, recent seismological studies on oceanic transform faults (TFs) and ridges have documented earthquakes to temperatures (T) up to 700-800°C. In this study, we carried out a petrological, microstructural and geochemical analysis of natural samples of peridotites dredged at 3 different oceanic TFs of the Southwest Indian Ridge: Shaka, Prince Edward and Atlantis II. We selected samples displaying variable amounts of ductile deformation (from porphyroclastic tectonites to ultramylonites) prior to serpentinization in order to characterize their relatively high-T mechanical behavior. We find that the most deformed samples record cycles of ductile and brittle deformation. Peridotite ductile flow is characterized by drastic grain size reduction and the development of (ultra)mylonitic shear zones. In these zones, a switch in olivine deformation mechanism from dislocation creep to grain-size sensitive creep is associated with dissolution/precipitation processes. Brittle deformation of these samples is evidenced by the presence of (at least centimetric) transgranular and intragranular fractures that fragment coarser grained minerals. Both kinds of fractures are filled with the same phase assemblage as in the ultramylonitic bands: olivine + amphibole ± orthopyroxene ± Al-phase (plagioclase and/or spinel) ± sulfides. The presence of amphibole indicates that this semi-brittle deformation was assisted by hydrous fluids and its composition (e.g. high concentration of chlorine) suggests that the fluids have most likely a hydrothermal origin. We interpret these fractures to have formed under fluid-assisted conditions, recording paleo-seismic activity that alternated with periods of relatively slow interseismic ductile flow. The presence of Mg

  18. Water-Rock Interactions in the Peridotite Aquifer of the Oman-UAE Ophiolite: Strontium Isotopic Ratio and Geochemical Evolution of Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompard, Nicolas; Matter, Juerg; Teagle, Damon

    2016-04-01

    The peridotite aquifer in Wadi Tayin, Sultanate of Oman, is a perfect example of natural carbonation of ultramafic rocks. In situ mineral carbonation is considered the most safest and permanent option of CO2 Capture and Sequestration (CCS). However, the process itself is yet to be characterised and a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in natural mineral carbonation is needed before geo-engineering it. We used the 87Sr/86Sr system to follow the water-rock interactions along the groundwater flowpath in the peridotite aquifer and to determine the sources of divalent cations (Mg2+, Ca2+) required for mineral carbonation. The Sr-isotope data of groundwater show that the aquifer rocks are the main source for divalent cations (Mg2+, Ca2+ and Sr2+) and secondary carbonates are their main sink. The groundwater 87Sr/86Sr ratio evolves with its pH: from 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7087 (n=3) to 0.7082 (n=8) between pH 7 and 8, and from 0.7086 (n=6) at pH 9 to 0.07075 (n=9) at pH 11. This evolution seems to support a two-step model for the water-rock interactions in the peridotite aquifer. From pH 7 to 8, secondary Ca-carbonate precipitation buffers the pH rise resulting from peridotite serpentinisation. From pH 9 to 11, peridotite serpentinisation drives the pH to alkaline condition. The change from a Mg-rich to a Ca-rich groundwater at pH 9 seems to confirm the two-step model.

  19. Characterizing the nature of melt-rock reaction in peridotites from the Santa Elena Ophiolite, NW Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, D.; Loocke, M. P.; Snow, J. E.; Gazel, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Santa Elena Ophiolite (SEO), located on the northwestern coast of Costa Rica, consists primarily of preserved oceanic mantle and crustal rocks thrust above an accretionary complex. The SEO is predominantly characterized by mantle peridotites (i.e., primarily spinel lherzolite with minor amounts of harzburgite and dunite) cut and intruded by minor pegmatitic gabbros, layered gabbros, plagiogranites, and doleritic and basaltic dykes. Previous studies have concluded that the complex formed in a suprasubduction zone (SSZ) setting based on the geochemical nature of the layered gabbros and plagiogranites (i.e., depleted LREE and HFSE and enriched LILE and Pb), as well, as the peridotites (i.e., low-TiO2, Zr, and V, and high MgO, Cr, and Ni)(Denyer and Gazel, 2009). Eighteen ultramafic samples collected during the winter 2010/2011 field season (SECR11) exhibit abundant evidence for melt-rock reaction (e.g., disseminated plagioclase and plagioclase-spinel, clinopyroxene-spinel, and plagioclase-clinopyroxene symplectites) and provide a unique opportunity to characterize the textural and chemical nature of melt-rock reaction in the SEO. We present the results of a petrologic investigation (i.e., petrography and electron probe microanalysis) of 28 thin sections (19 spinel lherzolites, of which 14 are plagioclase-bearing, 4 pyroxenite veins, and 5 harzburgites) derived from the SECR11 sample set. The results of this investigation have the potential to better our understanding of the nature of melt generation and migration and melt-rock interaction in the SEO mantle section and shed further light on the complex petrogenetic history of the SEO. Denyer, P., Gazel, E., 2009, Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 28:429-442.

  20. NiO and Fe/Mn in Fo-rich olivines from OIB, MORB, and mantle peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Baker, M.; Hofmann, A. E.; Clague, D.; Stolper, E.

    2006-12-01

    Olivines from mantle peridotites have a narrow range of NiO (0.36±0.03 [1σ] wt%), but NiO of olivines in basalts suggest NiO in mantle olivines is actually more variable: e.g., Hawaiian phenocrysts (Fo>90) have NiO >0.55%, and olivines from continental flood basalts can have >0.5% NiO. At the other end of the spectrum, some basaltic suites (e.g., Iceland, MORBs) have Fo>90 olivines with NiO >0.2%. Partial melting calculations on peridotites show it is difficult to generate liquids that crystallize Fo>90 olivines with >0.4% NiO without resorting to complex processes. Hypotheses to explain the variability of NiO in mantle-derived olivines include (1) reaction of peridotite with silica-rich melts of eclogite results in decreasing modal abundance of olivine and increasing NiO in olivine [1,2]; (2) magmas with NiO-rich olivines come from sources enriched in NiO due to a core-derived component [3]. [4] proposed that high Fe/Mn of Hawaiian vs. Icelandic and MORB lavas reflect a core-derived component in their sources. Possible core incorporation is poorly constrained but FeO and NiO are expected to increase by such processes, leading to correlations between NiO and Fe/Mn in mantle rocks with significant core-derived components. We present high-precision analyses of Fo-rich olivines from OIBs, MORBs, komatiites, and mantle peridotites, focusing on NiO contents and Fe/Mn ratios. Our goal is to test hypotheses to explain elevated NiO of Fo-rich olivines in basalts. Olivines are Fo85.1-93.4; more were analyzed, but we focused on this range to avoid complications due to decreasing NiO in olivine with crystallization. Errors (1σ) are 0.01 wt% in NiO and 1.5 in Fe/Mn (wt). Our data show several features: (1) NiO contents and Fe/Mn ratios of Fo>88 olivines are positively correlated, with the low end of the trend (NiO ~0.23%, Fe/Mn ~61) defined by MORB and Iceland and the high end of the trend (NiO ~0.55%, Fe/Mn ~80) by Reunion and Hawaii. Between these end points, there is a

  1. New constraints on the evolution of the Gibraltar Arc from palaeomagnetic data of the Ceuta and Beni Bousera peridotites (Rif, northern Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Thomas; Ruiz-Martínez, Vicente Carlos; Chalouan, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The Betic Cordillera and the Moroccan Rif together form one of the smallest and tightest orogenic arcs on Earth and almost completely close the Mediterranean to the west. For the explanation of the geodynamic evolution of the mountain belt, palaeomagnetic data that generally found clockwise block rotations in the Iberian and anticlockwise rotations in the Moroccan part of the mountain belt, have played a key role in recent works. This palaeomagnetic study has found new constraints on the rotations and timing of the peridotitic bodies outcropping in the key position at the westernmost margin of the mountain belt, in Ceuta and Beni Bousera (Rif, northern Africa). Detailed thermal demagnetization of 115 individually oriented samples from 14 sites was combined with rock magnetic and scanning electron microscopic experiments to analyze the magnetic mineralogy responsible for the remanences and the mechanisms and relative times of their acquisition. In Ceuta, up to three magnetic components, and in Beni Bousera, up to two magnetic components have been found, that are all to be interpreted as chemical remanent magnetizations (CRM). The data suggests the following succession of geodynamic events affecting the peridotites until recent times: (1) after their exhumation and subsequent cooling about 20 Ma ago, they recorded a characteristic remanent magnetization of both normal and reversed polarities, carried by (pseudo-)single-domain magnetite grains; (2) after their dismembering, the Ceuta peridotites were tilted southward by 22-34° about a horizontal or tilted axis (up to plunge 50°) with an azimuth of 72-145° and the Beni Bousera peridotites were rotated anticlockwise by 72.3 ± 12.1° about a vertical axis and (3) both recorded another magnetic signal of normal polarity only, carried by multi-domain magnetite grains; and finally (4) the Ceuta peridotites rotated anticlockwise by 19.7 ± 5.9° about a vertical axis. This study provides the first palaeomagnetic data for

  2. A mantle origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, Slave Craton: Evidence from 13C-, 15N- and 33,34S-stable isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartigny, Pierre; Farquhar, James; Thomassot, Emilie; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Wing, Bozwell; Masterson, Andy; McKeegan, Kevin; Stachel, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    In order to address diamond formation and origin in the lithospheric mantle underlying the Central Slave Craton, we report N- and C-stable isotopic compositions and N-contents and aggregation states for 85 diamonds of known paragenesis (73 peridotitic, 8 eclogitic and 4 from lower mantle) from the Panda kimberlite (Ekati Mine, Lac de Gras Area, Canada). For 12 peridotitic and two eclogitic sulfide inclusion-bearing diamonds from this sample set, we also report multiple-sulfur isotope ratios. The 73 peridotitic diamonds have a mean δ13C-value of - 5.2‰ and range from - 6.9 to - 3.0‰, with one extreme value at - 14.1‰. The associated δ15N-values range from - 17.0 to + 8.5‰ with a mean value of - 4.0‰. N-contents range from 0 to 1280 ppm. The 8 eclogitic diamonds have δ13C-values ranging from - 11.2 to - 4.4‰ with one extreme value at - 19.4‰. Their δ15N ranges from - 2.1 to + 7.9‰ and N-contents fall between 0 and 3452 ppm. Four diamonds with an inferred lower mantle origin are all Type II (i.e. nitrogen-free) and have a narrow range of δ13C values, between - 4.5 and - 3.5‰. The δ34S of the 14 analyzed peridotitic and eclogitic sulfide inclusions ranges from - 3.5 to +5.7‰. None of them provide evidence for anomalous δ33S-values; observed variations in δ33S are from +0.19 to - 0.33‰, i.e. within the 2 sigma uncertainties of mantle sulfur ( δ33S = 0‰). At Panda, the N contents and the δ13C of sulfide-bearing peridotitic diamonds show narrower ranges than silicate-bearing peridotitic diamonds. This evidence supports the earlier suggestion established from eclogitic diamonds from the Kaapvaal that sulfide-(±silicate) bearing diamonds sample a more restricted portion of sublithospheric mantle than silicate-(no sulfide) bearing diamonds. Our findings at Panda suggest that sulfide-bearing diamonds should be considered as a specific diamond population on a global-scale. Based on our study of δ34S, Δ 33S, δ15N and δ13C, we find no

  3. The Universal Cpx Jd-Di barometer for mantle peridotite eclogite and pyroxenites and it using for the mantle petrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashchepkov, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The Jd-Di exchange in clinopyroxenes used for the calibration of pyroxene barometer (Ashchepkov, 2000;2002; Ashchepkov et al 2010;2011;2012) was transformed to make one universal equation for mantle peridotite eclogites and pyroxenites. The original barometer (Ashchepkov, 2002) calibrated on pressures produced by Opx barometry (McGregor , 1974) was transformed (Ashchepkov et al ., 2004; 2010; 2011) to satisfy the increasing data bases for the mantle xenoliths and experimental values 530 in peridotitic and 650 in elcogitic systems . The obtained difference Pd =Pcpx- Pexp were studied for the dependence on each component and their combination . Instead of the common activities we used the temperature-dependent empirical equations. The three separate equations for the common peridotites, pyroxenites and eclogites (Ashchepkov et al., 2010) were checked and complex To and Al-Na-Fe dependent universal coefficients were received. The KD is determined as follows: KD=Na/AlCr*Mg/Ca The logarithmic dependence between P and KD was transformed to a linear one. Final pressure equations are: AlCr=(Al-0.01) *((T-600)/700)**0.75+Cr*(ToK-100)/1000+(4*Ti-0.0125)/ (T0-801)*650 +0.55*((Fe-0.23) *(T0-900)/10000-K) P=0.26*(5+12*(Al+0.30*Na)KD* ToK**0.75 /(1+Fe+ Fe*(ToK-600)/1000)-ln(1273/ ToK))*40*(7*Na-Al-15*Ti+10*Cr+Mg/4)+7.5*Si-20*( Al*Na*Mg/Ca/(Al-2*Ti+Na-2*Fe/(Fe+Mg))+50*(Na+0.1*Al-2*Ti+0.05*Mg-0.22*Ca-0.7*Na)/Ca). Obtained equation in combination with the (Nimis,Taylor, 2000) thermometer allow to reconstruct position of the magma feeder systems of the alkali basaltic magma withing the mantle diapirs in modern platforms like in Vitim plateau (Ashchepkov et al., 2011) and now was applicated to reconstruct the deep seated magma conduits beneath the mountain collision systems, island arcs ocean plateaus etc. This equation allows to receive the positions of the major groups of eclogites mantle sections and to find out the regularities of their behavior. The Fe rich eclogites commonly

  4. Highly siderophile element geochemistry of peridotites and pyroxenites from Horní Bory, Bohemian Massif: Implications for HSE behaviour in subduction-related upper mantle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Pitcher, L.; Strnad, L.; Puchtel, I. S.; Jelínek, E.; Walker, R. J.; Rohovec, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 1 (2013), s. 158-175 ISSN 0016-7037 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300130902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : alloy * high pressure * high temperature * igneous geochemistry * isotopic composition * mass balance * nappe * osmium isotope * peridotite * petrography * platinum group element * precipitation (chemistry) * pyroxenite * siderophile element * subduction * sulfide * upper mantle Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 4.250, year: 2013

  5. The deformation record of olivine in mylonitic peridotites from the Finero Complex, Ivrea Zone: Separate deformation cycles during exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Agnes K.; Trepmann, Claudia A.

    2015-12-01

    Mylonitic peridotites from the Finero complex are investigated to detect characteristic olivine microfabrics that can resolve separate deformation cycles at different metamorphic conditions. The heterogeneous olivine microstructures are characterized by deformed porphyroclasts surrounded by varying amounts of recrystallized grains. A well-developed but only locally preserved foam structure is present in recrystallized grain aggregates. This indicates an early stage of dynamic recrystallization and subsequent recovery and recrystallization at quasi-static stress conditions, where the strain energy was reduced such that a reduction in surface energy controlled grain boundary migration. Ultramylonites record a renewed stage of localized deformation and recrystallization by a second generation of recrystallized grains that do not show a foam structure. This second generation of recrystallized grains as well as sutured grain and kink band boundaries of porphyroclasts indicate that these microstructures developed during a stage of localized deformation after development of the foam structure. The heterogeneity of the microfabrics is interpreted to represent several (at least two) cycles of localized deformation separated by a marked hiatus with quasi-static recrystallization and recovery and eventually grain growth. The second deformation cycle did not only result in reactivation of preexisting shear zones but instead also locally affected the host rock that was not deformed in the first stage. Such stress cycles can result from sudden increases in differential stress imposed by seismic events, i.e., high stress-loading rates, during exhumation of the Finero complex.

  6. The Effect of CO2 on Partial Reactive Crystallization of MORB-Eclogite-derived Basaltic Andesite in Peridotite and Generation of Silica-Undersaturated Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recycled oceanic crust (MORB-eclogite) is considered to be the dominant heterogeneity in Earth's mantle. Because MORB-eclogite is more fusible than peridotite, siliceous partial melt derived from it must react with peridotite while the latter is still in the subsolidus state. Thus, studying such reactive process is important in understanding melting dynamics of the Earth's mantle. Reaction of MORB-eclogite-derived andesitic partial melt with peridotite can produce alkalic melts by partial reactive crystallization but these melts are not as silica-undersaturated as many natural basanites, nephelinites or melititites [1]. In this study, we constrain how dissolved CO2 in a siliceous MORB-eclogite-derived partial melt affects the reaction phase equilibria involving peridotite and can produce nephelinitic melts. Here we compare experiments on CO2-free [1] and 2.6 wt.% CO2 bearing andesitic melt+lherzolite mixtures conducted at 1375 °C and 3 GPa with added melt fraction of 8-50 wt.%. In both CO2-free and CO2-bearing experiments, melt and olivine are consumed and opx and garnet are produced, with the extent of modal change for a given melt-rock ratio being greater for the CO2-bearing experiments. While the residue evolves to a garnet websterite by adding 40% of CO2-bearing melt, the residue becomes olivine-free by adding 50% of the CO2-free melt. Opx mode increases from 12 to ~55 wt.% for 0 to 40% melt addition in CO2-bearing system and 12 to ~43 wt.% for 0 to 50% melt addition in CO2-free system. Garnet mode, for a similar range of melt-rock ratio, increases from ~10 to ~15 wt.% for CO2 bearing system and to ~11 wt.% for CO2-free system. Reacted melts from 25-33% of CO2-bearing melt-added runs contain ~39 wt.% SiO2 , ~11-13 wt.% TiO2, ~9 wt.% Al2O3, ~11 wt.% FeO*, 16 wt.% MgO, 10-11 wt.% CaO, and 3 wt.% Na2O whereas experiments with a similar melt-rock ratio in a CO2-free system yield melts with 44-45 wt.% SiO2, 6-7 wt.% TiO2, 13-14 wt.% Al2O3, 10-11 wt.% FeO*, 12-13 wt

  7. Metasomatic Reaction Zones as Monitors of Trace Element Transfer at the Slab-Mantle Interface: the Case of the Hochwart Peridotite (Ulten Zone, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocchi, M.; Hermann, J.; Bargossi, G. M.; Mair, V.; Morten, L.

    2006-12-01

    Ultramafic blocks belonging to the Hochwart peridotite outcrop (Ulten Zone, Italian Alps) preserve a series of metasomatic mineral zones generated by infiltration of Si-rich hydrous fluids which occurred at the gneiss- peridotite interface. The age of the high pressure metamorphism for the Hochwart complex has been constrained at 330 Ma (Tumiati et al., 2003, EPSL, 210, 509-526). The country rocks are stromatic gneisses consisting mainly of quartz, K-feldspar, garnet, kyanite, biotite and muscovite. The ultramafic body consists of strongly serpentinized metaperidotites which are exposed as a hectometre-size lens along a steep gully, associated to monomineralic zones that developed at the contact between the peridotite body and the garnet gneiss country rocks. The composition of the metasomatic zones has been investigated in detail and records an order of metasomatic zoning formed by phlogopite-rich to tremolite-anthophyllite-rich rocks going from the host gneiss towards the peridotite. In some cases, the ultramafics fade into the gneisses developing serpentine and talc which has replaced, presumably at lower temperatures, the serpentine matrix and occurs in association with chlorite. Phlogopite aggregates (phlogopitite) with accessory minerals (quartz + zircon + apatite) and metabasic pods (phlogopite and hornblende) also occur. Black tourmaline (schorl-dravite solid solution) has been found for the first time in the contact near the phlogopite zone, suggesting an external addition of elements (boron and fluorine) to the system at high temperature. The formation of the metasomatic zones composed exclusively of hydrous phases must have involved extensive H2O-metasomatism as already documented for the Ulten peridotites. The source for these fluids can be a system of trondhjemitic-pegmatitic dikes cutting the peridotite that would have channelled aqueous fluids into the ultramafic rocks. Whole-rock geochemistry and trace element (LA ICP-MS) composition of hydrous

  8. New calibration of Ji - Di clinopyroxene barometer for Eclogites, pyroxenites and peridotites and eclogite - pyroxenite mantle geotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashchepkov, Igor; Vishnyakova, Elena

    2010-05-01

    Checking the universe clinopyroxene JD-Di barometer on the experimental system showed that it better to use the separate schemes for the eclogite and peridotite systems. The clinopyroxene barometer based on the internal exchange of Jd-Di components for the Al. It allow using the temperature calculated with the (Krogh, 1988) method for the The barometer was calibrated on the 200 experimental runs for the eclogitic system (Yaxley,Brey,2004; Spandler ea, 2008; Konzett ea, 2008; Hanrahan ea, 2009 and references there in). It reproduces the pressure range to 120 kbar with the r= 0.91 (S=8) for 180 experimental runs. P(Ash2010 Ecl)=0.32 (1-0.215*Na/Al+0.012*Fe/Na)*Kd^3/4*ToK/(1+Fe)*(1+5*Fe)- 35*ln(1273/ToK)*(Al+Ti+2.5Na+1.5Fe3+)+(0.9-xx(2,8))*10+xx(2,9)/xx(2,3)* ToK /200-1.5 P1=(0.00004*P^3-0.0091*P^2+1.3936*P)*1.05 Where KD = Na*Mg/xAlCr*/Ca; XAlCr= Al+Cr+4*Ti-K-(Fe-0.21)*0.75 The tests on the natural associations form the eclogitic xenoliths with and without the diamonds and omphacite diamond inclusions (Taylor ea, 2006; Shatsky ea, 2008; Jacob ea, 2009) have shown very good agreement with the position of the Graphite -Diamond (Kennedy, Kennedy, 1977) boundary and to the conductive geotherms which are close to 34-36mvm-2 geotherms while for the South Africa they are more close to 40mvm-2 geotherms. For the zonal omphacites it produces the range of the nearly equal pressures or more rarely advective paths. The levels of the maximum enrichments in eclogites which are close to 50-60 kabr beneath 360ma Siberian kimberlites coincides with the levels of heating according to the monomineral and polymineral thermobarometry. South Africa eclogite geotherms often split into 2-3 branches: subductional (35) conductive (40) for Paleozoic-Mesozoic mantle lithosphere and the hottest advective close o 45 mv/m-2. For the pyroxenite compositions the barometer was rearranged to by the adding the temperature influence on Al , Ta, Fe exactly in KD as following: P(Ash2010 Per-Pxt)=0

  9. A subduction wedge origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds and harzburgites from the Panda kimberlite, Slave craton: evidence from Re-Os isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, K. J.; Shirey, S. B.; Richardson, S. H.; Carlson, R. W.; Gurney, J. J.; Harris, J. W.

    2006-09-01

    An extensive study of peridotitic sulfide inclusion bearing diamonds and their prospective harzburgitic host rocks from the 53 Ma Panda kimberlite pipe, Ekati Mine, NWT Canada, has been undertaken with the Re-Os system to establish their age and petrogenesis. Diamonds with peridotitic sulfide inclusions have poorly aggregated nitrogen (bearing diamonds and indicates residence in the cooler portion of the Slave craton lithospheric mantle. For most of the sulfide inclusions, relatively low Re contents (average 0.457 ppm) and high Os contents (average 339 ppm) lead to extremely low 187Re/188Os, typically << 0.05. An age of 3.52 ± 0.17 Ga (MSWD = 0.46) and a precise initial 187Os/188Os of 0.1093 ± 0.0001 are given by a single regression of 11 inclusions from five diamonds that individually provide coincident internal isochrons. This initial Os isotopic composition is 6% enriched in 187Os over 3.5 Ga chondritic or primitive mantle. Sulfide inclusions with less radiogenic initial Os isotopic compositions reflect isotopic heterogeneity in diamond forming fluids. The harzburgites have even lower initial 187Os/188Os than the sulfide inclusions, some approaching the isotopic composition of 3.5 Ga chondritic mantle. In several cases isotopically distinct sulfides occur in different growth zones of the same diamond. This supports a model where C-O-H-S fluids carrying a radiogenic Os signature were introduced into depleted harzburgite and produced diamonds containing sulfides conforming to the 3.5 Ga isochron. Reaction of this fluid with harzburgite led to diamonds with less radiogenic inclusions while elevating the Os isotope ratios of some harzburgites. Subduction is a viable way of introducing such fluids. This implies a role for subduction in creating early continental nuclei at 3.5 Ga and generating peridotitic diamonds.

  10. Trace element distribution in peridotite xenoliths from Tok, SE Siberian craton: A record of pervasive, multi-stage metasomatism in shallow refractory mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Chazot, Gilles; Chauvel, Catherine; Merlet, Claude; Bodinier, Jean-Louis

    2006-03-01

    Spinel peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts at Tok, SE Siberian craton range from fertile lherzolites to harzburgites and wehrlites; olivine-rich (70-84%) rocks are dominant. REE patterns in the lherzolites range from nearly flat for fertile rocks (14-17% cpx) to LREE-enriched; the enrichments are positively correlated with modal olivine, consistent with high-permeability of olivine-rich rocks during melt percolation. Clinopyroxene in olivine-rich Tok peridotites typically has convex-upward trace element patterns (La/Nd PM 1); the LREE-enrichments are positively correlated with phosphorus abundances and are mainly hosted by accessory phosphates and P-rich cryptocrystalline materials. In addition to apatite, some Tok xenoliths contain whitlockite (an anhydrous, halogen-poor and Na-Mg-rich phosphate), which is common in meteorites and lunar rocks, but has not been reported from any terrestrial mantle samples. Some olivine-rich peridotites have generations of clinopyroxene with distinct abundances of Na, LREE, Sr and Zr. The mineralogical and trace element data indicate that the lithospheric mantle section represented by the xenoliths experienced a large-scale metasomatic event produced by upward migration of mafic silicate melts followed by percolation of low- T, alkali-rich melts and fluids. Chromatographic fractionation and fractional crystallisation of the melts close to the percolation front produced strong LREE-enrichments, which are most common in the uppermost mantle and are related to carbonate- and P 2O 5-rich derivatives of the initial melt. Reversal and gradual retreat of the percolation front during thermal relaxation to ambient geotherm ("retrograde" metasomatism) caused local migration and entrapment of small-volume residual fluids and precipitation of volatile-rich accessory minerals. A distinct metasomatic episode, which mainly produced "anhydrous" late-stage interstitial materials was concomitant with the alkali basaltic magmatism, which brought

  11. First results from analysis of coordinated AVIRIS, TIMS, and ISM (French) data for the Ronda (Spain) and Beni Bousera (Morocco) peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, J. F.; Hurtrez, S.; Pinet, P.; Sotin, C.

    1992-01-01

    Ultramafic rocks are relatively rare at the Earth's surface but constitute the vast majority of the Earth by volume. Exposures of ultramafic bodies are therefore crucial for deducing many important processes that occur in the Earth's mantle. An important science question regarding the spatial distribution, abundance, and composition of mafic minerals in ultramafic bodies that can be examined with advanced sensor data is the melting process. When a lherzolite melts, clinopyroxene (cpx) melts first and therefore variations in the modal amount of cpx remaining in the mantle are a reflection of the amount of fractional melting that has occurred. Fe goes preferentially into the melt during melting but a 20 percent batch melting (i.e. closed system) acquires less Fe relative to 20 percent fractional melting (i.e. open system). Since the strength and wavelength of diagnostic absorptions is a strong function of Fe content, it is possible to make maps of the variation in Fe:Mg ratios which can be related to the general melting process. Accurate ground-truth information about local mineralogy provides internal calibration and consistency checks. Investigations using imaging spectrometer are very complementary to field studies because advanced sensor data can provide a synoptic view of modal mineralogy and chemical composition whereas field studies focus on detailed characterization of local areas. Two excellent exposures of ultramafic lithologies are being investigated with visible to mid-infrared imaging spectrometer data: the Ronda peridotite near Ronda, Spain and the Beni Bousera ophiolitic fragment in northern Morocco. Although separated by the Alboran Sea, these bodies are thought to be related and represent fertile sub-continental mantle. The Ronda peridotite is predominantly spinel lherzolite but grades into harzburgite and shows considerable variation in major and trace element compositions. Mafic layering and dykes (i.e. olivine gabbro) are also observed. This

  12. Spinel and plagioclase peridotites of the Nain ophiolite (Central Iran): Evidence for the incipient stage of oceanic basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnia, Tahmineh; Saccani, Emilio; Arai, Shoji

    2018-06-01

    The Nain ophiolites crop out along the western border of the central East Iran Microcontinent (CEIM) and consist of an ophiolitic mélange in which pargasite-bearing spinel and plagioclase mantle lherzolites are largely represented. Whole-rock and mineral chemistry data suggest that these rocks record the complex history of the asthenospheric and lithospheric mantle evolution. The spinel lherzolites have experienced low-degree ( 5%) partial melting and contain clinopyroxenes with positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 1.10-1.48) suggesting that the partial melting occurred under oxidized conditions (fayalite-magnetite-quartz -0.8 to +1.3). The pargasite and coexisting clinopyroxene in these rocks are depleted in light rare earth elements (LREE) (mean chondrite-normalized CeN/SmN = 0.045). The depleted chemistry of this amphibole reflects metasomatism during interaction with H2O-rich subalkaline mafic melts, most likely concurrently with or after the partial melting of the spinel lherzolites. The plagioclase lherzolites were subsequently formed by the subsolidus recrystallization of spinel lherzolites under plagioclase facies conditions as a result of mantle uprising, as evidenced by: (1) the development of plagioclase rims around the spinels; (2) plagioclase + orthopyroxene exsolution textures within some clinopyroxene grains; (3) an increase in plagioclase modal content coupled with an increase in modal olivine and a decrease in modal pyroxene and pargasite; (4) coincident decreases in Al, Mg, and Ni, and increases in Cr, Ti, and Fe in spinel, as well as decreases in Al and Ca, and increases in Cr and Ti in pyroxene and pargasite; and (5) the identical whole rock compositions of the spinel and plagioclase lherzolites, which rules out a magmatic origin for the plagioclase in these units. The Nain lherzolites have similar whole-rock and mineral geochemical compositions to subcontinental peridotites that are typically representative of Iberia-type rifted continental margins

  13. Petrogenesis and tectonic implications of gabbro and plagiogranite intrusions in mantle peridotites of the Myitkyina ophiolite, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Chen, Yi; Guo, Shun; Wang, Jian-Gang; Sein, Kyaing

    2017-07-01

    Centimeter-size intrusions of gabbros and plagiogranites occur in mantle peridotites of the Myitkyina ophiolite, Myanmar. The gabbros mainly consist of plagioclase and clinopyroxene, whereas orthopyroxene occasionally occurs. The plagiogranites are mainly composed of plagioclase, quartz and amphibole, with small amount of accessory minerals, such as zircon, apatite and rutile. Plagioclase in the gabbros varies from andesine to anorthite (An37-91), whereas plagioclase in the plagiogranites is less calcic (An1-40). Clinopyroxene in the gabbros is pervasively altered to hornblende. The gabbros contain 42.97-52.88 wt% SiO2, which show negative correlations with Al2O3, CaO and MgO, but positive correlations with Na2O, P2O5 and TiO2. Microtextural relations reveal the crystallization of clinopyroxene prior to plagioclase in the Myitkyina gabbros. This suggests that the gabbros were crystallized from hydrous melts, which is also supported by the occurrence of orthopyroxene and anorthitic plagioclase in some gabbros. The gabbros have slightly enriched Sr-Nd isotopes, with initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.703938-0.706609 and εNd(t) values of + 2.4-+7.2, and relatively variable Hf isotopes, with εHf(t) values of + 13.4-+24.9. A subduction component is required to explain the decoupled Nd-Hf isotopes of the gabbros. Binary mixing suggests that addition of ca 2% subducted sediments to a depleted mantle can account for the Nd-Hf decoupling. Therefore, both petrological and geochemical data of the gabbros support that the Myitkyina ophiolite was originated in a supra-subduction zone setting. The plagiogranites have compositions of tonalites and trondhjemites, containing 56.93-77.93 wt% SiO2, 1.27-10.79 wt% Na2O and 0.05-0.71 wt% K2O. They are slightly enriched in LREE over HREE and display positive anomalies in Eu, Zr, Hf but negative Nb anomalies. Very low TiO2 contents (0.03-0.2 wt%) of the plagiogranites suggest that they were not products of fractional crystallization of MORB

  14. Controls on rheology of peridotite at a palaeosubduction interface: a transect across the base of the Oman-UAE ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, T. K.; Wallis, D.; Hansen, L. N.; Waters, D. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2017-12-01

    Studies of experimentally deformed rocks and small-scale natural shear zones have demonstrated that volumetrically minor phases can control strain localisation by limiting grain growth and promoting grain-size sensitive deformation mechanisms. Such studies are often used to infer a critical role for minor phases in the development of plate boundaries. However, the role of of minor phases in strain localisation at plate boundaries remains to be tested by direct observation. To test the hypothesis that minor phases control strain localisation at plate boundaries, we conducted microstructural analyses of peridotite samples collected across the base of the Oman-UAE ophiolite. The base of the ophiolite is marked by the Semail thrust, which represents the now exhumed contact between subducted oceanic crust and the overlying mantle wedge. As such, the base of the ophiolite provides the opportunity to directly examine a former plate boundary. Our results demonstrate that the mean olivine grain size is inversely proportional to the abundance of minor phases (primarily pyroxene), consistent with suppression of grain growth by grain-boundary pinning. Our results also reveal that mean olivine grain size is proportional to CPO strength, suggesting that the fraction of strain accommodated by different deformation mechanisms varied spatially. Experimentally-derived flow laws indicate that under the inferred deformation conditions the viscosity of olivine was grain-size sensitive. As such, grain size, and thereby the abundance of minor phases, influenced viscosity during subduction-related deformation along the base of the mantle wedge. We calculate that viscosity and strain rate respectively decrease and increase by approximately an order of magnitude towards the base of the ophiolite. Our data indicate that this rheological weakening was primarily the result of more abundant secondary phases near the base of the ophiolite. Our interpretations are consistent with those of

  15. Depletion, cryptic metasomatism, and modal metasomatism of central European lithospheric mantle: evidence from elemental and Li isotope compositions of spinel peridotite xenoliths, Kozákov volcano, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medaris Jr., L. G.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Jelínek, E.; Magna, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 8 (2015), s. 1925-1956 ISSN 1437-3254 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Central European lithospheric mantle * geochemistry * geothermometry * Li isotopes * spinel peridotite xenoliths Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.133, year: 2015

  16. Metamorphic P-T path and zircon U-Pb dating of HP mafic granulites in the Yushugou granulite-peridotite complex, Chinese South Tianshan, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lifei; Xia, Bin; Lü, Zeng

    2018-03-01

    Co-existing granulite and peridotite may represent relics of the paleo-suture zone and provides an optimal opportunity for better understanding of orogeny between two blocks. In this study, we carried out petrological and U-Pb zircon dating investigation on the HP mafic granulites associated with peridotite complex at Yushugou in Chinese South Tianshan. The studied samples include garnet-bearing high-pressure mafic granulites which can be subdivided into two types: Type I orthopyroxene-free and Type II orthopyroxene-bearing granulites and amphibolite. Type I granulite (Y21-2) has a mineral assemblage of garnet (33 vol.%), clinopyroxene (32 vol.%) and plagioclase (30 vol.%); and Type II granulite (Y18-8) has a mineral assemblage of garnet (22 vol.%), clinopyroxene (10 vol.%), orthopyroxene (14 vol.%), plagioclase (45 vol.%) and quartz. Garnet in both granulites exhibits core-rim structure characterized by increasing grossular and decreasing pyrope from core to rim. Petrographic observations and phase equilibrium modeling using THERMOCALC in the NCFMASHTO system for the mafic granulites (Y21-2 and Y18-8) show three stages of metamorphism: Stage I (granulite facies) was recognized by the large porphyroblastic garnet core, with P-T conditions of 9.8-10.4 Kbar and 860-900 °C (Y21-2) and 9.9-10.6 Kbar and 875-890 °C (Y18-8), respectively; Stage II (HP granulite facies) has peak P-T conditions of 12.1 Kbar at 755 °C (Y21-2) and 13.8 Kbar at 815 °C (Y18-8) using mineral assemblages combining with garnet rim compositions with maximum grossular and minimum pyrope contents; Stage III (amphibolite facies) was characterized by the development of calcic amphibole in granulites with temperature of 446-563 °C. Therefore, an anticlockwise P-T path characterized by simultaneous temperature-decreasing and pressure-increasing was inferred for the Yushugou HP mafic granulite. Studies of zircon morphology and inclusions, combined with zircon U-Pb dating and REE geochemistry

  17. Modification of an ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle by continental subduction: Insight from the Maowu garnet peridotites in the Dabie UHP belt, eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Su, Bin; Chu, Zhuyin

    2017-05-01

    Orogenic mantle-derived peridotites commonly originate from the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) and thus provide a key target to investigate the modification of the SCLM by a subducting slab. The Maowu ultramafic rocks from the Dabie ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic belt have formerly been debated as representing cumulates or mantle-derived peridotites. Detailed petrological and geochemical data presented in this study provide new constraints on the origin and formation of the peridotites involving melt depletion in the ancient SCLM and deep crustal metasomatism. The Maowu garnet dunites have refractory bulk compositions characterized by high Mg# (91.9-92.0) and Ni (2537-2892 ppm) values and low Al2O3 (0.26-0.76 wt.%), CaO (0.05-0.32 wt.%), TiO2 (China craton. Many garnet orthopyroxenite veins crosscutting the Maowu dunites preserve abundant metasomatic textures and show variable enrichment in incompatible elements. Mineral and whole-rock chemistry indicate that these veins represent metasomatic products between the wall dunites and silica-rich hydrous melts under UHP conditions. The veins show large variations in platinum-group element (PGE) signatures and Re-Os isotopes. The garnet-poor orthopyroxenite veins are characterized by low Al2O3 ( 6 wt.%) and S (99-306 ppm) contents and show melt-like PGE patterns and high 187Os/188Os ratios (up to 0.36910). These features, combined with the occurrence of interstitial sulfides in the garnet-rich orthopyroxenite veins, suggest that crust-derived sulfur-saturated silicate melts may have significantly modified the PGE signature and destroyed the Re-Os systematics of the SCLM. However, when the crust-derived silicate melts became sulfur-depleted, such melts would not significantly modify the PGE patterns, radiogenic Os-isotope compositions or the Re-depletion model ages of the SCLM. Consequently, deep crust-mantle interactions in continental subduction zones could induce high degrees of Os isotopic

  18. The geological record of base metal sulfides in the cratonic mantle: A microscale 187Os/188Os study of peridotite xenoliths from Somerset Island, Rae Craton (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragagni, A.; Luguet, A.; Fonseca, R. O. C.; Pearson, D. G.; Lorand, J.-P.; Nowell, G. M.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.

    2017-11-01

    We report detailed petrographic investigations along with 187Os/188Os data in Base Metal Sulfide (BMS) on four cratonic mantle xenoliths from Somerset Island (Rae Craton, Canada). The results shed light on the processes affecting the Re-Os systematics and provide time constraints on the formation and evolution of the cratonic lithospheric mantle beneath the Rae craton. When devoid of alteration, BMS grains mainly consist of pentlandite + pyrrhotite ± chalcopyrite. The relatively high BMS modal abundance of the four investigated xenoliths cannot be reconciled with the residual nature of these peridotites, but requires addition of metasomatic BMS. This is especially evident in the two peridotites with the highest bulk Pd/Ir and Pd/Pt. Metasomatic BMS likely formed during melt/fluid percolation in the Sub Continental Lithospheric Mantle (SCLM) as well as during infiltration of the host kimberlite magma, when djerfisherite crystallized around older Fe-Ni-sulfides. On the whole-rock scale, kimberlite metasomatism is visible in a subset of bulk xenoliths, which defines a Re-Os errorchron that dates the host magma emplacement. The 187Os/188Os measured in the twenty analysed BMS grains vary from 0.1084 to >0.17 and it shows no systematic variation depending on the sulfide mineralogical assemblage. The largest range in 187Os/188Os is observed in BMS grains from the two xenoliths with the highest Pd/Ir, Pd/Pt, and sulfide modal abundance. The whole-rock TRD ages of these two samples underestimate the melting age obtained from BMS, demonstrating that bulk Re-Os model ages from peridotites with clear evidence of metasomatism should be treated with caution. The TRD ages determined in BMS grains are clustered around 2.8-2.7, ∼2.2 and ∼1.9 Ga. The 2.8-2.7 Ga TRD ages document the main SCLM building event in the Rae craton, which is likely related to the formation of the local greenstone belts in a continental rift setting. The Paleoproterozoic TRD ages can be explained by

  19. Partial reactive crystallization of variable CO2-bearing siliceous MORB-eclogite-derived melt in fertile peridotite and genesis of alkalic basalts with signatures of crustal recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of heterogeneity in the form of recycled altered oceanic crust (MORB-eclogite) has been proposed in the source of HIMU ocean island basalts (OIBs) [1]. Partial melts of recycled oceanic crust, however, are siliceous and Mg-poor and thus do not resemble the major element compositions of alkalic OIBs that are silica-poor and Mg-rich. In an upwelling heterogenous mantle, MORB-eclogite undergoes melting deeper than volatile-free peridotite, hence, andesitic partial melt derived from eclogite will react with subsolidus peridotite. We have examined the effect of such a melt-rock reaction under volatile-free conditions at 1375 °C, 3 GPa by varying the melt-rock ratio from 8 to 50 wt.% [2]. We concluded that the reacted melts reproduce certain major element characteristics of oceanic basanites, but not nephelinites. Also, the melt-rock reaction produces olivine and garnet-bearing websteritic residue. Because presence of CO2 has been invoked in the source of many HIMU ocean islands, the effect of CO2 on such a melt-rock reaction needs to be evaluated. Accordingly, we performed reaction experiments on mixtures of 25% and 33% CO2-bearing andesitic partial melt and peridotite at 1375 °C, 3 GPa by varying the dissolved CO2 content of the reacting melts from 1 to 5 wt.% (bulk CO2 from 0.25 to 1.6 wt.%) [3, this study]. Owing to melt-rock reaction, with increasing CO2 in the bulk mixture, (a) modes of olivine and cpx decrease while melt, opx and garnet increase, (b) reacted melts evolve to greater degree of Si-undersaturation (from andesite through basanite to nephelinite), (c) enhanced crystallization of garnet take place with higher CO2 in the melt, reducing alumina content of the reacted melts, and (d) CaO and MgO content of the reacted melts increase, without affecting FeO* and Na2O contents (indicating greater propensity of Ca2+ and Mg2+ over Fe2+ and Na+ to enter silicate melt as carbonate). For a given melt-MgO, the CO2-bearing reacted melts are a better

  20. Fragments of deeper parts of the hanging wall mantle preserved as orogenic peridotites in the central belt of the Seve Nappe Complex, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clos, Frediano; Gilio, Mattia; van Roermund, Herman L. M.

    2014-04-01

    Formation conditions of olivine microstructures are investigated in the Kittelfjäll spinel peridotite (KSP), a fragment of lithospheric mantle which occurs as an isolated body within high grade metamorphic crustal rocks of the Seve Nappe Complex (SNC), southern Västerbotten, central Sweden. The KSP is an orogenic peridotite containing a well developed penetrative compositional layering, defined by highly depleted dunite with olivine Mg# (100 × Mg/Mg + Fe) of 92.0-93.5 and harzburgite with lower Mg# (91.0-92.5). Dunite is characterized by three contrasting olivine microstructures formed in response to different tectonometamorphic events: Coarse-grained, highly strained olivine porphyroclasts (M1) up to 20 cm long are surrounded by dynamically recrystallized olivine grains (M2) defining a characteristic olivine "foam" microstructure (grain size: 200-2000 μm). An olivine "mortar" (M3) microstructure (10-50 μm) forms a penetrative fabric element only in strongly localized, cm-to-m sized shear zones that crosscut earlier structures/foliations. Olivine fabric analysis in synergy, with mineralogical and chemical analyses, reveals that the KSP body represents old, possibly Archean, sub-continental lithospheric mantle that was crustally emplaced into the Caledonian tectonic edifice from the hanging wall mantle during exhumation of the subducted Seve Nappe Complex (Jämtlandian orogeny ~ 454 Ma). Olivine porphyroclasts (M1) grew at high temperature during dominant isobaric cooling after extensive polybaric melt extraction (> 40%) and subsequent refertilization. The onset of the early Caledonian deformation is interpreted to be related to the crustal emplacement of the KSP during eduction of the SNC. This phase is characterized by the development of the olivine M2 foam microstructure, formed at 650-830 °C/1-2 GPa by dislocation creep processes producing an E-type CPO's by the operation of the [100](001) and subordinate [001](100) slip systems with operating flow stress

  1. Os-Hf-Sr-Nd isotope and PGE systematics of spinel peridotite xenoliths from Tok, SE Siberian craton: Effects of pervasive metasomatism in shallow refractory mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Shirey, Steven B.; Weis, Dominique; Brügmann, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    Os-Hf-Sr-Nd isotopes and PGE were determined in peridotite xenoliths carried to the surface by Quaternary alkali basaltic magmas in the Tokinsky Stanovik Range on the Aldan shield. These data constrain the timing and nature of partial melting and metasomatism in the lithospheric mantle beneath SE Siberian craton. The xenoliths range from the rare fertile spinel lherzolites to the more abundant, strongly metasomatised olivine-rich (70-84%) rocks. Hf-Sr-Nd isotope compositions of the xenoliths are mainly within the fields of oceanic basalts. Most metasomatised xenoliths have lower 143Nd / 144Nd and 176Hf / 177Hf and higher 87Sr / 86Sr than the host basalts indicating that the metasomatism is older and has distinct sources. A few xenoliths have elevated 176Hf / 177Hf (up to 0.2838) and plot above the Hf-Nd mantle array defined by oceanic basalts. 187Os / 188Os in the poorly metasomatised, fertile to moderately refractory (Al2O3 ≥ 1.6%) Tok peridotites range from 0.1156 to 0.1282, with oldest rhenium depletion ages being about 2 Ga. The 187Os / 188Os in these rocks show good correlations with partial melting indices (e.g. Al2O3, modal cpx); the intercept of the Al-187Os / 188Os correlation with lowest Al2O3 estimates for melting residues (∼0.3-0.5%) has a 187Os / 188Os of ∼0.109 suggesting that these peridotites may have experienced melt extraction as early as 2.8 Gy ago. 187Os / 188Os in the strongly metasomatised, olivine-rich xenoliths (0.6-1.3% Al2O3) ranges from 0.1164 to 0.1275 and shows no apparent links to modal or chemical compositions. Convex-upward REE patterns and high abundances of heavy to middle REE in these refractory rocks indicate equilibration with evolved silicate melts at high melt / rock ratios, which may have also variably elevated their 187Os / 188Os. This inference is supported by enrichments in Pd and Pt on chondrite-normalised PGE abundance patterns in some of the rocks. The melt extraction ages for the Tok suite of 2.0 to 2.8 Ga are

  2. Numerical modeling of convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction in big mantle wedge: Implications for the destruction of the North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lijuan

    2014-04-01

    The deep subduction of the Pacific Plate underneath East Asia is thought to have played a key role in the destruction of the North China Craton (NCC). To test this hypothesis, this paper presents a new 2-D model that includes an initial stable equilibrated craton, the formation of a big mantle wedge (BMW), and erosion by vigorous mantle convection. The model shows that subduction alone cannot thin the cold solid craton, but it can form a low-viscosity BMW. The amount of convective erosion is directly proportional to viscosity within the BMW (η0bmw), and the rheological boundary layer thins linearly with decreasing log10(η0bmw), thereby contributing to an increase in heat flow at the lithospheric base. This model also differs from previous modeling in that the increase in heat flow decays linearly with t1/2, meaning that the overall thinning closely follows a natural log relationship over time. Nevertheless, convection alone can only cause a limited thinning due to a minor increase in basal heat flow. The lowering of melting temperature by peridotite-melt interaction can accelerate thinning during the early stages of this convection. The two combined actions can thin the craton significantly over tens of Myr. This modeling, combined with magmatism and heat flow data, indicates that the NCC evolution has involved four distinct stages: modification in the Jurassic by Pacific Plate subduction and BMW formation, destruction during the Early Cretaceous under combined convective erosion and peridotite-melt interaction, extension in the Late Cretaceous, and cooling since the late Cenozoic.

  3. Carbon isotope fractionation during diamond growth in depleted peridotite: Counterintuitive insights from modelling water-maximum CHO fluids as multi-component systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, T.; Chacko, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2017-09-01

    Because of the inability of depleted cratonic peridotites to effectively buffer oxygen fugacities when infiltrated by CHO or carbonatitic fluids, it has been proposed recently (Luth and Stachel, 2014) that diamond formation in peridotites typically does not occur by rock-buffered redox reactions as previously thought but by an oxygen-conserving reaction in which minor coexisting CH4 and CO2 components in a water-rich fluid react to form diamond (CO2 + CH4 = 2C + 2H2O). In such fluid-buffered systems, carbon isotope fractionation during diamond precipitation occurs in the presence of two dominant fluid carbon species. Carbon isotope modelling of diamond precipitation from mixed CH4- and CO2-bearing fluids reveals unexpected fundamental differences relative to diamond crystallization from a single carbon fluid species: (1) irrespective of which carbon fluid species (CH4 or CO2) is dominant in the initial fluid, diamond formation is invariably associated with progressive minor (diamond in 13C as crystallization proceeds. This is in contrast to diamond precipitation by rock-buffered redox processes from a fluid containing only a single carbon species, which can result in either progressive 13C enrichment (CO2 or carbonate fluids) or 13C depletion (CH4 fluids) in the diamond. (2) Fluid speciation is the key factor controlling diamond δ13 C values; as XCO2 (XCO2 = CO2/[CO2 + CH4]) in the initial fluid increases from 0.1 to 0.9 (corresponding to an increase in fO2 of 0.8 log units), the carbon isotope composition of the first-precipitated diamond decreases by 3.7‰. The tight mode in δ13C of - 5 ± 1 ‰ for diamonds worldwide places strict constraints on the dominant range of XCO2 in water-rich fluids responsible for diamond formation. Specifically, precipitation of diamonds with δ13C values in the range -4 to -6‰ from mantle-derived fluids with an average δ13C value of -5‰ (derived from evidence not related to diamonds) requires that diamond-forming fluids were

  4. Petro-structural, geochemical and carbon and oxygen isotopic study on carbonates crosscuting the Oman Ophiolite peridotites: evidence of polygenic CO2 trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, J.; Godard, M.; Martinez, I.; Oliot, E.; Williams, M. J.; Rodriguez, O.; Chaduteau, C.; Gouze, P.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon trapping in ophiolitic peridotites contributes to the global carbon cycle between solid Earth and its outer envelopes (through subduction and/or modern alteration). To investigate this process, we performed petro-structural (microtomography, EBSD, EPMA) and geochemical studies (LA-ICP-MS, carbon and oxygen isotopes on bulk and minerals using SHRIMP) of harzburgites cored in the Oman Ophiolite. Studied harzburgites are highly serpentinized (> 90 %) and crosscut by 3 generations of carbonates (> 20 Vol%) with compositions from calcite to dolomite (Mg/Ca = 0-0.85). Type 1 carbonates are fine penetrative veinlets and mesh core after olivine. They have low REE (e.g., Yb = 0.08-0.23 x CI-chondrite) and negative Ce anomalies. They have δ13CPDB = -15.2 to 1.10‰ and δ18OSMOW = 17.5 to 33.7‰, suggesting precipitation temperatures up to 110°C. Type 2 carbonates are pluri-mm veins bounded by cm-thick serpentinized vein selvages, oriented dominantly parallel to mantle foliation. Dynamic recrystallization is observed, indicating polygenetic formation: well crystallized calcite with REE abundances similar to Type 1 carbonates are locally replaced by small dolomite and calcite grains with higher REE (e.g., Yb = 0.35-1.0 x CI-chondrite) and positive Gd anomaly. Type 2 carbonates have δ13CPDB = -12.6 to -4.1‰ and δ18OSMOW = 25.0 to 32.7‰, suggesting precipitation temperatures from 10 to 60°C. Type 3 carbonates are late pluri-mm to cm veins reactivating Type 2 veins. They consist of small grains of dolomite and calcite with REE abundances similar to recrystallized Type 2 carbonates. Type 3 carbonates have δ13CPDB = -8.3 to -5.8‰ and δ18OSMOW = 28.8 to 32.7‰, suggesting precipitation temperatures 100°C). Formation of carbonate veins (Type 2) indicates localization of fluid flux, while serpentinization remains the dominant alteration process. Low T carbonate veins (Type 3) remain the main flow path through ophiolitic peridotites. Our study suggests that

  5. Deformation fabrics of the Cima di Gagnone peridotite massif, Central Alps, Switzerland: evidence of deformation at low temperatures in the presence of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skemer, Philip; Katayama, Ikuo; Karato, Shun-Ichiro

    2006-07-01

    We report a new observation of the olivine B-type lattice-preferred orientation (LPO), from the garnet peridotite at Cima di Gagnone, Switzerland. The olivine B-type fabric forms at low temperatures and/or high stress in the presence of water, and is of particular interest because it may be used to explain the trench-parallel shear-wave splitting that is often observed at subduction zones. In conjunction with the olivine B-type fabric, we have found strong orthopyroxene LPO that is identical to those formed under water-free conditions. This suggests that water may not have a significant effect on orthopyroxene fabric. From the olivine microstructure, we determine that a stress of 22 ± 8 MPa was applied during the deformation event that formed the olivine LPO. Using an olivine flow-law, and assuming geological strain-rates, we determine the temperature of deformation to be 800 ± 175°C. This does not preclude an ultra-deep origin for the ultramafic rocks at Cima di Gagnone, but indicates that much of the deformation recorded in the microstructure occurred at modest temperatures.

  6. Age and composition of the UHP garnet peridotites in the Dabie orogenic belt (central China) record complex crust-mantle interaction in continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Zheng, J.; Wang, B.

    2017-12-01

    The Dabie-Sulu UHP belt was created by the collision between the North and South China cratons in Middle Triassic time (240-225 Ma). There are lots of garnet-bearing ultramafic body occurs as a lens in the belt. Age and composition of the Maowu garnet peridotites in the Dabie orogenic belt are reported. The garnet harzburgites are main moderately refractory (Mg#Ol=92) and minor fertile (Mg#Ol=88) with high Ni (2344-2603 ppm) and low Al2O3 (0.35-0.54 wt.%), CaO (0.76-2.19 wt.%) and TiO2 (˜0.01 wt.%). Zircons in the harzburgites mainly document metamorphism at 230 ± 2 Ma, 275 ± 5 Ma, 357 ± 4 Ma, and complex minor populations of ages including: 1.8 Ga, 1.3 Ga, and Neoproterozic-early Paleozoic ages (901-420 Ma). The early Meszosic and late Paleozoic zircons have similar trace-element patterns and ranges in ɛHf(t) (+0.6 to +3.4), Th/U ratio (0.2-0.7) and Hf depleted-mantle model ages (TDM ) mainly cluster in the interval 1.2-0.9 Ga. In contrast, the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic zircons have negative ɛHf(t) (-24.9 to -2.7) and oldest Hf TDM = 3.4Ga. Zircons of Neoproterozic-early Paleozoic have a wide range of Hf depleted-mantle model ages (2.4-0.7Ga) and ɛHf(t) (-15.3 to +9.5). Above of the all, we suggest that the Maowu garnet harzburgites are interpreted as a fragment of the metasomatized ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the southern margin of the North China Craton. They experienced the Proterozoic thermal event (1.9-1.8Ga), which is coeval with the assembly of the supercontinent Columbia. And then 1.3Ga mantle metasomatism with asthenospheric materials resulted in the final breakup of the Columbia supercontinent. Neoproterozic-early Paleozoic (901-420 Ma), deep parts of the south margin of the craton were metasomatized during the assembly and breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. Then, the southern margin of the craton occurred oceanic crust subduction ( 357 Ma), subsequent continental deep subduction and final continent-continent collision in Triassic.

  7. Microbial Diversity of Carbonate Chimneys at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field: Implications for Life-Sustaining Systems in Peridotite Seafloor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Cimino, P.; Kelley, D. S.; Baross, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF) is a novel peridotite-hosted vent environment discovered in Dec. 2000 at 30 N near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This field contains multiple large (up to 60 m), carbonate chimneys venting high pH (9-10), moderate temperature (45-75 C) fluids. The LCHF is unusual in that it is located on 1.5 my-old oceanic crust, 15 km from the nearest spreading axis. Hydrothermal flow in this system is believed to be driven by exothermic serpentinization reactions involving iron-bearing minerals in the underlying seafloor. The conditions created by such reactions, which include significant quantities of dissolved methane and hydrogen, create habitats for microbial communities specifically adapted to this unusual vent environment. Ultramafic, reducing hydrothermal environments like the LCHF may be analogous to geologic settings present on the early Earth, which have been suggested to be important for the emergence of life. Additionally, the existence of hydrothermal environments far away from an active spreading center expands the range of potential life-supporting environments elsewhere in the solar system. To study the abundance and diversity of microbial communities inhabiting the environments that characterize the LCHF, carbonate chimney samples were analyzed by microscopic and molecular methods. Cell densities of between 105 and 107 cells/g were observed within various samples collected from the chimneys. Interestingly, 4-11% of the microbial population in direct contact with vent fluids fluoresced with Flavin-420, a key coenzyme involved in methanogenesis. Enrichment culturing from chimney material under aerobic and anaerobic conditions yielded microorganisms in the thermophilic and mesophilic temperature regimes in media designed for methanogenesis, methane-oxidation, and heterotrophy. PCR analysis of chimney material indicated the presence of both Archaea and Eubacteria in the carbonate samples. SSU rDNA clone libraries constructed from the

  8. Controls on the rheological properties of peridotite at a palaeosubduction interface: A transect across the base of the Oman-UAE ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Tyler K.; Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N.; Waters, Dave J.; Searle, Michael P.

    2018-06-01

    Studies of experimentally deformed rocks and small-scale natural shear zones have demonstrated that volumetrically minor phases can control strain localisation by limiting grain growth and promoting grain-size sensitive deformation mechanisms. These small-scale studies are often used to infer a critical role for minor phases in the development of plate boundaries. However, the role of minor phases in strain localisation at an actual plate boundary remains to be tested by direct observation. In order to test the hypothesis that minor phases control strain localisation at plate boundaries, we conducted microstructural analyses of peridotite samples collected along a ∼1 km transect across the base of the Oman-United Arab Emirates (UAE) ophiolite. The base of the ophiolite is marked by the Semail thrust, which represents the now exhumed contact between subducted oceanic crust and the overlying mantle wedge. As such, the base of the ophiolite provides the opportunity to directly examine a former plate boundary. Our results demonstrate that the mean olivine grain size is inversely proportional to the abundance of minor phases (primarily orthopyroxene, as well as clinopyroxene, hornblende, and spinel), consistent with suppression of grain growth by grain-boundary pinning. Our results also reveal that mean olivine grain size is proportional to CPO strength (both of which generally decrease towards the metamorphic sole), suggesting that the fraction of strain produced by different deformation mechanisms varied spatially. Experimentally-derived flow laws indicate that under the inferred deformation conditions, the viscosity of olivine was grain-size sensitive. As such, grain size, and thereby the abundance of minor phases, influenced viscosity during subduction-related deformation along the base of the mantle wedge. We calculate an order of magnitude decrease in the viscosity of olivine towards the base of the ophiolite, which suggests strain was localised near the

  9. Compositional diversity in peridotites as result of a multi-process history: The Pacific-derived Santa Elena ophiolite, northwest Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Baumgartner, Peter O.; Castillo-Carrión, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    The Santa Elena ophiolite (SEO) is an ultramafic nappe of more than 270 km2 overlying a tectonic serpentinite-matrix mélange in northwest Costa Rica. It is mainly composed of Cpx-rich and Cpx-poor harzburgites (~ 2.5 km-thick), with minor lherzolite, dunite and chromitite, as well as intrusive mafic sills and subvertical dikes, which coalesce into an upper Isla Negritos gabbroic sill complex. Minerals and whole-rock features of the Cpx-rich and Cpx-poor harzburgites share features of the abyssal and supra-subduction zone (SSZ) peridotites, respectively. To explain these characteristics two-stages of melting and refertilization processes are required. By means of trace element modeling, the composition of Cpx-rich harzburgites may be reproduced by up to ~ 5-10% melting of a primitive mantle source, and the composition of Cpx-poor harzburgites and dunites by ~ 15-18% melting of an already depleted mantle. Therefore, the Cpx-rich harzburgites can be interpreted as product of first-stage melting and low-degrees of melt-rock interaction in a mid-ocean ridge environment, and the Cpx-poor harzburgites and dunites as the product of second-stage melting and refertilization in a SSZ setting. The mafic sills and the Isla Negrito gabbros are genetically related and can be explained as crystallization from the liquids that were extracted from the lower SSZ mantle levels and emplaced at shallow conditions. The Murciélagos Island basalts are not directly related to the ultramafic and mafic rocks of the SEO. Their E-MORB-like composition is similar to most of the CLIP mafic lavas and suggests a common Caribbean plume-related source. The SEO represents a fragment of Pacific-derived, SSZ oceanic lithosphere emplaced onto the southern North America margin during the late Cretaceous. Because of the predominance of rollback-induced extension during its history, only a limited amount of crustal rocks were formed and preserved in the SEO.

  10. Clinopyroxenite dikes crosscutting banded peridotites just above the metamorphic sole in the Oman ophiolite: early cumulates from the primary V3 lava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Satoko; Arai, Shoji; Tamura, Akihiro

    2013-04-01

    Oman ophiolite is one of the well-known ophiolites for excellent exposures not only of the mantle section but also of the crustal section including effusive rocks and the underlying metamorphic rocks. In the Oman ophiolite, three types of effusive rocks (V1, V2 and V3 from the lower sequences) are recognized: i.e., V1, MORB-like magma, V2, island-arc type lava, and V3, intra-plate lava (Godard et al., 2003 and references there in). V1 and V2 lavas are dominant (> 95 %) as effusive rocks and have been observed in almost all the blocks of northern part of the Oman ophiolite (Godard et al., 2003), but V3 lava has been reported only from Salahi area (Alabaster et al., 1982). It is clear that there was a time gap of lava eruption between V1-2 and V3 based on the presence of pelagic sediments in between (Godard et al., 2003). In addition, V3 lavas are fed by a series of doleritic dikes crosscutting V2 lava (Alley unit) (Alabaster et al., 1982). We found clinopyroxenite (CPXITE) dikes crosscutting deformation structure of basal peridotites just above the metamorphic sole in Wadi Ash Shiyah. The sole metamorphic rock is garnet amphibolite, which overlies the banded and deformed harzburgite and dunite. The CPXITE is composed of coarse clinopyroxene (CPX) with minor amount of chlorite, garnet (hydrous/anhydrous grossular-andradite) with inclusions of titanite, and serpentine formed at a later low-temperature stage. The width of the CPXITE dikes is 2-5 cm (10 cm at maximum) and the dikes contain small blocks of wall harzburgite. Almost all the silicates are serpentinized in the harzburgite blocks except for some CPX. The Mg# (= Mg/(Mg + Fe) atomic ratio) of the CPX is almost constant (= 0.94-0.95) in the serpentinite blocks but varies within the dikes, highest at the contact with the block (0.94) and decreasing with the distance from the contact to 0.81 (0.85 on average). The contents of Al2O3, Cr2O3, and TiO2 in the CPX of the dikes are 0.5-2.0, 0.2-0.6, and 0

  11. Compositional and isotopic heterogeneities in the Neo-Tethyan upper mantle recorded by coexisting Al-rich and Cr-rich chromitites in the Purang peridotite massif, SW Tibet (China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fahui; Yang, Jingsui; Xu, Xiangzhen; Kapsiotis, Argyrios; Hao, Xiaolin; Liu, Zhao

    2018-06-01

    The Purang harzburgite massif in SW Tibet (China) hosts abundant chrome ore deposits. Ores consist of 20 to >95% modal chromian spinel (Cr-spinel) with mylonitic fabric in imbricate shaped pods. The composition of Cr-spinel in these ores ranges from Al-rich [Cr#Sp or Cr/(Cr + Al) × 100 = 47.60-57.56] to Cr-rich (Cr#Sp: 62.55-79.57). Bulk platinum-group element (PGE) contents of chromitites are also highly variable ranging from 17.5 ppb to ∼2.5 ppm. Both metallurgical and refractory chromitites show a general enrichment in the IPGE (Os, Ir and Ru) with respect to the PPGE (Rh, Pt and Pd), resulting mostly in right-sloping primitive mantle (PM)-normalized PGE profiles. The platinum-group mineral (PGM) assemblages of both chromitite types are dominated by heterogeneously distributed, euhedral Os-bearing laurite inclusions in Cr-spinel. The Purang chromitites have quite inhomogeneous 187Os/188Os ratios (0.12289-0.13194) that are within the range of those reported for mantle-hosted chromitites from other peridotite massifs. Geochemical calculations demonstrate that the parental melts of high-Cr chromitites were boninitic, whereas those of high-Al chromitites had an arc-type tholeiitic affinity. Chromite crystallization was most likely stimulated by changes in magma compositions due to melt-peridotite interaction, leading to the establishment of a heterogeneous physicochemical environment during the early crystallization of the PGM. The highly variable PGE contents, inhomogeneous Os-isotopic compositions and varying Cr#Sp ratios of these chromitites imply a polygenetic origin for them from spatially distinct melt inputs. The generally low γOs values (different sections of a heterogeneously depleted mantle source region. These melts were most likely produced in the mantle wedge above a downgoing lithospheric slab.

  12. Platinum-group elements, S, Se and Cu in highly depleted abyssal peridotites from the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Ridge (ODP Hole 1274A): Influence of hydrothermal and magmatic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Claudio; Garrido, Carlos J.; Harvey, Jason; González-Jiménez, José María; Hidas, Károly; Lorand, Jean-Pierre; Gervilla, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Highly depleted harzburgites and dunites were recovered from ODP Hole 1274A, near the intersection between the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Ridge and the 15°20'N Fracture Zone. In addition to high degrees of partial melting, these peridotites underwent multiple episodes of melt-rock reaction and intense serpentinization and seawater alteration close to the seafloor. Low concentrations of Se, Cu and platinum-group elements (PGE) in harzburgites drilled at around 35-85 m below seafloor are consistent with the consumption of mantle sulfides after high degrees (>15-20 %) of partial melting and redistribution of chalcophile and siderophile elements into PGE-rich residual microphases. Higher concentrations of Cu, Se, Ru, Rh and Pd in harzburgites from the uppermost and lowest cores testify to late reaction with a sulfide melt. Dunites were formed by percolation of silica- and sulfur-undersaturated melts into low-Se harzburgites. Platinum-group and chalcophile elements were not mobilized during dunite formation and mostly preserve the signature of precursor harzburgites, except for higher Ru and lower Pt contents caused by precipitation and removal of platinum-group minerals. During serpentinization at low temperature (desulfurization to S-poor sulfides (mainly heazlewoodite) and awaruite. Contrary to Se and Cu, sulfur does not record the magmatic evolution of peridotites but was mostly added in hydrothermal sulfides and sulfate from seawater. Platinum-group elements were unaffected by post-magmatic low-temperature processes, except Pt and Pd that may have been slightly remobilized during oxidative seawater alteration.

  13. Interaction of peridotite with Ca-rich carbonatite melt at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa: Implication for merwinite formation in upper mantle, and for the metasomatic origin of sublithospheric diamonds with Ca-rich suite of inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharygin, Igor S.; Shatskiy, Anton; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Golovin, Alexander V.; Ohtani, Eiji; Pokhilenko, Nikolay P.

    2018-03-01

    We performed an experimental study, designed to reproduce the formation of an unusual merwinite + olivine-bearing mantle assemblage recently described as a part of a Ca-rich suite of inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds, through the interaction of peridotite with an alkali-rich Ca-carbonatite melt, derived from deeply subducted oceanic crust. In the first set of experiments, we studied the reaction between powdered Mg-silicates, olivine and orthopyroxene, and a model Ca-carbonate melt (molar Na:K:Ca = 1:1:2), in a homogeneous mixture, at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa. In these equilibration experiments, we observed the formation of a merwinite + olivine-bearing assemblage at 3.1 GPa and 1200 °C and at 6.5 GPa and 1300-1400 °C. The melts coexisting with this assemblage have a low Si and high Ca content (Ca# = molar 100 × Ca/(Ca + Mg) > 0.57). In the second set of experiments, we investigated reaction rims produced by interaction of the same Ca-carbonate melt (molar Na:K:Ca = 1:1:2) with Mg-silicate, olivine and orthopyroxene, single crystals at 3.1 GPa and 1300 °C and at 6.5 GPa and 1400 °C. The interaction of the Ca-carbonate melt with olivine leads to merwinite formation through the expected reaction: 2Mg2SiO4 (olivine) + 6CaCO3 (liquid) = Ca3MgSi2O8 (merwinite) + 3CaMg(CO3)2 (liquid). Thus, our experiments confirm the idea that merwinite in the upper mantle may originate via interaction of peridotite with Ca-rich carbonatite melt, and that diamonds hosting merwinite may have a metasomatic origin. It is remarkable that the interaction of the Ca-carbonate melt with orthopyroxene crystals does not produce merwinite both at 3.1 and 6.5 GPa. This indicates that olivine grain boundaries are preferable for merwinite formation in the upper mantle.

  14. Effect of oxygen fugacity on OH dissolution in olivine under peridotite-saturated conditions: An experimental study at 1.5-7 GPa and 1100-1300 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaozhi

    2016-01-01

    The dissolution of OH in olivine by experimental studies at simulated conditions has attracted increasing interest over the past three decades, and the influence of pressure, temperature and composition has been relatively well constrained. Oxygen fugacity is highly heterogeneous in the upper mantle, on both temporal and spatial scales, and is an important parameter in characterizing many chemical and physical processes in the mantle. However, less attention has been devoted to the effect of oxygen fugacity on OH dissolution in olivine, and the only few available reports on this topic have led to significant inconsistency and debate. In this study, the correlation between oxygen fugacity and OH solubility in Fe-bearing olivine has been systematically investigated by conducting experiments at 1.5-7 GPa and 1100-1300 °C and under peridotite- and fluid-saturated conditions, with natural gem-quality olivine single crystals and fresh peridotite xenoliths as starting materials and with oxygen fugacity controlled by the Fe-FeO, Ni-NiO and Fe2O3-Fe3O4 oxygen buffer pairs. The water concentrations were determined by polarized analyses using a Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that, at all the experimental conditions, the OH bands at both high frequency (∼3650-3450 cm-1) and low frequency (∼3450-3100 cm-1) are prominent. The intensity of OH bands at ∼3355 and 3325 cm-1 increases positively with oxygen fugacity, suggesting a dominant role of Fe3+ in their incorporation. Under otherwise identical conditions, the water content is gradually enhanced with increasing pressure, temperature or oxygen fugacity. The effect of oxygen fugacity on the enhancement of OH solubility appears not sensitive to temperature (1100-1300 °C) at a given pressure, but becomes progressively stronger with increasing pressure from 1.5 to 7 GPa given the temperature. Relative to oxygen fugacity buffers, the OH solubility is on average increased by ∼50% between Fe-FeO and

  15. Imaging spectrometry and the Ronda peridotites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der F.D.

    1995-01-01

    In Chapter 2, the results of detailed geologic mapping of sedimentary strata of the Subbeticum of Ronda are presented including a stratigraphic description of several sections near Ronda, El Burgo, Ardales, Teba, and Arriate in the Ronda-Málaga area. These are used to develop time-facies

  16. Metamorphic reprocessing of a serpentinized carbonate-bearing peridotite after detachment from the mantle wedge: A P-T path constrained from textures and phase diagrams in the system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2-CO 2-H 2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mposkos, E.; Baziotis, I.; Proyer, A.

    2010-08-01

    -bearing metaperidotite from Gorgona probably represents a fragment of the hydrated mantle wedge. This is indicated by the REE compositions which differ from those of ophiolitic peridotites and resemble those of spinel or garnet peridotites of sub-continental origin. The ultramafic slice was incorporated tectonically into the subduction channel, most likely by tectonic erosion in the Early Jurassic, but did not experience ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism like the nearby metapelites that exhumed along the same subduction channel.

  17. Dynamic control on serpentine crystallization in veins: Constraints on hydration processes in oceanic peridotites

    OpenAIRE

    Andréani , Muriel; Mével , C.; Boullier , A.-M.; Escartín , J.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Deformation and hydration processes are intimately linked in the oceanic lithosphere, but the feedbacks between them are still poorly understood, especially in ultramafic rocks where serpentinization results in a decrease of rock density that implies a volume increase and/or mass transfer. Serpentinization is accompanied by abundant veining marked by different generations of vein-filling serpentines with a high variety of morphologies and textures that correspond to di...

  18. Magnetic properties of variably serpentinized peridotites and their implication for the evolution of oceanic core complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maffione, M.; Morris, A.; Plümper, O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/37155960X; van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269263624

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks during hydrothermal alteration at mid-ocean ridges profoundly changes the physical, chemical, rheological, and magnetic properties of the oceanic lithosphere. There is renewed interest in this process following the discovery of widespread exposures of

  19. Compositional trends among Kaapvaal Craton garnet peridotite xenoliths and their effects on seismic velocity and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt, Derek; Lesher, Charles

    2010-01-01

    and clinopyroxene enrichment possibly as a consequence of melt infiltration. More than half of the mineral mode variance among Kaapvaal Craton xenoliths can be accounted for by opx enrichment. Melt depletion effects can account for as much as 30% of the variance, while less than 20% of the variance is associated...

  20. Mineral chemistry and alteration characteristics of spinel in serpentinised peridotites from the northern central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.; Ray; Ishii, T.

    . Back Scattered Electron (BSE) imaging, X-ray mapping and mineral compositions were obtained using a EPMA (model JEOL JXA-8900R) with five wavelength dispersive spectrometers (WDS) at Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo. Silicate and oxide... polymorphs was performed by X- ray diffractogram (XRD, model Philips 1840) at National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India. Operating conditions for XRD analyses was 40 kV with an operating current of 22 mA. 4 Results Petrography Table 1...

  1. Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocities During Partial Melting of a Mantle Peridotite KLB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Donald J.; Li, Li; Whitaker, Matthew L.; Triplett, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge of the elastic properties of partially molten rocks is crucial for understanding low-velocity regions in the interior of the Earth. Models of fluid and solid mixtures have demonstrated that significant decreases in seismic velocity are possible with small amounts of melt, but there is very little available data for testing these models, particularly with both P and S waves for mantle compositions. We report ultrasonic measurements of P and S velocities on a partially molten KLB-1 sample at mantle conditions using a multi-anvil device at a synchrotron facility. The P, S, and bulk sound velocities decrease as melting occurs. We find that the quantity, ∂lnVS/∂lnVB (where VB is the bulk sound velocity) is lower than mechanical models estimate. Instead, our data, as well as previous data in the literature, are consistent with a dynamic melting model in which melting and solidification interact with the stress field of the acoustic wave.

  2. Re–Os geochemistry and geochronology of the Ransko gabbro–peridotite massif, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Pašava, J.; Erban, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 7 (2013), s. 799-804 ISSN 0026-4598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15390S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Re–Os * geochronology * gabbro * Bohemian Massif * Ni–Cu mineralization Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.667, year: 2013

  3. PALLADIUM, PLATINUM, RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM AND IRIDIUM IN PERIDOTITES AND CHROMITITES FROM OPHIOLITE COMPLEXES IN NEWFOUNDLAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Norman J; Talkington, Raymond W.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of spinel lherzolite, harzburgite, dunite, and chromitite from the Bay of Islands, Lewis Hills, Table Mountain, Advocate, North Arm Mountain, White Hills Periodite Point Rousse, Great Bend and Betts Cove ophiolite complexes in Newfoundland were analyzed for the platinum-group elements (PGE) Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru and Ir. The ranges of concentration (in ppb) observed for all rocks are: less than 0. 5 to 77 (Pd), less than 1 to 120 (Pt), less than 0. 5 to 20 (Rh), less than 100 to 250 (Ru) and less than 20 to 83 (Ir). Chondrite-normalized PGE ratios suggest differences between rock types and between complexes. Samples of chromitite and dunite show relative enrichment in Ru and Ir and relative depletion in Pt and Pd.

  4. Deep origin and hot melting of an Archaean orogenic peridotite massif in Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spengler, D.; Van Roermund, H.L.M.; Drury, M.R.; Ottolini, L.; Mason, P.R.D.; Davies, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    The buoyancy and strength of sub-continental lithospheric mantle is thought to protect the oldest continental crust (cratons) from destruction by plate tectonic processes. The exact origin of the lithosphere below cratons is controversial, but seems clearly to be a residue remaining after the

  5. Melt-peridotite reactions in upwelling EM1-type eclogite bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin

    2013-01-01

    or simple variations in degrees of mantle melting. The difference is also clear in major elements where the low Nb/U basalts have markedly higher alkali contents but lower FeO and Ni than the high Nb/U basalts. Four melt components have been identified based on olivine fractionation corrected compositions...

  6. Origin of the Luobusa diamond-bearing peridotites from the sub-arc mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanzhou; Zhang, Chang; Wu, Fuyuang; Chung, Sunlin

    2016-04-01

    Ophiolites are the remnants of ancient oceanic lithosphere that were emplaced onto continental margins. Ophiolites along the E-W trending Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture (YTS), which separates the Indian plate from the Eurasian plate, have been regarded as relics of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. The Luobusa ophiolite outcrops at the eastern YTS and mainly consists of harzburgites and dunites that have been intruded by gabbroic/diabase dykes at ca 130 Ma (Zhang et al., 2015). Basaltic lavas are rarely outcropped, and volumetrically minor (C., Liu, C. Z., Wu, F. Y., Zhang, L. L. & Ji, W. Q. Geochemistry and geochronology of maifc rocks from the Luobusa ophiolite, South Tibet. Lithos, 10.1016/j.lithos.2015.1006.1031 (2015). Zhou, M. F., Robinson, P. T., Malpas, J. & Li, Z. J. Podiform chromitites in the Luobusa Ophiolite (Southern Tibet): Implications for melt-rock interaction and chromite segregation in the upper mantle. J. Petrol. 37, 3-21 (1996).

  7. Domain structure and texture in fine grained symplectite from garnet breakdown in peridotite xenoliths (Zinst, Bavaria, Bohemian Massif)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habler, G.; Špaček, P.; Abart, R.

    2012-04-01

    Lherzolite xenoliths entrained in Oligocene basanite at the locality of Zinst (Bavaria, western Bohemian Massif) contain rare fine-grained symplectites forming about 5 millimeter sized patches comprising several microstructurally and chemically distinct concentric zones. The symplectites reflect a complex reaction history of lherzolite during decompression and interaction with melt. Here we focus on ultra-fine grained symplectite with an integrated bulk composition expressed in terms of garnet end-member component percentages as Prp(69-71)Alm(11-13)Grs(2.5-5)And(7.5-10)Uvr(4). According to the composition and the microstructural occurrence in lherzolite the ultra-fine grained symplectite is interpreted as a product of isochemical garnet breakdown, although the precursor phase is not preserved. Under cross polarized light patches with similar extinction show a domain microstructure in symplectite. BSE images reveal an intimate intergrowth of orthopyroxene, spinel and plagioclase. All phases have a shape preferred orientation within distinct domains, whereas discontinuous SPO changes occur at microstructural domain boundaries. Three types of symplectite were microstructurally discerned: The most pristine type A occurs in a 10-30 micrometers wide zone along the symplectite margin. Spinel forms several tens of nanometers wide rods or lamellae within Opx, whereas Pl and Opx represent the symplectite matrix. All phases show a strong SPO with the maximum elongation perpendicular to the symplectite boundary. At edges of this interface, the SPO of the symplectite phases changes accordingly. Discontinuities in SPO may coincide with changes in crystallographic orientation. EBSD data showed that symplectite phases have strict crystallographic orientation relations with Opx(100)//Spl(111) and Opx(010)//Spl(110). Whereas the initial lattice orientation is controlled by adjacent phases at the symplectite boundary, the crystallographic orientation within symplectite domains changes continuously along subdomain boundaries and perpendicular to the grain elongation. Type B symplectite has the same phase content and topotactic relations as type A, but the aspect ratio of the grains is smaller, and straight phase boundary segments occur. Furthermore, changes in lattice orientations differ from symplectite A. The crystallographic orientation of Opx and Spl shows a discontinuous scatter around the elongation (=growth) direction. Besides there is a continuous lattice orientation change in growth direction. Changes in crystallographic orientations have significantly larger rotation angles than the SPO changes within a single domain. In type C symplectite the Pl content is increased at the expense of Opx. Plagioclase has a higher albite component indicating that these domains had interacted with fluid or melt. Spinel displays rounded grain shapes and occurs both within Opx and Pl. All phases recrystallized with isometric grain shapes. Whereas symplectite A and B reflect reaction microstructures of garnet breakdown, symplectite C is a retrogression product of precursor symplectites A and B. The changes in crystallographic orientation along and across the SPO are interpreted as due to plastic deformation during symplectite growth. The formation of Opx + Pl + Spl from garnet has a positive reaction volume of about 10%. As the area of the reaction front is supposed not to change during a reaction increment, this volume increase leads to a mechanically driven outward flow of symplectite material. It is hypothesized, that reaction induced strain may have led to plastic deformation and modulation of the crystallographic orientation during propagation of the reaction front.

  8. Using mineral equilibria to estimate H2O activities in peridotites from the Western Gneiss Region of Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, Patricia; Lamb, William M.; Drury, Martyn

    2017-01-01

    The Earth's mantle is an important reservoir of H2O, and even a small amount of H2O has a significant influence on the physical properties of mantle rocks. Estimating the amount of H2O in rocks from the Earth's mantle would, therefore, provide some insights into the physical properties of this

  9. A conceptual hydrogeological model of ophiolitic aquifers (serpentinised peridotite): The test example of Mt. Prinzera (Northern Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segadelli, Stefano; Vescovi, Paolo; Ogata, Kei; Chelli, Alessandro; Zanini, Andrea; Boschetti, Tiziano; Petrella, Emma; Toscani, Lorenzo; Gargini, Alessandro; Celico, Fulvio

    2017-01-01

    © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.The main aim of this study is the experimental analysis of the hydrogeological behaviour of the Mt. Prinzera ultramafic massif in the northern Apennines, Italy. The analysed multidisciplinary database has been acquired through (a) geologic and structural survey; (b)

  10. Heterogeneous hydrogen distribution in orthopyroxene from veined mantle peridotite (San Carlos, Arizona): Impact of melt-rock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Carole M. M.; Demouchy, Sylvie; Alard, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    Experimental studies have shown that hydrogen embedded as a trace element in mantle mineral structures affects the physical properties of mantle minerals and rocks. Nevertheless, hydrogen concentrations in mantle minerals are much lower than predicted by hydrogen solubilities obtained experimentally at high pressure and temperature. Here, we report textural analyses and major and trace element concentrations (including hydrogen) in upper mantle minerals from a spinel-bearing composite xenolith (dunite and pyroxenite) transported by silica-undersaturated mafic alkaline lavas from the San Carlos volcanic field (Arizona, USA). Our results suggest that the composite xenolith results from the percolation-reaction of a basaltic liquid within dunite channels, and is equilibrated with respect to trace elements. Equilibrium temperatures range between 1011 and 1023 °C. Hydrogen concentrations (expressed in ppm H2O by weight) obtained from unpolarized and polarized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are low, with average values water stored in the Earth's upper mantle.

  11. Si-metasomatism in serpentinized peridotite: The effects of talc-alteration on strontium and boron isotopes in abyssal serpentinites from Hole 1268a, ODP Leg 209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jason; Savov, Ivan P.; Agostini, Samuele; Cliff, Robert A.; Walshaw, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Ultramafic rocks recovered from Hole 1268a, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 209, to the south of the 15°20‧N Fracture Zone on the Mid-Atlantic ridge have experienced a complex history of melt depletion and subsequent interaction with a series of fluids under varying temperature and pH conditions. After intense melt depletion, varying degrees of serpentinization at 100-200 °C took place, initially under seawater-like pH conditions. Subsequently, interaction with a higher temperature (300-350 °C) fluid with low (4-5) pH and low MgO/SiO2 resulted in the heterogeneous alteration of these serpentinites to talc-bearing ultramafic lithologies. The proximity of the currently active, high temperature Logatchev hydrothermal field, located on the opposite flank of the Mid-Atlantic ridge, suggests that unlike more distal localities sampled during ODP Leg 209, Hole 1268a has experienced Si-metasomatism (i.e. talc-alteration) by a Logatchev-like hydrothermal fluid. Serpentinite strontium isotope ratios were not materially shifted by interaction with the subsequent high-T fluid, despite the likelihood that this fluid had locally interacted with mid-ocean ridge gabbro. 87Sr/86Sr in the ultramafic lithologies of Hole 1268a are close to that of seawater (c.0.709) and even acid leached serpentinites retain 87Sr/86Sr in excess of 0.707, indistinguishable from Logatchev hydrothermal fluid. On the other hand, boron isotope ratios appear to have been shifted from seawater-like values in the serpentinites (δ11B = c.+40‰) to much lighter values in talc-altered serpentinites (δ11B = +9 to +20‰). This is likely a consequence of the effects of changing ambient pH and temperature during the mineralogical transition from serpentine to talc. Heterogeneous boron isotope systematics have consequences for the composition of ultramafic portions of the lithosphere returned to the convecting mantle by subduction. Inhomogeneities in δ11B, [B] and mineralogy introduce significant uncertainties in the prediction of the composition of slab fluids released during the early- to mid-stages of subduction.

  12. Abyssal and hydrated mantle wedge serpentinised peridotites: a comparison of the 15°20'N fracture zone and New Caledonia serpentinites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersole, Fiona Elizabeth; Evans, Katy; Frost, B. Ronald

    2017-08-01

    Subduction of serpentinised mantle transfers oxidised and hydrated mantle lithosphere into the Earth, with consequences for the oxidation state of sub-arc mantle and the genesis of arc-related ore deposits. The role of subducted serpentinised mantle lithosphere in earth system processes is uncertain because subduction fluxes are poorly constrained. Most subducted serpentinised mantle is serpentinised on the ocean floor settings. Yet this material is poorly represented in the literature because it is difficult to access. Large volumes of accessible serpentinite are available in ophiolite complexes, and most interpretations of subduction fluxes associated with ultramafic rocks are based on ophiolite studies. Seafloor and ophiolite serpentinisation can occur under different conditions, so it is necessary to assess if ophiolite serpentinites are a good proxy for seafloor serpentinites. Serpentinites sampled during ODP cruise 209 were compared with serpentinites from New Caledonia. The ODP209 serpentinites were serpentinised by modified seawater in a shallow hydrothermal seafloor setting. The New Caledonia serpentinites were serpentinised in a mantle wedge setting by slab-derived fluids, with possible contributions from oceanic serpentinisation and post-obduction serpentinisation. Petrological, whole rock and mineralogical analyses were combined to compare the two sample sets. Petrologically, the evolution of serpentinisation was close to identical in the two environments. However, more oxidised iron, Cl, S and C is present in serpentine from the ODP209 serpentinites relative to the New Caledonia serpentinites. Given these observations, the use of serpentinites from different geodynamic settings as a proxy for abyssal serpentinites from spreading settings must be undertaken with caution.

  13. Origin of eclogite and garnet pyroxenite from the Moldanubian Zone of the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic and its implication to other mafic layers embedded in orogenic peridotites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obata, M.; Hirajima, T.; Svojtka, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 88, 1-2 (2006), s. 321-340 ISSN 0930-0708 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3013006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : eclogite * pyroxenite * Bohemian Massif Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.038, year: 2006

  14. Genesis of diamond inclusions: An integrated cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study on eclogitic and peridotitic inclusions and their diamond host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Quint; Matveev, Sergei; Drury, Martyn; Gress, Michael; Chinn, Ingrid; Davies, Gareth

    2017-04-01

    Diamond inclusions are potentially fundamental to understanding the formation conditions of diamond and the volatile cycles in the deep mantle. In order to fully understand the implications of the compositional information recorded by inclusions it is vital to know whether the inclusions are proto-, syn-, or epigenetic and the extent to which they have equilibrated with diamond forming fluids. In previous studies, the widespread assumption was made that the majority of diamond inclusions are syngenetic, based upon observation of cubo-octahedral morphology imposed on the inclusions. Recent work has reported the crystallographic relationship between inclusions and the host diamond to be highly complex and the lack of crystallographic relationships between inclusions and diamonds has led some to question the significance of imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. This study presents an integrated EBSD and CL study of 9 diamonds containing 20 pyropes, 2 diopsides, 1 forsterite and 1 rutile from the Jwaneng and Letlhakane kimberlite clusters, Botswana. A new method was developed to analyze the crystallographic orientation of the host diamond and the inclusions with EBSD. Diamonds plates were sequentially polished to expose inclusions at different levels in the diamond. CL imaging at different depths was performed in order to produce a 3D view of diamond growth zones around the inclusions. Standard diamond polishing techniques proved too aggressive for silicate inclusions as they were damaged to such a degree that EBSD measurements on the inclusions were impossible. The inclusions were milled with a Ga+ focused ion beam (FIB) at a 12° angle to clean the surface for EBSD measurements. Of the 24 inclusions, 9 have an imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. Of these inclusions, 6 have faces orientated parallel to diamond growth zones and/or appear to have nucleated on a diamond growth surface, implying syngenesis. In contrast, other diamonds record resorption events such that inclusions now cut diamond growth zones. In most cases, the growth zonation around inclusions is not well defined due to CL haloes but some inclusions clearly disrupt diamond growth. Crystallographic orientations of diamond and the inclusions, determined using EBSD, revealed that each inclusion has a homogeneous orientation and record no compositional zonation. The diamonds also showed no angular deviations despite many having multiple growth and resorption zones; implying epitaxial growth of diamond. Crystallographic alignment between diamond and inclusions was not recorded for the principle planes and limited to 3 possible coincidences on minor planes from the 24 inclusions studied. The CL data show no evidence of syngenesis for these 3 inclusions. Analyses of two diamonds with inclusion clusters in different growth zones, 400 µm apart, revealed the same chemical composition and orientation, potentially implying they originated from an original larger inclusion. Combined EBSD and CL data suggest that there is no direct orientational correlation (epitaxial growth) between silicate inclusions and the host diamond, even when the mineral phases are of the same symmetry group. The presentation will provide a detailed evaluation of the genesis of individual inclusions.

  15. Reduced gas seepages in serpentinized peridotite complexes: Evidences for multiple origins of the H2-CH4-N2 gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, E.; Vacquand, C.; Beaumont, V.; Francois, G.; Sissmann, O.; Pillot, D.; Arcilla, C. A.; Prinzhofer, A.

    2017-12-01

    A comparative study of reduced gas seepages associated to serpentinized ultrabasic rocks was conducted in the ophiolitic complexes of Oman, the Philippines, Turkey and New Caledonia. This study is based on analyzes of the gas chemical composition, noble gases contents, and stable isotopes of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen. These gas seepages are mostly made of mixtures of three main components which are H2, CH4 and N2 in various proportions. The relative contents of the three main gas components show 4 distinct families of gas mixtures (H2-rich, N2-rich, N2-H2-CH4 and H2-CH4). These families are interpreted as reflecting different zones of gas generation within or below the ophiolitic complexes. In the H2-rich family associated noble gases display signatures close to the value of air. In addition to the atmospheric component, mantle and crustal contributions are present in the N2-rich, N2-H2-CH4 and H2-CH4 families. H2-bearing gases are either associated to ultra-basic (pH 10-12) spring waters or they seep directly in fracture systems from the ophiolitic rocks. In ophiolitic contexts, ultrabasic rocks provide an adequate environment with available Fe2+ and high pH conditions that favor H2 production. CH4 is produced either directly by reaction of dissolved CO2 with basic-ultrabasic rocks during the serpentinization process or in a second step by H2-CO2 interaction. H2 is present in the gas when no more carbon is available in the system to generate CH4 (conditions of strong carbon restriction). The N2-rich family is associated with relatively high contents of crustal 4He. In this family N2 is interpreted as issued mainly from sediments located below the ophiolitic units.

  16. Chromian spinel-rich black sands from eastern shoreline of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chromian spinel; detrital sand; ophiolites; Andaman Island; India. J. Earth Syst. .... (olivine: ol) inclusion; (e) peridotitic spinel with extensive fracturing; and (f) heavily altered rim of a peridotitic spinel. ..... The authors acknowledge the financial.

  17. Chemical petrology of polymetamorphic ultramafic rocks from Galicia, NW Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, P.

    1970-01-01

    The investigated polymetamorphic peridotites occur associated with metabasic rocks in several complexes of probably Precambrian age in the northern part of the Hesperian massif (Iberian peninsula). Spinel-clinopyroxene-, spinel-pargasite-, spinel-hornblende- and chlorite-amphibole-peridotites,

  18. Geochemical and petrological constraints on mantle composition of the Ohře(Eger) rift, Bohemian Massif: peridotite xenoliths from the České Středohoří Volcanic complex and northern Bohemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Medaris Jr., G.; Špaček, P.; Ulrych, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 8 (2015), s. 1957-1979 ISSN 1437-3254 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1170 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * mantle * metasomatism * Ohře(Eger) rift * xenolith Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.133, year: 2015

  19. Activation experiment for concrete blocks using thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Koichi; Tanaka, Seiichiro

    2017-09-01

    Activation experiments for ordinary concrete, colemanite-peridotite concrete, B4C-loaded concrete, and limestone concrete are carried out using thermal neutrons. The results reveal that the effective dose for gamma rays from activated nuclides of colemanite-peridotite concrete is lower than that for the other types of concrete. Therefore, colemanite-peridotite concrete is useful for reducing radiation exposure for workers.

  20. Constraining the deformation and exhumation history of the Ronda Massif, Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myall, Jack; Donaldson, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Ronda peridotite, southern Spain is comprised of four peridotite units hosted within metasedimentary units of the Betic Cordillera, Western Alps. These four areas of differing mineral facies are termed: the Garnet Mylonite , the Foliated Spinel Peridotite, the Granular Spinel Peridotite and the Foliated Plagioclase Peridotite. Whilst two of these units show a strong NE-SW foliation, the granular unit has no foliation and the Plagioclase facies shows a NW-SE foliation. The massif is separated from the metasedimentary host through a mylonite shear zone to the NW and thrust faults to the SE. The Garnets contain rims of Kelyphite which when combined with the rims of Spinel on the Plagioclase crystals illustrate the complicated exhumation of this massif. The Kelyphite shows the breakdown of garnet back to spinel and pyroxene showing the deeper high pressure high temperature mineral is under shallowing conditions whereas in contrast to this the low pressure low temperature plagioclase crystals have spinel rims showing that they have been moved into deeper conditions. The P-T-t pathway of the massif suggests slow exhumation to allow for partial recrystallisation of not only the garnets and plagioclases but of a 100m band of peridotite between the Foliated Spinel Peridotite and the Granular Spinel Peridotite facies. The tectonic model for the Ronda Peridotite that best describes the field data and subsequent lab work of this study is Mantle Core complex and slab roll back models. These models support mantle uprising during an extensional event that whereby slab roll back of the subducting lithosphere provides uplift into a void and emplacement into the crust. Further extension and final exhumation causes rotation of a mantle wedge into its present day position.

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 1255 ... ... Response For A Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell Under A Constant Magnetic Field .... Partial melting mechanism and mantle peridotite chemical ... A mathematical model for excess work load allowance in Nigeria Universities.

  2. Deep electromagnetic sounding of the moon with Lunokhod 2 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanyan, L. L.; Yegorov, I. V.; Faynberg, E. B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of electromagnetic sounding distinguished an outer high resistance shell about 200 km thick in the moon's structure. A preliminary petrological interpretation of the moon's layers indicated their origin as a consequence of differentiation of the initial peridotite material. Upon melting, 20% to 40% of the material melts and is removed to form a high resistance basaltic shell underlain by a layer of spinal peridotites enriched in divalent iron oxides and having a reduced resistance.

  3. Direct evidence of hydration into mantle during shearing below a trasform fault: Prince Edward transform fault, Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michibayashi, K.; Kakihata, Y.; Dick, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is located to the southwest of Rodriguez Triple Junction, where three Indian ocean ridges meet (Zhou & Dick, 2013, Nature). SWIR is one of the slowest spreading ocean ridges in the world. In this study, we studied microstructural development of 21 peridotite samples obtained from Prince Edward transform fault of SWIR by PROTEA5 cruise in 1983. The peridotites consist dominantly of olivine, orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene with minor amounts of amphibole and plagioclase as well as secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnetite. The peridotites were classified into four groups based on their microstructures: 3 ultramylonites mostly consisting of extremely fine crystals (3-5µm), 13 heterogeneous tectonites consisting of coarse-grained crystals and fine-grained matrix, 1 cataclasite and 4 intensely serpentinized peridotites. Olivine Mg# is 0.90-0.91 and spinel Cr# is 0.1-0.35. Amphibole crystals have chemical compositions of tremolite and magnesio-hornblende and they were intensely deformed within the ultramylonites and the heterogeneous tectonites, indicating that they have occurred before or during intense shearing in mantle. Moreover, extremely fine grain sizes of olivine and microboudin textures in both pyroxene and spinel crystals suggest that these peridotites have been sheared under high stress conditions. Furthermore, olivine crystal-fabrics within the amphibole bearing peridotites have B and E types that could be developed under hydrous conditions, whereas olivine fabrics within the other peridotites have A and D types that could be developed under anhydrous conditions (Karato et al., 2008, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci.). Consequently, the petrophysical characteristics of peridotites in this study indicate that the uppermost mantle below the Prince Edward transform fault has been locally but intensely hydrated during shearing due to transform movement.

  4. The harzburgites-lherzolite cycle: depletion and refertilization processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Lherzolites or clinopyroxene-rich harzburgites sampled at the ocean floor are now generally interpreted as refractory harzburgites refertilized by melt-rock reaction or melt impregnation at the spreading center, rather than as relatively undepleted bulk upper mantle. The key evidence for a melt refertilization origin is often textural. Critically, the refertilization can mask the underlying very refractory character: oceanic peridotites prior to melt refertilization at the ridge are often too refractory to be simple mantle residues of bulk upper mantle that was melted at the ridge. This suggests that the upper mantle contains large domains that record prior melting histories. This is supported by ancient rhenium-depletion ages that are common in oceanic peridotites. In this presentation, I will discuss some key examples (e.g., Macquarie Island [1], Pindos, Totalp, Lanzarote) of refertilized oceanic peridotites, which all have recorded previous, ancient depletions. I will show the textural and geochemical evidence for melt refertilization. It has often been assumed that melt refertilization occurs by interaction with mantle melts. However, there is now evidence for melt refertilization through a reaction with eclogite-derived melts, probably at the base of the melting column underneath the ridge system. These eclogitic mantle heterogeneities themselves do not normally survive the melting underneath the spreading center, but their isotopic signature can be recognized in the reacted peridotites. In summary, we have moved away from the idea that oceanic mantle rocks are simple melting residues of homogeneous bulk upper mantle. The picture that emerges is a rich and complex one, suggesting that oceanic mantle rocks record dynamic histories of melting and refertilization. In particular, the melting event in refertilized peridotites can be much older than the age of the ridge system at which they are sampled. Many oceanic peridotites contain evidence for a Mesoproterozoic

  5. Stagnation and Storage of Strongly Depleted Melts in Slow-Ultraslow Spreading Oceans: Evidence from the Ligurian Tethys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa; Padovano, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    Our studies of Alpine-Apennine ophiolite massifs (i.e., Lanzo, Voltri, Ligurides, Corsica) show that the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys oceanic basin was a slow-ultraslow spreading basin, characterized by the exposures on the seafloor of mantle peridotites with extreme compositional variability. The large majority of these peridotites are made of depleted spinel harzburgites and plagioclase peridotites. The former are interpreted as reactive peridotites formed by the reactive percolation of under-saturated, strongly trace element depleted asthenospheric melts migrated by porous flow through the mantle lithosphere. The latter are considered as refertilized peridotites formed by peridotite impregnation by percolated silica-saturated, strongly trace element depleted melts. Strongly depleted melts were produced as low-degrees, single melt increments by near fractional melting of the passively upwelling asthenosphere during the rifting stage of the basin. They escaped single melt increment aggregation, migrated isolated through the mantle lithosphere by reactive porous or channeled flow before oceanic opening, and were transformed into silica-saturated derivative liquids that underwent entrapment and stagnation in the shallow mantle lithosphere forming plagioclase-enriched peridotites. Widespread small bodies of strongly depleted gabbro-norites testify for the local coalescence of these derivative liquids. These melts never reached the surface (i.e., the hidden magmatism), since lavas with their composition have never been found in the basin. Subsequently, aggregated MORB melts upwelled within replacive dunite channels (as evidenced by composition of magmatic clinopyroxenes in dunites), intruded at shallow levels as olivine gabbro bodies and extruded as basaltic lavas, to form the crustal rocks of the oceanic lithosphere (i.e., the oceanic magmatism). Km-scale bodies of MORB olivine gabbros were intruded into the plagioclase-enriched peridotites, which were formed in the

  6. Diamond carbon sources: a comparison of carbon isotope models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkley, M.B.; Otter, M.L.; Gurney, J.J.; Hill, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The carbon isotope compositions of approximately 500 inclusion-bearing diamonds have been determined in the past decade. 98 percent of these diamonds readily fall into two broad categories on the basis of their inclusion mineralogies and compositions. These categories are peridotitic diamonds and eclogitic diamonds. Most peridotitic diamonds have δ 13 C values between -10 and -1 permil, whereas eclogitic diamonds have δ 13 C values between -28 and +2 permil. Peridotitic diamonds may represent primordial carbon, however, it is proposed that initially inhomogeneous δ 13 C values were subsequently homogenized, e.g. during melting and convection that is postulated to have occurred during the first billion years of the earth's existence. If this is the case, then the wider range of δ 13 C values exhibited by eclogitic diamonds requires a different explanation. Both the fractionation model and the subduction model can account for the range of observed δ 13 C values in eclogitic diamonds. 16 refs., 2 figs

  7. Recycling of Oceanic Lithosphere: Water, fO2 and Fe-isotope Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizmis, M.; Peslier, A. H.; McCammon, C. A.; Keshav, S.; Williams, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Spinel peridotite and garnet pyroxenite xenoliths from Hawaii provide important clues about the composition of the oceanic lithosphere, and can be used to assess its contribution to mantle heterogeneity upon recycling. The peridotites have lower bulk H2O (approximately 70-114 ppm) than the MORB source, qualitatively consistent with melt depletion. The garnet pyroxenites (high pressure cumulates) have higher H2O (200-460 ppm, up to 550 ppm accounting for phlogopite) and low H2O/Ce ratios (less than 100). The peridotites have relatively light Fe-isotopes (delta Fe -57 = -0.34 to 0.13) that decrease with increasing depletion, while the pyroxenites are significantly heavier (delta Fe-57 up to 0.3). The observed xenolith, as well as MORB and OIB total Fe-isotope variability is larger that can be explained by existing melting models. The high H2O and low H2O/Ce ratios of pyroxenites are similar to estimates of EM-type OIB sources, while their heavy delta Fe-57 are similar to some Society and Cook-Austral basalts. Therefore, recycling of mineralogically enriched oceanic lithosphere (i.e. pyroxenites) may contribute to OIB sources and mantle heterogeneity. The Fe(3+)/Sigma? systematics of these xenoliths also suggest that there might be lateral redox gradients within the lithosphere, between juxtaposed oxidized spinel peridotites (deltaFMQ = -0.7 to 1.6, at 15 kb) and more reduced pyroxenites (deltaFMQ = -2 to -0.4, at 20-25kb). Such mineralogically and compositionally imposed fO2 gradients may generate local redox melting due to changes in fluid speciation (e.g. reduced fluids from pyroxenite encountering more oxidized peridotite). Formation of such incipient, small degree melts could further contribute to metasomatic features seen in peridotites, mantle heterogeneity, as well as the low velocity and high electrical conductivity structures near the base of the lithosphere and upper mantle.

  8. Progressive deformation of ultramafic rocks accompanied with deflection of layered structure and mylonitization culminating into a pseudotachylyte-bearing seismogenic fault - a field evidence of plastic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, T.; Obata, M.

    2011-12-01

    Plastic instability leading to rupture nucleation and propagetion (e.g. Hobbs et al.1986, Kelemen and Hirth, 2007) is an attractive hypothesis for deep earthquakes but lacked clear field evidences. 1D across-fault shear localization observed in some places (e.g. Jin et al.1998) is not clear if the deformation is directly related with seismicity. We present a clear field evidence of plastic instability as guided by pyroxenite/peridotite layering deflection structure (hereafter called LD structure, see figure) accompanied with mylonitization in spinel(Sp)-peridotite facies (P>~1GPa) in Balmuccia peridotite, Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italy. The studied area contains abundant PST-bearing faults and N-S trending primary pyroxenite layers. Many faults in the area cut pyroxenite layers, but LD structure is found only in one place presented here. Many PSTs in the area have been (re)crystallized in Sp-peridotite facies, and have typically ultramylonitic texture (Ueda et al., 2008) with some injection veins. The fault with LD structure is situated in a fault system, which has two dominant attitudes with regional N-S extension. The shear strain of LD structure measured on outcrop surface is ~2.0. Near the fault, elongated Opx porphyroclasts (ellipses in figure) oblique to local layering are visible in peridotite. The dominant deformation textures are dynamic recrystallization in peridotite and kinking or undulatory extinction in pyroxenite. The mineral assemblages of the mylonite neoblast in the peridotite and the pyroxenite are Ol+Opx+Cpx+Sp+hornblende(Hbl), Cpx+Opx+Sp, respectively. Hbl typically occur only in neoblast. In the vicinity (several hundreds of micron) of the fault, dolomite(Dol) also occur in equilibrium with the assemblage above. The recrystallized grain sizes are 20-50 microns in peridotite and 10-30 microns in pyroxenite. The rarity of LD structure is consistent with general conception that deformation processes which lead to dynamic rupture initiation ought to be

  9. Iron transformations during low temperature alteration of variably serpentinized rocks from the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Lisa E.; Ellison, Eric T.; Miller, Hannah M.; Kelemen, Peter B.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2018-02-01

    Partially serpentinized peridotites in the Samail ophiolite in the Sultanate of Oman currently undergo low temperature alteration and hydration both at shallow levels, with water recently in contact with the atmosphere, and at depth, with anoxic, reducing fluids. However, it is unclear how changes in the distribution and oxidation state of Fe are driving the production of energy-rich gases such as hydrogen and methane detected in peridotite catchments. We track the Fe transformations in a suite of outcrop samples representing a subset of the spectrum of least to most altered end-members of the Oman peridotites. We use microscale mineralogical and geochemical analyses including QEMSCAN, Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping, and electron microprobe wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The less-altered peridotites possess a diversity of Fe-bearing phases including relict primary minerals (e.g. olivine, pyroxene, chromite) and secondary phases (e.g. serpentine and brucite). Raman spectroscopy and electron microprobe data (Si/(Mg + Fe)) indicate that much of the serpentine is significantly intergrown with brucite on the sub-micron scale. These data also indicate that the Fe content of the brucite ranges from 10 to 20 wt% FeO. The mineral assemblage of the highly reacted rocks is less diverse, dominated by serpentine and carbonate while olivine and brucite are absent. Magnetite is relatively rare and mainly associated with chromite. Goethite and hematite, both Fe(III)-hydroxides, were also identified in the highly altered rocks. Whole rock chemical analyses reflect these mineralogical differences and show that Fe in the partially serpentinized samples is on average more reduced (∼0.40-0.55 Fe3+/FeTotal) than Fe in the highly reacted rocks (∼0.85-0.90 Fe3+/FeTotal). We propose that olivine, brucite, chromite and, perhaps, serpentine in the less-altered peridotites act as reactive phases during low temperature alteration of the Oman

  10. Post-Mesozoic Rapid Increase of Seawater Mg/Ca due to Enhanced Mantle-Seawater Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Ligi; Enrico Bonatti; Marco Cuffaro; Daniele Brunelli

    2013-01-01

    The seawater Mg/Ca ratio increased significantly from ~ 80?Ma to present, as suggested by studies of carbonate veins in oceanic basalts and of fluid inclusions in halite. We show here that reactions of mantle-derived peridotites with seawater along slow spreading mid-ocean ridges contributed to the post-Cretaceous Mg/Ca increase. These reactions can release to modern seawater up to 20% of the yearly Mg river input. However, no significant peridotite-seawater interaction and Mg-release to the ...

  11. New Data on the Composition of Ophiolite Complexes on Karaginskii Island (Eastern Kamchatka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolotnev, S. G.; Tsukanov, N. V.; Sidorov, E. G.

    2018-03-01

    The geochemistry and composition of peridotite rock-forming minerals from blocks in the serpentinite mélange of Karaginskii Island have been studied. The composition features of the rock-forming minerals are indicative of the fact that they represent abyssal peridotites of the mid-oceanic ridges that did not undergo remelting under suprasubduction conditions. According to the geochemical data, these rocks were subject to metasomatic alterations under mantle conditions in the suprasubduction setting, which were caused by metasomatizing melts and/or fluids generated in the subduction zone.

  12. Mineral chemistry and geochemistry of ophiolitic metaultramafics from Um Halham and Fawakhir, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Karim, Abdel-Aal M.; Ali, Shehata; El-Shafei, Shaimaa A.

    2018-03-01

    This study is focused on ophiolitic metaultramafics from Um Halham and Fawakhir, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The rocks include serpentinized peridotites, serpentinites together with talc- and quartz-carbonates. The primary spinel relict is Al-chromite [Cr# > 60], which is replaced by Cr-magnetite during metamorphism. The high Cr# of Al-chromites resembles supra-subduction zone (SSZ) peridotites and suggests derivation from the deeper portion of the mantle section with boninitic affinity. These mantle rocks equilibrated with boninitic melt have been generated by high melting degrees. The estimated melting degrees ( 19-24%) lie within the range of SSZ peridotites. The high Cr# of spinel and Fo content of olivine together with the narrow compositional range suggest a mantle residual origin. Serpentinized peridotite and serpentinites have low Al2O3/SiO2 ratios (mostly serpentinization process. Moreover, they have very low Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf concentrations along with sub-chondritic Nb/Ta (0.3-16) and Zr/Hf (mostly 1-20) ratios further confirming that their mantle source was depleted by earlier melting extraction event. The high chondrite normalized (La/Sm)N ratios (average 10) reflect input of subduction-related slab melts/fluids into their mantle source.

  13. Origin of Manipur Ophiolite Complex, Indo-Myanmar Range ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    r b

    2017-11-20

    Nov 20, 2017 ... The Manipur. Ophiolite. Complex: Varying degree of serpentinization and relict pyroxenes. 11/20/2017. 13. Page 14. Serpentinization process preserves the protolith elemental signatures. 11/20/2017. 14 ... The range of Nd isotope ratios in the serpentinized peridotites. 11/20/2017. 17. Kingson et al.

  14. Rhenium-osmium isotopes in pervasively metasomatized mantle xenoliths from the Bohemian Massif and implications for the reliability of Os model ages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kochergina, Y. V.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Erban, V.; Matusiak-Malek, M.; Puziewicz, J.; Halodová, P.; Špaček, P.; Trubač, J.; Magna, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 430, July 15 (2016), s. 90-107 ISSN 0009-2541 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * depletion age * Ohře/Eger rift * Os isotopes * peridotite xenolith * Re-Os * sub-continental lithospheric mantle Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.347, year: 2016

  15. Abstracts of Manuscripts Submitted in 1988 for Publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Brian E. Tucholke and Elazar Uchupi ....................... GG-1 Tide Gauges of India K.O. Emery and D.G. Aubrey...GG-15 Radiolarian Biostratigraphy in the Central Indian Ocean, Ocean Drilling Project Leg 115 David A. Johnson...GG-16 PETROLOGY Abyssal Peridotites, Very-slow Spreading Ridges and Ocean Ridge Magmatism Henry

  16. Formation of diapiric structure in the deformation zone, central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    serpentinite layer existing near the base of the crust that is interpreted to have been formed at mid-ocean ... Keywords. Diffusive plate boundary; deformation zone; diapiric structure; serpentinized peridotites; crustal structure; ... calculated by applying Eotvos correction and nor- ..... trend of the basement and flat Moho, and.

  17. A new report of serpentinites from Northern Central Indian Ridge (at 6 degrees S) - An implication for hydrothermal activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Banerjee, R.; Iyer, S.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    from the Vityaz TF near 5"S, the Vema TF near gOS, the Argo TF near 13"S, the Marie Celeste FZ near 17"s and from the Melville TF near 30°S and 60°E (Engel and Fisher, 1975). Other occurrences of serpentinite and peridotites along the Indian Ocean...

  18. Axial‐type olivine crystallographic preferred orientations: the effect of strain geometry on mantle texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzaras, V.; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Cohen, Shaina M.; Medaris Jr., L. Gordon; Withers, Anthony C.; Bagley, Brian

    The effect of finite strain geometry on crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) is poorly constrained in the upper mantle. Specifically, the relationship between shape preferred orientation (SPO) and CPO in the mantle rocks remains unclear. We analyzed a suite of 40 spinel peridotite xenoliths

  19. Petrogenetic importance of Cr - spinel metaperidotite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snarska, B.

    2010-01-01

    The research is ultramafic body Komarovce the site, which represents the spinel metaperidotit. In recent works dealing with the problems of genesis and tectonic ultramafic rocks placement consideration, Cr - spinel, which is considered an important petrogenetic indicator. Based on its chemical composition can further characterize the origin of peridotite.

  20. A fabric study of Lherzolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collée, A.L.G.

    1963-01-01

    The solution of the problem whether the ultrabasic inclusions in lavas are accumulation products of early crystallized minerals of the lavas in which they occur, or fragments of the earth’s peridotite shell carried to the surface by the eruptive force of the lavas, largely depends on the answer to

  1. Reply to `Comment on "The beginnings of hydrous mantle wedge melting" by Till et al.' by Green, Rosenthal and Kovacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Christy B.; Grove, Timothy L.; Withers, Anthony C.

    2012-12-01

    The comment of Green et al. debates the interpretation of the temperature of the H2O-saturated peridotite solidus and presence of silicate melt in the experiments of Till et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 163:669-688, 2012) at <1,000 °C. The criticisms presented in their comment do not invalidate any of the most compelling observations of Till et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 163:669-688, 2012) as discussed in the following response, including the changing minor element and Mg# composition of the solid phases with increasing temperature in our experiments with 14.5 wt% H2O at 3.2 GPa, as well as the results of our chlorite peridotite melting experiments with 0.7 wt% H2O. The point remains that Till et al. (Contrib Mineral Petrol 163:669-688, 2012) present data that call into question the H2O-saturated peridotite solidus temperature preferred by Green (Tectonophysics 13(1-4):47-71, 1972; Earth Planet Sci Lett 19(1):37-53, 1973; Can Miner 14:255-268, 1976); Millhollen et al. (J Geol 82(5):575-587, 1974); Mengel and Green (Stability of amphibole and phlogopite in metasomatized peridotite under water-saturated and water-undersaturated conditions, Geological Society of Australia Special Publication, Blackwell, pp 571-581, 1989); Wallace and Green (Mineral Petrol 44:1-19, 1991) and Green et al. (Nature 467(7314):448-451, 2010).

  2. UHP metamorphism recorded by kyanite-bearing eclogite in the Seve Nappe Complex of northern Jämtland, Swedish Caledonides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janák, M.; Van Roermund, H.; Majka, J.; Gee, D.

    The first evidence for ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism in the Seve Nappe Complex of the Scandinavian Caledonides is recorded by kyanite-bearing eclogite, found in a basic dyke within a garnet peridotite body exposed close to the lake Friningen in northern Jämtland (central Sweden). UHP

  3. Ductile deformation and rheology of sub-continental mantle in a hot collisional orogeny: Example from the Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kusbach, V.; Ulrich, Stanislav; Schulmann, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56-57, May (2012), s. 108-123 ISSN 0264-3707 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : olivine lattice preferred orientation * peridotite mylonite * crust-mantle coupling * Variscan orogen * strain Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.967, year: 2012

  4. Post-Mesozoic Rapid Increase of Seawater Mg/Ca due to Enhanced Mantle-Seawater Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligi, Marco; Bonatti, Enrico; Cuffaro, Marco; Brunelli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The seawater Mg/Ca ratio increased significantly from ~ 80 Ma to present, as suggested by studies of carbonate veins in oceanic basalts and of fluid inclusions in halite. We show here that reactions of mantle-derived peridotites with seawater along slow spreading mid-ocean ridges contributed to the post-Cretaceous Mg/Ca increase. These reactions can release to modern seawater up to 20% of the yearly Mg river input. However, no significant peridotite-seawater interaction and Mg-release to the ocean occur in fast spreading, East Pacific Rise-type ridges. The Mesozoic Pangean superocean implies a hot fast spreading ridge system. This prevented peridotite-seawater interaction and Mg release to the Mesozoic ocean, but favored hydrothermal Mg capture and Ca release by the basaltic crust, resulting in a low seawater Mg/Ca ratio. Continent dispersal and development of slow spreading ridges allowed Mg release to the ocean by peridotite-seawater reactions, contributing to the increase of the Mg/Ca ratio of post-Mesozoic seawater. PMID:24067442

  5. Mantle strength of the San Andreas fault system and the role of mantle-crust feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzaras, V.; Tikoff, B.; Newman, J.; Withers, A.C.; Drury, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    In lithospheric-scale strike-slip fault zones, upper crustal strength is well constrained from borehole observations and fault rock deformation experiments, but mantle strength is less well known. Using peridotite xenoliths, we show that the upper mantle below the San Andreas fault system

  6. Scandian Ultrahigh-Pressure Metamorphism of Proterozoic Basement Rocks on Fjortoft and Otroy, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carswell, D.A.; van Roermund, H.L.M.; Wiggers de Vries, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral composition data are presented for samples of exsolved and recrystallized garnet websterites within the mantle-derived peridotite bodies and of external orthopyroxene eclogite lenses directly enclosed within the gneisses on the islands of Fjørtoft and Otrøy in the Western

  7. Fracture-zone tectonics at Zabargad Island, Red Sea (Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Stephen; Bonatti, Enrico; Brueckner, Hannes; Paulsen, Timothy

    1992-12-01

    Zabargad Island, which lies along the western margin of the Red Sea rift, is a remarkable place because it provides fresh exposures of undepleted mantle peridotite. How this peridotite came to be exposed on Zabargad remains unclear. Our field mapping indicates that most of the contacts between peridotite and the adjacent bodies of Pan-African gneiss and Cretaceous(?) Zabargad Formation on the island are now high-angle brittle faults. Zabargad Formation strata have been complexly folded, partly in response to this faulting. Overall, the array of high-angle faults and associated folds on the island resembles those found in cross-rift transfer zones. We suggest, therefore, that the Zabargad fracture zone, a band of submarine escarpments on the floor of the Red Sea north of the island, crosses Zabargad Island and has actively resolved differential movement between the central Red Sea rift and the northern Red Sea rift. The final stage of uplift that brought the unusual peridotite to the earth's surface is related to shallow crustal transpression, which may have inverted an earlier transtensional regime.

  8. Tin isotope fractionation during magmatic processes and the isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Amet, Quentin; Fitoussi, Caroline; Bourdon, Bernard

    2018-05-01

    Tin is a moderately volatile element whose isotope composition can be used to investigate Earth and planet differentiation and the early history of the Solar System. Although the Sn stable isotope composition of several geological and archaeological samples has been reported, there is currently scarce information about the effect of igneous processes on Sn isotopes. In this study, high-precision Sn isotope measurements of peridotites and basalts were obtained by MC-ICP-MS with a double-spike technique. The basalt samples display small variations in δ124/116Sn ranging from -0.01 ± 0.11 to 0.27 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.) relative to NIST SRM 3161a standard solution, while peridotites have more dispersed and more negative δ124Sn values ranging from -1.04 ± 0.11 to -0.07 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.). Overall, basalts are enriched in heavy Sn isotopes relative to peridotites. In addition, δ124Sn in peridotites become more negative with increasing degrees of melt depletion. These results can be explained by different partitioning behavior of Sn4+ and Sn2+ during partial melting. Sn4+ is overall more incompatible than Sn2+ during partial melting, resulting in Sn4+-rich silicate melt and Sn2+-rich residue. As Sn4+ has been shown experimentally to be enriched in heavy isotopes relative to Sn2+, the effect of melting is to enrich residual peridotites in relatively more compatible Sn2+, which results in isotopically lighter peridotites and isotopically heavier mantle-derived melts. This picture can be disturbed partly by the effect of refertilization. Similarly, the presence of enriched components such as recycled oceanic crust or sediments could explain part of the variations in Sn isotopes in oceanic basalts. The most primitive peridotite analyzed in this study was used for estimating the Sn isotope composition of the BSE, with δ124Sn = -0.08 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.) relative to the Sn NIST SRM 3161a standard solution. Altogether, this suggests that Sn isotopes may be a powerful probe of

  9. Invasion of Hydrous Fluids Predates Kimberlite Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylova, M. G.; Wang, Q.; Smith, E. M.

    2017-12-01

    Petrological observations on diamonds and peridotite xenoliths in kimberlites point towards an influx of hydrous metasomatic fluids shortly predating kimberlite formation. Diamonds may grow at different times within the same segment of the cratonic mantle, and diamonds that form shortly before (diamonds typically contain 10-25 wt.% water in fluid inclusions, while older octahedrally-grown diamonds host "dry" N2-CO2 fluids. Our recent studies of fluids in diamond now show that many different kinds of diamonds can contain fluid inclusions. Specifically, we found a new way to observe and analyze fluids in octahedrally-grown, non-fibrous diamonds by examining healed fractures. This is a new textural context for fluid inclusions that reveals a valuable physical record of infiltrating mantle fluids, that postdate diamond growth, but equilibrate within the diamond stability field at depths beyond 150 km. Another sign of the aqueous fluids influx is the formation of distinct peridotite textures shortly predating the kimberlite. Kimberlites entrain peridotite xenoliths with several types of textures: older coarse metamorphic textures and younger, sheared textures. The preserved contrast in grain sizes between porphyroclasts and neoblasts in sheared peridotites constrain the maximum duration of annealing. Experimental estimates of the annealing time vary from 7x107 sec (2 years) to 106 years (1 My) depending on olivine hydration, strain rate, pressure, temperature and, ultimately, the annealing mechanism. Kimberlite sampling of sheared peridotites from the lithosphere- asthenosphere boundary (LAB) implies their formation no earlier than 1 My prior to the kimberlite ascent. Water contents of olivine measured by FTIR spectrometry using polarized light demonstrated contrasting hydration of coarse and sheared samples. Olivine from sheared peridotite samples has the average water content of 78±3 ppm, in contrast to the less hydrated coarse peridotites (33±6 ppm). LAB hydration

  10. Geochemistry and geobiology of a present-day serpentinization site in California: The Cedars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Penny L.; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Johnson, Orion J.; Suzuki, Shino; Rietze, Amanda; Sessions, Alex L.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2013-05-01

    Ultra-basic (pH 11-12) reducing (-656 to -585 mV) groundwater springs discharging from serpentinized peridotite of The Cedars, CA, were investigated for their geochemistry and geobiology. The spring waters investigated were of meteoric origin; however, geochemical modeling suggests that there were two sources of groundwater, a shallow source with sufficient contact with The Cedars' peridotite body to be altered geochemically by serpentinization, and a deeper groundwater source that not only flows through the peridotite body but was also in contact with the marine sediments of the Franciscan Subduction Complex (FSC) below the peridotite body. We propose that the groundwater discharging from lower elevations (GPS1 and CS1) reflect the geochemistry of the deeper groundwater in contact with FSC, while groundwaters discharging from springs at higher elevations (NS1 and BSC) were a mixture of the shallow peridotite-only groundwater and the deeper groundwater that has been in contact with the FSC. Cell densities of suspended microbes within these waters were extremely low. In the NS1 and BSC spring fluids, cell densities ranged from 102 to 103 cells/ml, while suspended cells at GPS were lower than 10 cells/mL. However, glass slides incubated in the BSC and GPS1 springs for 2-3 weeks were colonized by cells with densities ranging from 106 to 107 cells/cm2 attached to their surfaces. All of the springs were very low (⩽1 μM) in several essential elements and electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate/ammonium, sulfate, and phosphate) required for (microbial) growth, which is not uncommon at sites of continental serpentinization. Gases rich in N2, H2, and CH4 were exsolving from the springs. The stable carbon isotope value (δ13CCH4 = -68 ± 0.6‰) and the CH4/C2+ (>103) of methane and other gaseous hydrocarbons exsolving from NS1 were typical of microbially sourced methane, whereas the isotope values and the CH4/C2+ of BSC and CS1 springs were more enriched in 13C and had CH4/C2

  11. Subduction initiation, recycling of Alboran lower crust, and intracrustal emplacement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle in the Westernmost Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas-Reus, María Isabel; Garrido, Carlos J.; Bosch, Delphine; Marchesi, Claudio; Hidas, Károly; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Unraveling the tectonic settings and processes involved in the annihilation of subcontinental mantle lithosphere is of paramount importance for our understanding of the endurance of continents through Earth history. Unlike ophiolites -- their oceanic mantle lithosphere counterparts -- the mechanisms of emplacement of the subcontinental mantle lithosphere in orogens is still poorly known. The emplacement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle peridotites is often attributed to extension in rifted passive margins or continental backarc basins, accretionary processes in subduction zones, or some combination of these processes. One of the most prominent features of the westernmost Mediterranean Alpine orogenic arcs is the presence of the largest outcrops worldwide of diamond facies, subcontinental mantle peridotite massifs; unveiling the mechanisms of emplacement of these massifs may provide important clues on processes involved in the destruction of continents. The western Mediterranean underwent a complex Alpine evolution of subduction initiation, slab fragmentation, and rollback within a context of slow convergence of Africa and Europe In the westernmost Mediterranean, the alpine orogeny ends in the Gibraltar tight arc, which is bounded by the Betic, Rif and Tell belts that surround the Alboran and Algero-Balearic basins. The internal units of these belts are mostly constituted of an allochthonous lithospheric domain that collided and overthrusted Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Mesozoic-Paleogene, South Iberian and Maghrebian rifted continental paleomargins. Subcontinental lithospheric peridotite massifs are intercalated between polymetamorphic internal units of the Betic (Ronda, Ojen and Carratraca massifs), Rif (Beni Bousera), and Tell belts. In the Betic chain, the internal zones of the allochthonous Alboran domain include, from bottom to top, polymetamorphic rock of the Alpujarride and Malaguide complexes. The Ronda peridotite massif -- the

  12. Reworking of Archean mantle in the NE Siberian craton by carbonatite and silicate melt metasomatism: Evidence from a carbonate-bearing, dunite-to-websterite xenolith suite from the Obnazhennaya kimberlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionov, Dmitri A.; Doucet, Luc S.; Xu, Yigang; Golovin, Alexander V.; Oleinikov, Oleg B.

    2018-03-01

    The Obnazhennaya kimberlite in the NE Siberian craton hosts a most unusual cratonic xenolith suite, with common rocks rich in pyroxenes and garnet, and no sheared peridotites. We report petrographic and chemical data for whole rocks (WR) and minerals of 20 spinel and garnet peridotites from Obnazhennaya with Re-depletion Os isotope ages of 1.8-2.9 Ga (Ionov et al., 2015a) as well as 2 pyroxenites. The garnet-bearing rocks equilibrated at 1.6-2.8 GPa and 710-1050 °C. Some xenoliths contain vermicular spinel-pyroxene aggregates with REE patterns in clinopyroxene mimicking those of garnet. The peridotites show significant scatter of Mg# (0.888-0.924), Cr2O3 (0.2-1.4 wt.%) and high NiO (0.3-0.4 wt.%). None are pristine melting residues. Low-CaO-Al2O3 (≤0.9 wt.%) dunites and harzburgites are melt-channel materials. Peridotites with low to moderate Al2O3 (0.4-1.8 wt.%) usually have CaO > Al2O3, and some have pockets of calcite texturally equilibrated with olivine and garnet. Such carbonates, exceptional in mantle xenoliths and reported here for the first time for the Siberian mantle, provide direct evidence for modal makeover and Ca and LREE enrichments by ephemeral carbonate-rich melts. Peridotites rich in CaO and Al2O3 (2.7-8.0 wt.%) formed by reaction with silicate melts. We infer that the mantle lithosphere beneath Obnazhennaya, initially formed in the Mesoarchean, has been profoundly modified. Pervasive inter-granular percolation of highly mobile and reactive carbonate-rich liquids may have reduced the strength of the mantle lithosphere leading the way for reworking by silicate melts. The latest events before the kimberlite eruption were the formation of the carbonate-phlogopite pockets, fine-grained pyroxenite veins and spinel-pyroxene symplectites. The reworked lithospheric sections are preserved at Obnazhennaya, but similar processes could erode lithospheric roots in the SE Siberian craton (Tok) and the North China craton, where ancient melting residues and

  13. Mechanical Mixing and Metamorphism of Mafic and Ultramafic Lithologies during Mylonisis at the ST. Paul Transform System, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrião, Á.; Maia, M.; Hemond, C.; Kaczmarek, M. A.; Briais, A.; Vincent, C.; Brunelli, D.

    2017-12-01

    The St. Paul Transform System offsets by 630 km the Equatorial Mid Atlantic Ridge at 1° N. It consists of four major faults separating three intra transform ridge axes. This region shows a transition from a transpressive, hot spot affected, regional-scale shear zone to the North to a region dominated by a particular oceanic core complex spreading to the South (Vincent et al., this congress). Samples collected in the region during the COLMEIA cruise (Maia et al., 2016) were studied for textures and whole-rock major and trace element contents. All samples experienced pervasive deformation at ductile to brittle conditions overprinted by late low-T alteration. Mylonitic and ultramylonitic rocks can be grouped in three main types: peridotitic, gabbroic and talc-chlorite schist. Peridotitic ultramylonites preserve few opx, cpx and sp porphyroclasts; they have homogeneous nano-micro grain size groundmass, banded foliation and late amphibole and sulfide crystallization. Locally S-C fabric overprints the mylonitic texture. Micro cracks, filled with serpentine, chlorite and oxides are common, as well fluid inclusions trails in olivine and plagioclase crystals of peridotite and gabbros respectively. Major and trace element content of the peridotitic mylonites plot in the depleted field of the abyssal peridotites; however, they present marked LREE enrichment and Eu positive anomaly. Gabbroic and talc-chlorite mylonites display REE-enriched patterns (up to 100x CI) and variable Eu anomalies. Major elements show a remarkable linear trend in the talc-chlorite group suggesting mixing of pure talc and chlorite end-members. These compositional characteristics suggest variable assimilation of MORB and E-MORB during mylonisis or early melt-rock interaction and hydrothermal evolution at variable metamorphic conditions. Vincent et al., 2017. Particular Oceanic Core Complex evolution …; this congress Maia et al., 2016. Extreme mantle uplift and exhumation ... Nat. Geo. doi:10

  14. CO2-SO3-rich (carbonate-sulfate) melt/fluids in the lithosphere beneath El Hierro, Canary Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglialoro, E.; Ferrando, S.; Malaspina, N.; Villa, I. M.; Frezzotti, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths from the island of El Hierro, the youngest of the Canary Islands, have been studied to characterize fluxes of carbon in the lithosphere of an OIB volcanism region. Fifteen xenoliths (4-10 cm in diameter) were collected in a rift lava flow (15-41 ka) at a new xenolith locality in El Julan cliff (S-SW of the island). Peridotites consist of protogranular to porphyroblastic spinel harzburgites, lherzolites, and subordinate dunites. One spinel clinopyroxenite, and one olivine-websterite were also analyzed. Ultramafic xenoliths were classified as HEXO (harzburgite and dunite with exsolved orthopyroxene), HLCO (harzburgite and lherzolite containing orthopyroxene without visible exsolution lamellae), and HTR (transitional harzburgite with exsolved orthopyroxene porphyroclasts, and poikilitic orthopyroxene) following [1]. While HLCO and HTR peridotites contain mostly CO2 fluid inclusions, HEXO peridotites preserve an early association of melt/fluid inclusions containing dominantly carbonate/sulfate/silicate glass, evolving to carbonate/sulfate/phosphate/spinel aggregates, with exsolved CO2 (± carbonates, anhydrite and H2O). Chemical and Raman analyses identify dolomite, Mg-calcite, anhydrite, sulfohalite [Na6(SO4)2FCl] (± other anhydrous and hydrous alkali-sulfates), apatite, and Cr-spinel in the inclusions. Sulfides are noticeably absent. The microstructure and chemical composition of the metasomatic fluids indicate that the peridotites were infiltrated by a carbonate-sulfate-silicate melt/fluid enriched in CO2, H2O, and P. A mantle origin for this fluid is supported by high densities of CO2inclusions (> 1g/cm3), determined by Raman microspectroscopy and cross-checked by microthermometry. Consequently, El Julan peridotites provide the first evidence for liberating oxidized C and S fluxes from the Earth lithosphere in an OIB source region, and suggest that oxidation of sulfide to sulfate can occur during small-degree partial melting of the upper mantle

  15. Intermediate-Depth Subduction Earthquakes Recorded by Pseudotachylyte in Dry Eclogite-Facies Oceanic Lithosphere from the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambelluri, M.; Pennacchioni, G.; Gilio, M.; Bestmann, M.

    2016-12-01

    While geophysical studies and laboratory experiments provide much information on subduction earthquakes, field studies identifying the rock types for earthquake development and the deep seismogenic environments are still scarce. To date, fluid overpressure and volume decrease during hydrous mineral breakdown the widely favoured trigger of subduction earthquakes in serpentinized lithospheric mantle and hydrated low-velocity layers atop slabs. Here we document up to 40 cm-thick pseudotachylyte (PST) in Alpine oceanic gabbro and peridotite (2-2.5 GPa-550-620°C), the analogue of a modern cold subducting oceanic lithosphere. These rocks mostly remained unaltered dry systems; only very minor domains (<1%) record partial hydration and static eclogitic metamorphism. Meta-peridotite shows high-pressure olivine + antigorite (garnet + zoisite + chlorite after mantle plagioclase); meta-gabbro develops omphacite + zoisite + talc + chloritoid + garnet. Abundant syn-eclogitic pseudotachylyte cut the dry gabbro-peridotite and the eclogitized domains. In meta-peridotite, PST shows olivine, orthopyroxene, spinel microliths and clasts of high-pressure olivine + antigorite and garnet + zoisite + chlorite aggregates. In metagabbro, microfaults in damage zones near PST cut brecciated igneous pyroxene cemented by omphacite. In unaltered gabbro, glassy PST contains micron-scale garnet replacing plagioclase microliths during, or soon after, PST cooling. In the host rock, garnet coronas between igneous olivine and plagioclase only occur near PST and between closely spaced PST veins. Absence of garnet away from PST indicates that garnet growth was triggered by mineral seeds and by heat released by PST. The above evidence shows that pseudotachylyte formed at eclogite-facies conditions. In such setting, strong, dry, metastable gabbro-peridotite concentrate stress to generate large intermediate depth subduction earthquakes without much involvement of free fluid.

  16. Transfer of subduction fluids into the deforming mantle wedge during nascent subduction: Evidence from trace elements and boron isotopes (Semail ophiolite, Oman)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Agard, P.; Lemarchand, D.; Soret, M.; Ulrich, M.

    2018-02-01

    The basal part of the Semail ophiolitic mantle was (de)formed at relatively low temperature (LT) directly above the plate interface during "nascent subduction" (the prelude to ophiolite obduction). This subduction-related LT deformation was associated with progressive strain localization and cooling, resulting in the formation of porphyroclastic to ultramylonitic shear zones prior to serpentinization. Using petrological and geochemical analyses (trace elements and B isotopes), we show that these basal peridotites interacted with hydrous fluids percolating by porous flow during mylonitic deformation (from ∼850 down to 650 °C). This process resulted in 1) high-T amphibole crystallization, 2) striking enrichments of minerals in fluid mobile elements (FME; particularly B, Li and Cs with concentrations up to 400 times those of the depleted mantle) and 3) peridotites with an elevated δ11B of up to +25‰. These features indicate that the metasomatic hydrous fluids are most likely derived from the dehydration of subducting crustal amphibolitic materials (i.e., the present-day high-T sole). The rapid decrease in metasomatized peridotite δ11B with increasing distance to the contact with the HT sole (to depleted mantle isotopic values in <1 km) suggests an intense interaction between peridotites and rapid migrating fluids (∼1-25 m.y-1), erasing the initial high-δ11B subduction fluid signature within a short distance. The increase of peridotite δ11B with increasing deformation furthermore indicates that the flow of subduction fluids was progressively channelized in actively deforming shear zones parallel to the contact. Taken together, these results also suggest that the migration of subduction fluids/melts by porous flow through the subsolidus mantle wedge (i.e., above the plate interface at sub-arc depths) is unlikely to be an effective mechanism to transport slab-derived elements to the locus of partial melting in subduction zones.

  17. Silicate melt metasomatism in the lithospheric mantle beneath SW Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puziewicz, Jacek; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Grégoire, Michel; Kukuła, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The xenoliths of peridotites representing the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath SW Poland and adjacent parts of Germany occur in the Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rocks. Our study is based on detailed characterization of xenoliths occurring in 7 locations (Steinberg in Upper Lusatia, Księginki, Pilchowice, Krzeniów, Wilcza Góra, Winna Góra and Lutynia in Lower Silesia). One of the two major lithologies occurring in the xenoliths, which we call the "B" lithology, comprises peridotites (typically harzburgites) with olivine containing from 90.5 to 84.0 mole % of forsterite. The harzburgites contain no clinopyroxene or are poor in that mineral (eg. in Krzeniów the group "B" harzburgites contain pfu in ortho-, and pfu in clinopyroxene). The exception are xenoliths from Księginki, which contain pyroxenes characterised by negative correlation between mg# and Al. The REE patterns of both ortho- and clinopyroxene in the group "B" peridotites suggest equilibration with silicate melt. The rocks of "B" lithology were formed due to alkaline silicate melt percolation in the depleted peridotitic protolith. The basaltic melts formed at high pressure are usually undersaturated in both ortho- and clinopyroxene at lower pressures (Kelemen et al. 1992). Because of cooling and dissolution of ortho- and clinopyroxene the melts change their composition and become saturated in one or both of those phases. Experimental results (e.g. Tursack & Liang 2012 and references therein) show that the same refers to alkaline basaltic silicate melts and that its reactive percolation in the peridotitic host leads to decrease of Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios of olivine and pyroxenes. Thus, the variation of relative volumes of olivine and orthopyroxene as well as the decrease of mg# of rock-forming silicates is well explained by reactive melt percolation in the peridotitic protolith consisting of high mg# olivine and pyroxenes (in the area studied by us that protolith was characterised by olivine

  18. Water in the oceanic lithosphere: Salt Lake Crater xenoliths, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Bizimis, M.

    2010-12-01

    Water can be present in nominally anhydrous minerals of peridotites in the form of hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen. Such water in the oceanic upper mantle could have a significant effect on its physical and chemical properties. However, the water content of the MORB source has been inferred indirectly from the compositions of basalts. Direct determinations on abyssal peridotites are scarce because they have been heavily hydrothermally altered. Here we present the first water analyses of minerals from spinel peridotite xenoliths of Salt Lake Crater, Oahu, Hawaii, which are exceptionally fresh. These peridotites are thought to represent fragments of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere that was refertilized by alkalic Hawaiian melts. A few have unradiogenic Os and radiogenic Hf isotopes and may be fragments of an ancient ( 2 Ga) depleted and recycled lithosphere. Water contents in olivine (Ol), orthopyroxene (Opx), and clinopyroxene (Cpx) were determined by FTIR spectrometry. Preliminary H_{2}O contents show ranges of 8-10 ppm for Ol, 151-277 ppm for Opx, and 337-603 ppm for Cpx. Reconstructed bulk rock H_{2}O contents range from 88-131 ppm overlapping estimates for the MORB source. Water contents between Ol minerals of the same xenolith are heterogeneous and individual OH infrared bands vary within a mineral with lower 3230 cm^{-1} and higher 3650-3400 cm^{-1} band heights from core to edge. This observation suggests disturbance of the hydrogen in Ol likely occurring during xenolith entrainment to the surface. Pyroxene water contents are higher than most water contents in pyroxenes from continental peridotite xenoliths and higher than those of abyssal peridotites. Cpx water contents decrease with increasing degree of depletion (e.g. increasing Fo in Ol and Cr# in spinel) consistent with an incompatible behavior of water. However Cpx water contents also show a positive correlation with LREE/HREE ratios and LREE concentrations consistent with refertilization. Opx

  19. Geochemical insights into the lithology of mantle sources for Cenozoic alkali basalts in West Qinling, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zheng, Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2018-03-01

    Although alkali basalts are common in oceanic islands and continental rifts, the lithology of their mantle sources is still controversial. While the peridotite is usually viewed as a common source lithology, there are increasing studies suggesting significant contributions from ultramafic metasomatites such as carbonated peridotite, pyroxenite and hornblendite to the origin of alkali basalts. The present study indicates that carbonated peridotite plus hornblendite would have served as the mantle sources of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the West Qinling orogen in China. The target basalts show low SiO2 contents of 36.9 to 40.8 wt% and highly variable Na2O + K2O contents from 0.86 to 4.77 wt%, but high CaO contents of 12.5 to 16.3 wt% and CaO/Al2O3 ratios of 1.42 to 2.19. They are highly enriched in the majority of incompatible trace elements, but depleted in Rb, K, Pb, Zr, Hf, and Ti. Furthermore, they exhibit high (La/Yb)N, Zr/Hf, Ce/Pb and Nb/Ta ratios, but low Ti/Eu and Hf/Sm ratios. Generally, with increasing (La/Yb)N and CaO/Al2O3 ratios, their Ti/Eu and Hf/Sm ratios decrease whereas their Zr/Hf, Ce/Pb and Nb/Ta ratios increase. These major and trace element features are similar to those of carbonatites and hornblendite-derived melts to some extent, but significantly different from those of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). This suggests that the alkali basalts would be originated from metasomatic mantle sources. A comparison of the major-trace elements in the alkali basalts with those of some representative mantle-derived melts indicates that the source lithology of alkali basalts is a kind of ultramafic metasomatites that are composed of carbonated peridotite and hornblendite. Such metasomatites would be generated by reaction of the depleted MORB mantle peridotite with hydrous, carbonate-bearing felsic melts derived from partial melting of the subducted Paleotethyan oceanic crust. Therefore, the melt-peridotite reaction at the slab-mantle interface in the

  20. Oxo-amphiboles in mantle xenoliths: evidence for H2O-rich melt interacting with the lithospheric mantle of Harrow Peaks (Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, S.; Bonadiman, C.; Biagioni, C.; Comodi, P.; Coltorti, M.; Zucchini, A.; Ottolini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Amphiboles are the most widespread hydrous metasomatic phases in spinel-bearing mantle peridotites from Harrow Peaks (HP), Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica). They occur both in veinlets and disseminated in the peridotite matrix (preferentially associated with clinopyroxene and spinel grains). Four amphibole crystals were investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SC-XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and micro-Mössbauer spectroscopy; these crystal-chemical data allow to constrain upper mantle conditions during growth of these amphiboles and the role of volatile circulation during metasomatic processes in the Antarctic region. The HP amphiboles have low Mg# values (69.3-84.1), high TiO2 (2.74-5.30 wt%) and FeOtot contents (3.40 to 6.90 wt%). The Fe3+/Fetot ratios are significantly high (0.53-0.66). The W-site is mainly occupied by O2- (0.984-1.187 apfu) plus OH (H2O: 0.70-1.01 wt%) and minor F (0.04-0.24 wt%) and Cl (0.03-0.08 wt%). Consequently, HP amphiboles are actually characterized by a significant oxo component. The aH2O values were calculated at 1.5 GPa by dehydration equilibrium equations written as H2O-buffering equilibria among end-member components of amphibole and coexisting peridotite phases. Three out of four HP amphibole-bearing peridotites have values of aH2O ranging from 0.122 to 0.335; whereas one sample has aH2O remarkably higher (0.782) approaching an ideal H2O basalt solubility. The HP fO2 values, determined by the olivine-spinel-orthopyroxene oxygeobarometer (ΔQFM = -1.77 : +0.01), are remarkably different from those calculated on the basis of the amphibole dehydration equilibrium and the application of the dissociation reaction (ΔQFM = -2.60 : +6.8). The high aH2O and the extremely high fO2 values, determined by the oxy-amphibole equilibrium with respect to the redox conditions recorded by the co-existing anhydrous minerals (close to QFM buffer), revealed that: i) the amphibole

  1. Water in the Oceanic Lithosphere: Salt Lake Crater Xenoliths, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Bizimis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Water can be present in nominally anhydrous minerals of peridotites in the form of hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen. Such water in the oceanic upper mantle could have a significant effect on its physical and chemical properties. However, the water content of the MORB source has been inferred indirectly from the compositions of basalts. Direct determinations on abyssal peridotites are scarce because they have been heavily hydrothermally altered. Here we present the first water analyses of minerals from spinel peridotite xenoliths of Salt Lake Crater, Oahu, Hawaii, which are exceptionally fresh. These peridotites are thought to represent fragments of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere that was refertilized by alkalic Hawaiian melts. A few have unradiogenic Os and radiogenic Hf isotopes and may be fragments of an ancient (2 Ga) depleted and recycled lithosphere. Water contents in olivine (Ol), orthopyroxene (Opx), and clinopyroxene (Cpx) were determined by FTIR spectrometry. Preliminary H_{2}O contents show ranges of 8-10 ppm for Ol, 151-277 ppm for Opx, and 337-603 ppm for Cpx. Reconstructed bulk rock H_{2}O contents range from 88-131 ppm overlapping estimates for the MORB source. Water contents between Ol minerals of the same xenolith are heterogeneous and individual OH infrared bands vary within a mineral with lower 3230 cm^{-1} and higher 3650-3400 cm^{-1} band heights from core to edge. This observation suggests disturbance of the hydrogen in Ol likely occurring during xenolith entrainment to the surface. Pyroxene water contents are higher than most water contents in pyroxenes from continental peridotite xenoliths and higher than those of abyssal peridotites. Cpx water contents decrease with increasing degree of depletion (e.g. increasing Fo in Ol and Cr# in spinel) consistent with an incompatible behavior of water. However Cpx water contents also show a positive correlation with LREE/HREE ratios and LREE concentrations consistent with refertilization. Opx water

  2. Magnesium isotopic composition of the Earth and chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Li, Wang-Ye; Ke, Shan; Marty, Bernard; Dauphas, Nicolas; Huang, Shichun; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Pourmand, Ali

    2010-07-01

    To constrain further the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth and chondrites, and investigate the behavior of Mg isotopes during planetary formation and magmatic processes, we report high-precision (±0.06‰ on δ 25Mg and ±0.07‰ on δ 26Mg, 2SD) analyses of Mg isotopes for (1) 47 mid-ocean ridge basalts covering global major ridge segments and spanning a broad range in latitudes, geochemical and radiogenic isotopic compositions; (2) 63 ocean island basalts from Hawaii (Kilauea, Koolau and Loihi) and French Polynesia (Society Island and Cook-Austral chain); (3) 29 peridotite xenoliths from Australia, China, France, Tanzania and USA; and (4) 38 carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondrites including 9 chondrite groups (CI, CM, CO, CV, L, LL, H, EH and EL). Oceanic basalts and peridotite xenoliths have similar Mg isotopic compositions, with average values of δ 25Mg = -0.13 ± 0.05 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.26 ± 0.07 (2SD) for global oceanic basalts ( n = 110) and δ 25Mg = -0.13 ± 0.03 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.25 ± 0.04 (2SD) for global peridotite xenoliths ( n = 29). The identical Mg isotopic compositions in oceanic basalts and peridotites suggest that equilibrium Mg isotope fractionation during partial melting of peridotite mantle and magmatic differentiation of basaltic magma is negligible. Thirty-eight chondrites have indistinguishable Mg isotopic compositions, with δ 25Mg = -0.15 ± 0.04 (2SD) and δ 26Mg = -0.28 ± 0.06 (2SD). The constancy of Mg isotopic compositions in all major types of chondrites suggest that primary and secondary processes that affected the chemical and oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrites did not significantly fractionate Mg isotopes. Collectively, the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth's mantle, based on oceanic basalts and peridotites, is estimated to be -0.13 ± 0.04 for δ 25Mg and -0.25 ± 0.07 for δ 26Mg (2SD, n = 139). The Mg isotopic composition of the Earth, as represented by the mantle, is similar to chondrites

  3. Lithospheric magma dynamics beneath the El Hierro Volcano, Canary Islands: insights from fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglialoro, E.; Frezzotti, M. L.; Ferrando, S.; Tiraboschi, C.; Principe, C.; Groppelli, G.; Villa, I. M.

    2017-10-01

    At active volcanoes, petrological studies have been proven to be a reliable approach in defining the depth conditions of magma transport and storage in both the mantle and the crust. Based on fluid inclusion and mineral geothermobarometry in mantle xenoliths, we propose a model for the magma plumbing system of the Island of El Hierro (Canary Islands). The peridotites studied here were entrained in a lava flow exposed in the El Yulan Valley. These lavas are part of the rift volcanism that occurred on El Hierro at approximately 40-30 ka. The peridotites are spinel lherzolites, harzburgites, and dunites which equilibrated in the shallow mantle at pressures between 1.5 and 2 GPa and at temperatures between 800 and 950 °C (low-temperature peridotites; LT), as well as at higher equilibration temperatures of 900 to 1100 °C (high-temperature peridotites; HT). Microthermometry and Raman analyses of fluid inclusions reveal trapping of two distinct fluid phases: early type I metasomatic CO2-N2 fluids ( X N2 = 0.01-0.18; fluid density (d) = 1.19 g/cm3), coexisting with silicate-carbonate melts in LT peridotites, and late type II pure CO2 fluids in both LT (d = 1.11-1.00 and 0.75-0.65 g/cm3) and HT ( d = 1.04-1.11 and 0.75-0.65 g/cm3) peridotites. While type I fluids represent metasomatic phases in the deep oceanic lithosphere (at depths of 60-65 km) before the onset of magmatic activity, type II CO2 fluids testify to two fluid trapping episodes during the ascent of xenoliths in their host mafic magmas. Identification of magma accumulation zones through interpretation of type II CO2 fluid inclusions and mineral geothermobarometry indicate the presence of a vertically stacked system of interconnected small magma reservoirs in the shallow lithospheric mantle between a depth of 22 and 36 km (or 0.67 to 1 GPa). This magma accumulation region fed a short-lived magma storage region located in the lower oceanic crust at a depth of 10-12 km (or 0.26-0.34 GPa). Following our model

  4. Mg isotope systematics during magmatic processes: Inter-mineral fractionation in mafic to ultramafic Hawaiian xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracke, A.; Tipper, E. T.; Klemme, S.; Bizimis, M.

    2018-04-01

    Observed differences in Mg isotope ratios between bulk magmatic rocks are small, often on a sub per mill level. Inter-mineral differences in the 26Mg/24Mg ratio (expressed as δ26Mg) in plutonic rocks are on a similar scale, and have mostly been attributed to equilibrium isotope fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Here we report Mg isotope data on minerals in spinel peridotite and garnet pyroxenite xenoliths from the rejuvenated stage of volcanism on Oahu and Kauai, Hawaii. The new data are compared to literature data and to theoretical predictions to investigate the processes responsible for inter-mineral Mg isotope fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Theory predicts up to per mill level differences in δ26Mg between olivine and spinel at magmatic temperatures and a general decrease in Δ26Mgolivine-spinel (=δ26Mgolivine - δ26Mgspinel) with increasing temperature, but also with increasing Cr# in spinel. For peridotites with a simple petrogenetic history by melt depletion, where increasing depletion relates to increasing melting temperatures, Δ26Mgolivine-spinel should thus systematically decrease with increasing Cr# in spinel. However, most natural peridotites, including the Hawaiian spinel peridotites investigated in this study, are overprinted by variable extents of melt-rock reaction, which disturb the systematic primary temperature and compositionally related olivine-spinel Mg isotope systematics. Diffusion, subsolidus re-equilibration, or surface alteration may further affect the observed olivine-spinel Mg isotope fractionation in peridotites, making Δ26Mgolivine-spinel in peridotites a difficult-to-apply geothermometer. The available Mg isotope data on clinopyroxene and garnet suggest that this mineral pair is a more promising geothermometer, but its application is restricted to garnet-bearing igneous (garnet pyroxenites) and metamorphic rocks (eclogites). Although the observed δ26Mg variation is on a sub per mill range in bulk magmatic rocks

  5. Peridote-water interaction generating migration pathways of H2-rich fluids in subduction context: Common processes in the ophiolites of Oman, New-Caledonia, Philippines and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, E. P.; Prinzhofer, A.; Pillot, D.; Vacquand, C.; Sissmann, O.

    2010-12-01

    The occurrence of H2 flows which were punctually known notably in the ophiolites of Oman, Zambales (Philippines) and Antalya (Turkey) appears to be a widespread phenomenon in these major peridotite massifs associated with ancient or active subduction processes. Similar H2-rich gas flows have been discovered also in the peridotite of New-Caledonia. H2 concentrations are locally high (commonly 60 to90% in Oman). H2 is frequently degassing in hyperalkaline springs but the highest flows were found directly expelled from fractures in the peridotites. Obviously, within the fracture systems, gas and associated hyperalkaline water separate at shallow depth close to the top of the upper aquifer level. Locally high flows of gas migrate vertically in the fractures, whereas water with degassing H2 tends to migrate laterally in the fracture network toward the creeks where most of the hyperalkaline springs are found. The genesis of natural H2 is interpreted as the result of the interaction, at depth, between ultrabasic mantle rocks in the upper plate and water expelled by the subducted sediments by oxidation of metals (Fe2+, Mn2+) and reduction of water during serpentinisation. CH4 is commonly associated to the H2-rich fluids and it is interpreted as the result of the reduction of available CO2 at depth. N2 is also commonly associated to the H2-rich fluids in the ophiolites, whereas N2 flows (within H2) were found in the subducted sediments (below the sole décollement of the peridotite) where it can be observed (Oman and New-Caledonia). Within the peridotites, the hyperalkaline water is rich in ions OH- and Ca2+ and characterized by high pH (between 11 and 12). Most alkaline springs are found in the vicinity of major faults and/or lithological discontinuities like the basal décollement of the ophiolites and the peridotite-gabbro contact (Moho). This hyperalkaline water migration induces a chain of diagenetic reactions starting at depth within the fracture systems by the

  6. Asthenospheric percolation of alkaline melts beneath the St. Paul region (Central Atlantic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Daniele; Seyler, Monique

    2010-01-01

    Two peridotite suites collected by submersible in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean (Hekinian et al., 2000) were studied for textures, modes, and in situ major and trace element compositions in pyroxenes. Dive SP12 runs along the immersed flank of the St. Peter and Paul Rocks islets where amphibole-bearing, ultramafic mylonites enriched in alkalies and incompatible elements are exposed (Roden et al., 1984), whereas dive SP03 sampled a small intra-transform spreading centre situated about 370 km east of the St. Peter and Paul Rocks. Both suites are characterized by undeformed, coarse-grained granular textures typical of abyssal peridotites, derived from residual mantle after ˜ 15% melting of a DMM source, starting in the garnet stability field. Trace element modelling, textures and lack of mineral zoning indicate that the residual peridotites were percolated, reacted and refertilized by ˜ 2.6% partially aggregated melts in the uppermost level of the melting region. This relatively large amount of refertilization is in agreement with the cold and thick lithosphere inferred by previous studies. Freezing of trapped melts occurred as the peridotite entered the conductive layer, resulting in late-stage crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, spinel, ± plagioclase. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns in clinopyroxenes from SP03 indicate that they last equilibrated with (ultra-) depleted partial melts. In contrast, REE concentrations in clinopyroxenes from SP12 display U and S shaped LREE-enriched patterns and the calculated compositions of the impregnating melts span the compositional range of the regional basalts, which vary from normal MORB to alkali basalt sometimes modified by chromatographic fractionation with no, or very limited, mineral reaction. Thus the mylonitic band forming the St. Peter and St. Paul Rocks ridge is not a fragment of subcontinental lithospheric mantle left behind during the opening of the Central Atlantic, nor the source of the alkaline basalts

  7. Trace element partitioning between aqueous fluids and silicate melts measured with a proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, J.; Green, T.H. [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia). School of Earth Sciences; Sie, S.H. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1996-12-31

    A series of experiments were performed to examine the capacity of H{sub 2}O-fluids to concentrate and transport incompatible elements through peridotitic mantle and metamorphosed (eclogitic) ocean crust. Two naturally occurring rock compositions, trondhjemitic and basanitic, were used in experiments. The proton microprobe was used to determine the trace element concentrations in the solutes from H{sub 2}O-fluids equilibrated at 900-1100 degree C, 2.0 GPa with water saturated melts of trondhjemitic and basanitic compositions. Partitioning data for H{sub 2}O-fluids and silicate melts show that H{sub 2}O-fluids equilibrated with mantle peridotites will not be strongly enriched in trace elements relative to their wallrocks, and thus they melts do not strongly concentrate alkaline earths Th and U, relative to high-field strength elements. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  8. Chemical erosion and hydrologic budget for the Susure karst plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikić Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The karst plateau of Susure, about 4.5 km2 in surface area, is situated on the Jadovnik eastern offset, western Serbia. The plateau is a morphologic unit higher 15 m to 30 m than the surrounding terrain. The unit consists of crushed and karstified Middle Triassic limestones. Numerous hydrogeological and geomorphologic features of the plateau are attractive for visitors in this economically underdeveloped country. Rocks building up the surrounding terrain are largely peridotites. Surface streams flow neither into nor off the plateau. Atmospheric precipitations discharge to evapotanspiration and filtration underground. More than eighteen constant springs at the limestone/peridotite tectonic contact drain fracture aquifers on the karst plateau border. Measured precipitations and springflows were the input and output data for accounting water budget of an aquifer of Middle Triassic limestones in the Susure plateau.

  9. The diamondiferous roots of our wandering continent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurney, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    Mantle xenoliths and minerals, including diamonds, found in the mainly Cretaceous kimberlites on the Kalahari craton provide evidence for the stabilization of a thick pool predominantly peridotitic continental nucleus in the Archaean. This was followed by widespread formation of lesser amounts of eclogite added to the lithosphere throughout the Proterozoic. Most diamonds were derived from the Archaean peridotite and Proterozoic eclogite and were liberated into kimberlite by xenolith disaggregation. The mantle lithosphere is heterogeneous and has undergone considerable modification by such processes as intrusive igneous activity, metasomatism of different styles, subsolidus metamorphism, deformation and probably the recycling of oceanic crust throughout much of its history. Diamond formation and preservation is similarly complex. The kimberlite-borne mantle sample provides a unique window of information about continental evolution in which the diamonds and their occasional encapsulated inclusions play a key role. 88 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  10. The role of eclogite in the mantle heterogeneity at Cape Verde

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Abigail Katrine; Holm, Paul Martin; Troll, Valentin R.

    2014-01-01

    The Cape Verde hotspot, like many other Ocean Island Basalt provinces, demonstrates isotopic heterogeneity on a 100–200 km scale. The heterogeneity is represented by the appearance of an EM1-like component at several of the southern islands and with a HIMU-like component present throughout...... have been limited. We apply the minor elements in olivine approach (Sobolev et al. in Nature 434:590–597, 2005; Science, doi:10.1126/science.1138113, 2007), to determine and quantify the contributions of peridotite, pyroxenite and eclogite melts to the mantle heterogeneity observed at Cape Verde. Cores...... of olivine phenocrysts of the Cape Verde volcanics have low Mn/FeO and low Ni*FeO/MgO that deviate from the negative trend of the global array. The global array is defined by mixing between peridotite and pyroxenite, whereas the Cape Verde volcanics indicate contribution of an additional eclogite source...

  11. Trace element partitioning between aqueous fluids and silicate melts measured with a proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, J; Green, T H [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde, NSW (Australia). School of Earth Sciences; Sie, S H [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1997-12-31

    A series of experiments were performed to examine the capacity of H{sub 2}O-fluids to concentrate and transport incompatible elements through peridotitic mantle and metamorphosed (eclogitic) ocean crust. Two naturally occurring rock compositions, trondhjemitic and basanitic, were used in experiments. The proton microprobe was used to determine the trace element concentrations in the solutes from H{sub 2}O-fluids equilibrated at 900-1100 degree C, 2.0 GPa with water saturated melts of trondhjemitic and basanitic compositions. Partitioning data for H{sub 2}O-fluids and silicate melts show that H{sub 2}O-fluids equilibrated with mantle peridotites will not be strongly enriched in trace elements relative to their wallrocks, and thus they melts do not strongly concentrate alkaline earths Th and U, relative to high-field strength elements. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  12. The 3.1 Ga Nuggihalli chromite deposits, Western Dhawar craton (India)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukherjee, Ria; Mondal, Sisir K.; Frei, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Nuggihalli greenstone belt is part of the older greenstone belts (3.4 - 3.0 Ga) in the Western Dharwar Craton, southern India. This greenstone sequence consists of conformable metavolcanic and metasedimentary supracrustal rock assemblages that belong to the Sargur Group. Sill-like ultramafic......-mafic plutonic bodies are present within these supracrustal rocks (schist rocks) which are in turn enclosed by tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite gneiss (TTG). The sill-like ultramafic-mafic rocks are cumulates derived from a high-Mg parental magma that are represented by chromitite-hosted serpentinite...... and tremolite-chlorite-actinolite- schist (altered peridotite), anorthosite, pyroxenite, and gabbro hosting magnetite bands. The first whole-rock Sm-Nd data for the peridotite anorthosite- pyroxenite-gabbro unit has been obtained yielding an age of 3125 ± 120 Ma (MSWD = 1.3) which is similar to reported ages...

  13. Mineral compositions of plutonic rocks from the Lewis Hills massif, Bay of Islands ophiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan E.; Elthon, Don

    1988-01-01

    Mineral compositions of residual and cumulate rocks from the Lewis Hills massif of the Bay of Islands ophiolite complex are reported and interpreted in the context of magnetic processes involved in the geochemical evolution of spatially associated diabase dikes. The mineral compositions reflect greater degrees of partial melting than most abyssal peridotites do and appear to represent the most depleted end of abyssal peridotite compositions. Subsolidus equilibration between Cr-Al spinal and olivine generally has occurred at temperatures of 700 to 900 C. The spinel variations agree with the overall fractionation of basaltic magmas producing spinels with progressively lower Cr numbers. The compositions of clinopyroxenes suggest that the fractionation of two different magma series produced the various cumulate rocks.

  14. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    primitive basalts and trachybasalts but also more evolved samples from the retroarc region and the larger volcanoes Payún Matrú and Payún Liso are presented. The samples cover a broad range of compositions from intraplate lavas similar to ocean island basalts to arc andesites. A common feature found...... are isotopically similar to the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone arc rocks and their mantle source possibly resembled the source of South Atlantic N-MORB prior to addition of fluids and melts from the subduction channel. However, it must have been more enriched than the estimates of depleted upper mantle from...... the lithosphere is thinnest and possibly in areas of elevated mantle temperatures. The pyroxenite melts formed at deeper levels react with the surrounding peridotite and thereby changes composition leading to eruption of melts which experienced variable degrees of melt-peridotite interaction. This can presumably...

  15. Serpentinite with and without brucite: A reaction pathway analysis of a natural serpentinite in the Josephine ophiolite, California

    OpenAIRE

    Sonzogni, Yann; Treiman, Allan H.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.

    2017-01-01

    A partially serpentinized peridotite from the Josephine ophiolite has been studied in detail in order to characterize the chemical processes of its serpentinization. The original rock was harzburgite, and its olivine and orthopyroxene are partially replaced by veins and patches of lizardite serpentine and magnetite; brucite and talc are completely absent from the serpentinite, regardless of whether the precursor mineral was olivine or pyroxene. Petrographic and mineral-chemical data suggest a...

  16. Three steps of serpentinization in an eclogitized oceanic serpentinization front (Lanzo Massif - Western Alps)

    OpenAIRE

    DEBRET, Baptiste; NICOLLET, christian; ANDREANI, Muriel; SCHWARTZ, Stéphane; GODARD, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    The Lanzo peridotite massif is a fragment of oceanic lithosphere generated in an ocean-continent transition context and eclogitized during alpine collision. Despite the subduction history, the massif has preserved its sedimentary oceanic cover, suggesting that it may have preserved its oceanic structure. It is an exceptional case for studying the evolution of a fragment of the lithosphere from its oceanization to its subduction and then exhumation. We present a field and petrological study re...

  17. Mid-ocean ridge serpentinite in the Puerto Rico Trench: Accretion, alteration, and subduction of Cretaceous seafloor in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, F.; Marschall, H.; Bowring, S. A.; Horning, G.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinite is believed to be one of the main carriers of water and fluid mobile elements into subduction zones, but direct evidence for serpentinite subduction has been elusive. The Antilles island arc is one of only two subduction zones worldwide that recycles slow-spreading oceanic lithosphere where descending serpentinite is both exposed by faulting and directly accessible on the seafloor. Here we examined serpentinized peridotites dredged from the North Wall of the Puerto Rico Trench (NWPRT) to assess their formation and alteration history and discuss geological ramifications resulting from their emplacement and subduction. Lithospheric accretion and serpentinization occurred, as indicated by U-Pb geochronology of hydrothermally altered zircon, at the Cretaceous Mid-Atlantic Ridge (CMAR). In addition to lizardite-rich serpentinites with pseudomorphic textures after olivine and pyroxene typical for static serpentinization at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges, recovered samples include non-pseudomorphic antigorite-rich serpentinites that are otherwise typically associated with peridotite at convergent plate boundaries. Antigorite-serpentinites have considerably lower Fe(III)/Fetot and lower magnetic susceptibilities than lizardite-serpentinites with comparable Fetot contents. Rare earth element (REE) contents of lizardite-serpentinites decrease linearly with increasing Fe(III)/Fetot of whole rock samples, suggesting that oxidation during seafloor weathering of serpentinite releases REEs to seawater. Serpentinized peridotites recorded multifaceted igneous and high- to low-temperature hydrothermal processes that involved extensive chemical, physical, and mineralogical modifications of their peridotite precursors with strong implications for our understanding of the accretion, alteration, and subduction of slow-spreading oceanic lithosphere.

  18. Compositional Variation of Chrome Spinels in the Ore-bearing Zones of the Kraka Ophiolite and the Chromitite Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Saveliev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a chemical variation of accessory and ore-forming chrome spinels from the Kraka ultramafic massif at the different scales, from the deposit to the thin section. A correlation analysis of compositional and structural features of ultramafic rocks and ores was performed. The ultramafic rocks and chromitites in the studied massif show the distinct deformation structures and tectonite olivine fabric. A typical chemical gap (i.e. Cr#=Cr/(Cr+Al was observed between peridotite, on the one hand, and dunite and chromitite, on the other hand, on the scale of deposits and ore-bearing zones. The location and size of this gap depend on the type of deposit. The gap becomes wider from the disseminated tabular bodies to the typical podiform ones. It has been found that in the thin initial dunite veinlets in peridotite the chrome spinels chemistry changes gradually and there is no Cr# gap between peridotite and dunite. The dunite venlets show a strong olivine fabric, which is an evidence of their high-temperature plastic flow origin. It has been revealed that new chrome spinel grains previously formed as rods or needles and then coarsened. We explained this observation as the result of impurity segregation, coalescence and spheroidization induced by the plastic deformation of olivine. It is inferred that a solid crystal flow is the main requirement for the dunite and chromitite body formation in the Kraka ophiolite massif. In the solid stream, the mineral phase separation takes place. For example, olivine and orthopyroxene grains of parental peridotite separate from one another, and weaker (more mobile olivine grains form dunite bodies in which chromitite appears as a result of impurity segregation.

  19. Neutron activation analysis of the rare earth elements in rocks from the earth's upper mantle and deep crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stosch, H.-G.; Koetz, J.; Herpers, U.

    1986-01-01

    Three techniques for analyzing rare earth elements (REE) in geological materials are described, i.e. instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), neutron activation analysis with pre-irradiation chemical REE separation (PCS-NAA) and radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA). The knowledge of REE concentrationd in eclogites, peridotites and minerals from the earth's lower crust and upper mantle is very useful in constraining their petrogenetic history. (author)

  20. First find of serpentinite in the cliffs of the Heracleian Peninsula of Southwestern Crimea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, L. I.; Promyslova, M. Yu.; Koronovskii, N. V.; Tzarev, V. V.

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports on the geological position and composition of serpentinite and serpentinitized peridotite, which we were the first to find in the cliffs of the southern part of the Heracleian Peninsula of Southwestern Crimea. In combination with pillow lava, gabbro, fragments of parallel dikes, and jasper, these rocks form an ophiolite association, which formerly belonged to the ancient crust of a back-arc basin that had reached the spreading stage of development.

  1. The geology and mineral deposits of Tantalite Valley, Warmbad district, South West Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Backstroem, J.W.

    1976-04-01

    The Tantalite Valley Complex, a poorly mineralised (Cu and Ni sulphides) body of roughly concentric peridotite-gabbroid intrusions was emplaced along a major zone of dislocation (the Tantallite Valley Lineament) into a metasedimentary sequence of migmatites and gneisses which, together with the complex, have experienced a complex metamorphic and tectonic history. A number of large mineralised pegmatites (producers of minerals of Nb, Ta, Bi, Li and Be over the past two decades), was intruded about 1000 Ma ago [af

  2. Timing of pyroxenite formation in supra-subduction Josephine Ophiolite, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, T.; Le Roux, V.; Kurz, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Josephine ophiolite is a partly dismembered ophiolite located in southern Oregon and northwestern California (USA). It displays a large ( 640 km2) mantle section that is mostly composed of depleted spinel harzburgite and lherzolite re-equilibrated at temperatures of 900 °C. In addition, the peridotite section of the ophiolite contains minor dunites and pyroxenite veins ranging from orthopyroxenites to clinopyroxenites. Using field, petrological and geochemical data, previous studies have shown that the peridotite experienced 10-20% of hydrous flux melting. In addition, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene in harzburgites show variable degrees of light rare-earth element (LREE) enrichment, which suggests percolation and re-equilibration with small fractions of boninite melt. Overall, the trace element concentrations of pyroxenes indicate that the harzburgites experienced particularly high degrees of melting in the mantle wedge. We collected a number of orthopyroxenite and clinopyroxenite veins in the mantle section of the Josephine Ophiolite. Here we present the major and rare-earth element (REE) contents of pyroxene in 4 orthopyroxenites and 2 clinopyroxenites and calculate the major element and REE closure temperatures for individual veins. We show that individual pyroxenites record drastic variations in their degree of REE depletion, indicating that multiple generations of melts percolated the peridotite. The pyroxenite veins also record higher REE closure temperatures (>1200 ºC) compared to the surrounding peridotite, potentially indicating rapid cooling after emplacement. REE closure temperatures are also higher than major element closure temperatures. In parallel, we analyzed Sr isotopes by MC-ICPMS in pyroxene separates from 4 veins. Results indicate that the maximum age of emplacement of orthopyroxenite veins corresponds to the age of exhumation. Some clinopyroxenites may have formed during earlier melt percolation events. This study supports the idea that

  3. Alkaline and Carbonate-rich Melt Metasomatism and Melting of Subcontinental Lithospheric Mantle: Evidence from Mantle Xenoliths, NE Bavaria, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Špaček, Petr; Magna, T.; Ulrych, Jaromír; Svojtka, Martin; Hegner, E.; Balogh, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 12 (2013), s. 2597-2633 ISSN 0022-3530 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1170 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : peridotite * metasomatism * subcontinental lithosphere * Sr-Nd-Li isotopes * microstructure Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 4.485, year: 2013

  4. New evidence for the asthenospheric origin of the Cameroon Volcanic Line from 1D shear wave velocities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tokam, AP

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available the mantle composition beneath Ethiopia and southern Brazil (Keranen et al., 2009; Julia et al., 2008). Many petrological studies of ultramafic orogenic massifs and ultramafic xenoliths along the CVL (mainly around Mount Cameroon and the Adamawa....N. and Oya, M. 2010. Petrological and chemical variability of peridotite xenoliths from the Cameroon Volcanic Line, West Africa: an evidence from Plume emplacement. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences, 107, 57-69. McKenzie, D...

  5. Origin and the mechanical properties of asbestos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hanley, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    Dual networks and chemographic analysis are used to investigate the stability of lizardite and chrysotile in the simplest multisystem that describes serpentinization. Phase diagrams for Mg serpentinites described by MgO-SiO/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O are constructed for systems of five, six and seven phases using dual networks. The seven-phase system brucite, forsterite, lizardite, chrysotile, antigorite, enstatite, and talc describes the serpentinization of Mg peridotites. The chrysotile asbestos deposits of southeastern Quebec occur in serpentinized peridotites of Ordovician ophiolites. The asbestos is localized in veins within blocks of partly serpentinized peridotite bounded by zones containing schistose serpentinite and granitic masses. A simple, rapid microscopic test was designed to obtain semi-quantitative measurements of the bending strength of acicular or fibrous crystals. The instrument was tested on samples of asbestiform tremolite from Baltimore, Maryland, and non-asbestiform tremolite from the Warren Head mine in New Hampshire. The samples ranged in size from 0.3 to 0.8 mm in length and 0.9 to 15 ..mu..m in diameter. The asbestiform tremolite was stronger than the non-asbestiform tremolite at every diameter, with an order of magnitude higher strength at small diameters. This indicates that asbestiform tremolite behaves as a whisker, whereas non-asbestiform tremolite does not.

  6. Elastic and electrical properties and permeability of serpentinites from Atlantis Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon-Suarez, Ismael; Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Tim A.; North, Laurence J.; Best, Angus I.; Rouméjon, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    Serpentinized peridotites co-exist with mafic rocks in a variety of marine environments including subduction zones, continental rifts and mid-ocean ridges. Remote geophysical methods are crucial to distinguish between them and improve the understanding of the tectonic, magmatic and metamorphic history of the oceanic crust. But, serpentinite peridotites exhibit a wide range of physical properties that complicate such a distinction. We analysed the ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities (Vp, Vs) and their respective attenuation (Qp-1, Qs-1), electrical resistivity and permeability of four serpentinized peridotite samples from the southern wall of the Atlantis Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, collected during International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 357. The measurements were taken over a range of loading-unloading stress paths (5-45 MPa), using ∼1.7 cm length, 5 cm diameter samples horizontally extracted from the original cores drilled on the seafloor. The measured parameters showed variable degrees of stress dependence, but followed similar trends. Vp, Vs, resistivity and permeability show good inter-correlations, while relationships that included Qp-1 and Qs-1 are less clear. Resistivity showed high contrast between highly serpentinized ultramafic matrix (>50 Ω m) and mechanically/geochemically altered (magmatic/hydrothermal-driven alteration) domains (serpentinization and the alteration state of the rock, contrasted by petrographic analysis. This study shows the potential of combining seismic techniques and controlled source electromagnetic surveys for understanding tectonomagmatic processes and fluid pathways in hydrothermal systems.

  7. Calcium Isotopic Composition of Bulk Silicate Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J.; Ionov, D. A.; Liu, F.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Huang, F.

    2016-12-01

    Ca isotopes are used to study the accretion history of the Earth and terrestrial planets, but, Ca isotopic composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) remains poorly constrained [1]. To better understand the Ca isotopic composition of BSE, we analyzed 22 well studied peridotite xenoliths from Tariat (Mongolia), Vitim (southern Siberia) and Udachnaya (Siberian Craton). These samples include both fertile and highly depleted garnet and spinel peridotites that show no or only minor post-melting metasomatism or alteration. Ca isotope measurements were done on a Triton-TIMS using double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The data are reported as δ44/40Ca (relative to NIST SRM 915a). Results for geostandards are consistent with those from other laboratories. 2 standard deviations of SRM 915a analyses are 0.13‰ (n=48). δ44/40Ca of both and fertile and refractory peridotites range from 0.79 to 1.07‰ producing an average of 0.93±0.12‰ (2SD). This value defines the Ca isotopic composition of the BSE, which is consistent with the average δ44/40Ca of oceanic basalts ( 0.90‰)[2,3]. [1] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292; [2] Valdes et al (2014) EPSL 394; [3]DePaolo (2004) RMG 55.

  8. Formation of pyroxenite layers in the Totalp ultramafic massif (Swiss Alps) - Insights from highly siderophile elements and Os isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Acken, David; Becker, Harry; Walker, Richard J.; McDonough, William F.; Wombacher, Frank; Ash, Richard D.; Piccoli, Phil M.

    2010-01-01

    Pyroxenitic layers are a minor constituent of ultramafic mantle massifs, but are considered important for basalt generation and mantle refertilization. Mafic spinel websterite and garnet-spinel clinopyroxenite layers within Jurassic ocean floor peridotites from the Totalp ultramafic massif (eastern Swiss Alps) were analyzed for their highly siderophile element (HSE) and Os isotope composition. Aluminum-poor pyroxenites (websterites) display chondritic to suprachondritic initial γOs (160 Ma) of -2 to +27. Osmium, Ir and Ru abundances are depleted in websterites relative to the associated peridotites and to mantle lherzolites worldwide, but relative abundances (Os/Ir, Ru/Ir) are similar. Conversely, Pt/Ir, Pd/Ir and Re/Ir are elevated. Aluminum-rich pyroxenites (clinopyroxenites) are characterized by highly radiogenic 187Os/ 188Os with initial γOs (160 Ma) between +20 and +1700. Their HSE composition is similar to that of basalts, as they are more depleted in Os, Ir and Ru compared to Totalp websterites, along with even higher Pt/Ir, Pd/Ir and Re/Ir. The data are most consistent with multiple episodes of reaction of mafic pyroxenite precursor melts with surrounding peridotites, with the highest degree of interaction recorded in the websterites, which typically occur in direct contact to peridotites. Clinopyroxenites, in contrast, represent melt-dominated systems, which retained the precursor melt characteristics to a large extent. The melts may have been derived from a sublithospheric mantle source with high Pd/Ir, Pt/Ir and Re/Os, coupled with highly radiogenic 187Os/ 188Os compositions. Modeling indicates that partial melting of subducted, old oceanic crust in the asthenosphere could be a possible source for such melts. Pentlandite and godlevskite are identified in both types of pyroxenites as the predominant sulfide minerals and HSE carriers. Heterogeneous HSE abundances within these sulfide grains likely reflect subsolidus processes. In contrast, large grain

  9. Modes and implications of mantle and lower-crust denudation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Timothy John

    Slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (Cann, 1993, Cannat, 1993). Extension at mid-ocean ridges is most commonly manifested by slip on high angle (˜60°) normal faults that dip into, and define the rift valley walls (Smith and Cann, 1993). Less commonly, extension occurs by long periods of slip along low-angle normal faults that penetrate to structurally deep levels of oceanic lithosphere and denude gabbro and/or pendotite to the seafloor in domal massifs termed "oceanic core complexes" (Dick et al., 1981; Dick et al., 1991; Tucholke et al., 1998; Mutter and Karson, 1992; Cann et al., 1997; MacLeod et al., 2002). This dissertation addresses processes and implications of tectonic extension at two oceanic core complexes. Atlantis Massif (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is formed dominantly of serpentinized peridotite with lesser gabbro, and Atlantis Bank (57°E, Southwest Indian Ridge) is dominated by gabbro. Localization of brittle strain at Atlantis Massif occurred by reaction-softening processes associated with metasomatic alteration of peridotite and serpentmite to amphibole-, chlorite- and talc-bearing assemblages. Ductile strain at Atlantis Massif and Atlantis Bank is localized into intervals of highly-fractionated, oxide-rich gabbro. Two-oxide geothermometry of gabbro indicates that it was not penetratively deformed below ˜500°C. Denuded peridotite at Atlantis Massif is host to hydrothermal circulation driven in part by exothermic serpentinization reactions. Serpentinization decreases the seismic velocity of peridotite and leads to acquisition of a magnetic signature. Venting of highly-alkaline, methane- and hydrogen-rich serpentinization-derived fluids leads to lithification of seafloor carbonate ooze by precipitation of carbonate cement in a zone of mixing with "normal" seawater. This process may be the primary depositional mechanism of ophicalcite deposits and likely occurs wherever peridotite is exposed near the Earth's surface and is fractured to permit water

  10. Carbonatite and silicate melt metasomatism of the mantle surrounding the Hawaiian plume: Evidence from volatiles, trace elements, and radiogenic isotopes in rejuvenated-stage lavas from Niihau, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jacqueline; Clague, David A.; Cousens, Brian; Monsalve, Maria Luisa; Uhl, Jessika

    2008-09-01

    We present new volatile, trace element, and radiogenic isotopic compositions for rejuvenated-stage lavas erupted on Niihau and its submarine northwest flank. Niihau rejuvenated-stage Kiekie Basalt lavas are mildly alkalic and are isotopically similar to, though shifted to higher 87Sr/86Sr and lower 206Pb/204Pb than, rejuvenated-stage lavas erupted on other islands and marginal seafloor settings. Kiekie lavas display trace element heterogeneity greater than that of other rejuvenated-stage lavas, with enrichments in Ba, Sr, and light-rare earth elements resulting in high and highly variable Ba/Th and Sr/Ce. The high Ba/Th lavas are among the least silica-undersaturated of the rejuvenated-stage suite, implying that the greatest enrichments are associated with the largest extents of melting. Kiekie lavas also have high and variable H2O/Ce and Cl/La, up to 620 and 39, respectively. We model the trace element concentrations of most rejuvenated-stage lavas by small degrees (˜1% to 9%) of melting of depleted peridotite recently metasomatized by a few percent of an enriched incipient melt (0.5% melting) of the Hawaiian plume. Kiekie lavas are best explained by 4% to 13% partial melting of a peridotite source metasomatized by up to 0.2% carbonatite, similar in composition to oceanic carbonatites from the Canary and Cape Verde Islands, with lower proportion of incipient melt than that for other rejuvenated-stage lavas. Primary H2O and Cl of the carbonatite component must be high, but variability in the volatile data may be caused by heterogeneity in the carbonatite composition and/or interaction with seawater. Our model is consistent with predictions based on carbonated eclogite and peridotite melting experiments in which (1) carbonated eclogite and peridotite within the Hawaiian plume are the first to melt during plume ascent; (2) carbonatite melt metasomatizes plume and surrounding depleted peridotite; (3) as the plume rises, silica-undersaturated silicate melts are also

  11. Distribution of lithium in the Cordilleran Mantle wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, J. W.; Jean, M. M.; Seitz, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Enriched fluid-mobile element (i.e., B, Li, Be) concentrations in peridotites from the Coast Range ophiolite are compelling evidence that this ophiolite originated in a subduction environment. A new method presented in Shervais and Jean (2012) for modeling the fluid enrichment process, represents the total addition of material to the mantle wedge source region and can be applied to any refractory mantle peridotite that has been modified by melt extraction and/or metasomatism. Although the end-result is attributed to an added flux of aqueous fluid or fluid-rich melt phase derived from the subducting slab, in the range of tens of parts per million - the nature and composition of this fluid could not be constrained. To address fluid(s) origins, we have analyzed Li isotopes in bulk rock peridotite and eclogite, and garnet separates, to identify possible sources, and fluid flow mechanisms and pathways. Bulk rock Li abundances of CRO peridotites (δ7Li = -14.3 to 5.5‰; 1.9-7.5 ppm) are indicative of Li addition and δ7Li-values are lighter than normal upper mantle values. However, Li abundances of clino- and orthopyroxene appear to record different processes operating during the CRO-mantle evolution. Low Li abundances in orthopyroxene (2 ppm) record subsequent interaction with Li-enriched fluids (or melts). The preferential partitioning of lithium in clinopyroxene could be indicative of a particular metasomatic agent, e.g., fluids from a dehydrating slab. Future in-situ peridotite isotope studies via laser ablation will further elucidate the fractionation of lithium between orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and serpentine. To obtain a more complete picture of the slab to arc transfer processes, we also measured eclogites and garnet separates to δ7Li= -18 to 3.5‰ (11.5-32.5 ppm) and δ7Li= 1.9 to 11.7‰ (0.7-3.9 ppm), respectively. In connection with previous studies focused on high-grade metamorphic assemblages within the Franciscan complex, an overall framework exists

  12. Significado de las deformaciones internas en las peridotitas de Sierra Alpujata (Málaga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubía, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ronda peridotites rest at the base of the Los Reales nappe (Alpujarride Complex, Betic Chain. Two successive plastic deformations are imprinted in the Sierra Alpujata peridotites. The first one is a high temperature (> 1000º C -low stress (0.3-0.5 Kb deformation as show by coarse-grained porphyroclastic lherzolites. This deformation can take place by mantle flow in a spreading zone related to continental rifting. The second deformation. at low temperature (~8000º C and high stress (1-2 Kb, erase the last one at the edge rones of the peridotite sheet, giving the mylonitisation of peridotites and the development of dynamothermal aureoles in the wall rocks, This deformation is due to the thrusting of a mantle slab over the continental crust. The kinematic analysis of the high and low-temperature ultrabasic tectonites provides, in the present position of the Betic Chain a N 70º E direction for the paleorift. The peridotite thrusting is practically realized in the same direction, from the WSW to the ENE.

    Las peridotitas de Ronda (Málaga forman la base del manto de Los Reales (Alpujárrides, Cordilleras Béticas. Las rocas ultrabásicas del macizo de Sierra Alpujata permiten reconocer dos deformaciones plásticas sucesivas. La primera es una deformación de altas temperaturas (> 1.000ºC y bajos esfuerzos (0.3-0.5 Kb que se conserva en lherzolitas con textura porfiroclástica de grano grueso. Esta deformación puede atribuirse al flujo del manto en una zona de expansión relacionada a procesos de "rifting" continental. La segunda deformación, de bajas temperaturas (~800ºC y altos esfuerzos (1-2 Kb, oblitera a la anterior en las zonas de borde de la lámina peridotítica, produciendo la milonitización de las peridotitas y el desarrollo de aureolas dinamotérmicas en los materiales encajantes. Esta deformación se debe al cabalgamiento de una escama del manto sobre la corteza continental. El análisis cinemático de las tectonitas

  13. Silica-enriched mantle sources of subalkaline picrite-boninite-andesite island arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénard, A.; Arculus, R. J.; Nebel, O.; Ionov, D. A.; McAlpine, S. R. B.

    2017-02-01

    Primary arc melts may form through fluxed or adiabatic decompression melting in the mantle wedge, or via a combination of both processes. Major limitations to our understanding of the formation of primary arc melts stem from the fact that most arc lavas are aggregated blends of individual magma batches, further modified by differentiation processes in the sub-arc mantle lithosphere and overlying crust. Primary melt generation is thus masked by these types of second-stage processes. Magma-hosted peridotites sampled as xenoliths in subduction zone magmas are possible remnants of sub-arc mantle and magma generation processes, but are rarely sampled in active arcs. Published studies have emphasised the predominantly harzburgitic lithologies with particularly high modal orthopyroxene in these xenoliths; the former characteristic reflects the refractory nature of these materials consequent to extensive melt depletion of a lherzolitic protolith whereas the latter feature requires additional explanation. Here we present major and minor element data for pristine, mantle-derived, lava-hosted spinel-bearing harzburgite and dunite xenoliths and associated primitive melts from the active Kamchatka and Bismarck arcs. We show that these peridotite suites, and other mantle xenoliths sampled in circum-Pacific arcs, are a distinctive peridotite type not found in other tectonic settings, and are melting residues from hydrous melting of silica-enriched mantle sources. We explore the ability of experimental studies allied with mantle melting parameterisations (pMELTS, Petrolog3) to reproduce the compositions of these arc peridotites, and present a protolith ('hybrid mantle wedge') composition that satisfies the available constraints. The composition of peridotite xenoliths recovered from erupted arc magmas plausibly requires their formation initially via interaction of slab-derived components with refractory mantle prior to or during the formation of primary arc melts. The liquid

  14. Unraveling multiple phases of sulfur cycling during the alteration of ancient ultramafic oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Johnston, David T.

    2018-02-01

    Ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems - characterized by ongoing serpentinization reactions - exert an important influence on the global sulfur cycle. Extensive water-rock interaction causes elemental exchange between seawater and the oceanic lithosphere, effectively removing sulfate from seawater through both abiogenic and biogenic processes. Here, we use bulk rock multiple sulfur isotope signatures (32S, 33S, 34S) and in situ sulfide analyses together with petrographic observations to track the sulfur cycling processes and the hydrothermal evolution of ancient peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems. We investigate serpentinized peridotites from the Northern Apennine ophiolite in Italy and the Santa Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica and compare those with the Iberian Margin (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 149 and 173) and the 15°20‧N Fracture Zone along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (ODP Leg 209). In situ measurements of sulfides in the Northern Apennine serpentinites preserve a large range in δ34Ssulfide of -33.8 to +13.3‰ with significant heterogeneities within single sulfide grains and depending on mineralogy. Detailed mineralogical investigation and comparison with bulk rock Δ33Ssulfide and in situ δ34Ssulfide data implies a thermal evolution of the system from high temperatures (∼350 °C) that allowed thermochemical sulfate reduction and input of hydrothermal sulfide to lower temperatures (rock associated with detachment faulting along a mid-ocean ridge spreading center. The Santa Elena peridotites preserve distinct signatures for fluid circulation at high temperatures with both closed system thermochemical sulfate reduction and input of mafic-derived sulfur. In addition, the peridotites provide strong evidence that low Ca2+ concentrations in peridotite-hosted systems can limit sulfate removal during anhydrite precipitation at temperatures above 150 °C. This may play a central role for the availability of sulfate to microbial communities within these

  15. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of serpentinite from the Ingalls ophiolite complex, central Cascades, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, J. H., Jr.; Milliken, S. H.; Zalud, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Jurassic Ingalls ophiolite complex is located in the central Cascades, Washington State. This ophiolite predominantly consists of three variably serpentinized mantle units. Serpentinite occurs as massive replacing peridotite, or as highly sheared fault zones cutting other rocks. Mylonitic serpentinite forms a large-scale mélange in the middle of the ophiolite, and is interpreted as a fracture zone. Whole-rock and mineral geochemistry of the massive serpentinite was done to understand the metasomatic process and identify the possible protoliths of these rocks. Whole-rock major and trace elements of the massive serpentinite are similar to modern peridotites. The majority of samples analyzed are strongly serpentinized, while a few were moderately to weakly altered. Ca, Mg, and Al suggest these rocks formed from serpentinized harzburgite and dunite with minor lherzolite. All samples have positive Eu/Eu*. Serpentinites plot in fields defined by modern abyssal and forearc peridotites. Trace elements suggests the protoliths underwent variable amounts of mantel depletion (5-20%). Serpentine and relic igneous minerals were analyzed by EPMA at the Florida Center for Analytical Electron Microscopy. The serpentine dose not chemically display brucite mixing, has minor substitution of Fe, Ni, and Cr for Mg, and minor Al substitution for Si. Bastites have higher Ni than replaced olivine. Mineral chemistry, high LOI, and X-ray diffraction suggest lizardite is the primary serpentine polymorph, with minor chrysotile also occurring. Relic Al-chromite and Cr-spinel commonly have Cr-magnetite rims. These relic cores have little SiO2 and Fe3+, suggesting the spinels are well preserved. Most spinels plot in overlap fields defined by abyssal and arc peridotite, while two samples plot entirely in arc fields. Relic olivine have Fo90 to Fo92 and plot along the mantle array. Relic pyroxene are primarily enstatite, with lesser high-Ca varieties. Relic minerals plot near fields defined by

  16. Preliminary data on mantle xenoliths from the Feldstein basalt (Thuringia, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuła, Anna; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Milke, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Feldstein is an isolated outcrop of columnar basaltic rock nearby Themar, located 60 km south-west of Erfurt (Thuringia, Germany). The Feldstein alkali basalt (ca. 16.3 Ma) belongs to the Heldburger Gangschar subset of the Central European Volcanic Province (Abratis et al. 2007). The Feldstein alkali basalt contains peridotitic xenoliths, which were the subject of our study. Two groups of spinel peridotite xenoliths occur in the Feldstein basalt. Group A spinel peridotite (2 xenoliths) is characterized by protogranular texture with typical grain size of 2 - 3 mm (max 8 mm). It consists of olivine (90.28 - 91.36 % Fo, 0.35 - 0.45 wt. % NiO), orthopyroxene (mg# 0.91 - 0.92, Al 0.09 - 0.18 a pfu), clinopyroxene (mg# 0.93 - 0.95, Al 0.06 - 0.21 a pfu) and spinel (cr# 0.20 - 0.41, mg# 0.66 - 0.78). The mg# and Al content in clinopyroxene are negatively correlated following the depletion trend after variable degrees of partial melting of the same source. One of the studied samples contains clinopyroxene that does not plot on the general depletion trend but has significantly higher Al (0.15 - 0.21 a pfu) for similar mg # 0.93 - 0.94 with clinopyroxenes from this trend. However the primitive mantle normalized clinopyroxene REE patterns (concave upwards with LaN/YbN=0.11) indicate that they are the residues after elevated degrees of partial melting. The most magnesian clinopyroxene that is Ca-rich and Al-poor has REE abundances, typical for strongly depleted spinel peridotites. It has concave upwards primitive mantle normalized pattern and LaN/YbN=0.61. A slight increase of LaN and CeN with inflection point at PrN has been observed as well. The group B spinel peridotites have protogranular texture (3-4 mm, max 7 mm grains) and some of them contain several melt pockets of basaltic composition. It consists of olivine (88.95 - 91.32 % Fo, 0.34 - 0.47 wt.% NiO), orthopyroxene (mg# 0.90 - 0.93, Al 0.04 - 0.16 apfu) and clinopyroxene (mg# 0.90 - 0.93, Al 0.10 - 0.20 a pfu). The

  17. The helium flux from the continents and ubiquity of low-3He/4He recycled crust and lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James M. D.; Barry, Peter H.; Hilton, David R.; Burgess, Ray; Pearson, D. Graham; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2015-03-01

    New helium isotope and trace-element abundance data are reported for pyroxenites and eclogites from South Africa, Siberia, and the Beni Bousera Massif, Morocco that are widely interpreted to form from recycled oceanic crustal protoliths. The first He isotope data are also presented for Archaean peridotites from the Kaapvaal (South Africa), Slave (Canada), and Siberian cratons, along with recently emplaced off-craton peridotite xenoliths from Kilbourne Hole, San Carlos (USA) and Vitim (Siberia), to complement existing 3He/4He values obtained for continental and oceanic peridotites. Helium isotope compositions of peridotite xenoliths vary from 7.3 to 9.6 RA in recently (volcanics that contain a contribution from asthenospheric sources. Using the new He isotope data for cratonic peridotites and assuming that significant portions (>50%) of the Archaean and Proterozoic continental lithospheric mantle are stable and unaffected by melt or fluid infiltration on geological timescales (>0.1 Ga), and that U and Th contents vary between cratonic lithosphere and non-cratonic lithosphere, calculations yield a 3He flux of 0.25-2.2 atoms/s/cm2 for the continental lithospheric mantle. These estimates differ by a factor of ten from non-cratonic lithospheric mantle and are closer to the observed 3He flux from the continents (<1 atoms/s/cm2). Pyroxenites and eclogites from the continental regions are all characterized by 3He/4He (0.03-5.6 RA) less than the depleted upper mantle, and relatively high U and Th contents. Together with oceanic and continental lithospheric peridotites, these materials represent reservoirs with low time-integrated 3He/(U + Th) in the mantle. Pyroxenites and eclogites are also characterized by higher Fe/Mg, more radiogenic Os-Pb isotope compositions, and more variable δ18O values (∼3‰ to 7‰), compared with peridotitic mantle. These xenoliths are widely interpreted to be the metamorphic/metasomatic equivalents of recycled oceanic crustal protoliths. The

  18. How to make a craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Chin, E. J.; Erdman, M.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Lederer, G. W.; Savage, P. S.; Zhong, S.; Zincone, S.

    2013-12-01

    Most Archean cratons are underlain by long-lived 200-300 km thick thermal boundary layers, significantly thicker than oceanic boundary layers, which eventually subduct. The longevity of cratons is perplexing because cold thermal boundary layers should be gravitationally unstable or should thermally erode with time. However, it is agreed that thermal contraction of the cratonic root is compensated by intrinsic compositional buoyancy due to extreme melt depletion. This melt depletion is also thought to have dehydrated the peridotitic residue, strengthening the cratonic mantle, making it resistant to thermo-mechanical erosion. Exactly how cratonic mantle arrives at this chemically buoyant and dehydrated state is unknown. Possible scenarios include formation by melting within a large plume head, accretion of oceanic lithosphere, and accretion of sub-arc mantle. The high degrees of melting would seem to imply formation in hot plume heads, but low Al and heavy rare earth element contents suggest formation in the spinel stability field, implying formation at shallower depths than their current equilibration pressures. We present a new thermobarometer designed to estimate the average melting pressures and temperatures of residual peridotites using whole rock major element compositions. We find that the average melting pressures and temperatures of cratonic peridotites range between 3-4 GPa and 1600 °C. If cratonic peridotites melted via adiabatic decompression, these average pressures represent maximum bounds on the final pressures of melt extraction. Currently, cratonic peridotites derive from 4-7 GPa, implying that the building blocks of peridotites experienced an increase of 1-3 GPa, equivalent to 30-90 km of overburden. Our results thus imply that cratonic mantle most likely formed by tectonic thickening of oceanic or arc lithospheres. But because both arc and oceanic lithospheres might be expected to be wet due to hydrous flux melting and serpentinization

  19. Deformation associated with the denudation of mantle-derived rocks at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 13°-15°N: The role of magmatic injections and hydrothermal alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazo, Suzanne; Cannat, Mathilde; Delacour, AdéLie; EscartíN, Javier; RouméJon, StéPhane; Silantyev, Sergei

    2012-09-01

    Outcrops of deeply derived ultramafic rocks and gabbros are widespread along slow spreading ridges where they are exposed in the footwall of detachment faults. We report on the microstructural and petrological characteristics of a large number of samples from ultramafic exposures in the walls of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) axial valley at three distinct locations at lat. 13°N and 14°45'N. One of these locations corresponds to the footwall beneath a corrugated paleo-fault surface. Bearing in mind that dredging and ROV sampling may not preserve the most fragile lithologies (fault gouges), this study allows us to document a sequence of deformation, and the magmatic and hydrothermal history recorded in the footwall within a few hundred meters of the axial detachment fault. At the three sampled locations, we find that tremolitic amphiboles have localized deformation in the ultramafic rocks prior to the onset of serpentinization. We interpret these tremolites as hydrothermal alteration products after evolved gabbroic rocks intruded into the peridotites. We also document two types of brittle deformation in the ultramafic rocks, which we infer could produce the sustained low magnitude seismicity recorded at ridge axis detachment faults. The first type of brittle deformation affects fresh peridotite and is associated with the injection of the evolved gabbroic melts, and the second type affects serpentinized peridotites and is associated with the injection of Si-rich hydrothermal fluids that promote talc crystallization, leading to strain localization in thin talc shear zones. We also observed chlorite + serpentine shear zones but did not identify samples with serpentine-only shear zones. Although the proportion of magmatic injections in the ultramafic rocks is variable, these characteristics are found at each investigated location and are therefore proposed as fundamental components of the deformation in the footwall of the detachment faults associated with denudation of

  20. 187Os/188Os of boninites from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana forearc, IODP Exp 352

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, D. E.; Nelson, W. R.; Reagan, M. K.; Pearce, J. A.; Godard, M.; Shervais, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) subduction zone is an ideal laboratory in which to study the evolution of a subduction zone from its initiation to the development of modern-day arc volcanism. Boninite lavas were produced in the IBM forearc region during the early stages of subduction and are thought to have been generated by flux melting the previously depleted mantle wedge. Mariana forearc mantle peridotites record unradiogenic 187Os/188Os signatures (0.1193-0.1273) supporting the existence of variably depleted mantle in this region (Parkinson et al., 1998). In order to understand the connection between the regional mantle, slab-derived fluids, and the generation of boninites, Re-Os isotopic data were measured on subset of boninite-series lavas obtained during IODP Expedition 352. Preliminary age-corrected (48 Ma) 187Os/188Os isotopic data for boninite-series lavas (sites U1439C and U1442A) are unradiogenic to modestly radiogenic (0.1254-0.1390) compared to primitive mantle (0.1296), consistent with Os isotopic data from boninite sands from the Bonin Islands (0.1279-0.1382; Suzuki et al., 2011). The least radiogenic boninites have 187Os/188Os (< 0.1296) values consistent with average MORB mantle recorded globally by abyssal peridotites (0.1238 ± 0.0042; Rudnick & Walker, 2009). However, boninite lavas were not derived from the most refractory ancient mantle recorded by Mariana peridotites. Unradiogenic boninites generally have higher Os abundances (0.043-0.567 ppb), whereas more radiogenic boninites have low Os abundances (0.015-0.036). Due to their low Os abundances, the moderately radiogenic isotopic signatures may be the result of interaction with highly radiogenic seawater or incorporation of radiogenic sediment (e.g. Suzuki et al. 2011). However, the radiogenic values could also be the result of fluid flux from the subducting Pacific plate.

  1. Magnesium isotopic composition of the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, F.; Li, W.; Ke, S.; Marty, B.; Huang, S.; Dauphas, N.; Wu, F.; Helz, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of Mg isotopic composition of the Earth not only are important for understanding its geochemistry but also can shed light on the accretion history of the Earth as well as the evolution of the Earth-Moon system. However, to date, the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth is still poorly constrained and highly debated. There is uncertainty in the magnitude of Mg isotope fractionation at mantle temperatures and whether the Earth has a chondritic Mg isotopic composition or not. To constrain further the Mg isotopic composition of the mantle and investigate the behavior of Mg isotopes during igneous differentiation, we report >200 high-precision (δ26Mg French Polynesian volcanoes (Society island and Cook Austral chain); 3) olivine grains from Hawaiian volcanoes (Kilauea, Koolau and Loihi) and 4) peridotite xenoliths from Australia, China, France, Tanzania and USA. Global oceanic basalts and peridotite xenoliths have a limited (<0.2 ‰) variation in Mg isotopic composition, with an average δ26Mg = -0.25 relative to DSM3. Olivines from Hawaiian lavas have δ26Mg ranging from -0.43 to +0.03, with most having compositions identical to basalts and peridotites. Therefore, the mantle’s δ26Mg value is estimated to be ~ -0.25 ± 0.1 (2SD), different from that reported by Wiechert and Halliday (2007; δ26Mg = ~ 0) but similar to more recent studies (δ26Mg = -0.27 to -0.33) (Teng et al. 2007; Handler et al. 2009; Yang et al., 2009). Moreover, we suggest the Earth, as represented by the mantle, has a Mg isotopic composition similar to chondrites (δ26Mg = ~-0.33). The need for a model such as that of Wiechert and Halliday (2007) that involves sorting of chondrules and calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions in the proto planetary disc is thus not required to explain the Mg isotopic composition of the Earth.

  2. Stochastic melting of the marble cake mantle: Evidence from local study of the East Pacific Rise at 12050'N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prinzhofer, A.; Lewin, E.; Allegre, C.J.; Paris-7 Univ., 75

    1989-01-01

    Isotopes (Nd, Sr and Pb) and trace elements (REE, Ba, Sr, Rb) have been measured on a set of basaltic glasses from a restricted area (40x10 km) at 12 0 50'N on the East Pacific Rise. The huge variation of incompatible element concentrations (factor 70 for Ba concentrations), and the variable degrees of correlation between element concentrations cannot be explained by usual models of melting and fractional crystallization. A rough correlation between the Ce/Yb ratio and the isotopic ratios favors a ''source effect'' for the genesis of the glasses. We have developed a model including both partial melting process acting on a heterogeneous mantle source with two components (peridotites and pyroxenites; ''marble cake mantle'' of Allegre and Turcotte) and fractional crystallization. The purpose of this model is not to obtain values of the four parameters involved (degree of melting in the peridotites, in the pyroxenites, proportion of pyroxenites involved in the melting, degree of fractional crystallization) for each analyzed glass, but to model the whole set of glasses by stochastic genesis and sampling of liquids. We have used the stochastic procedure for the four controlled parameters, currently generating 10,000 ''samples''. Our preferred model for this portion of the East Pacific Ridge is obtained with a degree of melting in the peridotites and in the pyroxenites varying uniformly from 6 to 20%, and from 6 to 50% respectively. The degree of mixing between liquids issued from the two sources varies from 0 to 100%, and the degree of fractional crystallization remains small, without noticeable effect on the concentrations, varying from 0 to 6%. (orig.)

  3. The nature of crustal reflectivity at the southwest Iberian margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffett, G. G.; Torne, M.; Carbonell, R.; Melchiorre, M.; Vergés, J.; Fernàndez, M.

    2017-11-01

    Reprocessing of multi-channel seismic reflection data acquired over the northern margin of the Gulf of Cádiz (SW Iberian margin) places new constraints on the upper crustal structure of the Guadalquivir-Portimão Bank. The data presented have been processed with optimized stacking and interval velocity models, a better approach to multiple attenuation, preserved amplitude information to derive the nature of seismic reflectivity, and accurate time-to-depth conversion after migration. The reprocessed data reveal a bright upper crustal reflector just underneath the Paleozoic basement that spatially coincides with the local positive free-air gravity high called the Gulf of Cádiz Gravity High. To investigate the nature of this reflector and to decipher whether it could be associated with pieces of mantle material emplaced at upper crustal levels, we calculated its reflection coefficient and compared it to a buried high-density ultramafic body (serpentinized peridotite) at the Gorringe Bank. Its reflection coefficient ratio with respect to the sea floor differs by only 4.6% with that calculated for the high-density ultramafic body of the Gorringe Bank, while it differs by 35.8% compared to a drilled Miocene limestone unconformity. This means that the Gulf of Cádiz reflector has a velocity and/or density contrast similar to the peridotite at the Gorringe Bank. However, considering the depth at which it is found (between 2.0 and 4.0 km) and the available geological information, it seems unlikely that the estimated shortening from the Oligocene to present is sufficient to emplace pieces of mantle material at these shallow levels. Therefore, and despite the similarity in its reflection coefficient with the peridotites of the Gorringe Bank, our preferred interpretation is that the upper crustal Gulf of Cádiz reflector represents the seismic response of high-density intracrustal magmatic intrusions that may partially contribute to the Gulf of Cádiz Gravity High.

  4. Petrology and geochemistry of the high-Cr podiform chromitites of the Köycegiz ophiolite, southwest Turkey: implications for the multi-stage evolution of the oceanic upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fahui; Yang, Jingsui; Dilek, Yildirim; Wang, ChunLian; Hao, Xiaolin; Xu, Xiangzhen; Lian, Dongyang

    2018-03-01

    Ophiolites exposed across the western Tauride belt in Turkey represent tectonically emplaced fragments of oceanic lithosphere obducted onto the continental margin following the closure of the Neotethys Ocean during the Late Cretaceous. The ultramafic massif of Köycegiz, which is located in the ophiolitic belt of southwestern Turkey, is a major source of metallurgical chromitite ore. The massif comprises a base of tectonized harzburgite with minor dunite overlain by a magmatic sequence of wehrlite, pyroxenite, troctolite and gabbro. Only sparse refractory chromitites occur within the harzburgites; in contrast, the upper and middle sections of the peridotite sequence contain abundant metallurgical chromitites. The peridotites record abundant evidence of mantle metasomatism on various scales, as the Fo values of olivine in harzburgite are 90.1-95.4, whereas those in dunite are 90.1-91.8. The compositions of the melts passing through the peridotites changed gradually from arc tholeiite to boninite due to melt-rock reactions, thus producing more Cr-rich chromitites in the upper part of the body. Most of the chromitites have high Cr numbers (77-78), although systematic changes in the compositions of the olivine and chromian spinel occur from the harzburgites to the dunite envelopes to the chromitites, reflecting melt-rock reactions. The calculated ΔlogfO2 (FMQ) values range from - 2.77 to + 1.03 in the chromitites, - 2.73 to -0.01 in the harzburgites, and - 1.65 to + 0.45 in the dunites. All of the available evidence suggests that the Köycegiz ophiolite formed in a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) mantle wedge. These models indicate that the harzburgites represent the products of first-stage melting and low degrees of melt-rock interaction that occurred in a mid-ocean ridge (MOR) environment. In contrast, the chromitites and dunites represent the products of second-stage melting and related refertilization, which occurred in an SSZ environment.

  5. Structural evolution of the Semail Ophiolite metamorphic sole, Wadi Hawasina and Northern Jebel Nakhl Culmination, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, C.; Bailey, C.; Visokay, L.; Scharf, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Semail ophiolite is the world's largest and best-exposed ophiolite sequence, however the processes associated with both oceanic detachment and later emplacement onto the Arabian continental margin remain enigmatic. This study examines the upper mantle section of the ophiolite, its associated metamorphic sole, and the autochthonous strata beneath the ophiolite at two locations in northern Oman. Our purpose is to understand the structural history of ophiolite emplacement and evaluate the deformation kinematics of faulted and sheared rocks in the metamorphic sole. At Wadi Hawasina, the base of the ophiolite is defined by a 5- to 15-m thick zone of penetratively-serpentinized mylonitic peridotite. Kinematic indicators record top-to-the SW (reverse) sense-of-shear with a triclinic deformation asymmetry. An inverted metamorphic grade is preserved in the 300- to 500-m thick metamorphic sole that is thrust over deep-water sedimentary rocks of the Hawasina Group. The study site near Buwah, in the northern Jebel Nakhl culmination, contains a N-to-S progression of mantle peridotite, metamorphic sole, and underlying Jurassic carbonates. Liswanite crops out in NW-SE trending linear ridges in the peridotite. The metamorphic sole includes well-foliated quartzite, metachert, and amphibolite. Kinematic evidence indicates that the liswanite and a serpentinized mélange experienced top to-the north (normal) sense-of-shear. Two generations of E-W striking, N-dipping normal faults separate the autochthonous sequence from the metamorphic sole, and also cut out significant sections of the metamorphic sole. Fabric analysis reveals that the metamorphic sole experienced flattening strain (K<0.2) that accumulated during pure shear-dominated general shear (Wk<0.4). Normal faulting and extension at the Buwah site indicates that post-ophiolite deformation is significant in the Jebel Akhdar and Jebel Nakhl culminations.

  6. Gravity driven and in situ fractional crystallization processes in the Centre Hill complex, Abitibi Subprovince, Canada: Evidence from bilaterally-paired cyclic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, R. D.; Fowler, A. D.

    1996-12-01

    The formation of layers in mafic intrusions has been explained by various processes, making it the subject of much controversy. The concept that layering originates from gravitational settling of crystals has been superseded in recent years by models involving in situ fractional crystallization. Here we present evidence from the Centre Hill complex that both processes may be operative simultaneously within the same intrusion. The Centre Hill complex is part of the Munro Lake sill, an Archean layered mafic intrusion emplaced in volcanic rocks of the Abitibi Subprovince. The Centre Hill complex comprises the following lithostratigraphic units: six lower cyclic units of peridotite and clinopyroxenite; a middle unit of leucogabbro; six upper cyclic units of branching-textured gabbro (BTG) and clotted-textured gabbro (CTG), the uppermost of these units being overlain by a marginal zone of fine-grained gabbro. The cyclic units of peridotite/clinopyroxenite and BTG/CTG are interpreted to have formed concurrently through fractional crystallization, associated with periodic replenishment of magma to the chamber. The units of peridotite and clinopyroxenite formed by gravitational accumulation of crystals that grew under the roof. The cyclic units of BTG and CTG formed along the upper margin of the sill by two different mechanisms: (1) layers of BTG crystallized in situ along an inward-growing roof and (2) layers of CTG formed by accumulation of buoyant plagioclase crystals. The layers of BTG are characterized by branching pseudomorphs after fayalite up to 50 cm in length that extend away from the upper margin. The original branching crystals are interpreted to have grown from stagnant intercumulus melt in a high thermal gradient resulting from the injection of new magma to the chamber.

  7. Rare Mineralogy in Alkaline Ultramafic Rocks, Western Kentucky Fluorspar District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W.

    2017-12-01

    The alkaline ultramafic intrusive dike complex in the Western Kentucky Fluorspar District contains unusual mineralogy that was derived from mantle magma sources. Lamprophyre and peridotite petrologic types occur in the district where altered fractionated peridotites are enriched in Rare Earth Elements (REE) and some lamprophyre facies are depleted in incompatible elements. Unusual minerals in dikes, determined by petrography and X-ray diffraction, include schorlomite and andradite titanium garnets, astrophyllite, spodumene, niobium rutile, wüstite, fluoro-tetraferriphlogopite, villiaumite, molybdenite, and fluocerite, a REE-bearing fluoride fluorescent mineral. Mixing of MVT sphalerite ore fluids accompanies a mid-stage igneous alteration and intrusion event consistent with paragenetic studies. The presence of lithium in the spodumene and fluoro-tetraferriphlogopite suggests a lithium phase in the mineral fluids, and the presence of enriched REE in dikes and fluorite mineralization suggest a metasomatic event. Several of these rare minerals have never been described in the fluorspar district, and their occurrence suggests deep mantle metasomatism. Several REE-bearing fluoride minerals occur in the dikes and in other worldwide occurrences, they are usually associated with nepheline syenite and carbonatite differentiates. There is an early and late stage fluoride mineralization, which accompanied dike intrusion and was also analyzed for REE content. One fluorite group is enriched in LREE and another in MREE, which suggests a bimodal or periodic fluorite emplacement. Whole-rock elemental analysis was chondrite normalized and indicates that some of the dikes are slightly enriched in light REE and show a classic fractionation enrichment. Variations in major-element content; high titanium, niobium, and zirconium values; and high La/Yb, Zr/Y, Zr/Hf, and Nb/Ta ratios suggest metasomatized lithospheric-asthenospheric mantle-sourced intrusions. The high La/Yb ratios in some

  8. Serpentinization reaction pathways: implications for modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janecky, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental seawater-peridotite reaction pathways to form serpentinites at 300/sup 0/C, 500 bars, can be accurately modeled using the EQ3/6 codes in conjunction with thermodynamic and kinetic data from the literature and unpublished compilations. These models provide both confirmation of experimental interpretations and more detailed insight into hydrothermal reaction processes within the oceanic crust. The accuracy of these models depends on careful evaluation of the aqueous speciation model, use of mineral compositions that closely reproduce compositions in the experiments, and definition of realistic reactive components in terms of composition, thermodynamic data, and reaction rates.

  9. Sources and mobility of carbonate melts beneath cratons, with implications for deep carbon cycling, metasomatism and rift initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Sebastian; Romer, Rolf L.; Stracke, Andreas; Steenfelt, Agnete; Smart, Katie A.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Torsvik, Trond H.

    2017-05-01

    Kimberlite and carbonatite magmas that intrude cratonic lithosphere are among the deepest probes of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Their co-existence on thick continental shields is commonly attributed to continuous partial melting sequences of carbonated peridotite at >150 km depths, possibly as deep as the mantle transition zone. At Tikiusaaq on the North Atlantic craton in West Greenland, approximately 160 Ma old ultrafresh kimberlite dykes and carbonatite sheets provide a rare opportunity to study the origin and evolution of carbonate-rich melts beneath cratons. Although their Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-Li isotopic compositions suggest a common convecting upper mantle source that includes depleted and recycled oceanic crust components (e.g., negative ΔεHf coupled with > + 5 ‰ δ7Li), incompatible trace element modelling identifies only the kimberlites as near-primary low-degree partial melts (0.05-3%) of carbonated peridotite. In contrast, the trace element systematics of the carbonatites are difficult to reproduce by partial melting of carbonated peridotite, and the heavy carbon isotopic signatures (-3.6 to - 2.4 ‰ δ13C for carbonatites versus -5.7 to - 3.6 ‰ δ13C for kimberlites) require open-system fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Given that the oxidation state of Earth's mantle at >150 km depth is too reduced to enable larger volumes of 'pure' carbonate melt to migrate, it is reasonable to speculate that percolating near-solidus melts of carbonated peridotite must be silicate-dominated with only dilute carbonate contents, similar to the Tikiusaaq kimberlite compositions (e.g., 16-33 wt.% SiO2). This concept is supported by our findings from the North Atlantic craton where kimberlite and other deeply derived carbonated silicate melts, such as aillikites, exsolve their carbonate components within the shallow lithosphere en route to the Earth's surface, thereby producing carbonatite magmas. The relative abundances of trace elements of such highly

  10. Textural variability of ordinary chondrite chondrules: Implications of their formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovieva, N. G.; Mitreikina, O. B.; Granovsky, L. B.

    1994-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microprobe examination of the Raguli H3-4, Saratov L3, and Fucbin L5-6 ordinary chondrites and the analysis of preexisted data on other meteorites have shown that the variety of textural types of chondrules depends on the chemical composition of the chondrules. The comparison of bulk-rock chemistries of the chondrules by major components demonstrates that they apparently fall, like basic-ultrabasic rock, into groups of dunitic and pyroxenitic composition. This separation is further validated by the character of zoning in chondrules of the intermediate, peridotitic type. The effect is vividly demonstrated by the 'chondrule-in-chondrule' structure.

  11. Kankan diamonds (Guinea) III: δ13C and nitrogen characteristics of deep diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, T.; Harris, J. W.; Aulbach, S.; Deines, P.

    Diamonds from the Kankan area in Guinea formed over a large depth profile beginning within the cratonic mantle lithosphere and extending through the asthenosphere and transition zone into the lower mantle. The carbon isotopic composition, the concentration of nitrogen impurities and the nitrogen aggregation level of diamonds representing this entire depth range have been determined. Peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds of lithospheric origin from Kankan have carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C: peridotitic -5.4 to -2.2‰ eclogitic -19.7 to -0.7‰) and nitrogen characteristics (N: peridotitic 17-648 atomic ppm; eclogitic 0-1,313 atomic ppm; aggregation from IaA to IaB) which are generally typical for diamonds of these two suites worldwide. Geothermobarometry of peridotitic and eclogitic inclusion parageneses (worldwide sources) indicates that both suites formed under very similar conditions within the cratonic lithosphere, which is not consistent with a derivation of diamonds with light carbon isotopic composition from subducted organic matter within subducting oceanic slabs. Diamonds containing majorite garnet inclusions fall to the isotopically heavy side (δ13C: -3.1‰ to +0.9‰) of the worldwide diamond population. Nitrogen contents are low (0-126 atomic ppm) and one of the two nitrogen-bearing diamonds shows such a low level of nitrogen aggregation (30% B-centre) that it cannot have been exposed to ambient temperatures of the transition zone (>=1,400 °C) for more than 0.2 Ma. This suggests rapid upward transport and formation of some Kankan diamonds pene-contemporaneous to Cretaceous kimberlite activity. Similar to these diamonds from the asthenosphere and the transition zone, lower mantle diamonds show a small shift towards isotopic heavy compositions (-6.6 to -0.5‰, mode at -3.5‰). As already observed for other mines, the nitrogen contents of lower mantle diamonds were below detection (using FTIRS). The mutual shift of sublithospheric diamonds towards

  12. Magnetization of lower oceanic crust and upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikawa, E.

    2004-05-01

    The location of the magnetized rocks of the oceanic crust that are responsible for sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies has been a long-standing problem in geophysics. The recognition of these anomalies was a key stone in the development of the theory of plate tectonics. Our present concept of oceanic crustal magnetization is much more complex than the original, uniformly magnetized model of Vine-Matthews-Morley Hypothesis. Magnetic inversion studies indicated that the upper oceanic extrusive layer (Layer 2A of 0.5km thick) was the only magnetic layer and that it was not necessary to postulate any contribution from deeper parts of oceanic crust. Direct measurements of the magnetic properties of the rocks recovered from the sea floor, however, have shown that the magnetization of Layer 2A, together with the observations that this layer could record geomagnetic field reversals within a vertical section, is insufficient to give the required size of observed magnetic anomalies and that some contribution from lower intrusive rocks is necessary. Magnetization of oceanic intrusive rocks were observed to be reasonably high enough to contribute to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies, but were considered somewhat equivocal until late 1980Os, in part because studies had been conducted on unoriented dredged and ophiolite samples and on intermittent DSDP/ODP cores. Since ODP Leg 118 that cored and recovered continuous 500m of oceanic intrusive layer at Site 735B, Southwest Indian Ridge with an extremely high recovery of 87 percent, there have been several ODP Legs (legs 147, 153, 176, 179 and 209) that were devoted to drilling gabbroic rocks and peridotites. In terms of the magnetization intensities, all of the results obtained from these ODP Legs were supportive of the model that a significant contribution must come from gabbros and peridotites and the source of the lineated magnetic anomalies must reside in most of the oceanic crust as well as crust-mantle boundary

  13. Metasomatised ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the young Zealandia microcontinent and its role in HIMU-like intraplate magmatism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, James M; Waight, Tod Earle; van der Meer, Quinten

    2014-01-01

    There has been long debate on the asthenospheric versus lithospheric source for numerous intraplate basalts with ocean island basalt (OIB) and high time-integrated U/Pb (HIMU)-like source signatures that have erupted through the Zealandia continental crust. Analysis of 157 spinel facies peridotitic...... is highly heterogeneous. It is composed of a refractory craton-like domain (West Otago) adjacent to several moderately fertile domains (East Otago, North Otago, Auckland Islands). Each domain has an early history decoupled from the overlying Carboniferous and younger continental crust, and each domain has...

  14. Magmatism during the accretion of the late Archaean Dharwar Craton (South India): sanukitoids and related rocks in their geological context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyen, J.-F.; Martin, H.; Jayananda, M.; Peucat, J.-J.

    2003-04-01

    The South Indian Dharwar Craton assembled during the late-Archaean (ca. 2.5 Ga). This event was associated with intense granite genesis and emplacement. Based on petrography and geochemistry, 4 main types of late Archaean granitoids were distinguished: (1) Anatectic granites (and diatexites), formed by partial melting of TTG gneisses; (2) Classical TTGs; (3) Sanukitoids, generated by interaction between slab melts (TTG) and mantle peridotite; (4) The high HFSE Closepet granite, interpreted as derived from partial melting of a mantle metasomatized by slab melts (TTG). While the 3 later groups all are interpreted as resulting from slab melt/mantle wedge interactions, their differences are related to decreasing felsic melt/peridotite ratios during the ascent “slab melts” in the mantle wedge above an active subduction zone. Field data together with geochronology and isotope geochemistry allow to subdivide the Dharwar craton into three main domains: (1) The Western Dharwar Craton (WDC) is an old (3.3 2.9 Ga ), stable continental block with limited amounts of 2.5 Ga old anatectic granites. (2) The Eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC) is subdivided into two parts: (2a) West of Kolar Schist Belt, a region of 3.0-2.7 Ga old basement intruded by 2.5 Ga old anatectic granites; (2b) East of Kolar, an area featuring mainly 2.5 Ga old diatexites and granites, derived of partial melting of a newly accreted TTG crust. Anatectic granites are ubiquitous, and late in the cratonic evolution; they witnessed generalized melting of a juvenile crust. In contrast, deep-originated granites emplaced before this melting and are restricted to the boundaries between the blocks. This structure of distinct terranes separated by narrow bands operating as channels for deep-originated magmas provides independent evidences for a two-stage evolution: an arc accretion context for the TTG, sanukitoids and related rocks, immediately followed by high temperature reworking of the newly accreted craton

  15. Major element composition of the lithospheric mantle under the North Atlantic craton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Stevenson, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    nature of the Sarfartoq mantle showing comparable degrees of depletion to other cratonic roots. Modal analyses indicate that the Sarfartoq mantle is not typified by the orthopyroxene enrichment observed in the Kaapvaal root, but shows more affinity with the Canadian Arctic (Somerset Island), Tanzania...... is compositionally layered as follows: (1) an internally stratified upper layer (70 to 180 km) consisting of coarse, un-deformed, refractory garnet-bearing and garnet-free peridotites and, (2) a lower layer (180 to 225 km) characterized by fertile, CPX-bearing, porphyroclastic garnet lherzolites. The stratification...

  16. Restitic or not? Insights from trace element content and crystal - Structure of spinels in African mantle xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaz, Davide; Musco, Maria Elena; Petrelli, Maurizio; Caldeira, Rita; De Min, Angelo; Marzoli, Andrea; Mata, Joao; Perugini, Diego; Princivalle, Francesco; Boumehdi, Moulay Ahmed; Bensaid, Idris Ali Ahmadi; Youbi, Nasrrddine

    2017-05-01

    The lithospheric architecture of Africa consists of several Archean cratons and smaller cratonic fragments, stitched together and flanked by polycyclic fold belts. Here we investigate the structure and chemistry of spinels from lithospheric mantle xenoliths from distinct tectonic settings, i.e. from the Saharan metacraton in Libya (Waw-En-Namus) which could show archaic chemical features, Cameroon (Barombi Koto and Nyos Lakes) where the Sub Continental Lithospheric Mantle was modified during the Pan-African event and fluxed by asthenospheric melts of the Tertiary Cameroon Volcanic Line and Morocco (Tafraoute, Bou-Ibalrhatene maars) in the Middle Atlas where different metasomatic events have been recorded. From a structural point of view it is to notice that the Libyan spinels can be divided into two groups having different oxygen positional parameter (u > 0.2632 and u Morocco spinels show a Tc in the range 630-760 °C. About 150 different spinels have been studied for their trace element content and it can be seen that many of them are related to Cr content, while Zn and Co are not and clearly distinguish the occurrences. Differences in the trace element chemistry, in the structural parameters and in the intracrystalline closure temperatures suggest that a different history should be considered for Cameroon, Morocco and LB I and LB II spinels. Even if it was not considered for this purpose, we tentatively used the Fe2 +/Fe3 + vs. TiO2 diagram that discriminate between peridotitic and the so-called "magmatic" spinels, i.e. spinel crystallized from melts. LB I and LB II spinels plot in the peridotitic field while Cameroon and Morocco spinels fall in the magmatic one. Consequently, the xenoliths sampled from a probably juvenile SCLM at the edge of the most important lithospheric roots (i.e. Cameroon and Morocco) apparently have spinels possibly fractionated in situ from percolating melts and do not represent a real spinel-peridotite facies. On the contrary mantle

  17. A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Deborah S.; Karson, Jeffrey A.; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Shank, Timothy M.; Butterfield, David A.; Hayes, John M.; Schrenk, Matthew O.; Olson, Eric J.; Proskurowski, Giora; Jakuba, Mike; Bradley, Al; Larson, Ben; Ludwig, Kristin; Glickson, Deborah; Buckman, Kate; Bradley, Alexander S.; Brazelton, William J.; Roe, Kevin; Elend, Mitch J.; Delacour, Adélie; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Baross, John A.; Summons, Roger E.; Sylva, Sean P.

    2005-03-01

    The serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field is a remarkable submarine ecosystem in which geological, chemical, and biological processes are intimately interlinked. Reactions between seawater and upper mantle peridotite produce methane- and hydrogen-rich fluids, with temperatures ranging from A low diversity of microorganisms related to methane-cycling Archaea thrive in the warm porous interiors of the edifices. Macrofaunal communities show a degree of species diversity at least as high as that of black smoker vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, but they lack the high biomasses of chemosynthetic organisms that are typical of volcanically driven systems.

  18. The uniquely high-temperature character of Cullinan diamonds: A signature of the Bushveld mantle plume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, N. M.; Kopylova, M.; Bussweiler, Y.; Pearson, D. G.; Gurney, J.; Davidson, J.

    2018-04-01

    The mantle beneath the Cullinan kimberlite (formerly known as "Premier") is a unique occurrence of diamondiferous cratonic mantle where diamonds were generated contemporaneously and shortly following a mantle upwelling that led to the formation of a Large Igneous Province that produced the world's largest igneous intrusion - the 2056 Ma Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC). We studied 332 diamond inclusions from 202 Cullinan diamonds to investigate mantle thermal effects imposed by the formation of the BIC. The overwhelming majority of diamonds come from three parageneses: (1) lithospheric eclogitic (69%), (2) lithospheric peridotitic (21%), and (3) sublithospheric mafic (9%). The lithospheric eclogitic paragenesis is represented by clinopyroxene, garnet, coesite and kyanite. Main minerals of the lithospheric peridotitic paragenesis are forsterite, enstatite, Cr-pyrope, Cr-augite and spinel; the sublithospheric mafic association includes majorite, CaSiO3 phases and omphacite. Diamond formation conditions were calculated using an Al-in-olivine thermometer, a garnet-clinopyroxene thermometer, as well as majorite and Raman barometers. The Cullinan diamonds may be unique on the global stage in recording a cold geotherm of 40 mW/m2 in cratonic lithosphere that was in contact with underlying convecting mantle at temperatures of 1450-1550 °C. The studied Cullinan diamonds contain a high proportion of inclusions equilibrated at temperatures exceeding the ambient 1327 °C adiabat, i.e. 54% of eclogitic diamonds and 41% of peridotitic diamonds. By contrast, ≤ 1% of peridotitic diamond inclusions globally yield equally high temperatures. We propose that the Cullinan diamond inclusions recorded transient, slow-dissipating thermal perturbations associated with the plume-related formation of the 2 Ga Bushveld igneous province. The presence of inclusions in diamond from the mantle transition zone at 300-650 km supports this view. Cullinan xenoliths indicative of the thermal state of

  19. Origin and Distribution of Water Contents in Continental and Oceanic Lithospheric Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    The water content distribution of the upper mantle will be reviewed as based on the peridotite record. The amount of water in cratonic xenoliths appears controlled by metasomatism while that of the oceanic mantle retains in part the signature of melting events. In both cases, the water distribution is heterogeneous both with depth and laterally, depending on localized water re-enrichments next to melt/fluid channels. The consequence of the water distribution on the rheology of the upper mantle and the location of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary will also be discussed.

  20. 87Sr/86Sr variations in basalts of Late Eocene-Early Miocene series in Eastern Sikhoteh-Alin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esin, S.V.; Ponomarchuk, V.A.; Shipitsyn, Yu.G.; Palesskij, Yu.G.

    1993-01-01

    Late Eocene high-alumina and Oligocene high-alumina and magnesian basalts of the Neogene calc-alkaline series from the Eastern Sikhoteh-Alin are shown to have the following 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios: 0.70390-0.70465; 0.70347-0.70401, and the 0.70330-0.70347. Analysis of variations of Sr ratios, REE, HFSE, and LILE suggests that they are the products of successive melting of a multicomponent source containing the peridotite material of OIB- and MORB-types altered by fluids to a different degree and the pelagic sediments

  1. Oceanic mantle rocks reveal evidence for an ancient, 1.2-1.3 Ga global melting event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, A. H.; Sergeev, D.; McTaminey, L.; Dale, C. W.; Meisel, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    It is now increasingly being recognized that many oceanic peridotites are refertilized harzburgites, and that the refertilization often masks an extremely refractory character of the original mantle rock 'protolith'. Oceanic peridotites are, when the effects of melt refertilization are undone, often too refractory to be simple mantle melting residues after the extraction of mid-ocean ridge basalts at a spreading center. Rhenium-osmium isotope analysis is a powerful method to look through the effects of refertilization and to obtain constraints on the age of the melting that produced the refractory mantle protolith. Rhenium-depletion model ages of such anomalously refractory oceanic mantle rocks - found as abyssal peridotites or as mantle xenoliths on ocean islands - are typically >1 Ga, i.e., much older than the ridge system at which they were emplaced. In my contribution I will show results from two case studies of refertilized anciently depleted mantle rocks (Macquarie Island 'abyssal' peridotites and Lanzarote mantle xenoliths). Interestingly, very refractory oceanic mantle rocks from sites all around the world show recurring evidence for a Mesoproterozoic (~1.2-1.3 Ga) melting event [1]. Therefore, oceanic mantle rocks seem to preserve evidence for ancient melting events of global significance. Alternatively, such mantle rocks may be samples of rafts of ancient continental lithospheric mantle. Laser-ablation osmium isotope 'dating' of large populations of individual osmium-bearing alloys from mantle rocks is the key to better constrain the nature and significance of these ancient depletion events. Osmium-bearing alloys form when mantle rocks are melted to high-degrees. We have now extracted over >250 detrital osmium alloys from placer gold occurrences in the river Rhine. These alloys are derived from outcrops of ophiolitic mantle rocks in the Alps, which include blocks of mantle rocks emplaced within the Tethys Ocean, and ultramafic lenses of unknown

  2. Mineral chemistry and geothemobarometry of mantle harzburgites in the Eastern Metamorphic Complex of Khoy ophiolite -NW Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morovvat Faridazad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Khoy ophiolite at the global scale is in the middle part of the Alp-Himalaya orogenic belt and it is extended over 3900 Km2 which indicates remnant Neotethys oceanic lithosphere in the Mesozoic era (Kananian et al., 2010. In this paper, in addition to a review of previous investigations about Khoy ophiolite, we will try to determine the nature and kind of minerals, origin and partial melting rate as well as the equilibrium pressure and temperature of harzburgites from the Eastern Metamorphic Complex of Khoy ophiolite. Materials and methods Thin sections microscopy studies were carried out following field investigations. EPMA analysis was carried out with using a Superprobe JEOL, JXA 8200 Microprobe unit at the state of WDS and under condition of 15kv accelerating voltage, 10nA current beam, 1µm beam diameter and collection of natural and synthetic standards for calibration. Results The study area is located at the NW of Iran and north of the Khoy city in the west Azarbaijan province. This area is part of the ophiolitic complex of NW Iran and belongs to its Eastern Metamorphic Complex. This metamorphic zone has large tectonically segments of the metamorphic ophiolites which mainly include serpentinized peridotites with associated metagabbros. There are three types of peridotitic rocks in this area which are: Lherzolites, harzburgites and dunites. Lherzolites are composed of olivine (60-70%, orthopyroxene (10-30% and clinopyroxene (~10-20% with minor amounts (~2% of Cr-spinel mineral. Harzburgites are composed of olivine (70-80%, orthopyroxene (10-20% and clinopyroxene (~5% with minor amounts (~2% of Cr-spinel mineral. Dunites are composed of olivine (90-95%, orthopyroxene (5-10% with minor amounts (~1-2% of Cr-spinel mineral. Composition range of olivines is between Fo89.46 Fa10.37 to Fo89.86 Fa10.0 as well as NiO content range is 018-046 (wt %. The calculated Mg# of olivines is 0.90 and the composition of olivines in Fo-Fa diagram

  3. Sulfur isotope composition of orogenic spinel lherzolite massifs from Ariege (north-eastern pyrenees, France): An ion microprobe study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaussidon, M. (Centre de Recherches Petrographiques et Geochimiques, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)); Lorand, J. (Unite associee au CNRS, Paris (France))

    1990-10-01

    The orogenic spinel lherzolite massifs from Ariege, which represent tectonically emplaced fragments of the sub-continental upper mantle, are composed mainly of variously depleted peridotites. These rocks are crosscut by two generations of pyroxenites. The first is made up of layered pyroxenites, which are interpreted either as crystal segregates from Triassic continental tholeiites or as subducted parts of the oceanic crust re-injected within the upper mantle. The second consists of amphibole-rich dikes separated from Cretaceous alkali basalts. Forty sulfide grains, occurring either as inclusions within silicates or as interstitial grains, were investigated by ion microprobe for their sulfur isotopic compositions. Comparison between sulfide inclusions in silicates and interstitial sulfide grains strongly suggests that serpentinization and pyrenean metamorphism had no significant effect don the {delta}{sup 34}S values. Likewise, these values are broadly independent of the degree of partial melting. The negative {delta}{sup 34}S values of the massive peridotites could represent an ancient depletion event in the upper mantle. By contrast, the positive {delta}{sup 34}S values observed in the layered pryoxenites and the amphibole-rich dikes indicate that the two parent magmas had in common a mantle source variously enriched in {sup 34}S. Therefore, the present study reveals two extreme reservoirs characterized by different {delta}{sup 34}S values in the upper mantle. This range of variations can explain most {delta}{sup 34}S values found in MORB, continental tholeiites, and alkali basalts.

  4. Abnormal lithium isotope composition from the ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Deloule, Etienne; Su, Ben-Xun; Ying, Ji-Feng; Santosh, M; Xiao, Yan

    2014-03-04

    Lithium elemental and isotopic compositions of olivines in peridotite xenoliths from Hebi in the North China Craton provide direct evidence for the highly variable δ(7)Li in Archean lithospheric mantle. The δ(7)Li in the cores of olivines from the Hebi high-Mg# peridotites (Fo > 91) show extreme variation from -27 to +21, in marked deviation from the δ(7)Li range of fresh MORB (+1.6 to +5.6) although the Li abundances of the olivines are within the range of normal mantle (1-2 ppm). The Li abundances and δ(7)Li characteristics of the Hebi olivines could not have been produced by recent diffusive-driven isotopic fractionation of Li and therefore the δ(7)Li in the cores of these olivines record the isotopic signature of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Our data demonstrate that abnormal δ(7)Li may be preserved in the ancient lithospheric mantle as observed in our study from the central North China Craton, which suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle has experienced modification of fluid/melt derived from recycled oceanic crust.

  5. Associated chemical and carbon isotopic composition variations in diamonds from Finsch and Premier kimberlite, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deines, P.

    1984-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of 66 inclusion-containing diamonds from the Premier kimberlite, South Africa, 93 inclusion-containing diamonds and four diamonds of two diamond-bearing peridotite xenoliths from the Finsch kimberlite, South Africa was measured. The data suggest a relationship between the carbon isotopic composition of the diamonds and the chemical composition of the associated silicates. For both kimberlites similar trends are noted for diamonds containing peridotite-suite inclusions (P-type) and for diamonds containing eclogite-suite inclusions (E-type): Higher delta 13 C P-type diamonds tend to have inclusions lower in SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , MgO, Mg/(Mg + Fe) and higher in FeO and CaO. Higher delta 13 C E-type diamonds tend to have inclusions lower in SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , MgO, Mg/(Mg + Fe), Na 2 O, K 2 O, TiO 2 and higher in CaO, Ca/(Ca + Mg). Consideration of a number of different models that have been proposed for the genesis of kimberlites, their zenoliths and diamonds shows that they are all consistent with the conclusion that in the mantle, regions exist that are characterized by different mean carbon isotopic compositions. (author)

  6. REE controls in ultramafic hosted MOR hydrothermal systems: An experimental study at elevated temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Douglas E.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2005-02-01

    A hydrothermal experiment involving peridotite and a coexisting aqueous fluid was conducted to assess the role of dissolved Cl - and redox on REE mobility at 400°C, 500 bars. Data show that the onset of reducing conditions enhances the stability of soluble Eu +2 species. Moreover, Eu +2 forms strong aqueous complexes with dissolved Cl - at virtually all redox conditions. Thus, high Cl - concentrations and reducing conditions can combine to reinforce Eu mobility. Except for La, trivalent REE are not greatly affected by fluid speciation under the chemical and physical condition considered, suggesting control by secondary mineral-fluid partitioning. LREE enrichment and positive Eu anomalies observed in fluids from the experiment are remarkably similar to patterns of REE mobility in vent fluids issuing from basalt- and peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems. This suggests that the chondrite normalized REE patterns are influenced greatly by fluid speciation effects and secondary mineral formation processes. Accordingly, caution must be exercised when using REE in hydrothermal vent fluids to infer REE sources in subseafloor reaction zones from which the fluids are derived. Although vent fluid patterns having LREE enrichment and positive Eu anomalies are typically interpreted to suggest plagioclase recrystallization reactions, this need not always be the case.

  7. Radiogenic isotopes in enriched mid-ocean ridge basalts from Explorer Ridge, northeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousens, Brian; Weis, Dominique; Constantin, Marc; Scott, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Extreme gradients in topography related to variations in magma supply are observed on the Southern Explorer Ridge (SER), part of the northern Juan de Fuca ridge system. We report radiogenic isotope (Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf) and geochemical data for twenty-four basalt whole-rock and glass samples collected from the length of the SER and from Explorer Deep, a rift to the north of the SER. Lavas from the SER form a north-south geochemical gradient, dominated by E-MORB at the northern axial high, and range from T-MORB to N-MORB towards the southern deepest part of the ridge. Linear relationships between incompatible element ratios and isotopic ratios in MORB along the ridge are consistent with mixing of magmas beneath the ridge to generate the geographic gradient from E- to N-MORB. The E-MORB have high Sr and Pb, and low Nd and Hf isotopic ratios, typical of enriched mantle that includes a FOZO or HIMU isotopic component. The West Valley and Endeavour segments of the northern Juan de Fuca ridge also include this isotopic component, but the proportion of the FOZO or HIMU component is more extreme in the SER basalts. The FOZO or HIMU component may be garnet-bearing peridotite, or a garnet pyroxenite embedded in peridotite. Recycled garnet pyroxenite better explains the very shallow SER axial high, high Nb/La and La/Sm, and the ;enriched; isotopic compositions.

  8. The evolution of Neoproterozoic magmatism in Southernmost Brazil: shoshonitic, high-K tholeiitic and silica-saturated, sodic alkaline volcanism in post-collisional basins

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    Sommer Carlos A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neoproterozoic shoshonitic and mildly alkaline bimodal volcanism of Southernmost Brazil is represented by rock assemblages associated to sedimentary successions, deposited in strike-slip basins formed at the post-collisional stages of the Brasilian/Pan-African orogenic cycle. The best-preserved volcano sedimentary associations occur in the Camaquã and Campo Alegre Basins, respectively in the Sul-riograndense and Catarinense Shields and are outside the main shear belts or overlying the unaffected basement areas. These basins are characterized by alternation of volcanic cycles and siliciclastic sedimentation developed dominantly on a continental setting under subaerial conditions. This volcanism and the coeval plutonism evolved from high-K tholeiitic and calc-alkaline to shoshonitic and ended with a silica-saturated sodic alkaline magmatism, and its evolution were developed during at least 60 Ma. The compositional variation and evolution of post-collisional magmatism in southern Brazil are interpreted as the result mainly of melting of a heterogeneous mantle source, which includes garnet-phlogopite-bearing peridotites, veined-peridotites with abundant hydrated phases, such as amphibole, apatite and phlogopite, and eventually with the addition of an asthenospheric component. The subduction-related metasomatic character of post-collisional magmatism mantle sources in southern Brazil is put in evidence by Nb-negative anomalies and isotope features typical of EM1 sources.

  9. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    We have measured Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic compositions in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite diabase dikes, and gabbro and websterite dikes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cummulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have mean 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios and standard deviations of 0.70314 +- 0.00030 and 0.70306 +- 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern midocean ridge basalt. The 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dikes range from 0.7034 to 0.7047, 0.7038 to 0.7046, and 0.7037 to 0.7061, respectively. These higher 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with seawater. Mineral separates from dikes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dikes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions

  10. Evidence of young, proximal and primary (YPP diamond source occurring in alluviums in the Santo Antônio do Bonito, Santo Inácio and Douradinho rivers in Coromandel region, Minas Gerais

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    Rogério Silvestre Pereira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Magmatism associated with the Alto Paranaíba structural high comprises kimberlites, kamafugites, and alkaline complexes, forming an approximately 400 x 150 km NW-SE belt in the southern São Francisco Craton. Dating of some intrusions reveals ages between 120 and 75 Ma. Chemical analyses of garnet recovered in alluvium from traditional diamond digging areas indicate peridotitic garnet windows in Três Ranchos and Coromandel. Six hundred and eighty (680 diamonds acquired or recovered during mineral exploration in the digging areas of Romaria, Estrela do Sul, Três Ranchos and Coromandel show unique characteristics, certain populations indicating young, proximal and primary sources (YPP. Analyses of 201 stones from Santo Antônio do Bonito, Santo Inácio and Douradinho rivers alluvium, Coromandel, present no evidence of transport, characterizing a proximal source. Within these river basins, exposures of the Late Cretaceous Capacete Formation basal conglomerate contain mainly small rounded and/or angular quartzite pebbles and of basic and ultrabasic rocks, as well as kimberlite minerals (garnet, ilmenite, spinel, sometimes diamond. A magnetotelluric profile between the Paraná and Sanfranciscana basins shows that the thick underlying lithosphere in the Coromandel region coincides with the peridotitic garnet window and with a diamond population displaying proximal source characteristics. Diamond-bearing kimberlite intrusions occur in different areas of Alto Paranaíba.

  11. Evaluation of nutrient and energy sources of the deepest known serpentinite-hosted ecosystem using stable carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Yuji; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Okumura, Tomoyo; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Hiromi Kayama; Ohara, Yasuhiko

    2018-01-01

    The Shinkai Seep Field (SSF) in the southern Mariana forearc discovered in 2010 is the deepest (~5,700 m in depth) known serpentinite-hosted ecosystem dominated by a vesicomyid clam, Calyptogena (Abyssogena) mariana. The pioneering study presumed that the animal communities are primary sustained by reducing fluid originated from the serpentinization of mantle peridotite. For understanding the nutrient and energy sources for the SSF community, this study conducted four expeditions to the SSF and collected additional animal samples such as polychaetes and crustaceans as well as sediments, fragments of chimneys developing on fissures of serpentinized peridotite, seeping fluid on the chimneys, and pore water within the chimneys. Geochemical analyses of seeping fluids on the chimneys and pore water of the chimneys revealed significantly high pH (~10) that suggest subseafloor serpentinization controlling fluid chemistry. Stable isotope systematics (carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur) among animals, inorganic molecules, and environmental organic matter suggest that the SSF animal community mostly relies on the chemosynthetic production while some organisms appear to partly benefit from photosynthetic production despite the great depth of SSF.

  12. Pyrenean hyper-extension : breaking, thinning, or stretching of the crust ? A view from the central north-Pyrenean zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saint Blanquat, Michel; Bajolet, Flora; Boulvais, Philippe; Boutin, Alexandre; Clerc, Camille; Delacour, Adélie; Deschamp, Fabien; Ford, Mary; Fourcade, Serge; Gouache, Corentin; Grool, Arjan; Labaume, Pierre; Lagabrielle, Yves; Lahfid, Abdeltif; Lemirre, Baptiste; Monié, Patrick; de Parseval, Philippe; Poujol, Marc

    2017-04-01

    The geology of the North Pyrenean Zone in the central Pyrenees allows for the observation in the field of the entire section of the Pyrenean rift, from the mantle to the crust and the Mesozoic cover (pre, syn and post rift). The good knowledge we have of the pre-Alpine history of the Pyrenees allows us to properly constrain the Alpine geological evolution of the pre-Triassic rocks which record both Variscan and Alpine orogenic cycles. The mantle outcrop as kilometric to centimetric fragments of peridotite dispersed within a carbonate metamorphic breccia. The study of peridotite serpentinisation shows several events of low-temperature serpentinisation, in contact with seawater. In some locallities, we can observe a mixture of fragments of variously serpentinized peridotites. This suggests a tectonic context where fragments of peridotites from different structural levels were sampled more or less synchronously. The granulitic basement is characterized by a Variscan syndeformational HT event (300-280 Ma). So far we have not found any trace of a Cretaceous HT event (> 500°C). On the other hand, the basement is affected by a regional metasomatism that began during the Jurassic and became more spatially focused with time until it was restricted to the Pyrenean rift during the Aptien, Albian and Cenomanian. The talc-chlorite metasomatism (120-95 Ma) shows an evolution from a static toward a syn-deformation hydrothermal event, under a more or less normal geothermal gradient. Extensional deformation is recorded by the reworking of several inherited low-angle Variscan tectonic contacts, but also by dispersed high-angle extensional shear zones formed under greenshist conditions. The metamorphic Mesozoic cover of the basement massifs, which constitute the so-called Internal Metamorphic Zone, is an allochtonous unit made of lenses of Mesozoic rocks enclosed into the breccia, which locally contains peridotite and basement clasts. The Mesozoic metamorphic carbonates show a first

  13. COMPOSITIONAL AND THERMAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LITHOSPHERIC AND ASTHENOSPHERIC MANTLE AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CONTINENTAL DELAMINATION

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    A. I. Kiselev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The lower part of lithosphere in collisional orogens may delaminate due to density inversion between the asthenosphere and the cold thickened lithospheric mantle. Generally, standard delamination models have neglected density changes within the crust and the lithospheric mantle, which occur due to phase transitions and compositional variations upon changes of P-T parameters. Our attention is focused on effects of phase and density changes that may be very important and even dominant when compared with the effect of a simple change of the thermal mantle structure. The paper presents the results of numerical modeling for eclogitization of basalts of the lower crust as well as phase composition changes and density of underlying peridotite resulted from tectonic thickening of the lithosphere and its foundering into the asthenosphere. As the thickness of the lower crust increases, the mafic granulite (basalt passes into eclogite, and density inversion occurs at the accepted crust-mantle boundary (P=20 kbar because the newly formed eclogite is heavier than the underlying peridotite by 6 % (abyssal peridotite, according to [Boyd, 1989]. The density difference is a potential energy for delamination of the eclogitic portion of the crust. According to the model, P=70 kbar and T=1300 °C correspond to conditions at the lower boundary of the lithosphere. Assuming the temperature adiabatic distribution within the asthenosphere, its value at the given parameters ranges from 1350 °C to 1400 °C. Density inversion at dry conditions occurs with the identical lithospheric and asthenospheric compositions at the expense of the temperature difference at 100 °C with the density difference of only 0.0022 %. Differences of two other asthenospheric compositions (primitive mantle, and lherzolite KH as compared to the lithosphere (abyssal peridotite are not compensated for by a higher temperature. The asthenospheric density is higher than that of the lithospheric base

  14. Trace element mobility at the slab-mantle interface: constraints from "hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocchi, M.; Tropper, P.; Mair, V.; Bargossi, G. M.; Hermann, J.

    2009-04-01

    Subduction mélanges and hybrid rocks are considered, together with mafic rocks, metasediments and serpentinite as an important volatile-bearing portion of subducting slabs (cf. Spandler et al., 2008 and references therein; Miller et al., 2009). In particular, metasomatic rocks occurring in exhumed HP mélanges have recently attracted growing interest for two main reasons: i) metasomatic rocks forming at the interface between ultramafic and crustal rocks of subducting slabs constitute new bulk compositions which can affect the redistribution of major and trace elements and modify the composition of slab fluids moving to the mantle wedge and ii) these mineral assemblages, consisting mainly of hydrous phases can potentially store and transport water at great depth in subduction zones. Ultramafic rocks belonging to the Hochwart peridotite (Ulten Zone, central-eastern Italian Alps) preserve a series of metasomatic mineral zones generated by infiltration of hydrous fluids/melts, which occurred at the gneiss-peridotite interface (Tumiati et al., 2007; Marocchi et al., 2009). The peridotite body of Mt. Hochwart represents an almost unique occurrence where subduction-related mantle metasomatism can be studied on an outcrop scale. The ultramafic body consists of metaperidotites exposed as a hectometre-size lens along a steep gully, associated to monomineralic zones that developed at the contact between the peridotite body and the garnet-bearing gneiss country rocks. The formation of the metasomatic zones composed exclusively of hydrous phases involved extensive H2O-metasomatism as already documented for the Ulten peridotites (Scambelluri et al., 2006; Marocchi et al., 2007). Whole-rock geochemistry and trace element composition of hydrous phases (phlogopite and amphibole) in different metasomatic zones indicate mobility of many elements, including elements such as Ta, which are considered to have scarce mobility in fluids. Trace element composition of accessory minerals in

  15. The peculiar case of Marosticano xenoliths: a cratonic mantle fragment affected by carbonatite metasomatism in the Veneto Volcanic Province (Northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, Valentina; Bonadiman, Costanza; Coltorti, Massimo; Florencia Fahnestock, M.; Bryce, Julia G.; Marzoli, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Tertiary Magmatic Province of Veneto, known as Veneto Volcanic Province (VVP), in the Northern Italy, represents one of the most important volcanic provinces of the Adria Plate. It is composed by five volcanic districts: Val d'Adige, Marosticano, Mts. Lessini, Berici Hills and Euganean Hills. Most of the volcanic products are relatively undifferentiated lavas, from nephelinites to tholeiites in composition. Commonly VVP nephelinites and basanites carry mantle xenoliths. This study presents a petrological characterization of the new xenolith occurrence of Marosticano and comparison with previously studied VVP xenolith populations (i.e. from the Lessinean and Val d'Adige areas), which represent off-craton lithospheric mantle fragment affected by Na-alkaline silicate metasomatism (Siena & Coltorti 1989; Beccaluva et al., 2001; Gasperini et al., 2006). Marosticano (MA) peridotites are anhydrous spinel-bearing lherzolites and harzburgites, which are geochemically well distinguishible from the other VVP mantle xenoliths. Primary minerals record the "most restitic" composition of the VVP sampled mantle, even calling the geochemical features of a sub-cratonic mantle. Olivines in both lherzolites and harzburgites show high Ni contents compared with the Fo values (Ni→ lherzolite: 2600-3620 ppm; harzburgite: 2600-3540 ppm; Fo → lh: 91-92; hz: 90-93) that follow the trend of olivine from a cratonic area (Kelemen, 1998). Orthopyroxenes have mg# values with 1:1 ratio with coexisting olivines and Al2O3 contents always 0.5 wt%) contents are also the chemical characteristics of the clinopyroxenes. On the whole both MA pyroxenes show major element contents that recall the characteristics of those from cratonic (sp-bearing) peridotites (e.g. from Greenland, South Africa and Tanzania; Downes et al., 2004). In addition, the relationship between the high Fo content of olivine and the high chromium contents (cr#=(Cr/(Cr+Al)X100); lh: 30-53; hz: 38-67) in coexisting spinel, out of

  16. Viscosity of komatiite liquid at high pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Dwyer, L.; Lesher, C. E.; Wang, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The viscosities of komatiite liquids at high pressures and temperatures are being investigated by the in-situ falling sphere technique, using the T-25 multianvil apparatus at the GSECARS 13 ID-D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, ANL. The refractory and fluid nature of komatiite and other ultramafic liquids relevant to the Earth's deep interior, presents unique challenges for this approach. To reach superliquidus temperatures we use a double reservoir configuration, where marker spheres are placed at the top of both a main melt reservoir and an overlying reservoir containing a more refractory composition. Using this approach, we have successfully measured the viscosity of a komatiite from Gorgona Island (GOR-94-29; MgO - 17.8 wt.%; NBO/T = 1.6) up to 6 GPa and 1900 K. Under isothermal conditions, viscosity increases with pressure, consistent with the depolymerized nature of the komatiite. At 1900 K, viscosity increases from 1.5 (+- 0.3) Pa s at 3.5 GPa to 3.4 (+- 0.3) Pa s at 6 GPa, corresponding to an activation volume of 2.2 cm3/mol. At high pressures, the viscosities of Gorgona Island komatiite melt are an order of magnitude higher than those measured by Liebske et al. (2005, EPSL, v. 240) for peridotite melt (MgO 37.1 wt.%; NBO/T = 2.5), and similar in magnitude to molten diopside (NBO/T = 2) (Reid et al. 2003, PEPI, v. 139). The positive pressure dependence is consistent with the reduction in interatomic space diminishing the free volume of the liquid as it is compressed. Above 6 GPa the free volume reduction may become less important with the production of high-coordinated network formers, as attributed to the reversal of the pressure dependence of viscosity for peridotite melt at ~8.5 GPa and diopside melt at ~10 GPa. Experiments at higher pressures are underway to determine if a similar viscosity maximum occurs for komatiite melt and whether its pressure is greater than 10 GPa, as suggested by the data for peridotite and diopside melts.

  17. Alkaline and carbonatite metasomatism of lithospheric mantle beneath SW Poland- Pilchowice case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwiek, Mateusz; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2014-05-01

    The Cenozoic basanites from Pilchowice (SW Poland) form volcanic plug located exactly at Intra- Sudetic Fault. These basanites belong to the Polish part of the Central European Volcanic Province and contain numerous, usually small (pfu and mg# from 0.915- 0.920 . One xenolith contains clinopyroxene with abundant spongy rims. Primary clinopyroxene is very rare and Al-enriched (mg# 0.92, 0.17 atoms of Al pfu). The spinel is Cr enriched (cr# 0.46-0.68) and is usually associated with clinopyroxene. Orthopyroxene is depleted in REE compared to primitive mantle. Orthopyroxene from majority of xenoliths are strongly LREE depleted ((La/Lu)N = 0.03-0.21). All studied peridotites contain clinopyroxene which is enriched (2 to 70 times) in REE compared to primitive mantle. Clinopyroxene patterns show relative low HREE concentration ((La/Lu)N = 4.75- 19.99), moreover patterns from three samples are convex- upward shaped with inflection point on Nd ((La/Nd)N = 0.36-0.96). Clinopyroxene- poor lithology, high cr# in spinel and LREE- depleted nature of orthopyroxene suggest that upper mantle sampled by Pilchowice basanite is a restite after partial melting. The LREE enriched composition of clinopyroxene suggest that peridotites were metasomatised. Clinopyroxene convex- upward shaped REE plots with inflection point on Nd is typical for metasomatism related with alkaline melt. On the other hand very low ratios of Ti/ Eu (24.8- 738.9) and high (La/ Yb)N (3.5- 17) ratio (Coltorti, 1999) suggest that the metasomatic agent was either a mixture of alkaline silicate melt with carbonatite or peridotite reaction with two independent agents is recorded. This study is a part of MSc thesis of the first author and was possible thanks to the project NCN 2011/03/B/ST10/06248 of Polish National Centre for Science. Coltorti, M., Bonadiman, C., Hinton, R. W., Siena, F. & Upton, B. G. J. (1999). Carbonatite metasomatism of the oceanic upper mantle: Evidence from clinopyroxenes and glasses in

  18. Constraining the Timescales of Rehydration in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals Using 3D Numerical Diffusion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, K. J.; Warren, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) are important for characterizing deep-Earth water reservoirs, but the water contents of olivine (ol), orthopyroxene (opx), and clinopyroxene (cpx) in peridotites generally do not reflect mantle equilibrium conditions. Ol is typically "dry" and decoupled from H in cpx and opx, which is inconsistent with models of partial melting and/or diffusive loss of H during upwelling beneath mid-ocean ridges. The rehydration of mantle pyroxenes via late-stage re-fertilization has been invoked to explain their relatively high water contents. Here, we use sophisticated 3D diffusion models (after Shea et al., 2015, Am Min) of H in ol, opx, and cpx to investigate the timescales of rehydration across a range of conditions relevant for melt-rock interaction and serpentinization of peridotites. Numerical crystals with 1 mm c-axis lengths and realistic crystal morphologies are modeled using recent H diffusivities that account for compositional variation and diffusion anisotropy. Models were run over timescales of minutes to millions of years and temperatures from 300 to 1200°C. Our 3D models show that, at the high-T end of the range, H concentrations in the cores of NAMs are partially re-equilibrated in as little as a few minutes, and completely re-equilibrated within hours to weeks. At low-T (300°C), serpentinization can induce considerable diffusion in cpx and opx. H contents are 30% re-equilibrated after continuous exposure to hydrothermal fluids for 102 and 105 years, respectively, which is inconsistent with previous interpretations that there is no effect on H in opx under similar conditions. Ol is unaffected after 1 Myr due to the slower diffusivity of the proton-vacancy mechanism at 300°C (2-4 log units lower than for opx). In the middle of the T range (700-1000°C), rehydration of opx and cpx occurs over hours to days, while ol is somewhat slower to respond (days to weeks), potentially allowing the decoupling observed in natural samples to

  19. Preliminary biological sampling of GT3 and BT1 cores and the microbial community dynamics of existing subsurface wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, E. A.; Stamps, B. W.; Rempfert, K. R.; Ellison, E. T.; Nothaft, D. B.; Boyd, E. S.; Templeton, A. S.; Spear, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Subsurface microbial life is poorly understood but potentially very important to the search for life on other planets as well as increasing our understanding of Earth's geobiological processes. Fluids and rocks of actively serpentinizing subsurface environments are a recent target of biological study due to their apparent ubiquity across the solar system. Areas of serpentinization can contain high concentrations of molecular hydrogen, H2, that can serve as the dominant fuel source for subsurface microbiota. Working with the Oman Drilling Project, DNA and RNA were extracted from fluids of seven alkaline wells and two rock cores from drill sites GT3 and BT1 within the Samail ophiolite. DNA and cDNA (produced via reverse transcription from the recovered RNA) were sequenced using universal primers to identify microbial life across all three domains. Alkaline subsurface fluids support a microbial community that changes with pH and host-rock type. In peridotite with pH values of >11, wells NSHQ 14 and WAB 71 have high relative abundances of Meiothermus, Methanobacterium, the family Nitrospiraceae, and multiple types of the class Dehalococcoidia. While also hosted in peridotite but at pH 8.5, wells WAB 104 and 105 have a distinct, more diverse microbial community. This increased variance in community make-up is seen in wells that sit near/at the contact of gabbro and peridotite formations as well. Core results indicate both sampled rock types host a very low biomass environment subject to multiple sources of contamination during the drilling process. Suggestions for contaminant reduction, such as having core handlers wear nitrile gloves and flame-sterilizing the outer surfaces of core rounds for biological sampling, would have minimal impact to overall ODP coreflow and maximize the ability to better understand in situ microbiota in this low-biomass serpentinizing subsurface environment. While DNA extraction was successful with gram amounts of crushed rock, much can be

  20. Cr diffusion in MgAl2O4 synthetic spinels: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, C.; Celata, B.; Andreozzi, G.; Perinelli, C.; Misiti, V.

    2012-04-01

    Chromian spinel is an accessory phase common in crustal and mantle rocks, including peridotites, gabbros and basalts. Spinel, it has been identified as one of the most effective, sensible, and versatile petrogenetic indicator in mafic and ultramafic rock systems due to the strict interdependence between its physico-chemical properties (chemical composition, cation configuration etc.) and genetic conditions (temperature, pressure, and chemical characteristics of the system). In particular, studies on intra- and inter-crystalline Mg-Fe2+, Cr-Al exchange demonstrated the close relationship between spinel composition and both degree of partial melting and equilibrium temperature of spinel-peridotites. Moreover, studies focused on the chemical zoning of Mg-Fe2+ and/or Cr-Al components in spinel have been used, combined with a diffusion model, to provide quantitative information on peridotites and gabbros pressure-temperature paths and on deformation mechanisms. Although these potentials, most of the experimental studies have been performed on spinels hosting a limited content of divalent iron (sensu stricto, MgAl2O4), whereas the scarce studies on Cr-Al inter-diffusion coefficient have been performed at 3-7 GPa as pressure boundary condition. In order to contribute to the understanding of processes occurring in the lithospheric mantle, we have initiated an experimental research project aiming at determining the Cr-Al inter-diffusion in spinel at 2 GPa pressure and temperature ranging from 1100 to 1250 °C. The experiments were performed in a end-loaded piston cylinder by using a 19 mm assembly and graphite-Pt double capsules. As starting materials we used synthetic Mg-Al spinel (200-300 μm in size) and Cr2O3 powder. Microanalyses of experimental charge were performed on polished carbon-coated mounts by electronic microprobe. Line elemental analyses were made perpendicular to the contact surface between Cr2O3 powder and spinel, at interval of 2 μm. By processing these

  1. Geochemical characteristics and tectonic setting of the Tuerkubantao mafic-ultramafic intrusion in West Junggar, Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Deng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mineral chemistry, whole-rock major oxide, and trace element compositions have been determined for the Tuerkubantao mafic-ultramafic intrusion, in order to understand the early Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the West Junggar orogenic belt at the southern margin of the Central Asian orogenic belt. The Tuerkubantao mafic-ultramafic intrusion is a well-differentiated complex comprising peridotite, olivine pyroxenite, gabbro, and diorite. The ultramafic rocks are mostly seen in the central part of the intrusion and surrounded by mafic rocks. The Tuerkubantao intrusive rocks are characterized by enrichment of large ion lithophile elements and depleted high field strength elements relative to N-MORB. In addition, the Tuerkubantao intrusion displays relatively low Th/U and Nb/U (1.13–2.98 and 2.53–7.02, respectively and high La/Nb and Ba/Nb (1.15–4.19 and 37.7–79.82, respectively. These features indicate that the primary magma of the intrusion was derived from partial melting of a previously metasomatized mantle source in a subduction setting. The trace element patterns of peridotites, gabbros, and diorite in the Tuerkubantao intrusion have sub-parallel trends, suggesting that the different rock types are related to each other by differentiation of the same primary magma. The intrusive contact between peridotite and gabbro clearly suggest that the Tuerkubantao is not a fragment of an ophiolite. However, the Tuerkubantao intrusion displays many similarities with Alaskan-type mafic-ultramafic intrusions along major sutures of Phanerozoic orogenic belts. Common features include their geodynamic setting, internal lithological zoning, and geochemistry. The striking similarities indicate that the middle Devonian Tuerkubantao intrusion likely formed in a subduction-related setting similar to that of the Alaskan-type intrusions. In combination with the Devonian magmatism and porphyry mineralization, we propose that subduction of the oceanic slab has

  2. Constraining Mantle Differentiation Processes with La-Ce and Sm-Nd Isotope Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willig, M.; Stracke, A.

    2016-12-01

    Cerium (Ce) and Neodymium (Nd) isotopic ratios in oceanic basalts reflect the time integrated La-Ce and Sm-Nd ratios, and hence the extent of light rare earth element element (LREE) depletion or enrichment of their mantle sources. New high precision Ce-Nd isotope data from several ocean islands define a tight array in ԑCe-ԑNd space with ԑNd = -8.2±0.4 ԑCe + 1.3±0.9 (S.D.), in good agreement with previous data [1, 2]. The slope of the ԑCe-ԑNd array and the overall isotopic range are sensitive indicators of the processes that govern the evolution of the mantle's LREE composition. A Monte Carlo approach is employed to simulate continuous mantle-crust differentiation by partial melting and recycling of crustal materials. Partial melting of mantle peridotites produces variably depleted mantle and oceanic crust, which evolve for different time periods, before the oceanic crust is recycled back into the mantle including small amounts of continental crust (GLOSS [3]). Subsequently, depleted mantle and recycled materials of variable age and composition melt, and the respective melts mix in different proportions. Mixing lines strongly curve towards depleted mantle, and tend to be offset from the data for increasingly older and more depleted mantle. Observed ԑCe-ԑNd in ridge [1] and ocean island basalts and the slope of the ԑCe-ԑNd array therefore define upper limits for the extent and age of LREE depletion preserved in mantle peridotites. Very old average mantle depletion ages (> ca. 1-2 Ga) for the bulk of the mantle are difficult to reconcile with the existing ԑCe-ԑNd data, consistent with the range of Nd-Hf-Os model ages in abyssal peridotites [4-6]. Moreover, unless small amounts of continental crust are included in the recycled material, it is difficult to reproduce the relatively shallow slope of the ԑCe-ԑNd array, consistent with constraints from the ԑNd - ԑHf mantle array [7]. [1] Makishima and Masuda, 1994 Chem. Geol. 118, 1-8. [2] Doucelance et al

  3. Formation of cratonic lithosphere: An integrated thermal and petrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Claude; Rudnick, Roberta

    2012-09-01

    The formation of cratonic mantle peridotite of Archean age is examined within the time frame of Earth's thermal history, and how it was expressed by temporal variations in magma and residue petrology. Peridotite residues that occupy the lithospheric mantle are rare owing to the effects of melt-rock reaction, metasomatism, and refertilization. Where they are identified, they are very similar to the predicted harzburgite residues of primary magmas of the dominant basalts in greenstone belts, which formed in a non-arc setting (referred to here as "non-arc basalts"). The compositions of these basalts indicate high temperatures of formation that are well-described by the thermal history model of Korenaga. In this model, peridotite residues of extensive ambient mantle melting had the highest Mg-numbers, lowest FeO contents, and lowest densities at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga. These results are in good agreement with Re-Os ages of kimberlite-hosted cratonic mantle xenoliths and enclosed sulfides, and provide support for the hypothesis of Jordan that low densities of cratonic mantle are a measure of their high preservation potential. Cratonization of the Earth reached its zenith at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga when ambient mantle was hot and extensive melting produced oceanic crust 30-45 km thick. However, there is a mass imbalance exhibited by the craton-wide distribution of harzburgite residues and the paucity of their complementary magmas that had compositions like the non-arc basalts. We suggest that the problem of the missing basaltic oceanic crust can be resolved by its hydration, cooling and partial transformation to eclogite, which caused foundering of the entire lithosphere. Some of the oceanic crust partially melted during foundering to produce continental crust composed of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). The remaining lithosphere gravitationally separated into 1) residual eclogite that continued its descent, and 2) buoyant harzburgite diapirs that rose to underplate cratonic nuclei

  4. Successive reactive liquid flow episodes in a layered intrusion (Unit 9, Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion, Scotland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthold, Julien; Blundy, Jon; Holness, Marian

    2014-05-01

    We will present a detailed microstructural and geochemical study of reactive liquid flow in Unit 9 of the Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion. In the study region, Unit 9 comprises an underlying lens-like body of peridotite overlain by a sequence of troctolite and gabbro (termed allivalite), with some local and minor anorthosite. The troctolite is separated from the overlying gabbro by a distinct, sub-horizontal, undulose horizon (the major wavy horizon). Higher in the stratigraphy is another, similar, horizon (the minor wavy horizon) that separates relatively clinopyroxene-poor gabbro from an overlying gabbro. To the north of the peridotite lens, both troctolite and gabbro grade into poikilitic gabbro. Clinopyroxene habit in the allivalite varies from thin rims around olivine in troctolite, to equigranular crystals in gabbro, to oikocrysts in the poikilitic gabbro. The poikilitic gabbros contain multiple generations of clinopyroxene, with Cr-rich (~1.1 wt.% Cr2O3), anhedral cores with moderate REE concentrations (core1) overgrown by an anhedral REE-depleted second generation with moderate Cr (~0.7 wt.% Cr2O3) (core2). These composite cores are rimmed by Cr-poor (~0.2 wt.% Cr2O3) and REE-poor to moderate clinopyroxene. We interpret these microstructures as a consequence of two separate episodes of partial melting triggered by the intrusion of hot olivine-phyric picrite to form the discontinuous lenses that comprise the Unit 9 peridotite. Loss of clinopyroxene-saturated partial melt from the lower part of the allivalite immediately following the early stages of sill intrusion resulted in the formation of clinopyroxene-poor gabbro. The spatial extent of clinopyroxene loss is marked by the minor wavy horizon. A further partial melting event stripped out almost all clinopyroxene from the lowest allivalite, to form a troctolite, with the major wavy horizon marking the extent of melting during this second episode. The poikilitic gabbro formed from clinopyroxene-saturated melt

  5. Rheological structure of a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary zone, decoded from EBSD analysis of mantle xenoliths from Ichinomegata, NE Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Ozawa, K.

    2017-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths are fragments of mantle materials entrapped in alkali basalts or kimberlites and transported to the surface (Nixon, 1987). They provide information on rheological, thermal, chemical, petrological structures of the upper mantle (e.g. Green et al., 2010; McKenzie and Bickle, 1988; O'Reilly and Griffin, 1996). They potentially represent materials from a boundary zone of lithosphere and asthenosphere (LABZ), where the heat transportation mechanism changes from convection to conduction (Sleep, 2005, 2006). However, difficulties in geobarometry for spinel peridotite (e.g. O'Reilly et al., 1997) have hampered our understanding of shallow LABZ. Ichinomegata located in the back-arc side of NE Japan is a latest Pleistocene andesitic-dacitic volcano yielding spinel peridotite xenoliths (Katsui et al., 1979). Through our works (Sato and Ozawa, 2016, 2017a, 2017b), we have overcome difficulties in geobarometry of spinel peridotites and gained accurate thermal structure (0.74-1.60 GPa, 832-1084 °C) from eight of the nine examined xenoliths. The rheological and chemical features suggest drastic changes: undeformed (granular), depleted, subsolidus mantle representing lithospheric mantle (ca. 28-35 km) and deformed (porphyroclastic), fertile, hydrous supersolidus mantle representing rheological LABZ (ca. 35-54 km). We investigate depth dependent variation of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of constituent minerals of the xenoliths by electron back-scattered diffraction analysis (using JSM-7000F with a CCD detector and the CHANNEL5 software at the University of Tokyo). A shallower (ca. 32 km) sample with tabulargranular texture and coarse olivine size (0.92 mm) has A-type olivine CPO with [100] maximum as reported by Satsukawa and Michibayashi (2014) (hereafter SM14), whereas a deep (ca. 51 km) sample with porphyroclastic texture and finer olivine size (0.46 mm) has CPO with weaker fabric intensity characterized by a [100] girdle similar to AG-type and

  6. Geochemistry of axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb Hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Morgan, C.; Liias, R. A.

    1990-08-01

    Axial Seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg Seamount Chain, is the current center of the Cobb Hotspot. The Axial Seamount lavas are transitional between N-type and E-type mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), characteristics that they share with lavas along the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. There are, however, subtle, but distinct, differences between the seamount lavas and those of the adjoining ridge segments. These include higher Na2O, CaO, and Sr at a given MgO content and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas as compared with the ridge lavas. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial Seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. These high magma supply rates have sustained a continuously replenished, steady state magma reservoir that has erupted remarkably homogeneous lavas over a long time period. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial Seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most

  7. Lithospheric mantle evolution in the Afro-Arabian domain: Insights from Bir Ali mantle xenoliths (Yemen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgualdo, P.; Aviado, K.; Beccaluva, L.; Bianchini, G.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Bryce, J. G.; Graham, D. W.; Natali, C.; Siena, F.

    2015-05-01

    Detailed petrological and geochemical investigations of an extensive sampling of mantle xenoliths from the Neogene-Quaternary Bir Ali diatreme (southern Yemen) indicate that the underlying lithospheric mantle consists predominantly of medium- to fine-grained (often foliated) spinel-peridotites (85-90%) and spinel-pyroxenites (10-15%) showing thermobarometric estimates in the P-T range of 0.9-2.0 GPa and 900-1150 °C. Peridotites, including lherzolites, harzburgites and dunites delineate continuous chemical, modal and mineralogical variations compatible with large extractions of basic melts occurring since the late Proterozoic (~ 2 Ga, according to Lu-Hf model ages). Pyroxenites may represent intrusions of subalkaline basic melts interacting and equilibrated with the host peridotite. Subsequent metasomatism has led to modal changes, with evidence of reaction patches and clinopyroxene and spinel destabilization, as well as formation of new phases (glass, amphibole and feldspar). These changes are accompanied by enrichment of the most incompatible elements and isotopic compositions. 143Nd/144Nd ranges from 0.51419 to 0.51209 (εNd from + 30.3 to - 10.5), 176Hf/177Hf from 0.28459 to 0.28239 (εHf from + 64.4 to - 13.6), and 208Pb/204Pb from 36.85 to 41.56, thus extending from the depleted mantle (DM) towards the enriched OIB mantle (EM and HIMU) components. 3He/4He (R/RA) ratios vary from 7.2 to 7.9 with He concentrations co-varying with the most incompatible element enrichment, in parallel with metasomatic effects. These metasomatic events, particularly effective in harzburgites and dunites, are attributable to the variable interaction with alkaline basic melts related to the general extensional and rifting regime affecting the East Africa-Arabian domain during the Cenozoic. In this respect, Bir Ali mantle xenoliths resemble those occurring along the Arabian margins and the East Africa Rift system, similarly affected by alkaline metasomatism, whereas they are

  8. Formation and modification of chromitites in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Shoji; Miura, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Podiform chromitites have long supplied us with unrivaled information on various mantle processes, including the peridotite-magma reaction, deep-seated magmatic evolution, and mantle dynamics. The recent discovery of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) chromitites not only sheds light on a different aspect of podiform chromitites, but also changes our understanding of the whole picture of podiform chromitite genesis. In addition, new evidence was recently presented for hydrothermal modification/formation chromite/chromitite in the mantle, which is a classical but innovative issue. In this context, we present here an urgently needed comprehensive review of podiform chromitites in the upper mantle. Wall-rock control on podiform chromitite genesis demonstrates that the peridotite-magma reaction at the upper mantle condition is an indispensable process. We may need a large system in the mantle, far larger than the size of outcrops or mining areas, to fulfill the Cr budget requirement for podiform chromitite genesis. The peridotite-magma reaction over a large area may form a melt enriched with Na and other incompatible elements, which mixes with a less evolved magma supplied from the depth to create chromite-oversaturated magma. The incompatible-element-rich magma trapped by the chromite mainly precipitates pargasite and aspidolite (Na analogue of phlogopite), which are stable under upper mantle conditions. Moderately depleted harzburgites, which contain chromite with a moderate Cr# (0.4-0.6) and a small amount of clinopyroxene, are the best reactants for the chromitite-forming reaction, and are the best hosts for podiform chromitites. Arc-type chromitites are dominant in ophiolites, but some are of the mid-ocean ridge type; chromitites may be common beneath the ocean floor, although it has not yet been explored for chromitite. The low-pressure (upper mantle) igneous chromitites were conveyed through mantle convection or subduction down to the mantle transition zone to form

  9. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Inversion of Mantle Temperature and Composition, with Application to Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eric; Petersen, Kenni; Lesher, Charles

    2017-04-01

    Basalts are formed by adiabatic decompression melting of the asthenosphere, and thus provide records of the thermal, chemical and dynamical state of the upper mantle. However, uniquely constraining the importance of these factors through the lens of melting is challenging given the inevitability that primary basalts are the product of variable mixing of melts derived from distinct lithologies having different melting behaviors (e.g. peridotite vs. pyroxenite). Forward mantle melting models, such as REEBOX PRO [1], are useful tools in this regard, because they can account for differences in melting behavior and melt pooling processes, and provide estimates of bulk crust composition and volume that can be compared with geochemical and geophysical constraints, respectively. Nevertheless, these models require critical assumptions regarding mantle temperature, and lithologic abundance(s)/composition(s), all of which are poorly constrained. To provide better constraints on these parameters and their uncertainties, we have coupled a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling technique with the REEBOX PRO melting model. The MCMC method systematically samples distributions of key REEBOX PRO input parameters (mantle potential temperature, and initial abundances and compositions of the source lithologies) based on a likelihood function that describes the 'fit' of the model outputs (bulk crust composition and volume and end-member peridotite and pyroxenite melts) relative to geochemical and geophysical constraints and their associated uncertainties. As a case study, we have tested and applied the model to magmatism along Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland, where pyroxenite has been inferred to be present in the mantle source. This locale is ideal because there exist sufficient geochemical and geophysical data to estimate bulk crust compositions and volumes, as well as the range of near-parental melts derived from the mantle. We find that for the case of passive upwelling, the models

  10. Phase equilibria constraints on models of subduction zone magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, James D.; Johnston, Dana A.

    Petrologic models of subduction zone magmatism can be grouped into three broad classes: (1) predominantly slab-derived, (2) mainly mantle-derived, and (3) multi-source. Slab-derived models assume high-alumina basalt (HAB) approximates primary magma and is derived by partial fusion of the subducting slab. Such melts must, therefore, be saturated with some combination of eclogite phases, e.g. cpx, garnet, qtz, at the pressures, temperatures and water contents of magma generation. In contrast, mantle-dominated models suggest partial melting of the mantle wedge produces primary high-magnesia basalts (HMB) which fractionate to yield derivative HAB magmas. In this context, HMB melts should be saturated with a combination of peridotite phases, i.e. ol, cpx and opx, and have liquid-lines-of-descent that produce high-alumina basalts. HAB generated in this manner must be saturated with a mafic phase assemblage at the intensive conditions of fractionation. Multi-source models combine slab and mantle components in varying proportions to generate the four main lava types (HMB, HAB, high-magnesia andesites (HMA) and evolved lavas) characteristic of subduction zones. The mechanism of mass transfer from slab to wedge as well as the nature and fate of primary magmas vary considerably among these models. Because of their complexity, these models imply a wide range of phase equilibria. Although the experiments conducted on calc-alkaline lavas are limited, they place the following limitations on arc petrologic models: (1) HAB cannot be derived from HMB by crystal fractionation at the intensive conditions thus far investigated, (2) HAB could be produced by anhydrous partial fusion of eclogite at high pressure, (3) HMB liquids can be produced by peridotite partial fusion 50-60 km above the slab-mantle interface, (4) HMA cannot be primary magmas derived by partial melting of the subducted slab, but could have formed by slab melt-peridotite interaction, and (5) many evolved calc

  11. Gakkel Ridge: A window to ancient asthenosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J.; Hellebrand, E.; Dick, H.; Liu, C.; Stracke, A.

    2008-12-01

    We are accustomed to thinking of the ambient mantle as being a well-stirred reservoir, which contains at most regions of stored subducted slabs and "plums" containing lithophile trace element enrichments. What is forgotten in all of this is that the main process of formation of heterogeneities is a negative one - generating 10x more depleted mantle at any given moment than it does oceanic crust. Because the volume of lithosphere subducted over Earth history is so large, it has always been assumed that the process of subduction and convective mixing re-homogenizes the depleted and enriched reservoirs about as fast as it produces them. What if it doesn't? Our primary means of studying mantle heterogeneity however is basalts. Direct study of the mantle entails observations on xenoliths, ophiolites and orogenic lherzolites, and abyssal peridotites. The latter have the inherent problems of being melting residues, associated with fracture zones, are highly serpentinized and rare. The arctic ridge system gives us a unique perspective on the mantle, and samples we have recovered there are relatively free from these problems. Due to the slow spreading rate, which apparently severely limits the melt productivity, the thickest crust in the Arctic ridge system is approximately "normal". The most common crust is about half thickness and there are large expanses with no crust at all, in the sense of Hess, 1962, exposing mantle peridotite in the floor of extensive rift zones. We have shown Os isotopic evidence for the survival of ancient depletion signatures in Gakkel abyssal peridotites that apparently were not destroyed by subduction, convective stirring or resetting during magma genesis (Liu, et al., 2008). Additionally, preliminary Nd isotopic evidence suggests at least a 400Ma intact prehistory for these samples. Apparently, the low melt productivity on Gakkel Ridge has allowed the Gakkel mantle rocks to escape significant resetting due to melt interaction. This implies a

  12. The depth of sub-lithospheric diamond formation and the redistribution of carbon in the deep mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Christopher; Frost, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    Most diamonds form in the Earth's lithosphere but a small proportion contain Si-rich majoritic garnet inclusions that indicate formation in the deeper mantle. The compositions of syngenetic garnet inclusions can potential yield information on both the depth and mantle lithology in which the diamonds formed. Pressure dependent changes in garnet compositions have been calibrated using the results of experiments conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus at pressures between 6 and 16 GPa and temperatures of 1000 to 1400 °C. Using the results of these experiments a barometer was formulated based on an empirical parameterisation of the two major majoritic substitutions, referred to as majorite (Maj; Al3+ =Mg2+ +Si4+), and Na-majorite (Na-Maj; Mg2+ +Al3+ =Na+ +Si4+). Moreover, previously published experimental garnet compositions from basaltic, kimberlite, komatiite and peridotite bulk compositions were included in the calibration, which consequently covers pressures from 6 to 20 GPa and temperatures from 900 to 2100 °C. Experimental pressures are reproduced over these conditions with a standard deviation of 0.86 GPa. The barometer is used to determine equilibration pressures of approximately 500 reported garnet inclusions in diamonds from a range of localities. As the majority of these inclusions are proposed to be syngenetic this allows a detailed picture of diamond formation depths and associated source rocks to be established using inclusion chemistry. Geographic differences in diamond source rocks are mapped within the sub-lithospheric mantle to over 500 km depth. Continuous diamond formation occurs over this depth range within lithologies with eclogitic affinities but also in lithologies that appear transitional between eclogitic and peridotitic bulk compositions, with an affinity to pyroxenites. The geographic differences between eclogitic and pyroxenitic diamond source rocks are rationalised in terms of diamond formation within downwelling and upwelling regimes

  13. Fluid and element transfer at the slab-mantle interface: insights from the serpentinized Livingstone Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Scott, J.; Tarling, M.; Tulley, C. J.; le Roux, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    At the slab-mantle interface in subduction zones, hydrous fluids released by dehydration reactions are fluxed upwards into the fore-arc mantle corner. The extent to which these fluids can move across the plate interface shear zone has significant implications for understanding the composition of the mantle wedge and the origin of episodic tremor and slow slip. The >1000 km long Livingstone Fault in New Zealand provides a superbly exposed analogue (both in terms of scale and the rock types involved) for the serpentinite shear zone likely to be present along the slab-mantle interface. The Livingstone Fault is a sheared serpentinite mélange up to several hundreds of meters wide that separates greenschist-facies quartzofeldspathic metasediments (e.g. analogue for slab sediments) from variably-serpentinized harzburgitic peridotite (e.g. analogue for mantle wedge). To track element mobility and paleo-fluid flow across the shear zone, Sr and Nd isotopes were measured in five transects across the metasediments, mélange and serpentinized peridotites. Results show that the mélange and serpentinized peridotites (originally with Sr and Nd similar to Permian MORB) were progressively overprinted with the isotopic composition of the metasediments at distances of up to c. 400 m from the mélange-metasediment contact. Mass balance calculations require that many elements were mobile across the mélange shear zone, but permeability modeling indicates that diffusive transfer of such elements is unrealistically slow. Instead, it appears that fluid and element percolation in to and across the mélange was aided by episodic over-pressuring and fracturing, as indicated by the widespread presence of tremolite-bearing breccias and veins that mutually cross-cut the serpentinite mélange fabrics. Overall, the field and isotopic results indicate that fluid and element redistribution within major serpentinite-bearing shear zones is strongly aided by fracturing and brecciation that are

  14. Analysis of Ballistic Blocks and Eruption History of Montaña Colorada, Lanzarote, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple Domagall, A. M.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    From September 1730 to April 1736, more than 30 vents formed along a ~18 km long rift on the island of Lanzarote in the Canary Islands. Little actual data of these eruptions exist with the exception of court records and the diary of a priest from Yaiza. Previous research has broken this five and a half year period into 5 major eruptive phases (Carracedo et al., 1992).Montaña Colorada - a 150 m-tall, 600 m wide cinder cone - is the final vent associated with this eruption, and likely formed in 10 km long), large spatter clasts, spatter within the cinder cone, and a minor ash blanket are associated with this vent. These are typical of the 1730-1736 vents on Lanzarote. Unique to Montaña Colorada is the presence of a solidified lava pond within the vent, and an array of large (~1-4 m diameter), dense (2800 kg/m3), basaltic blocks roughly 500-1000 m from the vent. Additionally, peridotite nodules (up to 15 cm diameter) are found both within the lava flows and the tephra: the nodules are seen only here and at the, nearby, first vent associated with the eruptions. Lava flows, possibly from a fissure vent, started the eruption at Montaña Colorada: an effusion rate of 74.9 ± 25.9 m3s-1 is estimated for the 10.6 km-long, peridotite-bearing, flow, giving an emplacement time of ~1-3 days. As the eruption rate decreased, agglutinated spatter collected closer to the vent with loose tephra distally forming the main cinder cone. Towards the end of the eruption it appears the vent was filled with a lava pond, which breached to the north. The large, dense, blocks surrounding Montaña Colorada are here suggested to be the result of a transient explosion of a previous lava pond that occupied the vent. A lack of peridotite nodules or vesicles would be consistent with basalt that had pooled within the vent for some time. Eruption velocities on the order of 70-300 ms-1 are calculated for these blocks.

  15. Osmium Isotopic Evolution of the Mantle Sources of Precambrian Ultramafic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, A.; Walker, R. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Os isotopic composition of the modern mantle, as recorded collectively by ocean island basalts, mid- oceanic ridge basalts (MORB) and abyssal peridotites, is evidently highly heterogeneous (γ Os(I) ranging from +25). One important question, therefore, is how and when the Earth's mantle developed such large-scale Os isotopic heterogeneities. Previous Os isotopic studies of ancient ultramafic systems, including komatiites and picrites, have shown that the Os isotopic heterogeneity of the terrestrial mantle can be traced as far back as the late-Archean (~ 2.7-2.8 Ga). This observation is based on the initial Os isotopic ratios obtained for the mantle sources of some of the ancient ultramafic rocks determined through analyses of numerous Os-rich whole-rock and/or mineral samples. In some cases, the closed-system behavior of these ancient ultramafic rocks was demonstrated via the generation of isochrons of precise ages, consistent with those obtained from other radiogenic isotopic systems. Thus, a compilation of the published initial ^{187}Os/^{188}Os ratios reported for the mantle sources of komatiitic and picritic rocks is now possible that covers a large range of geologic time spanning from the Mesozoic (ca. 89 Ma Gorgona komatiites) to the Mid-Archean (e.g., ca. 3.3 Ga Commondale komatiites), which provides a comprehensive picture of the Os isotopic evolution of their mantle sources through geologic time. Several Precambrian komatiite/picrite systems are characterized by suprachondritic initial ^{187}Os/^{188}Os ratios (e.g., Belingwe, Kostomuksha, Pechenga). Such long-term enrichments in ^{187}Os of the mantle sources for these rocks may be explained via recycling of old mafic oceanic crust or incorporation of putative suprachondritic outer core materials entrained into their mantle sources. The relative importance of the two processes for some modern mantle-derived systems (e.g., Hawaiian picrites) is an issue of substantial debate. Importantly, however, the

  16. Feasible Metabolic Schema Associated with High pH Springs in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAWN eCARDACE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A field campaign targeting high pH springs in the Zambales and Palawan Ophiolites of the Philippines was conducted in 2012-2013, and enabled description of several springs sourced in altered pillow basalts, gabbros, and peridotites. We combine field observations of pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and oxidation-reduction potential with analyses of major ions, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved gas phases in order to model the activities of selected phases important to microbial metabolism, and to evaluate feasible metabolic reactions based on energy yield. We document changing geochemical inventories in these springs, and examine how the environment supports or prevents the function of certain microbial metabolisms.

  17. Feasible metabolisms in high pH springs of the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardace, Dawn; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Woycheese, Kristin M; Arcilla, Carlo A

    2015-01-01

    A field campaign targeting high pH, H2-, and CH4-emitting serpentinite-associated springs in the Zambales and Palawan Ophiolites of the Philippines was conducted in 2012-2013, and enabled description of several springs sourced in altered pillow basalts, gabbros, and peridotites. We combine field observations of pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and oxidation-reduction potential with analyses of major ions, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved gas phases in order to model the activities of selected phases important to microbial metabolism, and to rank feasible metabolic reactions based on energy yield. We document changing geochemical inventories in these springs between sampling years, and examine how the environment supports or prevents the function of certain microbial metabolisms. In all, this geochemistry-based assessment of feasible metabolisms indicates methane cycling, hydrogen oxidation, some iron and sulfur metabolisms, and ammonia oxidation are feasible reactions in this continental site of serpentinization.

  18. Comment on ;Dehydration breakdown of antigorite and the formation of B-type olivine CPO; by Nagaya et al. (2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaka, Toshio

    2014-12-01

    Recently, Nagaya et al. (2014) have reported the B-type crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of olivine in thermally metamorphosed serpentinites from the Happo ultramafic complex, central Japan, and interpreted the CPO as a result of topotactic growth of olivine after antigorite. Their conclusions require the reconsideration of the genesis of B-type olivine CPO, which is generally believed to be formed by plastic deformation of hydrous peridotites, and could have an impact on structural models of supra-subduction zones. I appreciate the detailed observations by Nagaya et al. (2014) but have to point out that they committed significant misinterpretation of facts and failed to show robust evidence and rationale for their argument.

  19. A petrogenetic model of the relationships among achondritic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, E.; Hays, J. F.; Mcsween, H. Y., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Petrological evidence is used to support the hypothesis that although the magma source regions and parent bodies of basaltic achondrite, shergottite, nakhlite, and chassignite meteorites are clearly distinct, they may be simply related. It is proposed that the peridotites which on partial melting generated the parent magmas of the shergottite meteorites differed from those which gave rise to eucritic magmas by being enriched in a component rich in alkalis and other volatiles. Similarly, the source regions of the parent magmas of the nakhlite and chassignite meteorites differed from those on the shergottite parent body by being still richer in this volatile-rich component. These regions could have been related by processes such as mixture of variable amounts of volatile-rich and volatile-poor components in planetary or nebular settings, or alternatively by variable varying degrees of volatile loss from volatile-rich materials.

  20. Source assemblage types for cratonic diamonds from X-ray synchrotron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, F.; Alvaro, M.; Casati, M. N.; Wilhelm, H.; Kleppe, A. K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Domeneghetti, M. C.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Three single crystals of clinopyroxene trapped within three different gem-quality diamonds from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberia, Russia) were analysed in situ by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to obtain information on their chemical composition and infer source assemblage type. A non-destructive approach was used with high-energy (≈ 60 keV; λ ≈ 0.206 Å) at I15, the extreme-conditions beamline at Diamond Light Source. A dedicated protocol was used to center the mineral inclusions located deep inside the diamonds in the X-ray beam. Our results reveal that two of the inclusions can be associated with peridotitic paragenesis whereas the third is eclogitic. This study also demonstrates that this non-destructive experimental approach is extremely efficient in evaluating the origin of minerals trapped in their diamond hosts.

  1. New age (ca. 2970 Ma), mantle source composition and geodynamic constraints on the Archean Fiskenæsset anorthosite complex, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, A; Frei, Robert; Scherstén, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The Archean Fiskenæsset Complex, SW Greenland, consists of an association of ca. 550-meter-thick layered anorthosite, leucogabbro, gabbro, and ultramafic rocks (peridotite, pyroxenite, dunite, hornblendite). The complex was intruded by tonalite, trondhjemite, and granodiorite (TTG) sheets (now...... orthogneisses) during thrusting that was followed by several phases of isoclinal folding. The trace element systematics of the Fiskenæsset Complex and associated volcanic rocks are consistent with a supra-subduction zone geodynamic setting. The Fiskenæsset anorthosites, leucogabbros, gabbros and ultramafic...... rocks collectively yield an Sm–Nd errorchron age of 2973 ± 28 Ma (MSWD = 33), with an average initial eNd = + 3.3 ± 0.7, consistent with a long-term depleted mantle source. Regression of Pb isotope data define an age of 2945 ± 36 Ma (MSWD = 44); and the regression line intersects the average growth...

  2. New results for Palaeozoic volcanic phases in the Prague Basin – magnetic and geochemical studies of Lištice, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiu Elbra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Palaeo-, rock magnetic and geochemical studies were conducted on volcanic samples from the Lištice area to improve the knowledge of Palaeozoic volcanic evolution in the Prague Basin. The magnetic data display no significant differences between two studied localities, indicating one magnetizing event for both localities. Geochemical data suggest that Lištice basalt could have originated from deep melting of the garnet peridotite mantle source during the attenuation and rifting of the continental lithosphere connected with asthenospheric mantle upwelling. The dataset furthermore supports the evidence of syn- or post-intrusive fluid interactions and low-temperature stages of alteration. The Ti-magnetite within amygdales of the samples was found to be carrying the characteristic remanent magnetization and reflects probably the Permo-Carboniferous remagnetization of volcanic phases.

  3. Trace Element Partitioning Between low-Ca Pyroxene and Ultracalcic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertermann, M.; Schmidt, M. W.; Pettke, T.

    2003-12-01

    Low-Ca pyroxene or pigeonite ( ˜0.25-0.35 Ca per formula unit, pfu) is an important residual phase during high temperature melting of refractory mantle (e.g., ankaramite formation). High-Ca cpx (>0.6-0.7 Ca pfu) may be residual to relatively low temperature melting of fertile mantle (MOR and OI), but the opx-cpx solvus narrows considerably at higher temperatures (>1330-1350° C), leading to coexisting opx and low-Ca cpx. Little is known about the trace element partitioning of such low-Ca cpx at upper mantle conditions. Our new partitioning experiments investigate the role of low-Ca cpx during melting of depleted peridotite. Nominally anhydrous experiments with graphite-lined Pt-capsules were conducted at 1.4 GPa and 1360-1370° C. The synthetic starting material is close in composition to an ultracalcic liquid saturated in opx+pigeonite+olivine+spinel. The experiments yielded assemblages of glass, low-Ca cpx, ol, and minor Cr-spinel; opx is absent. The low-Ca clinopyroxenes have 0.20 and 0.32 Ca pfu at 1370 and 1360° C, respectively, and tetrahedral Al of 0.046 and 0.067 pfu. The liquids have ˜50 wt% SiO2, ˜12.5 wt% CaO and CaO/Al2O3 of 1.44-1.54. Pyroxenes and glasses were analyzed for trace elements (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er Yb, Lu, Sc, Y, Sr, Zr, Hf, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Zn) by LA-ICP-MS using a 193 nm ArF excimer laser coupled to an Elan 6100 mass spectrometer. Ablation occurred in He, and ablation spot sizes were 15-30 μ m for minerals and 50 μ m for glasses. Trace element concentrations in pyroxenes were low for most 3+ and 4+ cations. This resulted in small mineral/melt partition coefficients (D-values), approximately an order of magnitude lower than those for high-Ca cpx associated with peridotite melting, thus making the low-Ca cpx partitioning behavior rather similar to the behavior of peridotitic opx. Cpx with 0.32 Ca pfu has slightly elevated D-values for 3+ cations when compared to the 0.20 Ca pfu cpx: DSc = 0.45, DY = 0.11, DSm = 0.054 and DYb

  4. Geologic Map of the Weaverville 15' Quadrangle, Trinity County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, William P.

    2009-01-01

    The Weaverville 15' quadrangle spans parts of five generally north-northwest-trending accreted terranes. From east to west, these are the Eastern Klamath, Central Metamorphic, North Fork, Eastern Hayfork, and Western Hayfork terranes. The Eastern Klamath terrane was thrust westward over the Central Metamorphic terrane during early Paleozoic (Devonian?) time and, in Early Cretaceous time (approx. 136 Ma), was intruded along its length by the massive Shasta Bally batholith. Remnants of overlap assemblages of the Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) Great Valley sequence and the Tertiary Weaverville Formation cover nearly 10 percent of the quadrangle. The base of the Eastern Klamath terrane in the Weaverville quadrangle is a peridotite-gabbro complex that probably is correlative to the Trinity ophiolite (Ordovician), which is widely exposed farther north beyond the quadrangle. In the northeast part of the Weaverville quadrangle, the peridotite-gabbro complex is overlain by the Devonian Copley Greenstone and the Mississippian Bragdon Formation. Where these formations were intruded by the Shasta Bally batholith, they formed an aureole of gneissic and other metamorphic rocks around the batholith. Westward thrusting of the Eastern Klamath terrane over an adjacent body of mafic volcanic and overlying quartzose sedimentary rocks during Devonian time formed the Salmon Hornblende Schist and the Abrams Mica Schist of the Central Metamorphic terrane. Substantial beds of limestone in the quartzose sedimentary unit, generally found near the underlying volcanic rock, are too metamorphosed for fossils to have survived. Rb-Sr analysis of the Abrams Mica Schist indicates a metamorphic age of approx. 380 Ma. West of Weavervillle, the Oregon Mountain outlier of the Eastern Klamath terrane consists mainly of Bragdon Formation(?) and is largely separated from the underlying Central Metamorphic terrane by serpentinized peridotite that may be a remnant of the Trinity ophiolite. The North Fork

  5. Characterization of Spitsbergen Disks by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Le, L.; Ross, K.; McKay, David S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    'Carbonate disks' found in the fractures and pores spaces of peridotite xenoliths and basalts from the island of Spitsbergen in the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago have been suggested to be "The best (and best documented) terrestrial analogs for the [Martian meteorite] ALH84001 carbonate globules ..." Previous studies have indicated that Spitsbergen carbonates show broadly comparable internal layering and mineral compositions to ALH84001 carbonate-magnetite disks. We report here for the first time, the detailed mineral characterization of Spitsbergen carbonates and their spatial relationship to the host mineral assemblages in the xenolith, using high resolution TEM (as used previously for ALH84001 carbonate disks). These studies were conducted in concert with complementary Raman and SEM analysis of the same samples. Our results indicate that there are significant chemical and physical differences between the disks in Spitsbergen and the carbonates present in ALH84001.

  6. Thermal effects of variable material properties and metamorphic reactions in a three-component subducting slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Dolejš, David; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    We explore the effects of variable material properties, phase transformations, and metamorphic devolatilization reactions on the thermal structure of a subducting slab using thermodynamic phase equilibrium calculations combined with a thermal evolution model. The subducting slab is divided...... into three layers consisting of oceanic sediments, altered oceanic crust, and partially serpentinized or anhydrous harzburgite. Solid-fluid equilibria and material properties are computed for each layer individually to illustrate distinct thermal consequences when chemical and mechanical homogenization...... indicate that subducting sediments and oceanic crust warm by 40 and 70°C, respectively, before the effect of wedge convection and heating is encountered at 1.7 GPa. Retention of fluid in the slab pore space plays a negligible role in oceanic crust and serpentinized peridotites. By contrast, the large...

  7. Fractional ultrabasic-basic evolution of upper-mantle magmatism: Evidence from xenoliths in kimberlites, inclusions in diamonds and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2017-04-01

    Ultrabasic peridotites and pyroxenites together with basic eclogites are the upper-mantle in situ rocks among xenoliths in kimberlites. Occasionally their diamond-bearing varieties have revealed within the xenoliths. Therewith the compositions of rock-forming minerals demonstrate features characteristic for primary diamond-included minerals of peridotite and eclogite parageneses (the elevated contents of Cr-component in peridotitic garnets and Na-jadeitic component in eclogitic clinopyroxenes). High-pressure experimental study of melting equilibria on the multicomponent peridotie-pyroxenite system olivine Ol - orthopyroxene Opx - clinopyroxene Cpx - garnet Grt showed that Opx disappeared in the peritectic reaction Opx+L→Cpx (Litvin, 1991). As a result, the invariant peritectic equilibrium Ol+Opx+Cpx+Grt+L of the ultrabasic system was found to transform into the univariant cotectic assemblage Ol+Cpx+Grt+L. Further experimental investigation showed that olivine reacts with jadeitic component (Jd) with formation of garnet at higher 4.5 GPa (Gasparik, Litvin, 1997). Study of melting relations in the multicomponent system Ol - Cpx - Jd permits to discover the peritectic point Ol+Omph+Grt+L (where Omph - omphacitic clinopyroxene) at concentration 3-4 wt.% Jd-component in the system. The reactionary loss of Opx and Ol makes it possible to transform the 4-phase garnet lherzolite ultrabasic association into the bimineral eclogite assemblage. The regime of fractional Ol, Cpx and Grt crystallization must be accompanied by increasing content of jadeitic component in residual melts that causes the complete "garnetization of olivine". In the subsequent evolution, the melts would have to fractionate for basic SiO2-saturated compositions responsible for petrogenesis of eclogite varieties marked with accessory corundum Crn, kyanite Ky and coesite Coe. Both the peritectic mechanisms occur in regime of fractional crystallization. The sequence of the upper-mantle fractional

  8. Archean crustal evolution in the central Minto block, northern Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skulski, T.; Percival, J.A.; Stern, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The central Minto block contains three volcano-sedimentary successions. Near Lake Qalluviartuuq, an isotopically primitive ( 2.83 Ga ε Nd +3.8 to +2.3) 2.83 Ga volcano-plutonic sequence comprises depleted tholeiitic basalts, anorthositic gabbro, and diorite-granodiorite that is unconformably overlain by 2.76 Ga ε Nd +1.8) calc-alkaline sequence of pillow basalts, andesites, and peridotite cut by 2.73 Ga diorite. To the west, and in inferred tectonic contact, the sediment-dominated Kogaluc sequence includes both isotopically evolved calc-alkaline rocks ( 2.76 Ga ε Nd +1.6 to -0.1) including 2.78Ga ε Nd Nd 2.725Ga ε Nd - 1. 6). (author). 19 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs

  9. Water Content in the SW USA Mantle Lithosphere: FTIR Analysis of Dish Hill and Kilbourne Hole Pyroxenites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibler, Robert; Peslier, Anne H.; Schaffer, Lillian Aurora; Brandon, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Kilbourne Hole (NM, USA) and Dish Hill (CA, USA) mantle xenoliths sample continental mantle in two different tectonic settings. Kilbourne Hole (KH) is located in the Rio Grande rift. Dish Hill (DH) is located in the southern Mojave province, an area potentially affected by subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America. FTIR analyses were obtained on well characterized pyroxenite, dunite and wehrlite xenoliths, thought to represent crystallized melts at mantle depths. PUM normalized REE patterns of the KH bulk-rocks are slightly LREE enriched and consistent with those of liquids generated by 6% melting of a spinel peridotite source. Pyroxenite pyroxenes have no detectable water but one DH wehrlite, which bulk-rock is LREE enriched, has 4 ppm H2O in orthopyroxene and 2 Ga. The Farallon subduction appears to have enriched in water the southwestern United States lithospheric mantle further east than DH, beneath the Colorado plateau.

  10. The Lost City hydrothermal system: Constraints imposed by vent fluid chemistry and reaction path models on subseafloor heat and mass transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, W. E.; Pester, Nicholas J.; Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Ding, Kang

    2015-08-01

    Since the first reported discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal system in 2001, it was recognized that seawater alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a key role in the composition of the coexisting vent fluids. The unusually high pH and high concentrations of H2 and CH4 provide compelling evidence for this. Here we report the chemistry of hydrothermal fluids sampled from two vent structures (Beehive: ∼90-116 °C, and M6: ∼75 °C) at Lost City in 2008 during cruise KNOX18RR using ROV Jason 2 and R/V Revelle assets. The vent fluid chemistry at both sites reveals considerable overlap in concentrations of dissolved gases (H2, CH4), trace elements (Cs, Rb, Li, B and Sr), and major elements (SO4, Ca, K, Na, Cl), including a surprising decrease in dissolved Cl, suggesting a common source fluid is feeding both sites. The absence of Mg and relatively high concentrations of Ca and sulfate suggest solubility control by serpentine-diopside-anhydrite, while trace alkali concentrations, especially Rb and Cs, are high, assuming a depleted mantle protolith. In both cases, but especially for Beehive vent fluid, the silica concentrations are well in excess of those expected for peridotite alteration and the coexistence of serpentine-brucite at all reasonable temperatures. However, both the measured pH and silica values are in better agreement with serpentine-diopside-tremolite-equilibria. Geochemical modeling demonstrates that reaction of plagioclase with serpentinized peridotite can shift the chemical system away from brucite and into the tremolite stability field. This is consistent with the complex intermingling of peridotite and gabbroic bodies commonly observed within the Atlantis Massif. We speculate the existence of such plagioclase bearing peridotite may also account for the highly enriched trace alkali (Cs, Rb) concentrations in the Lost City vent fluids. Additionally, reactive transport modeling taking explicit account of temperature dependent rates of mineral

  11. Thermobarometry for spinel lherzolite xenoliths in alkali basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Kazuhito; Youbi, Nasrrddine; Boumehdi, Moulay Ahmed; Nagahara, Hiroko

    2016-04-01

    Application of geothermobarometers to peridotite xenoliths has been providing very useful information on thermal and chemical structure of lithospheric or asthenospheric mantle at the time of almost instantaneous sampling by the host magmas, based on which various thermal (e.g., McKenzie et al., 2005), chemical (e.g., Griffin et al., 2003), and rheological (e.g., Ave Lallemant et al., 1980) models of lithosphere have been constructed. Geothermobarometry for garnet or plagioclase-bearing lithologies provide accurate pressure estimation, but this is not the case for the spinel peridotites, which are frequently sampled from Phanerozoic provinces in various tectonic environments (Nixon and Davies, 1987). There are several geobarometers proposed for spinel lherzolite, such as single pyroxene geothermobarometer (Mercier, 1980) and geothermobarometer based on Ca exchange between olivine and clinopyroxene (Köhler and Brey, 1990), but they have essential problems and it is usually believed that appropriated barometers do not exist for spinel lherzolites (O'Reilly et al., 1997; Medaris et al., 1999). It is thus imperative to develop reliable barometry for spinel peridotite xenoliths. We have developed barometry for spinel peridotite xenoliths by exploiting small differences in pressure dependence in relevant reactions, whose calibration was made through careful evaluation of volume changes of the reactions. This is augmented with higher levels of care in application of barometer by choosing mineral domains and their chemical components that are in equilibrium as close as possible. This is necessary because such barometry is very sensitive to changes in chemical composition induced by transient state of the system possibly owing to pressure and temperature changes as well as chemical modification, forming chemical heterogeneity or zoning frequently reported from various mantle xenoliths (Smith, 1999). Thus very carful treatment of heterogeneity, which might be trivial for

  12. Markers of the pyroxenite contribution in the major-element compositions of oceanic basalts: Review of the experimental constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambart, Sarah; Laporte, Didier; Schiano, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    Based on previous and new results on partial melting experiments of pyroxenites at high pressure, we attempt to identify the major element signature of pyroxenite partial melts and to evaluate to what extent this signature can be transmitted to the basalts erupted at oceanic islands and mid-ocean ridges. Although peridotite is the dominant source lithology in the Earth's upper mantle, the ubiquity of pyroxenites in mantle xenoliths and in ultramafic massifs, and the isotopic and trace elements variability of oceanic basalts suggest that these lithologies could significantly contribute to the generation of basaltic magmas. The question is how and to what degree the melting of pyroxenites can impact the major-element composition of oceanic basalts. The review of experimental phase equilibria of pyroxenites shows that the thermal divide, defined by the aluminous pyroxene plane, separates silica-excess pyroxenites (SE pyroxenites) on the right side and silica-deficient pyroxenites (SD pyroxenites) on the left side. It therefore controls the melting phase relations of pyroxenites at high pressure but, the pressure at which the thermal divide becomes effective, depends on the bulk composition; partial melt compositions of pyroxenites are strongly influenced by non-CMAS elements (especially FeO, TiO2, Na2O and K2O) and show a progressive transition from the liquids derived from the most silica-deficient compositions to those derived from the most silica-excess compositions. Another important aspect for the identification of source lithology is that, at identical pressure and temperature conditions, many pyroxenites produce melts that are quite similar to peridotite-derived melts, making the determination of the presence of pyroxenite in the source regions of oceanic basalts difficult; only pyroxenites able to produce melts with low SiO2 and high FeO contents can be identified on the basis of the major-element compositions of basalts. In the case of oceanic island basalts

  13. On the nature and origin of garnet in highly-refractory Archean lithosphere: implications for continent stabilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sally

    2014-05-01

    The nature and timescales of garnet formation in the Earth's subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) are important to our understanding of how this rigid outer shell has evolved and stabilised since the Archean. Nevertheless, the widespread occurrence of pyrope garnet in the sub-cratonic mantle remains one of the 'holy grails' of mantle petrology. The paradox is that garnet often occurs in mantle lithologies (dunites and harzburgites) which represent residues of major melting events (up to 40 %) whereas experimental studies on fertile peridotite suggest this phase should be exhausted by years. The garnets display systematic trends from ultra-depleted to enriched compositions that have not been recognised in peridotite suites from elsewhere (Gibson et al., 2013). Certain harzburgite members of the xenolith suite contain the first reported occurrence of pyrope garnets with rare-earth element (REE) patterns similar to hypothetical garnets proposed by Stachel et al. (2004) to have formed in the Earth's SCLM during the Archean, prior to metasomatism. These rare ultra-depleted low-Cr garnets occur in low temperature (~1050 oC) xenoliths derived from depths of ~120 km and coexist in chemical and textural equilibrium with highly-refractory olivine (Fo95.4) and orthopyroxene (Mg#=96.4). These phases are all more magnesian than generally encountered in global samples of depleted mantle, i.e. harzburgites and diamond inclusion suites. The Tanzanian ultra-depleted garnets form interconnecting networks ('necklaces') around grains of orthopyroxene, which is of key importance to their origin. This close spatial relationship of garnet and orthopyroxene together with the major, trace and REE contents of the ultra-depleted garnets, are consistent with an origin by isochemical exsolution. The significance of ultra-depleted low-Cr garnets has not previously been recognised in global suites of mantle xenoliths or diamond inclusions: they appear to have been overlooked, primarily

  14. The role of silicate surfaces on calcite precipitation kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockmann, Gabrielle J.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illuminate how calcite precipitation depends on the identity and structure of the growth substrate. Calcite was precipitated at 25°C from supersaturated aqueous solutions in the presence of seeds of either calcite or one of six silicate materials: augite, enstatite......, labradorite, olivine, basaltic glass and peridotite rock. Calcite saturation was achieved by mixing a CaCl2-rich aqueous solution with a NaHCO3-Na2CO3 aqueous buffer in mixed-flow reactors containing 0.5-2g of mineral, rock, or glass seeds. This led to an inlet fluid calcite saturation index of 0.6 and a p...

  15. Experience melting through the Earth's lower mantle via LH-DAC experiments on MgO-SiO2 and CaO-MgO-SiO2 systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Marzena A.; Lord, Oliver T.; Walter, Michael J.; Trønnes, Reidar G.

    2015-04-01

    The large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) and ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) of the lowermost mantle [1] are likely characterized by distinct chemical compositions, combined with temperature anomalies. The heterogeneities may have originated by fractional crystallization of the magma ocean during the earliest history of the Earth [2,3] and/or the continued accretion at the CMB of subducted basaltic oceanic crust [4,5]. These structures and their properties control the distribution and magnitude of the heat flow at the CMB and therefore the convective dynamics and evolution of the whole Earth. To determine the properties of these structures and thus interpret the seismic results, a good understanding of the melting phase relations of relevant basaltic and peridotitic compositions are required throughout the mantle pressure range. The melting phase relations of lower mantle materials are only crudely known. Recent experiments on various natural peridotitic and basaltic compositions [6-8] have given wide ranges of solidus and liquidus temperatures at lower mantle pressures. The melting relations for MgO, MgSiO3 and compositions along the MgO-SiO2 join from ab initio theory [e.g. 9,10] is broadly consistent with a thermodynamic model for eutectic melt compositions through the lower mantle based on melting experiments in the MgO-SiO2 system at 16-26 GPa [3]. We have performed a systematic study of the melting phase relations of analogues for peridotitic mantle and subducted basaltic crust in simple binary and ternary systems that capture the major mineralogy of Earth's lower mantle, using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) technique at 25-100 GPa. We determined the eutectic melting temperatures involving the following liquidus mineral assemblages: 1. bridgmanite (bm) + periclase (pc) and bm + silica in the system MgO-SiO2 (MS), corresponding to model peridotite and basalt compositions 2. bm + pc + Ca-perovskite (cpv) and bm + silica + cpv in the

  16. Lithological discrimination of accretionary complex (Sivas, northern Turkey) using novel hybrid color composites and field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Mutlu; Çelik, Ömer Faruk; Özyavaş, Aziz

    2018-02-01

    One of the most appropriate approaches to better understand and interpret geologic evolution of an accretionary complex is to make a detailed geologic map. The fact that ophiolite sequences consist of various rock types may require a unique image processing method to map each ophiolite body. The accretionary complex in the study area is composed mainly of ophiolitic and metamorphic rocks along with epi-ophiolitic sedimentary rocks. This paper attempts to map the Late Cretaceous accretionary complex in detail in northern Sivas (within İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan Suture Zone in Turkey) by the analysis of all of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) bands and field study. The new two hybrid color composite images yield satisfactory results in delineating peridotite, gabbro, basalt, and epi-ophiolitic sedimentary rocks of the accretionary complex in the study area. While the first hybrid color composite image consists of one principle component (PC) and two band ratios (PC1, 3/4, 4/6 in the RGB), the PC5, the original ASTER band 4 and the 3/4 band ratio images were assigned to the RGB colors to generate the second hybrid color composite image. In addition to that, the spectral indices derived from the ASTER thermal infrared (TIR) bands discriminate clearly ultramafic, siliceous, and carbonate rocks from adjacent lithologies at a regional scale. Peridotites with varying degrees of serpentinization illustrated as a single color were best identified in the spectral indices map. Furthermore, the boundaries of ophiolitic rocks based on fieldwork were outlined in detail in some parts of the study area by superimposing the resultant maps of ASTER maps on Google Earth images of finer spatial resolution. Eventually, the encouraging geologic map generated by the image analysis of ASTER data strongly correlates with lithological boundaries from a field survey.

  17. Resolving the fine-scale velocity structure of continental hyperextension at the Deep Galicia Margin using full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, R. G.; Morgan, J. V.; Minshull, T. A.; Bayrakci, G.; Bull, J. M.; Klaeschen, D.; Reston, T. J.; Sawyer, D. S.; Lymer, G.; Cresswell, D.

    2018-01-01

    Continental hyperextension during magma-poor rifting at the Deep Galicia Margin is characterized by a complex pattern of faulting, thin continental fault blocks and the serpentinization, with local exhumation, of mantle peridotites along the S-reflector, interpreted as a detachment surface. In order to understand fully the evolution of these features, it is important to image seismically the structure and to model the velocity structure to the greatest resolution possible. Traveltime tomography models have revealed the long-wavelength velocity structure of this hyperextended domain, but are often insufficient to match accurately the short-wavelength structure observed in reflection seismic imaging. Here, we demonstrate the application of 2-D time-domain acoustic full-waveform inversion (FWI) to deep-water seismic data collected at the Deep Galicia Margin, in order to attain a high-resolution velocity model of continental hyperextension. We have used several quality assurance procedures to assess the velocity model, including comparison of the observed and modeled waveforms, checkerboard tests, testing of parameter and inversion strategy and comparison with the migrated reflection image. Our final model exhibits an increase in the resolution of subsurface velocities, with particular improvement observed in the westernmost continental fault blocks, with a clear rotation of the velocity field to match steeply dipping reflectors. Across the S-reflector, there is a sharpening in the velocity contrast, with lower velocities beneath S indicative of preferential mantle serpentinization. This study supports the hypothesis that normal faulting acts to hydrate the upper-mantle peridotite, observed as a systematic decrease in seismic velocities, consistent with increased serpentinization. Our results confirm the feasibility of applying the FWI method to sparse, deep-water crustal data sets.

  18. Deformation associated to exhumation of serpentinized mantle rocks in a fossil Ocean Continent Transition: The Totalp unit in SE Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazo, S.; Manatschal, G.; Cannat, M.; Andréani, M.

    2013-08-01

    Although the exhumation of ultramafic rocks in slow and ultraslow spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges and Ocean Continent Transitions (OCTs) has been extensively investigated, the deformation processes related to mantle exhumation are poorly constrained. In this paper we present a new geological map and a section across the exhumed serpentinized peridotites of the Totalp unit near Davos (SE Switzerland), and we propose that the Totalp unit is formed by two Alpine thrust sheets. Geological mapping indicates local exposure of a paleo-seafloor that is formed by an exhumed detachment surface and serpentinized peridotites. The top of the exhumed mantle rocks is made of ophicalcites that resulted from the carbonation of serpentine under static conditions at the seafloor. The ophicalcites preserve depositional contacts with Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous pelagic sediments (Bernoulli and Weissert, 1985). These sequences did not exceed prehnite-pumpellyite metamorphic facies conditions, and locally escaped Alpine deformation. Thin mylonitic shear zones as well as foliated amphibole-bearing ultramafic rocks have been mapped. The age of these rocks and the link with the final exhumation history are yet unknown but since amphibole-bearing ultramafic rocks can be found as clasts in cataclasites related to the detachment fault, they pre-date detachment faulting. Our petrostructural study of the exhumed serpentinized rocks also reveals a deformation gradient from cataclasis to gouge formation within 150 m in the footwall of the proposed paleo-detachment fault. This deformation postdates serpentinization. It involves a component of plastic deformation of serpentine in the most highly strained intervals that has suffered pronounced grain-size reduction and a polyphase cataclastic overprint.

  19. Unraveling the Alteration History of Serpentinites and Associated Ultramafic Rocks from the Kampos HPLT Subduction Complex, Syros, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperdock, E. H. G.; Stockli, D. F.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinization, hydration of peridotite, has a profound effect on fundamental tectonic and petrologic processes such as deformation of the lithosphere, bulk rheology, fluid-mobile element cycling and deep earth carbon cycling. Though numerous studies have investigated the petrology, structure and geochemistry of serpentinites, the absolute chronology of serpentinization remains elusive due to a lack of accessory minerals that can be dated using established geochronological techniques. Magnetite forms as a common secondary mineral in serpentinites from the fluid-induced breakdown reaction of primary peridotite minerals. Magnetite (U-Th)/He chronometry provides the potential to directly date the cooling of exhumed ultramafic bodies and the low-temperature fluid alteration of serpentinites. We present the first application of magnetite (U-Th)/He chronometry to date stages of alteration in ultramafic rocks from the Kampos mélange belt, a high-pressure low-temperature (HP-LT) subduction complex that experienced exhumation in the Miocene on the island of Syros, Greece. Two generations of magnetite are distinguishable by grain size, magnetite trace element geochemistry and (U-Th)/He age. Large magnetite grains (mm) from a chlorite schist and a serpentinite schist have distinct geochemical signatures indicative of formation during blackwall-related fluid alteration and record Mid-Miocene exhumation-related cooling ages, similar to zircon (U-Th)/He ages from northern Syros. Smaller grains (µm) from the serpentinite schist lack blackwall-related fluid signatures and record post-exhumation mineral formation associated with widespread high-angle Pliocene normal faulting. These results reveal evidence for multiple episodes of fluid-rock alteration, which has implications for the cooling history and local geochemical exchanges of this HP-LT terrane. Given the fundamental impact of serpentinizaton on a vast array of tectonic, petrological, and geochemical processes, the

  20. Large-Scale Deformation and Uplift Associated with Serpentinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Lowell, R. P.; Smith, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic and geophysical data suggest that partially serpentinized peridotites and serpentinites are a significant part of the oceanic lithosphere. All serpentinization reactions are exothermic and result in volume expansion as high as 40%. Volume expansion beneath the seafloor will lead to surface uplift and elevated stresses in the neighborhood of the region undergoing serpentinization. The serpentinization-induced stresses are likely to result in faulting or tensile fracturing that promote the serpentinization process by creating new permeability and allowing fluid access to fresh peridotite. To explore these issues, we developed a first-order model of crustal deformation by considering an inclusion undergoing transformation strain in an elastic half-space. Using solutions for inclusions of different shapes, orientations, and depths, we calculate the surface uplift and mechanical stresses generated by the serpentinization processes. We discuss the topographic features at the TAG hydrothermal field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 26°N), uplift of the Miyazaki Plain (Southwestern Japan), and tectonic history of the Atlantic Massif (inside corner high of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N, and the Atlantis Transform Fault). Our analysis suggests that an anomalous salient of 3 km in diameter and 100 m high at TAG may have resulted from approximately 20% transformational strain in a region beneath the footwall of the TAG detachment fault. This serpentinization process tends to promote slip along some overlying normal faults, which may then enhance fluid pathways to the deeper crust to continue the serpentinization process. The serpentinization also favors slip and seismicity along the antithetic faults identified below the TAG detachment fault. Our solution for the Miyazaki Plain above the Kyushu-Palau subduction zone explains the observed uplift of 120 m, but the transformational strain needs only be 3%. Transformational strains associated with serpentinization in this region may

  1. Metasomatism, Fluid Overpressure and Brecciation at the Slab-Mantle Interface: Insights from the Livingstone Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, M.; Smith, S. A. F.; Scott, J.

    2017-12-01

    Juxtaposition of mantle peridotite and serpentinite against quartzofeldspathic and mafic schists occurs along the shallow slab-mantle interface in some subduction zones. This part of the subduction interface has been invoked as a possible source region of episodic tremor and slow slip, yet geological observations of fault zone structures and chemical reactions pertinent to this region are quite rare. The >1000 km long Livingstone Fault in New Zealand is a superbly exposed fault zone that provides a suitable analogue (both in terms of scale and the rock types involved) for the shallow slab-mantle interface. The fault is characterized by a foliated and highly sheared serpentinite mélange tens to several hundreds of meters wide that separates (partially serpentinised) peridotites from quartzofeldspathic schists. Talc- and tremolite-forming metasomatic reactions occurred along the margins of the mélange and around entrained pods due to mixing of serpentinite with silica- and calcium-rich fluids derived from the adjacent quartzofeldspathic schist. The metasomatic reactions generated significant volumes of water at the melange-schist contact that became trapped between the two relatively impermeable fault zone lithologies. On the schist side of the contact, brittle faulting was promoted by the formation of a laterally-continuous silicified zone up to tens of metres wide. On the melange side, a zone up to tens of metres wide of `crackle-breccias' containing veined stockworks of tremolite indicates periodic increases of pore pressure sufficient to cause hydraulic fracture of serpentinite. The crackle-breccias are multi-generational indicating that this process was episodic. Sr and Nd isotope data and permeability calculations suggest that the episodic brecciation process was critical to the transfer of fluids across the melange. Our observations suggest that fluid-producing metasomatic reactions along the shallow slab-mantle interface may contribute to the tremor signal

  2. Eclogitic metatrondhjemites from metaophiolites of the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Silvana; Tartarotti, Paola; Meyzen, Chrstine; Benciolini, Luca; Toffolo, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Eclogitic metatrondhjemites from metaophiolites of the Western Alps Martin S.**, Tartarotti P.*, Meyzen C. **, Benciolini L.***, Toffolo L. ** *Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Milano ** Dipartimento di Geoscienze, Università di Padova *** Dipartimento di Chimica, Fisica e Ambiente, Università di Udine In the Urtier valley (southern Aosta Valley, Italy), the Piemonte metaophiolites mainly consist of serpentinized peridotites including pods and boudinaged layers of Fe-metagabbro and trondhjemite transposed in the main eclogitic foliation. The contact between serpentinized peridotites and Fe-metagabbro/trondhjemite is locally lined by chloriteschist and rodingite. The high pressure parageneses in the Fe-metagabbro are omphacite-garnet-rutile-glaucophane-phengite, and in the metatrondhjemite plagioclase-quartz-phengite-clinozoisite-epidote-garnet, respectively. Bulk-rock major and trace elements in addition to O isotope analyses were performed in both rock types. Fe-metagabbros are characterized by MgO wt% ranging between 6.11 and 9.63%, ∑REE= 20-101 ppm, (La/Yb)N = 0.22-0.91; trondhjemites have SiO2 43%, Al2O3 ranging between 21 and 24%, CaO ranging between 17 and 20%, ∑REE = 172 - 272 ppm, (La/Yb)N ranging between 7.78 and 13.70. The δ18O is 5.9 ‰ in a Fe-metagabbro sample and 7.4 ‰ in a trondhjemite sample, suggesting that these rocks have been affected by a weak oceanic low temperature alteration. The high CaO content may indicate a metasomatic process which could have occurred during the oceanic stage or at high pressure conditions.

  3. The geological and petrological studies of the subduction boundaries and suggestion for the geological future work in Japan - How to avoid ultra-mega-earthquakes -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific plate is surrounded by circum-Pacific active margin, along which volcanic and seismic activities are very high. Ultra-Mega-Earthquakes (=UMEs, M>9.0) are occasionally observed along the margin, where sedimentary rocks of subducting slaves contact with the accreted sedimentary rocks of subducted slaves. But, those UME have never been occured along western Pacific islandarc-trench system including Izu-Ogasawara (=Bonin)-Mariana-Yap-Palau-Philippine-Tonga-Kermadec Trenches. I assume that the geological and petrological characteristics of the subduction boundaries are very important to understand those different seismic activities. Along the above mentioned trench inner wall, especially in the southern Mariana, mantle peridotites are widely distributed. Subducting slave contacts directly with the olivine dominant mantle peridotites of subducted slave, serpentinite layer can be deposited easily under hydrous oceanic sub-bottom environment and very slippery subduction boundaries are left along the subduction zone.On the other hand, those geological evidences give us some ideas on how to avoid UMEs in the Japanese Islands along Japan Trench and Nankai Trough in future. We will be able to change artificially from normal subduction boundaries with asperity zone into slippery subduction boundaries with serpentine layer, by means of serpentine mud injection toward the subduction boundaries interior by combining the following improved drilling technologies A and B. (A) Deep Sea Drilling Vessel CHIKYU has a drilling ability to reach subduction boundary with asperity zone in the Nankai Trough. (B) Advanced drilling technology in the shale gas industry is tremendous, that is, after one vertical deep drilling, horizontal drilling towards several direction are performed, then shale gas is collected by hydraulic fracturing method. I hope that, after several generations, our posterity will be able to avoid UMEs by continuous serpentine mud injection.

  4. The role of frictional strength on plate coupling at the subduction interface

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Eh

    2012-10-01

    At a subduction zone the amount of friction between the incoming plate and the forearc is an important factor in controlling the dip angle of subduction and the structure of the forearc. In this paper, we investigate the role of the frictional strength of sediments and of the serpentinized peridotite on the evolution of convergent margins. In numerical models, we vary thickness of a serpentinized layer in the mantle wedge (15 to 25km) and the frictional strength of both the sediments and serpentinized mantle (friction angle 1 to 15, or static friction coefficient 0.017 to 0.27) to control the amount of frictional coupling between the plates. With plastic strain weakening in the lithosphere, our numerical models can attain stable subduction geometry over millions of years. We find that the frictional strength of the sediments and serpentinized peridotite exerts the largest control on the dip angle of the subduction interface at seismogenic depths. In the case of low sediment and serpentinite friction, the subduction interface has a shallow dip, while the subduction zone develops an accretionary prism, a broad forearc high, a deep forearc basin, and a shallow trench. In the high friction case, the subduction interface is steep, the trench is deeper, and the accretionary prism, forearc high and basin are all absent. The resultant free-air gravity and topographic signature of these subduction zone models are consistent with observations. We believe that the low-friction model produces a geometry and forearc structure similar to that of accretionary margins. Conversely, models with high friction angles in sediments and serpentinite develop characteristics of an erosional convergent margin. We find that the strength of the subduction interface is critical in controlling the amount of coupling at the seismogenic zone and perhaps ultimately the size of the largest earthquakes at subduction zones. © 2012. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Sulfide enrichment at an oceanic crust-mantle transition zone: Kane Megamullion (23°N, MAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciazela, Jakub; Koepke, Juergen; Dick, Henry J. B.; Botcharnikov, Roman; Muszynski, Andrzej; Lazarov, Marina; Schuth, Stephan; Pieterek, Bartosz; Kuhn, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    The Kane Megamullion oceanic core complex located along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (23°30‧N, 45°20‧W) exposes lower crust and upper mantle directly on the ocean floor. We studied chalcophile elements and sulfides in the ultramafic and mafic rocks of the crust-mantle transition and the mantle underneath. We determined mineralogical and elemental composition and the Cu isotope composition of the respective sulfides along with the mineralogical and elemental composition of the respective serpentines. The rocks of the crust-mantle transition zone (i.e., plagioclase harzburgite, peridotite-gabbro contacts, and dunite) overlaid by troctolites are by one order of magnitude enriched in several chalcophile elements with respect to the spinel harzburgites of the mantle beneath. Whereas the range of Cu concentrations in spinel harzburgites is 7-69 ppm, the Cu concentrations are highly elevated in plagioclase harzburgites with a range of 90-209 ppm. The zones of the peridotite-gabbro contacts are even more enriched, exhibiting up to 305 ppm Cu and highly elevated concentrations of As, Zn, Ga, Sb and Tl. High Cu concentrations show pronounced correlation with bulk S concentrations at the crust-mantle transition zone implying an enrichment process in this horizon of the oceanic lithosphere. We interpret this enrichment as related to melt-mantle reaction, which is extensive in crust-mantle transition zones. In spite of the ubiquitous serpentinization of primary rocks, we found magmatic chalcopyrites [CuFeS2] as inclusions in plagioclase as well as associated with pentlandite [(Fe,Ni)9S8] and pyrrhotite [Fe1-xS] in polysulfide grains. These chalcopyrites show a primary magmatic δ65Cu signature ranging from -0.04 to +0.29 ‰. Other chalcopyrites have been dissolved during serpentinization. Due to the low temperature (enrichment, increased sulfide modes, and potentially formation of small sulfide deposits could be expected globally along the petrological Moho.

  6. Determination of platinum group elements and gold in reference materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with nickel sulphide fire-assay collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcelli, C.P.R.; Figueiredo, A.M.G.; Sarkis, J.E.S.; Kakazu, M.; Enzweiler, J.

    2002-01-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) after NiS fire assay were used to determine platinum group elements (PGE) and Au in the geological reference materials peridotite GPt-3 and pyroxene peridotite GPt-4 (IGGE, China). INAA has been one of the most useful analytical techniques for PGEs and Au determination, due to its high sensitivity and accuracy. After the fire assay, the NiS button is dissolved in concentrated hydrochloric acid, leaving a residue of insoluble PGE sulphides; the solution is filtered and the filter is directly irradiated with neutrons. In more recent years, ICP-MS with nickel fire assay collection and tellurium coprecipitation has been used as a mean of analysing PGE, with the main advantage of avoiding problems of losses of PGE during the HCl digestion of the NiS button. Buttons were prepared by mixing the sample (10-15 g) with fluxes, nickel and sulphur in a fire clay crucible and fused at temperatures around 1000 deg C. For NAA, the filters containing the PGEs and Au were irradiated at the IEA-R1 research nuclear reactor at IPEN. The measurements of the induced gamma-ray activity were carried out in an hyperpure Ge detector. In general, the results obtained by the two techniques were in good agreement with recommended values. INAA results exhibited higher values than the recommended values for Pd and Pt in GPt-3, while the opposite effect was observed for GPt-4 sample. Ru was not detected by INAA. On the other hand, Rh and Ir were determined more accurately by INAA (relative errors better than 10%). The ICP-MS analytical technique showed better detection limits, and all the PGE were determined. Results obtained for Pt and Pd presented accuracy better than 5% while losses were observed for Os and Ir. (author)

  7. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon magnetic anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Wilt, M.J.; Corrigan, D.J.

    1982-10-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I Power Plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3 to 3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 by 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analyzed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed tham to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in-situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. the suite of igneous rocks was probably passively emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotitic-gabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6 to 11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  8. Water, lithium and trace element compositions of olivine from Lanzo South replacive mantle dunites (Western Alps): New constraints into melt migration processes at cold thermal regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Alessio; Tribuzio, Riccardo; Ottolini, Luisa; Hamada, Morihisa

    2017-10-01

    Replacive mantle dunites are considered to be shallow pathways for extraction of mantle melts from their source region. Dunites offer a unique possibility to unravel the compositional variability of the melts produced in the upper mantle, before mixing and crystal fractionation modify their original signature. This study includes a quantification of H2O, Li and trace elements (Ni, Mn, Co, Sc, V, Ti, Zr, Y and HREE) in olivine from large replacive dunite bodies (>20 m) within a mantle section exposed in the Western Italian Alps (Lanzo South ophiolite). On the basis of olivine, clinopyroxene and spinel compositions, these dunites were previously interpreted to be formed by melts with a MORB signature. Variations in Ni, Mn, Co and Ca contents in olivine from different dunite bodies suggested formation by different melt batches. The variable H2O and Li contents of these olivines agree with this idea. Compared to olivine from residual peridotites and olivine phenocrysts in MORB (both having H2O 1 ppm), the Lanzo South dunite olivine has high H2O (18-40 ppm) and low Li (0.35-0.83 ppm) contents. Geochemical modelling suggests that the dunite-forming melts were produced by low melting degrees of a mixed garnet-pyroxenite-peridotite mantle source, with a contribution of a garnet pyroxenite component variable from 20 to 80%. The Lanzo dunites experienced migration of melts geochemically enriched and mainly produced in the lowermost part of the melting region. Extraction of enriched melts through dunite channels are probably characteristic of cold thermal regimes, where low temperatures and a thick mantle lithosphere inhibit mixing with melts produced at shallower depths.

  9. Sulphur isotope variations in the mantle from ion microprobe analyses of micro-sulphide inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussidon, M.; Albarede, F.; Sheppard, S.M.F.

    1989-01-01

    21 samples of sulphide trapped either as liquid globules or grains in various minerals (olivine, pyroxenes, ilmenite and garnet) or rocks (basalt glasses, peridotites, eclogites and kimberlites) of mantle origin, have been analysed for their sulphur isotope, and their Cu, Ni, Fe compositions by ion microprobe. The results show a wide range of δ 34 S values between -4.9±1 and +8±1per mille. Sulphides with high nickel contents (up to 40% pentlandite), corresponding mostly to residual peridotites, have δ 34 S values ranging from -3.2per mille to +3.6per mille with a mode of +3±1per mille, compared to low Ni content sulphides, mostly contained in pyroxenites, OIB and kimberlites, ranging from -3.6per mille to +8per mille with a mode of +1±1per mille. The δ 34 S of sulphides originating from within the mantle are variable. The sulphide globules with high Ni contents and δ 34 S values close to +3per mille, are probably produced by 10-20% partial melting of a mantle source containing 300 ppm sulphur as an upper limit and having a δ 34 S value of +0.5±0.5per mille. This difference in δ 34 S values suggests a high-temperature S-isotope fractionation of ≅+3per mille between liquid sulphide and the sulphur dissolved in the silicate liquid. The sulphur isotopes balance in the system upper mantle + oceanic crust + continental crust + seawater requires a mean δ 34 S value of the primitive upper mantle of +0.5per mille, slightly but significantly different from that of chondrites (+0.2±0.2per mille). (orig.)

  10. Key new pieces of the HIMU puzzle from olivines and diamond inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Yaakov; Class, Cornelia; Goldstein, Steven L; Hanyu, Takeshi

    2016-09-29

    Mantle melting, which leads to the formation of oceanic and continental crust, together with crust recycling through plate tectonics, are the primary processes that drive the chemical differentiation of the silicate Earth. The present-day mantle, as sampled by oceanic basalts, shows large chemical and isotopic variability bounded by a few end-member compositions. Among these, the HIMU end-member (having a high U/Pb ratio, μ) has been generally considered to represent subducted/recycled basaltic oceanic crust. However, this concept has been challenged by recent studies of the mantle source of HIMU magmas. For example, analyses of olivine phenocrysts in HIMU lavas indicate derivation from the partial melting of peridotite, rather than from the pyroxenitic remnants of recycled oceanic basalt. Here we report data that elucidate the source of these lavas: high-precision trace-element analyses of olivine phenocrysts point to peridotite that has been metasomatized by carbonatite fluids. Moreover, similarities in the trace-element patterns of carbonatitic melt inclusions in diamonds and HIMU lavas indicate that the metasomatism occurred in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle, fused to the base of the continental crust and isolated from mantle convection. Taking into account evidence from sulfur isotope data for Archean to early Proterozoic surface material in the deep HIMU mantle source, a multi-stage evolution is revealed for the HIMU end-member, spanning more than half of Earth's history. Before entrainment in the convecting mantle, storage in a boundary layer, upwelling as a mantle plume and partial melting to become ocean island basalt, the HIMU source formed as Archean-early Proterozoic subduction-related carbonatite-metasomatized subcontinental lithospheric mantle.

  11. By-products of the serpentinization process on the Oman ophiolite : chemical and isotopic composition of carbonate deposits in alkaline springs, and associated secondary phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissmann, O.; Martinez, I.; Deville, E.; Beaumont, V.; Pillot, D.; Prinzhofer, A.; Vacquand, C.; Chaduteau, C.; Agrinier, P.; Guyot, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The isotopic compositions (d13C, d18O) of natural carbonates produced by the alteration of basic and ultrabasic rocks on the Oman ophiolite have been measured in order to better understand their formation mechanisms. Fossil carbonates developed on altered peridotitic samples, mostly found in fractures, and contemporary carbonates were studied. The samples bear a large range of d13C. Those collected in veins are magnesian (magnesite, dolomite) and have a carbon signature reflecting mixing of processes and important fractionation (-11‰ to 8‰). Their association with talc and lizardite suggests they are by-products of a serpentinization process, that must have occurred as a carbon-rich fluid was circulating at depth. On the other hand, the carbonates are mostly calcic when formed in alkaline springs, most of which are located in the vicinity of lithological discontinuities such as the peridotite-gabbro contact (Moho). Aragonite forms a few meters below the surface of the ponds in Mg-poor water, and is systematically associated with brucite (Mg(OH)2). This suggests most of the Mg dissolved at depth has reprecipitated during the fluid's ascension through fractures or faults as carbonates and serpentine. Further up, on the surface waters of the ponds (depleted in Mg and D.I.C.), thin calcite films precipitate and reach extremely negative d13C values (-28‰), which could reflect either a biological carbon source, or kinetic fractionation from pumping atmospheric CO2. Their formation represent an efficient and natural process for carbon dioxide mineral sequestration. The d18O signature from all samples confirm the minerals crystallized from a low-temperature fluid. The hyperalkaline conditions (pH between 11 and 12) allowing for these fast precipitation kinetics are generated by the serpentinization process occurring at depth, as indicated by the measured associated H2-rich gas flows (over 50%) seeping out to the surface.

  12. Reactive transport model of the formation of oxide-type Ni-laterite profiles (Punta Gorda, Moa Bay, Cuba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Cristina; Galí, Salvador; Villanova-de-Benavent, Cristina; Soler, Josep M.; Proenza, Joaquín A.

    2017-10-01

    Oxide-type Ni-laterite deposits are characterized by a dominant limonite zone with goethite as the economically most important Ni ore mineral and a thin zone of hydrous Mg silicate-rich saprolite beneath the magnesium discontinuity. Fe, less soluble, is mainly retained forming goethite, while Ni is redeposited at greater depth in a Fe(III) and Ni-rich serpentine (serpentine II) or in goethite, where it adsorbs or substitutes for Fe in the mineral structure. Here, a 1D reactive transport model, using CrunchFlow, of Punta Gorda oxide-type Ni-laterite deposit (Moa Bay, Cuba) formation is presented. The model reproduces the formation of the different laterite horizons in the profile from an initial, partially serpentinized peridotite, in 106 years, validating the conceptual model of the formation of this kind of deposits in which a narrow saprolite horizon rich in Ni-bearing serpentine is formed above peridotite parent rock and a thick limonite horizon is formed over saprolite. Results also confirm that sorption of Ni onto goethite can explain the weight percent of Ni found in the Moa goethite. Sensitivity analyses accounting for the effect of key parameters (composition, dissolution rate, carbonate concentration, quartz precipitation) on the model results are also presented. It is found that aqueous carbonate concentration and quartz precipitation significantly affects the laterization process rate, while the effect of the composition of secondary serpentine or of mineral dissolution rates is minor. The results of this reactive transport modeling have proven useful to validate the conceptual models derived from field observations.

  13. Age and duration of eclogite-facies metamorphism, North Qaidam HP/UHP terrane, Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattinson, C.G.; Wooden, J.L.; Liou, J.G.; Bird, D.K.; Wu, C.L.

    2006-01-01

    Amphibolite-facies para-and orthogneisses near Dulan, at the southeast end of the North Qaidam terrane, enclose minor eclogite and peridotite which record ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphism associated with the Early Paleozoic continental collision of the Qilian and Qaidam microplates. Field relations and coesite inclusions in zircons from paragneiss suggest that felsic, mafic, and ultramafic rocks all experienced UHP metamorphism and a common amphibolite-facies retrogression. SHRIMP-RG U-Pb and REE analyses of zircons from four eclogites yield weighted mean ages of 449 to 422 Ma, and REE patterns (flat HREE, no Eu anomaly) and inclusions of garnet, omphacite, and rutile indicate these ages record eclogite-facies metamorphism. The coherent field relations of these samples, and the similar range of individual ages in each sample suggests that the ???25 m.y. age range reflects the duration of eclogite-facies conditions in the studied samples. Analyses from zircon cores in one sample yield scattered 433 to 474 Ma ages, reflecting partial overlap on rims, and constrain the minimum age of eclogite protolith crystallization. Inclusions of Th + REE-rich epidote, and zircon REE patterns are consistent with prograde metamorphic growth. In the Lu??liang Shan, approximately 350 km northwest in the North Qaidam terrane, ages interpreted to record eclogite-facies metamorphism of eclogite and garnet peridotite are as old as 495 Ma and as young as 414 Ma, which suggests that processes responsible for extended high-pressure residence are not restricted to the Dulan region. Evidence of prolonged eclogite-facies metamorphism in HP/UHP localities in the Northeast Greenland eclogite province, the Western Gneiss Region of Norway, and the western Alps suggests that long eclogite-facies residence may be globally significant in continental subduction/collision zones.

  14. A crustal-upper mantle model for southeastern Sicily (Italy) from the integration of petrologic and geophysical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuella, Fabio Carmelo; Brancato, Alfonso; Carbone, Serafina; Gresta, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    An interdisciplinary approach is proposed to investigate the structure and composition of the Permo-Triassic basement of the Hyblean Plateau and Sicily Channel. Comparisons of published data on peridotites and spinels from different geodynamic settings, and new data on Hyblean spinels, reveal the affinity of the Hyblean basement with an ultra-slow spreading oceanic lithosphere, rather than with the Africa continental plate. Similar results derive from volcanic rocks of the studied area, whose Nb/Yb vs. Th/Yb ratio hints at their affinity with the MORB-OIB array, even excluding any possible contamination with continental crust lithologies, unlike North Africa lavas. The comparison of He isotopic ratios from Hyblean Plateau and Sicily Channel highlights their similarity with values measured in fluids emitted from the Rainbow and Logatchev hydrothermal fields in Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Based on petrologic and geochemical evidence for the oceanic nature of the Permo-Triassic basement in southeastern Sicily, and the occurrence of serpentinized harzburgite xenoliths in Hyblean diatremes, the P-wave velocity model proposed for the investigated area is used to estimate lithospheric pressure, density, degree of serpentinization and magnetic susceptibility also considering both abyssal and ophiolitic serpentinites. The resulting values suggest the presence of peridotites affected by different degrees of serpentinization (35-100 vol.%) ranging to a depth of 8-19 km. As a whole, combined seismic, gravimetric and magnetic data indicate the presence of a marked anomaly at a depth of about 19 km. As a consequence, we consider the Moho discontinuity as a serpentinization front, by fixing the relative top at a depth of 19 km. Our results suggest that the oceanic lithospheric model for southeastern Sicily could be broadened to the Sicily Channel, which is possibly correlated to the adjacent Ionian oceanic basin, inferred as belonging to the Oman-Iraq-Levantine-Sicily seaway.

  15. Deformation, static recrystallization, and reactive melt transport in shallow subcontinental mantle xenoliths (Tok Cenozoic volcanic field, SE Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasi, Andréa; Vauchez, Alain; Ionov, Dmitri A.

    2008-07-01

    Partial melting and reactive melt transport may change the composition, microstructures, and physical properties of mantle rocks. Here we explore the relations between deformation and reactive melt transport through detailed microstructural analysis and crystallographic orientation measurements in spinel peridotite xenoliths that sample the shallow lithospheric mantle beneath the southeastern rim of the Siberian craton. These xenoliths have coarse-grained, annealed microstructures and show petrographic and chemical evidence for variable degrees of reaction with silicate melts and fluids, notably Fe-enrichment and crystallization of metasomatic clinopyroxene (cpx). Olivine crystal preferred orientations (CPO) range from strong to weak. [010]-fiber patterns, characterized by a point concentration of [010] normal to the foliation and by dispersion of [100] in the foliation plane with a weak maximum parallel to the lineation, predominate relative to the [100]-fiber patterns usually observed in lithospheric mantle xenoliths and peridotite massifs. Variations in olivine CPO patterns or intensity are not correlated with modal and chemical compositions. This, together with the analysis of microstructures, suggests that reactive melt percolation postdated both deformation and static recrystallization. Preferential crystallization of metasomatic cpx along (010) olivine grain boundaries points to an influence of the preexisting deformation fabrics on melt transport, with higher permeability along the foliation. Similarity between orthopyroxene (opx) and cpx CPO suggests that cpx orientations may be inherited from those of opx during melt-rock reaction. As observed in previous studies, reactive melt transport does not weaken olivine CPO and seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle, except in melt accumulation domains. In contrast, recovery and selective grain growth during static recrystallization may lead to development of [010]-fiber olivine CPO and, if foliations are

  16. Flow in the western Mediterranean shallow mantle: Insights from xenoliths in Pliocene alkali basalts from SE Iberia (eastern Betics, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidas, Károly; Konc, Zoltán.; Garrido, Carlos J.; Tommasi, Andréa.; Vauchez, Alain; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Marchesi, Claudio; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Szabó, Csaba; Varas-Reus, María. Isabel; Gervilla, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Mantle xenoliths in Pliocene alkali basalts of the eastern Betics (SE Iberia, Spain) are spinel ± plagioclase lherzolite, with minor harzburgite and wehrlite, displaying porphyroclastic or equigranular textures. Equigranular peridotites have olivine crystal preferred orientation (CPO) patterns similar to those of porphyroclastic xenoliths but slightly more dispersed. Olivine CPO shows [100]-fiber patterns characterized by strong alignment of [100]-axes subparallel to the stretching lineation and a girdle distribution of [010]-axes normal to it. This pattern is consistent with simple shear or transtensional deformation accommodated by dislocation creep. One xenolith provides evidence for synkinematic reactive percolation of subduction-related Si-rich melts/fluids that resulted in oriented crystallization of orthopyroxene. Despite a seemingly undeformed microstructure, the CPO in orthopyroxenite veins in composite xenoliths is identical to those of pyroxenes in the host peridotite, suggesting late-kinematic crystallization. Based on these observations, we propose that the annealing producing the equigranular microstructures was triggered by melt percolation in the shallow subcontinental lithospheric mantle coeval to the late Neogene formation of veins in composite xenoliths. Calculated seismic properties are characterized by fast propagation of P waves and polarization of fast S waves parallel to olivine [100]-axis (stretching lineation). These data are compatible with present-day seismic anisotropy observations in SE Iberia if the foliations in the lithospheric mantle are steeply dipping and lineations are subhorizontal with ENE strike, implying dominantly horizontal mantle flow in the ENE-WSW direction within vertical planes, that is, subparallel to the paleo-Iberian margin. The measured anisotropy could thus reflect a lithospheric fabric due to strike-slip deformation in the late Miocene in the context of WSW tearing of the subducted south Iberian margin

  17. Deformation and hydration state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Styrian Basin (Pannonian Basin, Eastern Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, L. E.; Hidas, K.; Kovács, I. J.; Klébesz, R.; Szabo, C.

    2016-12-01

    In the Carpathian-Pannonian Region, Neogene alkali basaltic volcanism occurred in six volcanic fields, from which the Styrian Basin Volcanic Field (SBVF) is the westernmost one. In this study, we present new petrographic and crystal preferred orientation (CPO) data, and structural hydroxyl ("water") contents of upper mantle xenoliths from 12 volcanic outcrops across the SBVF. The studied xenoliths are mostly coarse granular lherzolites, amphiboles are present in almost every sample and often replace pyroxenes and spinels. The peridotites are highly annealed, olivines and pyroxenes do not show significant amount of intragranular deformation. Despite the annealed texture of the peridotites, olivine CPO is unambiguous, and varies between [010]-fiber, orthogonal and [100]-fiber symmetry. The CPO of pyroxenes is coherent with coeval deformation with olivine, showing [100]OL distributed subparallel to [001]OPX. The CPO of amphiboles suggest postkinematic epitaxial overgrowth on the precursor pyroxenes. The "water" content of the studied xenoliths exhibit rather high values, up to 10, 290 and 675 ppm in olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, respectively. Ortho- and clinopyroxene pairs show equilibrium in all samples, however "water" loss in olivines is observed in several xenoliths. The xenoliths show equilibrium temperatures from 850 to 1100 °C, which corresponds to lithospheric mantle depths between 30 and 60 km. Equilibrium temperatures show correlation with the varying CPO symmetries and grain size: coarser grained xenoliths with [100]-fiber and orthorhombic symmetry appear in the high temperature (>1000 °C) xenoliths, which is characteristic for asthenospheric origin. Most of the samples display transitional CPO symmetry between [010]-fiber and orthogonal, which indicate extensive lithospheric deformation under varying stress field from transtensional to transpressional settings. Based on the estimated seismic properties of the studied samples, a significant part of

  18. Phase relations in the hydrous CMAS pyrolite in presence of KCl at 2 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonov, O.

    2012-04-01

    In the upper mantle, chlorides are constituents of concentrated aqueous solutions (brines), as well as chloride-carbonate and carbonatite melts. Mineral assemblages coming from diverse depth levels show that mobile (K, Na)Cl-bearing fluids are able to provoke intensive metasomatism of the peridotitic mantle accompanied by melting. Scarce experimental studies on influence of brines on mineral equilibria in the peridotitic mantle (Stalder et al., 2008; Chu et al., 2011) indicate that influence of chlorides on water activity in a fluid equilibrated with forsterite enstatite at pressures above 2 GPa is very similar to their effect at lower "crustal" pressures (e.g. Aranovich, Newton, 1997): decrease of the H2O activity with an increase of the salt content results in an increase of the melting temperature of silicates. Nevertheless, these experiments were performed in the Al-free systems. Presence of Al would provoke an active interaction of alkali chlorides, namely KCl, with silicates with formation of new K-Al-bearing phases, such as phlogopite (in presence of H2O), which would influence on the melting of complex assemblages. In order to investigate an effect of KCl on phase relations in the Al2O3, CaO, Na2O-rich hydrous peridotite and on stability of garnet, pyroxenes, and amphiboles, in particular, experiments on interaction of the model CMAS pyrolite Fo57En17Prp14Di12 (+0.3 wt. % of Na2O) with the H2O-KCl fluid were performed at 2 GPa in the temperature interval 900-1200. Mixtures of synthetic forsterite, diopside, enstatite and pyrope in the above weight ratio were mixed with 14 wt. % of Mg(OH)2 corresponding to 4.4 wt. % of H2O in the system. 2.4, 3.7, 5 and 10 wt. % of KCl were added to silicate-H2O mixture. Experiments were performed using a piston-cylinder apparatus with ½-inch talc high-pressure cells calibrated via brucite = periclase + H2O and albite = jadeite + quartz equilibria curves. Temperature was controlled with accuracy ?1 with the W95Re5/W80Re20

  19. Preliminary data on the Bramberg (Hassberge, Bavaria, Germany) mantle xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuła, Anna; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    Bramberg hill is a well preserved basaltic volcanic cone (494 m asl), situated 2 km north-west of Bramberg village (Hassberge, Bavaria, Germany). Bramberg basalt belongs to Heldburger Ganschar subset of the Central European Volcanic Province and contains 5 - 8 cm peridotitic xenoliths, which are the aim of our study, based on characterization of 7 xenoliths. Two groups of spinel peridotite xenoliths occur in the Bramberg basalt. Group A spinel peridotite (6 xenoliths) is characterized by protogranular texture with typical grain size of 2 - 3 mm (max 8 mm). It consists of olivine (89.9 - 91.1 % Fo, 0.32 - 0.44 wt. % NiO), orthopyroxene (mg# 0.90 - 0.92, Al 0.10 - 0.18 a. pfu), clinopyroxene (mg# 0.90 - 0.92, Al 0.13 - 0.26 a pfu) and spinel (cr# 0.13 - 0.39, mg# 0.58 - 0.75). LA-ICP-MS trace element analyses (xenolith 3150) show that orthopyroxene is depleted relative to primitive mantle. Rare earth element patterns exhibit two trends. The first (U-shaped, LaN/YbN = 0.1) probably reflects orthopyroxene with thin clinopyroxene lamellae, while pure orthopyroxene is characterized by constant depletion from Lu to La (LaN/YbN = 1.1). In the primitive mantle normalized trace element diagram negative Ti, Hf, Sr anomalies occur. Clinopyroxene is enriched in trace elements relative primitive mantle. REE normalized diagram is characterized by constant enrichment from Lu to La (LaN/YbN = 10.7). Strong negative Ti, Hf, Nd and Pb anomalies occur in the trace element pattern. The group B (1 xenolith) contains olivine of forsterite content 87.3 - 88.2 mole % and containing 0.35 - 0.39 wt. % NiO. Orthopyroxene is characterized by mg# 0.88 - 0.89 and variable content of Al 0.07 - 0.14 atoms pfu. Clinopyroxene (mg# 0.88 - 0.90) contains 0.10 - 0.26 atoms Al pfu. Spinel is characterized by low mg# (0.50 - 0.52) and high cr# (0.49) relative to group A xenoliths. The group B xenolith is characterized by presence of carbonates. Carbonates (up to 0.5 mm grains) are located in interstices

  20. Fluid properties control degassing or storage of abiogenic CH4 during slab exhumation: the fluid inclusion record from the Western Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, S.; Castelli, D.; Frezzotti, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Abiogenic CH4 can be produced by interaction between carbonates and reducing fluids derived from the hydration of ultramafics (e.g., mantle peridotite or HP Ol-serpentinite). This process occurs during slab exhumation because cooling promotes serpentinization of olivine in presence of water (Fo + H2O = Atg + Brc and the linked reactions: Fa + H2O = Fe-Atg + Mag + H2 and Atg + CaCO3 + H2 = Di + Brc + CH4 + H2O) at ca. 500-375°C (P=2.0-0.2 GPa). Experiments in the CH4-H2O-NaCl system indicate that, at these conditions, fluids are immiscible even for very low salinity (ca. 3 wt%) and that the NaCl content in the aqueous part of the fluid increases with temperature whereas the CH4 content in the gaseous part shows an opposite trend (Lamb et al., 2002; Li, 2017).In HP rodingite from the Piemonte ophiolite Zone (W Alps), primary fluid inclusions consisting of a brine (6 wt% CaCl2 + 6 wt% NaCl) with H2 + CH4 ≤ 1 mol % [CH4/(H2+CH4) = 0.37-10] occur in vesuvianite veins that formed at P=0.2 GPa and T=375°C. We interpret them as the aqueous part of an immiscible reducing fluid produced during late Alpine serpentinization of the surrounding ultramafics. Interestingly, CH4-H2 gaseous fluids are never reported in rodingite, whereas early CH4-H2O-H2±graphite and CH4-H2±graphite fluid inclusions, with variable gas-water proportions, trapped in calcite at P≤1.0 GPa and T≤450°C, are recently reported from HP "graphitized" ophicarbonate from the Lanzo peridotite Massif (W Alps; Vitale Brovarone et al., 2017).Both HP ophiolites and partially-serpentinized peridotite massifs are, thus, efficient lithologies to produce CH4 during exhumation. The amount of released CH4 depends on the amount of water available during exhumation. However, when fluids immiscibility occurs, the gaseous-rich part (CH4-H2) of the immiscible fluid produced in ultramafics likely remains confined in the slab because it is less mobile with respect to the aqueous-rich part due to its high dihedral

  1. Oriented growth due to topotactic replacement of antigorite by olivine as a mechanism for the formation of B-type olivine CPO in convergent margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, T.; Wallis, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Michibayashi, K.; Mizukami, T.

    2012-12-01

    B-type olivine (Ol) CPO patterns are characterized by an a-axis concentration parallel to the intermediate principle axis of strain and have been proposed by many workers as the cause of seismic anisotropy in the mantle wedge of subduction zones that shows the fast direction perpendicular to the plate movement direction. Experimental work has shown that B-type Ol CPO can form by dislocation creep at relatively high stresses and in the presence of water. Natural examples of B-type Ol CPO have also been reported, but there are several discrepancies with the experimental results. 1) Some natural B-type CPO formed at relatively high temperatures and low stress outside the ranges predicted by experiments. 2) Natural examples lack evidence for the c-slip expected for the formation of B-type Ol CPO by dislocation creep. 3) The high shear stresses expected along subduction boundaries promote the formation of B-type Ol CPO, but these regions are also expected to be associated with the formation of serpentine minerals and even relatively small amounts prevent strong CPO patterns from forming because of grain-boundary sliding occurring between Ol and serpentine. We show B-type Ol CPO can form as a result of static topotactic growth of olivine after high-temperature breakdown of antigorite (Atg) schist. In the Happo-One region of the Hida Marginal belt, Japan, dehydration of foliated Atg produces non-deformed secondary Ol formed in veins or patches and peridotite-hornfels where the conversion is complete.The CPO of non-deformed Ol in veins and in the hornfels shows a strong B-type fabric. The veins show consistent Ol CPO irrespective of the vein orientation, implying the CPO is not related to the vein opening direction. The CPO of Atg bordering the vein Ol shows a strong concentration of c-axes at a high angle to the foliation and a strong alignment of b-axes parallel to the lineation. Numerous recent studies have shown this type of Atg CPO is the most widespread in the

  2. Petrogenesis of the Alaskan-type mafic-ultramafic complex in the Makkah quadrangle, western Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtoor, Abdelmonem; Ahmed, Ahmed Hassan; Harbi, Hesham

    2016-10-01

    The Makkah quadrangle is a part of the Jeddah terrane in the Precambrian basement, Western Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia. Gabal Taftafan mafic-ultramafic complex lies within the central part of the Makkah quadrangle. The Taftafan mafic-ultramafic complex is a well-differentiated rock association which comprises of dunite core, hornblende- and plagioclase-bearing peridotites, troctolite, clinopyroxenite and marginal gabbro, in a distinctive zonal structure. The bulk-rock geochemistry of the Taftafan mafic-ultramafic rocks is characterized by a tholeiitic/sub-alkaline affinity with high Mg in the ultramafic core (0.84) and is systematically decreased towards the marginal gabbro (0.60). The patterns of trace elements show enrichment in the fluid-mobile elements (Sr, Ba) and a pronounced negative Nb anomaly which reflect a hydrous parental magma generated in a subduction tectonic setting. The mafic-ultramafic rocks of the Taftafan complex have low total rare earth elements (REE) displaying sub-parallel patterns leading to the assumption that these rocks are comagmatic and are formed by fractional crystallization from a common magma type. The platinum-group elements (PGE) content of all rock types in the Taftafan complex is very low, with ∑ PPGE > ∑ IPGE; displaying slightly positive slopes of the PGE distribution patterns. The chemistry of ferromagnesian minerals is characterized by a high forsterite (Fo) olivine with wide range (Fo91-67), from ultramafic core to the marginal gabbro, Ca-rich diopsidic clinopyroxene, and calcic hornblende. Orthopyroxene is almost absent from all rock types, or very rare when present. Hornblende and Ca-plagioclase possess the longest crystallization history since they are present in almost all rock types of the complex. Spinels in the dunite and hornblende-bearing peridotite core show homogeneous composition with intermediate Cr# (0.53-0.67). Plagioclase-bearing peridotite and troctolite have two exsolved types of spinel; Al

  3. Multiple magmatism in an evolving suprasubduction zone mantle wedge: The case of the composite mafic-ultramafic complex of Gaositai, North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, T.; Tang, Li; Teng, Xueming

    2017-07-01

    The suprasubduction zone mantle wedge of active convergent margins is impregnated by melts and fluids leading to the formation of a variety of magmatic and metasomatic rock suites. Here we investigate a composite mafic-ultramafic intrusion at Gaositai, in the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC). The hornblende gabbro-serpentinite-dunite-pyroxenite-gabbro-diorite suite surrounded by hornblendites of this complex has long been considered to represent an "Alaskan-type" zoned pluton. We present petrologic, mineral chemical, geochemical and zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf data from the various rock types from Gaositai including hornblende gabbro, serpentinite, dunite, pyroxenite, diorite and the basement hornblendite which reveal the case of multiple melt generation and melt-peridotite interaction. Our new mineral chemical data from the mafic-ultramafic suite exclude an "Alaskan-type" affinity, and the bulk geochemical features are consistent with subduction-related magmatism with enrichment of LILE (K, Rb, and Ba) and LREE (La and Ce), and depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta, Zr, and Hf) and HREE. Zircon U-Pb geochronology reveals that the hornblendites surrounding the Gaositai complex are nearly 2 billion years older than the intrusive complex and yield early Paleoproterozoic emplacement ages (2433-2460 Ma), followed by late Paleoproterozoic metamorphism (1897 Ma). The serpentinites trace the history of a long-lived and replenished ancient sub-continental lithospheric mantle with the oldest zircon population dated as 2479 Ma and 1896 Ma, closely corresponding with the ages obtained from the basement rock, followed by Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic zircon growth. The oldest member in the Gaositai composite intrusion is the dunite that yields emplacement age of 755 Ma, followed by pyroxenite formed through the interaction of slab melt and wedge mantle peridotite at 401 Ma. All the rock suites also carry multiple population of younger zircons ranging in age from Paleozoic to

  4. Preservation of an Archaean whole rock Re-Os isochron for the Venetia lithospheric mantle: Evidence for rapid crustal recycling and lithosphere stabilisation at 3.3 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Quinten H. A.; Klaver, Martijn; Reisberg, Laurie; Riches, Amy J. V.; Davies, Gareth R.

    2017-11-01

    Re-Os and platinum group element analyses are reported for peridotite xenoliths from the 533 Ma Venetia kimberlite cluster situated in the Limpopo Mobile Belt, the Neoarchaean collision zone between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. The Venetian xenoliths provide a rare opportunity to examine the state of the cratonic lithosphere prior to major regional metasomatic disturbance of Re-Os systematics throughout the Phanerozoic. The 32 studied xenoliths record Si-enrichment that is characteristic of the Kaapvaal lithospheric mantle and can be subdivided into five groups based on Re-Os analyses. The most pristine group I samples (n = 13) display an approximately isochronous relationship and fall on a 3.28 ± 0.17 Ga (95 % conf. int.) reference line that is based on their mean TMA age. This age overlaps with the formation age of the Limpopo crust at 3.35-3.28 Ga. The group I samples derive from ∼50 to ∼170 km depth, suggesting coeval melt depletion of the majority of the Venetia lithospheric mantle column. Group II and III samples have elevated Re/Os due to Re addition during kimberlite magmatism. Group II has otherwise undergone a similar evolution as the group I samples with overlapping 187Os/188Os at eruption age: 187Os/188OsEA, while group III samples have low Os concentrations, unradiogenic 187Os/188OsEA and were effectively Re-free prior to kimberlite magmatism. The other sample groups (IV and V) have disturbed Re-Os systematics and provide no reliable age information. A strong positive correlation is recorded between Os and Re concentrations for group I samples, which is extended to groups II and III after correction for kimberlite addition. This positive correlation precludes a single stage melt depletion history and indicates coupled remobilisation of Re and Os. The combination of Re-Os mobility, preservation of the isochronous relationship, correlation of 187Os/188Os with degree of melt depletion and lack of radiogenic Os addition puts tight constraints on

  5. Hyperextension in the Caledonian margin of Baltica and its bearing on the structural and metamorphic evolution of Scandinavian Caledonides (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Scandinavian segment (~2000 km) of the Caledonian-Appalachian orogen formed by a head-on collision of Baltica and Laurentia. The collision followed rapid (>10 cm/yr) convergence, subduction and closure of the Iapetus Ocean in the Ordovician to the Middle Silurian. The collision culminated in a Himalayan type continental collision at 430 Ma, after which the continental subduction/convergence continued for 20 Myr. The terminal stage was characterized by syn- and post-orogenic extension and exhumation, which produced a template used in opening of the present-day Norwegian Sea. The Scandian collision produced a 'layer-cake' tectono-stratigraphy, but correlation of individual nappe units along strike is not trivial. The vestiges of the Iapetus can, however, be traced along the entire Scandinavian Peninsula and constitute the Iapetus suture. Rocks of assumed Laurentian origin structurally overlie the suture. The outboard units underwent several orogenic events that pre-date the Scandian collision and which took place outboard of Baltica. These will not be discussed further here. The Caledonian passive margin of Baltica was very wide, consisting of non-volcanic hyperextended segments as well as passive volcanic margin domains. Basement-cover pairs, in places with mafic dyke-swarms constitute most of these units. The Baltican and assumed Baltican units below the suture have evidence of diachronous and relatively locally developed pre-Scandian deformation and metamorphic events. In S. Norway large basement-cover units are separated by a melange with numerous solitary mantle peridotites and a number of detrital serpentinites. The melange can be traced along strike across S. Norway. Locally, an island-type ';Celtic' fauna is preserved in detrital serpentinite. Some mantle rocks were structurally emplaced, exhumed, eroded and juxtaposed with continental clastics and crust before the Early Ordovician. The melange was recently interpreted to represent an oceanic to

  6. Ferropericlase inclusions in ultradeep diamonds from Sao Luiz (Brazil): high Li abundances and diverse Li-isotope and trace element compositions suggest an origin from a subduction mélange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Hans-Michael; Brey, Gerhard P.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Durali-Müller, Soodabeh; Ludwig, Thomas; Höfer, Heidi E.

    2018-05-01

    The most remarkable feature of the inclusion suite in ultradeep alluvial and kimberlitic diamonds from Sao Luiz (Juina area in Brazil) is the enormous range in Mg# [100xMg/(Mg + Fe)] of the ferropericlases (fper). The Mg-richer ferropericlases are from the boundary to the lower mantle or from the lower mantle itself when they coexist with ringwoodite or Mg- perovskite (bridgmanite). This, however, is not an explanation for the more Fe-rich members and a lowermost mantle or a "D" layer origin has been proposed for them. Such a suggested ultra-deep origin separates the Fe-rich fper-bearing diamonds from the rest of the Sao Luiz ultradeep diamond inclusion suite, which also contains Ca-rich phases. These are now thought to have an origin in the uppermost lower mantle and in the transition zone and to belong either to a peridotitic or mafic (subducted oceanic crust) protolith lithology. We analysed a new set of more Fe-rich ferropericlase inclusions from 10 Sao Luiz ultradeep alluvial diamonds for their Li isotope composition by solution MC-ICP-MS (multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), their major and minor elements by EPMA (electron probe micro-analyser) and their Li-contents by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry), with the aim to understand the origin of the ferropericlase protoliths. Our new data confirm the wide range of ferropericlase Mg# that were reported before and augment the known lack of correlation between major and minor elements. Four pooled ferropericlase inclusions from four diamonds provided sufficient material to determine for the first time their Li isotope composition, which ranges from δ7Li + 9.6 ‰ to -3.9 ‰. This wide Li isotopic range encompasses that of serpentinized ocean floor peridotites including rodingites and ophicarbonates, fresh and altered MORB (mid ocean ridge basalt), seafloor sediments and of eclogites. This large range in Li isotopic composition, up to 5 times higher than `primitive upper mantle' Li

  7. Implications of Zn/Fe ratios for the sources of Colorado Plateau basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzitis, S.; Reid, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Early Miocene to recent mafic magmatism migrated across the Arizona Transition Zone towards the center of the stable Colorado Plateau at a rate of ~ 3-6 km/Myr (Roy et al., 2009). Present-day volcanic centers are close to a stepwise change in the thickness of the lithosphere between the Colorado Plateau and Basin and Range. Accordingly, volcanic migration might track progressive thinning of the lithosphere towards the center of the Colorado Plateau. This project aims to determine the conditions of melt generation across the transition zone in order to investigate the temporal/spatial correlation between volcanism and thinning of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere. Pressure and temperature estimates for Colorado Plateau basalts can be obtained from the Mg and Si contents of melts (Lee et al, 2009) but require melting of a peridotitic source. Eclogite and pyroxenite xenoliths reported in Colorado Plateau basalts show that melt sources could be olivine-poor. Zn/Fe ratios in melts can help to distinguish contributions from olivine-poor sources because they are sensitive to differences in bulk chemistry and to mineralogy (Le Roux et al., 2010). Specifically, Zn/Fe is not fractionated between melt, olivine, and orthopyroxene, but is highly fractionated when clinopyroxene and garnet are present. Our work to date has focused on laser ablation-IC-PMS analysis of individual olivine grains from high-Mg basalts (>8.0 wt. %) from the San Francisco and Mormon Mountain volcanic fields. Preliminary values of Zn/Fe ratios that represent the averages of multiple analyses of several grains in individual samples range from 7.9 to 9.3 (x10000). Variations of up to 1.7 (x10000) in the ratios exist between individual grains within samples and could be the result of co-crystallization of clinopyroxene with olivine. The lowest values in each sample should approach the Zn/Fe ratios of parental melts, and are, in turn, similar to MORB values and predicted peridotite melts. The results suggest

  8. Lithosphere erosion atop mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, R.; Arcay, D.; Tommasi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mantle plumes are traditionally proposed to play an important role in lithosphere erosion. Seismic images beneath Hawaii and Cape Verde show a lithosphere-asthenosphere-boundary (LAB) up to 50 km shallower than the surroundings. However, numerical models show that unless the plate is stationary the thermo-mechanical erosion of the lithosphere does not exceed 30 km. We use 2D petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical models based on a finite-difference method on a staggered grid and marker in cell method to study the role of partial melting on the plume-lithosphere interaction. A homogeneous peridotite composition with a Newtonian temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity is used to simulate both the plate and the convective mantle. A constant velocity, ranging from 5 to 12.5 cm/yr, is imposed at the top of the plate. Plumes are created by imposing a thermal anomaly of 150 to 350 K on a 50 km wide domain at the base of the model (700 km depth); the plate right above the thermal anomaly is 40 Myr old. Partial melting is modeled using batch-melting solidus and liquidus in anhydrous conditions. We model the progressive depletion of peridotite and its effect on partial melting by assuming that the melting degree only strictly increases through time. Melt is accumulated until a porosity threshold is reached and the melt in excess is then extracted. The rheology of the partially molten peridotite is determined using viscous constitutive relationship based on a contiguity model, which enables to take into account the effects of grain-scale melt distribution. Above a threshold of 1%, melt is instantaneously extracted. The density varies as a function of partial melting degree and extraction. Besides, we analyze the kinematics of the plume as it impacts a moving plate, the dynamics of time-dependent small-scale convection (SSC) instabilities developing in the low-viscosity layer formed by spreading of hot plume material at the lithosphere base, and the resulting thermal

  9. High porosity harzburgite and dunite channels for the transport of compositionally heterogeneous melts in the mantle: II. Geochemical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y.; Schiemenz, A.; Xia, Y.; Parmentier, E.

    2009-12-01

    In a companion numerical study [1], we explored the spatial distribution of high porosity harzburgite and dunite channels produced by reactive dissolution of orthopyroxene (opx) in an upwelling mantle column and identified a number of new features. In this study, we examine the geochemical consequences of channelized melt flow under the settings outlined in [1] with special attention to the transport of compositionally heterogeneous melts and their interactions with the surrounding peridotite matrix during melt migration in the mantle. Time-dependent transport equations for a trace element in the interstitial melt and solids that include advection, dispersion, and melt-rock reaction were solved in a 2-D upwelling column using the high-order numerical methods outlined in [1]. The melt and solid velocities were taken from the steady state or quasi-steady state solutions of [1]. In terms of trace element fractionation, the simulation domain can be divided into 4 distinct regions: (a) high porosity harzburgite channel, overlain by; (b) high porosity dunite channel; (c) low porosity compacting boundary layer surrounding the melt channels; and (d) inter-channel regions outside (c). In the limit of local chemical equilibrium, melting in region (d) is equivalent to batch melting, whereas melting and melt extraction in (c) is more close to fractional melting with the melt suction rate first increase from the bottom of the melting column to a maximum near the bottom of the dunite channel and then decrease upward in the compacting boundary layer. The melt composition in the high porosity harzburgite channel is similar to that produced by high-degree batch melting (up to opx exhaustion), whereas the melt composition in the dunite is a weighted average of the ultra-depleted melt from the harzburgite channel below, the expelled melt from the compacting boundary layer, and melt produced by opx dissolution along the sidewalls of the dunite channel. Compaction within the dunite

  10. Depleted and metasomatized oceanic lithosphere beneath La Palma, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janisch, Astrid; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2017-04-01

    Due to the inaccessibility of Earth's interior, xenoliths became the best possibility to study the chemical composition of the earth mantle as well as its various processes. Three samples out of the sample suite of mantle peridotites from San Antonio Volcano on La Palma, Canary Islands, have been chosen to illustrate three examples of diverse mantle metasomatic events. The first sample, a pyroxene-hornblende-peridotite, was influenced by an alkali-rich, silicic-hydrous undersaturated melt and/or fluid forming a conspicuous cross-cutting amphibole-apatite-dyke with several veins percolating through the rock. Forsterite content in olivine varies between 82.5 - 85.5 and 86.0 - 89.0, suggesting at least two different occurrences of metasomatic overprint. Clinopyroxenes are mostly found in association with amphibole and in textural equilibrium hinting that both minerals may have grown together, while orthopyroxene have only been found as remnant inclusions in olivine. These clinopyroxenes are Cr-Diopsides with En43.40-50.97-Wo43.99-48.64-Fs4.30-8.22 and Mg# between 85.54 and 92.36. Secondary clinopyroxenes are Ti-Augites with En39.86-46.81-Wo46.65-51.98-Fs5.86-8.72 and Mg# of 82.44 - 89.09. The second sample, a sp-dunite, is characterized by haüyne-bearing melt veins which clearly indicate host-basalt infiltration. The haüyne is always in contact with amphibole, spinel and clinopyroxene denoting that they have been formed at the same time because there is no evidence for reaction among these phases. The melt infiltration apparently took place prior to xenolith entrainment in the host basalt. Primary olivine has Fo content of 89.57 - 89.67 with NiO ranging from 0.32 - 0.334, in contrast Fo content in secondary olivine varies from 89.05 - 90.86 and NiO fluctuates between 0.24 - 0.31. Cr-Diopside compositions are in range of En41.63-47.05-Wo47.83-51-90-Fs4.93-6.64 and Mg# between 86.48 - 90.50. The third sample is also a sp-dunite and marked by a network of phlogopite

  11. Fluid transport in reaction induced fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Sun, WaiChing; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-04-01

    The process of fracture formation due to a volume increasing chemical reaction has been studied in a variety of different settings, e.g. weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al. te{royne}, serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite by Rudge et al. te{rudge} and replacement reactions in silica-poor igneous rocks by Jamtveit et al. te{jamtveit}. It is generally assumed that fracture formation will increase the net permeability of the rock, and thus increase the reactant transport rate and subsequently the total rate of material conversion, as summarised by Kelemen et al. te{kelemen}. Ulven et al. te{ulven_1} have shown that for fluid-mediated processes the ratio between chemical reaction rate and fluid transport rate in bulk rock controls the fracture pattern formed, and Ulven et al. te{ulven_2} have shown that instantaneous fluid transport in fractures lead to a significant increase in the total rate of the volume expanding process. However, instantaneous fluid transport in fractures is clearly an overestimate, and achievable fluid transport rates in fractures have apparently not been studied in any detail. Fractures cutting through an entire domain might experience relatively fast advective reactant transport, whereas dead-end fractures will be limited to diffusion of reactants in the fluid, internal fluid mixing in the fracture or capillary flow into newly formed fractures. Understanding the feedback process between fracture formation and permeability changes is essential in assessing industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock, but little is seemingly known about how large the permeability change will be in reaction-induced fracturing. In this work, we study the feedback between fracture formation during volume expansion and fluid transport in different fracture settings. We combine a discrete element model (DEM) describing a volume expanding process and the related fracture formation with different models that describe the fluid transport in the

  12. Universal single grain amphibole thermobarometer for mantle rocks - preliminary calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashchepkov, Igor

    2017-04-01

    Calibration of S-Al- K-Na-Ca distribution in the structure of the mantle amphiboles (Cr- hornblende, pargasite, kaersutite) using experimental data (Niida, Green, 1999; Wallace Green, 1991, Conceicao, Green, 2004; Medard et al, 2006; Safonov, Butvina, 2013; 2016; Pirard, Hermann, 2015 etc) allows to obtain an equation for pressure estimates in 0.5 - 4.5 GPa interval. Regression calculated pressures with experimental values (R 0.82) and precision 5 kbar allow to use barometer for a wide range of mantle rocks from peridotite to pyroxenites and megacrystals. For the higher pressures (Cr- pargasite richterite) calibration is carried by the cross- correlations with the estimates calculated for the natural associations obtained using clino- and orthopyroxene. IT was used KD =Si/(8-Al-2.2*Ti)*(Na+K))/Ca for the following equation: P(GPa)=0.0035*(4+K/(Na+K))*2*Mg)/Fe+3.75*(K+Na)/Ca))*KD*ToK**0.75/ (1+3.32*Fe)-ln(1273/ToK*5*(8*Mg-Al*2 +3*Ti+8*Cr+3*K)/10 Th advantage of this barometer comparing with the previous (Ridolfi, Renzulli, 2012) is that is working with all mantle amphibole types. For the calculations of the PT parameters of the natural xenocrysts it was used monomineral version of Gar-Amph termometer (Ravna et al., 2000) in combination with the received barometer. Contents of Ca- Mg and Fe in associated garnets were calculated usinf the regressions obtained from natural and experimental associations. Aplication of the mantle amphibole thermobarometry for the reconstruction of sections of the cratonic mantle lithosphere of Yakutia show that amphibloles are distributed in various parts of mantle sections in deifferent mantle terranes of Yakutia. The most abundant amphoboles from Alakite region are distributed within all mantle section. In the SCLM beneat Yubileyaya pipe thehalf of them belong to the spinel garnet facie refering to the upper pyroxenitic suit and Cr- hornblende - mica viens. The second group reffer to the eclogite pyroxenite layer in the middle part of

  13. Crystal preferred orientations of minerals from mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks form the Catalan Volcanic Zone (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Roig, Mercè; Galán, Gumer; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks from the Catalan Volcanic Zone, associated with the Neogene-Quaternary rift system in NE Spain, are formed of anhydrous spinel lherzolites and harzburgites with minor olivine websterites. Both peridotites are considered residues of variable degrees of partial melting, later affected by metasomatism, especially the harzburgites. These and the websterites display protogranular microstructures, whereas lherzolites show continuous variation between protogranular, porphyroclastic and equigranular forms. Thermometric data of new xenoliths indicate that protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and websterites were equilibrated at higher temperatures than porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites. Mineral chemistry also indicates lower equilibrium pressure for porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites than for the protogranular ones. Crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine and pyroxenes from these new xenoliths were determined with the EBSD-SEM technique to identify the deformation stages affecting the lithospheric mantle in this zone and to assess the relationships between the deformation fabrics, processes and microstructures. Olivine CPOs in protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and a pyroxenite display [010]-fiber patterns characterized by a strong point concentration of the [010] axis normal to the foliation and girdle distribution of [100] and [001] axes within the foliation plane. Olivine CPO symmetry in porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites varies continuously from [010]-fiber to orthorhombic and [100]-fiber types. The orthorhombic patterns are characterized by scattered maxima of the three axes, which are normal between them. The rare [100]-fiber patterns display strong point concentration of [100] axis, with normal girdle distribution of the other two axes, which are aligned with each other. The patterns of pyroxene CPOs are more dispersed than those of olivine, especially for clinopyroxene, but

  14. The temperature of primary melts and mantle sources of komatiites, OIBs, MORBs and LIPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    There is general agreement that the convecting mantle, although mostly peridotitic in composition, is compositionally and thermally heterogeneous on different spatial scales. The amount, sizes, temperatures and compositions of these heterogeneities significantly affect mantle dynamics because they may diverge greatly from dominant peridotites in their density and fusibility. Differences in potential temperature and composition of mantle domains affect magma production and cannot be easily distinguished from each other. This has led to radically different interpretations of the melting anomalies that produce ocean-island basalts, large igneous provinces and komatiites: most scientists believe that they originate as hot, deep-sourced mantle plumes; but a small though influential group (e.g. Anderson 2005, Foulger, 2010) propose that they derive from high proportions of easily fusible recycled or delaminated crust, or in the case of komatiites contain large amount of H2O (e.g. Grove & Parman, 2004). The way to resolve this ambiguity is an independent estimation of temperature and composition of mantle sources of various types of magma. In this paper I report application of newly developed olivine-spinel-melt geothermometers based on partition of Al, Cr, Sc and Y for different primitive lavas from mid-ocean ridges, ocean-island basalts, large igneous provinces and komatiites. The results suggest significant variations of crystallization temperature for the same Fo of high magnesium olivines of different types of mantle-derived magmas: from the lowest (down to 1220 degree C) for MORB to the highest (up to over 1500 degree C) for komatiites and Siberian meimechites. These results match predictions from Fe-Mg olivine-melt equilibrium and confirm the relatively low temperature of the mantle source of MORB and higher temperatures in the mantle plumes that produce the OIB of Iceland, Hawaii, Gorgona, Archean komatiites and several LIPs (e.g Siberian and NAMP). The

  15. 1.88 Ga São Gabriel AMCG association in the southernmost Uatumã-Anauá Domain: Petrological implications for post-collisional A-type magmatism in the Amazonian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valério, Cristóvão da Silva; Macambira, Moacir José Buenano; Souza, Valmir da Silva; Dantas, Elton Luiz; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll

    2018-02-01

    In the southernmost Uatumã-Anauá Domain, central Amazonian craton (Brazil), crop out 1.98 Ga basement inliers represented by (meta)leucosyenogranites and amphibolites (Igarapé Canoas Suite), 1.90-1.89 Ga high-K calc-alkaline granitoids (Água Branca Suite), a 1.88-1.87 Ga alkali-calcic A-type volcano-plutonic system (Iricoumé-Mapuera), Tonian SiO2-satured alkaline granitoids, 1.45-1.25 Ga orthoderived metamorphic rocks (Jauaperi Complex) and Orosirian-Upper Triassic mafic intrusions. New data on petrography, multielementar geochemistry, in situ zircon U-Pb ages and Nd and Hf isotopes of alkali-calcic A-type granites (São Gabriel Granite, Mapuera Suite) and related rocks are indicative of a 1.89-1.87 Ga volcano-plutonic system integrated to the São Gabriel AMCG association. Its magmatic evolution was controlled by the fractional crystallization combined with magma mixing and cumulation processes. Nd isotope values (εNdt values = - 3.71 to + 0.51 and Nd TDM model age = 2.44 to 2.12 Ga) and U-Pb inherited zircon crystals (2115 ± 22 Ma; 2206 ± 21 Ma; 2377 ± 17 Ma, 2385 ± 17 Ma) of the São Gabriel system indicate a large participation of Siderian-Rhyacian crust (granite-greenstones and granulites) and small contribution of Rhyacian mantelic magma. εHft values (+ 5.2 to - 5.8) and Hf TDM ages (3.27-2.14 Ga) also point to contribution of Paleoarchean-Rhyacian crustal melts and small participation of Siderian-Rhyacian mantle melts. Residual melts from the lower crust have been mixed with basaltic melts generated by partial melting of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (peridotite) in a post-collisional setting at 1.89-1.87 Ga. The mafic melts of such a mixture could have been originated through partial melting of residual ocean plate fragments (eclogites) which ascended onto a residual mantle wedge (hornblende peridotite) and melted it, resulting in modified basaltic magma which, by underplating, led heat to the anatexis of the lower continental crust

  16. Platinum-Group Minerals and Other Accessory Phases in Chromite Deposits of the Alapaevsk Ophiolite, Central Urals, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Zaccarini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An electron microprobe study has been carried out on platinum-group minerals, accessory phases, and chromite in several chromite deposits of the Alapaevsk ophiolite (Central Urals, Russia namely the Bakanov Kluch, Kurmanovskoe, Lesnoe, 3-d Podyony Rudnik, Bol’shaya Kruglyshka, and Krest deposits. These deposits occur in partially to totally serpentinized peridotites. The microprobe data shows that the chromite composition varies from Cr-rich to Al-rich. Tiny platinum-group minerals (PGM, 1–10 µm in size, have been found in the chromitites. The most abundant PGM is laurite, accompanied by minor cuproiridsite and alloys in the system Os–Ir–Ru. A small grain (about 20 μm was found in the interstitial serpentine of the Bakanov Kluch chromitite, and its calculated stoichiometry corresponds to (Ni,Fe5P. Olivine, occurring in the silicate matrix or included in fresh chromite, has a mantle-compatible composition in terms of major and minor elements. Several inclusions of amphibole, Na-rich phlogopite, and clinopyroxene have been identified. The bimodal Cr–Al composition of chromite probably corresponds to a vertical distribution in the ophiolite sequence, implying formation of Cr-rich chromitites in the deep mantle, and Al-rich chromitites close to the Moho-transition zone, in a supra-subduction setting. The presence of abundant hydrous silicate inclusions, such as amphibole and phlogopite, suggests that the Alapaevsk chromitites crystallized as a result of the interaction between a melt enriched in fluids and peridotites. Laurite and cuproiridsite are considered to be magmatic in origin, i.e., entrapped as solid phases during the crystallization of chromite at high temperatures. The sulfur fugacity was relatively high to allow the precipitation of Ir-bearing sulfides, but below the Os–OsS2 buffer. The alloys in the system Os–Ir–Ru are classified as secondary PGM, i.e., formed at low temperature during the serpentinization process. The

  17. Multi-scale Onland-Offshore Investigations of the New Caledonia Ophiolite, SW Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, C. N.; Collot, J.; Sevin, B.; Patriat, M.; Etienne, S.; Iseppi, M.; Lesimple, S.; Jeanpert, J.; Mortimer, N. N.; Poli, S.; Pattier, F.; Juan, C.; Robineau, B.; Godard, M.; Cluzel, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Peridotite Nappe of New Caledonia is one of the largest ultramafic ophiolite in the World: it represents about one quarter of the 500 x 80 km island of Grande Terre. This extensive upper mantle unit was tectonically emplaced during the Eocene onto the northeastern edge of Zealandia continent. It is weakly deformed because it was not involved in a collision belt after obduction. A dome-shaped Eocene HP/LT metamorphic complex was exhumed across the fore-arc mantle lithosphere in the northern tip of the island. Post-obduction Miocene to Present coral reefs developed in shallow waters around Grande Terre and surrounding islands. In the perspective of a possible onshore/offshore drilling project (IODP/ICDP), we present recent advances in our understanding of offshore extensions of this ophiolite. To the south of New Caledonia, the offshore continuation of the ultramafic allochthon has been identified by dredges and by its geophysical signature as a continuous linear body that extends over a distance of more than 400 km at about 2000m bsl. Such water depths allow an unprecedented seismic reflection imaging of a drowned and well-preserved ophiolite. Seismic profiles show that the nappe has a flat-top, and is capped by carbonate reefs and dissected by several major normal faults. To the east of this presumed ultramafic body, Felicité Ridge is a 30 km wide, 350 km long, dome-shaped ridge, which may be interpreted as the possible southern extension of the HP/LT metamorphic complex observed onshore. Onshore, several 150 to 200 m long cores were drilled in the ophiolite and airborne electromagnetic allowed high-resolution imaging down to 400 m depth. These recent results allow identification of internal thrusts within the peridotite body and more superficial landslides. The analysis of polyphase fracturation and associated serpentinization brings new constraints on the tectonic evolution of the ophiolite and its subsequent weathering pattern. We integrate these data and

  18. Diverse P-T paths for the Cycladic ultramafic rock associations: Constraints on their origin, emplacement and exhumation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzir, Y; Garfunkel, Z; Avigad, D; Matthews, A

    2008-01-01

    Within the Alpine orogen of the Cyclades ultramafic rocks occur in diverse tectonic positions, are associated with a variety of rock sequences and are regionally metamorphosed at variable conditions. Here this diversity is interpreted in terms of variable mechanisms for incorporation of mantle rocks into orogenic belts and used to better constrain spatial heterogeneity of P-T burial and exhumation paths in the Cyclades. The Cycladic Blueschist Unit (CBU) was metamorphosed first at high pressure conditions in the Eocene (M1) and variably overprinted during exhumation in the Early Miocene (M2). On the islands of Syros and Evia the CBU includes relatively thin HP-LT ophiolitic melange intervals hosted by meta-sedimentary sequences. Meta-serpentinites are associated with eclogitized metagabbro and metabasites on Syros, but with epidote blueschists on Evia. Given the wide and comparable geochemical heterogeneity in the Syros and Evian melanges, the Syros metabasites record higher M1 temperatures (450-500 deg. C) relative to their Evian counterparts (400-430 deg. C). The M2 overprint is manifested in Syros by greenschist facies assemblages (∼450 deg. C), whereas pumpellyite-actinolite assemblage (∼350 deg. C) overgrew blueschists in Evia. Within the M2 migmatized leucogneiss core of the Naxos dome (∼700 0 C) meta-peridotite lenses are the sole preservers of pre-M2 history. The Naxos meta-peridotites possess relict mantle assemblage, fertile spinel lherzolite chemical composition and mantle-like oxygen isotope ratios. Thus unlike ophiolite-associated ultramafics in the Cyclades that were serpentinized prior to metamorphism, the Naxos metaperidotites were directly emplaced from the subcontinental mantle into an underthrust continent during collision and HP metamorphism. Ultramafic assemblages constrain M1 temperatures on Naxos to 550-650 0 C. It follows that going southeastwards from Evia through Syros to Naxos progressively deeper levels of the subducted plate are

  19. Origin of multiple serpentinization events in New Caledonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, M.; Guillot, S.; Muñoz, M.; Picard, C.

    2011-12-01

    Studies on serpentinites around the world have shown that various polymorphs can coexist depending on the temperature, pressure and chemistry of the formation environment. Identifying serpentine polymorphs can thus provide significant constrains on the geodynamic environment at the time of formation. The New Caledonia ophiolite (Southwest Pacific) is one of the world's largest (500 km long, 50 km wide and 2 km thick). Emplaced during Eocene, it is thrust upon the continental Norfolk ridge, which derived from the splitting of the East Gondwana margin during Lower Late Cretaceous. The ophiolite consists of a large continuous massif occurring in the south of the island and some smaller isolated klippes located along the West coast. The peridotites are mostly harzburgite, related to a supra-subduction zone environment. The northernmost massifs are also composed of lherzolites, inherited from the opening of the South Loyalty Basin where the ophiolite was formed. Serpentinization is ubiquitous (usually >50%) independently from the nature of the peridotite. However, numerous studies have focused on the ophiolite but very few on the serpentinite. In this study, we use the Raman spectroscopy to identify serpentine polymorph in each part of the ophiolite. In situ trace element measurements were performed to constrain the behavior of fluid mobile element (FME: As, Sb, B, Li, Cs, Pb, U, Ba, Sr), and we are currently analyzing stable isotopic ratios to investigate the origin of fluids. Our results show that lizardite represents ~90% of the serpentine in the New Caledonia ophiolite. Only the serpentine sole has recorded multiple serpentinization events. In this horizon, the lizardite is crosscut by millimeter to centimeter antigorite veins. Chrysotile is the last polymorph to crystallize in millimeter crackseals. If the formation of the lizardite can be easily related to abyssal history of the ophiolite for the lherzolite and its supra-subduction history for the harzburgite, the

  20. Linking precious metal enrichment and halogen cycling in mafic magmatic systems: insights from the Rum layered intrusion, NW Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A. P.; O'Driscoll, B.; Clay, P. L.; Burgess, R.

    2017-12-01

    Layered intrusions host the world's largest known concentrations of the platinum-group elements (PGE). Emphasis has been attached to the role of halogen-bearing fluids in concentrating the precious metals, but whether this occurs at the magmatic stage, or via subsequent metasomatism, is actively debated. One obstacle to progress has been the analytical difficulty of measuring low abundances of the halogens in the cumulate products of layered intrusions. To elucidate the importance of the halogens in facilitating PGE-mineralisation, as well as fingerprint halogen provenance and assess the importance of halogen cycling in mafic magma systems more generally, a suite of samples encompassing different stages of activity of the Palaeogene Rum layered intrusion was investigated. Halogen abundances were measured by neutron irradiation noble gas mass spectrometric analysis, permitting the detection of relatively low (ppm-ppb) abundances of Cl, Br and I in mg-sized samples. The samples include PGE-enriched chromite seams, various cumulates (e.g., peridotites), picrites (approximating the Rum parental magma), and pegmatites representing volatile-rich melts that circulated the intrusion at a late-stage in its solidification history. The new data reveal that PGE-bearing chromite seams contain relatively low Cl concentrations (2-3 ppm), with high molar ratios of Br/Cl and I/Cl (0.005 and 0.009, respectively). The picrites and cumulates have Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios close to sub-continental lithospheric mantle values of approximately 0.0013 and 0.00002, respectively, and thus likely reflect the Rum magma source region. A positive correlation between Cl and Br signifies comparable partitioning behaviour in all samples. However, I is more variable, displaying a positive correlation with Cl for more primitive samples (e.g. picrite and peridotite), and seemingly decoupling from Br and Cl in chromite seams and pegmatites. The relative enrichment of I over Cl in the chromite seams points

  1. Continental basalts record the crust-mantle interaction in oceanic subduction channel: A geochemical case study from eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2017-09-01

    Continental basalts, erupted in either flood or rift mode, usually show oceanic island basalts (OIB)-like geochemical compositions. Although their depletion in Sr-Nd isotope compositions is normally ascribed to contributions from the asthenospheric mantle, their enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) is generally associated with variable enrichments in the Sr-Nd isotope compositions. This indicates significant contributions from crustal components such as igneous oceanic crust, lower continental crust and seafloor sediment. Nevertheless, these crustal components were not incorporated into the mantle sources of continental basalts in the form of solidus rocks. Instead they were processed into metasomatic agents through low-degree partial melting in order to have the geochemical fractionation of the largest extent to achieve the enrichment of LILE and LREE in the metasomatic agents. Therefore, the mantle sources of continental basalts were generated by metasomatic reaction of the depleted mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) mantle with hydrous felsic melts. Nevertheless, mass balance considerations indicate differential contributions from the mantle and crustal components to the basalts. While the depleted MORB mantle predominates the budget of major elements, the crustal components predominate the budget of melt-mobile incompatible trace elements and their pertinent radiogenic isotopes. These considerations are verified by model calculations that are composed of four steps in an ancient oceanic subduction channel: (1) dehydration of the subducting crustal rocks at subarc depths, (2) anataxis of the dehydrated rocks at postarc depths, (3) metasomatic reaction of the depleted MORB mantle peridotite with the felsic melts to generate ultramafic metasomatites in the lower part of the mantle wedge, and (4) partial melting of the metasomatites for basaltic magmatism. The composition of metasomatites is quantitatively dictated by

  2. Metaultramafic schists and dismembered ophiolites of the Ashe Metamorphic Suite of northwestern North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Loren A.; Merschat, Arthur J.; Vance, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Metaultramafic rocks (MUR) in the Ashe Metamorphic Suite (AMS) of northwestern North Carolina include quartz ± feldspar-bearing QF-amphibolites and quartz-deficient, locally talc-, chlorite-, and/or Mg-amphibole-bearing TC-amphibolites. Some workers divide TC-amphibolites into Todd and Edmonds types, based on mineral and geochemical differences, and we provisionally add a third type – olivine ± pyroxene-rich, Rich Mountain-type rocks. Regionally, MUR bodies range from equant, Rich Mountain- to highly elongate, Todd-TC-amphibolite-type bodies. The MURs exhibit three to five mineral associations containing assemblages with olivine, anthophyllitic amphibole, Mg-hornblende, Mg-actinolite, cummingtonite, and serpentine representing decreasing eclogite to greenschist facies grades of metamorphism over time. MUR protoliths are difficult to determine. Southwestern MUR bodies have remnant olivine ± pyroxene-rich assemblages representing ultrabasic-basic, dunite-peridotite-pyroxenite protoliths. Northeastern TC-amphibolite MURs contain hornblende and actinolitic amphiboles plus chlorites – aluminous and calcic assemblages suggesting to some that metasomatism of basic, QF-amphibolites yields all TC-amphibolites. Yet MgO-CaO-Al2O3 and trace element chemistries of many TC-amphibolites resemble compositions of plagioclase peridotites. We show that a few AMS TC-amphibolites had basaltic/gabbroic protoliths, while presenting arguments opposing application of the metasomatic hypothesis to all TC-amphibolites. We establish that MUR bodies are petrologically heterolithic and that TC-amphibolites are in contact with many rock types; that those with high Cr, Ni, and Mg have olivine- or pyroxene-dominated protoliths; that most exhibit three or more metamorphic mineral associations; and that contacts thought to be metasomatic are structural. Clearly, different MUR bodies have different chemistries representing various protoliths, and have different mineral assemblages, reflecting

  3. Primary magmas and mantle sources of Emeishan basalts constrained from major element, trace element and Pb isotope compositions of olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Wu, Ya-Dong; Zhang, Le; Nichols, Alexander R. L.; Hong, Lu-Bing; Zhang, Yin-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2017-07-01

    Olivine-hosted melt inclusions within lava retain important information regarding the lava's primary magma compositions and mantle sources. Thus, they can be used to infer the nature of the mantle sources of large igneous provinces, which is still not well known and of the subject of debate. We have analysed the chemical compositions and Pb isotopic ratios of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in the Dali picrites, Emeishan Large Igneous Province (LIP), SW China. These are the first in-situ Pb isotope data measured for melt inclusions found in the Emeishan picrites and allow new constraints to be placed on the source lithology of the Emeishan LIP. The melt inclusions show chemical compositional variations, spanning low-, intermediate- and high-Ti compositions, while their host whole rocks are restricted to the intermediate-Ti compositions. Together with the relatively constant Pb isotope ratios of the melt inclusions, the compositional variations suggest that the low-, intermediate- and high-Ti melts were derived from compositionally similar sources. The geochemical characteristics of melt inclusions, their host olivines, and whole-rocks from the Emeishan LIP indicate that Ca, Al, Mn, Yb, and Lu behave compatibly, and Ti, Rb, Sr, Zr, and Nb behave incompatibly during partial melting, requiring a pyroxenite source for the Emeishin LIP. The wide range of Ti contents in the melt inclusions and whole-rocks of the Emeishan basalts reflects different degrees of partial melting in the pyroxenite source at different depths in the melting column. The Pb isotope compositions of the melt inclusions and the OIB-like trace element compositions of the Emeishan basalts imply that mixing of a recycled ancient oceanic crust (EM1-like) component with a peridotite component from the lower mantle (FOZO-like component) could have underwent solid-state reaction, producing a secondary pyroxenite source that was subsequently partially melted to form the basalts. This new model of pyroxenite

  4. Crustal Accretion at Subduction Initiation Along Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc and the Link to SSZ Ophiolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, O.; Tani, K.; Reagan, M. K.; Kanayama, K.; Umino, S.; Harigane, Y.; Sakamoto, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) forearc preserves the earliest arc magmatic history from subduction initiation to the establishment of the arc. Recent investigations have established a bottom to top igneous stratigraphy of: 1) mantle peridotite, 2) gabbroic rocks, 3) a sheeted dyke complex, 4) basaltic pillow lavas (forearc basalts: FAB), 5) boninites and magnesian andesites, 6) tholeiites and calcalkaline arc lavas. This stratigraphy has many similarities to supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites. One of the most important common characteristics between the SSZ ophiolites and the forearc crust is the occurrence of MORB-like basaltic lavas underlying or accompanying boninites and early arc volcanic suites. A key observation from the IBM forearc is that FAB differs from nearby back-arc lavas in chemical characteristics, including a depletion in moderately incompatible elements. This indicates that FAB is not a pre-existing oceanic basement of the arc, but the first magmatic product after subduction initiation. Sheeted dikes of FAB composition imply that this magmatism was associated with seafloor spreading, possibly triggered by onset of slab sinking. Recognition of lavas with transitional geochemical characteristics between the FAB and the boninites strongly implies genetic linkage between these two magma types. The close similarity of the igneous stratigraphy of SSZ ophiolites to the IBM forearc section strongly implies a common magmatic evolutionary path, i.e., decompressional melting of a depleted MORB-type mantle is followed by melting of an even more depleted mantle with the addition of slab-derived fluid/melt to produce boninite magma. Similarity of magmatic process between IBM forearc and Tethyan ophiolites appears to be reflected on common characteristics of upper mantle section. Peridotite from both sections show more depleted characteristics compared to upper mantle rocks from mid-ocean ridges. Age determinations reveal that first magmatism at the IBM arc

  5. Metasomatism and the Weakening of Cratons: A Mechanism to Rift Cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenker, Stefanie; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The preservation of cratons is a demonstration of their strength and resistance to deformation. However, several cratons are rifting now (e.g. Tanzania and North China Craton) or have rifted in the past (e.g. North Atlantic Craton). To explain this paradox, we suggest that widespread metasomatism of the originally cold depleted dehydrated craton mantle lithosphere root can act as a potential weakening mechanism. This process, particularly melt metasomatism, increases root density through a melt-peridotite reaction, and reduces root viscosity by increasing the temperature and rehydrating the cratonic mantle lithosphere. Using 2D numerical models, we model silicate-melt metasomatism and rehydration of cold cratonic mantle lithosphere that is positioned beside standard Phanerozoic lithosphere. The models are designed to investigate when a craton is sufficiently weakened to undergo rifting and is no longer protected by the initially weaker adjacent standard Phanerozoic lithosphere. Melt is added to specified layers in the cratonic mantle lithosphere at a uniform volumetric rate determined by the duration of metasomatism (3 Myr, 10 Myr or 30 Myr), until a total of ~30% by volume of melt has been added. During melt addition heat and mass are properly conserved and the density and volume increase by the respective amounts required by the reaction with the peridotite. No extensional boundary conditions are applied to the models during the metasomatism process. As expected, significant refertilization leads to removal and thinning of progressively more gravitationally unstable cratonic mantle lithosphere. We show that the duration of metasomatism dictates the final temperature in the cratonic upper mantle lithosphere. Consequently, when extensional boundary conditions are applied in our rifting tests in most cases the Phanerozoic lithosphere rifts. The craton rifts only in the models with the hottest cratonic upper mantle lithosphere. Our results indicate rifting of cratons

  6. Inclusions of crichtonite-group minerals in Cr-pyropes from the Internatsionalnaya kimberlite pipe, Siberian Craton: Crystal chemistry, parageneses and relationships to mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvukhin, Dmitriy I.; Malkovets, Vladimir G.; Sharygin, Igor S.; Tretiakova, Irina G.; Griffin, William L.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.

    2018-05-01

    Cr-pyrope xenocrysts and associated inclusions of crichtonite-group minerals from the Internatsionalnaya kimberlite pipe were studied to provide new insights into processes in the lithospheric mantle beneath the Mirny kimberlite field, Siberian craton. Pyropes are predominantly of lherzolitic paragenesis (Cr2O3 2-6 wt%) and have trace-element spectra typical for garnets from fertile mantle (gradual increase in chondrite-normalized values from LREE to MREE-HREE). Crichtonite-group minerals commonly occur as monomineralic elongated inclusions, mostly in association with rutile, Mg-ilmenite and Cr-spinel within individual grains of pyrope. Sample INT-266 hosts intergrowth of crichtonite-group mineral and Cl-apatite, while sample INT-324 contains polymineralic apatite- and dolomite-bearing assemblages. Crichtonite-group minerals are Al-rich (1.1-4.5 wt% Al2O3), moderately Zr-enriched (1.3-4.3 wt% ZrO2), and are Ca-, Sr-, and occasionally Ba-dominant in terms of A-site occupancy; they also contain significant amounts of Na and LREE. T-estimates and chemical composition of Cr-pyropes imply that samples represent relatively low-T peridotite assemblages with ambient T ranging from 720 to 820°С. Projected onto the 35 mW/m2 cratonic paleogeotherm for the Mirny kimberlite field (Griffin et al., 1999b. Tectonophysics 310, 1-35), temperature estimates yield a P range of 34-42 kbar ( 110-130 km), which corresponds to a mantle domain in the uppermost part of the diamond stability field. The presence of crichtonite-group minerals in Cr-pyropes has petrological and geochemical implications as evidence for metasomatic enrichment of some incompatible elements in the lithospheric mantle beneath the Mirny kimberlite field. The genesis of Cr-pyropes with inclusions of crichtonite-group minerals is attributed to the percolation of Ca-Sr-Na-LREE-Zr-bearing carbonate-silicate metasomatic agents through Mg- and Cr-rich depleted peridotite protoliths. The findings of several potentially

  7. A Silurian-early Devonian slab window in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt: Evidence from high-Mg diorites, adakites and granitoids in the western Central Beishan region, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rongguo; Xiao, Wenjiao; Li, Jinyi; Wu, Tairan; Zhang, Wen

    2018-03-01

    The Beishan orogenic belt is a key region for deciphering the accretionary processes of the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Here in this paper we present new zircon U-Pb ages, bulk-rock major and trace element, and zircon Hf isotopic data for the Baitoushan, and Bagelengtai plutons in the western Central Beishan region to address the accretionary processes. The Baitoushan pluton consists of quartz diorites, monzonites and K-feldspar granites, with zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages of 435 Ma, 421 Ma and 401 Ma, respectively. The Baitoushan quartz diorites and quartz monzonites exhibit relatively high MgO contents and Mg# values (63-72), display enrichments in LILEs and LREEs, and exhibit high Ba (585-1415 ppm), Sr (416-570 ppm) and compatible element (such as Cr and Ni) abundances, which make them akin to typical high-Mg andesites. The Baitoushan quartz diorites and quartz monzonites were probably generated by the interaction of subducted oceanic sediment-derived melts and mantle peridotites. The Baitoushan K-feldspar granites are ascribed to fractionated I-type granites with peraluminous and high-K calc-alkaline characteristics. They exhibit positive εHf(t) values (2.43-7.63) and Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic zircon Hf model ages (0.92-1.60 Ga). Those early Devonian granites, including Baitoushan K-feldspar granite and Gongpoquan leucogranites (402 Ma), are derived from melting of the mafic lower crust and/or sediments by upwelling of hot asthenospheric mantle. The Bagelengtai granodiorites exhibit similar geochemical signatures with that of typical adakites, with a zircon SHRIMP U-Pb age of 435 Ma. They exhibit relatively high Sr (502-628 ppm) and Al2O3 (16.40-17.40 wt.%) contents, and low MgO (1.02-1.29 wt.%), Y (3.37-6.94 ppm) and HREEs contents, with relatively high Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N ratios. The Bagelengtai granodiorites were derived from partial melting of subducted young oceanic crust, with significant contributions of subducted sediments, subsequently

  8. Melting temperatures of MgO under high pressure determined by micro-texture observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Ohfuji, H.; Nishi, M.; Irifune, T.

    2016-12-01

    Periclase (MgO) is the second abundant mineral after bridgmanite in the Earth's lower mantle, and its melting temperature (Tm) under pressure is important to constrain the chemical composition of ultra-deep magma formed near the mantle-core boundary. However, the melting behavior is highly controversial among previous studies: a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) study reported a melting curve with a dTm/dP of 30 K/GPa at zero pressure [1], while several theoretical computations gave substantially higher dTm/dP of 90 100 K/GPa [2,3]. We performed a series of LHDAC experiments for measurements of Tm of MgO under high pressure, using single crystal MgO as the starting material. The melting was detected by using micro-texture observations of the quenched samples. We found that the laser-heated area of the sample quenched from the Tm in previous LHDAC experiments [1] showed randomly aggregated granular crystals, which was not caused by melting, but by plastic deformation of the sample. This suggests that the Tms of their study were substantially underestimated. On the other hand, the sample recovered from the temperature higher by 1500-1700 K than the Tms in previous LHDAC experiments showed a characteristic internal texture comparable to the solidification texture typically shown in metal casting. We determined the Tms based on the observation of this texture up to 32 GPa. Fitting our Tms to the Simon equation yields dTm/dP of 82 K/GPa at zero pressure, which is consistent with those of the theoretical predictions (90 100 K/GPa) [2,3]. Extrapolation of the present melting curve of MgO to the pressure of the CMB (135 GPa) gives a melting temperature of 8900 K. The present steep melting slope offers the eutectic composition close to peridotite (in terms of Mg/Si ratio) throughout the lower mantle conditions. According to the model for sink/float relationship between the solid mantle and the magma [4], a considerable amount of iron (Fe/(Mg+Fe) > 0.24) is expected

  9. Petrochemistry of a xenolith-bearing Neogene alkali olivine basalt from northeastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Saeed; Stern, Charles R.

    2012-05-01

    A small isolated Neogene, possibly Quaternary, monogenetic alkali olivine basalt cone in northeastern Iran contains both mantle peridotite and crustal gabbroic xenoliths, as well as plagioclase megacrysts. The basaltic magma rose to the surface along pathways associated with local extension at the junction between the N-S right-lateral and E-W left-lateral strike slip faults that form the northeastern boundary of the Lut microcontinental block. This basalt is enriched in LREE relative to HREE, and has trace-element ratios similar to that of oceanic island basalts (OIB). Its 87Sr/86Sr (0.705013 to 0.705252), 143Nd/144Nd (0.512735 to 0.512738), and Pb isotopic compositions all fall in the field of OIB derived from enriched (EM-2) mantle. It formed by mixing of small melt fractions from both garnet-bearing asthenospheric and spinel-facies lithospheric mantle. Plagioclase (An26-32) megacrysts, up to 4 cm in length, have euhedral crystal faces and show no evidence of reaction with the host basalt. Their trace-element concentrations suggest that these megacrysts are co-genetic with the basalt host, although their 87Sr/86Sr (0.704796) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512687) ratios are different than this basalt. Round to angular, medium-grained granoblastic meta-igneous gabbroic xenoliths, ranging from ~ 1 to 6 cm in dimension, are derived from the lower continental crust. Spinel-peridotite xenoliths equilibrated in the subcontinental lithosphere at depths of 30 to 60 km and temperatures of 965 °C to 1065 °C. These xenoliths do not preserve evidence of extensive metasomatic enrichment as has been inferred for the mantle below the Damavand volcano further to the west in north-central Iran, and clinopyroxenes separated from two different mantle xenoliths have 87Sr/86Sr (0.704309 and 0.704593) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512798) ratios which are less radiogenic than either their host alkali basalt or Damavand basalts, implying significant regional variations in the composition and extent of

  10. The birth, growth and ageing of the Kaapvaal subcratonic mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, Gerhard P.; Shu, Qiao

    2018-06-01

    The Kaapvaal craton and its underlying mantle is probably one of the best studied Archean entity in the world. Despite that, discussion is still vivid on important aspects. A major debate over the last few decades is the depth of melting that generated the mantle nuclei of cratons. Our new evaluation of melting parameters in peridotite residues shows that the Cr2O3/Al2O3 ratio is the most useful pressure sensitive melting barometer. It irrevocably constrains the pressure of melting (melt separation) to less than 2 GPa with olivine (ol), orthopyroxene (opx) and spinel (sp) as residual phases. Garnet (grt) grows at increasing pressure during lithosphere thickening and subduction via the reaction opx + sp → grt + ol. The time of partial melting is constrained by Re-depletion model ages (TRD) mainly to the Archean (Pearson and Wittig 2008). However, only 3% of the ages are older than 3.1 Ga while crustal ages lie mainly between 3.1 to 2.8 Ga for the W- and 3.7 to 2.8 Ga for the E-block. Many TRD-ages are probably falsified by metasomatism and the main partial melting period was older than 3.1 Ga. Also, Nd- and Hf- model ages of peridotitic lithologies from the W-block are 3.2 to 3.6 Ga old. The corresponding very negative ɛNd (-40) and ɛHf values (-65) signal the presence of subducted crustal components in these old mantle portions. Subducted components diversify the mantle in its chemistry and thermal structure. Adjustment towards a stable configuration occurs by fluid transfer, metasomatism, partial melting and heat transfer. Ages of metasomatism from the Lu-Hf isotope system are 3.2 Ga (Lace), 2.9 Ga (Roberts Victor) and 2.62 Ga (Finsch) coinciding with the collision of cratonic blocks, the growth of diamonds, metamorphism of eclogites and of Ventersdoorp magmatism. The cratonic lithosphere was stabilized thermally by the end of the Archean and cooled since then with a rate of 0.07 °C/Ma.

  11. Geochemistry of single diamond crystals by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damarupurshad, A.

    1995-02-01

    Neutron activation analysis is probably the most powerful technique, available to date, for the analysis of the trace elements in diamond. In this study the technique of neutron activation analysis has been modified and optimized for the analysis of single, small (0.01-0.5 carat), inclusion-bearing and inclusion-free diamonds. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to analyze for up to 40 different elements at the ppb and ppt levels in diamonds from Brazil, South Africa, Colorado and China. The data obtained was used to detect and understand the differences between diamonds from the eclogitic and peridotitic para geneses and between diamonds from the different localities. In this regard, two inter element ratios, i.e. Cr/Sc and Au/Ir ratios were found to be useful. It seems that diamonds from a particular locality or mine have a unique range of Cr/Sc ratios. Furthermore, the identity of the dominant silicate inclusion(s) can be deduced from the Cr/Sc ratio of the diamond, since each type of silicate inclusion has a different range of Cr/Sc ratios. Not only is the Cr/Sc ratio distinctive for silicate inclusions in diamonds, it is also distinctive for minerals co genetic with diamond, such as orange garnet, red garnet, chrome diopside and ortho pyroxene (macrocrysts) which were separated from kimberlites. Sulphide inclusions may also contain detectable quantities of Au and Ir and the ratios of these two elements can also be used to differentiate between diamonds of the two para geneses. Carbon isotope ratios of these eclogitic and peridotitic diamonds were also measured. The comparison of this with the Cr/Sc ratios revealed that the carbon isotope ratios of both para geneses overlap in a narrow range and do not show the clear separations seen with Cr/Sc and Au/Ir ratios. It can be suggested, therefore, on the basis of the suite of 61 diamonds analyzed in this study, that the Cr/Sc and Au/Ir ratios are much more useful tools to distinguish between diamonds

  12. Garnet - two pyroxene rock from the Gridino complex, Russia: a record of the early metasomatic stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunova, Alena A.; Perchuk, Alexei L.

    2010-05-01

    The Gridino complex is one of the oldest high pressure complexes on the Earth. The most spectacular exposures occur in islands and in a 10-50 m wide belt along the shore of the White Sea in the Gridino area. The exotic blocks show wide range of compositions. In addition to predominating amphibolites and eclogites, there are also peridotites, zoisitites and sapphirine-bearing rocks. The peridotites are represented by garnet - two pyroxene rocks and orthopyroxenites. It this paper we present an intriguing results of the petrological study of the garnet- two pyroxene rock. The garnet- two pyroxene rock considered occurs as elliptical body 4×6 m in size within amphibole-biotite gneiss in the island Visokii. The rock consists of mosaic of coarse-grained primary garnet, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. Accessories are represented by magnetite, ilmenite, pyrite and zircon. Garnet contains inclusions of clinopyroxene, Mg-calcite and chlorite. The chlorite inclusions always intergrow with dendritic mineral enriched in REE (mainly Ce) situated on the wall of vacuole which shows the tendency of negative crystal shape. Similar chlorite inclusions are hosted by clino- and orthopyroxenes. The chlorite is of diabantite composition. The inclusions are often surrounded by the two systems of cracks - radial and concentric, which is really exotic phenomenon for crystalline rock. The primary minerals experienced different degree of the retrograde alteration expressed as amphibolization and/or growth of the orthopyroxene-amphibole-garnet symplectites. The retrogression is patchy in the central part of garnet- two pyroxene body, but intensifies towards the rims where primary minerals are absent. Mineral thermobarometry reveals HP rock equilibration at 670-750 оС and 14-20 kbar followed by subisothermal decompression down to 640-740 оС and 6-14 kbar. Specific composition of the chlorite and its association with REE phase in all rock-forming minerals suggests that anhydrous HP

  13. Major, Trace, and Volatile (CO2, H2O, S, F, and Cl) Elements from 1000+ Hawaiian Olivine-hosted Melt Inclusions Reveal the Dynamics of Crustal Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marske, J. P.; Hauri, E. H.; Trusdell, F.; Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Global cycling of volatile elements (H2O, CO2, F, S, Cl) via subduction to deep mantle followed by entrainment and melting within ascending mantle plumes is an enigmatic process that controls key aspects of hot spot volcanism (i.e. melting rate, magma supply, degassing, eruptive style). Variations in radiogenic isotope ratios (e.g.187Os/188Os) at hot spots such as Hawaii reveal magmatic processes within deep-seated mantle plumes (e.g. mantle heterogeneity, lithology, and melt transport). Shield-stage lavas from Hawaii likely originate from a mixed plume source containing peridotite and recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite) based on variations of radiogenic isotopes. Hawaiian lavas display correlations among isotopes, major and trace elements [1] that might be expected to have an expression in the volatile elements. To investigate this link, we present Os isotopic ratios (n=51), and major, trace, and volatile elements from 1003 olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) and their host minerals from tephra from Koolau, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kilauea, and Loihi volcanoes. The data show a strong correlation between MI volatile contents and incompatible trace element ratios (La/Yb) with Os isotopes of the same host olivines and reveal large-scale volatile heterogeneity and zonation exists within the Hawaiian plume. 'Loa' chain lavas, which are thought to originate from greater proportions of recycled oceanic crust/pyroxenite, have MIs with lower H2O, S, F, and Cl contents compared to 'Kea' chain lavas that were derived from more peridotite-rich sources. The depletion of volatile elements in the 'Loa' volcano MIs can be explained if they tapped an ancient dehydrated oceanic crust component within the Hawaiian plume. Higher extents of melting beneath 'Loa' volcanoes can also explain these depletions. The presence of dehydrated recycled mafic material in the plume source suggests that subduction effectively devolatilizes part of the oceanic crust. These results are similar to the

  14. Magmatic systems of large continental igneous provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sharkov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Large igneous provinces (LIPs formed by mantle superplume events have irreversibly changed their composition in the geological evolution of the Earth from high-Mg melts (during Archean and early Paleoproterozoic to Phanerozoic-type geochemically enriched Fe-Ti basalts and picrites at 2.3 Ga. We propose that this upheaval could be related to the change in the source and nature of the mantle superplumes of different generations. The first generation plumes were derived from the depleted mantle, whereas the second generation (thermochemical originated from the core-mantle boundary (CMB. This study mainly focuses on the second (Phanerozoic type of LIPs, as exemplified by the mid-Paleoproterozoic Jatulian–Ludicovian LIP in the Fennoscandian Shield, the Permian–Triassic Siberian LIP, and the late Cenozoic flood basalts of Syria. The latter LIP contains mantle xenoliths represented by green and black series. These xenoliths are fragments of cooled upper margins of the mantle plume heads, above zones of adiabatic melting, and provide information about composition of the plume material and processes in the plume head. Based on the previous studies on the composition of the mantle xenoliths in within-plate basalts around the world, it is inferred that the heads of the mantle (thermochemical plumes are made up of moderately depleted spinel peridotites (mainly lherzolites and geochemically-enriched intergranular fluid/melt. Further, it is presumed that the plume heads intrude the mafic lower crust and reach up to the bottom of the upper crust at depths ∼20 km. The generation of two major types of mantle-derived magmas (alkali and tholeiitic basalts was previously attributed to the processes related to different PT-parameters in the adiabatic melting zone whereas this study relates to the fluid regime in the plume heads. It is also suggested that a newly-formed melt can occur on different sides of a critical plane of silica undersaturation and can

  15. Using MicroFTIR to Map Mineral Distributions in Serpentinizing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Kubo, M. D.; Cardace, D.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinization, the water-rock reaction forming serpentine mineral assemblages from ultramafic precursors, can co-occur with the production of hydrogen, methane, and diverse organic compounds (McCollom and Seewald, 2013), evolving water appropriate for carbonate precipitation, including in ophiolite groundwater flow systems and travertine-producing seeps/springs. Serpentinization is regarded as a geologic process important to the sustainability of the deep biosphere (Schrenk et al., 2013) and the origin of life (Schulte et al., 2006). In this study, we manually polished wafers of ultramafic rocks/associated minerals (serpentinite, peridotite, pyroxenite, dunite; olivine, diopside, serpentine, magnetite), and travertine/constituent minerals (carbonate crusts; calcite, dolomite), and observed mineral boundaries and interfaces using µFTIR analysis in reflection mode. We used a Thermo Nicolet iS50 FTIR spectrometer coupled with a Continuum IR microscope to map minerals/boundaries. We identify, confirm, and document FTIR wavenumber regions linked to serpentinite- and travertine-associated minerals by referencing IR spectra (RRUFF) and aligning with x-ray diffraction. The ultramafic and carbonate samples are from the following field localities: McLaughlin Natural Reserve - a UC research reserve, Lower Lake, CA; Zambales, PH; Ontario, CA; Yellow Dog, MI; Taskesti, TK; Twin Sisters Range, WA; Sharon, MA; Klamath Mountains, CA; Dun Mountain, NZ; and Sussex County, NJ. Our goals are to provide comprehensive µFTIR characterization of mineral profiles important in serpentinites and related rocks, and evaluate the resolving power of µFTIR for the detection of mineral-encapsulated, residual organic compounds from biological activity. We report on µFTIR data for naturally occurring ultramafics and travertines and also estimate the limit of detection for cell membrane components in mineral matrices, impregnating increasing mass proportions of xanthan gum in a peridotite sand

  16. The reliability of Raman micro-spectroscopy in measuring the density of CO2 mantle fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remigi, S.; Frezzotti, M. L.; Ferrando, S.; Villa, I. M.; Maffeis, A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent evaluations of carbon fluxes into and out the Earth's interior recognize that a significant part of the total outgassing of deep Earth carbon occurs in tectonically active areas (Kelemen and Manning, 2015). Potential tracers of carbon fluxes at mantle depths include CO2 fluid inclusions in peridotites. Raman micro-spectroscopy allows calculating the density of CO2 fluids based on the distance of the CO2 Fermi doublet, Δ, in cm-1 (Rosso and Bodnar, 1995). The aim of this work is to check the reliability of Raman densimeter equations (cf. Lamadrid et al., 2016) for high-density CO2 fluids originating at mantle depths. Forty pure CO2 inclusions in peridotites (El Hierro, Canary Islands) of known density (microthermometry) have been analyzed by Raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to evaluate the influence of contaminants on the reliability of equations, 22 CO2-rich inclusions containing subordinate amounts of N2, CO, SO2 have also been studied. Raman spectrometer analytical conditions are: 532 nm laser, 80 mW emission power, T 18°C, 1800 and 600 grating, 1 accumulation x 80 sec. Daily calibration included diamond and atmosphere N2. Results suggest that the "Raman densimeter" represents an accurate method to calculate the density of CO2 mantle fluids. Equations, however, must be applied only to pure CO2 fluids, since contaminants, even in trace amounts (0.39 mol%), affect the Δ resulting in density overestimation. Present study further highlights how analytical conditions and data processing, such as spectral resolution (i.e., grating), calibration linearity, and statistical treatment of spectra, influence the accuracy and the precision of Δ measurements. As a consequence, specific analytical protocols for single Raman spectrometers should be set up in order to get reliable CO2 density data. Kelemen, Peter B., & Craig E. Manning. PNAS, 112.30 (2015): E3997-E4006.Lamadrid, H. M., Moore, L. R., Moncada, D., Rimstidt, J. D., Burruss, R. C., & Bodnar, R. J. Chem

  17. Alpine Serpentinite Geochemistry As Key To Define Timing Of Oceanic Lithosphere Accretion To The Subduction Plate Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, M.; Scambelluri, M.; Agostini, S.; Godard, M.; Pettke, D. T.; Angiboust, S.

    2016-12-01

    Isotopic (Pb, Sr and B) and trace element (B, Be, As, Sb, U, Th) signatures of serpentinites are useful geochemical tools to assess element exchange and fluid-rock interactions in subduction zone settings. They help to unravel geological history and tectonic evolution of subduction serpentinites and associated meta-oceanic crust. Sedimentary-derived fluid influx within HP plate interface environments strongly enriches serpentinites in As, Sb, B, U and Th and resets their B, Sr and Pb isotopic compositions. This HP metasomatic signature is preserved during exhumation and/or released at higher PT through de-serpentinization, fueling partial melting in the sub-arc mantle and recycling such fingerprint into arc magmas. This study focuses on the subduction recrystallization, geochemical diversity and fluid-rock interaction recorded by high- to ultra-high pressure (HP, UHP) Alpine serpentinites from the subducted oceanic plate (Cignana Unit, Zermatt-Saas Complex, Monviso and Lanzo Ultramafic Massifs). The As and Sb compositions of the HP-UHP Alpine ophiolitic rocks reveal the interaction between serpentinite and crust-derived fluids during their emplacement along the plate interface. This enables to define a hypothetical architecture of the Alpine subduction interface, considering large ultramafic slices. In this scenario, the Lanzo peridotite and serpentinite retain an As-Sb composition comparable to DM and PM: i.e. they experienced little exchange with sediment-derived fluids. Lanzo thus belonged to sections of the subducting plate, afar from the plate interface. Serpentinites from the Lago di Cignana Unit and Monviso and Voltri are richer in As and Sb, showing moderate to strong interaction with sediment- and crust-derived fluids during subduction (i.e. they behaved as open systems). These serpentinite slices accreted at the plate interface and exchanged with slab-derived fluids at different depths during Alpine subduction: Voltri accreted at shallower conditions (50

  18. Moessbauer Study of Serpentine Minerals in the Ultramafic Body of Tehuitzingo, Southern Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mancera, G.; Ortega-Gutierrez, F.; Nava, N. E.; Arriola, H. S.

    2003-01-01

    Serpentine 'polymorph' minerals (chrysotile, lizardite, and antigorite) are hydrous Mg-Fe silicates that commonly form serpentine rock (serpentinite) by hydration of olivine-pyroxene peridotites from the mantle of the Earth. During the complex geologic history of orogenic belts, the redox and hydration state of the mantle changes, and olivine and pyroxenes are replaced by serpentine group minerals during tectonic deformation and uplift. Unfortunately, modern microanalysis of minerals by electron probe does not distinguish the oxidation state of iron, and it has to be assumed or estimated by precise methods, such as Moessbauer spectrometry. The studied samples were collected in the Xayacatlan Formation of the Tehuitzingo area, State of Puebla, within the Paleozoic Acatlan Complex. The original mantle peridotite was completely converted to serpentinite, with secondary crystallization of Fe-Mg oxides, calcsilicates, and carbonates. The three serpentine 'polymorphs' were identified in the studied samples, although with a clear predominance of the high-temperature member antigorite, which was preliminary determined by optical petrography, X-ray diffraction, electron probe, and scanning electron microscopy. Microprobe total iron content in most specimens was +3 substitution at the tetrahedral site may also occur according to some Moessbauer studies. This paper studied the iron valence state and its position in serpentine minerals of the Tehuitzingo ultramafic body using Moessbauer techniques. The analyses in most samples detected one doublet, compatible with Fe +2 in octahedral coordination, but only two specimens displayed two doublets corresponding to Fe +2 and Fe +3 in octahedral coordination. Doublets corresponding to Fe +3 in tetrahedral sites were not found. The parameters obtained for all the Fe +2 doublets are similar (QS=2.76±0.08 mm/sec, and IS=1.12±0.01), whereas the ratio Fe +3 /Fe +2 (0-0.34) has a strong tendency for iron to be in a divalent state. This

  19. Controls on the stable isotope compositions of travertine from hyperalkaline springs in Oman: Insights from clumped isotope measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, E. S.; Guo, W.; Paukert, A. N.; Matter, J. M.; Mervine, E. M.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2016-11-01

    Carbonate formation at hyperalkaline springs is typical of serpentinization in peridotite massifs worldwide. These travertines have long been known to exhibit large variations in their carbon and oxygen isotope compositions, extending from apparent equilibrium values to highly depleted values. However, the exact causes of these variations are not well constrained. We analyzed a suite of well-characterized fresh carbonate precipitates and travertines associated with hyperalkaline springs in the peridotite section of the Samail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman, and found their clumped isotope compositions vary systematically with formation environments. Based on these findings, we identified four main processes controlling the stable isotope compositions of these carbonates. These include hydroxylation of CO2, partial isotope equilibration of dissolved inorganic carbon, mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end-members, and post-depositional recrystallization. Most notably, in fresh crystalline films on the surface of hyperalkaline springs and in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools, we observed large enrichments in Δ47 (up to ∼0.2‰ above expected equilibrium values) which accompany depletions in δ18O and δ13C, yielding about 0.01‰ increase in Δ47 and 1.1‰ decrease in δ13C for every 1‰ decrease in δ18O, relative to expected equilibrium values. This disequilibrium trend, also reflected in preserved travertines ranging in age from modern to ∼40,000 years old, is interpreted to arise mainly from the isotope effects associated with the hydroxylation of CO2 in high-pH fluids and agrees with our first-order theoretical estimation. In addition, in some fresh carbonate precipitates from the bottom of hyperalkaline pools and in subsamples of one preserved travertine terrace, we observed additional enrichments in Δ47 at intermediate δ13C and δ18O, consistent with mixing between isotopically distinct carbonate end

  20. Water and Slabs in the Transition Zone - Hydrous Ringwoodite in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D. G.; Brenker, F. E.; Nestola, F.; McNeill, J.; Nasdala, L.; Hutchison, M.; Matveev, S.; Mather, K.; Vincze, L.; Schmitz, S.; Vekemens, B.

    2014-12-01

    Theory and experiments have shown that the Earth's Transition Zone (TZ) could be a major repository for water, due to the ability of the higher-pressure polymorphs of olivine - wadsleyite and ringwoodite - to host up to ~2.5wt. % H2O. Despite experimental demonstration of the water-bearing capacity of these phases, geophysical probes such as electrical conductivity have provided conflicting results, and the issue of whether the TZ contains abundant water remains highly controversial. We report X-ray diffraction, Raman and infra-red spectroscopic evidence for the first terrestrial occurrence of any higher pressure polymorph of olivine: ringwoodite, included in a diamond from Juína, Brazil. The ringwoodite occurs with a Ca-walstromite phase that we interpret to be retrogressed Ca-silicate perovskite. The most likely interpretation of this two-phase assemblage is that it represents a partially retrogressed portion of a somewhat Fe-rich peridotitic mantle, in which hydrous ringwoodite, and former CaSiO3- perovskite co-existed above 15GPa. The ringwoodite has a Mg# of ~ 75, suggesting that it may be mantle hybrised with a more fertile component such as subducted oceanic crust. The water-rich nature of this inclusion (~1.5 wt%), along with the preservation of ringwoodite, is the first direct evidence that, at least locally, the TZ is hydrous, to about 1 wt%. As well as being in agreement with recent magnetotelluric estimates of the TZ water content, this amount of water helps to reconcile measured TZ seismic velocities with those predicted from lab experiments. The finding also indicates that some kimberlites must have their primary sources in this deep mantle region. The high water content of the ringwoodite suggests that it was not close to the mantle geotherm when trapped in the diamond. This may be an indication that the the assemblage was part of a water-rich subducted slab out of thermal equilibrium, within the transition zone. The water-rich nature of the

  1. Extreme incompatibility of helium during mantle melting: Evidence from undegassed mid-ocean ridge basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David W.; Michael, Peter J.; Shea, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We report total helium concentrations (vesicles + glass) for a suite of thirteen ultradepleted mid-ocean ridge basalts (UD-MORBs) that were previously studied for volatile contents (CO2, H2O) plus major and trace elements. The selected basalts are undersaturated in CO2 + H2O at their depths of eruption and represent rare cases of undegassed MORBs. Sample localities from the Atlantic (2), Indian (1) and Pacific (7) Oceans collectively show excellent linear correlations (r2 = 0.75- 0.92) between the concentrations of helium and the highly incompatible elements C, K, Rb, Ba, Nb, Th and U. Three basalts from Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic were also studied but show anomalous behavior marked by excess lithophile trace element abundances. In the Atlantic-Pacific-Indian suite, incompatible element concentrations vary by factors of 3-4.3, while helium concentration varies by a factor of 13. The strong correlations between the concentrations of helium and incompatible elements are explained by helium behavior as the most incompatible element during mantle melting. Partial melting of an ultradepleted mantle source, formed as a residue of earlier melt extraction, accounts for the observed concentrations. The earlier melting event involved removal of a small degree melt (∼1%) at low but non-zero porosity (0.01-0.5%), leading to a small amount of melt retention that strongly leveraged the incompatible element budget of the ultradepleted mantle source. Equilibrium melting models that produce the range of trace element and helium concentrations from this source require a bulk solid/melt distribution coefficient for helium that is lower than that for other incompatible elements by about a factor of ten. Alternatively, the bulk solid/melt distribution coefficient for helium could be similar to or even larger than that for other incompatible elements, but the much larger diffusivity of helium in peridotite leads to its more effective incompatibility and efficient extraction from a

  2. Homogenisation of sulphide inclusions within diamonds: A new approach to diamond inclusion geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Iain; Hughes, Hannah S. R.; Butler, Ian B.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Muir, Duncan

    2017-11-01

    Base metal sulphide (BMS) inclusions in diamonds provide a unique insight into the chalcophile and highly siderophile element composition of the mantle. Entombed within their diamond hosts, these provide a more robust (closed system) sample, from which to determine the trace element, Re-Os and S-isotopic compositions of the mantle than mantle xenoliths or orogenic peridotites, as they are shielded from alteration during ascent to the Earth's crust and subsequent surface weathering. However, at temperatures below 1100 °C some BMS inclusions undergo subsolidus re-equilibration from an original monosulphide solid solution (Mss) and this causes fractionation of the major and trace elements within the inclusions. Thus to study the subjects noted above, current techniques require the entire BMS inclusion to be extracted for analyses. Unfortunately, 'flaking' of inclusions during break-out is a frequent occurrence and hence the risk of accidentally under-sampling a portion of the BMS inclusion is inherent in current practices. This loss may have significant implications for Re-Os isotope analyses where incomplete sampling of a Re-rich phase, such as chalcopyrite that typically occurs at the outer margins of BMS inclusions, may induce significant bias in the Re-Os and 187Os/188Os measurements and resulting model and isochron ages. We have developed a method for the homogenisation of BMS inclusions in diamond prior to their break-out from the host stone. Diamonds are heated to 1100 °C and then quenched to chemically homogenise any sulphide inclusions for both major and trace elements. Using X-ray Computed Microtomography (μCT) we determine the shape and spatial setting of multiple inclusions within a host stone and crucially show that the volume of a BMS inclusion is the same both before and after homogenisation. We show that the homogenisation process significantly reduces the inherent variability of in situ analysis when compared with unhomogenised BMS, thereby

  3. Early Cretaceous wedge extrusion in the Indo-Burma Range accretionary complex: implications for the Mesozoic subduction of Neotethys in SE Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji'en; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Cai, Fulong; Sein, Kyaing; Naing, Soe

    2017-06-01

    The Indo-Burma Range (IBR) of Myanmar, the eastern extension of the Yarlung-Tsangpo Neotethyan belt of Tibet in China, contains mélanges with serpentinite, greenschist facies basalt, chert, sericite schist, silty slate and unmetamorphosed Triassic sandstone, mudstone and siltstone interbedded with chert in the east, and farther north high-pressure blueschist and eclogite blocks in the Naga Hills mélange. Our detailed mapping of the Mindat and Magwe sections in the middle IBR revealed a major 18 km antiformal isocline in a mélange in which greenschist facies rocks in the core decrease in grade eastwards and westwards symmetrically `outwards' to lower grade sericite schist and silty slate, and at the margins to unmetamorphosed sediments, and these metamorphic rocks are structurally repeated in small-scale imbricated thrust stacks. In the Mindat section the lower western boundary of the isoclinal mélange is a thrust on which the metamorphic rocks have been transported over unmetamorphosed sediments of the Triassic Pane Chaung Group, and the upper eastern boundary is a normal fault. These relations demonstrate that the IBR metamorphic rocks were exhumed by wedge extrusion in a subduction-generated accretionary complex. Along strike to the north in the Naga Hills is a comparable isoclinal mélange in which central eclogite lenses are succeeded `outwards' by layers of glaucophane schist and glaucophanite, and to lower grade greenschist facies sericite schist and slate towards the margins. In the Natchaung area (from west to east) unmetamorphosed Triassic sediments overlie quartzites, sericite schists, actinolite schists and meta-volcanic amphibolites derived from MORB-type basalt, which are in fault contact with peridotite. Olivine in the peridotite has undulatory extinction suggesting deformation at 600-700 °C, similar to the peak temperature of the amphibolite; these relations suggest generation in a metamorphic sole. The amphibolites have U/Pb zircon ages of 119

  4. A conceptual model for the asthenosphere: redox melting in the C-O-H-bearing mantle vs. geophysical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Tarits, Pascal; Massuyeau, Malcolm; David, Sifre; Leila, Hashim; Emmanuel, Gardes

    2013-04-01

    The asthenosphere has classically been considered as a convective layer, with its viscosity decreased by the presence of 100's ppm water in olivine, and being overtopped by a rigid and dry lithosphere. It, however, needs a new conceptual definition as the presence of water seems not able to affect the rheology of olivine; furthermore, properties such as electrical conductivity and seismic wave's velocity are not sensibly affected by water content in olivine, leaving the geophysical features of the asthenosphere unexplained. An asthenosphere impregnated by low melt fractions is consistent with constraints on melting behavior of C-O-H-bearing peridotites and may also better explain electrical conductivity and seismic features. The challenge is therefore to confront and reconcile the complexity of mantle melting in the C-O-H system with geophysical observations. This work reviews and discusses several key properties of the asthenosphere and relates their vertical and lateral heterogeneities to geodynamic processes. The first discussion is about the top of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundary in the oceanic mantle. The discontinuity identified by seismic and electrical surveys is located at an average depth of 65km and is weakly influenced by the age, and therefore, the temperature of the lithosphere. This puzzling observation is shown here to be in perfect line the onset of peridotite melting in presence of both H2O and CO2. Mantle melting is therefore expected at 65 km depth, where the melt is essentially carbonatitic, inducing weakening and imposing transition in the regime of thermal transfer. Deeper, the melt evolve to silica-richer compositions. Twenty years of petrological investigations on processes that control mantle redox state unanimously concur on an increasingly reduced mantle with increasing depth. The conventional wisdom defines garnet as being increasingly abundant and increasingly able to concentrate ferric iron with increasing depth. Such oxygen

  5. Transformation of Serpentinite to Listvenite as Recorded in the Vein History of Rocks From Oman Drilling Project Hole BT1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C. E.; Kelemen, P. B.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.; Urai, J. L.; de Obeso, J. C.; Jesus, A. P. M.; Zeko, D.

    2017-12-01

    Oman Drilling Project Hole BT1B intersected 191 m of listvenite (magnesite + quartz rock) and serpentinite in the hanging wall of the basal thrust of the Oman ophiolite. Recovery was 100%. Listvenite is the dominant lithology in the upper plate rocks (166 m). Its shows wide color and textural variation, including pseudomorphic replacement of serpentinized peridotite. Serpentinite was encountered in two main contiguous intervals totaling 25 m. In light of the strongly metasomatic nature for the origin of listvenite, a substantial portion of the core description effort was dedicated to characterization of the complex veining history recorded in the hole. Dense veining is recorded in both lithologies. The density of 200/m. The density of veins >1 mm was 50-100/m, with somewhat higher densities recorded in serpentinite than in listvenite. In order of oldest to youngest, the main vein types in serpentinite are microscopic mesh-textured serpentine veins, macroscopic serpentine veins, carbonate-oxide veins, and carbonate veins. The vein paragenesis in listvenite is: early carbonate-oxide veins, followed by carbonate and carbonate-quartz veins, then late carbonate veins. The carbonate-oxide and carbonate veins are shared by the lithologies and hold clues to the transformation of ultramafic rocks to listvenite. Carbonate-oxide veins form a distinctive set that is interpreted to be the earliest record of carbonate formation in serpentinite. They contain Fe-oxide, usually hematite, on a medial line, with antitaxial magnesite crystals growing outward and showing terminations against wall rock minerals. Antitaxial textures may be evidence of positive reaction volumes. In serpentinite, secondary serpentine after earlier serpentine is common at vein margins. Carbonate-oxide veins are the earliest observed in listvenite, where they may form isolated veins to dense, aligned networks that impart a foliated texture. In some cases, they appear to predate replacement of serpentine by

  6. Active Microbial Sulfate Reduction in Serpentinization Fluids of the Semail Ophiolite in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glombitza, C.; Rempfert, K. R.; Templeton, A. S.; Hoehler, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction (SR) is among the oldest known microbial processes on Earth. It is the predominant anaerobic microbial process in sulfur-rich marine sediments but it also occurs in subsurface lithoautotrophic ecosystems, where it is driven by radiolytically produced H2 and sulfate [1]. Serpentinization is a process by which H2 is generated in a reaction of water with peridotite rock. This abiotic generation of H2 suggests its potential to power life in rocks as a stand-alone process, independent of the photosynthetic biosphere, because the generated H2 is a key energy source for microbial metabolism. This is of particular interest in understanding the role of water-rock reactions in generating habitable conditions on and beyond Earth. Sulfate is plausibly available in several of the water-bearing environments now known beyond Earth, making SR a potentially important metabolism in those systems. Sulfate minerals are abundant on the surface of Mars [2], suggesting that Martian groundwaters may be sulfate-rich. Sulfate is also postulated to be a component of the oceans of Europa and Enceladus [3, 4]. The inferred presence of both sulfate and peridotite rocks in these environments points toward a potential niche for sulfate reducers and highlights the need to understand how and where SR occurs in serpentinizing systems on Earth. We incubated formation fluids sampled from in the Semail Ophiolite in Oman with a 35-S labelled sulfate tracer and determined the rates of in-situ microbial sulfate reduction. The selected fluids represent different environmental conditions, in particular varying substrate concentrations (sulfate, H2 and CH4) and pH (pH 8.4 to pH 11.2). We found active microbial SR at very low rates in almost all fluids, ranging from 2 fmol mL-1 d-1 to 2 pmol mL-1 d-2. Lowest rates were associated with the hyperalkaline fluids (pH > 10), that had also the lowest sulfate concentration (50-90 µmol L-1). In line with previously determined species

  7. Geochemical and Mineralogical Profiles Across the Listvenite- Metamorphic Transition in the Basal Megathrust of the Oman Ophiolite: First Results from Drilling at Oman Drilling Project Hole BT1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, M.; Bennett, E.; Carter, E.; Kourim, F.; Lafay, R.; Noël, J.; Kelemen, P. B.; Michibayashi, K.; Harris, M.

    2017-12-01

    The transition from the base of the Oman ophiolite to the underlying metamorphic sole was drilled at Hole BT1B (Sumail Massif) during Phase 1 of Oman Drilling Project (Winter 2016-2017). 74 samples were collected from the 300m of recovered cores for whole rock geochemical and XRD analyses. 55 listvenites, ophicarbonates and serpentinites, and 19 schists and greenstones were analyzed for major and minor elements (XRF) and for CO2 and S concentrations (CHNS) aboard DV Chikyu (ChikyuOman, Summer 2017). Analyses for trace elements (ICP-MS) at the University of Montpellier are in progress. The composition of listvenites, ophicalcites and serpentinites recovered at Hole BT1B record extensive interactions between CO2-rich fluids and the serpentinized peridotites. These reactions involved addition of SiO2 and formation of carbonates at the expense of the serpentinized peridotite protolith. All samples recovered from the mantle section are enriched in fluid mobile and incompatible trace elements compared to the mean composition of the Oman mantle. These enrichments are up to 103 times the Oman mantle for Rb and Ba. They mimic the pattern of the samples from the metamorphic sole. This suggests that the composition of the listvenites in these elements is controlled by that of contaminating fluids that may have originated in the same lithologies as those drilled at the base of Hole BT1B. Listvenites, ophicalcites and serpentinites also show notable downhole chemical variations, with listvenites showing marked variations in Al2O3 and TiO2. Occurrence of lherzolites and cpx-harzburgites has been reported at the base of the Oman dominantly harzburgitic mantle section. The observed variations in the listvenites (Al2O3 and TiO2) could be related to the composition of their protolith, the deepest having more fertile compositions. Alternatively, the observed downhole changes in the composition of listvenites may relate to the progressive equilibration of the reacting ultramafic

  8. Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueter, Nico; Soesilo, Joko; Fedortchouk, Yana; Nestola, Fabrizio; Belluco, Lorenzo; Troch, Juliana; Wälle, Markus; Guillong, Marcel; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Driesner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called "headless" diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930-1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U-Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make

  9. Constraining the dynamic response of subcontinental lithospheric mantle to rifting using Re-Os model ages in the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, C.; Class, C.; Goldstein, S. L.; Shirey, S. B.; Martin, A. P.; Cooper, A. F.; Berg, J. H.; Gamble, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    lithosphere extends beneath the TAM. With further analyses we hope to determine if there is lateral flow of cratonic lithosphere into the rift. Huismans, R., Beaumount, C., 2011. Depth-dependent extension, two stage breakup and cratonic underplating at rifted margins. Nature 473, 74-78. Reisberg, L.C., Lorand, J.P., 1995. Longevity of sub-continental mantle lithosphere from osmium isotope systematics in orogenic peridotite massifs. Nature 376, 159-162. Rudnick, R.L., Walker, R.J., 2009. Interpreting ages from Re-Os isotopes in peridotites. Lithos 1125, 1083-1095.

  10. Mg-Fe Isotope Systems of Mantle Xenoliths: Constrains on the Evolution of Siberian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Y.; Kiseeva, E. S.; Sobolev, N. V.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths bring to the surface a variety of lithologies (dunites, lherzolites, harzburgites, wehrlites, eclogites, pyroxenites, and websterites) and represent snapshots of the geochemical processes that occur deep within the Earth. Recent improvements in the precision of the MC-ICP-MS measurements have allowed us to expand the amount of data on Mg and Fe isotopes for mantle-derived samples. For instance, to constrain the isotopic composition of the Earth based on the study of spinel and garnet peridotites (An et al., 2017; Teng et al., 2010), to trace the origin and to investigate the isotopic fractionation mechanism during metamorphic process using cratonic or orogenic eclogites (Li et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2012) and to reveal the metasomatism-induced mantle heterogeneity by pyroxenites (Hu et al., 2016). Numerous multi-stage modification events and mantle layering are detected in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle under the Siberian craton (Ashchepkov et al., 2008a; Sobolev et al., 1975, etc). Combined analyses of Mg and Fe isotopic systems could provide new constraints on the formation and evolution of the ancient cratonic mantle. In order to better constrain the magnitude and mechanism of inter-mineral Mg and Fe isotopic fractionations at high temperatures, systematic studies of mantle xenoliths are needed. For example, theoretical calculations and natural samples measurements have shown that large equilibrium Mg isotope fractionations controlled by the difference in coordination number of Mg among minerals could exist (Huang et al., 2013; Li et al., 2011). Thus, the Mg isotope geothermometer could help us trace the evolution history of ancient cratons. In this study we present Mg and Fe isotopic data for whole rocks and separated minerals (clinopyroxene (cpx) and garnet (grt)) from different types of mantle xenoliths (garnet pyroxenites, eclogites, grospydites and garnet peridotites) from a number of kimberlite pipes in Siberian craton (Udachnaya

  11. Constraints on the Chemistry and Abundance of Hydrous Phases in Sub Continental Lithospheric Mantle: Implications for Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S.; Dasgupta, R.; Fischer, K. M.; Mookherjee, M.

    2017-12-01

    The origins of a 2-10% reduction in seismic shear wave velocity (Vs) at depths of 60-160 km in sub continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) regions, identified as the Mid Lithospheric Discontinuity (MLD) [e.g., 1] are highly debated [e.g., 2, 3]. One of the proposed explanations for MLDs is the presence of hydrous minerals such as amphibole and phlogopite at these depths [e.g., 2, 4, 5]. Although the stability and compositions of these phases in peridotite + H2O ± CO2 have been widely explored [e.g., 6], their composition and abundance as a function of permissible SCLM chemistry remain poorly understood. We have compiled phase equilibria experiments conducted over a range of pressure (0.5-8 GPa), temperature (680-1300 °C), major element peridotite compositions, and volatiles (H2O: 0.05-13.79 wt.% and CO2: 0.25-5.3 wt.%). The goal was to constrain how compositional parameters such as CaO and alkali/H2O affect the chemistry and abundance of amphibole and phlogopite. We observe that the abundance of amphibole increases with CaO content and decreasing alkali/H2O. The abundance of phlogopite varies directly with K2O content. Unlike phlogopite compositions that remain consistent, amphibole compositions show variability (pargastitic to K-richterite) depending on bulk CaO and Na2O. Mineral modes, obtained by mass balance on a melt/fluid free basis, were used to calculate aggregate shear wave velocity, Vs for the respective assemblages [e.g., 7] and compared with absolute values observed at MLD depths [e.g., 8]. Vs shows a strong inverse correlation with phlogopite and amphibole modes (particularly where phlogopite is absent). For the Mg# range of cratonic xenoliths, 5-10% phlogopite at MLD depths can match the observed Vs values, while CaO contents in cratonic xenoliths limit the amphibole abundance to 10%, which is lower than previous estimates based on heat flow calculations [e.g., 4]. The modes of hydrous and other phases and corresponding Vs values could be used to

  12. Continental crust formation: Numerical modelling of chemical evolution and geological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, U.; Hendel, R.

    2017-05-01

    Oceanic plateaus develop by decompression melting of mantle plumes and have contributed to the growth of the continental crust throughout Earth's evolution. Occasional large-scale partial melting events of parts of the asthenosphere during the Archean produced large domains of precursor crustal material. The fractionation of arc-related crust during the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic contributed to the growth of continental crust. However, it remains unclear whether the continents or their precursors formed during episodic events or whether the gaps in zircon age records are a function of varying preservation potential. This study demonstrates that the formation of the continental crust was intrinsically tied to the thermoconvective evolution of the Earth's mantle. Our numerical solutions for the full set of physical balance equations of convection in a spherical shell mantle, combined with simplified equations of chemical continent-mantle differentiation, demonstrate that the actual rate of continental growth is not uniform through time. The kinetic energy of solid-state mantle creep (Ekin) slowly decreases with superposed episodic but not periodic maxima. In addition, laterally averaged surface heat flow (qob) behaves similarly but shows peaks that lag by 15-30 Ma compared with the Ekin peaks. Peak values of continental growth are delayed by 75-100 Ma relative to the qob maxima. The calculated present-day qob and total continental mass values agree well with observed values. Each episode of continental growth is separated from the next by an interval of quiescence that is not the result of variations in mantle creep velocity but instead reflects the fact that the peridotite solidus is not only a function of pressure but also of local water abundance. A period of differentiation results in a reduction in regional water concentrations, thereby increasing the temperature of the peridotite solidus and the regional viscosity of the mantle. By plausibly varying the

  13. Dependence of Subduction Zone seismicity on Strain-Rate-Dependent Critical Homologous Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity with large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc=T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed. We find that THc for ocean plates is ˜0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ˜50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2D polynomial fits to a relocated catalog, are ˜50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022 to $1023 Pa s, i.e., where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cutoff for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH>0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than those associated with earthquakes located where TH ≤0.55. We conclude that the

  14. Alakit and Daldyn kimberlite fields, Siberia, Russia: Two types of mantle sub-terranes beneath central Yakutia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Ashchepkov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineral data from Yakutian kimberlites allow reconstruction of the history of lithospheric mantle. Differences occur in compositions of mantle pyropes and clinopyroxenes from large kimberlite pipes in the Alakit and Daldyn fields. In the Alakit field, Cr-diopsides are alkaline, and Stykanskaya and some other pipes contain more sub-calcic pyropes and dunitic-type diamond inclusions, while in the Daldyn field harzburgitic pyropes are frequent. The eclogitic diamond inclusions in the Alakit field are sharply divided in types and conditions, while in the Daldyn field they show varying compositions and often continuous Pressure–Temperature (P–T ranges with increasing Fe# with decreasing pressures. In Alakit, Cr-pargasites to richterites were found in all pipes, while in Daldyn, pargasites are rare Dalnyaya and Zarnitsa pipes. Cr-diopsides from the Alakit region show higher levels of light Rare Earth Elements (LREE and stronger REE-slopes, and enrichment in light Rare Earth Elements (LREE, sometimes Th-U, and small troughs in Nb-Ta-Zr. In the Daldyn field, the High Field Strength Elements HFSE troughs are more common in clinopyroxenes with low REE abundances, while those from sheared and refertilized peridotites have smooth patterns. Garnets from Alakit show HREE minima, but those from Daldyn often have a trough at Y and high U and Pb. PTXfO2 diagrams from both regions show similarities, suggesting similar layering and structures. The degree of metasomatism is often higher for pipes which show dispersion in P–Fe# trends for garnets. In the mantle beneath Udachnaya and Aykhal, pipes show 6–7 linear arrays of P–Fe# in the lower part of the mantle section at 7.5–3.0 GPa, probably reflecting primary subduction horizons. Beneath the Sytykanskaya pipe, there are several horizons with opposite inclinations which reflect metasomatic processes. The high dispersion of the P–Fe# trend indicating widespread metasomatism is associated with decreased

  15. Dependence of the brittle ductile transition on strain-rate-dependent critical homologous temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-05-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2-D polynomial fits to a relocated catalogue, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022-1023 Pa s, that is, where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cut-off for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are two to

  16. Effects of interaction between ultramafic tectonite and mafic magma on Nd-Pb-Sr isotopic systems in the Neoproterozoic Chaya Massif, Baikal-Muya ophiolite belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelin, Yuri V.; Ritsk, Eugeni Yu.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    1997-04-01

    Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr and U-Pb isotopic systems have been studied in minerals and whole rocks of harzburgites and mafic cumulates from the Chaya Massif, Baikal-Muya ophiolite belt, eastern Siberia, in order to determine the relationship between mantle ultramafic and crustal mafic sections. Geological relations in the Chaya Massif indicate that the mafic magmas were emplaced into, and interacted with older solid peridotite. Hand picked, acid-leached, primary rock-forming and accessory minerals (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and plagioclase) from the two harzburgite samples show coherent behavior and yield 147Sm/ 144Nd- 143Nd/ 144Nd and 238U/ 204Pb- 206Pb/ 204Pb mineral isochrons, corresponding to ages of 640 ± 58 Ma (95% confidence level) and 620 ± 71 Ma, respectively. These values are indistinguishable from the crystallization age of the Chaya mafic units of 627 ± 25 Ma (a weighted average of internal isochron Sm-Nd ages of four mafic cumulates). The Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systems in the harzburgite whole-rock samples were disturbed by hydrothermal alteration. These alteration-related isotopic shifts mimic the trend of variations in primary isotopic compositions in the mafic sequence, thus emphasizing that isotopic data for ultramafic rocks should be interpreted with great caution. On the basis of initial Sr and Nd values, ultramafic and mafic rocks of the Chaya Massif can be divided into two groups: (1) harzburgites and the lower mafic unit gabbronorites withɛ Nd = +6.6 to +7.1 andɛ Sr = -11 to -16; and (2) websterite of the lower unit and gabbronorites of the upper mafic unit:ɛ Nd = +4.6 to +6.1 andɛ Sr = -8 to -9. Initial Pb isotopic ratios are identical in all rocks studied, with mean values of 206Pb/ 204Pb= 16.994 ± 0.023 and 207Pb/ 204Pb= 15.363 ± 0.015. The similarity of ages and initial isotopic ratios within the first group indicates that the isotopic systems in the pre-existing depleted peridotite were reset by extensive interaction with

  17. Deformation and fluid-enhanced annealing in subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath the Pannonian Basin (Styrian Basin, Eastern Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, Laszlo; Hidas, Károly; János Kovács, István; Tommasi, Andrea; Garrido, Carlos; Szabó, Csaba

    2017-04-01

    In the Carpathian-Pannonian region, xenolith-bearing Neogene alkali basaltic volcanism occurred in five volcanic fields [1], from which the Styrian Basin Volcanic Field (SBVF) is the westernmost one. In this study, we present new petrographic and crystal preferred orientation (CPO) data, and structural hydroxyl ("water") contents of upper mantle xenoliths from 12 volcanic outcrops across the SBVF. The studied xenoliths are mostly coarse granular hydrous spinel lherzolites. Amphiboles, replacing pyroxenes and spinels, are present in almost every sample. The peridotites are highly annealed, olivines and pyroxenes show no significant amount of intragranular deformation. Despite the annealed texture of the peridotites, olivine CPO is unambiguous and varies between [010]-fiber, orthogonal and [100]-fiber symmetry. The CPO of pyroxenes is coherent with coeval deformation with olivine. The fabric and CPO of amphiboles suggest postkinematic epitaxial overgrowth on the precursor pyroxenes. The structural hydroxyl content of the studied xenoliths exhibits rather high, equilibrium values, up to 10, 290 and 675 ppm in olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, respectively. The olivines contain more structural hydroxyl in the annealed xenoliths than in the more deformed ones. The xenoliths show equilibrium temperatures from 850 to 1100 °C, which corresponds to lithospheric mantle depths between 30 and 60 km. Equilibrium temperatures show correlation with the varying CPO symmetries and grain size: coarser grained xenoliths with [100]-fiber and orthorhombic symmetry appear in the high temperature (>1000 °C) xenoliths, which is characteristic for asthenospheric environments [2]. Most of the samples display transitional CPO symmetry between [010]-fiber and orthogonal, which indicate lithospheric deformation under varying stress field from transtensional to transpressional settings [3], probably related to the Miocene evolution of the Pannonian Basin, during which varying compressive and

  18. Nickel and helium evidence for melt above the core-mantle boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Claude; Asimow, Paul D; Ionov, Dmitri A; Vidito, Chris; Jackson, Matthew G; Geist, Dennis

    2013-01-17

    High (3)He/(4)He ratios in some basalts have generally been interpreted as originating in an incompletely degassed lower-mantle source. This helium source may have been isolated at the core-mantle boundary region since Earth's accretion. Alternatively, it may have taken part in whole-mantle convection and crust production over the age of the Earth; if so, it is now either a primitive refugium at the core-mantle boundary or is distributed throughout the lower mantle. Here we constrain the problem using lavas from Baffin Island, West Greenland, the Ontong Java Plateau, Isla Gorgona and Fernandina (Galapagos). Olivine phenocryst compositions show that these lavas originated from a peridotite source that was about 20 per cent higher in nickel content than in the modern mid-ocean-ridge basalt source. Where data are available, these lavas also have high (3)He/(4)He. We propose that a less-degassed nickel-rich source formed by core-mantle interaction during the crystallization of a melt-rich layer or basal magma ocean, and that this source continues to be sampled by mantle plumes. The spatial distribution of this source may be constrained by nickel partitioning experiments at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary.

  19. Mineralogy of asbestos from the metamorphic complex from north eastern Takab-NW Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajialioghli, R.; Moazzen, M.

    2016-01-01

    The ultramafic rocks from the Takht-e-Soleyman metamorphic complex, in Precambrian age, are classified as serpentinized meta peridotites and serpentinites, based on degree of serpentinization. Serpentine forms more than 90 volume% of the serpentinites. On the basis of serpentine polymorphs, textural relations and micro-structure features, variety of serpentinites are determined as massive serpentinites, serpentinite schists and chrysotile-bearing serpentinites. Chrysotile in serpentinites has been formed due to static condition and brittle deformations. During static state chrysotile and lizardite after olivine and pyroxene are formed as pseudomorphic mesh and bastite textures in the massive serpentinites. Then serpentinization processes reactivated by formation and development of joints and fractures related to brittle deformations at the local sheared zones. Chrysotile occur as fine grained crystals in the serpentinite matrix and veinlets with mm thickness filling fractures of the chrysotile-bearing serpentinites. Slight thickness of chrysotile veinlet in the investigated serpentinites can be attributed to the olivine rich composition of protolite. Low amounts of Cr 2 O 3 in composition of the analyzed chrysotile supports low clinopyroxene and high olivine in protolite of serpentinites. Serpentinite schists are formed under ductile deformation condition at the regional sheared zones. Amphibole asbestos occur as veins having meter scale thickness filling of joints and fractures at the regional sheared zone. Length of thin and long asbestos amphibole arrives up to cm. On the basis of petrography, Raman spectroscopy, XRD and microprope analysis, both chrysotile- and amphibole asbestos have been recognized in the Takht-e-Soleyman serpentintes.

  20. New evidence for the serpentinization of the Palaeozoic basement of southeastern Sicily from joint 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampiccolo, E.; Brancato, A.; Manuella, F. C.; Carbone, S.; Gresta, S.; Scribano, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we derived the first 3-D P-wave seismic attenuation images (QP) as well as new 3-D VP and VP/VS models for the crust in southeastern Sicily. We used a large data set of local seismic events occurring in the time span 1994-2013. The results of this tomographic study have important implications on the seismic behaviour of the region. Based on velocity and attenuation images, we identified distinct volumes characterized by different fluid content, which correlate well with seismicity distribution. Moreover, the obtained velocity and attenuation tomographies help us to provide a more complete picture of the crustal structure of the area. High VP, high QP and high VP/VS values have been obtained in the crustal basement, below a depth of 8 km, and may be interpreted as due to the presence of serpentinized peridotites. Accordingly, the new model for the degree of serpentinization, retrieved from VP values, shows that the basement has an average serpentinization value of 96 ± 3 vol.% at 8 km, decreasing to 44 ± 5 vol.% at about 18-20 km.

  1. Preliminary investigations on the carbon dioxide sequestering potential of the ultramafic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Guthrie, G.; Counce, D.; Kluk, E.; Bergfeld, D.; Snow, M.

    1997-08-01

    Fossil fuels continue to provide major sources of energy to the modern world even though global emissions of CO{sub 2} are presently at levels of 19 Gt/yr. Future antipollution measures may include sequestering of waste CO{sub 2} as magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) by processing ultramafic rocks to obtain reactable Mg. Huge ultramafic deposits consisting of relatively pure Mg-rich silicates exist throughout much of the world in ophiolites and layered intrusions. Peridotites (especially dunites) and serpentinites comprise the best ores because they contain the most Mg by weight and are relatively reactive to hot acids such as HCl. Although mining such deposits on a large scale would have environmental impacts, the sequestering process could provide Cr, Ni, and other metals as byproducts and could dispose of existing waste (white) asbestos. Small ultramafic bodies ({approximately} 1 km{sup 3}) can potentially sequester about 1 Gt of CO{sub 2} or about 20% of annual US emissions. A single large deposit of dunite ({approximately} 30 km{sup 3}) could dispose of about 20 yr of current US CO{sub 2} emissions. The cost and environmental impact of mining these deposits must be weighed against the increased costs of energy and benefits to the atmosphere and climate.

  2. The H2/CH4 ratio during serpentinization cannot reliably identify biological signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruifang; Sun, Weidong; Liu, Jinzhong; Ding, Xing; Peng, Shaobang; Zhan, Wenhuan

    2016-09-26

    Serpentinization potentially contributes to the origin and evolution of life during early history of the Earth. Serpentinization produces molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) that can be utilized by microorganisms to gain metabolic energy. Methane can be formed through reactions between molecular hydrogen and oxidized carbon (e.g., carbon dioxide) or through biotic processes. A simple criterion, the H 2 /CH 4 ratio, has been proposed to differentiate abiotic from biotic methane, with values approximately larger than 40 for abiotic methane and values of serpentinization experiments at 200 °C and 0.3 kbar. However, it is not clear whether the criterion is applicable at a wider range of temperatures. In this study, we performed sixteen experiments at 311-500 °C and 3.0 kbar using natural ground peridotite. Our results demonstrate that the H 2 /CH 4 ratios strongly depend on temperature. At 311 °C and 3.0 kbar, the H 2 /CH 4 ratios ranged from 58 to 2,120, much greater than the critical value of 40. By contrast, at 400-500 °C, the H 2 /CH 4 ratios were much lower, ranging from 0.1 to 8.2. The results of this study suggest that the H 2 /CH 4 ratios cannot reliably discriminate abiotic from biotic methane.

  3. Nuclear microprobe analysis of serpentine from the mid-Atlantic ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orberger, Beate; Metrich, Nicole; Mosbah, Michelle; Mevel, Catherine; Fouquet, Yves

    1999-01-01

    At mid-ocean ridges, ultramafic rocks are serpentinized by interaction with seawater-derived fluids. Elements, dissolved in large quantities in seawater, e.g., Na, K, Cl, Br, Ca and Sr, can be, in small amounts, incorporated as traces into the crystal structure of the various serpentine minerals (Mg 3 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 ). These trace elements can be used to track the composition of the reacting fluids and to constrain physico-chemical conditions. This paper represents the first application of particle-induced X- and γ-ray emission (PIXE/PIGE) analysis to serpentine using the nuclear microprobe at the Laboratoire Pierre Suee (CEA-CNRS). Three types of serpentine, belonging to two different serpentinization generations, have been analysed in samples collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (14 deg. 45'N/45 deg. W) that exposes serpentinized peridotites on which the Logachev black smoker is placed. The trace elements Cl, F, S, Cu, Zn, Ca, K, Ni, Cr and Mn were detected from several tens to several thousands of ppm. Bromine, As and Sr are close to the detection limit of about 5 ppm. The trace element concentrations and interelement relationships in serpentines vary (a) with the serpentine type and (b) with the geographic location to the black smoker. Chlorine and in part S originated from seawater, whereas Cu, Zn, Ca, K, Ni, Cr and Fe and the major amount of S were mobilized from the unaltered host rock and partitioned between the serpentine and the aqueous solution

  4. Tectonic origin of serpentinites on Syros, Greece: Geochemical signatures of abyssal origin preserved in a HP/LT subduction complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperdock, Emily H. G.; Raia, Natalie H.; Barnes, Jaime D.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Schwarzenbach, Esther M.

    2018-01-01

    This study combines whole rock trace and major element geochemistry, and stable isotope (δD and δ18O) analyses with petrographic observations to deduce the origin and tectonic setting of serpentinization of ultramafic blocks from the exhumed HP/LT Aegean subduction complex on Syros, Greece. Samples are completely serpentinized and are characterized by mineral assemblages that consist of variable amounts of serpentine, talc, chlorite, and magnetite. δD and δ18O values of bulk rock serpentinite powders and chips (δD = - 64 to - 33‰ and δ18O = + 5.2 to + 9.0‰) reflect hydration by seawater at temperatures serpentinization by seawater, followed by secondary fluid-rock interactions with a sedimentary source pre- or syn-subduction. Whole rock major element, trace element, and REE analyses record limited melt extraction, exhibit flat REE patterns, and do not show pronounced Eu anomalies. The geochemical signatures preserved in these serpentinites argue against a mantle wedge source, as has been previously speculated for ultramafic rocks on Syros. Rather, the data are consistent with derivation from abyssal peridotites in a hyper-extended margin setting or mid-ocean ridge and fracture zone environment. In either case, the data suggest an extensional and/or oceanic origin associated with the Cretaceous opening of the Pindos Ocean and not a subduction-related derivation from the mantle wedge.

  5. Quasi-3-D Seismic Reflection Imaging and Wide-Angle Velocity Structure of Nearly Amagmatic Oceanic Lithosphere at the Ultraslow-Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, Ekeabino; Cannat, Mathilde; Watremez, Louise; Leroy, Sylvie; Singh, Satish C.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from 3-D processing of 2-D seismic data shot along 100 m spaced profiles in a 1.8 km wide by 24 km long box during the SISMOSMOOTH 2014 cruise. The study is aimed at understanding the oceanic crust formed at an end-member mid-ocean ridge environment of nearly zero melt supply. Three distinct packages of reflectors are imaged: (1) south facing reflectors, which we propose correspond to the damage zone induced by the active axial detachment fault: reflectors in the damage zone have dips up to 60° and are visible down to 5 km below the seafloor; (2) series of north dipping reflectors in the hanging wall of the detachment fault: these reflectors may correspond to damage zone inherited from a previous, north dipping detachment fault, or small offset recent faults, conjugate from the active detachment fault, that served as conduits for isolated magmatic dykes; and (3) discontinuous but coherent flat-lying reflectors at shallow depths (serpentinization and fracturation of the exhumed mantle-derived peridotites in the footwall of active and past detachment faults.

  6. Microbial diversity in The Cedars, an ultrabasic, ultrareducing, and low salinity serpentinizing ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shino; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Wu, Angela; Cheung, Andrea; Tenney, Aaron; Wanger, Greg; Kuenen, J Gijs; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2013-09-17

    The Cedars, in coastal northern California, is an active site of peridotite serpentinization. The spring waters that emerge from this system feature very high pH, low redox potential, and low ionic concentrations, making it an exceptionally challenging environment for life. We report a multiyear, culture-independent geomicrobiological study of three springs at The Cedars that differ with respect to the nature of the groundwater feeding them. Within each spring, both geochemical properties and microbial diversity in all three domains of life remained stable over a 3-y period, with multiple samples each year. Between the three springs, however, the microbial communities showed considerable differences that were strongly correlated with the source of the serpentinizing groundwater. In the spring fed solely by deep groundwater, phylum Chloroflexi, class Clostridia, and candidate division OD1 were the major taxa with one phylotype in Euryarchaeota. Less-abundant phylotypes include several minor members from other candidate divisions and one phylotype that was an outlier of candidate division OP3. In the springs fed by the mixture of deep and shallow groundwater, organisms close to the Hydrogenophaga within Betaproteobacteria dominated and coexisted with the deep groundwater community members. The shallow groundwater community thus appears to be similar to those described in other terrestrial serpentinizing sites, whereas the deep community is distinctly different from any other previously described terrestrial serpentinizing community. These unique communities have the potential to yield important insights into the development and survival of life in these early-earth analog environments.

  7. A serpentinite-hosted ecosystem in the Southern Mariana Forearc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yasuhiko; Reagan, Mark K; Fujikura, Katsunori; Watanabe, Hiromi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Teruaki; Stern, Robert J; Pujana, Ignacio; Martinez, Fernando; Girard, Guillaume; Ribeiro, Julia; Brounce, Maryjo; Komori, Naoaki; Kino, Masashi

    2012-02-21

    Several varieties of seafloor hydrothermal vents with widely varying fluid compositions and temperatures and vent communities occur in different tectonic settings. The discovery of the Lost City hydrothermal field in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge has stimulated interest in the role of serpentinization of peridotite in generating H(2)- and CH(4)-rich fluids and associated carbonate chimneys, as well as in the biological communities supported in highly reduced, alkaline environments. Abundant vesicomyid clam communities associated with a serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal vent system in the southern Mariana forearc were discovered during a DSV Shinkai 6500 dive in September 2010. We named this system the "Shinkai Seep Field (SSF)." The SSF appears to be a serpentinite-hosted ecosystem within a forearc (convergent margin) setting that is supported by fault-controlled fluid pathways connected to the decollement of the subducting slab. The discovery of the SSF supports the prediction that serpentinite-hosted vents may be widespread on the ocean floor. The discovery further indicates that these serpentinite-hosted low-temperature fluid vents can sustain high-biomass communities and has implications for the chemical budget of the oceans and the distribution of abyssal chemosynthetic life.

  8. Numerical model of the transition from continental rifting to oceanization: the case study of the Ligure-Piemontese ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, M.; Marotta, A. M.; Conte, K.; Spalla, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The transition from continental rifting to oceanization has been investigated by mean of a 2D thermo-mechanical numerical model in which the formation of oceanic crust by mantle serpentinization, due to the hydration of the uprising peridotite, as been implemented. Model predictions have been compared with natural data related to the Permian-Triassic thinning affecting the continental lithosphere of the Alpine domain, in order to identify which portions of the present Alpine-Apennine system, preserving the imprints of Permian-Triassic high temperature (HT) metamorphism, is compatible, in terms of lithostratigraphy and tectono-metamorphic evolution, with a lithospheric extension preceding the opening of the Ligure-Piemontese oceanic basin. At this purpose age, petrological and structural data from the Alpine and Apennine ophiolite complexes are compared with model predictions from the oceanization stage. Our comparative analysis supports the thesis that the lithospheric extension preceding the opening of the Alpine Tethys did not start on a stable continental lithosphere, but developed by recycling part of the old Variscan collisional suture. The HT Permian-Triassic metamorphic re-equilibration overprints an inherited tectonic and metamorphic setting consequent to the Variscan subduction and collision, making the Alps a key case history to explore mechanisms responsible for the re-activation of orogenic scars.

  9. The H2/CH4 ratio during serpentinization cannot reliably identify biological signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruifang; Sun, Weidong; Liu, Jinzhong; Ding, Xing; Peng, Shaobang; Zhan, Wenhuan

    2016-09-01

    Serpentinization potentially contributes to the origin and evolution of life during early history of the Earth. Serpentinization produces molecular hydrogen (H2) that can be utilized by microorganisms to gain metabolic energy. Methane can be formed through reactions between molecular hydrogen and oxidized carbon (e.g., carbon dioxide) or through biotic processes. A simple criterion, the H2/CH4 ratio, has been proposed to differentiate abiotic from biotic methane, with values approximately larger than 40 for abiotic methane and values of serpentinization experiments at 200 °C and 0.3 kbar. However, it is not clear whether the criterion is applicable at a wider range of temperatures. In this study, we performed sixteen experiments at 311-500 °C and 3.0 kbar using natural ground peridotite. Our results demonstrate that the H2/CH4 ratios strongly depend on temperature. At 311 °C and 3.0 kbar, the H2/CH4 ratios ranged from 58 to 2,120, much greater than the critical value of 40. By contrast, at 400-500 °C, the H2/CH4 ratios were much lower, ranging from 0.1 to 8.2. The results of this study suggest that the H2/CH4 ratios cannot reliably discriminate abiotic from biotic methane.

  10. Deep-Earth Equilibration between Molten Iron and Solid Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M.; Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental partitioning between iron-rich metals and silicate minerals influences the properties of Earth's deep interior, and is ultimately responsible for the nature of the core-mantle boundary. These interactions between molten iron and solid silicates were influential during planetary accretion, and persist today between the mantle and liquid outer core. Here we report the results of diamond anvil cell experiments at lower mantle conditions (40 GPa, >2500 K) aimed at examining systems containing a mixture of metals (iron or Fe-16Si alloy) and silicates (peridotite). The experiments were conducted at pressure-temperature conditions above the metallic liquidus but below the silicate solidus, and the recovered samples were analyzed by FIB/SEM with EDS to record the compositions of the coexisting phases. Each sample formed a three-phase equilibrium between bridgmanite, Fe-rich metallic melt, and an oxide. In one experiment, using pure Fe, the quenched metal contained 6 weight percent O, and the coexisting oxide was ferropericlase. The second experiment, using Fe-Si alloy, was highly reducing; its metal contained 10 wt% Si, and the coexisting mineral was stishovite. The distinct mineralogies of the two experiments derived from their different starting metals. These results imply that metallic composition is an important factor in determining the products of mixed phase iron-silicate reactions. The properties of deep-Earth interfaces such as the core-mantle boundary could be strongly affected by their metallic components.

  11. Mantle xenoliths from Nemby, Eastern Paraguay: O-Sr-Nd isotopes and trace elements of hosted clinopyroxenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comin-Chiaramonti, P; Antonini, P; Girardi, V.A.V; Gomes, C.B; Laurora, S; Zanetti, A

    2001-01-01

    The Nemby spinel peridotites (Asuncion- Sapucai-Villarrica Graben, Central Eastern Paraguay) are variable in major element compositions, ranging from relatively 'fertile' to very depleted in basaltic component. Some of the xenoliths have exceeding high K 2 O (HK suite, distinct from the low K 2 O, LK-suite) and incompatible element (IE) contents compared with the composition of lherzolites which underwent partial melting during 'basalt-extraction'. The IE contents of clinopyroxenes encompass world-wide occurrences. This suggests that processes, other than depletion, occurred. Demarchi et al. (1988) have shown that K is mostly partitioned into glassy patches (blebs) in the xenoliths and glassy drops in clinopyroxenes. The blebs have been interpreted as derived from the breakdown of volatile-bearing wet phases, such as amphibole and/or phlogopite, which melted during ascent to the surface; the glassy drops in clinopyroxenes are generally interpreted as products of incongruent partial melting induced by decompression (Comin- Chiaramonti et al., 1986). Both probably represent the remnants of hydrous phases such as micas and/or amphiboles, and/or products induced by the influx of small-volume, volatile-rich melts (Petrini et al., 1994). In summary, most of the major element chemistry of the Nemby xenoliths (except for K 2 O and to a lesser extent for Na 2 O) are consistent with residual compositions after variable degrees of partial melting and metasomatic effects shown by alkali and IE enrichments in both whole rock and in clinopyroxene. Clinopyroxenes display variable REE enrichments, more evident in those crystals characterized by spongy texture and abundance of glassy drops. A possible explanation for the progressive enrichment of samples characterized by similar HREE and different LREE abundances is different ion-exchange processes (cf. 'simple mixing metasomatism model' of Song and Frey, 1989; Sen et al., 1993) due to the passage of LREE-rich chemical front on

  12. Atmospheric dust additions as a soil formation factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Hernandez, J. L.; Ruoss, J.

    2009-07-01

    The Mediterranean area is distinguished by a least four features that determine the nature of its soils. These are its climate, its mountains, the addition of exogenous dust and ongoing anthropogenic effects. We here present three cases in which the influence of atmospheric dust additions can be detected in the soils of representative circum-Saharan contexts the Canary Islands, Betic intramontane depressions, and the Sierra Bermeja peridotite massif (Malaga). The unique position of the Canary Islands determines important rates of dust deposit, largely depending on position on the relief. the nature of the dust contrasts with the rocky substratum of the islands, and the marine and volcanic context can also affect the nature of the deposits. The numerous, extensive intramontane basins of the Betic Cordilleras act as large captors of atmospheric dust, with rates similar to those found in the Canary archipelago. The carbonate content of these exogenous additions represents a significant components that should be taken into account when establishing the carbonate accumulation regime in these soils. (Author) 13 refs.

  13. Mantle amphibole control on arc and within-plate chemical signatures: Quaternary lavas from Kurdistan Province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirkhah, M.; Allen, M. B.; Neill, I.; Emami, M. H.; McLeod, C.

    2012-04-01

    New analyses of Quaternary lavas from Kurdistan Province in west Iran shed light on the nature of collision zone magmatism. The rocks are from the Turkish-Iranian plateau within the Arabia-Eurasia collision. Compositions are typically basanite, hawaiite and alkali basalt. Sr-Nd isotope values are close to BSE, which is similar to Quaternary alkali basalts of NW Iran, but distinct from a depleted source melting under Mount Ararat. The chemical signatures suggests variable melting of two distinct sources. One inferred source produced melts with La/Nb from~3.5 to~1.2, which we model as the result of depletion of amphibole during ≤1% melting in the garnet stability field. We infer phlogopite in the source of potassic lavas from Takab. Lithosphere delamination or slab break-off mechanisms for triggering melting are problematic, as the lithosphere is~150-200km thick. It is possible that the negative dT/dP section of the amphibole peridotite solidus was crossed as a result of lithospheric thickening in the collision zone. This explanation is conditional upon the mantle source being weakly hydrated and so only containing a small proportion of amphibole, which can be exhausted during small degrees of partial melting. Our model maybe viable for other magmatic areas within orogenic plateaux, e.g. northern Tibet. Depletion of mantle amphibole may also help explain larger scale transitions from arc to within-plate chemistry in orogens, such as the Palaeogene Arabia-Eurasia system.

  14. Mesozoic mafic dikes from the Shandong Peninsula, North China Craton: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shen; Hu Ruizhong; Zhao Junhong; Feng Caixia; Zou, Haibo

    2006-01-01

    Mesozoic mafic dikes are widely distributed in Luxi (Mengyin and Zichuan) and Jiaodong regions of the Shandong Peninsula, China, providing an opportunity of investigating the nature of the lost lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton (NCC). The mafic dikes are characterized by strong depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE), enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE), highly variable Th/U ratios, high initial ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr) i (0.7050-0.7099) and negative ε Nd (T) (-6.0 to -17.6). They were derived from melting of metasomatized portions of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle, followed by fractionation of clinopyroxenes. The similarity in Nd isotopic compositions between the Mengyin gabbro dikes and the Paleozoic peridotite xenoliths suggests that ancient lithospheric mantle was still retained at 120 Ma below Mengyin, although the ancient lithospheric mantle in many other places beneath NCC had been severely modified. There might be multiple enrichment events in the lithospheric mantle. An early-stage (before or during Paleozoic) rutile-rich metasomatism affected the lithospheric mantle below Mengyin, Jiaodong and Zichuan. Since then, the lithospheric mantle beneath Mengyin was isolated. A late-stage metasomatism by silicate melts modified the lithospheric mantle beneath Jiaodong and Zichuan but not Mengyin. The removal of the enriched lithospheric mantle and the generation of the mafic dikes may be mainly related to the convective overturn accompanying Jurassic-Cretaceous subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate. (author)

  15. Geology, geochemistry and petrology of basalts from Paraná Continental Magmatic Province in the Araguari, Uberlândia, Uberaba and Sacramento regions, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Castanheira de Moraes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study covers the region between the cities of Sacramento and Araguari/Uberlândia (Minas Gerais State, Brazil, where basalt flows from the Paraná Continental Magmatic Province outcrop. The investigated rocks present tholeiitic signature, with high titanium content, and are classified as Pitanga magma-type. The preserved basalt thickness is between 10 and 200 meters and individual flows do not exceed 15 meters thick. Flows were identified as sheet lobes, smaller and thinner flows units - stacked laterally and vertically forming compound lavas -, or frontal, centimetric lobes. The basalt flows show decimetric to metric intercalations of clastic sedimentary rock, with depositional characteristics that can vary from aeolian to lacustrine, and are important markers on prevailing environmental conditions. The plagioclases are dominantly labradorite and pyroxene is augite, whereas olivine can be hyalosiderite or hortonolite/ferrohortonolite. The behavior of the major, minor and trace elements is compatible with the presence of at least two parental magmas, which were subjected to fractional crystallization mainly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, ilmenite and magnetite. There is a chemistry distinction between basalts from Sacramento to those from Araguari/Uberlândia region, the former one showing more evolved than the last one. The high (La/LuN values are indicative of partial melting of a garnet peridotite, while the Rare Earth Elements (REE values are indicative of fractional crystallization.

  16. Synthesis of inverse ringwoodite sheds light on the subduction history of Tibetan ophiolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, Luca; Griffin, William L; Panero, Wendy R; Sirotkina, Ekaterina; Bobrov, Andrey; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2018-04-03

    Tibetan ophiolites are shallow mantle material and crustal slabs that were subducted as deep as the mantle transition zone, a conclusion supported by the discovery of high-pressure phases like inverse ringwoodite in these sequences. Ringwoodite, Mg 2 SiO 4 , exhibits the normal spinel structure, with Mg in the octahedral A site and Si in the tetrahedral B site. Through A and B site-disorder, the inverse spinel has four-coordinated A cations and the six-coordinated site hosts a mixture of A and B cations. This process affects the density and impedance contrasts across the boundaries in the transition zone and seismic-wave velocities in this portion of the Earth. We report the first synthesis at high pressure (20 GPa) and high temperature (1600 °C) of a Cr-bearing ringwoodite with a completely inverse-spinel structure. Chemical, structural, and computational analysis confirm the stability of inverse ringwoodite and add further constraints to the subduction history of the Luobusa peridotite of the Tibetan ophiolites.

  17. Integrating EarthScope Data to Constrain the Long-Term Effects of Tectonism on Continental Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, R. C.; van der Lee, S.

    2017-12-01

    One of the most significant products of the EarthScope experiment has been the development of new seismic tomography models that take advantage of the consistent station design, regular 70-km station spacing, and wide aperture of the EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) network. These models have led to the discovery and interpretation of additional compositional, thermal, and density anomalies throughout the continental US, especially within tectonically stable regions. The goal of this work is use data from the EarthScope experiment to better elucidate the temporal relationship between tectonic activity and seismic velocities. To accomplish this, we compile several upper-mantle seismic velocity models from the Incorporated Research Institute for Seismology (IRIS) Earth Model Collaboration (EMC) and compare these to a tectonic age model we compiled using geochemical ages from the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance: EarthChem Database. Results from this work confirms quantitatively that the time elapsed since the most recent tectonic event is a dominant influence on seismic velocities within the upper mantle across North America. To further understand this relationship, we apply mineral-physics models for peridotite to estimate upper-mantle temperatures for the continental US from tomographically imaged shear velocities. This work shows that the relationship between the estimated temperatures and the time elapsed since the most recent tectonic event is broadly consistent with plate cooling models, yet shows intriguing scatter. Ultimately, this work constrains the long-term thermal evolution of continental mantle lithosphere.

  18. Study of the metamorphic belts and tectonics; Henseitai kenkyu to tectonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1997-10-25

    Study of metamorphic belts and tectonics is introduced. Minerals supposedly originating in the transitional zone and the lower mantle, that is, inclusions in diamond in kimberlite, are deemed to carry information about the depth level of 670km and lower. The place of origin of peridotite, Alpe Arami of Switzerland, is again estimated at a level of 300km or deeper. In the tectonic cross section in this region, the oceanic crust is bent and folded, and such a structure enables the supposition that fragments off the transitional zone may be carried upward to the ground surface. This region is now being limelighted, with plume tectonics enjoying popularity. The split of Pangaea is related with the ascent of plume. In the eastern part of Australia, there are alkali rocks attributable to the plume that was supposedly active at the end of the Proterozoic. Zircon U-Pb dating by SHRIMP offers a new approach to the tectonics of metamorphic rocks, and is reinforcing the position of metamorphic petrology relative to the study of collision and split of continents. 64 refs., 10 figs.

  19. A major Early Miocene thermal pulse due to subduction segmentation and rollback in the western Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spakman, W.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Vissers, R.

    2012-12-01

    Geological studies have shown that Eo-Oligocene subduction related high-pressure, low-temperature metasediments and peridotites of the Alboran region (Spain, Morocco) and the Kabylides (Algeria) experienced a major Early Miocene (~21 Ma) thermal pulse requiring asthenospheric temperatures at ~60 km depth. Despite earlier propositions, the cause of this thermal pulse is still controversial while also the paleogeographic origin of the Alboran and Kabylides units is debated. Here, we relate the thermal pulse to segmentation of the West Alpine-Tethyan slab under the SE Iberian margin (Baleares-Sardinia). We restore the Alboran rocks farther east than previously assumed, to close to the Balearic Islands, adjacent to Sardinia. We identify three major lithosphere faults, the NW-SE trending North Balearic Transform Zone (NBTZ) and the ~W-E trending Emile Baudot and North African transforms that accommodated the Miocene subduction evolution of slab segmentation, rollback, and migration of Alboran and Kabylides rocks to their current positions. The heat pulse occurred S-SE of the Baleares where slab segmentation along the NBTZ triggered radially outgrowing S-SW rollback opening a slab window that facilitated local ascent of asthenosphere below the rapidly extending Alboran-Kabylides accretionary prism. Subsequent slab rollback carried the Kabylides and Alboran domains to their present positions. Our new reconstruction is in line with tomographically imaged mantle structure and focuses attention on the crucial role of evolving subduction segmentation driving HT-metamorphism and subsequent extension, fragmentation, and dispersion of geological terrains.

  20. Indicia carbonate - ultrabasic massives of Ukrainian Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovchenko S.E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches of geology and composition of silicate-carbonate rocks of the Ukrainian shield. Concluded that they belonged to the karbonatites of the normal series. Metallogenic characteristics and specialization are confirming to the magmatic origin and resemblance with karbonatites alkaline series. In connection with the prevalence in the Precambrian ultrabasic-basic formation of carbonatites magmatism it was, seems to be more widespread in the areal extent of the ancient protoplatforms and rift zones. Numerous experimental data explicitly confirm the possibility of origin of dolomite melts of peridotite magma at its saturation pressure of CO2 and more than 5.7 GPa. Determined formational belonging and potential metallogenic specialization of silicate-carbonate rocks, associated with ultrabasic complexes of the Ukrainian Shield. Particular attention is paid to the identification of features that silicate-carbonate rocks can be attributed to magmatic or metamorphogenic-sedimentary formations, compared to their material composition and geotectonic position. As a result, identified the main characteristics for their recognition. Of these, the leading classified geotectonic, structural-geological, petrographic and mineralogical features, material composition and structure of the silicate-carbonate rocks associated with them relations of ultrabasic, mineralogical and geochemical features and communication with the manifestations useful mineralization. When you select features also include the effect of metamorphism on the nature of the transformation of carbonate-ultrabasic massifs and their modern look at this level erosion of the crust.

  1. Seismological evidence for a sub-volcanic arc mantle wedge beneath the Denali volcanic gap, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D.E.; Pasyanos, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Arc volcanism in Alaska is strongly correlated with the 100 km depth contour of the western Aluetian Wadati-Benioff zone. Above the eastern portion of the Wadati-Benioff zone however, there is a distinct lack of volcanism (the Denali volcanic gap). We observe high Poisson's ratio values (0.29-0.33) over the entire length of the Alaskan subduction zone mantle wedge based on regional variations of Pn and Sn velocities. High Poisson's ratios at this depth (40-70 km), adjacent to the subducting slab, are attributed to melting of mantle-wedge peridotites, caused by fluids liberated from the subducting oceanic crust and sediments. Observations of high values of Poisson's ratio, beneath the Denali volcanic gap suggest that the mantle wedge contains melted material that is unable to reach the surface. We suggest that its inability to migrate through the overlying crust is due to increased compression in the crust at the northern apex of the curved Denali fault.

  2. Syndeformation Chrome Spinels Inclusions in the Plastically Deformed Olivine Aggregates (Kraka Ophiolites, the Southern Urals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Saveliev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of structural, petrographic, mineralogical and chemical studies of dunite veinlets in spinel peridotite from the Kraka ophiolites. It is demonstrated that plastic deformation of polycrystalline olivine, which form dunite, was accompanied by precipitation of impurities (aluminum and chrome as newly formed chrome spinels. The thinnest acicular inclusions of 0.3-0.5 micron thick are aligned in olivine grains along [010] axis. Bigger elongated irregular chrome spinel grains usually occur along grain and sub-grain olivine boundaries, and, occasionally, inside the grains along [100] axis. Alteration from the fine xenomorphic grains of chrome spinels to the bigger idiomorphic crystals was observed. Analogically to dynamic ageing (dispersion hardening in metals, the structural and chemical alterations in dunites are interpreted as deformation induced segregation of impurities. It is suggested that the euhedral chrome spinel grains typical for ophiolitic dunites were formed by coalescence and spheroidization. This process may be a key factor in the formation of ophiolitic chrome ore deposits.

  3. Within-plate Cenozoic Volcanism and Mantle Sources Within The Western-central Mediterranean Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaluva, L.; Bianchini, G.; Bonadiman, C.; Coltorti, M.; Siena, F.

    An integrated study of anorogenic basic magmas and entrained mantle xenoliths rep- resents a promising approach for a comprehension of the magmatogenic events occur- ring within the lithospheric mantle in the western-central Mediterranean area. In this contribution we review the geochemical characteristics of mafic lavas and associated peridotite xenoliths from three anorogenic volcanic districts: Pliocene-Quaternary vol- canism of Sardinia; Pliocene-Quaternary volcanism of the Iblean area (eastern Sicily); Paleocene-Oligocene Veneto Volcanic Province. Investigations have been focused on 1) petrological features of parental magmas, which may contribute to infer the com- positional characteristics of mantle sources and to constrain the modes of partial melt- ing; 2) modelling the depletion events and metasomatic enrichments in mantle xeno- liths of the three volcanic districts, as well as the nature of their causative agents. Petrological features and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data, both of lava and xenoliths, indicate that DM+HIMU components distinguish the lithospheric mantle sections of Iblean and Veneto Volcanic Provinces. On the other hand, lavas and xenoliths from Sardinia display a significant different isotopic signature characterised by DM+EM1. Similar geochemical fingerprints, i.e. the significant presence of EM components are gener- ally recorded by mafic lavas and mantle xenoliths from the European Plate, whereas they are not observed in the stable African lithospheric domain.

  4. Gemstone deposits of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinović Zoran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gemstone minerals in Serbia have never been regarded as an interesting and significant resource. Nevertheless, more than 150 deposits and occurrences have been recorded and some of them preliminarily explored in the last 50 years. The majority of deposits and occurrences are located within the Serbo-Macedonian metallogenic province and the most significant metallogenic units at the existing level of knowledge are the Fruska Gora ore district, Cer ore district, Sumadija metallogenic zone, Kopaonik metallogenic zone and Lece-Halkidiki metallogenic zone. The most important genetic type of deposits is hydrothermal, particularly in case of serpentinite/peridotite as host/parent rock. Placer deposits are also economically important. The dominant gemstones are silica minerals: chalcedony (Chrysoprase, carnelian, bluish chalcedony etc., jasper (picture, landscape, red etc., common opal (dendritic, green, milky white etc., silica masses (undivided, and quartz (rock crystal, amethyst etc.. Beside silica minerals significant gemstones in Serbia include also beryl (aquamarine, garnet (almandine and pyrope, tourmaline, fluorite, rhodochrosite, carbonate-silica breccia, carbonate-silica onyx, silicified wood, howlite, serpentinite, marble onyx, and kyanite. This paper aims to present an overview of Serbian gemstone deposits and occurrences and their position based on a simplified gemstone metallogenic map of Serbia, as well as genetic-industrial classification of gemstone deposits and gemstone varieties.

  5. Petrology of metabasites in the south of Arousan, northeastern Isfahan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Bayat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Metagabbro, metadiabase and metabasalt of the Chah Palang and Me'raji mountains associated with Lower Paleozoic metamorphites are situated in the south of Arousan. Metabasites of these areas are relatively similar in terms of mineralogy and geochemical characteristics. Rock-forming minerals of the Me'raji metabasites are feldspar, amphibole, biotite, sphene, epidote, chlorite ± calcite. Metagabbro and metadiabase of the Chah Palang area are similar to the Me'raji metabasites in mineralogy and geochemistry. Volcanic rocks are overlain by metagabbros and consist of plagioclase, biotite, sphene, sanidine, chlorite, epidote and iron oxides. The rigid dykes, which are found in the volcanic units are associated with metagabbros and mineralogically are similar to the metavolcanics. Amphibolitic dykes are composed of amphibole, plagioclase and biotite with preferred orientation. Metabasites show limited range of differentiation. Me'raji metabasites are basalt and trachy-basalt in composition, whereas the Chah Palang ones present basalt and trachy-basalt composition. Similar to metabasites of the other parts of Iran, the studied basic rocks demonstrate alkaline to transitional chemical characteristic and are formed in an extensional environment by low-degree partial melting of a garnet-spinel peridotite. Metamorphic episodes have changed the studied rocks to amphibolite and greenschist, but the primitive igneous textures are preserved.

  6. Iron isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Dauphas, Nicolas; Huang, Shichun; Marty, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    The iron isotopic compositions of 93 well-characterized basalts from geochemically and geologically diverse mid-ocean ridge segments, oceanic islands and back arc basins were measured. Forty-three MORBs have homogeneous Fe isotopic composition, with δ56Fe ranging from +0.07‰ to +0.14‰ and an average of +0.105 ± 0.006‰ (2SD/√n, n = 43, MSWD = 1.9). Three back arc basin basalts have similar δ56Fe to MORBs. By contrast, OIBs are slightly heterogeneous with δ56Fe ranging from +0.05‰ to +0.14‰ in samples from Koolau and Loihi, Hawaii, and from +0.09‰ to +0.18‰ in samples from the Society Islands and Cook-Austral chain, French Polynesia. Overall, oceanic basalts are isotopically heavier than mantle peridotite and pyroxenite xenoliths, reflecting Fe isotope fractionation during partial melting of the mantle. Iron isotopic variations in OIBs mainly reflect Fe isotope fractionation during fractional crystallization of olivine and pyroxene, enhanced by source heterogeneity in Koolau samples.

  7. Lower crustal xenoliths, Chinese Peak lava flow, central Sierra Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Calk, L.C.; Kistler, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This assemblage of pyroxenite, peridotite and mafic granulite xenoliths in the toe of a 10 m.y. trachybasalt flow remnant overlying late Cretaceous granitic rocks, indicates the presence of a mafic-ultramafic complex beneath this part of central California; orthopyroxenites, websterites and clinopyroxenites are dominant. A few of the xenoliths contain ovoid opaque patches that are apparently pseudomorphs after garnet and have pyralspite garnet compositions; using a garnet-orthopyroxene geobarometer, they indicate a lower crustal depth of approx 40 km. Abundant mafic granulites can be subdivided into those with Al2O3 = or 15% and showing considerable scatter on oxide variation diagrams. The high-alumina granulite xenoliths have relatively low 87Rb/86Sr but high 87Sr/86Sr, whereas the low-alumina and ultramafic xenoliths have a wide range of 87Rb/86Sr, but lower 87Sr/86Sr; the isotopic data indicate roughly the same age as that of overlying granitic plutons (approx 100 m.y.). However, the granitic rocks have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios intermediate between those of the high-alumina and ultramafic xenoliths, suggesting that they result from the mixing of basaltic magma (represented by the ultramafic rocks) and crustal materials, with subsequent crystal fractionation.-R.A.H.

  8. Inferred rheological structure and mantle conditions from postseismic deformation following the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson-Lovell, Haylee; Huang, Mong-Han; Freed, Andrew M.; Fielding, Eric; Bürgmann, Roland; Andronicos, Christopher

    2018-06-01

    The 2010 Mw7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake provides a unique target of postseismic study as deformation extends across several distinct geological provinces, including the cold Mesozoic arc crust of the Peninsular Ranges and newly formed, hot, extending lithosphere within the Salton Trough. We use five years of global positioning system measurements to invert for afterslip and constrain a 3-D finite-element model that simulates viscoelastic relaxation. We find that afterslip cannot readily explain far-field displacements (more than 50 km from the epicentre). These displacements are best explained by viscoelastic relaxation of a horizontally and vertically heterogeneous lower crust and upper mantle. Lower viscosities beneath the Salton Trough compared to the Peninsular Ranges and other surrounding regions are consistent with inferred differences in the respective geotherms. Our inferred viscosity structure suggests that the depth of the Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) is ˜65 km below the Peninsular Ranges and ˜32 km beneath the Salton Trough. These depths are shallower than the corresponding seismic LAB. This suggests that the onset of partial melting in peridotite may control the depth to the base of the mechanical lithosphere. In contrast, the seismic LAB may correspond to an increase in the partial melt percentage associated with the change from a conductive to an adiabatic geotherm.

  9. Fossil intermediate-depth earthquakes in subducting slabs linked to differential stress release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambelluri, Marco; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Gilio, Mattia; Bestmann, Michel; Plümper, Oliver; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2017-12-01

    The cause of intermediate-depth (50-300 km) seismicity in subduction zones is uncertain. It is typically attributed either to rock embrittlement associated with fluid pressurization, or to thermal runaway instabilities. Here we document glassy pseudotachylyte fault rocks—the products of frictional melting during coseismic faulting—in the Lanzo Massif ophiolite in the Italian Western Alps. These pseudotachylytes formed at subduction-zone depths of 60-70 km in poorly hydrated to dry oceanic gabbro and mantle peridotite. This rock suite is a fossil analogue to an oceanic lithospheric mantle that undergoes present-day subduction. The pseudotachylytes locally preserve high-pressure minerals that indicate an intermediate-depth seismic environment. These pseudotachylytes are important because they are hosted in a near-anhydrous lithosphere free of coeval ductile deformation, which excludes an origin by dehydration embrittlement or thermal runaway processes. Instead, our observations indicate that seismicity in cold subducting slabs can be explained by the release of differential stresses accumulated in strong dry metastable rocks.

  10. Isotopic and trace element constraints on the genesis of a boninitic sequence in the Thetford Mines ophiolitic complex, Quebec, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, V.; Hebert, R.; Loubet, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Mont Ham Massif (part of the Thetford Mines ophiolite, south Quebec) represents a magmatic sequence made up of tholeiitic and boninitic derived products. A geochemical study confirms the multicomponent mixing models that have been classically advanced for the source of boninites, with slab-derived components added to the main refractory harzburgitic peridotite. An isochron diagram of the boninitic rocks is interpreted as a mixing trend between two components: (i) a light rare earth element (LREE) enriched component (A), interpreted as slab-derived fluid-melts equilibrated with sedimentary materials (ε Nd = -3, 147 Sm/ 144 Nd = 0.140), and (ii) a LREE-depleted component (B) (0.21 147 Sm/ 144 Nd Nd = 9). A multicomponent source is also necessary to explain the Nd-isotope and trace element composition of the tholeiites, which are explained by the melting of a more fertile, Iherzolitic mantle and (or) mid-ocean ridge basalt source (component C), characterized by a large-ion lithophile element depicted pattern and an lapetus mantle Nd isotopic composition (ε Nd = 9), mixed in adequate proportions with the two previously infered slab-derived components (A and B). The genesis of the boninites of Mont Ham is not significantly different from those of boninites located in the Pacific. An intraoceanic subduction zone appears to be an appropriate geodynamic environment for the Mont Ham ophiolitic sequence. (author)

  11. Geochemical evidence for the melting of subducting oceanic lithosphere at plate edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Lees, J. M.; Churikova, T. G.; Dorendorf, F.; Wöerner, G.; Volynets, O. N.

    2001-01-01

    Most island-arc magmatism appears to result from the lowering of the melting point of peridotite within the wedge of mantle above subducting slabs owing to the introduction of fluids from the dehydration of subducting oceanic crust. Volcanic rocks interpreted to contain a component of melt (not just a fluid) from the subducting slab itself are uncommon, but possible examples have been recognized in the Aleutian islands, Baja California, Patagonia and elsewhere. The geochemically distinctive rocks from these areas, termed `adakites', are often associated with subducting plates that are young and warm, and therefore thought to be more prone to melting. But the subducting lithosphere in some adakite locations (such as the Aleutian islands) appears to be too old and hence too cold to melt. This implies either that our interpretation of adakite geochemistry is incorrect, or that our understanding of the tectonic context of adakites is incomplete. Here we present geochemical data from the Kamchatka peninsula and the Aleutian islands that reaffirms the slab-melt interpretation of adakites, but in the tectonic context of the exposure to mantle flow around the edge of a torn subducting plate. We conclude that adakites are likely to form whenever the edge of a subducting plate is warmed or ablated by mantle flow. The use of adakites as tracers for such plate geometry may improve our understanding of magma genesis and thermal structure in a variety of subduction-zone environments.

  12. Palaeomagnetic Constrains on the Timing and the Geographical Distribution of Tectonic Rotations in the Betic Chain, Southern Spain. A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osete, M. L.; Villalain, J. J.; Pavon-Carrasco, F. J.; Palencia, A.

    2009-05-01

    The Betic Cordillera is the northern branch of the Betic-Rifean orogen, the westernmost segment of the Mediterranean Alpine orogenic system. Several palaeomagnetic studies have enhanced the important role that block rotations about vertical axes have played in the tectonic evolution of the region. In this work we present a review of published palaeomagnetic data. According with the rotational deformation, the Betics are divided into the central-western area and the eastern Betics. A sequence of rotations for the two regions is also proposed. In central and western Subbetics almost constant clockwise rotations of about 60 are documented in Jurassic limestones. The existence of a pervasive remagnetization of Jurassic limestones, which was coeval with the folding of the studied units and dated as post-Palaeogene, constrains the timing of tectonic rotations in western Subbetics. New palaeomagnetic data from Neogene sedimentary sequences in central Betics indicate that palaeomagnetic clockwise rotations continued after late Miocene. A similar pattern of 40 CW rotations occurred after 20-17 Ma was obtained from the study of the Ronda-Malaga peridotites (western Internal Betics). In eastern Subbetics a more heterogeneous pattern, including very high CW rotations has been observed. But recent rotational deformation in the Internal part of eastern Betics is CCW and related to the left-lateral strike-slip fault systems. Proposed kinematics models for the Betics are discussed under the light of the present available palaeomagnetic information.

  13. Isotopic characterisation of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath Zealandia, a rifted fragment of Gondwana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Scott, James M.; van der Meer, Quinten Har Adriaan

    2013-01-01

    The greater New Zealand region, known as Zealandia, represents an amalgamation of crustal fragments accreted to the paleo-Pacific Gondwana margin and which underwent significant thinning during the subsequent split from Australia and Antarctica in the mid-Cretaceous following opening of the Tasma...... Sea and the Southern Ocean. We present Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes and laser ablation trace element data for a comprehensive suite of clinopyroxene separates from spinel peridotite xenoliths (lherzolite to harzburgite) from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle across southern New Zealand...... composition, age or geographical separation. These isotopic compositions indicate that the sub-continental lithospheric mantle under southern New Zealand has a regionally distinct and pervasive FOZO to HIMU – like signature. The isotopic signatures are also similar to those of the alkaline magmas...... that transported the xenoliths and suggest that most of the HIMU signature observed in the volcanics could be derived from a major source component in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Trace element abundances in clinopyroxene are highly heterogeneous and vary from LREE-enriched, relatively flat and MORB...

  14. Archean crustal evolution in the central Minto block, northern Quebec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skulski, T; Percival, J A; Stern, R A [Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The central Minto block contains three volcano-sedimentary successions. Near Lake Qalluviartuuq, an isotopically primitive ({sup 2.83} {sup Ga}{epsilon}{sub Nd} +3.8 to +2.3) 2.83 Ga volcano-plutonic sequence comprises depleted tholeiitic basalts, anorthositic gabbro, and diorite-granodiorite that is unconformably overlain by <2.77 Ga conglomerates. Overlying the conglomerate is a more evolved ({sup 2.76} {sup Ga}{epsilon}{sub Nd} +1.8) calc-alkaline sequence of pillow basalts, andesites, and peridotite cut by 2.73 Ga diorite. To the west, and in inferred tectonic contact, the sediment-dominated Kogaluc sequence includes both isotopically evolved calc-alkaline rocks ({sup 2.76} {sup Ga}{epsilon}{sub Nd} +1.6 to -0.1) including <2.76 Ga rhyolitic tuff, pillowed andesites, and 2.76 Ga quartz-feldspar porphyry, and less abundant, depleted tholeiitic basalts (2.76 GaF-Nd +2.4). These are interlain with sedimentary rocks including banded iron-formation, quartzite, and metagreywacke. Calc-alkaline batholiths include 2.78 Ga pyroxene-bearing intermediate and felsic plutons ({sup 2.78Ga}{epsilon}{sub Nd} <+2.7) and younger, peraluminous tonalites ({epsilon}{sub Nd} <+1.3). Late, 2.73 Ga peraluminous granitoids are isotopically evolved ({sup 2.725Ga}{epsilon}{sub Nd} - 1. 6). (author). 19 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  15. Adakitica affinity rocks south-east of Manizales: petrogenetic features and geochemistry (Colombia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toro Toro, Luz Mary; Alvaran Echeverri, Mauricio; Borrero Pena, Carlos Alberto

    2008-01-01

    To the southeast of Manizales city, in Gallinazo area, there are a series of aligned hills such as: Gallinazo, Amazonas, Sabinas, La Oliva and La Negra, corresponding to volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks of andesitic and dacitic composition respectively, geochemical data present characteristic of adakitic rocks. Both, volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks presents high SiO 2 concentration (63,87-70,15%), Al 2 O 3 (14,18-16,83%), low Y concentration (11,20-27 ppm) and Yb (0,94-1,93 ppm); strong enrichment in Light Rare Earth Elements(LREE) and highly incompatible elements (Rb, Ba), except for Sr which presents low contents and negative anomaly of Nb-Ta, characteristic that distinguish also the calcoalkaline magmas. Geochemical pattern of LREE and multielements show a strong fractionation ((La/ Yb)n>8) with typical low content of (Yb ≤ 1.8 ppm , Y ≤ 18 ppm). In this work authors propose SE Manizales adakita-like rocks were generated by subducted basaltic slab melting with some minimum peridotitic mantelic wedge contamination. Genesis and geochemical characteristics of these rocks open the possibility to find Au-Cu porphyry mineralizations and epithermal gold deposits in this area due to their highly oxidixing potential.

  16. An internally consistent pressure calibration of geobarometers applicable to the Earth’s upper mantle using in situ XRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Christopher; Rosenthal, Anja; Myhill, Robert; Crichton, Wilson A.; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin; Frost, Daniel J.

    2018-02-01

    We have performed an experimental cross calibration of a suite of mineral equilibria within mantle rock bulk compositions that are commonly used in geobarometry to determine the equilibration depths of upper mantle assemblages. Multiple barometers were compared simultaneously in experimental runs, where the pressure was determined using in-situ measurements of the unit cell volumes of MgO, NaCl, Re and h-BN between 3.6 and 10.4 GPa, and 1250 and 1500 °C. The experiments were performed in a large volume press (LVPs) in combination with synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Noble metal capsules drilled with multiple sample chambers were loaded with a range of bulk compositions representative of peridotite, eclogite and pyroxenite lithologies. By this approach, we simultaneously calibrated the geobarometers applicable to different mantle lithologies under identical and well determined pressure and temperature conditions. We identified discrepancies between the calculated and experimental pressures for which we propose simple linear or constant correction factors to some of the previously published barometric equations. As a result, we establish internally-consistent cross-calibrations for a number of garnet-orthopyroxene, garnet-clinopyroxene, Ca-Tschermaks-in-clinopyroxene and majorite geobarometers.

  17. Petrogenesis and geochemical characterisation of ultramafic cumulate rocks from Hawes Head, Fiordland, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daczko, N.R.; Emami, S.; Allibone, A.H.; Turnbull, I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Early Cretaceous parts of the western Median Batholith (Western Fiordland Orthogneiss) represent the exposed root of a magmatic arc of dioritic to monzodioritic composition (SiO 2 = 51-55 wt%; Na 2 O/K 2 O = 3.7-8.8 in this study). We characterise for the first time the field relationships, petrography, mineralogy and geochemistry of ultramafic and mafic cumulates at Hawes Head, the largest exposure of ultramafic rocks in western Fiordland. We distinguish three related rock types at Hawes Head: hornblende peridotite (MgO = 21-35 wt%); hornblendite (MgO = 15-16 wt%); and pyroxenite (MgO = 21 wt%). Petrogenetic relationships between the ultramafic rocks and the surrounding Misty Pluton of the Western Fiordland Orthogneiss are demonstrated by: (i) mutually cross-cutting relationships; (ii) similar mafic phases (e.g. pyroxene and amphibole) with elevated Mg-numbers (e.g. olivine Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.77-0.82); (iii) fractionation trends in mineral geochemistry; and (iv) shared depleted heavy rare earth element patterns. In addition, the application of solid/liquid partition coefficients indicates that olivine in the ultramafic rocks at Hawes Head crystallised from a magma with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.54-0.57. The olivine grains therefore represent a plausible early crystallising phase of the adjacent Western Fiordland Orthogneiss (Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.51-0.55). (author). 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Investigations and researches on CO2 balance in a high-temperature carbon dioxide separation technology; Nisanka tanso koon bunri gijutsu ni okeru CO2 balance ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    With an objective to select a promising process by compari