WorldWideScience

Sample records for performance pay committee

  1. 28 CFR 545.22 - Institution work and performance pay committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Institution work and performance pay... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT WORK AND COMPENSATION Inmate Work and Performance Pay Program § 545.22 Institution work... Institution Inmate Work and Performance Pay Committee to administer the institution's work and performance pay...

  2. Merit pay: the Federal Government's pay-for-performance experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Holliman, Sherry Diane.

    1983-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited For many years, businesses in private industry have been utilizing and experimenting with various forms of performance-based pay. These innovations have been part of a continuing search by organizations for better approaches to administering pay. With the passing of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, the Federal Government began its form of this concept entitled, 'Merit Pay'. Although many studies have examined uses in the areas of ...

  3. 28 CFR 551.108 - Performance pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance pay. 551.108 Section 551.108 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.108 Performance pay. The Warden may approve a pretrial inmate for performance pay...

  4. Performance pay, sorting and social motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Tor; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Variable pay links pay and performance but may also help firms in attracting more productive employees. Our experiment investigates the impact of performance pay on both incentives and sorting and analyzes the influence of repeated interactions between firms and employees on these effects. We show that (i) the opportunity to switch from a fixed wage to variable pay scheme increases the average effort level and its variance; (ii) high skill employees concentrate under t...

  5. The Relationship between Pay-for-Performance Perceptions and Pay Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneman, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assessed relationship between pay-for-performance perceptions and pay satisfaction among 104 hospital employees. Results indicated positive relationship between pay-for-performance perceptions and pay-raise satisfaction, pay-level satisfaction, and overall pay satisfaction even after effects of salary level, salary increases, performance ratings,…

  6. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a "team". This ...

  7. Performance Pay for Teachers: Determinants and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Clive R.; Heywood, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Theory and evidence on performance-related pay for teaching remain inconclusive. Teachers will respond to rewards, but an appropriate reward structure may not be devised because education is a collaborative endeavor. Here we test three hypotheses: performance-related pay among teachers is more likely to be observed when there are evident…

  8. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J.; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a “team”. This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than a reduction of team cooperation. PMID:25397615

  9. Expecting Too Much of Performance Pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan Moore; Papay, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Pay for performance is not a new idea, and reformers should not ignore the dismal record of merit pay over the past century. Initially adopted with a flourish of expectations during several waves of popularity in the past, every plan eventually fell into disuse. These plans proved to be unexpectedly costly and cumbersome to run. They often…

  10. Modernizing the Federal Government: Paying for Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    works (Barr, 2007d). Employees are rated on performance measures such as “fair and equitable treatment of taxpayers” and “customer satisfaction ... Performance Act of 2007, Senate bill 1046, Washington, D.C., 2007b. 38 Modernizing the Federal Government: Paying for Performance Vroom , Victor H...AND SUBTITLE Modernizing the federal government paying for performance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  11. Performance Related Pay and Labor Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A. C.; Kerkhofs, M.J.M.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses information from a panel of Dutch firms to investigate the labor productivity effects of performance related pay (PRP).We find that PRP increases labor productivity at the firm level with about 9%.

  12. Performance Related Pay and Labour Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Gielen, Anne; Kerkhofs, Marcel J M; van Ours, Jan C

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses information from a panel of Dutch firms to investigate the labour productivity effects of performance related pay (PRP). We find that PRP increases labour productivity at the firm level with about 9%.

  13. Performance Pay and Teacher Motivation: Separating Myth from Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulleman, Chris S.; Barron, Kenneth E.

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on research from outside of education to evaluate some common myths about performance pay and to consider future directions for designing and evaluating performance pay systems in K-12 education. The five common myths surrounding performance pay include: (1) Performance pay systems improve performance; (2) Performance pay…

  14. 28 CFR 545.25 - Eligibility for performance pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligibility for performance pay. 545.25... WORK AND COMPENSATION Inmate Work and Performance Pay Program § 545.25 Eligibility for performance pay. (a) An inmate may receive performance pay for accomplishments in one or more of the following areas...

  15. Pay for performance in the public sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregn, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to an explanation of why pay for performance (PFP) in the public sector has difficulties in functioning properly and why, despite the difficulties, its use is continued. To do so, the paper draws on insights from behavioural economics. The explanation focuses on cognitive...

  16. 28 CFR 345.59 - Inmate performance pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmate performance pay. 345.59 Section... INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.59 Inmate performance pay. Inmate workers for FPI may also receive Inmate Performance Pay for participation in programs where this award is made...

  17. The Dilemmas of Adopting Performance Related Pay as a Reward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Dilemmas of Adopting Performance Related Pay as a Reward Strategy for ... over automatic pay increase (formal and transparent reward systems linked to ... of reward and compensation, and low level of motivation and performance.

  18. Performance measurement and pay for performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijl, van H.F.J.M.; Kleingeld, P.A.M.; Algera, J.A.; Rutten, M.L.; Sonnentag, S.

    2002-01-01

    This chapter, which takes a (re)design perspective, focuses on the management of employees’ contributions to organisational goal attainment. The control loop for the self-regulation of task performance is used as a frame of reference. Several subsets of design requirements are described and related

  19. 75 FR 9544 - Inmate Work and Performance Pay Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... inmate may receive performance pay only for that portion of the month that the inmate was working... Inmate Work and Performance Pay Program AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Proposed rule... work and performance pay by removing redundant language and provisions that relate solely to staff...

  20. 5 CFR 9701.342 - Performance pay increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... increases, the Secretary or designee must take into account the average value of within-grade and quality... pay pool controls to allocate pay increases based on performance points that are directly linked to... function of the amount of money in the performance pay pool, the relative point value placed on ratings...

  1. Performance pay, sorting and the dimensions of job satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    C Green; J S Heywood

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of performance related pay on several dimensions of job satisfaction. In cross-sectional estimates, performance related pay is associated with increased overall satisfaction, satisfaction with pay, satisfaction with job security and satisfaction with hours. It appears to be negatively associated with satisfaction with the work itself. Yet, after accounting for worker fixed-effects, the positive associations remain and the negative association vanishes. Th...

  2. Executive compensation, financial performance and say on pay votes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 was passed as a response to the late-2000s recession. A shareholder opt-in executive pay vote was introduced as a solution to the managerial power problem. We examine the results of this recommended solution and prove its viability. We find that there is a stronger association between high CEO pay and low say-on-pay vote support for firms with negative financial performance. We also find the market-to-book ratio is significantly lower for companies that failed say-on-pay votes. Furthermore, regulated industries such as financial services are more likely receive unfavourable say-on-pay votes. We document an increase in the sensitivity of CEO pay to poor performance. Overall, these finds are consistent with calls for less “rewards for failure” that led to the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

  3. Cross-Country Evidence on Teacher Performance Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessmann, Ludger

    2011-01-01

    The general-equilibrium effects of performance-related teacher pay include long-term incentive and teacher-sorting mechanisms that usually elude experimental studies but are captured in cross-country comparisons. Combining country-level performance-pay measures with rich PISA-2003 international achievement micro data, this paper estimates…

  4. The Trouble with Pay for Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. Phillip

    2003-01-01

    Structured interviews with 575 administrators and supervisors in 6 school districts finds 8 impediments to school board implementation of an effective merit pay system for these employees: Lack of knowledge, teacher heritage, supervisor's ability, supervisor's motivation, managerial prerogatives, amount of rewards, and type of rewards. Offers…

  5. Performance Pay and Ethnic Wage Differences in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Colin P. Green; John S. Heywood; Nikolaos Theodoropoulos

    2012-01-01

    In the first study using British data, we show that the average wage advantage of holding a performance pay job is greater for minorities than that for Whites. This generates a smaller ethnic wage gap among performance pay jobs than among time rate jobs. Yet, this pattern is driven by those receiving bonuses not those receiving performance related pay and it is evident only for Asians and for those in managerial jobs. Moreover, it is partially driven by sorting in which the more able take bon...

  6. Performance-related pay and gender wage differences

    OpenAIRE

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Kauhanen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    We study the impact of performance-related pay (PRP) on gender wage differences using Finnish linked employer-employee panel data. Controlling for unobserved person and firm effects, we find that bonuses increase women's earnings slightly less than men's, but the economic significance of the difference is negligible. Piece rates and reward rates, however, tend to increase gender wage differentials. Thus, the nature of a performance related pay plan is important for gauging the impact of PRP o...

  7. Non-performance of the Severance Pay Program in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Vodopivec

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Combining information from the Firm Survey of Labor Costs with the information about claims filed with the Guarantee Fund by workers whose employers defaulted on their severance pay obligations, the paper analyzes the so-called non-performance problem of severance pay – the fact that coverage, and thus legal entitlement, does not guarantee the actual receipt of the benefit – as experienced in Slovenia in 2000. The findings are threefold: (i one-third of total obligations incurred by firms failed to be honored and only a small portion of defaulted severance pay claims was reimbursed by the Guarantee Fund; (ii while both men and women seem to be equally affected, workers older than 40 were disproportionally represented among those whose severance pay claims failed to be honored; and, (iii among firms that incurred severance pay liabilities, larger and more productive firms were more likely to observe their fiduciary obligations and pay them out. These findings corroborate the weaknesses of severance pay as an income protection program, pointing to the large scale of the non-performance problem and the inequities created by it.

  8. Modernizing the Federal Government: Paying for Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montoya, Silvia; Graham, John D

    2007-01-01

    Enhancing the performance of the civil service has been a central objective of the United States since the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 authorized a performance-based component to federal salary structures...

  9. Managing imperfect competition by pay for performance and reference pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Henry Y

    2018-01-01

    I study a managed health service market where differentiated providers compete for consumers by choosing multiple service qualities, and where copayments that consumers pay and payments that providers receive for services are set by a payer. The optimal regulation scheme is two-sided. On the demand side, it justifies and clarifies value-based reference pricing. On the supply side, it prescribes pay for performance when consumers misperceive service benefits or providers have intrinsic quality incentives. The optimal bonuses are expressed in terms of demand elasticities, service technology, and provider characteristics. However, pay for performance may not outperform prospective payment when consumers are rational and providers are profit maximizing, or when one of the service qualities is not contractible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Team Performance Pay and Motivation Theory: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Pamela; Combs, Julie P.; Bustamante, Rebecca M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore teachers' perceptions of a team performance pay program in a large suburban school district through the lens of motivation theories. Mixed data analysis was used to analyze teacher responses from two archival questionnaires (Year 1, n = 368; Year 2, n = 649). Responses from teachers who participated in the team…

  11. Dynamic Incentive Effects of Relative Performance Pay: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert); J.A. Non (Arjan); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe conduct a field experiment among 189 stores of a retail chain to study dynamic incentive effects of relative performance pay. Employees in the randomly selected treatment stores could win a bonus by outperforming three comparable stores from the control group over the course of four

  12. Diplomatic Mission: President Obama's Path to Performance Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarick, Andy

    2011-01-01

    In his first major education speech as a presidential candidate, Senator Barack Obama affirmed his support of teachers unions. Less than two years later, in his first major education address as president, delivered to the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in March 2009, Obama explicitly backed paying teachers for performance, a reform the unions…

  13. Evaluating the fair market value of pay for performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jen; Higgins, Alexandra

    2014-04-01

    When assessing a pay-for-performance arrangement, the following factors should be considered: Existence and/or size of minimum savings threshold before savings are allocated. Savings allocation percentage available to physicians. Benchmarks used to measure quality against past performance and/or medical evidence. Ways in which quality outcomes are measured and paid for. Per member per month payments for patient management. Physician investment (participation fee, time, or capital). Existence of downside risk to physicians. Employed compensation structure (if applicable).

  14. CEO pay-performance sensitivity in the South African context

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Bussin

    2015-01-01

    The topic of executive pay-performance sensitivity has resulted in mixed research findings. Literature related to executive remuneration constructs, company performance measures and the underlying theories is critically reviewed in this article. The literature is compared to research findings within the South African context pre, during and post the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. The researcher found similar results in the South African context compared to research in other countries and in...

  15. Paying health workers for performance in Battagram district, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javeed Sarah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing interest in using pay-for-performance mechanisms in low and middle-income countries in order to improve the performance of health care providers. However, at present there is a dearth of independent evaluations of such approaches which can guide understanding of their potential and risks in differing contexts. This article presents the results of an evaluation of a project managed by an international non-governmental organisation in one district of Pakistan. It aims to contribute to learning about the design and implementation of pay-for-performance systems and their impact on health worker motivation. Methods Quantitative analysis was conducted of health management information system (HMIS data, financial records, and project documents covering the period 2007-2010. Key informant interviews were carried out with stakeholders at all levels. At facility level, in-depth interviews were held, as were focus group discussions with staff and community members. Results The wider project in Battagram had contributed to rebuilding district health services at a cost of less than US$4.5 per capita and achieved growth in outputs. Staff, managers and clients were appreciative of the gains in availability and quality of services. However, the role that the performance-based incentive (PBI component played was less clear--PBI formed a relatively small component of pay, and did not increase in line with outputs. There was little evidence from interviews and data that the conditional element of the PBIs influenced behaviour. They were appreciated as a top-up to pay, but remained low in relative terms, and only slightly and indirectly related to individual performance. Moreover, they were implemented independently of the wider health system and presented a clear challenge for longer term integration and sustainability. Conclusions Challenges for performance-based pay approaches include the balance of rewarding individual

  16. Has Performance Pay Increased Wage Inequality in Britain?

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Mark L.; Bryson, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) we show performance pay (PP) increased earnings dispersion among men and women, and to a lesser extent among full-time working women, in the decade of economic growth which ended with the recession of 2008. PP was also associated with some compression in the lower half of the wage distribution for women. The effects were predominantly associated with a broad measure of PP that included bonuses. However, these effects were modest and th...

  17. PERFORMANCE BASED PAY AS A DETERMINANT OF JOB SATISFACTION: A STUDY IN MALAYSIA GIATMARA CENTERS

    OpenAIRE

    Azman ISMAIL; Nurhana M RAFIUDDIN; Mohd Hamran MOHAMAD; Norashikin Sahol HAMID; Aniza WAMIN; Nurzawani ZAKARIA

    2011-01-01

    Compensation management literature highlights that performance based pay has two major characteristics: participation in pay systems and adequacy of pay. The ability of management to properly implement such pay systems may lead to increased job satisfaction in organizations. Though, the nature of this relationship is interesting, little is known about the influence of performance based pay on job satisfaction in compensation management literature. Therefore, this study was conducted to examin...

  18. Using an Equity/Performance Matrix to Address Salary Compression/Inversion and Performance Pay Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Peter; Thomas, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Pay compression and inversion are significant problems for many organizations and are often severe in schools of business in particular. At the same time, there is more insistence on showing accountability and paying employees based on performance. The authors explain and show a detailed example of how to use a Compensation Equity/ Performance…

  19. Performance pay and the gender wage gap : evidence from Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Rica, Sara de la; Dolado, Juan José; Vegas Sánchez, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses detailed information from a large wage survey in 2006 to analyze the gender wage gap in the performance-pay (PP) component of total hourly wages and its contribution to the overall gender gap in Spain. Under the assumption that PP is determined in a more competitive fashion than the other wage components, one would expect, in principle, to find a low gender gap in PP. However, this is not what we find. After controlling for observable differences in individual and job characte...

  20. The effect of performance related pay in employment services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofie Johansen, Ann; Holm, Anders; Rosdahl, Anders

    This paper investigates the effects of performance-related pay (PRP) in Danish local employment administration on unemployed social clients’ employment outcomes. PRP implies here that employees in the employment administration are rewarded each time a social client gets a job. There are different...... schemes involved in the programme – schemes with collective payoffs and schemes with private payoffs and schemes with monetary payoffs and non-monetary payoffs, such as training activities. The main conclusion is that PRP seems to promote employment chances of social clients. Especially it seems that PRP...

  1. CEO pay-performance sensitivity in the South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bussin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The topic of executive pay-performance sensitivity has resulted in mixed research findings. Literature related to executive remuneration constructs, company performance measures and the underlying theories is critically reviewed in this article. The literature is compared to research findings within the South African context pre, during and post the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. The researcher found similar results in the South African context compared to research in other countries and industries. The research challenges the notion that there is one dominant theory driving CEO compensation. The principal-agent theory, supported by the optimal contract theory, are foremost during periods of strong economic performance, while the influence of managerial power and other behavioural theories appear to prevail during periods of weak economic performance. This article proposes some critical considerations in order to manage this tension.

  2. Hospital responses to pay-for-performance incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Nahra, Tammie A; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Wheeler, John R C

    2006-05-01

    Not-for-profit hospitals are complex organizations and, therefore, may face unique challenges in responding to financial incentives for quality. In this research, we explore the types of behavioural changes made by not-for-profit Michigan hospitals in response to a pay-for-performance system for quality. We also identify factors that motivate or facilitate changes in effort. We apply a conceptual framework based on agency theory to motivate our research questions. Using data derived from structured interviews and surveys administered to 86 hospitals participating in a pay-for-performance system, we compare hospitals reporting and not reporting behavioural changes. Separate analyses are performed for hospitals reporting structure-related changes and hospitals reporting process-related changes. Our findings confirm that hospitals respond to incentive payments; however, our findings also reveal that hospital responses are not universal. Rather, involvement by boards of trustees, willingness to exert leverage with physicians, and financial and competitive motivations are all associated with hospitals' behavioural responses to incentives. Results of this research will help inform payers and hospital managers considering the use of incentives about the nature of hospitals' responses.

  3. Teachers’ perceptions of individual performance-related pay in practice : A picture of a counterproductive pay system

    OpenAIRE

    Lundström, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    This article describes and discusses Swedish upper-secondary teachers’ perceptions of the effects of individual performance-related pay (PRP) in the context of educational restructuring and governance. The empirical data were generated through semi-structured interviews of 23 teachers. Power’s distinction between programmatic and technological elements of audit is used as a frame of reference for the problematization of the pay system. The findings demonstrate a wide gap between the programma...

  4. Performance Pay, Delegation and Multitasking under Uncertainty and Innovativeness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai J.; Laursen, Keld

    examine the risk-incentives trade-off and related predictions from agency theory on the basis of data from a data set encompassing close to 1000 Danish firms. We find that the relation between the use of performance pay in these firms and the environmental uncertainty they confront - which is one way......The existing empirical evidence is somewhat inconclusive with respect to a number of the key predictions of the agency model. Although the reach of agency theory is considerably wider, the dominant portion of work has been taken up with examining the nature of the trade-off between risk...... and incentives, and the implications thereof for contractual design. More specifically, some researchers have recently noted that the predicted trade-off between risk and incentives turns out to be rather weak, and perhaps non-existent, when confronted with the available empirical evidence. In this paper, we...

  5. Performance-based pay is fair, particularly when I perform better : Differential fairness perceptions of allocators and recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, N.W.; Van den Bos, K.P.; de Graaff, D.

    2005-01-01

    We examined in two experiments the impact of the roles that people enact (allocator or recipient) and performance attributions (talent or effort) on fairness perceptions of pay systems (performance-based pay or job-based pay). To test the relative effects of the roles that people enact, in the

  6. Interactional justice as a mediator of the relationship between pay for performance and job satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the effect of pay for performance and interactional justice on job satisfaction.Design/methodology/approach: A survey method was used to collect 107 usable questionnaires from employees who work in the US subsidiary manufacturing firm operating in a silicon valley in East Malaysia, Malaysia.Findings: The outcomes showed two important findings: first, relationship between interactional justice and adequacy of pay significantly correlated with job satisfaction. Second, relationship between interactional justice and participation in pay systems significantly correlated with job satisfaction. Statistically, this result confirms that interactional justice does act as a mediating variable in the pay for performance models of the studied organization.Originality/value: Most previous research tested a direct effect of pay for performance on job satisfaction. Unlike such research approach, this study discovers that interactional justice has strengthened the effect of pay for performance on job satisfaction in a compensation system framework.

  7. Bank CEO Pay-Performance Relations and the Effects of Deregulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Anthony J; Ezzell, John R; Miles, James A

    1995-01-01

    The authors test the deregulation hypothesis that posits that bank CEO compensation became more sensitive to performance as bank management became less regulated. They observe a significant increase in pay-performance sensitivities from their 1976-81 regulation subsample to their 1982-88 deregulation subsample. These increases in pay sensitivities after deregulation are observed for salary and bonus, stock options, and common stock holdings. The authors observe increases in the pay-performanc...

  8. Subjective and objective performance assessment : Performance pay at Trelleborg Forsheda AB

    OpenAIRE

    Luotonen, David; Hasselström, Markus

    2009-01-01

      The purpose of this thesis is to understand the opinions and potential effects of objective and subjective assessments of performance as a basis for performance pay for blue-collar workers. The study takes a qualitative approach to find out how and why four companies - Trelleborg Forsheda, Finnveden Powertrain, Isaberg Rapid and Parker Hannifin- work with salaries, incentive system and performance assessment the way they do. The concept of individual salary is central in this thesis, and in...

  9. Effect of Manager’s Role in Performance Based Pay on Employee Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman, I

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the recent literature pertaining on Islamic based organizational compensation, performance based pay consists of two essential features: communication and performance appraisal. Recent studies in this field highlights that the ability of managers to appropriately communicate pay information and appraise employee performance may have a significant impact on employee outcomes, especially job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess the relationship between manager’s role in performance based pay and employee outcomes using self-administered questionnaires collected from employees at a district council in Peninsular Malaysia. The outcomes of the SmartPLS path model analysis showed that pay communication does not act as an important determinant of job satisfaction, but performance appraisal does act as an important determinant of job satisfaction. Conversely, pay communication and performance appraisal act as important determinants of organizational commitment. In addition, this study provides discussion, implications and conclusion

  10. Pay for Performance Proposals in Race to the Top Round II Applications. Briefing Memo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    The Education Commission of the States reviewed all 36 Race to the Top (RttT) round II applications. Each of the 36 states that applied for round II funding referenced pay for performance under the heading of "Improving teacher and principal effectiveness based on performance." The majority of states outlined pay for performance…

  11. 28 CFR 545.26 - Performance pay provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... supervision and instruction, safety and care of equipment, ability to work with others, and overall job..., physical demands, working conditions (exposed to dusts, odors, etc.), and the degree of responsibility held... inmate may receive special bonus pay based on the inmate's exceptional work in a temporary job assignment...

  12. PERFORMANCE BASED PAY AS A DETERMINANT OF JOB SATISFACTION: A STUDY IN MALAYSIA GIATMARA CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman ISMAIL

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compensation management literature highlights that performance based payhas two major characteristics: participation in pay systems and adequacy ofpay. The ability of management to properly implement such pay systems maylead to increased job satisfaction in organizations. Though, the nature of thisrelationship is interesting, little is known about the influence of performancebased pay on job satisfaction in compensation management literature.Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the relationship between payfor performance and job satisfaction in Malaysian GIATMARA centers. Theresults of exploratory factor analysis confirmed that measurement scalesused in this study satisfactorily met the standards of validity and reliabilityanalyses. An outcome of stepwise regression analysis shows thatdeterminant of job satisfaction is performance based pay. Further, this resultconfirms that pay for performance is an important antecedent for jobsatisfaction in the studied organizations.

  13. Performance Related Pay in Australian Universities: The Case of Swinburne University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Peter; Schier, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Performance related pay is not common in Australian universities. A number of Australian universities have begun to show interest in implementing more individualised pay arrangements. Swinburne University of Technology, in Melbourne, has chosen, contrary to the wishes of many of its staff, to be a path-breaker and has introduced a performance…

  14. Detrimental Effects of Performance-Related Pay in the Public Sector?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregn, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Performance-related pay has been a key ingredient in New Public Management reforms. Nevertheless, the research presented here indicates some adverse effects of such incentives. These incentives may impair an initial motivation to work and change the norms that guide behavior. An issue which...... in particular has been given insufficient attention is fairness. Findings drawn from experimental economics supported by field studies demonstrate that perceived unfairness may have important negative effects on performance. The implication of a broader perspective in the analysis of performance-related pay...... in the public sector is that such a pay system, contrary to its aim, may have detrimental effects on performance....

  15. Effect of Participation in Performance Pay Systems and Employees’ Satisfaction with Job Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman Ismail

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to evaluate the association between participation in performance pay systems and employees’ satisfaction with job conditions. A survey method was utilized to collect data from subordinates who serve at disaster management agencies in West Malaysia. The findings of SmartPLS path model analysis display four important outcomes: first, the relationship between participation in pay plans and satisfaction with intrinsic job conditions was not significant. Second, relationship between participation in pay operations and satisfaction with intrinsic job conditions was not significant. Third, the relationship between participation in pay plans and satisfaction with extrinsic job conditions was significance. Finally, the relationship between participation in pay operations and satisfaction with extrinsic job conditions was significance. This finding demonstrates that participation in pay plans and participation in pay operations do not act as important predictors of employees’ satisfaction with intrinsic job conditions. Conversely, participation in pay plans and participation in pay operations do act as important predictors of employees’ satisfaction with extrinsic job conditions. Further, this research delivers discussion, implications and conclusion.

  16. Relationship between organizational factors and performance among pay-for-performance hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vina, Ernest R; Rhew, David C; Weingarten, Scott R; Weingarten, Jason B; Chang, John T

    2009-07-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)/Premier Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration (HQID) project aims to improve clinical performance through a pay-for-performance program. We conducted this study to identify the key organizational factors associated with higher performance. An investigator-blinded, structured telephone survey of eligible hospitals' (N = 92) quality improvement (QI) leaders was conducted among HQID hospitals in the top 2 or bottom 2 deciles submitting performance measure data from October 2004 to September 2005. The survey covered topics such as QI interventions, data feedback, physician leadership, support for QI efforts, and organizational culture. More top performing hospitals used clinical pathways for the treatment of AMI (49% vs. 15%, p vs. 18%, p vs. 13%, p vs. 23%, p vs. 77%, p vs. 69%, p vs. 64%, p vs. 7.9%, p organizational culture that supported coordination of care (p Organizational structure, support, and culture are associated with high performance among hospitals participating in a pay-for-performance demonstration project. Multiple organizational factors remain important in optimizing clinical care.

  17. Does it pay to pay performance fees? Empirical evidence from Dutch pension funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, Dirk; van Oord, Arco; Rijsbergen, David

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the relation between investment returns and performance fees for 218 Dutch occupational pension funds with an average total of 985 billion euro in assets under management from 2012 to 2015. Our dataset is free from self-reporting biases and includes total return, excess return and

  18. The effect of performance-based pay systems on job satisfaction and stress

    OpenAIRE

    Hornbach, Jessica Janina

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations regarding the health- and wellbeing-related outcomes of performance-based pay systems have been scarce and ambiguous so far. Considering the huge economic and organizational impact of stress-related health problems, it is important to further investigate this relation, including the impact of different variables that can help to explain the variation in the relationship between performance-based pay and job strain. The main purpose of this study is to challenge the res...

  19. 77 FR 2296 - Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; the Green Building Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; the Green Building Advisory Committee; Notification of Upcoming... teleconference meetings of the Green Building Advisory Committee (the Committee). The teleconference meetings are... Federal High Performance Green Buildings, Office of Governmentwide Policy, General Services Administration...

  20. Can pay for performance improve the quality of primary care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, Martin; Olesen, Frede

    2016-01-01

    I mange lande synes sundhedsvæsenet ikke at kunne tilbyde tilstrækkelig behandling af en lang række sygdomme. Højt kvalificerede læger er en afgørende faktor, men dygtige læger er ikke nok til at sikre god behandling. Derfor ses der nu mange steder efter nye incitamenter, som kan bidrage til at h...... til nye former for behandling og pleje. Vi har brug for mere forskning på dette område, hvis vi på et oplyst grundlag skal beslutte, om og evt. hvordan vi bedst indfører elementer af ”pay for perfomance” for at forbedre de services, der udbydes i sundhedsvæsenet....

  1. Use of Provider-Level Dashboards and Pay-for-Performance in Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michtalik, Henry J.; Carolan, Howard T.; Haut, Elliott R.; Lau, Brandyn D.; Streiff, Michael B.; Finkelstein, Joseph; Pronovost, Peter J.; Durkin, Nowella; Brotman, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite safe and cost-effective venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention measures, VTE prophylaxis rates are often suboptimal. Healthcare reform efforts emphasize transparency through programs to report performance, and payment incentives through programs to pay-for-performance. Objective To sequentially examine an individualized physician dashboard and pay-for-performance program to improve VTE prophylaxis rates amongst hospitalists. Design Retrospective analysis of 3144 inpatient admissions. After a baseline observation period, VTE prophylaxis compliance was compared during both interventions. Setting 1060-bed tertiary care medical center. Participants 38 part- and full-time academic hospitalists. Interventions A Web-based hospitalist dashboard provided VTE prophylaxis feedback. After 6 months of feedback only, a pay-for-performance program was incorporated, with graduated payouts for compliance rates of 80-100%. Measurements Prescription of American College of Chest Physicians guideline-compliant VTE prophylaxis and subsequent pay-for-performance payments. Results Monthly VTE prophylaxis compliance rates were 86% (95% CI: 85, 88), 90% (95% CI: 88, 93), and 94% (95% CI: 93, 96) during the baseline, dashboard, and combined dashboard/pay-for-performance periods, respectively. Compliance significantly improved with the use of the dashboard (p=0.01) and addition of the pay-for-performance program (p=0.01). The highest rate of improvement occurred with the dashboard (1.58%/month; p=0.01). Annual individual physician performance payments ranged from $53 to $1244 (mean $633; SD ±350). Conclusions Direct feedback using dashboards was associated with significantly improved compliance, with further improvement after incorporating an individual physician pay-for-performance program. Real-time dashboards and physician-level incentives may assist hospitals in achieving higher safety and quality benchmarks. PMID:25545690

  2. Efficiency of Pay for Performance Programs in Romanian Companies and the Mediating Role of Organizational Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriesi Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present research examined the influences of pay for performance programs on employee performance in the Romanian context, by comparing a sample of employees in companies in which such programs are implemented to a sample of employees in organizations in which performance is not used as a criterion in deciding financial rewards. Results show that the work performances of the former, as evaluated by the direct supervisors of each employee, are significantly higher than those of the latter, and that this effect of performance pay is partly mediated by its positive effects on employee perceptions of distributive and procedural justice. Furthermore, results indicate that the individual – level financial incentive systems are more efficient in fostering work performance than the team – level performance pay programs in the Romanian employee sample, and that they also have stronger effects on the two dimensions of organizational justice.

  3. Effect of Participation in Performance Pay Systems and Employees’ Satisfaction with Job Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Arman Ismail; Aimi Anuar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the association between participation in performance pay systems and employees’ satisfaction with job conditions. A survey method was utilized to collect data from subordinates who serve at disaster management agencies in West Malaysia. The findings of SmartPLS path model analysis display four important outcomes: first, the relationship between participation in pay plans and satisfaction with intrinsic job conditions was not significant. Second, relatio...

  4. Medicare's "Global" terrorism: where is the pay for performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R Lawrence; Luchette, Fred A; Esposito, Thomas J; Pyrz, Karen; Gamelli, Richard L

    2008-02-01

    Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) payment policies for surgical operations are based on a global package concept. CMS' physician fee schedule splits the global package into preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative components of each procedure. We hypothesized that these global package component valuations were often lower than comparable evaluation and management (E&M) services and that billing for E&M services instead of the operation could often be more profitable. Our billing database and Trauma Registry were queried for the operative procedures and hospital lengths of stay for trauma patients during the past 5 years. Determinations of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative payments were calculated for 10-day and 90-day global packages, comparing them to CMS payments for comparable E&M codes. Of 90-day and 10-day Current Procedural Terminology codes, 88% and 100%, respectively, do not pay for the comprehensive history and physical that trauma patients usually receive, whereas 41% and 98%, respectively, do not even meet payment levels for a simple history and physical. Of 90-day global package procedures, 70% would have generated more revenue had comprehensive daily visits been billed instead of the operation ($3,057,500 vs. $1,658,058). For 10-day global package procedures, 56% would have generated more revenue with merely problem-focused daily visits instead of the operation ($161,855 vs. $156,318). Medicare's global surgical package underpays E&M services in trauma patients. In most cases, trauma surgeons would fare better by not billing for operations to receive higher reimbursement for E&M services that are considered "bundled" in the global package payment.

  5. 78 FR 56703 - Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Green Building Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Green Building Advisory Committee; Notification of Upcoming... Green Building Advisory Committee Meeting (the Committee) and the schedule for a series of conference..., Designated Federal Officer, [[Page 56704

  6. Manufacturing Advantage: Why High-Performance Work Systems Pay Off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Eileen; Bailey, Thomas; Berg, Peter; Kalleberg, Arne L.

    A study examined the relationship between high-performance workplace practices and the performance of plants in the following manufacturing industries: steel, apparel, and medical electronic instruments and imaging. The multilevel research methodology combined the following data collection activities: (1) site visits; (2) collection of plant…

  7. A performance incentive contract that pays off for all parties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krummrich, C.R.; Johnston, R.E.; Crist, T.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Western Business Unit Bakersfield drilling department of Chevron, U.S.A. Production Company developed a drilling performance incentive contract that was implemented during 1994 in the Lost Hills field of California. The performance incentive contract (PIC) financially rewarded all of the drilling contractor's rig employees for outperforming pre-established drilling performance goals. The key elements of the performance incentive program are: (1) Goals that rigger incentives are based on cost categories that are controllable by the drilling team; (2) Goals were established using a database of past years performance; (3) Goals that are not achieved negatively impact the incentive earned in an effort to deter repeated errors; (4) Accidents that occur on the job negatively impact the incentive earned; (5) Administration of the program is not time consuming. The results of using an incentive contract in the Lost Hills drilling program are: (1) Time and cost of operations are reduced; (2) The results are measurable and repeatable; (3) A team environment develops in which ideas are shared and acted upon by crew members and supervisory personnel

  8. The Implementation of Pay for Performance in Idaho Schools: A Case Study of Teacher Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniec, Shelly Ann

    2013-01-01

    This is a qualitative narrative case study set in an Idaho high school where twelve educators offered their viewpoints on the implementation of Idaho's pay-for-performance legislation. In the spring of 2011, Idaho legislators passed laws aimed at increasing student performance and college or career readiness. These laws, known as Idaho's Students…

  9. Is the Pay-Performance Relationship Always Positive? : Evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffhues, Pieter; Kabir, Mohammed Rezaul

    This study examines the widespread belief that executive pay should reflect firm performance. We compile a hand-collected data set of compensation paid to executive directors of Dutch listed companies and analyze if executive compensation is indeed determined by firm performance. A variety of

  10. Female Directors, Board Committees and Firm Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, Colin P.; Homroy, Swarnodeep

    A number of studies have found little economic impact of board gender diversity on firm performance. We return to this issue in the context of large European firms. Our contribution is twofold. First, using information on the gender of CEOs children as a source of exogenous variation in female

  11. Performance Pay, Delegation and Multitasking under Uncertainty and Innovativeness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai J.; Laursen, Keld

    2005-01-01

    It has been recently noted that the trade-off between risk and incentives that agency theory predicts turns out to be rather weak. We examine predictions from agency theory on the basis of data from a data set encompassing close to 1000 Danish firms. We find that the relation between performance...

  12. Performance related pay (PRP) to social workers in Danish Job Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg Jensen, Maya; Rosdahl, Anders

    This paper discusses two issues: - Why has some Danish local employment administrations introduced performance related pay (PRP) for social workers while others have not? - Does PRP to social workers imply better efforts to bring long-term recipients of social assistance into employment?......This paper discusses two issues: - Why has some Danish local employment administrations introduced performance related pay (PRP) for social workers while others have not? - Does PRP to social workers imply better efforts to bring long-term recipients of social assistance into employment?...

  13. [Pay for performance explained by transaction costs theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbaneff, Yuri; Cortes, Ariel; Torres, Sergio; Yepes, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of transaction costs theory to explain incentives in the health care chain. We performed a case study of CPS, a health insurance company in Bogota (Colombia), which preferred not to publish its name. CPS moves in the environment of high transaction costs and uses the hybrid form of governance at the outpatient level. Incentive intensity, administrative control and the contract all agree with the theory. At the hospital level, the market is used, despite greater uncertainty. Because of the discrete form (1.0) of the incentives and the absence of administrative control, it is difficult for CPS to relate payment to hospital performance. Transaction costs theory explains the configuration of incentives. Another contribution made by this theory to the literature is the criterion to differentiate between the market and the hybrid. We propose that the market uses discrete-type (1.0) incentives, while the hybrid uses continuous, commission-like incentives. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of Pay-for-Performance on Work Motivation of Sales Personnel: A Case of Information Media Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Milvi Tepp; Monika Poomann

    2006-01-01

    The usage of pay-for-performance for the management of human resources is constantly growing. However, estimations about the efficiency of applying this are contradictory. The current paper describes the reasons for the contradictory results, suggests an expectations theory based model as an appropriate framework for analysing the pay-for-performance as motivator and presents results of an empirical research about the effects of pay-for-performance on motivation.A reason for the contradiction...

  15. The Best Laid Plans: Pay for Performance Incentive Programs for School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Peter; Goldring, Ellen; Canney, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In an era of heightened accountability and limited fiscal resources, school districts have sought novel ways to increase the effectiveness of their principals in an effort to increase student proficiency. To address these needs, some districts have turned to pay-for-performance programs, aligning leadership goals with financial incentives to…

  16. Managing poorly performing clinicians: health care providers' willingness to pay for independent help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Verity; Sussex, Jon; Ryan, Mandy; Tetteh, Ebenezer

    2012-03-01

    To determine the willingness to pay (WTP) of senior managers in the UK National Health Service (NHS) for services to help manage performance concerns with doctors, dentists and pharmacists. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was used to elicit senior managers' preferences for a support service to help manage clinical performance concerns. The DCE was based on: a literature review; interviews with support service providers and clinical professional bodies; and discussion groups with managers. From the DCE responses, we estimate marginal WTP for aspects of support services. 451 NHS managers completed the DCE questionnaire. NHS managers are willing to pay for: advice, 'facilitation', and behavioural, health, clinical and organisational assessments. Telephone advice with written confirmation was valued most highly. NHS managers were willing to pay £161.56 (CI: £160.81-£162.32) per year per whole time equivalent doctor, dentist or pharmacist, for support to help manage clinical performance concerns. Marginal WTP varied across respondent subgroups but was always positive. Health care managers valued help in managing the clinicians' performance, and were willing to pay for it from their organisations' limited funds. Their WTP exceeds the current cost of a UK body providing similar support. Establishing a central body to provide such services across a health care system, with the associated economies of scale including cumulative experience, is an option that policy makers should consider seriously. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the Political Underbelly of Organizational Learning: Learning during Pay and Performance Management Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In an effort to better understand the political dimensions of organizational learning, this paper aims to examine learning processes in an organizational context--namely renegotiation of pay and performance management arrangements--where the interests of organizational members are threatened. Design/methodology/approach: Data were derived…

  18. Weighing the Merits. Several States Are implementing Pay-for-Performance Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    Some 37.1 percent of education spending was earmarked for teachers in 2001-02, according to the American Federation of Teachers, and most of that money was paid out using traditional compensation systems. But as expectations for accountability increase, a handful of states are looking to pay-for-performance systems to attract quality…

  19. Matchmaking: the influence of monitoring environments on the effectiveness of performance pay systems

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Belfield; David Marsden

    2002-01-01

    This study uses cross-section and panel data from the 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey to explore contextual influences on the relationship between performance-related pay (PRP) and organizational performance. While it finds strong evidence that the use of PRP can enhance performance outcomes, it also determines that this relationship is qualified by the structure of workplace monitoring environments. In addition, it presents evidence that managers learn about optimum combinations of ...

  20. Impact of 'stretch' targets for cardiovascular disease management within a local pay-for-performance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Utz J; Huckvale, Kit; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Pay-for-performance programs are often aimed to improve the management of chronic diseases. We evaluate the impact of a local pay for performance programme (QOF+), which rewarded financially more ambitious quality targets ('stretch targets') than those used nationally in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). We focus on targets for intermediate outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease and diabetes. A difference-in-difference approach is used to compare practice level achievements before and after the introduction of the local pay for performance program. In addition, we analysed patient-level data on exception reporting and intermediate outcomes utilizing an interrupted time series analysis. The local pay for performance program led to significantly higher target achievements (hypertension: p-value <0.001, coronary heart disease: p-values <0.001, diabetes: p-values <0.061, stroke: p-values <0.003). However, the increase was driven by higher rates of exception reporting (hypertension: p-value <0.001, coronary heart disease: p-values <0.03, diabetes: p-values <0.05) in patients with all conditions except for stroke. Exception reporting allows practitioners to exclude patients from target calculations if certain criteria are met, e.g. informed dissent of the patient for treatment. There were no statistically significant improvements in mean blood pressure, cholesterol or HbA1c levels. Thus, achievement of higher payment thresholds in the local pay for performance scheme was mainly attributed to increased exception reporting by practices with no discernable improvements in overall clinical quality. Hence, active monitoring of exception reporting should be considered when setting more ambitious quality targets. More generally, the study suggests a trade-off between additional incentive for better care and monitoring costs.

  1. Performance Pay Preferences of College of Education Faculty and Administrators at One Historically Black University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the attitudes and perceptions College of Education faculty and administrators have about performance pay at a Historically Black University (HBCU). A secondary purpose of the study was to determine the performance pay plan and specific measures of faculty productivity preferred by College of Education…

  2. Incentives and control in primary health care: findings from English pay-for-performance case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Ruth; Harrison, Stephen; Checkland, Kath

    2008-01-01

    The authors' aim was to investigate mechanisms and perceptions of control following the implementation of a new "pay-for-performance" contract (the new General Medical Services, or GMS, contract) in general practice. This article was based on an in-depth qualitative case study approach in two general practices in England. A distinction is emerging amongst ostensibly equal partners between those general practitioners conducting and those subject to surveillance. Attitudes towards the contract were largely positive, although discontent was higher in the practice which employed a more intensive surveillance regime and greater amongst nurses than doctors. The sample was small and opportunistic. Further research is required to examine the longer-term effects as new contractual arrangements evolve. Increased surveillance and feedback mechanisms associated with new pay-for-performance schemes have the potential to constrain and shape clinical practice. The paper highlights the emergence of new tensions within and between existing professional groupings.

  3. Not-for-profit hospital CEO performance and pay: some evidence from Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Jeffrey; Santerre, Rexford E

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses observations from a panel data set of 35 chief executive officers (CEOs) from 29 not-for-profit hospitals in Connecticut over the period 1998 to 2006 to investigate the relationship between CEO performance and pay. Both economic and charity performance measures are specified in the empirical model. The multiple regression results reveal that not-for-profit hospital CEOs, at least in Connecticut, are driven at the margin to increase the occupancy rate of privately insured patients at the expense of uncompensated care and public-pay patients. This type of behavior on the part of not-for-profit hospital CEOs calls into question the desirability of allowing these hospitals a tax exemption on earned income, property, and purchases.

  4. Impact of pay for performance on access at first dialysis in Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsager, Jennie; Krishnasamy, Rathika; Gray, Nicholas A

    2018-05-01

    Commencement of haemodialysis with an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or arteriovenous graft (AVG) is associated with improved survival compared with commencement with a central venous catheter. In 2011-2012, Queensland Health made incentive payments to renal units for early referred patients who commenced peritoneal dialysis (PD), or haemodialysis with an AVF/AVG. The aim of this study was to determine if pay for performance improved clinical care. All patients who commenced dialysis in Australia between 2009 and 2014 and were registered with the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry (ANZDATA) were included. A multivariable regression model was used to compare rates of commencing dialysis with a PD catheter or permanent AVF/AVG during the pay-for-performance period (2011-2012) with periods prior (2009-2010) and after (2013-2014). A total of 10 858 early referred patients commenced dialysis during the study period, including 2058 in Queensland. In Queensland, PD as first modality increased with time (P pay-for-performance period as reference, the odds ratio for commencement with PD or haemodialysis with an AVF/AVG in Queensland was 1.02 (95% CI 0.81-1.29) in 2009-2010 and 1.28 (95% CI 1.01-1.61) in 2013-2014. There was no change for the rest of Australia (0.97 95% CI 0.87-1.09 in 2009-2010 and 1.00 95% CI 0.90-1.11 in 2013-14). Pay for performance did not improve rates of commencement of dialysis with PD or an AVF/AVG during the payment period. A lag effect on clinical care may explain the improvement in later years. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  5. BPH Procedural Treatment: The Case for Value-Based Pay for Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Stovsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “pay for performance” (P4P applied to the practice of medicine has become a major foundation in current public and private payer reimbursement strategies for both institutional and individual physician providers. “Pay for performance” programs represent a substantial shift from traditional service-based reimbursement to a system of performance-based provider payment using financial incentives to drive improvements in the quality of care. P4P strategies currently embody rudimentary structure and process (as opposed to outcomes metrics which set relatively low-performance thresholds. P4P strategies that align reimbursement allocation with “free market” type shifts in cognitive and procedural care using evidence-based data and positive reinforcement are more likely to produce large-scale improvements in quality and cost efficiency with respect to clinical urologic care. This paper reviews current paradigms and, using BPH procedural therapy outcomes, cost, and reimbursement data, makes the case for a fundamental change in perspective to value-based pay for performance as a reimbursement system with the potential to align the interests of patients, physicians, and payers and to improve global clinical outcomes while preserving free choice of clinically efficacious treatments.

  6. Teacher Pay-for-Performance in School Turnaround: How Bonuses and Differentiated Pay Scales Can Help Support School Turnaround. Meeting the Turnaround Challenge: Strategies, Resources & Tools to Transform a Framework into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass Insight Education (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Given the importance of good teaching and leadership for school success, turnaround schools should think carefully about how to structure professional environments that reward and motivate excellence. A system of "Pay-for-Contribution" that includes tools such as hard-to-staff and skill shortage pay, performance pay, and/or retention…

  7. 77 FR 24494 - Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Green Building Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Green Building Advisory Committee; Notification of Upcoming... agenda for the May 9, 2012, meeting of the Green Building Advisory Committee Meeting (the Committee). The... Sandler, Designated Federal Officer, Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, Office of...

  8. Measuring quality in health care and its implications for pay-for-performance initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin C; Shauver, Melissa J

    2009-02-01

    The quality of health care is important to American consumers, and discussion on quality will be a driving force toward improving the delivery of health care in America. Funding agencies are proposing a variety of quality measures, such as centers of excellence, pay-for-participation, and pay-for-performance initiatives, to overhaul the health care delivery system in this country. It is quite uncertain, however, whether these quality initiatives will succeed in curbing the unchecked growth in health care spending in this country, and physicians understandably are concerned about more intrusion into the practice of medicine. This article outlines the genesis of the quality movement and discusses its effect on the surgical community.

  9. Taking stock of pay-for-performance: a candid assessment from the front lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damberg, Cheryl L; Raube, Kristiana; Teleki, Stephanie S; Dela Cruz, Erin

    2009-01-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) has been widely adopted, but it remains unclear how providers are responding and whether results are meeting expectations. Physician organizations involved in the California Integrated Healthcare Association's (IHA) P4P program reported having increased physician-level performance feedback and accountability, speeded up information technology adoption, and sharpened their organizational focus and support for improvement in response to P4P; however, after three years of investment, these changes had not translated into breakthrough quality improvements. Continued monitoring is required to determine whether early investments made by physician organizations provide a basis for greater improvements in the future.

  10. Impact of the Revised Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance on Audit Committee Attributes and Firm Performance

    OpenAIRE

    KALLAMU, Basiru Salisu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Using a sample of 37 finance companies listed under the finance segment of Bursa Malaysia, we examined the impact of the revision to Malaysian code on corporate governance on audit committee attributes and firm performance. Our result suggests that audit committee attributes significantly improved after the Code was revised. In addition, the coefficient for audit committee and risk committee interlock has a significant negative relationship with Tobin’s Q in the period before the re...

  11. The long-term effect of premier pay for performance on patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ashish K; Joynt, Karen E; Orav, E John; Epstein, Arnold M

    2012-04-26

    Pay for performance has become a central strategy in the drive to improve health care. We assessed the long-term effect of the Medicare Premier Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration (HQID) on patient outcomes. We used Medicare data to compare outcomes between the 252 hospitals participating in the Premier HQID and 3363 control hospitals participating in public reporting alone. We examined 30-day mortality among more than 6 million patients who had acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or pneumonia or who underwent coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) between 2003 and 2009. At baseline, the composite 30-day mortality was similar for Premier and non-Premier hospitals (12.33% and 12.40%, respectively; difference, -0.07 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.40 to 0.26). The rates of decline in mortality per quarter at the two types of hospitals were also similar (0.04% and 0.04%, respectively; difference, -0.01 percentage points; 95% CI, -0.02 to 0.01), and mortality remained similar after 6 years under the pay-for-performance system (11.82% for Premier hospitals and 11.74% for non-Premier hospitals; difference, 0.08 percentage points; 95% CI, -0.30 to 0.46). We found that the effects of pay for performance on mortality did not differ significantly among conditions for which outcomes were explicitly linked to incentives (acute myocardial infarction and CABG) and among conditions not linked to incentives (congestive heart failure and pneumonia) (P=0.36 for interaction). Among hospitals that were poor performers at baseline, mortality was similar in the two groups of hospitals at the start of the study (15.12% and 14.73%; difference, 0.39 percentage points; 95% CI, -0.36 to 1.15), with similar rates of improvement per quarter (0.10% and 0.07%; difference, -0.03 percentage points; 95% CI, -0.08 to 0.02) and similar mortality rates at the end of the study (13.37% and 13.21%; difference, 0.15 percentage points; 95% CI, -0.70 to 1.01). We

  12. The Alignment of Pay-For-Performance with the Strategy in Environment of Balanced Scorecard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Albuquerque de Vasconcelos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available According to Kaplan and Norton (1997 a fixed compensation no longer meets the diverse expectations of reward and remuneration of staff. In this scenario, the economic agents seek business management tools that allow connecting individual performance to organizational performance. Taking these in considerations, this study aims to analyze if the criteria for the use of pay-for-performance is in accordance with the organization's strategy expressed by the indicators and goals used in the Balanced Scorecard (BSC. A qualitative approach was through a field survey of descriptive character, using, for data collection, a structured questionnaire with open and closed questions. The sample consists of 17 Brazilian companies in three business segments (heavy construction, industry and technology / services and leaders in the market in which they operate. The results showed that, although it was clear the use of indicators associated with the use of BSC, the pay-for-performance models studied did not included in a balanced way, the indicators associated with BSC. There is a dissonance between corporate rhetoric and practice and mainly, the non-recognition of compensation management as a tool for alignment and support business strategies

  13. Horses or unicorns: can paying for performance make quality competition routine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M; Kalyan, Dev N

    2006-06-01

    The competitive benefits of pay-for-performance (P4P) financial incentives are widely assumed. These incentives can affect health care through several mechanisms, however, not all of which involve competition. This insight has three implications. First, federal antitrust enforcement should continue to scrutinize P4P arrangements. Second, government needs to play a larger role in P4P than through antitrust oversight. Third, widespread enthusiasm for a particular health policy reform does not relieve policy makers of the obligation to understand its theoretical basis.

  14. An honest day's work: pay for performance in a pediatric radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisset, George S.

    2017-01-01

    Compensation models in radiology take a variety of forms, but regardless of practice type, successful models must reward productivity, be simple, and epitomize fairness. The ideal model should also be flexible enough to transition, based upon the changing strategic goals of a department. The plan should be constructed around rewarding the behaviors that the organization values. In this minisymposium article the author presents the value of different types of compensation plans and discusses advantages and disadvantages. Finally, the author presents a pay-for-performance model that has had long-term success at a private-turned-academic practice in pediatric radiology. (orig.)

  15. An honest day's work: pay for performance in a pediatric radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisset, George S. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Compensation models in radiology take a variety of forms, but regardless of practice type, successful models must reward productivity, be simple, and epitomize fairness. The ideal model should also be flexible enough to transition, based upon the changing strategic goals of a department. The plan should be constructed around rewarding the behaviors that the organization values. In this minisymposium article the author presents the value of different types of compensation plans and discusses advantages and disadvantages. Finally, the author presents a pay-for-performance model that has had long-term success at a private-turned-academic practice in pediatric radiology. (orig.)

  16. Association between time of pay-for-performance for patients and community health services use by chronic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pay-for-performance for patients is a cost-effective means of improving health behaviours. This study examined the association between the pay time for performance for patients and CHS use by chronic patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken to estimate distribution characteristics of CHS use in 2011 and collect data of socio-demographic characteristics (sex, age, education level, occupation, disposable personal income in 2011, distance between home and community health agency, chronic disease number, and time of pay-for-performance for patients. Participants were 889 rural adults with hypertension or type II diabetes aged 35 and above. Standardized CHS use means chronic patients use CHS at least once per quarter. RESULTS: Patients who received incentives prior to services had 2.724 times greater odds of using standardized CHS than those who received incentives after services (95%CI, 1.986-3.736, P<0.001. For all subgroups (socio-demographic characteristics and chronic disease number, patients who received incentives prior to services were more likely to use standardized CHS than those receiving incentives after services. CONCLUSIONS: Pay time for performance for patients was associated with CHS use by chronic patients. Patients receiving incentive prior to services were more likely to use standardized CHS. And pay time should not be ignored when the policy on pay-for-performance for patients is designed.

  17. Impact of pay for performance on inequalities in health care: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamsan, Riyadh; Majeed, Azeem; Ashworth, Mark; Car, Josip; Millett, Christopher

    2010-07-01

    To assess the impact of pay for performance programmes on inequalities in the quality of health care in relation to age, sex, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Systematic search and appraisal of experimental or observational studies that assessed quantitatively the impact of a monetary incentive on health care inequalities. We searched published articles in English identified in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases. Twenty-two studies were identified, 20 of which were conducted in the United Kingdom and examined the impact of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. Sixteen studies used practice level data rather than patient level data. Socioeconomic status was the most frequently examined inequality; age, sex and ethnic inequalities were less frequently assessed. There was some weak evidence that the use of financial incentives reduced inequalities in chronic disease management between socioeconomic groups. Inequalities in chronic disease management between age, sex and ethnic groups persisted after the use of such incentives. Inequalities in chronic disease management have largely persisted after the introduction of the Quality and Outcome Framework. Pay for performance programmes should be designed to reduce inequalities as well as improve the overall quality of care.

  18. Incentive Design and Quality Improvements: Evidence from State Medicaid Nursing Home Pay-for-Performance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Skira, Meghan M; Werner, Rachel M

    2018-01-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) programs have become a popular policy tool aimed at improving health care quality. We analyze how incentive design affects quality improvements in the nursing home setting, where several state Medicaid agencies have implemented P4P programs that vary in incentive structure. Using the Minimum Data Set and the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting data from 2001 to 2009, we examine how the weights put on various performance measures that are tied to P4P bonuses, such as clinical outcomes, inspection deficiencies, and staffing levels, affect improvements in those measures. We find larger weights on clinical outcomes often lead to larger improvements, but small weights can lead to no improvement or worsening of some clinical outcomes. We find a qualifier for P4P eligibility based on having few or no severe inspection deficiencies is more effective at decreasing inspection deficiencies than using weights, suggesting simple rules for participation may incent larger improvement.

  19. Accident analyses performed for the Norwegian committee on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.; Thomassen, D.; Kvaal, E.

    1979-02-01

    As part of the work performed for the Norwegian Government Committee on Nuclear Power, risk calculations were carried out for two examples of possible reactor sites in Norway. The calculations were performed with the computer program COMO (or CRACK), which was also used in the American reactor safety study (WASH-1400). In connection with the Norwegian calculations some modifications were made to the program, and relevant data for Norwegian conditions were introduced. The atmospheric dispersion model and meteorological data are discussed at some length. An analysi of the population distribution around both sites is presented and land usage is also discussed. Radiation dose calculations internal, and external, are summarised. Shielding factors from terrain and buildings are also given, and the effect of evacuation briefly discussed. Health effects, immediate mortalities, and delayed and genetic effects are discussed at some length. The economic consequences of an accident due to e.g. evacuation, condemnation of agricultural products, cost of decontamination, loss in property value and relocation costs are estimated. The results are presented graphically as a function of probability. (JIW)

  20. The antecedents of satisfaction with pay in teams: do performance-based compensation and autonomy keep team-members satisfied?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Godeanu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the effects performance-based compensation and autonomy on satisfaction with pay in the context of team working. I develop a complex perspective that considers the influence of different monetary and non-monetary rewards on satisfaction with pay. Drawing from the agency theory, equity theory and theory of cooperation I predict that both piece rates and team-based rewards are associated with higher pay satisfaction. Moreover, I claim that both individual and team-based autonomy contribute to increased satisfaction with pay. Using a cross-sectional dataset of randomly selected European employees who are asked about specific working and living conditions, results confirm that both productivity-based rewards and autonomy are important for employee satisfaction. Managers should know when to introduce rewards based only on individual merits and when to give to use autonomy as a buffer to compensate for the potential lack of fairness in the payment system.

  1. 78 FR 15112 - Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane Performance and Handling Characteristics-New Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Committee; Transport Airplane Performance and Handling Characteristics--New Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of new task assignment for the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee... findings. The Task The FAA tasked ARAC to consider several areas within the airplane performance and...

  2. Financial gains and risks in pay-for-performance bonus algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Jerry; Drozd, Edward M; Smith, Kevin; Trisolini, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given to evidence-based process indicators associated with quality of care, while much less attention has been given to the structure and key parameters of the various pay-for-performance (P4P) bonus and penalty arrangements using such measures. In this article we develop a general model of quality payment arrangements and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the key parameters. We then conduct simulation analyses of four general P4P payment algorithms by varying seven parameters, including indicator weights, indicator intercorrelation, degree of uncertainty regarding intervention effectiveness, and initial baseline rates. Bonuses averaged over several indicators appear insensitive to weighting, correlation, and the number of indicators. The bonuses are sensitive to disease manager perceptions of intervention effectiveness, facing challenging targets, and the use of actual-to-target quality levels versus rates of improvement over baseline.

  3. Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Maria Ellegård, Lina; Anell, Anders

    2018-01-01

    ' choice of antibiotics. During 2006-2013, eight Swedish health care authorities adopted P4P to make physicians select narrow-spectrum antibiotics more often in the treatment of children with RTI. Exploiting register data on all purchases of RTI antibiotics in a difference-in-differences analysis, wefind......, which act on fewer bacteria types, when possible. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is nonetheless widespread, not least for respiratory tract infections (RTI), a common reason for antibiotics prescriptions. We examine if pay-for-performance (P4P) presents a way to influence primary care physicians...... that P4P significantly increased the share of narrow-spectrum antibiotics. There are no signs that physicians gamed the system by issuing more prescriptions overall....

  4. Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Leadership Team of the IAHR Committee for Hydraulic Machinery and Systems Eduard EGUSQUIZA, UPC Barcelona, Spain, Chair François AVELLAN, EPFL-LMH, Switzerland, Past Chair Richard K FISHER, Voith Hydro Inc., USA, Past Chair Fidel ARZOLA, Edelca, Venezuela Michel COUSTON, Alstom Hydro, France Niklas DAHLBÄCKCK, Vatenfall, Sweden Normand DESY, Andritz VA TECH Hydro Ltd., Canada Chisachi KATO, University of Tokyo, Japan Andrei LIPEJ, Turboinstitut, Slovenija Torbjørn NIELSEN, NTNU, Norway Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA, 'Politehnica' University Timisoara, Romania Stefan RIEDELBAUCH, Stuggart University, Germany Albert RUPRECHT, Stuttgart University, Germany Qing-Hua SHI, Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co., China Geraldo TIAGO, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Brazil International Advisory Committee Shouqi YUAN (principal) Jiangsu University China QingHua SHI (principal) Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co. China Fidel ARZOLA EDELCA Venezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNER Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Anton BERGANT Litostroj Power doo Slovenia B C BHAOYAL Research & Technology Centre India Hermod BREKKE NTNU Norway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc. USA Paul COOPER Fluid Machinery Research Inc USA V A DEMIANOV Power Machines OJSC Russia Bart van ESCH Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Netherland Arno GEHRER Andritz Hydro Graz Austria Akira GOTO Ebara Corporation Japan Adiel GUINZBURG The Boeing Company USA D-H HELLMANN KSB AG Germany Ashvin HOSANGADI Combustion Research and Flow Technology USA Byung-Sun HWANG Korea Institute of Material Science Korea Toshiaki KANEMOTO Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Mann-Eung KIM Korean Register of Shipping Korea Jiri KOUTNIK Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Jinkook LEE Eaton Corporation USA Young-Ho LEE Korea Maritime University Korea Woo-Seop LIM Hyosung Goodsprings Inc Korea Jun MATSUI Yokohama National University Japan Kazuyoshi Mitsubishi H I Ltd, Japan MIYAGAWA Christophe NICOLET Power Vision Engineering Srl Switzerland Maryse PAGE Hydro

  5. Pay for performance programs in Australia: a need for guiding principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ian A

    2008-11-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) programs which reward clinical providers with incentive payments based on one or more measures of quality of care are now common in the United States and the United Kingdom and it is likely they will attract increasing interest in Australia. However, empirical evidence demonstrating effectiveness of such programs is limited and many existing programs have not had rigorous outcome evaluation. To maximise success, future P4P programs should incorporate the lessons and insights obtained from previous experience. Based on a review of published trials, program evaluations and position statements, the following principles that may guide future program design and implementation were synthesised: 1) formulate a rationale and a business case for P4P; 2) use established evidence-based performance measures; 3) use rigorous and verifiable methods of data collection and analysis; 4) define performance targets using absolute and relative thresholds; 5) use rewards that are sufficient, equitable and transparent; 6) address appropriateness of provider responses and avoid perverse incentives; 7) implement communication and feedback strategies; 8) use existing organisational structures to implement P4P programs; 9) attribute credit for performance to participants in ways that foster population-based perspectives; and 10) invest in outcomes and health service research. Recommendations flowing from these principles relevant to Australian settings are provided.

  6. Teacher Responses to Pay-for-Performance Policies: Survey Results from Four High-Poverty, Urban School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John

    2011-01-01

    Policymakers are increasingly adopting "pay-for-performance" policies in which teachers are compensated based on their performance as measured by classroom evaluations and/or student achievement test results. Prior research has produced largely inconclusive findings concerning support among teachers for these policies and their effects…

  7. Design choices made by target users for a pay-for-performance program in primary care: an action research approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, K.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Jacobs, J.E.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International interest in pay-for-performance (P4P) initiatives to improve quality of health care is growing. Current programs vary in the methods of performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. One may assume that involvement of health care professionals in the goal setting and

  8. Performance pay improves engagement, progress, and satisfaction in computer-based job skills training of low-income adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; DeFulio, Anthony; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Advancing the education of low-income adults could increase employment and income, but adult education programs have not successfully engaged low-income adults. Monetary reinforcement may be effective in promoting progress in adult education. This experiment evaluated the benefits of providing incentives for performance in a job-skills training program for low-income, unemployed adults. Participants worked on typing and keypad programs for 7 months. Participants randomly assigned to Group A (n = 23) earned hourly and productivity pay on the typing program (productivity pay), but earned only equalized hourly pay on the keypad program (hourly pay). Group B (n = 19) participants had the opposite contingencies. Participants worked more on, advanced further on, and preferred their productivity pay program. These results show that monetary incentives can increase performance in a job-skills training program, and indicate that payment in adult education programs should be delivered contingent on performance in the training program instead of simply on attendance. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  9. Should pay-for-performance schemes be locally designed? evidence from the commissioning for quality and innovation (CQUIN) framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. R.; McDonald, R.; Sutton, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It is increasingly recognized that the design characteristics of pay-for-performance schemes are important in determining their impact. One important but under-studied design aspect is the extent to which pay-for-performance schemes reflect local priorities. The English Department...... framework potentially offered an opportunity to learn how technical design influenced outcome but due to the high degree of local experimentation and little systematic collection of key variables, it is difficult to derive lessons from this unstructured experiment about the impact and importance...

  10. BOARD OF DIRECTORS, AUDIT COMMITTEE CHARACTERISTICS AND THE PERFORMANCE OF SAUDI ARABIA LISTED COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Ali Al-Matari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between the internal corporate governance mechanism related to the board of directors, the audit committee characteristics and the performance of the Saudi companies listed in the Saudi stock exchange (TADAWL in 2010, excluding financial companies. The statistical results of the study are not in line with the agency theory that board of directors and audit committee might mitigate agency problems leading to reduced agency cost by aligning the interests of controlling owners with those of the company. While audit Committee size (ACSIZE is found to have a significant relationship with firm performance (but in the opposite direction to expectation, other hypothesized variables, the proportion of non-executive directors (BODCOM, CEO Duality (DUAL, Board Size (BSIZE, Audit Committee Independence (ACIND, audit committee meeting (ACMEET were found to be as expected directions but insignificantly related to firm performance measure except the direction of the proportion of non-executive directors (BODCOM was opposite to the expectations.

  11. 77 FR 66616 - Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Green Building Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Green Building Advisory Committee; Notification of Upcoming... and agenda for the November 27, 2012, meeting of the Green Building Advisory Committee Meeting (the... Green Buildings, Office of Government-wide Policy, General Services Administration, 1275 First Street NE...

  12. 78 FR 21368 - Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Green Building Advisory Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... Federal High-Performance Green Buildings; Green Building Advisory Committee; Notification of Upcoming... and agenda for the May 1, 2013, meeting of the Green Building Advisory Committee Meeting (the... Green Buildings, Office of Government-wide Policy, General Services Administration, 1275 First Street NE...

  13. Paying for performance: Performance incentives increase desire for the reward object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Julia D; Nordgren, Loran F

    2016-09-01

    The current research examines how exposure to performance incentives affects one's desire for the reward object. We hypothesized that the flexible nature of performance incentives creates an attentional fixation on the reward object (e.g., money), which leads people to become more desirous of the rewards. Results from 5 laboratory experiments and 1 large-scale field study provide support for this prediction. When performance was incentivized with monetary rewards, participants reported being more desirous of money (Study 1), put in more effort to earn additional money in an ensuing task (Study 2), and were less willing to donate money to charity (Study 4). We replicated the result with nonmonetary rewards (Study 5). We also found that performance incentives increased attention to the reward object during the task, which in part explains the observed effects (Study 6). A large-scale field study replicated these findings in a real-world setting (Study 7). One laboratory experiment failed to replicate (Study 3). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. When Does Corporate Sustainability Performance Pay off? The Impact of Country-Level Sustainability Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Chengyong; Wang, Qian; van der Vaart, Taco; van Donk, Dirk Pieter

    There has been considerable debate on and research efforts into the question as to if, and if so when, improving corporate sustainability performance is not only beneficial for social and environmental wellbeing but also for the financial wellbeing of a firm. So far, the literature has reported

  15. Paying for performance and the social relations of health care provision: an anthropological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrath, Priscilla; Nichter, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, the use of financial incentive schemes has become a popular form of intervention to boost performance in the health sector. Often termed "paying for performance" or P4P, they involve "…the transfer of money or material goods conditional upon taking a measurable action or achieving a predetermined performance target" (Eldridge & Palmer, 2009, p.160). P4P appear to bring about rapid improvements in some measured indicators of provider performance, at least over the short term. However, evidence for the impact of these schemes on the wider health system remains limited, and even where evaluations have been positive, unintended effects have been identified. These have included: "gaming" the system; crowding out of "intrinsic motivation"; a drop in morale where schemes are viewed as unfair; and the undermining of social relations and teamwork through competition, envy or ill feeling. Less information is available concerning how these processes occur, and how they vary across social and cultural contexts. While recognizing the potential of P4P, the authors argue for greater care in adapting schemes to particular local contexts. We suggest that insights from social science theory coupled with the focused ethnographic methods of anthropology can contribute to the critical assessment of P4P schemes and to their adaptation to particular social environments and reward systems. We highlight the need for monitoring P4P schemes in relation to worker motivation and the quality of social relations, since these have implications both for health sector performance over the long term and for the success and sustainability of a P4P scheme. Suggestions are made for ethnographies, undertaken in collaboration with local stakeholders, to assess readiness for P4P; package rewards in ways that minimize perverse responses; identify process variables for monitoring and evaluation; and build sustainability into program design through linkage with complementary reforms

  16. Pay-for-performance in disease management: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struijs Jeroen N

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pay-for-performance (P4P is increasingly implemented in the healthcare system to encourage improvements in healthcare quality. P4P is a payment model that rewards healthcare providers for meeting pre-established targets for delivery of healthcare services by financial incentives. Based on their performance, healthcare providers receive either additional or reduced payment. Currently, little is known about P4P schemes intending to improve delivery of chronic care through disease management. The objectives of this paper are therefore to provide an overview of P4P schemes used to stimulate delivery of chronic care through disease management and to provide insight into their effects on healthcare quality and costs. Methods A systematic PubMed search was performed for English language papers published between 2000 and 2010 describing P4P schemes related to the implementation of disease management. Wagner's chronic care model was used to make disease management operational. Results Eight P4P schemes were identified, introduced in the USA (n = 6, Germany (n = 1, and Australia (n = 1. Five P4P schemes were part of a larger scheme of interventions to improve quality of care, whereas three P4P schemes were solely implemented. Most financial incentives were rewards, selective, and granted on the basis of absolute performance. More variation was found in incented entities and the basis for providing incentives. Information about motivation, certainty, size, frequency, and duration of the financial incentives was generally limited. Five studies were identified that evaluated the effects of P4P on healthcare quality. Most studies showed positive effects of P4P on healthcare quality. No studies were found that evaluated the effects of P4P on healthcare costs. Conclusion The number of P4P schemes to encourage disease management is limited. Hardly any information is available about the effects of such schemes on healthcare quality and costs.

  17. Pay-for-performance in disease management: a systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pay-for-performance (P4P) is increasingly implemented in the healthcare system to encourage improvements in healthcare quality. P4P is a payment model that rewards healthcare providers for meeting pre-established targets for delivery of healthcare services by financial incentives. Based on their performance, healthcare providers receive either additional or reduced payment. Currently, little is known about P4P schemes intending to improve delivery of chronic care through disease management. The objectives of this paper are therefore to provide an overview of P4P schemes used to stimulate delivery of chronic care through disease management and to provide insight into their effects on healthcare quality and costs. Methods A systematic PubMed search was performed for English language papers published between 2000 and 2010 describing P4P schemes related to the implementation of disease management. Wagner's chronic care model was used to make disease management operational. Results Eight P4P schemes were identified, introduced in the USA (n = 6), Germany (n = 1), and Australia (n = 1). Five P4P schemes were part of a larger scheme of interventions to improve quality of care, whereas three P4P schemes were solely implemented. Most financial incentives were rewards, selective, and granted on the basis of absolute performance. More variation was found in incented entities and the basis for providing incentives. Information about motivation, certainty, size, frequency, and duration of the financial incentives was generally limited. Five studies were identified that evaluated the effects of P4P on healthcare quality. Most studies showed positive effects of P4P on healthcare quality. No studies were found that evaluated the effects of P4P on healthcare costs. Conclusion The number of P4P schemes to encourage disease management is limited. Hardly any information is available about the effects of such schemes on healthcare quality and costs. PMID:21999234

  18. Collectivism versus individualism: performance-related pay and union coverage for non-standard workers in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Alison L.; Francesconi, Marco

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents the extent of union coverage and performance-related pay (PRP) - the latter representing one aspect of pay flexibility - across standard and non-standard workers in Britain, using the first seven waves of the British Household Panel Survey, 1991-1997. We find there is no evidence of expansion of either union coverage or PRP towards any type of non-standard employment in the 1990s. Thus union rhetoric about a 'strategy of enlargement' towards non-standard workers remains j...

  19. Pay Television Among Low-Income Populations: Reflections on Research Performed in the Rio de Janeiro Favela of Rocinha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Lynn Letalien

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study performed in Brazil's most notorious shantytown (or favela, Rocinha, located in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Over 150 residents with pay television subscriptions responded to questions regarding their television viewing habits before and since subscribing. The author contends that pay television was used primarily to gain better or increased access to Brazilian programming and a small number of particular types of foreign programming. She questions whether pay television viewership in Rocinha should be characterized as evidence of cultural imperialism and suggests that, in places such as Rocinha, where having access to only broadcast stations can effectively mean having access to a single television channel, it could be useful to extend conventional notions of the "digital divide" to include non-"interactive" media such as television.

  20. Leading in Times of Change: Principals' Perspectives of Their Role in a New Pay-for-Performance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Torres, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore principals' perspectives on how they make sense of their leadership roles in a new pay-for-performance system. The study describes the perceptions of six principals, two each from elementary, middle, and high school levels, regarding leadership in a recently changed system. Principals were…

  1. The Effect of Monitoring Committees on the Relationship between Board Structure and Firm Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen Ammari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of board structure on the performance of French firms in the presence of several monitoring committees. We studied 80 publicly listed French firms spanning from 2001 to 2013. We concluded that large board size has a negative effect on market performance. While large board size in combination with the existence of at least three committees enhances accounting performance and does not have any impact on market performance, the existence of a board dominated by independent directors with the presence of at least three committees seems to have only a negative impact on accounting performance. Our findings indicate that monitoring committees are beneficial for shareholders only for corporations with a large board size.

  2. [Pay for performance (P4P). Long-term effects and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, M; Gültekin, N

    2011-02-01

    After 10 years of experience and research, a wide array of results on evaluation and long-term effects of pay for performance (P4P) programs have been published. These data do not only give insight into most of the problems of implementation, but also into aspects which, in part, may attenuate the high expectations at the beginning of the discussion. P4P programs exhibit a ceiling effect, some improvements are reversed after incentives are cancelled, and improvements show opportunity costs as absent improvements for indicators, which are not object to financial incentives (in some cases for the same disease). These observations can be explained by the hypothesis that P4P programs have characteristics of fee-for-service reimbursement, if symmetric information is available for insurance and provider. P4P programs are local instruments. While integration of healthcare is considered as an important issue, they should be combined with programs and incentives which foster further vertical and horizontal integration. For Germany, further research in the implementation and effects of P4P programs is necessary.

  3. Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegård, Lina Maria; Dietrichson, Jens; Anell, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to public health worldwide. As the healthcare sector's use of antibiotics is an important contributor to the development of resistance, it is crucial that physicians only prescribe antibiotics when needed and that they choose narrow-spectrum antibiotics, which act on fewer bacteria types, when possible. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is nonetheless widespread, not least for respiratory tract infections (RTI), a common reason for antibiotics prescriptions. We examine if pay-for-performance (P4P) presents a way to influence primary care physicians' choice of antibiotics. During 2006-2013, 8 Swedish healthcare authorities adopted P4P to make physicians select narrow-spectrum antibiotics more often in the treatment of children with RTI. Exploiting register data on all purchases of RTI antibiotics in a difference-in-differences analysis, we find that P4P significantly increased the share of narrow-spectrum antibiotics. There are no signs that physicians gamed the system by issuing more prescriptions overall. © 2017 The Authors Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Does the proportion of pay linked to performance affect the job satisfaction of general practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Thomas; Whittaker, William; Sutton, Matt

    2017-01-01

    There is concern that pay-for-performance (P4P) can negatively affect general practitioners (GPs) by reducing their autonomy, increasing their wage dispersion or eroding their intrinsic motivation. This is especially a concern for the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), a highly powered P4P scheme for UK GPs. The QOF affected all GPs but the exposure of their income to P4P varied. GPs did not know their level of exposure before the QOF was introduced and could not choose or manage it. We examine whether changes in GPs' job satisfaction before and after the introduction of the QOF in 2004 were correlated with the proportion of their income that became exposed to P4P. We use data on 1920 GPs observed at three time points spanning the introduction of the QOF; 2004, 2005 and 2008. We estimate the effect of exposure to P4P using a continuous difference-in-differences model. We find no significant effects of P4P exposure on overall job satisfaction or 12 additional measures of working lives in either the short or longer term. The level of exposure to P4P does not harm job satisfaction or other aspects of working lives. Policies influencing the exposure of income to P4P are unlikely to alter GP job satisfaction subject to final income remaining constant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of a pay-for-performance program in primary care designed by target users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Kirsten; Braspenning, Jozé; Akkermans, Reinier P; Jacobs, J E Annelies; Grol, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Evidence for pay-for-performance (P4P) has been searched for in the last decade as financial incentives increased to influence behaviour of health care professionals to improve quality of care. The effectiveness of P4P is inconclusive, though some reviews reported significant effects. To assess changes in performance after introducing a participatory P4P program. An observational study with a pre- and post-measurement. Setting and subjects. Sixty-five general practices in the south of the Netherlands. Intervention. A P4P program designed by target users containing indicators for chronic care, prevention, practice management and patient experience (general practitioner's [GP] functioning and organization of care). Quality indicators were calculated for each practice. A bonus with a maximum of 6890 Euros per 1000 patients was determined by comparing practice performance with a benchmark. Quality indicators for clinical care (process and outcome) and patient experience. We included 60 practices. After 1 year, significant improvement was shown for the process indicators for all chronic conditions ranging from +7.9% improvement for cardiovascular risk management to +11.5% for asthma. Five outcome indicators significantly improved as well as patients' experiences with GP's functioning and organization of care. No significant improvements were seen for influenza vaccination rate and the cervical cancer screening uptake. The clinical process and outcome indicators, as well as patient experience indicators were affected by baseline measures. Smaller practices showed more improvement. A participatory P4P program might stimulate quality improvement in clinical care and improve patient experiences with GP's functioning and the organization of care.

  6. Corporate governance practices and financial performance: The mediating effect of risk management committee at manufacturing firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyanus Herman Halim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to examine the effect of the Risk Management Committee on firm performance, and the intervening effect of the Risk Management Committee on the relationship between Corporate Governance, Firm Size, Financial Reporting Risk, and Firm Performance. Using the purposive sampling method, 299 firms were selected as the sample. This study used secondary data obtained from the companies’ annual reports, and the data was then analyze using SPSS, version 20.0. The results of this study indicate that the entire research hypothesis is accepted. This study found that the Risk Management Committee affects firm performance, and that Risk Management Committee acts as the intervening variable in the relationship between corporate governance, firm size, and financial reporting risk on firm performance. The existence of RMC would facilitate the company to control better the quality of financial reporting risks.

  7. Implementation Processes and Pay for Performance in Healthcare: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Karli K; Damberg, Cheryl L; Mendelson, Aaron; Motu'apuaka, Makalapua; Freeman, Michele; O'Neil, Maya; Relevo, Rose; Low, Allison; Kansagara, Devan

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade, various pay-for-performance (P4P) programs have been implemented to improve quality in health systems, including the VHA. P4P programs are complex, and their effects may vary by design, context, and other implementation processes. We conducted a systematic review and key informant (KI) interviews to better understand the implementation factors that modify the effectiveness of P4P. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL through April 2014, and reviewed reference lists. We included trials and observational studies of P4P implementation. Two investigators abstracted data and assessed study quality. We interviewed P4P researchers to gain further insight. Among 1363 titles and abstracts, we selected 509 for full-text review, and included 41 primary studies. Of these 41 studies, 33 examined P4P programs in ambulatory settings, 7 targeted hospitals, and 1 study applied to nursing homes. Related to implementation, 13 studies examined program design, 8 examined implementation processes, 6 the outer setting, 18 the inner setting, and 5 provider characteristics. Results suggest the importance of considering underlying payment models and using statistically stringent methods of composite measure development, and ensuring that high-quality care will be maintained after incentive removal. We found no conclusive evidence that provider or practice characteristics relate to P4P effectiveness. Interviews with 14 KIs supported limited evidence that effective P4P program measures should be aligned with organizational goals, that incentive structures should be carefully considered, and that factors such as a strong infrastructure and public reporting may have a large influence. There is limited evidence from which to draw firm conclusions related to P4P implementation. Findings from studies and KI interviews suggest that P4P programs should undergo regular evaluation and should target areas of poor performance. Additionally, measures and incentives should align

  8. The effect of pay-for-performance in nursing homes: evidence from state Medicaid programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Rachel M; Konetzka, R Tamara; Polsky, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) is commonly used to improve health care quality in the United States and is expected to be frequently implemented under the Affordable Care Act. However, evidence supporting its use is mixed with few large-scale, rigorous evaluations of P4P. This study tests the effect of P4P on quality of care in a large-scale setting-the implementation of P4P for nursing homes by state Medicaid agencies. 2001-2009 nursing home Minimum Data Set and Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) datasets. Between 2001 and 2009, eight state Medicaid agencies adopted P4P programs in nursing homes. We use a difference-in-differences approach to test for changes in nursing home quality under P4P, taking advantage of the variation in timing of implementation across these eight states and using nursing homes in the 42 non-P4P states plus Washington, DC as contemporaneous controls. Quality improvement under P4P was inconsistent. While three clinical quality measures (the percent of residents being physically restrained, in moderate to severe pain, and developed pressure sores) improved with the implementation of P4P in states with P4P compared with states without P4P, other targeted quality measures either did not change or worsened. Of the two structural measures of quality that were tied to payment (total number of deficiencies and nurse staffing) deficiency rates worsened slightly under P4P while staffing levels did not change. Medicaid-based P4P in nursing homes did not result in consistent improvements in nursing home quality. Expectations for improvement in nursing home care under P4P should be tempered. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  9. Cross-Country Evidence on Teacher Performance Pay. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 10-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessmann, Ludger

    2010-01-01

    The general-equilibrium effects of performance-related teacher pay include long-term incentive and teacher-sorting mechanisms that usually elude experimental studies but are captured in cross-country comparisons. Combining country-level performance-pay measures with rich PISA-2003 international achievement microdata, this paper estimates…

  10. Board of Directors, Audit Committee Characteristics and the Performance of Saudi Arabia Listed Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Matari, Yahya Ali; Al-Swidi, Abdullah Kaid; Fadzil, Faudziah Hanim Bt Hanim; Al-Matari, Ebrahim Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between the internal corporate governance mechanism related to the board of directors, the audit committee characteristics and the performance of the Saudi companies listed in the Saudi stock exchange (TADAWL) in 2010, excluding financial companies. The statistical results of the study are not in line with the agency theory that board of directors and audit committee might mitigate agency problems leading to reduced agency cost by aligning the interests of...

  11. Board of Directors, Audit Committee Characteristics and Performance of Saudi Arabia Listed Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Yahya Ali Al-Matari; Abdullah Kaid Al-Swidi; Faudziah Hanim Bt Fadzil; Ebrahim Mohammed Al-Matari

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between the internal corporate governance mechanism related to the board of directors, the audit committee characteristics and the performance of the Saudi companies listed in the Saudi stock exchange (TADAWL) in 2010, excluding financial companies. The statistical results of the study are not in line with the agency theory that board of directors and audit committee might mitigate agency problems leading to reduced agency cost by aligning the interests of...

  12. The effects of pay for performance on disparities in stroke, hypertension, and coronary heart disease management: interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Tayu; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), a major pay-for-performance programme, was introduced into United Kingdom primary care in April 2004. The impact of this programme on disparities in health care remains unclear. This study examines the following questions: has this pay for performance programme improved the quality of care for coronary heart disease, stroke and hypertension in white, black and south Asian patients? Has this programme reduced disparities in the quality of care between these ethnic groups? Did general practices with different baseline performance respond differently to this programme? Retrospective cohort study of patients registered with family practices in Wandsworth, London during 2007. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series was used to take into account the previous time trend. Primary outcome measures were mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Our findings suggest that the implementation of QOF resulted in significant short term improvements in blood pressure control. The magnitude of benefit varied between ethnic groups with a statistically significant short term reduction in systolic BP in white and black but not in south Asian patients with hypertension. Disparities in risk factor control were attenuated only on few measures and largely remained intact at the end of the study period. Pay for performance programmes such as the QOF in the UK should set challenging but achievable targets. Specific targets aimed at reducing ethnic disparities in health care may also be needed.

  13. The case of the unpopular pay plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfeld, T; Coil, M; Berwick, D; Nyberg, T; Beer, M

    1992-01-01

    Three years after launching the team-based Quality For All program, Top Chemical Company CEO Sam Verde was searching for a team-based compensation system that would reflect his company's new philosophy. With a committee gathered to discuss the issue, Verde confronts the fact that changing pay plans is an issue few people can agree on. "Very simply," explains vice president for compensation Gilbert Porterfield, "the plan is designed to give employees working on teams real incentives for constant improvement and overall excellence. The variable aspect of the system pays employees for the performance of their group." This doesn't sit well with the others. "It's going to punish teams like mine for the failings of others instead of rewarding us for the work we do and have already done," says packaging team representative Ruth Gibson. Another committee member feels that team-based anything is a "motivational happy land that doesn't square with how people really work." While Verde likes the proposed pay plan, he has doubts over whether his employees will accept the risk. Upper management has no problem basing 60% of its pay on TopChem's performance. But getting line employees to risk part of their salaries--even as little as 4%--on the ups and downs of the chemical industry may be more trouble than it's worth. Four experts on compensation reveal where Top Chemical went wrong in its plan and how Sam Verde might bring about change successfully.

  14. Ethnic disparities in diabetes management and pay-for-performance in the UK: the Wandsworth Prospective Diabetes Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Millett

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Pay-for-performance rewards health-care providers by paying them more if they succeed in meeting performance targets. A new contract for general practitioners in the United Kingdom represents the most radical shift towards pay-for-performance seen in any health-care system. The contract provides an important opportunity to address disparities in chronic disease management between ethnic and socioeconomic groups. We examined disparities in management of people with diabetes and intermediate clinical outcomes within a multiethnic population in primary care before and after the introduction of the new contract in April 2004.We conducted a population-based longitudinal survey, using electronic general practice records, in an ethnically diverse part of southwest London. Outcome measures were prescribing levels and achievement of national treatment targets (HbA1c < or = 7.0%; blood pressure [BP] < 140/80 mm Hg; total cholesterol < or = 5 mmol/l or 193 mg/dl. The proportion of patients reaching treatment targets for HbA1c, BP, and total cholesterol increased significantly after the implementation of the new contract. The extents of these increases were broadly uniform across ethnic groups, with the exception of the black Caribbean patient group, which had a significantly lower improvement in HbA1c (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-0.97 and BP control (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.53-0.81 relative to the white British patient group. Variations in prescribing and achievement of treatment targets between ethnic groups present in 2003 were not attenuated in 2005.Pay-for-performance incentives have not addressed disparities in the management and control of diabetes between ethnic groups. Quality improvement initiatives must place greater emphasis on minority communities to avoid continued disparities in mortality from cardiovascular disease and the other major complications of diabetes.

  15. Paying It Forward: A Technical Assistance Guide for Developing and Implementing Performance-Based Scholarships. The Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbeck, Rashida; Ware, Michelle; Cerna, Oscar; Valenzuela, Ireri

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties in paying for college and in maintaining good academic performance are two major hurdles to college graduation for low-income students. In recent years, state and federal budgets for postsecondary education have been cut significantly, limiting the options policymakers, education leaders, and communities have to improve rates of…

  16. Specialist committee's review reports for experimental fast reactor JOYO' MK-III performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2004-02-01

    Performance tests (startup-physics tests and power elevation tests) were planed for experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' MK-III where irradiation performances were upgraded by power increase from 100 to 140 MW. The reactor safety committee of O-arai Engineering Center has established a specialist committee for 'JOYO' MK-III Performance Tests at the first meeting of 2003 on 23th. April 2003, to accomplish the tests successfully. Subjects of the specialist committee were reviews of following items covering a wide range. 1) Contents of modification works. 2) Reflections of functional test results to the plant and facilities. 3) Reflections of safety rule modification to instruction and manual for operation. 4) Quality assurances and pre-calculation for performance test. 5) Inspection plan and its results. 6) Adequacy of performance test plan. 7) Confirmation of performance test results. Before test-starts, the specialist committee has confirmed by reviewing the items from 1) to 6) based on explanations and documents of the Division of Experimental Reactor, that the test plan and pre-inspections are adequate. After the tests, the specialist committee had confirmed by reviewing the item 7) in the same way, that the each test result satisfies the corresponding criterion. The specialist committee has concluded from these review's results before and after the tests that the 'JOYO' MK-III Performance Tests were carried out appropriately. Besides, the first criticality of the JOYO MK-III was achieved on 2nd. July 2003, and the continuous full power operation was carried on 20th. Nov. 2003. Finally, all performance tests were completed by the pass of the last governmental pre-serviced inspection (dose rate measurement during the shut down condition). (author)

  17. Will hypertension performance measures used for pay-for-performance programs penalize those who care for medically complex patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Laura A; Woodard, Lechauncy D; Henderson, Louise M; Urech, Tracy H; Pietz, Kenneth

    2009-06-16

    There is concern that performance measures, patient ratings of their care, and pay-for-performance programs may penalize healthcare providers of patients with multiple chronic coexisting conditions. We examined the impact of coexisting conditions on the quality of care for hypertension and patient perception of overall quality of their health care. We classified 141 609 veterans with hypertension into 4 condition groups: those with hypertension-concordant (diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, dyslipidemia) and/or -discordant (arthritis, depression, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) conditions or neither. We measured blood pressure control at the index visit, overall good quality of care for hypertension, including a follow-up interval, and patient ratings of satisfaction with their care. Associations between condition type and number of coexisting conditions on receipt of overall good quality of care were assessed with logistic regression. The relationship between patient assessment and objective measures of quality was assessed. Of the cohort, 49.5% had concordant-only comorbidities, 8.7% had discordant-only comorbidities, 25.9% had both, and 16.0% had none. Odds of receiving overall good quality after adjustment for age were higher for those with concordant comorbidities (odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.70 to 1.87), discordant comorbidities (odds ratio, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.23 to 1.41), or both (odds ratio, 2.25; 95% confidence interval, 2.13 to 2.38) compared with neither. Findings did not change after adjustment for illness severity and/or number of primary care and specialty care visits. Patient assessment of quality did not vary by the presence of coexisting conditions and was not related to objective ratings of quality of care. Contrary to expectations, patients with greater complexity had higher odds of receiving high-quality care for hypertension. Subjective ratings of care did not vary with the presence or absence of

  18. Exploring the effect of at-risk case management compensation on hospital pay-for-performance outcomes: tools for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Randy L; Hamilton, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Acute care nurse case managers are charged with compliance oversight, managing throughput, and ensuring safe care transitions. Leveraging the roles of nurse case managers and social workers during care transitions translates into improved fiscal performance under the Affordable Care Act. This article aims to equip leaders in the field of case management with tools to facilitate the alignment of case management systems with hospital pay-for-performance measures. A quality improvement project was implemented at a hospital in south Alabama to examine the question: for acute care case managers, what is the effect of key performance indictors using an at-risk compensation model in comparison to past nonincentive models on hospital readmissions, lengths of stay, and patient satisfaction surrounding the discharge process. Inpatient acute care hospital. The implementation of an at-risk compensation model using key performance indicators, Lean Six Sigma methodology, and Creative Health Care Management's Relationship-Based Care framework demonstrated reduced length of stay, hospital readmissions, and improved patient experiences. Regulatory changes and new models of reimbursement in the acute care environment have created the perfect storm for case management leaders. Hospital fiscal performance is dependent on effective case management processes and the ability to optimize scarce resources. The quality improvement project aimed to further align case management systems and structures with hospital pay-for-performance measures. Tools for change were presented to assist leaders with the change acceleration process.

  19. Impact of the pay-for-performance contract and the management of hypertension in Scottish primary care: a 6-year population-based repeated cross-sectional study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Simpson, Colin R

    2011-07-01

    The 2004 introduction of the pay-for-performance contract has increased the proportion of income that GPs are able to earn by targeting quality care to patients with chronic diseases such as hypertension.

  20. Work-Life Balance Practices, Performance-Related Pay, and Gender Equality in the Workplace: Evidence from Japan

    OpenAIRE

    KATO Takao; KODAMA Naomi

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses unique firm-level panel data from Japan and provides new evidence on the possible impact on gender equality in the workplace of human resources management (HRM) practices. Specifically we consider a number of work-life balance (WLB) practices that are developed in part to enhance gender equality as well as performance-related pay (PRP) that is one of the most often discussed changes in the Japanese HRM system in recent years. Our fixed effect estimates indicate that daycare se...

  1. AGU Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administrative Committees are responsible for those functions required for the overall performance or well-being of AGU as an organization. These committees are Audit and Legal Affairs, Budget and Finance*, Development, Nominations*, Planning, Statutes and Bylaws*, Tellers.Operating Committees are responsible for the policy direction and operational oversight of AGU's primary programs. The Operating Committees are Education and Human Resources, Fellows*, Information Technology, International Participation*, Meetings, Public Affairs, Public Information, Publications*.

  2. 28 CFR 345.56 - Vacation pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vacation pay. 345.56 Section 345.56... (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.56 Vacation pay. Inmate workers are granted FPI vacation pay by the SOI when their continued good work performance justifies such pay, based on...

  3. Why not “just for the money”? An experimental vignette study of the cognitive price effects and crowding effects of performance-related pay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Jensen, Lars Engelbrecht

    2017-01-01

    whether the mechanism is motivational as expected. This study finds support for these expectations using a vignette survey experimental setup of 1,152 responses (from 384 respondents). The results indicate that PRP positively affects organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), but that this effect......-controlling, the importance of intrinsic motivation can actually increase. The implications of this study are that PRP is not necessarily harmful, and that managers should pay close attention to how their employees perceive performance-based pay systems....

  4. Value-Added Merit Pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Daniel F.

    The purpose of merit pay is to reward employees for their accomplishments and motivate them to continue improving. Critics of merit pay say the increased extrinsic motivation that it prompts is more than offset by the decrease in intrinsic motivation. Supporters of performance-based pay claim several benefits of the practice. This study addressed…

  5. The effect of performance-related pay of hospital doctors on hospital behaviour: a case study from Shandong, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills Anne

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the recognition that public hospitals are often productively inefficient, reforms have taken place worldwide to increase their administrative autonomy and financial responsibility. Reforms in China have been some of the most radical: the government budget for public hospitals was fixed, and hospitals had to rely on charges to fill their financing gap. Accompanying these changes was the widespread introduction of performance-related pay for hospital doctors – termed the "bonus" system. While the policy objective was to improve productivity and cost recovery, it is likely that the incentive to increase the quantity of care provided would operate regardless of whether the care was medically necessary. Methods The primary concerns of this study were to assess the effects of the bonus system on hospital revenue, cost recovery and productivity, and to explore whether various forms of bonus pay were associated with the provision of unnecessary care. The study drew on longitudinal data on revenue and productivity from six panel hospitals, and a detailed record review of 2303 tracer disease patients (1161 appendicitis patients and 1142 pneumonia patients was used to identify unnecessary care. Results The study found that bonus system change over time contributed significantly to the increase in hospital service revenue and hospital cost recovery. There was an increase in unnecessary care and in the probability of admission when the bonus system switched from one with a weaker incentive to increase services to one with a stronger incentive, suggesting that improvement in the financial health of public hospitals was achieved at least in part through the provision of more unnecessary care and drugs and through admitting more patients. Conclusion There was little evidence that the performance-related pay system as designed by the sample of Chinese public hospitals was socially desirable. Hospitals should be monitored more closely

  6. The influence of welfare systems on pay-for-performance programs for general practitioners: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammi, Mehdi; Fortier, Grant

    2017-04-01

    While pay-for-performance (P4P) programs are increasingly common tools used to foster quality and efficiency in primary care, the evidence concerning their effectiveness is at best mixed. In this article, we explore the influence of welfare systems on four P4P-related dimensions: the level of healthcare funders' commitment to P4Ps (by funding and length of program operation), program design (specifically target-based vs. participation-based program), physicians' acceptance of the program and program effects. Using Esping-Andersen's typology, we examine P4P for general practitioners (GPs) in thirteen European and North American countries and find that welfare systems contribute to explain variations in P4P experiences. Overall, liberal systems exhibited the most enthusiastic adoption of P4P, with significant physician acceptance, generous incentives and positive but modest program effects. Social democratic countries showed minimal interest in P4P for GPs, with the exception of Sweden. Although corporatist systems adopted performance pay, these countries experienced mixed results, with strong physician opposition. In response to this opposition, health care funders tended to favour participation-based over target-based P4P. We demonstrate how the interaction of decommodification and social stratification in each welfare regime influences these countries' experiences with P4P for GPs, directly for funders' commitment, program design and physicians' acceptance, and indirectly for program effects, hence providing a framework for analyzing P4P in other contexts or care settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Small businesses performance in West African border regions: Do social networks pay off?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuepié, Mathias; Tenikué, Michel; Walther, Olivier

    networks are also the most successful in terms of monthly sales and profit. The paper shows that the overall economic performance of traders is affected by the socio-professional position of the actors with whom they are connected. While social ties with local religious leaders have no effect......This paper studies the link between economic performance and social networks in West Africa. Using first-hand data collected on 358 small-scale traders in five border markets between Niger, Nigeria and Benin, we are particularly interested in testing whether the most well-connected actors of trade...... on their business, support received from civil servants, politicians, and security authorities translates into economic performance. The paper also shows significant differences between countries, regions and marketplaces. Social connections developed with state representatives have a much greater effect...

  8. Teacher Evaluation, Pay for Performance, and Learning around Instruction: Between Dissonant Incentives and Resonant Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintrop, Rick; Ordenes, Miguel; Coghlan, Erin; Pryor, Laura; Madero, Cristobal

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The study examines why the logic of a performance management system, supported by the federal Teacher Incentive Fund, might be faulty. It does this by exploring the nuances of the interplay between teaching evaluations as formative and summative, the use of procedures, tools, and artifacts obligated by the local Teacher Incentive Fund…

  9. The Emotional Impact of Performance-Related Pay on Teachers in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Pat; Menter, Ian; Hextall, Ian

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on the emotional impact of Threshold Assessment on teachers and schools. Using data from an ESRC funded project, 'The impact of Performance Threshold Assessment on teachers' work' (ESRC R000239286), we seek to contribute to a growing literature on teachers' emotions by sharing some of the insights gained from 76 interviews…

  10. Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Maria Ellegård, Lina; Anell, Anders

    -for-performance in a difference-in-differences analysis. Despite that the monetary incentives were small, we find that P4P significantly increased narrow-spectrum antibiotics' share of RTI antibiotics consumption. We further find larger effects in areas where there were many private providers, where the incentive was formulated...... as a penalty rather than a reward, and where all providers were close to a P4P target....

  11. Paying More Attention to Attention: Improving the Performance of Convolutional Neural Networks via Attention Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Zagoruyko, Sergey; Komodakis, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Attention plays a critical role in human visual experience. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that attention can also play an important role in the context of applying artificial neural networks to a variety of tasks from fields such as computer vision and NLP. In this work we show that, by properly defining attention for convolutional neural networks, we can actually use this type of information in order to significantly improve the performance of a student CNN network by forcin...

  12. Physician-Pharmacist collaboration in a pay for performance healthcare environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, T M; Izakovic, M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare is becoming more complex and costly in both European (Slovak) and American models. Healthcare in the United States (U.S.) is undergoing a particularly dramatic change. Physician and hospital reimbursement are becoming less procedure focused and increasingly outcome focused. Efforts at Mercy Hospital have shown promise in terms of collaborative team based care improving performance on glucose control outcome metrics, linked to reimbursement. Our performance on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) post-operative glucose control metric for cardiac surgery patients increased from a 63.6% pass rate to a 95.1% pass rate after implementing interventions involving physician-pharmacist team based care.Having a multidisciplinary team that is able to adapt quickly to changing expectations in the healthcare environment has aided our institution. As healthcare becomes increasingly saturated with technology, data and quality metrics, collaborative efforts resulting in increased quality and physician efficiency are desirable. Multidisciplinary collaboration (including physician-pharmacist collaboration) appears to be a viable route to improved performance in an outcome based healthcare system (Fig. 2, Ref. 12).

  13. Early detection of poor adherers to statins: applying individualized surveillance to pay for performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Zimolzak

    Full Text Available Medication nonadherence costs $300 billion annually in the US. Medicare Advantage plans have a financial incentive to increase medication adherence among members because the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS now awards substantive bonus payments to such plans, based in part on population adherence to chronic medications. We sought to build an individualized surveillance model that detects early which beneficiaries will fall below the CMS adherence threshold.This was a retrospective study of over 210,000 beneficiaries initiating statins, in a database of private insurance claims, from 2008-2011. A logistic regression model was constructed to use statin adherence from initiation to day 90 to predict beneficiaries who would not meet the CMS measure of proportion of days covered 0.8 or above, from day 91 to 365. The model controlled for 15 additional characteristics. In a sensitivity analysis, we varied the number of days of adherence data used for prediction.Lower adherence in the first 90 days was the strongest predictor of one-year nonadherence, with an odds ratio of 25.0 (95% confidence interval 23.7-26.5 for poor adherence at one year. The model had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.80. Sensitivity analysis revealed that predictions of comparable accuracy could be made only 40 days after statin initiation. When members with 30-day supplies for their first statin fill had predictions made at 40 days, and members with 90-day supplies for their first fill had predictions made at 100 days, poor adherence could be predicted with 86% positive predictive value.To preserve their Medicare Star ratings, plan managers should identify or develop effective programs to improve adherence. An individualized surveillance approach can be used to target members who would most benefit, recognizing the tradeoff between improved model performance over time and the advantage of earlier detection.

  14. Paying for performance to improve the delivery of health interventions in low- and middle-income countries .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Sophie; Fretheim, Atle; Kessy, Flora L; Lindahl, Anne Karin

    2012-02-15

    There is a growing interest in paying for performance as a means to align the incentives of health workers and health providers with public health goals. However, there is currently a lack of rigorous evidence on the effectiveness of these strategies in improving health care and health, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Moreover, paying for performance is a complex intervention with uncertain benefits and potential harms. A review of evidence on effectiveness is therefore timely, especially as this is an area of growing interest for funders and governments. To assess the current evidence for the effects of paying for performance on the provision of health care and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. We searched more than 15 databases in 2009, including the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group Specialised Register (searched 3 March 2009), CENTRAL (2009, Issue 1) (searched 3 March 2009), MEDLINE, Ovid (1948 to present) (searched 24 June 2011), EMBASE, Ovid (1980 to 2009 Week 09) (searched 2 March 2009), EconLit, Ovid (1969 to February 2009) (searched 5 March 2009), as well as the Social Sciences Citation Index, ISI Web of Science (1975 to present) (searched 8 September 2010). We also searched the websites and online resources of numerous international agencies, organisations and universities to find relevant grey literature and contacted experts in the field. We carried out an updated search on the Results-Based Financing website in April 2011, and re-ran the MEDLINE search in June 2011. Pay for performance refers to the transfer of money or material goods conditional on taking a measurable action or achieving a predetermined performance target. To be included, a study had to report at least one of the following outcomes: changes in targeted measures of provider performance, such as the delivery or utilisation of healthcare services, or patient outcomes, unintended effects and/or changes in resource use. Studies

  15. Leaders' experiences and perceptions implementing activity-based funding and pay-for-performance hospital funding models: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Pamela E; Hewko, Sarah J; Pfaff, Kathryn A; Cleghorn, Laura; Cunningham, Barbara J; Elston, Dawn; Cummings, Greta G

    2015-08-01

    Providing cost-effective, accessible, high quality patient care is a challenge to governments and health care delivery systems across the globe. In response to this challenge, two types of hospital funding models have been widely implemented: (1) activity-based funding (ABF) and (2) pay-for-performance (P4P). Although health care leaders play a critical role in the implementation of these funding models, to date their perspectives have not been systematically examined. The purpose of this systematic review was to gain a better understanding of the experiences of health care leaders implementing hospital funding reforms within Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. We searched literature from 1982 to 2013 using: Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Elite, and Business Source Complete. Two independent reviewers screened titles, abstracts and full texts using predefined criteria. We included 2 mixed methods and 12 qualitative studies. Thematic analysis was used in synthesizing results. Five common themes and multiple subthemes emerged. Themes include: pre-requisites for success, perceived benefits, barriers/challenges, unintended consequences, and leader recommendations. Irrespective of which type of hospital funding reform was implemented, health care leaders described a complex process requiring the following: organizational commitment; adequate infrastructure; human, financial and information technology resources; change champions and a personal commitment to quality care. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Design choices made by target users for a pay-for-performance program in primary care: an action research approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirschner Kirsten

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background International interest in pay-for-performance (P4P initiatives to improve quality of health care is growing. Current programs vary in the methods of performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. One may assume that involvement of health care professionals in the goal setting and methods of quality measurement and subsequent payment schemes may enhance their commitment to and motivation for P4P programs and therefore the impact of these programs. We developed a P4P program in which the target users were involved in decisions about the P4P methods. Methods For the development of the P4P program a framework was used which distinguished three main components: performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. Based on this framework design choices were discussed in two panels of target users using an adapted Delphi procedure. The target users were 65 general practices and two health insurance companies in the South of the Netherlands. Results Performance measurement was linked to the Dutch accreditation program based on three domains (clinical care, practice management and patient experience. The general practice was chosen as unit of assessment. Relative standards were set at the 25th percentile of group performance. The incentive for clinical care was set twice as high as the one for practice management and patient experience. Quality scores were to be calculated separately for all three domains, and for both the quality level and the improvement of performance. The incentive for quality level was set thrice as high as the one for the improvement of performance. For reimbursement, quality scores were divided into seven levels. A practice with a quality score in the lowest group was not supposed to receive a bonus. The additional payment grew proportionally for each extra group. The bonus aimed at was on average 5% to 10% of the practice income. Conclusions Designing a P4P program for primary care with involvement of

  17. Design choices made by target users for a pay-for-performance program in primary care: an action research approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background International interest in pay-for-performance (P4P) initiatives to improve quality of health care is growing. Current programs vary in the methods of performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. One may assume that involvement of health care professionals in the goal setting and methods of quality measurement and subsequent payment schemes may enhance their commitment to and motivation for P4P programs and therefore the impact of these programs. We developed a P4P program in which the target users were involved in decisions about the P4P methods. Methods For the development of the P4P program a framework was used which distinguished three main components: performance measurement, appraisal and reimbursement. Based on this framework design choices were discussed in two panels of target users using an adapted Delphi procedure. The target users were 65 general practices and two health insurance companies in the South of the Netherlands. Results Performance measurement was linked to the Dutch accreditation program based on three domains (clinical care, practice management and patient experience). The general practice was chosen as unit of assessment. Relative standards were set at the 25th percentile of group performance. The incentive for clinical care was set twice as high as the one for practice management and patient experience. Quality scores were to be calculated separately for all three domains, and for both the quality level and the improvement of performance. The incentive for quality level was set thrice as high as the one for the improvement of performance. For reimbursement, quality scores were divided into seven levels. A practice with a quality score in the lowest group was not supposed to receive a bonus. The additional payment grew proportionally for each extra group. The bonus aimed at was on average 5% to 10% of the practice income. Conclusions Designing a P4P program for primary care with involvement of the target users gave us an

  18. Use of PSA Level 2 analysis for improving containment performance. Report of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    In order to discuss and exchange experience on different aspects of methods associated with Level 2 PSA and its applications for improving containment performance, the IAEA held a Technical Committee meeting in Vienna in December 1996. The meeting, which was attended by 26 participants from 20 Member States, provided a broad forum for discussion. The meeting addressed the issues related to the actual performance of Level 2 PSA studies as well as the insights gained from applications to improve containment performance. Particular attention was given to studies and applications for WWER type reactors, for which Level 2 work is still in its early stages, and for channel type reactors where modelling of accident progression is complex and significantly different from vessel type light water reactors. This TECDOC contains the papers presented at the meeting and the results of extensive discussions which were held in specific working groups

  19. Excellence in Transitional Care of Older Adults and Pay-for-Performance: Perspectives of Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaje, Alicia I; Newcomer, Alison R; Maynor, Kenric A; Duhaney, Robert L; Eubank, Kathryn J; Carrese, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    Article-at-a-Glance Background: Care transitions across health care settings are common and can result in adverse outcomes for older adults. Few studies have examined health care professionals' perspectives on important process measures or pay-for-performance (P4P) strategies related to transitional care. A study was conducted to characterize health care professionals' perspectives on (1) successful transitional care of older adults (age 65 years and older), (2) suggestions for improvement, and (3) P4P strategies related to transitional care. In a qualitative study, one-hour semistructured in-depth interviews were conducted in an acute care hospital, a skilled nursing facility, two community-based primary care practices, and one home health care agency with 20 health care professionals (18 physicians and 2 home health care administrators) with direct experience in care transitions of older adults and who were likely to be affected by P4P strategies. Findings were organized into three thematic domains: (1) components and markers of effective transitional care, (2) difficulties in design and implementation of P4P strategies, and (3) health care professionals' concerns and unmet needs related to delivering optimal care during transitions. A conceptual framework was developed on the basis of the findings to guide design and implementation of P4P strategies for improving transitional care. In characterizing health care professionals' perspectives, specific care processes to target, challenges to address in the design of P4P strategies, and unmet needs to consider regarding education and feedback for health care professionals were described. Future investigations could evaluate whether performance targets, educational interventions, and implementation strategies based on this conceptual framework improve quality of transitional care.

  20. Health system changes under pay-for-performance: the effects of Rwanda's national programme on facility inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Diana K L; Sherry, Tisamarie B; Bauhoff, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) programmes have been introduced in numerous developing countries with the goal of increasing the provision and quality of health services through financial incentives. Despite the popularity of P4P, there is limited evidence on how providers achieve performance gains and how P4P affects health system quality by changing structural inputs. We explore these two questions in the context of Rwanda's 2006 national P4P programme by examining the programme's impact on structural quality measures drawn from international and national guidelines. Given the programme's previously documented success at increasing institutional delivery rates, we focus on a set of delivery-specific and more general structural inputs. Using the programme's quasi-randomized roll-out, we apply multivariate regression analysis to short-run facility data from the 2007 Service Provision Assessment. We find positive programme effects on the presence of maternity-related staff, the presence of covered waiting areas and a management indicator and a negative programme effect on delivery statistics monitoring. We find no effects on a set of other delivery-specific physical resources, delivery-specific human resources, delivery-specific operations, general physical resources and general human resources. Using mediation analysis, we find that the positive input differences explain a small and insignificant fraction of P4P's impact on institutional delivery rates. The results suggest that P4P increases provider availability and facility operations but is only weakly linked with short-run structural health system improvements overall. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Improving on-time surgical starts: the impact of implementing pre-OR timeouts and performance pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Luke; Langell, John

    2017-11-01

    Operating room (OR) time is expensive. Underutilized OR time negatively impacts efficiency and is an unnecessary cost for hospitals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a pre-OR timeout and performance pay incentive on the frequency of on-time, first surgical starts. At a single Veterans Affairs Medical Center, we implemented a pre-OR timeout in the form of a safety-briefing checklist and a modest performance pay incentive for on-time starts (>90% compliance) for attending surgeons. Data were collected on all first-start cases beginning before implementation in 2008 and continued through 2015. Each year, an average of 960 first starts occurred across nine surgical divisions. Before implementation of either the timeout or pay incentive, only 15% of cases started on time, and by 2015, greater than 72% were on time (P 60 min were not significant (P = 0.31; P = 0.81). Assuming a loss of 7 min per case for delays pay for on-time starts significantly improves OR utilization and reduces unnecessary costs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Management of developing swimming performance in National Paralympic Committee of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonik Rahmawati

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to understand and analyze structural organization of NPC (National Paralympic Committee of Indonesia on managing swimming performance,recruitment system, infrastructure management, funding management and implementation of the exercise management on managing swimming performance. This study was conducted at Head Office of NPC Indonesia and Kartasura Swimming Pool, Central Java Province. This studyis made in qualitative manner and presented in descriptive approach. The data collection is conducted by doing observation, document analysis, and interviews. The results of the management of developing swimming performance in NPC (National Paralympic Committee of Indonesia are summarized as follows: 1 there are general chairman, the head of the achievement division, the head of the sports department, coach manager and then directed to the coach coordinator and coach’s assistant in the organizational structure 2 recruitment of the organization is held by choosing people who concerned about NPC of Indonesia, recruitment of coach is held without any special tests, which is selected by: giving priority to athletes who have ever won medals and have experienced in coaching, while recruitment of athletes is held by using special test by NPC of Indonesia, 3 facilities, in the form of swimming’s support tools, are given gradually by Ministry of Youth and Sports Affairsby submitting proposals. Meanwhile, facility such as swimming pool still depends on renting Kartasura Swimming Pool, 4 the funding is obtained from Ministry of Youth and Sports Affairs without any sponsorship, 5 training program is held by giving suitable program in general preparation, special preparation, pre match, and also considering athletes’ physical condition, technique, and mental status. Training program can be developed according to the condition of each athlete. Based on the analysis, it can be concluded that management of developing swimming

  3. Application of the analytic hierarchy process in the performance measurement of colorectal cancer care for the design of a pay-for-performance program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kuo-Piao; Chen, Li-Ju; Chang, Yao-Jen; Chang, Yun-Jau; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2013-02-01

    To prioritize performance measures for colorectal cancer care to facilitate the implementation of a pay-for-performance (PFP) system. Questionnaires survey. Medical hospitals in Taiwan. Sixty-six medical doctors from 5 November 2009 to 10 December 2009. Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) technique. Main outcome measure(s) Performance measures (two pre-treatment, six treatment related and three monitoring related) were used. Forty-eight doctors responded and returned questionnaires (response rate 72.7%) with surgeons and physicians contributing equally. The most important measure was the proportion of colorectal patients who had pre-operative examinations that included chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography or MRI (global priority: 0.144), followed by the proportion of stages I-III colorectal cancer patients who had undergone a wide surgical resection documented as 'negative margin' (global priority: 0.133) and the proportion of colorectal cancer patients who had undergone surgery with a pathology report that included information on tumor size and node differentiation (global priority: 0.116). Most participants considered that the best interval for the renewal indicators was 3-5 years (43.75%) followed by 5-10 years (27.08%). To design a PFP program, the AHP method is a useful technique to prioritize performance measures, especially in a highly specialized domain such as colorectal cancer care.

  4. Pay-for-performance policy and data-driven decision making within nursing homes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Miech, Edward; Davila, Heather Wood; Mueller, Christine; Cooke, Valerie; Arling, Greg

    2015-05-01

    Health systems globally and within the USA have introduced nursing home pay-for-performance (P4P) programmes in response to the need for improved nursing home quality. Central to the challenge of administering effective P4P is the availability of accurate, timely and clinically appropriate data for decision making. We aimed to explore ways in which data were collected, thought about and used as a result of participation in a P4P programme. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 232 nursing home employees from within 70 nursing homes that participated in P4P-sponsored quality improvement (QI) projects. Interview data were analysed to identify themes surrounding collecting, thinking about and using data for QI decision making. The term 'data' appeared 247 times in the interviews, and over 92% of these instances (228/247) were spontaneous references by nursing home staff. Overall, 34% of respondents (79/232) referred directly to 'data' in their interviews. Nursing home leadership more frequently discussed data use than direct care staff. Emergent themes included using data to identify a QI problem, gathering data in new ways at the local level, and measuring outcomes in response to P4P participation. Alterations in data use as a result of policy change were theoretically consistent with the revised version of the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework, which posits that successful implementation is a function of evidence, context and facilitation. Providing a reimbursement context that facilitates the collection and use of reliable local evidence may be an important consideration to others contemplating the adaptation of P4P policies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. [Pay for performance in dental care: A systematic narrative review of quality P4P models in dental care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenot, Regine

    2017-11-01

    Pay for performance (P4P) links reimbursement to the achievement of quality objectives. Experiences with P4P instruments and studies on their effects are available for the inpatient sector. A systematic narrative review brings together findings concerning the use and the effects of P4P, especially in dental care. A systematic literature search in PubMed and the Cochrane Library for reimbursement models using quality indicators provided 77 publications. Inclusion criteria were: year of publication not older than 2007, dental sector, models of quality-oriented remuneration, quality of care, quality indicators. 27 publications met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated with regard to the instruments and effects of P4P. The database search was supplemented by a free search on the Internet as well as a search in indicator databases and portals. The results of the included studies were extracted and summarized narratively. 27 studies were included in the review. Performance-oriented remuneration is an instrument of quality competition. In principle, P4P is embedded in an existing remuneration system, i.e., it does not occur in isolation. In the United States, England and Scandinavia, models are currently being tested for quality-oriented remuneration in dental care, based on quality indicators. The studies identified by the literature search are very heterogeneous and do not yield comparable endpoints. Difficulties are seen in the reproducibility of the quality of dental care with regard to certain characteristics which still have to be defined as quality-promoting properties. Risk selection cannot be ruled out, which may have an impact on structural quality (access to care, coordination). There were no long-term effects of P4P on the quality of care. In the short and medium term, adverse effects on the participants' motivation as well as shifting effects towards the private sector are described. A prerequisite for the functioning of P4P is the definition of clear

  6. Merit Pay Misfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Al

    2011-01-01

    Critics argue that the uniform salary schedule is unfair because it promotes mediocrity by rewarding poor performers while failing to recognize outstanding achievement on the job. Advocates for merit pay systems for preK-12 education also contend that the uniform salary schedule ignores the basic purpose of education--student learning. Although…

  7. Teachers' Perceptions of Merit Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Vanessa; Langheinrich, Cornelia; Loth, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to show the various perceptions teachers have on merit pay. This research was designed to examine the perceptions and attitudes of teachers towards the idea of performance based pay. This topic has been an ongoing battle within school systems since the 1800s. The participants in this study were teachers from the state…

  8. Is a diabetes pay-for-performance program cost-effective under the National Health Insurance in Taiwan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Elise Chia-Hui; Pwu, Raoh-Fang; Chen, Duan-Rung; Yang, Ming-Chin

    2014-03-01

    In October 2001, a pay-for-performance (P4P) program for diabetes was implemented by the National Health Insurance (NHI), a single-payer program, in Taiwan. However, only limited information is available regarding the influence of this program on the patient's health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to estimate the costs and consequences of enrolling patients in the P4P program from a single-payer perspective. A retrospective observational study of 529 diabetic patients was conducted between 2004 and 2005. The data used in the study were obtained from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) in Taiwan. Direct cost data were obtained from NHI claims data, which were linked to respondents in the NHIS using scrambled individual identification. The generic SF36 health instrument was employed to measure the quality-of-life-related health status and transformed into a utility index. Patients enrolled in the P4P program for at least 3 months were categorized as the P4P group. Following propensity score matching, 260 patients were included in the study. Outcomes included life-years, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), diabetes-related medical costs, overall medical costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). A single-payer perspective was assumed, and costs were expressed in US dollars. Nonparametric bootstrapping was conducted to estimate confidence intervals for cost-effectiveness ratios. Following matching, no significant difference was noted between two groups with regard to the patients' age, gender, education, family income, smoking status, BMI, or whether insulin was used. The P4P group had an increase of 0.08 (95 % CI 0.077-0.080) in QALYs, and the additional diabetes-related medical cost was US$422.74 (95 % CI US$413.58-US$435.05), yielding an ICER of US$5413.93 (95 % CI US$5226.83-US$5562.97) per QALY gained. Our results provides decision makers with valuable information regarding the impact of the P4P program of diabetes care

  9. Economic evaluation of a pre-ESRD pay-for-performance programme in advanced chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hui-Min; Lin, Ming-Yen; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Wu, Ping-Hsun; Cheng, Li-Jeng; Jian, Feng-Shiuan; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2017-07-01

    The National Health Insurance Administration in Taiwan initiated a nationwide pre-end-stage renal disease (ESRD) pay-for-performance (P4P) programme at the end of 2006 to improve quality of care for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This study aimed to examine this programme's effect on patients' clinical outcomes and its cost-effectiveness among advanced CKD patients. We conducted a longitudinal observational matched cohort study using two nationwide population-based datasets. The major outcomes of interests were incidence of dialysis, all-cause mortality, direct medical costs, life years (LYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio comparing matched P4P and non-P4P advanced CKD patients. Competing-risk analysis, general linear regression and bootstrapping statistical methods were used for the analysis. Subdistribution hazard ratio (95% confidence intervals) for advanced CKD patients enrolled in the P4P programme, compared with those who did not enrol, were 0.845 (0.779-0.916) for incidence of dialysis and 0.792 (0.673-0.932) for all-cause mortality. LYs for P4P and non-P4P patients who initiated dialysis were 2.83 and 2.74, respectively. The adjusted incremental CKD-related costs and other-cause-related costs were NT$114 704 (US$3823) and NT$32 420 (US$1080) for P4P and non-P4P patients who initiated dialysis, respectively, and NT$-3434 (US$114) and NT$45 836 (US$1572) for P4P and non-P4P patients who did not initiate dialysis, respectively, during the 3-year follow-up period. P4P patients had lower risks of both incidence of dialysis initiation and death. In addition, our empirical findings suggest that the P4P pre-ESRD programme in Taiwan provided a long-term cost-effective use of resources and cost savings for advanced CKD patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  10. Design of sustainable food chains: Measuring consumers' willingness-to-pay through the performance of experimental auctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Ana I.A.

    Today's EU animal production systems face a major challenge. On one hand, they must deal with society's demand for production strategies that are safer, more environmental-friendly and ensure better animal welfare. On the other hand, they have to address food suppliers' aspirations for economic....... Moreover, the ability to quantify consumers' willingness-to-pay for new, ethically-improved foods is vital for the economic sustainability of the animal production sector, as well as for the generation of addedvalue products. This abstract presents the outcome of a pilot study of Dutch consumers...... conducted previously3,4. The type of auction employed was the second-price, sealed bid auction. The results obtained give some indication that Dutch consumers' might be willing to pay more for ethical benefits, namely those perceived to be associated with safety. Nevertheless, our findings also indicate...

  11. A "next generation" ethics committee. St. Joseph Health system has integrated performance-improvement features into its ethics work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the limitations that accompany the traditional model of ethics committees, St. Joseph Health System (SJHS), Orange, CA, has been working to integrate ethics expertise and quality-improvement methodology into its "Next Generation Model" (NG Model) for such committees. However, moving from a traditional structure to the NG Model (introduced to SJHS facilities in 1999) brought some challenges, not the least of which was a deep-rooted culture of resistance to change. Following a 2004 audit of how the NG model was working, some common challenges were identified. To deal with those challenges, SJHS developed some tools and techniques that have helped ease the ongoing transition. These tools have helped the system's ethics committees address such issues as collaboration for the sake of organizational integration, setting goals, and measuring performance of various ethics roles.

  12. Organizational factors influencing human performance in nuclear power plants. Report of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    In 1991 a Safety Series report on Safety Culture of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) was published as 75-INSAG-4 by the IAEA. This report deals with the concept of Safety Culture as it relates to organizations and individuals involved in the operations of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Generally, the role of management and organization in assuring the safe operation of NPPs has been widely recognized and its importance accepted. However, the understanding of what constitutes effective management and organization the area of safety is less developed than the understanding of most of the technical issues which plant operators and regulatory bodies are confronted with. The Technical Committee meeting provided a forum for a broad exchange of information on practices and experiences in the area of organization and management to accomplish operational safety in NPPs and thus enhance Safety Culture. This report and the papers presented at the meeting discuss those factors which influence and improve human performance covering both aspects, i.e. the basic requirements imposed on the operator and the ways of managerial support which enhance the reliable and safety oriented performance of operators. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Confirming theoretical pay constructs of a variable pay scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibangilizwe Ncube

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Return on the investment in variable pay programmes remains controversial because their cost versus contribution cannot be empirically justified. Research purpose: This study validates the findings of the model developed by De Swardt on the factors related to successful variable pay programmes. Motivation for the study: Many organisations blindly implement variable pay programmes without any means to assess the impact these programmes have on the company’s performance. This study was necessary to validate the findings of an existing instrument that validates the contribution of variable pay schemes. Research design, approach and method: The study was conducted using quantitative research. A total of 300 completed questionnaires from a non-purposive sample of 3000 participants in schemes across all South African industries were returned and analysed. Main findings: Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, it was found that the validation instrument developed by De Swardt is still largely valid in evaluating variable pay schemes. The differences between the study and the model were reported. Practical/managerial implications: The study confirmed the robustness of an existing model that enables practitioners to empirically validate the use of variable pay plans. This model assists in the design and implementation of variable pay programmes that meet critical success factors. Contribution/value-add: The study contributed to the development of a measurement instrument that will assess whether a variable pay plan contributes to an organisation’s success.

  14. Social Comparison of Pay and Inequity Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Ben

    Inequity theory differs from social exchange theory in its analysis of a worker's reaction to pay by asserting that effects on work performance caused by high or low pay are due to social comparison of fairness rather than principles of direct exchange, such as reciprocity and power. The present experiment held piece-rate pay constant at two…

  15. 78 FR 51809 - Seventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 227, Standards of Navigation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    .../Administrative Remarks Agenda Overview Review Committee Status and Revised TORs Datacom Situation and..., Federal Aviation Administration. [FR Doc. 2013-20420 Filed 8-20-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910-13-P ...

  16. Improving health systems performance in low- and middle-income countries: a system dynamics model of the pay-for-performance initiative in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, O; Lin, S; Igusa, T; Peters, D H

    2017-12-01

    System dynamics methods were used to explore effective implementation pathways for improving health systems performance through pay-for-performance (P4P) schemes. A causal loop diagram was developed to delineate primary causal relationships for service delivery within primary health facilities. A quantitative stock-and-flow model was developed next. The stock-and-flow model was then used to simulate the impact of various P4P implementation scenarios on quality and volume of services. Data from the Afghanistan national facility survey in 2012 was used to calibrate the model. The models show that P4P bonuses could increase health workers' motivation leading to higher levels of quality and volume of services. Gaming could reduce or even reverse this desired effect, leading to levels of quality and volume of services that are below baseline levels. Implementation issues, such as delays in the disbursement of P4P bonuses and low levels of P4P bonuses, also reduce the desired effect of P4P on quality and volume, but they do not cause the outputs to fall below baseline levels. Optimal effect of P4P on quality and volume of services is obtained when P4P bonuses are distributed per the health workers' contributions to the services that triggered the payments. Other distribution algorithms such as equal allocation or allocations proportionate to salaries resulted in quality and volume levels that were substantially lower, sometimes below baseline. The system dynamics models served to inform, with quantitative results, the theory of change underlying P4P intervention. Specific implementation strategies, such as prompt disbursement of adequate levels of performance bonus distributed per health workers' contribution to service, increase the likelihood of P4P success. Poorly designed P4P schemes, such as those without an optimal algorithm for distributing performance bonuses and adequate safeguards for gaming, can have a negative overall impact on health service delivery systems

  17. Impact of a pay-for-performance incentive on support for smoking cessation and on smoking prevalence among people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Christopher; Gray, Jeremy; Saxena, Sonia; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Majeed, Azeem

    2007-06-05

    Many people with diabetes continue to smoke despite being at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We examined the impact of a pay-for-performance incentive in the United Kingdom introduced in 2004 as part of the new general practitioner contract to improve support for smoking cessation and to reduce the prevalence of smoking among people with chronic diseases such as diabetes. We performed a population-based longitudinal study of the recorded delivery of cessation advice and the prevalence of smoking using electronic records of patients with diabetes obtained from participating general practices. The survey was carried out in an ethnically diverse part of southwest London before (June-October 2003) and after (November 2005-January 2006) the introduction of a pay-for-performance incentive. Significantly more patients with diabetes had their smoking status ever recorded in 2005 than in 2003 (98.8% v. 90.0%, p lower among women (adjusted odds ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.95) but was not significantly different in the most and least affluent groups. In 2005, smoking rates continued to differ significantly with age (10.6%-25.1%), sex (women, 11.5%; men, 20.6%) and ethnic background (4.9%-24.9%). The introduction of a pay-for-performance incentive in the United Kingdom increased the provision of support for smoking cessation and was associated with a reduction in smoking prevalence among patients with diabetes in primary health care settings. Health care planners in other countries may wish to consider introducing similar incentive schemes for primary care physicians.

  18. Performance of operating and advanced light water reactor designs. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    Nuclear power can provide security of energy supply, stable energy costs, and can contribute to greenhouse gas reduction. To fully realize these benefits, a continued and strong focus must be maintained on means for assuring the economic competitiveness of nuclear power relative to alternatives. Over the past several years, considerable improvements have been achieved in nuclear plant performance. Worldwide, the average energy availability factor has increased from 66 per cent in 1980 to 81 per cent in 1999, with some utilities achieving significantly higher values. This is being achieved through integrated programmes including personnel training and quality assurance, improvements in plant system and component design and plant operation, by various means to reduce outage duration for maintenance and refuelling and other scheduled shutdowns, and by reducing the number of forced outages. Application of technical means for achieving high performance of nuclear power plants is an important element for assuring their economic competitiveness. For the current plants, proper management includes development and application of better technologies for inspection, maintenance and repair. For future plants, the opportunity exists during the design phase to incorporate design features and technologies for achieving high performance. This IAEA Technical Committee meeting (TCM) provided a forum for information exchange on design features and technologies incorporated into LWR plants commissioned within the last 15-20 years, and into evolutionary LWR designs still under development, for achieving performance improvements with due regard to stringent safety requirements and objectives. It also addressed on-going technology development expected to achieve further improvements and/or significant cost reductions. The TCM was attended by 32 participants from 14 Member States: Argentina, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico

  19. Can't get no satisfaction? Will pay for performance help?: toward an economic framework for understanding performance-based risk-sharing agreements for innovative medical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towse, Adrian; Garrison, Louis P

    2010-01-01

    This article examines performance-based risk-sharing agreements for pharmaceuticals from a theoretical economic perspective. We position these agreements as a form of coverage with evidence development. New performance-based risk sharing could produce a more efficient market equilibrium, achieved by adjustment of the price post-launch to reflect outcomes combined with a new approach to the post-launch costs of evidence collection. For this to happen, the party best able to manage or to bear specific risks must do so. Willingness to bear risk will depend not only on ability to manage it, but on the degree of risk aversion. We identify three related frameworks that provide relevant insights: value of information, real option theory and money-back guarantees. We identify four categories of risk sharing: budget impact, price discounting, outcomes uncertainty and subgroup uncertainty. We conclude that a value of information/real option framework is likely to be the most helpful approach for understanding the costs and benefits of risk sharing. There are a number of factors that are likely to be crucial in determining if performance-based or risk-sharing agreements are efficient and likely to become more important in the future: (i) the cost and practicality of post-launch evidence collection relative to pre-launch; (ii) the feasibility of coverage with evidence development without a pre-agreed contract as to how the evidence will be used to adjust price, revenues or use, in which uncertainty around the pay-off to additional research will reduce the incentive for the manufacturer to collect the information; (iii) the difficulty of writing and policing risk-sharing agreements; (iv) the degree of risk aversion (and therefore opportunity to trade) on the part of payers and manufacturers; and (v) the extent of transferability of data from one country setting to another to support coverage with evidence development in a risk-sharing framework. There is no doubt that

  20. 22 CFR 214.42 - Uniform pay guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uniform pay guidelines. 214.42 Section 214.42... Advisory Committees § 214.42 Uniform pay guidelines. (a) A.I.D. follows OMB/CSC guidelines in section 11 of... experts, their compensation shall be fixed in accordance with CSC guidelines and regulations, and the...

  1. 44 CFR 12.18 - Uniform pay guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Uniform pay guidelines. 12.18 Section 12.18 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 12.18 Uniform pay guidelines. (a) Members. Subject to the...

  2. Behind the Pay Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  3. Intellectual capital performance and cash-based incentive payments for executive directors: Impact of remuneration committee and corporate governance features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J-L. W. Mitchell Van der Zahn

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We use a sample of 964 executive directors representing 354 Singapore publicly listed firms to examine linkage between firm performance and cash-based bonus payments. As a pooled OLS regression model may hide different models that characterize subsets of observations we use latent class analysis to further examine the data and to identify more specifically the influence of corporate governance features. Our latent class analysis results indicate that remuneration committees with members having their interests better aligned with shareholders (such as presence of a significant owner appear more likely to consider the incremental value of tying executive director compensation to intellectual capital performance. Remuneration committees with a lower risk of influence from managerial power were also found to be more likely to support a compensation linkage for executive directors to intellectual capital performance. The influence of the remuneration committee features is evident for both entrepreneurial and traditional firms. Overall, our findings are consistent with both the optimal-contract pricing and managerial power views of executive compensation setting.

  4. [Women's willingness to pay for cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Min-Son; Sung, Na-Young; Yang, Jeong Hee; Park, Eun-Cheol; Choi, KuiSon

    2006-07-01

    The goal of this study is to measure women's willingness to pay for cancer screening and to identify those factors associated with this willingness to pay A population-based telephone survey was performed on 1,562 women (aged 30 years or over) for 2 weeks (9-23th, July, 2004). Data about sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, the intention of the cancer screenings and willingness to pay for cancer screening were collected. 1,400 respondents were included in the analysis. The women's willingness to pay for cancer screening and the factors associated with this willingness to pay were evaluated. The results show that 76% of all respondents have a willingness to pay for cancer screening. Among those who are willing to pay, the average and median amount of money for which the respondents are willing to pay are 126,636 (s.d.: 58,414) and 120,000 won, respectively. As the status of education & the income are higher, the average amount that women are willing to pay becomes much more. The amount of money women are willing to pay is the highest during the 'contemplation' stage. Being willing to pay or not is associated with a change of behavior (transtheoretical model), the income, the concern about the cancer risk, the family cancer history, the marital status, the general health exam, age and the place of residence. Income is associated with a greater willingness to pay. Old age was associated with a lower willingness to pay. According to the two-part model, income and TTM are the most important variables associated with the willingness to pay for cancer screening. The cancer screening participation rate is low compared with the willingness to pay for cancer screening. It is thought that we have to consider the participants' behavior that's associated with cancer screening and their willingness to pay in order to organize and manage cancer screening program.

  5. Control assembly materials for water reactors: Experience, performance and perspectives. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of water cooled nuclear power reactors depends to a large extent upon the reliable operation of control assemblies for the regulation and shutdown of the reactors. These consist of neutron absorbing materials clad in stainless steel or zirconium based alloys, guide tubes and guide cards, and other structural components. Current designs have worked extremely well in normal conditions, but less than ideal behaviour limits the lifetimes of control materials, imposing an economic penalty which acts as a strong incentive to produce improved materials and designs that are more reliable. Neutron absorbing materials currently in use include the ceramic boron carbide, the high melting point metal hafnium and the low melting point complex alloy Ag-In-Cd. Other promising neutron absorbing materials, such as dysprosium titanate, are being evaluated in the Russian Federation. These control materials exhibit widely differing mechanical, physical and chemical properties, which must be understood in order to be able to predict the behaviour of control rod assemblies. Identification of existing failure mechanisms, end of life criteria and the implications of the gradual introduction of extended burnup, mixed oxide (MOX) fuels and more complex fuel cycles constitutes the first step in a search for improved materials and designs. In the early part of this decade, it was recognized by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) that international conferences, symposia and published reviews on the materials science aspects of control assemblies were few and far between. Consequently, the IWGFPT recommended that the IAEA should rectify this situation with a series of Technical Committee meetings (TCMs) devoted entirely to the materials aspects of reactor control assemblies. The first was held in 1993 and in the intervening five years considerable progress has been made. In bringing together experts in the

  6. Control assembly materials for water reactors: Experience, performance and perspectives. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of water cooled nuclear power reactors depends to a large extent upon the reliable operation of control assemblies for the regulation and shutdown of the reactors. These consist of neutron absorbing materials clad in stainless steel or zirconium based alloys, guide tubes and guide cards, and other structural components. Current designs have worked extremely well in normal conditions, but less than ideal behaviour limits the lifetimes of control materials, imposing an economic penalty which acts as a strong incentive to produce improved materials and designs that are more reliable. Neutron absorbing materials currently in use include the ceramic boron carbide, the high melting point metal hafnium and the low melting point complex alloy Ag-In-Cd. Other promising neutron absorbing materials, such as dysprosium titanate, are being evaluated in the Russian Federation. These control materials exhibit widely differing mechanical, physical and chemical properties, which must be understood in order to be able to predict the behaviour of control rod assemblies. Identification of existing failure mechanisms, end of life criteria and the implications of the gradual introduction of extended burnup, mixed oxide (MOX) fuels and more complex fuel cycles constitutes the first step in a search for improved materials and designs. In the early part of this decade, it was recognized by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) that international conferences, symposia and published reviews on the materials science aspects of control assemblies were few and far between. Consequently, the IWGFPT recommended that the IAEA should rectify this situation with a series of Technical Committee meetings (TCMs) devoted entirely to the materials aspects of reactor control assemblies. The first was held in 1993 and in the intervening five years considerable progress has been made. In bringing together experts in the

  7. Remuneration Committee, Board Independence and Top Executive Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Shyan Kuo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examine whether the levels and structures of top executive compensation vary discernibly with different levels of board independence. We also examine how the newly mandated adoption of the remuneration committee (RC in Taiwan affects the board independence-executive pay relation. The mandatory establishment of RC for Taiwanese public firms, starting in 2011, is intended to strengthen the reasonableness and effectiveness of the executive compensation structure; thus, it is timely and of interest for practitioners and regulators to understand whether the establishment of RCs can effectively discipline top executive compensation policies. We first find that CEOs of firms that do not appoint independent directors have greater levels of annual pay than is the case for firms that have appointed independent directors, after controlling for the effect of CEO pay determinants. Second, we find that CEO pay for early RC adopters is more closely related to firm performance. Third, we find that the establishing of RCs may decrease CEO pay and enhance the pay-performance association, in particular for firms that have not appointed independent directors; however, this effect is not found to be statistically significant.

  8. 5 CFR 532.507 - Pay for holiday work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay for holiday work. 532.507 Section 532... SYSTEMS Premium Pay and Differentials § 532.507 Pay for holiday work. (a) An employee who is entitled to holiday premium pay and who performs work on a holiday which is not overtime work shall be paid the...

  9. Incentive payments are not related to expected health gain in the pay for performance scheme for UK primary care: cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleetcroft Robert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The General Medical Services primary care contract for the United Kingdom financially rewards performance in 19 clinical areas, through the Quality and Outcomes Framework. Little is known about how best to determine the size of financial incentives in pay for performance schemes. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that performance indicators with larger population health benefits receive larger financial incentives. Methods We performed cross sectional analyses to quantify associations between the size of financial incentives and expected health gain in the 2004 and 2006 versions of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. We used non-parametric two-sided Spearman rank correlation tests. Health gain was measured in expected lives saved in one year and in quality adjusted life years. For each quality indicator in an average sized general practice we tested for associations first, between the marginal increase in payment and the health gain resulting from a one percent point improvement in performance and second, between total payment and the health gain at the performance threshold for maximum payment. Results Evidence for lives saved or quality adjusted life years gained was found for 28 indicators accounting for 41% of the total incentive payments. No statistically significant associations were found between the expected health gain and incentive gained from a marginal 1% increase in performance in either the 2004 or 2006 version of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. In addition no associations were found between the size of financial payment for achievement of an indicator and the expected health gain at the performance threshold for maximum payment measured in lives saved or quality adjusted life years. Conclusions In this subgroup of indicators the financial incentives were not aligned to maximise health gain. This disconnection between incentive and expected health gain risks supporting clinical activities that are only

  10. Measuring Dutch consumers' willingness-to-pay for ethically-improved foods and supply chains through the performance of experimental auctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, Ana I.A.

    for ethical benefits to be introduced in fish production, namely for those perceived to be associated with food safety. Nevertheless, these findings also point out that consumers' may not always value the ethical attributes they consider relevant in a consistent manner, especially if these seem to contradict......This paper presents the outcome of a pilot study on Dutch consumers' willingness-to-pay for fresh fish originating from production systems with different levels of ethical attributes, as estimated through the performance of experimental auctions. Fifteen Dutch citizens living in Noord......-Holland and being regular consumers of fresh fish were selected to participate in this study. Two experimental sessions were held in December 2003. Information regarding the subjects, their knowledge about fish production systems and the perceived relevance of different ethical attributes was collected prior...

  11. Do strong brands pay off? : An empirical investigation of the relation between brand asset valuator and financial performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeeten, F.H.M.; Vijn, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the relation between BrandAssetTM Valuatorand financial performance measures. More specifically, we investigate whether pillars of the BrandAssetTM Valuatormodel (Brand Vitality and Brand Stature) are associated with accounting performance (return on investment, return

  12. Gender Differences in Pay

    OpenAIRE

    Francine D. Blau; Lawrence M. Kahn

    2000-01-01

    We consider the gender pay gap in the United States. Both gender-specific factors, including gender differences in qualifications and discrimination, and overall wage structure, the rewards for skills and employment in particular sectors, importantly influence the gender pay gap. Declining gender differentials in the U.S., and the more rapid closing of the gender pay gap in the U.S. than elsewhere, appear to be primarily due to gender-specific factors. However, the relatively large gender pay...

  13. Marine Corps Pay Incentives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marines from 2000 to 2017. The thesis includes a literature review on economic theory related to pay incentives in the Department of Defense, a...The purpose of this thesis to provide the Marine Corps with a comprehensive report on pay incentive programs and special pay that were available to...summarization of pay incentive categories, a data analysis on take-up rates and average annual amounts at the end of each fiscal year, and a program review

  14. 3 CFR - Pay Freeze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay Freeze Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of January 21, 2009 Pay Freeze Memorandum for the Assistant to the President and Chief... the White House staff forgo pay increases until further notice. Accordingly, as a signal of our shared...

  15. Calculations of Financial Incentives for Providers in a Pay-for-Performance Program: Manual Review Versus Data From Structured Fields in Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urech, Tracy H; Woodard, LeChauncy D; Virani, Salim S; Dudley, R Adams; Lutschg, Meghan Z; Petersen, Laura A

    2015-10-01

    Hospital report cards and financial incentives linked to performance require clinical data that are reliable, appropriate, timely, and cost-effective to process. Pay-for-performance plans are transitioning to automated electronic health record (EHR) data as an efficient method to generate data needed for these programs. To determine how well data from automated processing of structured fields in the electronic health record (AP-EHR) reflect data from manual chart review and the impact of these data on performance rewards. Cross-sectional analysis of performance measures used in a cluster randomized trial assessing the impact of financial incentives on guideline-recommended care for hypertension. A total of 2840 patients with hypertension assigned to participating physicians at 12 Veterans Affairs hospital-based outpatient clinics. Fifty-two physicians and 33 primary care personnel received incentive payments. Overall, positive and negative agreement indices and Cohen's kappa were calculated for assessments of guideline-recommended antihypertensive medication use, blood pressure (BP) control, and appropriate response to uncontrolled BP. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess how similar participants' calculated earnings were between the data sources. By manual chart review data, 72.3% of patients were considered to have received guideline-recommended antihypertensive medications compared with 65.0% by AP-EHR review (κ=0.51). Manual review indicated 69.5% of patients had controlled BP compared with 66.8% by AP-EHR review (κ=0.87). Compared with 52.2% of patients per the manual review, 39.8% received an appropriate response by AP-EHR review (κ=0.28). Participants' incentive payments calculated using the 2 methods were highly correlated (r≥0.98). Using the AP-EHR data to calculate earnings, participants' payment changes ranged from a decrease of $91.00 (-30.3%) to an increase of $18.20 (+7.4%) for medication use (interquartile range, -14.4% to 0

  16. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees’ key performance indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Friedman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC through the creation of a resident dashboard. Methods: Program leadership at a large university-based program developed four new end of rotation evaluations based on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM and Accreditation Council of Graduated Medical Education's (ACGME 22 reportable milestones. A resident dashboard was then created to pull together both milestone- and non-milestone-based quantitative data and qualitative data compiled from faculty, nurses, peers, staff, and patients. Results: Dashboards were distributed to the members of the CCC in preparation for the semiannual CCC meeting. CCC members adjudicated quantitative and qualitative data to present their cohort of residents at the CCC meeting. Based on the committee's response, evaluation scores remained the same or were adjusted. Final milestone scores were then entered into the accreditation data system (ADS on the ACGME website. Conclusions: The process of resident assessment is complex and should comprise both quantitative and qualitative data. The dashboard is a valuable tool for program leadership to use both when evaluating house staff on a semiannual basis at the CCC and to the resident in person.

  17. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees' key performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Karen A; Raimo, John; Spielmann, Kelly; Chaudhry, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC) through the creation of a resident dashboard. Program leadership at a large university-based program developed four new end of rotation evaluations based on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and Accreditation Council of Graduated Medical Education's (ACGME) 22 reportable milestones. A resident dashboard was then created to pull together both milestone- and non-milestone-based quantitative data and qualitative data compiled from faculty, nurses, peers, staff, and patients. Dashboards were distributed to the members of the CCC in preparation for the semiannual CCC meeting. CCC members adjudicated quantitative and qualitative data to present their cohort of residents at the CCC meeting. Based on the committee's response, evaluation scores remained the same or were adjusted. Final milestone scores were then entered into the accreditation data system (ADS) on the ACGME website. The process of resident assessment is complex and should comprise both quantitative and qualitative data. The dashboard is a valuable tool for program leadership to use both when evaluating house staff on a semiannual basis at the CCC and to the resident in person.

  18. Evaluation of the Teacher Incentive Fund: Implementation and Impacts of Pay-for-Performance after Two Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hanley; Wellington, Alison; Hallgren, Kristin; Speroni, Cecilia; Herrmann, Mariesa; Glazerman, Steven; Constantine, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Recent efforts to attract and retain effective educators and to improve teaching practices have focused on reforming evaluation and compensation systems for teachers and principals. In 2006, Congress established the Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF), which provides grants to support performance-based compensation systems for teachers and principals in…

  19. Performance Pay Improves Engagement, Progress, and Satisfaction in Computer-Based Job Skills Training of Low-Income Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; DeFulio, Anthony; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Advancing the education of low-income adults could increase employment and income, but adult education programs have not successfully engaged low-income adults. Monetary reinforcement may be effective in promoting progress in adult education. This experiment evaluated the benefits of providing incentives for performance in a job-skills training…

  20. Pay for performance in neonatal-perinatal medicine--will the quality of health care improve in the neonatal intensive care unit? A business model for improving outcomes in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Alan R

    2010-03-01

    Because neonatal medicine is such an expensive contributor to health care in the United States--with a small population of infants accounting for very high health care costs--there has been a fair amount of attention given to this group of patients. An idea that has received increasing attention in this discussion is pay for performance. This article discusses the concept of pay for performance, examines what potential benefits and risks exist in this model, and investigates how it might achieve the desired goals if implemented in a thoughtful way. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 5 CFR 9701.313 - Homeland Security Compensation Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... 9701.313 Section 9701.313 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Overview of Pay System § 9701.313... special rate supplements. The Compensation Committee will consider factors such as turnover, recruitment...

  2. Flight performance and feather quality: paying the price of overlapping moult and breeding in a tropical highland bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angela Echeverry-Galvis

    Full Text Available A temporal separation of energetically costly life history events like reproduction and maintenance of the integumentary system is thought to be promoted by selection to avoid trade-offs and maximize fitness. It has therefore remained somewhat of a paradox that certain vertebrate species can undergo both events simultaneously. Identifying potential costs of overlapping two demanding life history stages will further our understanding of the selection pressures that shape the temporal regulation of life history events in vertebrates. We studied free-living tropical Slaty brush-finches (Atlapetes schistaceus, in which individuals spontaneously overlap reproduction and moult or undergo both events in separation. To assess possible costs of such an overlap we quantified feather quality and flight performance of individuals in different states. We determined individual's life history state by measuring gonad size and scoring moult stage, and collected a newly grown 7(th primary wing feather for later analysis of feather quality. Finally, we quantified flight performance for each individual in the wild. Overlapping individuals produced lighter and shorter wing feathers than individuals just moulting, with females decreasing feather quality more strongly during the overlap than males. Moreover, overlapping individuals had a reduced flight speed during escape flights, while their foraging flight speed was unaffected. Despite overlappers being larger and having a smaller wing area, their lower body mass resulted in a similar wing load as in breeders or moulters. Individuals measured repeatedly in different states also showed significant decreases in feather quality and escape flight speed during the overlap. Reduced escape flight speed may represent a major consequence of the overlap by increasing predation risk. Our data document costs to undergoing two life history stages simultaneously, which likely arise from energetic trade-offs. Impairments in

  3. CERN scientists take part in the Tevatron Run II performance review committee

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Tevatron Run II is under way at Fermilab, exploring the high-energy frontier with upgraded detectors that will address some of the biggest questions in particle physics.Until CERN's LHC switches on, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider is the world's only source of top quarks. It is the only place where we can search for supersymmetry, for the Higgs boson, and for signatures of additional dimensions of space-time. The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently convened a high-level international review committee to examine Fermilab experts' first-phase plans for the accelerator complex. Pictured here with a dipole magnet in CERN's LHC magnet test facility are the four CERN scientists who took part in the DOE's Tevatron review. Left to right: Francesco Ruggiero, Massimo Placidi, Flemming Pedersen, and Karlheinz Schindl. Further information: CERN Courier 43 (1)

  4. Older Adults Pay an Additional Cost When Texting and Walking: Effects of Age, Environment, and Use of Mixed Reality on Dual-Task Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovsky, Tal; Weiss, Patrice L; Kizony, Rachel

    2018-04-06

    Texting while walking (TeWW) has become common among people of all ages, and mobile phone use during gait is increasingly associated with pedestrian injury. Although dual-task walking performance is known to decline with age, data regarding the effect of age on dual-task performance in ecological settings are limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of age, environment (indoors/outdoors), and mixed reality (merging of real and virtual environments) on TeWW performance. A cross-sectional design was used. Young (N = 30; 27.8 ± 4.4 years) and older (N = 20; 68.9 ± 3.9 years) adults performed single and dual-task texting and walking indoors and outdoors, with and without a mixed reality display. Participants also completed evaluations of visual scanning and cognitive flexibility (Trail Making Test) and functional mobility (Timed Up and Go). Indoors, similar interference to walking and texting occurred for both groups, but only older adults' gait variability increased under dual task conditions. Outdoors, TeWW was associated with larger age-related differences in gait variability, texting accuracy, and gait dual-task costs. Young adults with better visual scanning and cognitive flexibility performed TeWW with lower gait costs (r = 0.52 to r = 0.65). The mixed reality display was unhelpful and did not modify walking or texting. Older adults tested in this study were relatively high-functioning. Gaze of participants was not directly monitored. Although young and older adults possess the resources necessary for TeWW, older adults pay an additional "price" when dual-tasking, especially outdoors. TeWW may have potential as an ecologically-valid assessment and/or an intervention paradigm for dual task performance among older adults as well as for clinical populations.

  5. Impact of audit and feedback and pay-for-performance interventions on pediatric hospitalist discharge communication with primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor-Sojo, Javier; Creek, Tracy; Leong, Traci

    2015-01-01

    The study team sought to improve hospitalist communication with primary care providers (PCPs) at discharge through interventions consisting of (a) audit and feedback and (b) inclusion of a discharge communication measure in the incentive compensation for pediatric hospitalists. The setting was a 16-physician pediatric hospitalist group within a tertiary pediatric hospital. Discharge summaries were selected randomly for documentation of communication with PCPs. At baseline, 57% of charts had documented communication with PCPs, increasing to 84% during the audit and feedback period. Following the addition of a financial incentive, documentation of communication with PCPs increased to 93% and was sustained during the combined intervention period. The number of physicians meeting the study's performance goal increased from 1 to 14 by the end of the study period. A financial incentive coupled with an audit and feedback tool was effective at modifying physician behavior, achieving focused, measurable quality improvement gains. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  6. Pay for performance – motivation to succeed in Advanced Trauma Life Support courses – a question of background or funding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein, Roman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To correlate students’ performance with their professional background and motivation to take part in Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS courses. We base our analysis on the self-determination theory that differentiates intrinsic (ambition to perform by individual itself from extrinsic motivation (incentive by external stimuli.Design: We present a non-blinded, monocentric, non-randomized descriptive study of 376 students taking part in an ATLS course at one course site in Germany. Part of a two-day ATLS course are two written tests; we correlate test scores with background information provided by the students in a questionnaire of 13 items (age, sex, adress, board certification, specialty, subspecialty, position, hospital level of care, hospital operator and hospital participation in trauma network, motivation, funding source, condition of funding.Setting: The students were recuited at the BG Trauma Center Ludwigshafen (Germany, a large 528-bed trauma center and one of 13 ATLS course sites in Germany.Participants: 449 ATLS course students taking part in ATLS courses at the above-mentioned course site from February 2009 to May 2010 were sent a questionnaire asking for their background. All 449 course students were eligible to participate. 376 (83.7% questionnaires were returned, pre- and post-test results of all students aquired and included into our calculations. 312 (83% were male and 64 (17% female. The majority (59.3% of recruited students came from trauma surgery, 21.8% from anesthesiology, 8% from general surgery, 4% from abdominal surgery, 0.5% from vascular or thoracic surgery each and 5.9% from other specialties.Results: Neither age, sex, subspecialty, hospital level of care, hospital operator, or hospital participation in trauma network played a role with respect to motivation or test results. The high degree of intrinsic motivation of consultants (92.3% had no impact on their test results. Anesthesiologists were higher

  7. Pay for performance - motivation to succeed in Advanced Trauma Life Support courses - a question of background or funding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Roman; Armbruster, Wolfgang; Grotz, Martin; Höner, Bernd; Münzberg, Matthias; Grützner, Paul Alfred; Wölfl, Christoph Georg

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To correlate students' performance with their professional background and motivation to take part in Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) courses. We base our analysis on the self-determination theory that differentiates intrinsic (ambition to perform by individual itself) from extrinsic motivation (incentive by external stimuli). Design: We present a non-blinded, monocentric, non-randomized descriptive study of 376 students taking part in an ATLS course at one course site in Germany. Part of a two-day ATLS course are two written tests; we correlate test scores with background information provided by the students in a questionnaire of 13 items (age, sex, adress, board certification, specialty, subspecialty, position, hospital level of care, hospital operator and hospital participation in trauma network, motivation, funding source, condition of funding). Setting: The students were recuited at the BG Trauma Center Ludwigshafen (Germany), a large 528-bed trauma center and one of 13 ATLS course sites in Germany. Participants: 449 ATLS course students taking part in ATLS courses at the above-mentioned course site from February 2009 to May 2010 were sent a questionnaire asking for their background. All 449 course students were eligible to participate. 376 (83.7%) questionnaires were returned, pre- and post-test results of all students aquired and included into our calculations. 312 (83%) were male and 64 (17%) female. The majority (59.3%) of recruited students came from trauma surgery, 21.8% from anesthesiology, 8% from general surgery, 4% from abdominal surgery, 0.5% from vascular or thoracic surgery each and 5.9% from other specialties. Results: Neither age, sex, subspecialty, hospital level of care, hospital operator, or hospital participation in trauma network played a role with respect to motivation or test results. The high degree of intrinsic motivation of consultants (92.3%) had no impact on their test results. Anesthesiologists were higher motivated

  8. Water channel reactor fuels and fuel channels: Design, performance, research and development. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) recommended holding a Technical Committee Meeting on Water Channel Reactor Fuel including into this category fuels and pressure tubes/fuel channels for Atucha-I and II, BWR, CANDU, FUGEN and RBMK reactors. The IWGFPT considered that even if the characteristics of Atucha, CANDUs, BWRs, FUGEN and RBMKs differ considerably, there are also common features. These features include materials aspects, as well as core, fuel assembly and fuel rod design, and some safety issues. There is also some similarity in fuel power history and operating conditions (Atucha-I and II, FUGEN and RBMK). Experts from 11 countries participated at the meeting and presented papers on technology, performance, safety and design, and materials aspects of fuels and pressure tubes/fuel channels for the above types of water channel reactors. Refs, figs, tabs.

  9. Water channel reactor fuels and fuel channels: Design, performance, research and development. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) recommended holding a Technical Committee Meeting on Water Channel Reactor Fuel including into this category fuels and pressure tubes/fuel channels for Atucha-I and II, BWR, CANDU, FUGEN and RBMK reactors. The IWGFPT considered that even if the characteristics of Atucha, CANDUs, BWRs, FUGEN and RBMKs differ considerably, there are also common features. These features include materials aspects, as well as core, fuel assembly and fuel rod design, and some safety issues. There is also some similarity in fuel power history and operating conditions (Atucha-I and II, FUGEN and RBMK). Experts from 11 countries participated at the meeting and presented papers on technology, performance, safety and design, and materials aspects of fuels and pressure tubes/fuel channels for the above types of water channel reactors

  10. Confronting Objections to Performance Pay: A Study of the Impact of Individual and Gain-sharing Incentives on the Job Satisfaction of British Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Pouliakas, Konstantinos; Theodossiou, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of incentive pay schemes in recent years has raised concerns about their potential detrimental effect on intrinsic job satisfaction (JS), job security and employee morale. This study explores the impact of pay incentives on the overall job satisfaction of workers in the UK and their satisfaction with various facets of jobs. Using data from eight waves (1998-2005) of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) and a uniquely-designed well-being dataset (EPICURUS), a signific...

  11. What can the past of pay-for-performance tell us about the future of Value-Based Purchasing in Medicare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Andrew M; Damberg, Cheryl L

    2013-06-01

    The Medicare program has implemented pay-for-performance (P4P), or Value-Based Purchasing, for inpatient care and for Medicare Advantage plans, and plans to implement a program for physicians in 2015. In this paper, we review evidence on the effectiveness of P4P and identify design criteria deemed to be best practice in P4P. We then assess the extent to which Medicare's existing and planned Value-Based Purchasing programs align with these best practices. Of the seven identified best practices in P4P program design, the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing program is strongly aligned with two of the best practices, moderately aligned with three, weakly aligned with one, and has unclear alignment with one best practice. The Physician Value-Based Purchasing Modifier is strongly aligned with two of the best practices, moderately aligned with one, weakly aligned with three, and has unclear alignment with one of the best practices. The Medicare Advantage Quality Bonus Program is strongly aligned with four of the best practices, moderately aligned with two, and weakly aligned with one of the best practices. We identify enduring gaps in P4P literature as it relates to Medicare's plans for Value-Based Purchasing and discuss important issues in the future of these implementations in Medicare. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 5 CFR 550.131 - Authorization of pay for holiday work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorization of pay for holiday work... REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Pay for Holiday Work § 550.131 Authorization of pay for holiday work. (a) Except as otherwise provided in this subpart, an employee who performs holiday work is...

  13. 5 CFR 410.402 - Paying premium pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paying premium pay. 410.402 Section 410... for Training Expenses § 410.402 Paying premium pay. (a) Prohibitions. Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, an agency may not use its funds, appropriated or otherwise available, to pay...

  14. Paying for Hitler's War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Book review of: Jonas Scherner & Eugene N. White (eds.), Paying for Hitler's War: The Consequenses of Nazi Hegemony for Europe (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2016)......Book review of: Jonas Scherner & Eugene N. White (eds.), Paying for Hitler's War: The Consequenses of Nazi Hegemony for Europe (NY: Cambridge University Press, 2016)...

  15. Financial Advice: Who Pays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Michael S.; Huston, Sandra J.; Winchester, Danielle D.

    2011-01-01

    Using a cost-benefit framework for financial planning services and proprietary data collected in the summer of 2008, the client characteristics that are associated with the likelihood of paying for professional financial advice, as well as the type of financial services purchased, are identified. Results indicate that respondents who pay for…

  16. The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme and spirometry: rewarding quality or just quantity? A cross-sectional study in Rotherham, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    South Gail

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate spirometry is important in the management of COPD. The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework pay-for-performance scheme for general practitioners includes spirometry related indicators within its COPD domain. It is not known whether high achievement against QOF spirometry indicators is associated with spirometry to BTS standards. Methods Data were obtained from the records of 3,217 patients randomly sampled from 5,649 patients with COPD in 38 general practices in Rotherham, UK. Severity of airflow obstruction was categorised by FEV1 (% predicted according to NICE guidelines. This was compared with clinician recorded COPD severity. The proportion of patients whose spirometry met BTS standards was calculated in each practice using a random sub-sample of 761 patients. The Spearman rank correlation between practice level QOF spirometry achievement and performance against BTS spirometry standards was calculated. Results Spirometry as assessed by clinical records was to BTS standards in 31% of cases (range at practice level 0% to 74%. The categorisation of airflow obstruction according to the most recent spirometry results did not agree well with the clinical categorisation of COPD recorded in the notes (Cohen's kappa = 0.34, 0.30 – 0.38. 12% of patients on COPD registers had FEV1 (% predicted results recorded that did not support the diagnosis of COPD. There was no association between quality, as measured by adherence to BTS spirometry standards, and either QOF COPD9 achievement (Spearman's rho = -0.11, or QOF COPD10 achievement (rho = 0.01. Conclusion The UK Quality and Outcomes Framework currently assesses the quantity, but not the quality of spirometry.

  17. An innovative pay-for-performance (P4P) strategy for improving malaria management in rural Kenya: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menya, Diana; Logedi, John; Manji, Imran; Armstrong, Janice; Neelon, Brian; O'Meara, Wendy Prudhomme

    2013-05-08

    In high-resource settings, 'pay-for-performance' (P4P) programs have generated interest as a potential mechanism to improve health service delivery and accountability. However, there has been little or no experimental evidence to guide the development or assess the effectiveness of P4P incentive programs in developing countries. In the developing world, P4P programs are likely to rely, at least initially, on external funding from donors. Under these circumstances, the sustainability of such programs is in doubt and needs assessment. We describe a cluster-randomized controlled trial underway in 18 health centers in western Kenya that is testing an innovative incentive strategy to improve management of an epidemiologically and economically important problem--diagnosis and treatment of malaria. The incentive scheme in this trial promotes adherence to Ministry of Health guidelines for laboratory confirmation of malaria before treatment, a priority area for the Ministry of Health. There are three important innovations that are unique to this study among those from other resource-constrained settings: the behavior being incentivized is quality of care rather than volume of service delivery; the incentives are applied at the facility-level rather than the individual level, thus benefiting facility infrastructure and performance overall; and the incentives are designed to be budget-neutral if effective. Linking appropriate case management for malaria to financial incentives has the potential to improve patient care and reduce wastage of expensive antimalarials. In our study facilities, on average only 25% of reported malaria cases were confirmed by laboratory diagnosis prior to the intervention, and the total treatment courses of antimalarials dispensed did not correspond to the number of cases reported. This study will demonstrate whether facility rather than individual incentives are compelling enough to improve case management, and whether these incentives lead to

  18. 公立医院“绩效工资分配”改革的实践与体会%Practices and Experiences of “Performance Pay Allocation” Reform in Public Hospitals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡坚勇; 吴俊; 朱燕; 陈玮臻; 孟祥博

    2013-01-01

    Since the late 2006, reform of the performance pay system in First People’s hospital of Hangzhou in have been explored based on “post salary system” and “pay for performance system”, which achieved the success of setting position for business, selecting people for position, setting salary for position, pay for performance, more pay for more work, flexible for position and dynamic management. As a result, the incentive mechanism of “pay for performance” plays its role effectively by bringing workers together and inspiring them, which contributes to the realization of these two benefits. Experience: ( 1) it is important for leaders change ideas and be brave to face difficulties; (2) detailing the process, implement the scheme while practicing is more important;(3) pay attention to game interests of each side, especially need to consider ole workers’ conflicts of profit; (4) it is needed to pay attention to the culture construction of hospitals.%自2006年下半年以来,我们在杭州市第一人民医院分院探索“绩效工资分配”改革,以实施“岗位工资制度”和“绩效奖金制度”改革为前提,真正做到了以事设岗,以岗择人,以岗定薪,绩效挂钩,多劳多得,能上能下,动态管理。从而有效地发挥了“绩效工资分配”的激励机制,凝聚了职工人心,极大地调动了职工的工作积极性,取得了两个效益双丰收。其经验体会:(1)领导班子转变观念和敢于碰硬是关键;(2)过程细化,实践中不断完善方案很重要;(3)注意各方利益博弈,尤对老职工的利益冲突要予以充分考虑;(4)必须重视医院文化建设。

  19. Differences in Receipt of Three Preventive Health Care Services by Race/Ethnicity in Medicare Advantage Plans: Tracking the Impact of Pay for Performance, 2010 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Mari; Smith, Maureen; Oliver, Thomas R.; DuGoff, Eva H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In 2012, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) introduced the Quality Bonus Payment Demonstration, a pay-for-performance (P4P) program, into Medicare Advantage plans. Previous studies documented racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of care among participants in these plans. The objective of this study was to determine whether P4P incentives have affected these disparities in Medicare Advantage plans. Methods We studied 411 Medicare Advantage health plans that participated in the Medicare Health Outcome Survey in 2010 and 2013. Preventive health care was defined as self-reported receipt of health care provider communication or treatment to reduce risk of falling, improve bladder control, and monitor physical activity among individuals reporting these problems. Logistic regression stratified by health care plan was used to examine racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of preventive health care before and after the introduction of the P4P program in 2012. Results We found similar racial/ethnic differences in receipt of preventive health care before and after the introduction of P4P. Blacks and Asians were less likely than whites to receive advice to improve bladder control and more likely to receive advice to reduce risk of falling and improve physical activity. Hispanics were more likely to report receiving advice about all 3 health issues than whites. After the introduction of P4P, the gap decreased between Hispanics and whites for improving bladder control and monitoring physical activity and increased between blacks and whites for monitoring physical activity. Conclusion Racial/ethnic differences in receipt of preventive health care are not always in the expected direction. CMS should consider developing a separate measure of equity in preventive health care services to encourage health plans to reduce gaps among racial/ethnic groups in receiving preventive care services. PMID:27609303

  20. Effect of pay for performance to improve quality of maternal and child care in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ashis; Gopalan, Saji S; Chandramohan, Daniel

    2016-04-14

    Pay for Performance (P4P) mechanisms to health facilities and providers are currently being tested in several low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to improve maternal and child health (MCH). This paper reviews the existing evidence on the effect of P4P program on quality of MCH care in LMICs. A systematic review of literature was conducted according to a registered protocol. MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Embase were searched using the key words maternal care, quality of care, ante natal care, emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) and child care. Of 4535 records retrieved, only eight papers met the inclusion criteria. Primary outcome of interest was quality of MCH disaggregated into structural quality, process quality and outcomes. Risk of bias across studies was assessed through a customized quality checklist. There were four controlled before after intervention studies, three cluster randomized controlled trials and one case control with post-intervention comparison of P4P programs for MCH care in Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, the Philippines, and Rwanda. There is some evidence of positive effect of P4P only on process quality of MCH. The effect of P4P on delivery, EmONC, post natal care and under-five child care were not evaluated in these studies. There is weak evidence for P4P's positive effect on maternal and neonatal health outcomes and out-of-pocket expenses. P4P program had a few negative effects on structural quality. P4P is effective to improve process quality of ante natal care. However, further research is needed to understand P4P's impact on MCH and their causal pathways in LMICs. PROSPERO registration number CRD42014013077 .

  1. Does Pay-For-Performance Program Increase Providers Adherence to Guidelines for Managing Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Taiwan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Ju; Huang, Nicole; Chen, Long-Sheng; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Li, Chung-Pin; Wu, Chen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Many people are concerned about that the quality of preventive care for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suboptimal. Taiwan, a hyperendemic area of chronic HBV and HCV infection, implemented a nationwide pay-for-performance (P4P) program in 2010, which aimed to improve the preventive care provided to HBV and HCV patients by increasing physicians' adherence to guidelines through financial incentives. The objective of this study was to evaluate the early effects of the P4P program on utilization of preventive services by HBV and HCV patients. Using a quasi-experimental design with propensity score matching method, we matched the HBV and HCV patients enrolled in the P4P program with non-enrollees in 2010, resulting in 21,643 patients in each group. Generalized estimating equations was applied to examine the difference-in-difference effects of P4P program enrollment on the utilization of three guideline-recommended preventive services (regular outpatient follow-up visits, abdominal ultrasonography (US) examinations, and aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) tests by HBV and HCV patients. The P4P program enrollees were significantly more likely to attend twice-annual follow-up visits, to receive recommended US examinations and AST/ALT tests, than non-enrollees. The results of our preliminary assessment indicate that financial incentives offered by the P4P program was associated with a modest improvement in adherence to guidelines for better chronic HBV and HBC management.

  2. 77 FR 5615 - First Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 227, Standards of Navigation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Performance--Background/History Review of SC 181 Products and Intended Applications Walk through of DO-236B... Responsibilities Any Other Business Establish Agenda for Next Meeting Date and Place of Next Meeting Adjourn... Washington, DC, on January 30, 2012. John Raper, Manager, Business Operations Branch, Federal Aviation...

  3. Advances in fuel pellet technology for improved performance at high burnup. Proceedings of a Technical Committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA has recently completed two co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs) on The Development of Computer Models for Fuel Element Behaviour in Water Reactors, and on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup. Through these CRPs it became evident that there was a need to obtain data on fuel behaviour at high burnup. Data related o thermal behaviour, fission gas release and pellet to clad mechanical interaction were obtained and presented at the Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Fuel Pellet Technology for Improved Performance at High Burnup which was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). The 34 papers from 10 countries are published in this proceedings and presented by a separate abstract. The papers were grouped in 6 sessions. First two sessions covered the fabrication of both UO 2 fuel and additives and MOX fuel. Sessions 3 and 4 covered the thermal behaviour of both types of fuel. The remaining two sessions dealt with fission gas release and the mechanical aspects of pellet to clad interaction

  4. Use of Key Performance Indicators to Improve Milestone Assessment in Semi-Annual Clinical Competency Committee Meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Arora, Harendra; Martinelli, Susan M

    2017-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System requires residency programs to semiannually submit composite milestone data on each resident's performance. This report describes and evaluates a new assessment review procedure piloted in our departmental Clinical Competency Committee (CCC) semi-annual meeting in June 2016. A modified Delphi technique was utilized to develop key performance indicators (KPI) linking milestone descriptors to clinical practice. In addition, the CCC identified six specific milestone sub-competencies that would be prescored with objective data prior to the meeting. Each resident was independently placed on the milestones by 3 different CCC faculty members. Milestone placement data of the same cohort of 42 residents (Clinical Anesthesia Years 1-3) were collected to calculate inter-rater reliability of the assessment procedures before and after the implemented changes. A survey was administrated to collect CCC feedback on the new procedure. The procedure assisted in reducing meeting time from 8 to 3.5 hours. Survey of the CCC members revealed positive perception of the procedure. Higher inter-rater reliability of the milestone placement was obtained using the implemented KPIs (Intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] single measure range: before=.53-.94, after=.74-.98). We found the new assessment procedure beneficial to the efficiency and transparency of the assessment process. Further improvement of the procedure involves refinement of KPIs and additional faculty development on KPIs to allow non-CCC faculty to provide more accurate resident evaluations.

  5. Board affiliation and pay gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglan Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of board affiliation on the corporate pay gap. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms from 2005 to 2011, we find that boards with a greater presence of directors appointed by block shareholders have lower pay gaps. Furthermore, the governance effects of board affiliation with and without pay are distinguished. The empirical results show that board affiliation without pay is negatively related to the pay gap, while board affiliation with pay is positively related to the pay gap. Overall, the results shed light on how block shareholders affect their companies’ pay gaps through board affiliation.

  6. Gender-Pay-Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Eicker, Jannis

    2017-01-01

    Der Gender-Pay-Gap ist eine statistische Kennzahl zur Messung der Ungleichheit zwischen Männern* und Frauen* beim Verdienst. Es gibt zwei Versionen: einen "unbereinigten" und einen "bereinigten". Der "unbereinigte" Gender-Pay-Gap berechnet den geschlechtsspezifischen Verdienstunterschied auf Basis der Bruttostundenlöhne aller Männer* und Frauen* der Grundgesamtheit. Beim "bereinigten" Wert hingegen werden je nach Studie verschiedene Faktoren wie Branche, Position und Berufserfahrung herausger...

  7. The Gender Pay Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Manning

    2006-01-01

    Empirical research on gender pay gaps has traditionally focused on the role of gender-specific factors, particularly gender differences in qualifications and differences in the treatment of otherwise equally qualified male and female workers (i.e., labor market discrimination). This paper explores the determinants of the gender pay gap and argues for the importance of an additional factor, wage structure, the array of prices set for labor market skills and the rewards received for employment ...

  8. ASTM Committee C28: International Standards for Properties and Performance of Advanced Ceramics-Three Decades of High-Quality, Technically-Rigorous Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties and performance of advanced ceramics and glasses are difficult to measure correctly without the proper techniques. For over three decades, ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics, has developed high-quality, technically-rigorous, full-consensus standards (e.g., test methods, practices, guides, terminology) to measure properties and performance of monolithic and composite ceramics that may be applied to glasses in some cases. These standards contain testing particulars for many mechanical, physical, thermal, properties and performance of these materials. As a result these standards are used to generate accurate, reliable, repeatable and complete data. Within Committee C28, users, producers, researchers, designers, academicians, etc. have written, continually updated, and validated through round-robin test programs, 50 standards since the Committee's founding in 1986. This paper provides a detailed retrospective of the 30 years of ASTM Committee C28 including a graphical pictogram listing of C28 standards along with examples of the tangible benefits of standards for advanced ceramics to demonstrate their practical applications.

  9. ASTM Committee C28: International Standards for Properties and Performance of Advanced Ceramics, Three Decades of High-quality, Technically-rigorous Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and mechanical properties and performance of advanced ceramics and glasses are difficult to measure correctly without the proper techniques. For over three decades, ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics, has developed high quality, rigorous, full-consensus standards (e.g., test methods, practices, guides, terminology) to measure properties and performance of monolithic and composite ceramics that may be applied to glasses in some cases. These standards testing particulars for many mechanical, physical, thermal, properties and performance of these materials. As a result these standards provide accurate, reliable, repeatable and complete data. Within Committee C28 users, producers, researchers, designers, academicians, etc. have written, continually updated, and validated through round-robin test programs, nearly 50 standards since the Committees founding in 1986. This paper provides a retrospective review of the 30 years of ASTM Committee C28 including a graphical pictogram listing of C28 standards along with examples of the tangible benefits of advanced ceramics standards to demonstrate their practical applications.

  10. Federal Pay Equity Act of 1984. Part 2. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Compensation and Employee Benefits of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session on H.R. 4599 and H.R. 5092. (May 30, July 17, October 18, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

    In these three congressional hearings on pay equity, focuses are on two bills--the Federal Pay Equity Act of 1984, which would examine wage discrimination within the Federal civil service system, and the Pay Equity Act of 1984, which would mandate the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to report regularly on activities to enforce pay equity…

  11. Performance evaluation of the European Committee Standardization Method EN1785 for the detection of irradiated processed food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Adachi, Rika; Takatsuki, Satoshi; Matsuda, Rieko; Teshima, Reiko; Nei, Daisuke; Kameya, Hiromi; Todoriki, Setsuko; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    2-dodecylcyclobutanone (DCB) and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (TCB) are specific radiolytic products in irradiated lipid-containing food and can be used to detect irradiated foods. We previously reported a performance evaluation test in a single laboratory for qualitative detection methods using DCB and TCB as markers for irradiated foods. EN1785, a European Committee Standardization Method, has been widely used for qualitative detection of DCB and TCB in irradiated foods. Here, we evaluated the applicability of EN1785 to camembert cheese, liquid whole egg, sausage and eel grilled without seasoning by using our evaluation test. In this test, extracted lipids from the food were used as negative samples. The lipids spiked with DCB and TCB were used as positive samples. For each food type, 4 negative and 16 positive samples were analyzed by EN1785. All of the negative samples were judged negative and all of the positive samples were judged positive. Thus, EN1785 should be able to detect irradiation in the tested food. Additionally, to confirm the ability of the validated method to detect irradiated food, the same type of food examined above, both unirradiated and irradiated at doses of 0.5-4 kGy, were analyzed by the method. All of the unirradiated samples were judged negative and all of the irradiated samples were judged positive. (author)

  12. Report of working committee 10 ''gas and developing / transitional economy countries''; Rapport du comite de travail 10 ''pays gaziers en voie de developpement et en transition economique''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hached, A.

    2000-07-01

    This report deals with the works undertaken by working committee 10 during the 1997 - 2000 Triennium. The objective set by the IGU consisted in studying the generic thema in gas markets development for the less developed countries, in the developing countries with intermediate revenue as well as in the transitional economy countries. The first study group devoted his works to the problematic analysis of natural gas in the less developed countries, those where the GNP per capita is very low and the internal markets of which are little or non dynamic. This analysis has been developed in a certain number of countries rather representative of their respective region: Angola, Cameroon and Cote d'Ivoire for sub-Saharian Africa, Bangladesh and Vietnam for Asia. The second study group analysed the changes in transitional economy countries (Baltic, countries in Central Europe and Ukraine) and their different consequences on gas industry. These countries apply gas industry reforms which are not implemented at the same rate more especially as they belong to a huge and very contrasted geographic region. The third study group devoted his works to the analysis of intensified conditions in the use of natural gas in the developing countries with intermediate revenue. He also examined the feasibility of an economic development in gas distribution networks in large cities. Two important issues focused his attention: financing and technology transfer. (author)

  13. Do discriminatory pay regimes unleash antisocial behavior?

    OpenAIRE

    Grosch, Kerstin; Rau, Holger A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze how pay-regime procedures affect antisocial behavior at the workplace. In a real-effort experiment we vary two determinants of pay regimes: discrimination and justification of payments by performance. In our Discrimination treatment half of the workforce is randomly selected and promoted and participate in a tournament (high-income workers) whereas the other half receives no payment (lowincome workers). Afterwards, antisocial behavior is measured by a Joy-of-Destruct...

  14. Using pay for performance incentives (P4P) to improve management of suspected malaria fevers in rural Kenya: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menya, Diana; Platt, Alyssa; Manji, Imran; Sang, Edna; Wafula, Rebeccah; Ren, Jing; Cheruiyot, Olympia; Armstrong, Janice; Neelon, Brian; O'Meara, Wendy Prudhomme

    2015-10-16

    Inappropriate treatment of non-malaria fevers with artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) is a growing concern, particularly in light of emerging artemisinin resistance, but it is a behavior that has proven difficult to change. Pay for performance (P4P) programs have generated interest as a mechanism to improve health service delivery and accountability in resource-constrained health systems. However, there has been little experimental evidence to establish the effectiveness of P4P in developing countries. We tested a P4P strategy that emphasized parasitological diagnosis and appropriate treatment of suspected malaria, in particular reduction of unnecessary consumption of ACTs. A random sample of 18 health centers was selected and received a refresher workshop on malaria case management. Pre-intervention baseline data was collected from August to September 2012. Facilities were subsequently randomized to either the comparison (n = 9) or intervention arm (n = 9). Between October 2012 and November 2013, facilities in the intervention arm received quarterly incentive payments based on seven performance indicators. Incentives were for use by facilities rather than as payments to individual providers. All non-pregnant patients older than 1 year of age who presented to a participating facility and received either a malaria test or artemether-lumefantrine (AL) were eligible to be included in the analysis. Our primary outcome was prescription of AL to patients with a negative malaria diagnostic test (n = 11,953). Our secondary outcomes were prescription of AL to patients with laboratory-confirmed malaria (n = 2,993) and prescription of AL to patients without a malaria diagnostic test (analyzed at the cluster level, n = 178 facility-months). In the final quarter of the intervention period, the proportion of malaria-negative patients in the intervention arm who received AL was lower than in the comparison arm (7.3% versus 10.9%). The improvement

  15. 75 FR 36698 - Committee Management Renewals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    .... Committees Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering, 1173 Advisory Committee for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, 1115 Advisory Committee for GPRA Performance Assessment..., and Transport Systems, 1189 Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry, 1191 Proposal Review Panel for Civil...

  16. 5 CFR 9701.323 - Eligibility for pay increase associated with a rate range adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... individual pay increase. An employee who meets or exceeds performance expectations (i.e., has a rating of... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligibility for pay increase associated...) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Setting and...

  17. 5 CFR 610.407 - Premium pay for holiday work for employees on compressed work schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... schedule who performs work on a holiday is entitled to basic pay, plus premium pay at a rate equal to basic pay, for the work that is not in excess of the employee's compressed work schedule for that day. For... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Premium pay for holiday work for...

  18. Pay Equity Act, 17 May 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This document contains major provisions of the 1988 Pay Equity Act of Prince Edward Island, Canada. (Nova Scotia enacted similar legislation in 1988.) This act defines "female-dominated class" or "male-dominated class" as a class with 60% or more female or male incumbents, respectively. The objective of this act is to achieve pay equity among public sector employers and employees by identifying systemic gender discrimination through a comparison of the relative wages and value of the work performed by female- and male-dominated classes. The value of work is to be determined by considering the skill, effort, and responsibility required by the work as well as the conditions under which it is performed. A difference in wages between a female- and male-dominated class performing work of equal or comparable value can be justified by a formal performance appraisal system or formal seniority system that does not discriminate on the basis of gender or by a skills shortage which requires a temporary inflation in wages to attract workers for a certain position. No wages shall be reduced to implement pay equity. Implementation of pay equity will include the work of bargaining agents to achieve agreement on salient points. Pay equity may be implemented in four stages over a period of 24 months.

  19. Pays en transition

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les périodes de transformation risquent de provoquer le chaos, mais elles sont également porteuses de rapides progrès sur le plan social et économique. Le CRDI est intervenu dans quelque 25 pays ayant amorcé une transition de la guerre à la paix, de la dictature à la démocratie ou d'une économie fermée à une.

  20. LES PAYS EN TRANSITION

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cathy Egan

    En 2002, une certaine paix sociale avait été rétablie, bien qu'elle fut instable et souvent entachée de violence. Le pays amorçait le ... mieux comprendre comment il recueille et diffuse l'information destinée ... transition) et les technologies de l'information et de la communication (TIC). Les étapes suivantes ont consisté à ...

  1. Retroactive Stop Loss Special Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pay (RSLSP), providing $500 for each month/partial month served in stop loss status. Service members served under stop loss must submit a claim for the special pay. Throughout the year, the services have or extension of service, became ineligible to receive retroactive stop loss special pay. There may be

  2. 76 FR 74842 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... Minimum Aviation System Performance Standards (MASPS) for Advanced VHF Digital Data Communications... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee... RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public...

  3. 77 FR 16894 - Financial Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... reported and collected; --Performing applied research and essential long-term research; --Developing tools... economics, financial institutions and markets, statistical analysis, financial markets analysis... is essential to the effective operation of the Committee. Application for Advisory Committee...

  4. When Punishment Pays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Explaining cooperation in groups remains a key problem because reciprocity breaks down between more than two. Punishing individuals who contribute little provides a potential answer but changes the dilemma to why pay the costs of punishing which, like cooperation itself, provides a public good. Nevertheless, people are observed to punish others in behavioural economic games, posing a problem for existing theory which highlights the difficulty in explaining the spread and persistence of punishment. Here, I consider the apparent mismatch between theory and evidence and show by means of instructive analysis and simulation how much of the experimental evidence for punishment comes from scenarios in which punishers may expect to obtain a net benefit from punishing free-riders. In repeated games within groups, punishment works by imposing costs on defectors so that it pays them to switch to cooperating. Both punishers and non-punishers then benefit from the resulting increase in cooperation, hence investing in punishment can constitute a social dilemma. However, I show the conditions in which the benefits of increased cooperation are so great that they more than offset the costs of punishing, thereby removing the temptation to free-ride on others' investments and making punishment explicable in terms of direct self-interest. Crucially, this is because of the leveraging effect imposed in typical studies whereby people can pay a small cost to inflict a heavy loss on a punished individual. In contrast to previous models suggesting punishment is disadvantaged when rare, I show it can invade until it comes into a producer-scrounger equilibrium with non-punishers. I conclude that adding punishment to an iterated public goods game can solve the problem of achieving cooperation by removing the social dilemma. PMID:23483907

  5. Lack of Association between Blood Pressure Management by Anesthesia Residents and Competence Committee Evaluations or In-training Exam Performance: A Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Makarova, Natalya; Riveros-Perez, Ricardo; Brown, David L; Kimatian, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Prompt treatment of severe blood pressure instability requires both cognitive and technical skill. The ability to anticipate and respond to episodes of hemodynamic instability should improve with training. The authors tested the hypothesis that the duration of severe hypotension during anesthesia administered by residents correlates with concurrent adjusted overall performance evaluations by the Clinical Competence Committee and subsequent in-training exam scores. The authors obtained data on 70 first- and second-year anesthesia residents at the Cleveland Clinic. Analysis was restricted to adults having noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia. Outcome variables were in-training exam scores and subjective evaluations of resident performance ranked in quintiles. The primary predictor was cumulative systolic arterial pressure less than 70 mmHg. Secondary predictors were administration of vasopressors, frequency of hypotension, average duration of hypotensive episodes, and blood pressure variability. The primary statistical approach was mixed-effects modeling, adjusted for potential confounders. The authors considered 15,216 anesthesia care episodes. A total of 1,807 hypotensive episodes were observed, lasting an average of 32 ± 20 min (SD) per 100 h of anesthesia, with 68% being followed by vasopressor administration. The duration of severe hypotension (systolic pressure less than 70 mmHg) was associated with neither Competence Committee evaluations nor in-training exam scores. There was also no association between secondary blood pressure predictors and either Competence Committee evaluations or in-training exam results. There was no association between any of the five blood pressure management characteristics and either in-training exam scores or clinical competence evaluations. However, it remains possible that the measures of physiologic control, as assessed from electronic anesthesia records, evaluate useful but different aspects of anesthesiologist

  6. 78 FR 58596 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8481] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee... --External relations --Report on the status of the Convention and membership of the Organization --Report on... performs functions --Supplementary agenda items, if any The agenda items for A 28, to be considered include...

  7. 28 CFR 345.51 - Inmate pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmate pay. 345.51 Section 345.51... (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.51 Inmate pay. (a) Grade levels. Inmate workers in FPI locations receive pay at five levels ranging from 5th grade pay (lowest) to 1st grade pay...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1242 - Back pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Back pay. 404.1242 Section 404.1242 Employees... Prior to 1987 § 404.1242 Back pay. (a) Back pay defined. Back pay is pay received in one period of time... an employer. It includes pay made under Federal or State laws intended to create an employment...

  9. Java Card for PayTv Application

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Pallab

    2013-01-01

    Smart cards are widely used along with PayTV receivers to store secret user keys and to perform security functions to prevent any unauthorized viewing of PayTV channels. Java Card technology enables programs written in the Java programming language to run on smart cards. Smart cards represent one of the smallest computing platforms in use today. The memory configuration of a smart card are of the order of 4K of RAM, 72K of EEPROM, and 24K of ROM. Using Java card provides advantages to the ind...

  10. Paying for quality not quantity: a wisconsin health maintenance organization proposes an incentive model for reimbursement of chiropractic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursel, Kevin J; Jacobson, Martin; Stephenson, Kathy

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a reimbursement model that was developed by one Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) to transition from fee-for-service to add a combination of pay for performance and reporting model of reimbursement for chiropractic care. The previous incentive program used by the HMO provided best-practice education and additional reimbursement incentives for achieving the National Committee for Quality Assurance Back Pain Recognition Program (NCQA-BPRP) recognition status. However, this model had not leveled costs between doctors of chiropractic (DCs). Therefore, the HMO management aimed to develop a reimbursement model to incentivize providers to embrace existing best-practice models and report existing quality metrics. The development goals included the following: it should (1) be as financially predictable as the previous system, (2) cost no more on a per-member basis, (3) meet the coverage needs of its members, and (4) be able to be operationalized. The model should also reward DCs who embraced best practices with compensation, not simply tied to providing more procedures, the new program needed to (1) cause little or no disruption in current billing, (2) be grounded achievable and defined expectations for improvement in quality, and (3) be voluntary, without being unduly punitive, should the DC choose not to participate in the program. The generated model was named the Comprehensive Chiropractic Quality Reimbursement Methodology (CCQRM; pronounced "Quorum"). In this hybrid model, additional reimbursement, beyond pay-for-procedures will be based on unique payment interpretations reporting selected, existing Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) codes, meaningful use of electronic health records, and achieving NCQA-BPRP recognition. This model aims to compensate providers using pay-for-performance, pay-for-quality reporting, pay-for-procedure methods. The CCQRM reimbursement model was developed to address the current needs of one

  11. Shortchanged: The Hidden Costs of Lockstep Teacher Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNTP, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Nobody goes into teaching to get rich, but that's no excuse not to pay teachers as professionals. Compensation is one of the most important factors in determining who enters the teaching profession and how long they stay--yet 90 percent of all U.S. school districts pay teachers without any regard for their actual performance with students,…

  12. Be vigilant, this government is coming after your pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Mike

    2016-02-10

    When chancellor George Osborne accepted what might have been a couple of luncheon vouchers from Google in payment of ten years' unpaid UK tax, the Department of Health submitted its evidence to the Pay Review Body in favour of extending 'plain time working' and introducing performance-related incremental pay progression.

  13. Employee Reactions to Merit Pay: Cognitive Approach and Social Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingchun

    2010-01-01

    The dissertation aims to tackle one of the most pressing questions facing the merit pay system researchers and practitioners: Why do merit pay raises have such a small effect on employees' satisfaction, commitment and job performance? My approach to the study of this question is to develop explanatory frameworks from two perspectives: cognitive…

  14. Gender Pay Gap in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Oczki, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the article is to investigate the actual and explained gender pay gaps in Poland in comparison with selected highly developed countries, and to discuss the factors determining wage disparities between men and women. Data from Eurostat EU-SILC and the International Labour Organization were used. The article concludes that the gender pay gap in Poland is relatively small and decreasing, and that estimates of the explained gender pay gap published by the Internationa...

  15. Green buildings pay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naboni, Emanuele; Edwards, Brian

    The new edition of ‘Green Buildings Pay’ authored by Brian Edwards and Emanuele Naboni explores the business and professional benefits which derive from architectural design driven by sustainability. With a new sub-title ‘Green Buildings Pay: design, productivity and ecology’ the book argues...... that environmental design has altered how we design, construct and manage buildings. The book has relevance to those who not only design and engineer buildings but to those who commission architecture and those who occupy the products of this process. Hence, the user is a key consideration. The book examines via...... a number of LEED and BREEAM cases the buildings which flow from corporate environmental responsibility. A number of office and university buildings are examined from three main perspectives- the architect, client and user. One key finding is that architectural innovation has been driven by ecological...

  16. Pay as you throw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlen, Lisa; Lagerkvist, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Householders' response to weight-based billing for the collection of household waste was investigated with the aim of providing decision support for waste management policies. Three questions were addressed: How much and what kind of information on weight-based billing is discernible in generic Swedish waste collection statistics? Why do local authorities implement weight-based billing, and how do they perceive the results? and, Which strengths and weaknesses of weight-based billing have been observed on the local level? The study showed that municipalities with pay-by-weight schemes collected 20% less household waste per capita than other municipalities. Surprisingly, no part of this difference could be explained by higher recycling rates. Nevertheless, the majority of waste management professionals were convinced that recycling had increased as a result of the billing system. A number of contradicting strengths and weaknesses of weight-based billing were revealed.

  17. Paying for Payments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Søren

    depends only on the relative costs of producing cash and card payments and can be used by regulators to assess privately set interchange fees. When calibrated to cost data, the model implies an optimal fee that is low and may even be negative. The findings are consistent with empirical evidence of high......Do consumers and merchants use the most efficient payment instruments? I examine how interchange fees, which are fees paid from merchants' banks to consumers' banks when card transactions take place, influence the choice between cash and payment cards. I show that when consumers do not pay...... transaction fees to banks - a common feature in bank contracts - card use is declining in interchange fees, and surcharging does not neutralize interchange fees. According to my model, banks set interchange fees at too high a level, resulting in too few card payments. I derive an optimal interchange fee which...

  18. Federal Pay Equity Act of 1984. Part 1. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Compensation and Employee Benefits of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session on H.R. 4599...and H.R. 5092. (April 3-4, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

    This document contains two congressional hearings on H.R. 4599, the Federal Pay Equity Act of 1984, and H.R. 5092, the Pay Equity Act of 1984. These bills would mandate the Office of Personnel Management to study wage discrepancies in the Federal classification structure and to devise a more equitable job evaluation program and would require…

  19. 5 CFR 9901.212 - Pay schedules and pay bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 9901.212 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND LABOR RELATIONS SYSTEMS (DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NATIONAL... Secretary may establish one or more pay schedules within each career group. (b) Each pay schedule may...

  20. Implementation and Impacts of Pay-for-Performance: The 2010 Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) Grantees after Three Years. NCEE Study Snapshot. NCEE 2016-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Alison; Chiang, Hanley; Hallgren, Kristin; Speroni, Cecilia; Herrmann, Mariesa; Burkander, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) provides grants to support performance-based compensation systems for teachers and principals in high-need schools. The goal of the grants is to increase the number of high-performing teachers in high-need schools by rewarding educators for improving students' achievement. The report on which this snapshot is based…

  1. Organizing Committee Advisory Committee 187

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organizing Committee. V M Datar (Chairman). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. D C Biswas (Convener). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. K Mahata (Secretary). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Z Ahmed. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. P V Bhagwat.

  2. Psychology of Pay and Compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thierry, Hk.; Smelser, N.J.; Baltes, P.B.

    2002-01-01

    In most industrialized countries the compensation, of managers and employees is structured along quite comparable patterns. One part consists of base pay, a second part of results-oriented pay, and a third part of secondary labor conditions. In many instances part four is composed of perquisites:

  3. Teacher Pay and Teacher Aptitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Can changes in teacher pay encourage more able individuals to enter the teaching profession? So far, studies of the impact of pay on the aptitude distribution of teachers have provided mixed evidence on the extent to which altering teacher salaries represents a feasible solution to the teacher quality problem. One possible reason is that these…

  4. Performance of cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera imaging in coronary artery disease: a review from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, Denis; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Ben-Haim, Simona; Rouzet, Francois; Songy, Bernard; Giordano, Alessandro; Gimelli, Alessia; Hyafil, Fabien; Sciagra, Roberto; Bucerius, Jan; Verberne, Hein J.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A.; Lindner, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The trade-off between resolution and count sensitivity dominates the performance of standard gamma cameras and dictates the need for relatively high doses of radioactivity of the used radiopharmaceuticals in order to limit image acquisition duration. The introduction of cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)-based cameras may overcome some of the limitations against conventional gamma cameras. CZT cameras used for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion have been shown to have a higher count sensitivity compared to conventional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques. CZT image quality is further improved by the development of a dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction algorithm, based on maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), which corrects for the loss in spatial resolution due to line response function of the collimator. All these innovations significantly reduce imaging time and result in a lower patient's radiation exposure compared with standard SPECT. To guide current and possible future users of the CZT technique for myocardial perfusion imaging, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, has decided to examine the current literature regarding procedures and clinical data on CZT cameras. The committee hereby aims (1) to identify the main acquisitions protocols; (2) to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of CZT derived myocardial perfusion, and finally (3) to determine the impact of CZT on radiation exposure. (orig.)

  5. Performance of cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera imaging in coronary artery disease: a review from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Denis [CHU Caen and Normandy University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Normandy University, Caen (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, CHU Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); Ben-Haim, Simona [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ramat Gan (Israel); Rouzet, Francois [University Hospital of Paris-Bichat, UMR 1148, Inserm et Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); UMR 1148, Inserm and Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University Paris, Paris (France); Songy, Bernard [Centre Cardiologique du Nord, Saint-Denis (France); Giordano, Alessandro [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Largo A. Gemelli, Department of Bioimages and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Gimelli, Alessia [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Hyafil, Fabien [Bichat University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, UMR 1148, Inserm and Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Florence (Italy); Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Verberne, Hein J. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Biomedical Photonic Imaging, Enschede (Netherlands); Lindner, Oliver [Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Collaboration: Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    2016-12-15

    The trade-off between resolution and count sensitivity dominates the performance of standard gamma cameras and dictates the need for relatively high doses of radioactivity of the used radiopharmaceuticals in order to limit image acquisition duration. The introduction of cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)-based cameras may overcome some of the limitations against conventional gamma cameras. CZT cameras used for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion have been shown to have a higher count sensitivity compared to conventional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques. CZT image quality is further improved by the development of a dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction algorithm, based on maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), which corrects for the loss in spatial resolution due to line response function of the collimator. All these innovations significantly reduce imaging time and result in a lower patient's radiation exposure compared with standard SPECT. To guide current and possible future users of the CZT technique for myocardial perfusion imaging, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, has decided to examine the current literature regarding procedures and clinical data on CZT cameras. The committee hereby aims (1) to identify the main acquisitions protocols; (2) to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of CZT derived myocardial perfusion, and finally (3) to determine the impact of CZT on radiation exposure. (orig.)

  6. 76 FR 52537 - Pay for Sunday Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... back pay claims permitted by the Barring Act of 1940, and noted that agencies could use the memorandum... of the Barring Act or the Back Pay Act of 1966 (as amended) and apply specifically to one Government...) An employee is entitled to pay at his or her rate of basic pay plus premium pay at a rate equal to 25...

  7. 28 CFR 345.52 - Premium pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Premium pay. 345.52 Section 345.52... (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.52 Premium pay. Payment of premium pay to... inmates at a location. (a) Eligibility. Inmates in first grade pay status may be considered for premium...

  8. 4 CFR 5.1 - Pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay. 5.1 Section 5.1 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM COMPENSATION § 5.1 Pay. (a) Pay principles. Pay of the employees of GAO shall be fixed by the Comptroller General consistent with the principles that— (1) There be equal pay for work of...

  9. 5 CFR 534.502 - Pay range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay range. 534.502 Section 534.502 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.502 Pay range. A pay rate fixed under this...

  10. 5 CFR 532.503 - Overtime pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overtime pay. 532.503 Section 532.503... Pay and Differentials § 532.503 Overtime pay. (a)(1) Employees who are exempt from the overtime pay provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as amended, shall be paid overtime pay in accordance with...

  11. Take the Money and Run: The Challenges of Designing and Evaluating Financial Incentives in Healthcare; Comment on “Paying for Performance in Healthcare Organisations”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Mannion

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are turning their attention to the use of explicit financial incentives to drive desired improvements in healthcare performance. However, we have only a weak evidence-base to inform policy in this area. The research challenge is to generate robust evidence on what financial incentives work, under what circumstances, for whom and with what intended and unintended consequences.

  12. Family Friendly Policies and Performance-Based Pay in Companies' Employment Management in Japan : Its Effect on Work Life Balance Satisfaction and Willingness to Job continuity

    OpenAIRE

    菅原, 佑香

    2012-01-01

    The Purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of firm's family friendly policies and also the recent introduction of as performance based wage system on employee's motivation. The motivation was measured in terms of work life balance satisfaction and willingness to continuity to work at the same workplace. To analyze these effects, I used probit model and ordinary least squares (OLS), and two step least squares. The main findings is as follows (1) Introduction of various family friend...

  13. Using Outperformance Pay to Motivate Academics: Insiders' Accounts of Promises and Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers have investigated the appropriateness of pay for outperformance, (also called "merit-based pay" and "performance-based pay") for academics, but a review of this body of work shows that the voice of academics themselves is largely absent. This article is a contribution to addressing this gap, summarising the…

  14. 76 FR 80268 - Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific or Professional Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... 3206-AL88 Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific or Professional Positions AGENCY: U.S. Office of... to amend rules for setting and adjusting pay of senior-level (SL) and scientific or professional (ST) employees. The Senior Professional Performance Act of 2008 changes pay for these employees by providing for...

  15. Hybrid All-Pay and Winner-Pay Contests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerlöf, Johan

    2017-01-01

    In many contests in economic and political life, both all-pay and winner-pay expenditures matter for winning. This paper studies such hybrid contests under symmetry and asymmetry. The symmetric model is very general but still yields a simple closed-form solution. More contestants tend to lead to ...... expenditures. An endogenous bias that maximizes total expenditures disfavors the high-valuation contestant but still makes her the more likely one to win....

  16. 5 CFR 550.604 - Biweekly pay periods and computation of pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biweekly pay periods and computation of pay. 550.604 Section 550.604 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Computation of Pay for Biweekly Pay Periods § 550.604 Biweekly pay...

  17. 5 CFR 534.305 - Pay periods and computation of pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay periods and computation of pay. 534... PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Basic Pay for Employees of Temporary Organizations § 534.305 Pay periods and computation of pay. (a) The requirements of 5 U.S.C. 5504, must be applied to employees of temporary...

  18. Equal Pay for Equal Work: Medicare Procedure Volume and Reimbursement for Male and Female Surgeons Performing Total Knee and Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Emma B; Brady, Christina; Pipkin, William C; Somerson, Jeremy S

    2018-02-21

    The observed sex gap in physician salary has been the topic of much recent debate in the United States, but it has not been well-described among orthopaedic surgeons. The objective of this study was to evaluate for sex differences in Medicare claim volume and reimbursement among orthopaedic surgeons. The Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Public Use File was used to compare claim volume and reimbursement between female and male orthopaedic surgeons in 2013. Data were extracted for each billing code per orthopaedic surgeon in the year 2013 for total claims, surgical claims, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) claims, and total hip arthroplasty (THA) claims. A total of 20,546 orthopaedic surgeons who treated traditional Medicare patients were included in the initial analysis. Claim volume and reimbursement received were approximately twofold higher for all claims and more than threefold higher for surgical claims for male surgeons when compared with female surgeons (p 10 TKAs and THAs, respectively, in 2013 for Medicare patients and were included in the subset analyses. Although male surgeons performed a higher mean number of TKAs than female surgeons (mean and standard deviation, 37 ± 33 compared with 26 ± 17, respectively, p men and women for TKA or THA ($1,135 ± $228 compared with $1,137 ± $184 for TKA, respectively, p = 0.380; $1,049 ± $226 compared with $1,043 ± $266 for THA, respectively, p = 0.310). Female surgeons had a lower number of total claims and reimbursements compared with male surgeons. However, among surgeons who performed >10 THAs and TKAs, there were no sex differences in the mean reimbursement payment per surgeon. The number of women in orthopaedics is rising, and there is much interest in how their productivity and compensation compare with their male counterparts.

  19. Pago por desempeño explicado desde la teoría de costos de transacción Pay for performance explained by transaction costs theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Gorbaneff

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la capacidad de la teoría de costos de transacción para explicar los incentivos en la cadena de salud. Métodos: Estudio de un caso de CPS, una aseguradora de salud en Bogotá (Colombia, que prefiere no publicar su nombre. Resultados: CPS se mueve en el ambiente de altos costos de transacción y utiliza la forma híbrida de gobernación en el nivel ambulatorio. La intensidad de incentivos, el control administrativo y el contrato están de acuerdo con la teoría. En el nivel hospitalario, a pesar de la alta incertidumbre, se utiliza el mercado. Los incentivos discretos tipo (1,0 y la ausencia de control administrativo dificultan a CPS relacionar el pago con el desempeño hospitalario. Conclusiones: La teoría de costos de transacción explica satisfactoriamente la configuración de los incentivos. Otro aporte a la literatura lo constituye el criterio para diferenciar entre mercado e híbrido. Se propone que para el mercado son característicos incentivos discretos tipo (1,0, mientras que para híbrido son los incentivos continuos tipo comisión.Objective: To evaluate the ability of transaction costs theory to explain incentives in the health care chain. Methods: We performed a case study of CPS, a health insurance company in Bogota (Colombia, which preferred not to publish its name. Results: CPS moves in the environment of high transaction costs and uses the hybrid form of governance at the outpatient level. Incentive intensity, administrative control and the contract all agree with the theory. At the hospital level, the market is used, despite greater uncertainty. Because of the discrete form (1.0 of the incentives and the absence of administrative control, it is difficult for CPS to relate payment to hospital performance. Conclusions: Transaction costs theory explains the configuration of incentives. Another contribution made by this theory to the literature is the criterion to differentiate between the market and the hybrid

  20. Unions and the Sword of Justice: Unions and Pay Systems, Pay Inequality, Pay Discrimination and Low Pay

    OpenAIRE

    A Charlwood; K Hansen; David Metcalf

    2000-01-01

    Dispersion in pay is lower among union members than among non-unionists. This reflects two factors. First, union members and jobs are more homogeneous than their non-union counterparts. Second, union wage policies within and across firms lower pay dispersion. Unions'' minimum wage targets also truncate the lower tail of the union distribution. There are two major consequences of these egalitarian union wage policies. First, the return to human capital is lower in firms which recognise unions ...

  1. An Analysis of Merit Pay Reforms in Educational Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Brulle

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available With roots in behaviorist philosophy, performance pay for teachers is often linked to accountability regimes in school reform. The theory girding such programs suggests that pay as an economic incentive can help cause teachers to increase student outcomes as measured by standardized test scores. What is little noticed by many educationists, but particularly by policy makers, is how programmatic effects affect the ontology of educational environment. There are several ways to approach the viability of such programs. In this study of three pay-for-performance programs, two in the U.S. and one in the UK, we provide theoretic insights in light of three variables: (i their psychological framework, (ii teacher efficacy and the teacher-student relationship, and (iii how the psychological impact of such programs coincides with larger institutional forces. Using theory to examine pay-for-performance is necessary in order to get beneath mere data and secure more thorough understandings of the phenomenological impacts of performance pay. And better understanding of these foundational features is necessary, even critical, in order to fully appreciate the economic and informational trade-offs in implementation. Our study suggests that as a small-scale reform measure and when it specifically accounts for complexities of educational production, performance pay may be a viable reform option.

  2. Developing “best practices” for bankers’ pay in line with Basel III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyi Yu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes hybrid capital securities as a significant part of senior bank executive incentive compensation in light of Basel III, a new global regulatory standard on bank capital adequacy and liquidity agreed by the members of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision. The committee developed Basel III in a response to the deficiencies in financial regulation brought about by the global financial crisis. Basel III strengthens bank capital requirements and introduces new regulatory requirements on bank liquidity and bank leverage. The hybrid bank capital securities we propose for bank executives’ compensation are preferred shares and subordinated debt that the June 2004 Basel II regulatory framework recognised as other admissible forms of capital. The past two decades have witnessed dramatic increase in performance-related pay in the banking industry. Stakeholders such as shareholders, debtholders and regulators criticise traditional cash and equity-based compensation for encouraging bank executives’ excessive risk taking and short-termism, which has resulted in the failure of risk management in high profile banks during the global financial crisis. Paying compensation in the form of hybrid bank capital securities may align the interests of executives with those of stakeholders and help banks regain their reputation for prudence after years of aggressive risk-taking. Additionally, banks are desperately seeking to raise capital in order to bolster balance sheets damaged by the ongoing credit crisis. Tapping their own senior employees with large incentive compensation packages may be a viable additional source of capital that is politically acceptable in times of large-scale bailouts of the financial sector and economically wise as it aligns the interests of the executives with the need for a stable financial system.

  3. The Use of Performance Based Funding in a Sport Organization: A Case Study of the United States Olympic Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    description and analysis of a single instance, phenomenon, or social unit (Merriam, 1998). Management by Objective (MBO). A control system designed to...theoretical principles of performance based funding instead of testing a hypothesis, my epistemology will be constructivist. Constructionism Maynard...operate. This constitutes a vital epistemological position that constructionism takes in relation to the interaction between the investigator and

  4. 5 CFR 359.705 - Pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pay. 359.705 Section 359.705... EXECUTIVE SERVICE; GUARANTEED PLACEMENT IN OTHER PERSONNEL SYSTEMS Guaranteed Placement § 359.705 Pay. (a...) is entitled to receive basic pay at the highest of— (1) The rate of basic pay in effect for the...

  5. 28 CFR 345.55 - Longevity pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Longevity pay. 345.55 Section 345.55... (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.55 Longevity pay. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, an inmate earns longevity pay raises after 18 months spent in FPI work status...

  6. 28 CFR 345.57 - Administrative pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative pay. 345.57 Section 345.57... (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.57 Administrative pay. An inmate excused from a job assignment may receive administrative pay for such circumstances as a general recall for an...

  7. 28 CFR 345.60 - Training pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training pay. 345.60 Section 345.60... (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.60 Training pay. Inmates directed by the SOI to take a particular type of training in connection with a FPI job are to receive FPI pay if the...

  8. 28 CFR 345.58 - Holiday pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Holiday pay. 345.58 Section 345.58... (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.58 Holiday pay. An inmate worker in FPI work status shall receive pay at the standard hourly rate, plus longevity where applicable, for all Federal...

  9. 5 CFR 551.501 - Overtime pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overtime pay. 551.501 Section 551.501 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Overtime Pay Provisions Basic Provisions § 551.501 Overtime pay. (a) An agency...

  10. 20 CFR 218.27 - Vacation pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacation pay. 218.27 Section 218.27 Employees... Beginning Date § 218.27 Vacation pay. (a) From railroad employer. Vacation pay may be credited to the... vacation pay is credited to the vacation period, the annuity can begin no earlier than the day after the...

  11. 5 CFR 9901.356 - Pay retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... position in a lower pay band offered by an activity to accommodate a disabling medical condition similar to... within the employee's new pay band or by establishing a retained rate that exceeds the maximum rate of the new pay band. Local market supplements are not considered part of base salary in applying pay...

  12. Does Knowledge Sharing Pay?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Pedersen, Torben; Venzin, Markus

    are developed using a simultaneous equation model applied to a unique dataset encompassing a German MNC, HeidelbergCement. Enablers and impediments of knowledge outflows are assessed in order to explain why subsidiaries share their knowledge with other MNC units. Implications are examined by studying the link......This empirical paper explores knowledge outflow from MNC subsidiaries and its impact on the MNC performance. We develop and test hypotheses derived from literature on MNC knowledge flows integrated with the perspective of knowledge-creating, self-interested MNC subsidiaries. The hypotheses...... between knowledge outflows and subsidiary performance. Our findings suggest that knowledge outflows increase a subsidiary's performance only up to a certain point and that too much knowledge sharing may be detrimental to the contributing subsidiary's performance....

  13. Merit pay as a motivator in the federal sector.

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, James D.

    1982-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 required the implementation of the Merit Pay System for a portion of the Federal civilian workforce as a means of increasing productivity through the use of monetary incentives. To test the validity of this concept, several theories of worker motivation are reviewed and their relation to money motivation and pay-for-performance is established. These relationships are compared to the results of dat...

  14. Racial Earnings Differentials and Performance Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, John S.; O'Halloran, Patrick L.

    2005-01-01

    A comparative analysis between output-based payment and time rates payment is presented. It is observed that racial or gender earnings discrimination is more likely in time rates payment and supervisory evaluations.

  15. Paying for Performance in Healthcare Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth McDonald

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aligning Financial Incentives (FIs to health policy goals is becoming increasingly popular. In many cases, such initiatives have failed to deliver anticipated benefits. Attributing this to the actions of self-interested and resistant professionals is not an entirely helpful approach. It is important to avoid simplistic assumptions to build knowledge of how and why schemes are implemented in practice to inform future policy in this area.

  16. Paying for performance in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Ruth

    2014-02-01

    Aligning Financial Incentives (FIs) to health policy goals is becoming increasingly popular. In many cases, such initiatives have failed to deliver anticipated benefits. Attributing this to the actions of self-interested and resistant professionals is not an entirely helpful approach. It is important to avoid simplistic assumptions to build knowledge of how and why schemes are implemented in practice to inform future policy in this area.

  17. Performance Pay, Training and Labor Mobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Market imperfections may cause firms and workers to under-invest in specific training. This paper shows that profit sharing may be a suitable instrument to enhance specific training investments, either by enhancing wage °exibility or by increasing the returns to training. As a result, profit sharing

  18. Information Security of Apple Pay

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xinru

    2016-01-01

    In the era of high-tech, the mode of payment is no longer just use cash or credit card. There are various payments come to our daily life. Online payment and other kinds of electronic payments are wildly in use by people. Apple Pay is a tool that provides easier and safer payment service for consumer. The main objective of this thesis is to understand deeply and analyze how easy and convenient Apple Pay is to use and why it is known as most secure form of payment. Besides that, there is a ...

  19. Steering Committee Progress Report on Hydrogen Sensor Performance Testing and Evaluation under the Memorandum of Agreement between NREL, U.S. DOE and JRC-IET, EC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, W.; Post, M.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Boon-Brett, L.; Palmisano, V.; Bonato, C.; Harskamp, F.

    2012-12-01

    This progress report is a programmatic summary of a formal MOA between NREL and the European Union Joint Research Center, Institute for Energy and Transport to be presented at the Steering Committee Meeting, December 3, 2012.

  20. How do clinical competency committees use different sources of data to assess residents' performance on the internal medicine milestones?A mixed methods pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpenyong, Andem; Baker, Elizabeth; Harris, Ilene; Tekian, Ara; Abrams, Richard; Reddy, Shalini; Park, Yoon Soo

    2017-10-01

    This study examines how Clinical Competency Committees (CCCs) synthesize assessment data to make judgments about residents' clinical performances. Between 2014 and 2015, after four six-month reporting periods to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), 7 of 16 CCC faculty at Rush University Medical Center completed questionnaires focused on their perspectives about rating residents on their achievement of the milestones and participated in a focus group. Qualitative data were analyzed using grounded theory. Milestones ratings for two six-month ACGME reporting cycles (n = 100 categorical residents) were also analyzed. CCC members weighted resident rotation ratings highest (weight = 37%), followed by faculty rotation comments (weight = 27%) and personal experience with residents (weight = 14%) for making judgments about learner's milestone levels. Three assessment issues were identified from qualitative analyses: (1) "design issues" (e.g. problems with available data or lack thereof); (2) "synthesis issues" (e.g. factors influencing ratings and decision-making processes) and (3) "impact issues" (e.g. how CCC generated milestones ratings are used). Identifying factors that affect assessment at all stages of the CCC process can contribute to improving assessment systems, including support for faculty development for CCCs. Recognizing challenges in synthesizing first and second-hand assessment data is an important step in understanding the CCC decision-making process.

  1. Grassland biodiversity can pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Seth; Isbell, Forest; Polasky, Stephen; Catford, Jane A; Tilman, David

    2018-04-10

    The biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) literature provides strong evidence of the biophysical basis for the potential profitability of greater diversity but does not address questions of optimal management. BEF studies typically focus on the ecosystem outputs produced by randomly assembled communities that only differ in their biodiversity levels, measured by indices such as species richness. Landholders, however, do not randomly select species to plant; they choose particular species that collectively maximize profits. As such, their interest is not in comparing the average performance of randomly assembled communities at each level of biodiversity but rather comparing the best-performing communities at each diversity level. Assessing the best-performing mixture requires detailed accounting of species' identities and relative abundances. It also requires accounting for the financial cost of individual species' seeds, and the economic value of changes in the quality, quantity, and variability of the species' collective output-something that existing multifunctionality indices fail to do. This study presents an assessment approach that integrates the relevant factors into a single, coherent framework. It uses ecological production functions to inform an economic model consistent with the utility-maximizing decisions of a potentially risk-averse private landowner. We demonstrate the salience and applicability of the framework using data from an experimental grassland to estimate production relationships for hay and carbon storage. For that case, our results suggest that even a risk-neutral, profit-maximizing landowner would favor a highly diverse mix of species, with optimal species richness falling between the low levels currently found in commercial grasslands and the high levels found in natural grasslands.

  2. History of Pay Equity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbezat, Debra A.

    2002-01-01

    Traces the evolution of salary-equity studies over time, and how the findings have changed with regard to pay differences by gender and race/ethnicity. Reviews the literature on salary equity for both faculty and nonfaculty academic employees. (EV)

  3. Compensation Consultants and CEO Pay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabir, Mohammed Rezaul; Minhat, Marizah

    2014-01-01

    The study examines the practice of employing multiple compensation consultants. Examining data of a sample of UK companies over the period 2003–2006 we find that CEOs receive higher equity-based pay when firms employ more than one compensation consultant. An increase in the number of compensation

  4. Activities of the research committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A.; Shirai, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Osugi, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Ishida, T.; Shimazaki, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-01-01

    The department of Nuclear Energy System serves as a secretarial of the following four research committees organized by JAERI; Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, Atomic and Molecular Data Research Committee, Research Committee on Reactor Physics and Research Committee on Marine Reactors. The purpose and the expected task of each committee are summarized here. The detailed activities of each committee are presented in this paper. (author)

  5. 75 FR 4108 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice; Board of Directors and Five Committees of the Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... Part 1622 to remove from its requirements the Board's Governance & Performance Review Committee when it.... Audit Committee 11 a.m. 2. Governance & Performance Review Committee. 3. Provision for the Delivery of.... Governance and Performance Review Committee Agenda 1. Approval of Agenda. 2. Approval of Minutes of the...

  6. User's manual to the ICRP Code: a series of computer programs to perform dosimetric calculations for the ICRP Committee 2 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, S.B.; Ford, M.R.

    1980-02-01

    A computer code has been developed that implements the recommendations of ICRP Committee 2 for computing limits for occupational exposure of radionuclides. The purpose of this report is to describe the various modules of the computer code and to present a description of the methods and criteria used to compute the tables published in the Committee 2 report. The computer code contains three modules of which: (1) one computes specific effective energy; (2) one calculates cumulated activity; and (3) one computes dose and the series of ICRP tables. The description of the first two modules emphasizes the new ICRP Committee 2 recommendations in computing specific effective energy and cumulated activity. For the third module, the complex criteria are discussed for calculating the tables of committed dose equivalent, weighted committed dose equivalents, annual limit of intake, and derived air concentration

  7. User's manual to the ICRP Code: a series of computer programs to perform dosimetric calculations for the ICRP Committee 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, S.B.; Ford, M.R.

    1980-02-01

    A computer code has been developed that implements the recommendations of ICRP Committee 2 for computing limits for occupational exposure of radionuclides. The purpose of this report is to describe the various modules of the computer code and to present a description of the methods and criteria used to compute the tables published in the Committee 2 report. The computer code contains three modules of which: (1) one computes specific effective energy; (2) one calculates cumulated activity; and (3) one computes dose and the series of ICRP tables. The description of the first two modules emphasizes the new ICRP Committee 2 recommendations in computing specific effective energy and cumulated activity. For the third module, the complex criteria are discussed for calculating the tables of committed dose equivalent, weighted committed dose equivalents, annual limit of intake, and derived air concentration.

  8. Improving Teaching Effectiveness: Merit Pay vs. Organizational Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushardt, Stephen C.; Fowler, Aubrey R.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies four conditions which cause merit pay systems to fail to increase teacher performance: lack of skills, the poor timing of rewards, an inability to measure performance; and competing reinforcers. Explains why organizational culture is a more effective mediator of rewards. (SD)

  9. Electronic pay and leave statements (e-Payslips)

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    Within the framework of measures to simplify and rationalise administrative procedures, the FI and IT Departments proposed a project to introduce electronic pay and leave statements. The project was launched at the beginning of 2004 after it had been approved by the Director of the Finance and Human Resources Departments. The project was presented to the GTPA (Groupe de Travail sur les Procédures Administratives) and discussed at the meeting of the SCC (Standing Concertation Committee) on 8 July 2004. The system designed and developed by the IT Department is now operational. What will change? Members of the personnel who currently receive a paper copy of their pay and/or leave statement will, in future, receive monthly e-mail notification of their electronic pay and leave statement, instead of the paper document. The current project does not affect retired members of the personnel. Each person receiving the e-mail notification will be invited to consult these electronic statements by clicking on a link p...

  10. The International Instruments on Gender Pay Equity

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Cher Weixia

    2008-01-01

    Today in the world women are earning around 78% of what men are earning. Gender pay gap ironically is still one major feature of the modern labor market, despite the fact that the right to equal pay is one of the founding principles recognized by the 1945 ILO constitution amendment. Since 1919 the right to equal pay was discussed during the preparation for the ILO constitution, scholars have been constantly making efforts to explore the potential solutions to gender pay differentials...

  11. Executive pay and shareholder litigation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Peng; Ailsa Röell

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines the impact of executive compensation on private securities litigation. We find that incentive pay in the form of options increases the probability of securities class action litigation, holding constant a wide range of firm characteristics. We further document that there is abnormal upward earnings manipulation during litigation class periods and that insiders exercise more options and sell more shares during class periods, but that this activity is largely driven by pre-ex...

  12. Fisherman expectations and pay-lake profits

    Science.gov (United States)

    George H. Moeller; John Engelken; John Engelken

    1973-01-01

    Personal interviews with licensed fishermen in Central New York State were used to determine characteristics of fishermen who are willing to pay to fish. Willingness to pay was related to aspects of the fishing experience that most strongly influenced fishing enjoyment. Sixty-two percent of the respondents expressed a willingness to pay for a quality fishing experience...

  13. 28 CFR 0.145 - Overtime pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overtime pay. 0.145 Section 0.145... Respect to Personnel and Certain Administrative Matters § 0.145 Overtime pay. The Director of the Federal... Attorney General may prescribe, authorize overtime pay (including additional compensation in lieu of...

  14. 20 CFR 218.28 - Sick pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sick pay. 218.28 Section 218.28 Employees... Beginning Date § 218.28 Sick pay. (a) From railroad employer. If the employee is carried on the payroll while sick, the annuity can begin no earlier than the day after the last day of sick pay. However, sick...

  15. 4 CFR 5.3 - Merit pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Merit pay. 5.3 Section 5.3 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE PERSONNEL SYSTEM COMPENSATION § 5.3 Merit pay. The Comptroller General may promulgate regulations establishing a merit pay system for such employees of the Government Accountability Office as the...

  16. 5 CFR 534.604 - Pay administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... equals or exceeds the rate of basic pay the employee received immediately prior to such appointment, not... that equals or exceeds the employee's highest previous rate of basic pay in a Federal civil service.... Advancement to a higher rate takes effect on the first day of the first pay period beginning on or after...

  17. The Pays de Gex celebrates science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    From 18 to 23 October, the Fête de la Science will be celebrated at various venues in the Pays de Gex and at CERN.   Physiscope will perform awe-inspiring demonstrations in the Globe. The Physiscope team will give demonstrations for schools and the general public in the Globe, performing awe-inspiring experiments to answer questions like "Can you drive a nail in with a banana?" or "Is it possible to survive a 100,000 volt shock?" The Esplanade du Lac in Divonne-les-Bains will host a Café des Sciences and performances by the children of the Lycée International in Ferney-Voltaire. The Physiscope is an educational venture of the Physics section of the University of Geneva and the research programme MaNEP. The programme of the Fête de la Science can be consulted here.      

  18. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  19. The Investment Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John H.

    1997-01-01

    The investment committee of the college or university governing board is charged with determining, overseeing, and assessing the policies and processes by which institutional funds are invested. The committee has fiduciary duty to ensure that the terms of investment of donors' gifts are met and to maximize investment returns within an appropriate…

  20. 5 CFR 550.1409 - Inapplicability of premium pay and aggregate pay caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inapplicability of premium pay and aggregate pay caps. 550.1409 Section 550.1409 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Inapplicability of premium pay and aggregate pay caps. Accrued compensatory time off under this subpart is not...

  1. Advisory Committee Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Hawk Coll., Moline, IL.

    An advisory committee is generally comprised of persons outside the education profession who have specialized knowledge in a given area. The committee advises, makes recommendations, and gives service to the college and its students, instructors, and administrators. At Black Hawk College, there are four types of advisory committees: community,…

  2. Paying your marketers--properly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Elizabeth Zink

    2003-09-01

    Home health agencies have more freedom to market their services since the implementation of the prospective payment system. In order to do that, a number of agencies have turned to marketing professionals for help. A common method of compensating marketers in the business world, however, is through payment for referrals--something expressly forbidden by federal statute. Home health agencies need to know what they can and can't do to pay marketers and must train their marketers on the federal anti-kickback regulations to assure their compliance.

  3. 5 CFR 550.113 - Computation of overtime pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under 5 U.S.C. 5305 or similar provision of law), the overtime hourly rate is 11/2 times his or her... a holiday at the same rate as for overtime work performed on another day. (d) An employee whose rate of basic pay is fixed on an annual or monthly basis and adjusted from time to time in accordance with...

  4. 78 FR 11727 - National Freight Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... performance in freight transportation; (6) development of freight transportation investment, data, and...; (3) availability and willingness to serve; and (4) relevant experience in working in committees and... minorities, women, and persons with disabilities. Please note, however, that federally registered lobbyists...

  5. Designing Incentives for Public School Teachers: Evidence from a Texas Incentive Pay Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Matthew G.; Taylor, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    Pay-for-performance is a popular public education reform, but there is little evidence about the characteristics of a well-designed incentive pay plan for teachers. Some of the literature suggests that effective incentive plans must offer relatively large awards to induce behavioral changes. On the other hand, the experimental economics literature…

  6. The Impact of Higher Fixed Pay and Lower Bonuses on Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bun, M.J.G.; Huberts, L.C.E.

    This study analyzes the effects of performance related pay on productivity exploiting a change in the payment structure of a large Dutch marketing company. Specifically, we investigate the consequences for company sales of higher fixed pay in combination with lower bonuses. Exploiting shift level

  7. Public sector pay in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Cribb, Jonathan; Emmerson, Carl; Sibieta, Luke

    2014-01-01

    This report looks at trends in public sector pay and compares these with what has been happening in the private sector. We start by analysing the overall levels of public and private sector pay, including how they have evolved over recent years and the differences after accounting for the different composition of the public and private sector workforces. We then examine how the difference between pay in the public and private sector varies across different groups of workers and areas of the c...

  8. Pay, working conditions, and teacher quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanushek, Eric A; Rivkin, Steven G

    2007-01-01

    Eric Hanushek and Steven Rivkin examine how salary and working conditions affect the quality of instruction in the classroom. The wages of teachers relative to those of other college graduates have fallen steadily since 1940. Today, average wages differ little, however, between urban and suburban districts. In some metropolitan areas urban districts pay more, while in others, suburban districts pay more. But working conditions in urban and suburban districts differ substantially, with urban teachers reporting far less administrator and parental support, worse materials, and greater student problems. Difficult working conditions may drive much of the difference in turnover of teachers and the transfer of teachers across schools. Using rich data from Texas public schools, the authors describe in detail what happens when teachers move from school to school. They examine how salaries and student characteristics change when teachers move and also whether turnover affects teacher quality and student achievement. They note that both wages and student characteristics affect teachers' choices and result in a sorting of teachers across schools, but they find little evidence that teacher transitions are detrimental to student learning. The extent to which variations in salaries and working conditions translate into differences in the quality of instruction depends importantly on the effectiveness of school personnel policies in hiring and retaining the most effective teachers and on constraints on both entry into the profession and the firing of low performers. The authors conclude that overall salary increases for teachers would be both expensive and ineffective. The best way to improve the quality of instruction would be to lower barriers to becoming a teacher, such as certification, and to link compensation and career advancement more closely with teachers' ability to raise student performance.

  9. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    .... FDA-2013-N-1380] Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination AGENCY: Food... announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee. This document removes the Veterinary Advisory Committee from the Agency's list of standing advisory committees. DATES: This rule is...

  10. Optimal Incentives for Public Sector Workers: The Case of Teacher-Designed Incentive Pay in Texas. Working Paper 2009-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lori L.; Springer, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    Pay for performance is a popular public education reform, and millions of dollars are currently being targeted for pay for performance programs. These reforms are popular because economic and management theories suggest that well-designed incentive pay programs could improve teacher effectiveness. There is little evidence about the characteristics…

  11. [Responsibilities of ethics committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, K

    2000-05-01

    Increasing numbers of clinical research projects are submitted to ethical committees (institutional review boards) for approval. New therapeutic developments have to be evaluated by these committees to protect patients/volunteers. Thus, the responsibility of ethical committees is increasing. The "Nürnberger Kodex" and the "Declaration of Helsinki" are the background for these evaluations. According to the German drug law the physician is obligated by law to submit the protocol to such a committee. In addition, local state physician authorities require such a procedure. Important considerations during the review process besides ethical aspects are the informed consent, which should be written in an understandable form, and the obligations of the insurance.

  12. Consensus, contracts, and committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J D

    1991-08-01

    Following a brief account of the puzzle that ethics committees present for the Western Philosophical tradition, I will examine the possibility that social contract theory can contribute to a philosophical account of these committees. Passing through classical as well as contemporary theories, particularly Rawls' recent constructivist approach, I will argue that social contract theory places severe constraints on the authority that may legitimately be granted to ethics committees. This, I conclude, speaks more about the suitability of the theory to this level of analysis than about the ethics committee phenomenon itself.

  13. Explaining the Gender Wage Gap: Pay Expectations for Self, Others, and Perceptions of "Fair Pay."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Philip D.; Jackson, Linda A.

    This study was conducted to investigate the pay expectations of graduating seniors, and specifically, the relationship between gender and pay expectations for one's self and others. The main purpose of the study was to determine if women and men differed in their initial pay expectations. Surveys were received from 447 college seniors, including…

  14. 77 FR 27832 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... organizations --Relations with non-governmental organizations --World Maritime Day --International Maritime... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7879] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee...-second Session of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Technical Co-operation Committee (TCC 62...

  15. Pay Equity Act (No. 34 of 1987), 29 June 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This document contains major provisions of Ontario, Canada's 1987 Pay Equity Act. The Act seeks to redress systemic gender discrimination in compensation for work performed by employees in "female job classes" and applies to all private sector employers in Ontario with 10 or more employees, all public sector employers, and the employees of applicable employers. The Act continues to apply even if an employer subsequently reduces the number of employees below 10. The Act calls for identification of systemic gender discrimination in compensation through comparisons between female job classes and male job classes in terms of compensation and value of work performed, which is a composite of skill, effort, and responsibility normally required. Pay equity is deemed achieved when the job rate for the female job class is at least equal to the rate for a male job class in the same establishment. If there is no male job class to use for comparison, pay equity is achieved when the female job rate is at least equal to the job rate of a male job class in the same establishment that, at the time of comparison, had a higher job rate while performing work of lower value than the female job class. Differences in compensation between a female and a male job class are allowed if they result from a formal seniority system that does not discriminate on basis of gender, a temporary training or development assignment equally available to males and females, a specified merit compensation plan, actions taken as the result of a gender-neutral reevaluation process, or a skills shortage leading to a temporary inflation in compensation. Pay equity will not be achieved by reducing any employee's compensation. The Act establishes a Pay Equity Commission to oversee implementation.

  16. Evaluation of clinical trials by Ethics Committees in Germany: Experience of applicants with the review of requests for opinion of the Ethics Committees - results of a survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (VFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ, Hagen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The review of requests for a positive opinion of the ethics committees (application procedure as a requirement to start a clinical trial in Germany has been completely redesigned with the transposition of EU Directive 2001/20/EC in the 12th Amendment of the German Medicines Act in August 2004. The experience of applicants (sponsors, legal representatives of sponsors in the EU and persons or organizations authorized by the sponsors to make the application, respectively in terms of interactions with the ethics committees in Germany has been positive overall, especially with respect to ethics committee adherence to the statutory timelines applicable for review of requests. However, inconsistencies between ethics committees exist in terms of the form and content of the requirements for application documents and their evaluation.With the objective of further improving both the quality of applications and the evaluation of those applications by ethics committees, a survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (VFA was conducted from January to April 2008. Based on reasoned opinions issued by the respective ethics committee in charge of the coordinating principal investigator (coordinating ethics committee, the type and frequency of formal and content-related objections to applications according to § 7 of the German Good Clinical Practice (GCP Regulation were systematically documented, and qualitative and quantitative analyses performed. 21 out of 44 members of the VFA participated in the survey. 288 applications for Phase I–IV studies submitted between January and December 2007 to 40 ethics committees were evaluated.This survey shows that about one in six applications is incomplete and has formal and/or content objections, respectively, especially those that pertain to documents demonstrating the qualification of the investigator and/or suitability of the facilities. These objections are attributable to

  17. Large-scale energy consumers pay less

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denneman, A.

    2012-01-01

    The price of electricity in the Netherlands rose with 6 percent in the first quarter of 2012, whereas large business consumers are paying less. The natural gas price has risen with about 10 percent in the last year, both for households and for large business consumers. Meanwhile, households are paying twice as much for electricity and gas as large business consumers. [nl

  18. Sex, Money and the Equal Pay Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Edwin B.

    1973-01-01

    Institutions who justify a wage differential between male and female custodians on the basis that women typically do the lighter work, and men the heavier, can find themselves in trouble. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 requires that men and women get the same pay for equal work -- and all custodial work is substantially equal to the Labor Department.…

  19. 20 CFR 404.1044 - Vacation pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacation pay. 404.1044 Section 404.1044 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1044 Vacation pay. We consider...

  20. Merit Pay and the Music Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpus, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Current proponents of education reform are at present seeking to fundamentally change the system of teacher compensation by eliminating the traditional single salary schedule and instituting a merit pay system that directly links teacher pay to student achievement. To date, the scholarly literature in music education has been silent on the subject…

  1. 20 CFR 211.4 - Vacation pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacation pay. 211.4 Section 211.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.4 Vacation pay. Payments made to an employee with respect to vacation or holidays shall be...

  2. 20 CFR 211.11 - Miscellaneous pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Miscellaneous pay. 211.11 Section 211.11 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT CREDITABLE RAILROAD COMPENSATION § 211.11 Miscellaneous pay. Any payment made to an employee by an employer which is...

  3. Public Perceptions of the Pay Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Catherine; Silva, Elena

    2005-01-01

    Women have made gains toward closing the gender pay gap during the past two decades. Much of the progress occurred during the 1980s, with smaller gains in the 1990s (Institute for Women's Policy Research 2004). Women's achievements in higher education are partly responsible for narrowing the pay gap in the 1980s and 1990s. As more women earned…

  4. Households' willingness to pay for public housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommeren, J.; van der Vlist, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of price controls, nonmarket housing allocation mechanisms such as queueing prevent households from revealing their marginal willingness to pay for housing through market prices. We derive the households' marginal willingness to pay using the intuitive idea that the length of the

  5. 20 CFR 404.1805 - Paying benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paying benefits. 404.1805 Section 404.1805 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Payment Procedures § 404.1805 Paying benefits. (a) As soon as possible after we have made a determination...

  6. Committee on Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCIENCE ADVISOR WASHINGTON, DC -- Today, House Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY23) and Advisor nominee Dr. John H. Marburger. The Senate Commerce Committee has scheduled a nomination hearing for this afternoon, and Boehlert and Grucci have been invited to testify. Dr. Marburger was nominated

  7. LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prof. B. B. P. Gupta

    INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. Bengaluru. 83rd ANNUAL MEETING. 3–5 November 2017, NEHU, Shillong. LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE. Local Organizing Committee. 1. Prof. S. K. Srivastava. Chairman. Vice-Chancellor, NEHU, Shillong. 2. Prof. B. B. P. Gupta. Organising Secretary. Department of Zoology ...

  8. 5 CFR 9901.364 - Foreign language proficiency pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Foreign language proficiency pay. 9901... NATIONAL SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Pay and Pay Administration Premium Pay § 9901.364 Foreign language proficiency pay. (a) General provisions. (1) This section applies to employees who may be paid...

  9. 41 CFR 301-54.2 - What is disposable pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is disposable pay... BILLED TRAVEL CHARGE CARD General Rules § 301-54.2 What is disposable pay? Disposable pay is your..., etc. Deductions may be made from any type of pay you receive from your agency, e.g., basic pay...

  10. 5 CFR 870.204 - Annual rates of pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual rates of pay. 870.204 Section 870... rates of pay. (a) (1) An insured employee's annual pay is his/her annual rate of basic pay as fixed by law or regulation. (2) Annual pay for this purpose includes the following: (i) Interim geographic...

  11. Net Pay Estimator | Alaska Division of Retirement and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefits > Net Pay Estimator Online Counselor Scheduler Empower Retirement Account Info Online myRnB Accessibility Net Pay Estimator Click here for the Retiree Net Pay Estimator? The net pay estimator is a useful tool to estimate your net pay under different salaries, federal withholding tax exemptions, and

  12. 33 CFR 52.71 - Authority to pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authority to pay. 52.71 Section... § 52.71 Authority to pay. (a) The Coast Guard is authorized to pay the claims of any person as the... authorized to pay any claim heretofore compensated by Congress through enactment of private law, or to pay...

  13. Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee, a permanent, broadly representative advisory committee, meets with EPA on a regular basis to discuss pesticide regulatory, policy, and program implementation issues.

  14. An Examination of Pay Facets and Referent Groups for Assessing Pay Satisfaction of Male Elementary School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I. Phillip; Young, Karen Holsey; Okhremtchouk, Irina; Castaneda, Jose Moreno

    2009-01-01

    Pay satisfaction was assessed according to different facets (pay level, benefits, pay structure, and pay raises) and potential referent groups (teachers and elementary school principals) for a random sample of male elementary school principals. A structural model approach was used that considers facets of the pay process, potential others as…

  15. Tackling the take-or-pay problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Kim.

    1997-01-01

    Centrica, the gas sales, trading and services company previously part of British Gas plc, has renegotiated a number of its take-or-pay contracts with North Sea gas producers since the end of 1996. The contracts - a legacy of the British Gas monopoly era - had placed an increasing financial burden on the company as it was effectively forced to pay above-market prices for gas which it did not always want to take, while trying to remain competitive in a market where an ever growing number of independent gas suppliers were offering low-cost supplies. The author looks at how Centrica has tackled its take-or-pay problem. (author)

  16. Request by the Bure (Haute-Marne) CLIS related to the reading of well logging performed by the ANDRA from drilling located around Bure, to check rock characterization and properties. Report made by the ANCCLI's Scientific Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    After having recalled the first conclusions of a work group built up by the Scientific Committee at the request of the Bure CLIS to assess studies performed by the ANDRA regarding the geological properties of the Bure site (site of deep geological storage of long life and high level radio-elements), this report proposes a critical discussion of measurements performed by the ANDRA, and more particularly of methodological aspects of this assessment of rock characteristics and properties based on well logging data. Thus, it comments the available raw data, the used instrumentation, the assessment of clay containment capacities (containment horizon homogeneity, stability of petrophysical properties, hydraulic studies with a focus on a noticed overpressure, modelling and data integration). Some brief propositions are stated. The appendix contains a set a questions to be submitted to the ANDRA by the Bure CLIS on the available data, on data calibration and homogenization, and on the assessment of containment capacities

  17. The EEOC's New Equal Pay Act Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Paul S.; Kohl, John P.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzes the new guidelines for enforcement of the Equal Pay Act and their implications for personnel management. Argues that there are key problem areas in the new regulations arising from considerable ambiguity and uncertainty about their interpretation. (SK)

  18. Social patterns of pay systems and their associations with psychosocial job characteristics and burnout among paid employees in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Wan-Yu; Cheng, Yawen; Chen, Chiou-Jung

    2009-04-01

    Today, performance-based pay systems, also known as variable pay systems, are commonly implemented in workplaces as a business strategy to improve workers' performance and reduce labor costs. However, their impact on workers' job stress and stress-related health outcomes has rarely been investigated. By utilizing data from a nationally representative sample of paid employees in Taiwan, we examined the distribution of variable pay systems across socio-demographic categories and employment sectors. We also examined the associations of pay systems with psychosocial job characteristics (assessed by Karasek's Demand-Control model) and self-reported burnout status (measured by the Chinese version of the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory). A total of 8906 men and 6382 women aged 25-65 years were studied, and pay systems were classified into three categories, i.e., fixed salary, performance-based pay (with a basic salary), and piece-rated or time-based pay (without a basic salary). Results indicated that in men, 57% of employees were given a fixed salary, 24% were given a performance-based pay, and 19% were remunerated through a piece-rated or time-based pay. In women, the distributions of the 3 pay systems were 64%, 20% and 15%, respectively. Among the three pay systems, employees earning through a performance-based pay were found to have the longest working hours, highest level of job control, and highest percentage of workers who perceived high stress at work. Those remunerated through a piece-rated/time-based pay were found to have the lowest job control, shortest working hours, highest job insecurity, lowest potential for career growth, and lowest job satisfaction. The results of multivariate regression analyses showed that employees earning through performance-based and piece-rated pay systems showed higher scores for personal burnout and work-related burnout, as compared to those who were given fixed salaries, after adjusting for age, education, marital status

  19. It pays to be green. A premature conclusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telle, K.

    2006-01-01

    It has been claimed that good environmental performance can improve firms' economic performance. However, because of e.g. data limitations, the methods applied in most previous quantitative empirical studies on effects of environmental performance on economic performance of firms suffer from several shortcomings. We discuss these shortcomings and conclude that previously applied methods are unsatisfactory as support for a conclusion that it pays for firms to be green. Then we illustrate the consequences of these shortcomings by performing several regression analyses of the effect of environmental performance on economic performance using a panel data set of Norwegian plants. A pooled regression where observable firm characteristics like e.g. size or industry are controlled for, confirms a positive effect of environmental performance on economic performance. However, the estimated positive effect could be due to omitted unobserved variables like management or technology. When the regression model controls for unobserved plant heterogeneity, the effect is generally no longer statistically significant. Hence, although greener plants tend to perform economically better, the analysis provides little support for the claim that it is because they are greener. These empirical findings further indicate that a conclusion that it pays to be green is premature

  20. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Main issues examined at the meeting of 2 October 2009 The October 2009 meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee was entirely devoted to preparation of TREF’s meeting on 21-22 October. The Committee took note of, discussed and agreed on clarifications needed to some of the documents and presentations that the Management intended to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: Equal opportunities The Committee took note of a preliminary report on equal opportunities at CERN drawn up by D. Chromek-Burckhart, the Equal Opportunities Officer, and T. Smith, Chairman of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel, containing in particular a proposal for a new process for resolving harassment conflicts. Technical analysis of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme - Actuary’s Report The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Charpentier, Chairman of the CERN Health Insurance Supervisory Board (CHIS Board), on the 2009 actuarial report on the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS). Th...

  1. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2008 The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2008 included: Short-term Saved Leave Scheme The Committee noted that, by the end of February 2008, some 600 staff had enrolled in the short-term saved leave scheme: approx. 58% had signed up for 1 slice, 14% for two slices, 5% for three slices and 23% for four slices. Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 4 (Rev. 4) - Unemployment Insurance Scheme. Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract The Committee agreed to recommend the Director-General to approve Administrative Circular No. 30 (Rev. 2) - Financial Benefits upon taking up appointment and termination of contract. Progressive Retirement Programme The Progressive Retirement Programme (PR...

  2. Gender pay gap varies greatly by occupation

    OpenAIRE

    Wrohlich, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    The German labor market is characterized by marked occupational segregation between women and men. The median earnings in female dominated occupations are lower than those in male dominated professions. This is one of the reasons for the gender pay gap. However, there are also large differences in earnings between men and women within occupations. These profession-specific gender pay gaps are smaller in professions with a high proportion of employees in the public sector. This finding indicat...

  3. Wage compression and the gender pay gap

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence M. Kahn

    2015-01-01

    There are large international differences in the gender pay gap. In some developed countries in 2010–2012, women were close to earnings parity with men, while in others large gaps remained. Since women and men have different average levels of education and experience and commonly work in different industries and occupations, multiple factors can influence the gender pay gap. Among them are skill supply and demand, unions, and minimum wages, which influence the economywide wage returns to educ...

  4. M&E-NetPay: A Micropayment System for Mobile and Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As an increasing number of people purchase goods and services online, micropayment systems are becoming particularly important for mobile and electronic commerce. We have designed and developed such a system called M&E-NetPay (Mobile and Electronic NetPay. With open interoperability and mobility, M&E-NetPay uses web services to connect brokers and vendors, providing secure, flexible and reliable credit services over the Internet. In particular, M&E-NetPay makes use of a secure, inexpensive and debit-based off-line protocol that allows vendors to interact only with customers, after validating coins. The design of the architecture and protocol of M&E-NetPay are presented, together with the implementation of its prototype in ringtone and wallpaper sites. To validate our system, we have conducted its evaluations on performance, usability and heuristics. Furthermore, we compare our system to the CORBA-based (Common Object Request Broker Architecture off-line micro-payment systems. The results have demonstrated that M&E-NetPay outperforms the .NET-based M&E-NetPay system in terms of performance and user satisfaction.

  5. Person-based differences in pay reactions: A compensation-activation theory and integrative conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Ingrid Smithey; Shaw, Jason D

    2018-06-07

    Compensation research has focused traditionally on how pay design characteristics (e.g., pay level, individual or group incentives) relate to average employee outcomes and, in toto, on how these outcomes affect organizational performance. Recently, scholars have begun to pay more attention to how individuals vary in the strength of their reactions to pay. Empirical research in several disciplines examines how the interplay of pay systems and person-based characteristics (psychological individual differences, demographics, and relative performance or position in a group) relate to important work-related outcomes. We develop a compensation-activation theory that frames compensation design characteristics as workplace "situations" providing cues that activate individuals' corresponding fundamental social motives made salient due to chronic or transient person-based characteristics. Where activation occurs, stronger-than-average responses to the compensation "situation" are expected. Using the theory as a lens, we synthesize and reinterpret existing research on person-based reactions to pay characteristics, including sorting, incentive/motivational effects, and effects on collective pay system reactions and unit/organizational outcomes. We conclude with a research agenda aimed at refining compensation-activation theory and advancing the study of compensation as it affects individual and organizational outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Activities of the research committee on thorium cycle in atomic energy society of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohki, Shiro

    1985-01-01

    In 1978 the Research Committee on Thorium Cycle was established as one of committees of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, and the Committee published a report titled 'The Thorium Cycle - Present Status and Future Prospect' in October 1980 as a result of investigations on the status of the thoirum cycle in Japan as well as that in overseas. Based on this investigation, the Committee is intending to evaluate synthetically the thorium utilization in Japan under the prospect for the middle and long term by intensifying the activities of the Committee. Furthermore, from this viewpoint, the author supplements comments on following three points: (1) Reasons why the thorium utilization has not received positive evaluation in Japan; (2) Reasons why Japan has to pay attention to thorium; (3) How the technology on thorium should be developed in Japan. (author)

  7. Home-based radiology transcription and a productivity pay plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, K

    1997-01-01

    Shands Hospital in Gainesville, Fla., decided to evaluate the way it provided transcription services in its radiology department. It identified four goals: increased productivity, decreased operating expense, finding much needed space in the radiology department and increasing employee morale. The department performs 165,000 procedures annually, with 66 radiologists, 29 faculty, and 37 residents and fellows on staff. Six FTEs comprised the transcription pool in the radiology department, with transcription their only duty. Transcriptionists were paid an hourly rate based on their years of service, not their productivity. Evaluation and measurement studies were undertaken by the hospital's management systems engineering department. The transcriptionists' hours were then changed to provide coverage during the periods of heaviest dictation. The productivity level of the transcription staff was also measured and various methods of measurement reviewed. The goal was a pure incentive pay plan that would reward employees for every increase in productivity. The incentive pay plan was phased in over a three-month period. Transcriptionists were paid for work performed, with no base pay beyond minimum wage. The move to home-based transcription was planned. The necessary equipment was identified and various issues specific to working at home were addressed. Approximately six months later, the transcriptionists were set up to work at home. The astounding results achieved are presented: 28% increase in productivity, operational cost savings exceeding $25,000 and a space savings of 238 square feet.

  8. 5 CFR 9701.372 - Creating initial pay ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Creating initial pay ranges. 9701.372... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Transitional Provisions § 9701.372 Creating initial pay ranges. (a) DHS must, after coordination with OPM, set the initial band rate ranges for the...

  9. 5 CFR 304.104 - Determining rate of pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determining rate of pay. 304.104 Section... CONSULTANT APPOINTMENTS § 304.104 Determining rate of pay. (a) The rate of basic pay for experts and... appropriate rate of basic pay on an hourly or daily basis, subject to the limitations described in section 304...

  10. 75 FR 81817 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... Order 13561 of December 22, 2010 Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay By the authority vested in me as..., it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Statutory Pay Systems. Pursuant to the Continuing... ``Continuing Appropriations Act''), the rates of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as defined...

  11. 41 CFR 301-76.2 - What is disposable pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is disposable pay... What is disposable pay? Disposable pay is the part of the employee's compensation remaining after the... deductions such as savings bonds, charitable contributions, etc. Deductions may be made from any type of pay...

  12. 5 CFR 534.603 - Rates of basic pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rates of basic pay. 534.603 Section 534.603 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Administrative Appeals Judge Positions § 534.603 Rates of basic pay. (a) The...

  13. 78 FR 80451 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... of Pay By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Statutory Pay Systems. The rates of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 5302(1)), as adjusted under 5 U.S...

  14. 5 CFR 930.205 - Administrative law judge pay system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... paragraph (a)(1) of this section. Such adjustments take effect on the 1st day of the first pay period... basic pay that equals or exceeds the applicant's highest previous Federal rate of basic pay, not to... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative law judge pay system. 930...

  15. ITER technical advisory committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, M.

    1999-01-01

    The ITER Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) meeting took place on December 20-22, 1999 at the Naka Joint Work Site. The objective of this meeting was to review the document 'Technical Basis for ITER-FEAT Outline Design (ODR)' issued by the Director on December 10. It was also aimed at providing the ITER Meeting scheduled for January 19-20, 2000 in Tokyo with a technical assessment of ODR and recommendations for the optimization of the anticipated plasma performance and engineering design, based on the guidelines approved by the Council in June 1998 and recommendations of the last TAC meeting

  16. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Main points examined at the meeting of 24 June 2009 Results of the 2009 MARS exercise The Committee took note of the results of the 2009 MARS exercise presented by the Head of the HR Department, expressing satisfaction for the early availability of the statistics and for the fact that the analysis of the results covered the last three years. Status report on the work on the five-yearly review The Committee took note of a presentation by P. Gildemyn on the data collection procedure for the 2010 five-yearly review (staff, fellows, associate members of the personnel, CHIS) and of the proposed work schedule. Implications for employment conditions of the discussions at the Finance Committee and Council on 17 and 18 June 2009 The Chairman briefly reported on the discussions at the meetings of the Finance Committee and Council in June 2009, on the 2010-2014 medium-term plan and the 2010 preliminary draft budget, as well as on the modified strategy and goals for 2009. The Committee ...

  17. Shareholder voice on executive pay : A decade of Dutch say on pay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, Christoph; Lafarre, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The Netherlands adopted shareholders’ say on pay over a decade ago. The general meeting of shareholders must approve the remuneration policy and any amendments to it. This Dutch approach offers fruitful insights into how say on pay works in practice. In the light of the recent European proposal to

  18. A comparison of pay-as-bid and marginal pricing in electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongjun

    This thesis investigates the behaviour of electricity markets under marginal and pay-as-bid pricing. Marginal pricing is believed to yield the maximum social welfare and is currently implemented by most electricity markets. However, in view of recent electricity market failures, pay-as-bid has been extensively discussed as a possible alternative to marginal pricing. In this research, marginal and pay-as-bid pricing have been analyzed in electricity markets with both perfect and imperfect competition. The perfect competition case is studied under both exact and uncertain system marginal cost prediction. The comparison of the two pricing methods is conducted through two steps: (i) identify the best offer strategy of the generating companies (gencos); (ii) analyze the market performance under these optimum genco strategies. The analysis results together with numerical simulations show that pay-as-bid and marginal pricing are equivalent in a perfect market with exact system marginal cost prediction. In perfect markets with uncertain demand prediction, the two pricing methods are also equivalent but in an expected value sense. If we compare from the perspective of second order statistics, all market performance measures exhibit much lower values under pay-as-bid than under marginal pricing. The risk of deviating from the mean is therefore much higher under marginal pricing than under pay-as-bid. In an imperfect competition market with exact demand prediction, the research shows that pay-as-bid pricing yields lower consumer payments and lower genco profits. This research provides quantitative evidence that challenges some common claims about pay-as-bid pricing. One is that under pay-as-bid, participants would soon learn how to offer so as to obtain the same or higher profits than what they would have obtained under marginal pricing. This research however shows that, under pay-as-bid, participants can at best earn the same profit or expected profit as under marginal

  19. Strain Hardening Cement Composites Structural Design and Performance State-of-the-Art Report of the RILEM Technical Committee 208-HFC, SC3

    CERN Document Server

    Kanda, Tetsushi

    2013-01-01

    Strain Hardening Cement Composites, SHCC hereafter, demonstrate excellent mechanical behavior showing tensile strain hardening and multiple fine cracks. This strain hardening behavior improves the durability of concrete structures employing SHCC and the multiple fine cracks enhance structural performance. Reliable tensile performance of SHCC enables us to design structures explicitly accounting for SHCC’s tensile properties. Reinforced SHCC elements (R/SHCC) indicate large energy absorbing performance under large seismic excitation. Against various types of loads, R/SHCC elements can be designed by superimposing re-bar performance and SHCC’s tensile performance.  This report focuses on flexural design, shear design, FE modeling and anti-seismic design of R/SHCC elements as well as application examples.  Establishing design methods for new materials usually leads to exploring application areas and this trend should be demonstrated by collecting actual application examples of SHCC in structures.

  20. 5 CFR 9901.305 - Rate of pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rate of pay. 9901.305 Section 9901.305... (NSPS) Pay and Pay Administration General § 9901.305 Rate of pay. (a) The term “rate of pay” in 5 U.S.C... overtime and other premium pay rates (including compensatory time off); and (2) The rates comprising the...

  1. Pay equity, minimum wage and equality at work

    OpenAIRE

    Rubery, Jill

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the underlying causes of pay discrimination embedded within the organization of the labour market and structures of pay and reward. Discusses the need to focus on pay equity as part of a general strategy of promoting equity and decent work and examines the case for using minimum wage policies in comparison to more targeted equal pay policies to reduce gender pay equity. Identifies potential obstacles to or support for such policies and describes experiences of the use of minimum wages...

  2. Laos. Un pays en mutation, Vatthana Pholsena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Bouté

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available C’est avec un regard neuf et une approche originale que Vatthana Pholsena a relevé le défi d’écrire l’ouvrage Laos. Un pays en mutation, le dernier-né de la collection « Asie Plurielle » (Belin qui a déjà proposé une longue série d’ouvrages de présentation générale des pays d’Asie. Cet ouvrage vient combler un grand manque dans la littérature sur le Laos. Aucun ouvrage généraliste en langue française n’existant jusque-là sur ce petit pays d’Asie du Sud-Est, le lecteur curieux devait se référ...

  3. 75 FR 27614 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... Environment Protection Committee. --Consideration of the report of the Maritime Safety Committee... Session of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Council to be held at the IMO headquarters in... HNS Convention. --World Maritime University: --IMO International Maritime Law Institute: --Protection...

  4. 77 FR 76164 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... atmospheric pollution --Development of international measures for minimizing the transfer of invasive aquatic... pollution hazards of chemicals and preparation of consequential amendments --Additional guidelines for... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8133] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee...

  5. The gender pay gap in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Debra Leaker

    2008-01-01

    Measuring differences between mens' and womens' earnings, presents estimates from ASHE, the LFS and the NES panel data setThe gender pay gap is a measure of the difference between the earnings of men and women. This article presents estimates of the gender pay gap from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, the Labour Force Survey and the New Earnings Survey panel data set. It examines how different personal and labour market characteristics influence the earnings of men and women.The resul...

  6. Willingness to Pay for Insurance in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan V.; Højbjerg Jacobsen, Rasmus; Lau, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Danish population, and information on household income and wealth from registers at Statistics Denmark. The results show that the willingness to pay is marginally higher than the actuarially fair value under expected utility theory, but significantly higher under rank-dependent utility theory, and up......We estimate how much Danish households are willing to pay for auto, home, and house insurance. We use a unique combination of claims data from a large Danish insurance company, measures of individual risk attitudes and discount rates from a field experiment with a representative sample of the adult...

  7. Pay inequality in 25 European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses disparity in women’s pay across 25 European countries using EU-SILC 2005. First, the gender pay gap is examined. Next, the impact of parenthood is analysed. We show that women suffer a wage disadvantage compared with men all over Europe, except for Poland. Motherhood usually reinforces the gender gap but most discrimination is sex-related so that it concerns all women as potential mothers. There is no uniform relationship between the parenthood and the gender wage gap.

  8. The public sector pay gap in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano Raffaela

    2010-01-01

    I investigate the public-private pay gap using Italian microdata covering the period 1980-2006. Even after controlling for observable characteristics of the labour force, I find a positive wage premium for the public sector, almost negligible during the eighties and averaging at about 12 percent in the period 1993-2006. While the pay gap for women and workers in southern regions turns out to be higher than the average in the whole sample period, the greater advantage from working in the publi...

  9. Willingness to Pay for Insurance in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan V.; Højbjerg Jacobsen, Rasmus; Lau, Morten I.

    We estimate the maximum amount that Danish households are willing to pay for three different types of insurance: auto, home and house insurance. We use a unique combination of claims data from the largest private insurance company in Denmark, measures of individual risk attitudes and discount rates...... possible states of nature, where all uncertainty is realized in the initial period and any loss incurred by an accident is subtracted from initial wealth. The estimated willingness to pay is based on annual claims and should thus be considered as an annual premium. Since there is some uncertainty about...... of the insurance claims....

  10. 78 FR 32698 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8340] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee... Technical Co-operation Committee --Protection of vital shipping lanes --Periodic review of administrative... of the Organization since the twenty-eighth regular session of the Assembly --External relations...

  11. 75 FR 43156 - Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Missile Defense Advisory Committee AGENCY: Missile Defense Agency (MDA), DoD. ACTION: Notice of closed meeting. SUMMARY: Under the... Defense announces that the Missile Defense Advisory Committee will meet on August 4 and 5, 2010, in...

  12. Does R&D pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalla, David; Minhas, Raman

    2010-03-01

    Pharmaceutical R&D is notoriously risky, lengthy and costly; moreover, it does not always produce products of blockbuster status. The conventional route of fully discovering, developing and marketing a new chemical entity is followed by the large pharmaceutical companies, whereas other organizations in the pharmaceutical sector--such as generic or specialty companies and biotechnology companies--only operate over portions of the full R&D process. Here, we compare the ten-year financial performance of these three subsectors through their price/earnings ratios and their return on capital metrics to understand which of these strategic alternatives offered the best return to investors. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Expert Committee on College Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Joy, V. P.; Raman Nair, R.; Ayub, M.

    1994-01-01

    Importance of library and information services in higher education was emphasized in India by many committees of Government of India from 1917 including Calcutta University Commission under Sir Michael Saddler, University Education Commission (1949) chaired by Dr. S. Radhakrishnan, Ranganathan Committee (1958), Education Commission (1966) chaired by D.S. Kothari, as well as Sen Committee, Mehrotra Committee etc of UGC. But as education being a State subject; union government could not go beyo...

  14. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  15. Plasma Science Committee (PLSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Plasma Science Committee (PLSC) is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences--National Research Council. Plasma sciences represent a broad and diverse field. The PLSC has accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general health of the field as whole. Although select advisory bodies have been created to address specific issues that affect plasma science, such as the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC), the PLSC provides a focus for the plasma science community that is unique and essential. The membership of the PLSC is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include accelerators and beams, space physics, astrophysics, computational physics and applied mathematics, fusion plasmas, fundamental experiments and theory, radiation sources, low temperature plasmas, and plasma-surface interactions. The PLSC is well prepared to respond to requests for studies on specific issues. This report discusses ion of the PLSC work

  16. Education of ethics committee members: experiences from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovecki, A; ten Have, H; Oresković, S

    2006-03-01

    To study knowledge and attitudes of hospital ethics committee members at the first workshop for ethics committees in Croatia. Before/after cross-sectional study using a self administered questionnaire. Educational workshop for members of hospital ethics committees, Zagreb, 2003. Knowledge and attitudes of participants before and after the workshop; everyday functioning of hospital ethics committees. The majority of the respondents came from committees with at least five members. The majority of ethics committees were appointed by the governing bodies of their hospitals. Most committees were founded after the implementation of the law on health protection in 1997. Membership structure (three physicians and two members from other fields) and functions were established on the basis of that law. Analysis of research protocols was the main part of their work. Other important functions-education, case analysis, guidelines formation-were neglected. Members' level of knowledge was not sufficient for the complicated tasks they were supposed to perform. However, it was significantly higher after the workshop. Most respondents felt their knowledge should be improved by additional education. Their views on certain issues and bioethical dilemmas displayed a high level of paternalism and over protectiveness, which did not change after the workshop. The committees developed according to bureaucratic requirements. Furthermore, there are concerns about members' knowledge levels. More efforts need to be made to use education to improve the quality of the work. Additional research is necessary to explore ethics committees' work in Croatia especially in the hospital setting.

  17. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLOOMQUIST, DOUGLAS D.

    2002-01-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2002, a 15-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece (the Trivelpiece Committee) was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 7-9, 2002 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the National Nuclear Security Administration of the Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE). The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of-state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding

  18. 76 FR 39884 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ...- establishment of ASAC is necessary and is in the public interest in connection with the performance of duties of... stakeholders control; and the economic, social, and political drivers that impact risk or response. ASAC is... committee has experience working together to identify problems, gather input and reach consensus on security...

  19. Rebuilding a Research Ethics Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John S. G.; Marchesi, August

    2013-01-01

    The principal ethics committee in Australia's Capital, Canberra, underwent a major revision in the last three years based on changes debated in the literature. Committee or Board structure varies widely; regulations determining minimum size and membership differ between countries. Issues such as the effectiveness of committee management,…

  20. Can Benford's Law explain CEO pay?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mukherjee, Shibashish

    2018-01-01

    Manuscript Type: Empirical Research Issue: This study applies the statistical properties of Benford’s Law to CEO pay. Benford’s ‘Law’ states that in an unbiased dataset, the first digit values are usually unequally allocated when considering the logical expectations of equal distribution. In this

  1. How to Pay for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Charles C.

    The financial crisis for institutions of higher education is deepening. Higher tuition rates may be one of the answers, but this would exclude even more young people from attending college because of inability to pay, at a time when greater equality of opportunity in higher education has become an important goal. Federal support has helped but not…

  2. The Pays de Gex on the Menu

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Did you know that you can swing from tree to tree like Tarzan (or Jane!) in the brand new forest adventure centre at the Col de la Faucille? And that, in addition to Crozet-Lélex, Mijoux-La Faucille and La Vattay, the Pays de Gex boasts a fourth ski resort at Menthières above Bellegarde-sur-Valserine? All these attractions, and hundreds of others that the Pays de Gex has to offer, were presented at a special exhibition stand in CERN's Restaurant No. 1 last week. For the tenth year running, the Pays de Gex-La Faucille Tourist Office and Geneva's fourteen Coop restaurants had organised a special week devoted to promoting the Pays de Gex-Monts Jura region. Thousands of information leaflets were handed out and visitors had the opportunity to take part in a big raffle with no fewer than 145 prizes to be won: ski passes, Juraventure entrance tickets, meal vouchers courtesy of local hotels and restaurants, and subscriptions to the Val Vital fitness centre in Divonne-les-Bains. The Coop restaur...

  3. Multiple Compensation Consultants and CEO Pay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabir, Mohammed Rezaul; Minhat, Marizah

    The study examines the practice of employing multiple compensation consultants. Data for a sample of UK companies over the period 2003-2006 are analyzed using a variety of econometric methods. We find that CEOs receive higher equity-based pay when firms employ more than one compensation consultant.

  4. An Accounting Program Merit Pay Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, David H.; Campbell, Annhenrie; Tan, Kim B.; Wagner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Basing the compensation of accounting professors on merit pay in order to encourage better teaching, research and service is controversial. Before the effectiveness of merit-based salary plans can be examined empirically, it must be determined which accounting programs use such a system. In this study, the 852 accounting programs in the United…

  5. 77 FR 11599 - January 2012 Pay Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... definitions can be found at http://www.opm.gov/oca/12tables/locdef.asp . The 2012 locality pay percentages... increased in 2012. The memo is available at http://www.opm.gov/flsa/oca/11tables/Extend_2012.pdf . On.... (See http://www.opm.gov/oca/compmemo/index.asp .) The memorandum transmitted Executive Order 13594 and...

  6. Job Evaluation: Pay Equity Problem or Solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecham, Robert C.

    It has been hypothesized that current methods of determining pay rates value the characteristics of jobs held primarily by men differently than the characteristics of jobs held primarily by women, resulting in lower earnings for women. A policy capturing approach using numerically rated job characteristics (PAQ data) was applied separately to the…

  7. How to pay in LicenseScript

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corin, R.J.; Chong, C.N.; Etalle, Sandro; Hartel, Pieter H.

    Current DRM systems do not provide flexible payment methods, requiring the user to handle the payment by hand. For instance, when the user needs to pay for watching a movie, she needs to decide which available payment method is the most optimal and suitable. This is a rather cumbersome process for

  8. 32 CFR 728.14 - Pay patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT NAVY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of the Uniformed Services on Active Duty § 728.14 Pay patients. Care is provided on a reimbursable basis to: Coast Guard active duty officers...

  9. Teacher-Pay Experiments Mounting Amid Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    The debate over linking teacher pay to student test scores that ignited on Capitol Hill recently underscores the growing momentum--and continued controversy--behind tying what teachers earn to what students learn. Both the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers came out swinging against language in a draft bill for…

  10. Power and pay: The union and equal pay at B.C. Electric/Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creese, G.

    1993-01-01

    The struggle for equal pay for women in one large office union, the Office and Technical Employees' Union (OTEU), at British Columbia Electric/Hydro is analyzed. The analysis concentrates on the second phase of the equal pay movement that preoccupied the union for over 30 years starting in 1949. Equal pay for equal job-evaluation was finally achieved in 1981, yet this struggle did not produce a subsequent questioning of gender bias within the job evaluation process or the structure of the existing hierarchy of jobs. The study illustrates some of the ways that gender hierarchies and inequities are defined and reinforced by employers seeking to maintain profits by keeping labor costs down, as BC Electric/Hydro resisted eliminating the differential in male and female pay, systematically restructured unequal pay, and continually resorted to lower community standards even when the company's own job evaluation system suggested equal comparators with male jobs. Gendered jobs are also shaped by union practices, as evidenced by the OTEU's role in restructuring the postwar gender division of labor in the late 1940s, as well as their early and persistent challenges to the female differential but, at the same time, the continued marginalization of equal pay as a women's issue rather than a general union issue. 66 refs

  11. Power and pay: The union and equal pay at B. C. Electric/Hydro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creese, G

    The struggle for equal pay for women in one large office union, the Office and Technical Employees' Union (OTEU), at British Columbia Electric/Hydro is analyzed. The analysis concentrates on the second phase of the equal pay movement that preoccupied the union for over 30 years starting in 1949. Equal pay for equal job-evaluation was finally achieved in 1981, yet this struggle did not produce a subsequent questioning of gender bias within the job evaluation process or the structure of the existing hierarchy of jobs. The study illustrates some of the ways that gender hierarchies and inequities are defined and reinforced by employers seeking to maintain profits by keeping labor costs down, as BC Electric/Hydro resisted eliminating the differential in male and female pay, systematically restructured unequal pay, and continually resorted to lower community standards even when the company's own job evaluation system suggested equal comparators with male jobs. Gendered jobs are also shaped by union practices, as evidenced by the OTEU's role in restructuring the postwar gender division of labor in the late 1940s, as well as their early and persistent challenges to the female differential but, at the same time, the continued marginalization of equal pay as a women's issue rather than a general union issue. 66 refs.

  12. 77 FR 32639 - HIT Standards Committee and HIT Policy Committee; Call for Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HIT Standards Committee and HIT Policy Committee; Call for... Health Information Technology Policy Committee (HITPC). Name of Committees: HIT Standards Committee and HIT Policy Committee. General Function of the Committees: The HITSC is charged to provide...

  13. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary Meeting on 11 May 2009 The meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee held on 11 May 2009 was entirely dedicated to the preparation of the TREF meeting on 19 & 20 May 2009. The Committee took note, discussed and agreed on some clarifications on a number of documents and presentations that the Management planned to submit and/or present to TREF on the following subjects: • Personnel statistics 2008: J. Purvis presented the Personnel Statistics for 2008 prepared by HR Department. In line with the previous year, key messages were firstly, a general reduction in staff (2544 to 2400, - 6%), secondly, a reduction in administrative services personnel (from 422 to 387, - 8%) and thirdly, a marked increase in the number of Users and Unpaid Associates (from 8369 to 9140, + 9%) • Five-Yearly Review 2010: A series of draft documents were submitted for discussion, comprising an introductory document explaining the statutory basis for the following four document...

  14. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The main items discussed at the meetings of the Standing Concertation Committee in the first quarter of 2009 included: Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS) 2009 exercise The committee took note of 2009 MARS ceiling guidelines giving the advancement budget by career path and amounting to approx 1.80% of the basic salary bill. To this will be added 250 steps CERN-wide, financed by savings from implementation of the international indemnity for 2007, 2008 and the first half of 2009. The specific Senior Staff Guidelines, including the proposed number of promotions from Career Path E to F, were also noted. The guidelines with respect to step distribution were also noted: the minima and maxima remain the same as in previous years. Compliance with the guidelines will continue to be monitored closely (more details, including a frequently asked questions section). It was also noted that Financial Awards (awards for extraordinary service and responsibility allowances) may b...

  15. Committees and sponsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    International Advisory Committee Richard F CastenYale, USA Luiz Carlos ChamonSão Paulo, Brazil Osvaldo CivitareseLa Plata, Argentina Jozsef CsehATOMKI, Hungary Jerry P DraayerLSU, USA Alfredo Galindo-UribarriORNL & UT, USA James J KolataNotre Dame, USA Jorge López UTEP, USA Joseph B NatowitzTexas A & M, USA Ma Esther Ortiz IF-UNAM Stuart PittelDelaware, USA Andrés SandovalIF-UNAM Adam SzczepaniakIndiana, USA Piet Van IsackerGANIL, France Michael WiescherNotre Dame, USA Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (Chair)IF-UNAM Roelof BijkerICN-UNAM Ruben FossionICN-UNAM David LizcanoININ Sponsors Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAMInstituto de Física, UNAMInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones NuclearesDivisión de Física Nuclear de la SMFCentro Latinoamericano de Física

  16. Regulatory Review Committee update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, T. [Polishuk, Camman and Steele, London ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The Committee's objectives, current membership and current issues are reviewed. Each current issue, notably the consultation process with the Ministry of Natural Resources, appeal of Ministry actions, orphan wells/security deposits, oilfield fluid disposal and labour code practices review are discussed in some detail. Dissatisfaction with the current appeals process to the Ministry is highlighted, along with a search for an all encompassing solution. The orphan well problem also received considerable attention, with similar demands for a comprehensive solution.

  17. Annex 5. Monitoring committee

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Head of monitoring committee: the Research Commission of the govern­ment of French Polynesia. Panel members Representatives of the following organisations: IRD centre in Papeete Oceanologic Center of the Pacific/Ifremer Investment Promotion Authority Environment Division EPIC Vanille Institut Louis-Malardé Gepsun “Natural Substances process engineering” technology platform (cf. Abbreviations) Fisheries Division Economic Affairs Division External Trade Division Development of Industry and the...

  18. Environment Committee report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, Geoffrey.

    1986-01-01

    The findings of the House of Commons Environment Committee (March 1986) on radioactive waste are examined. The report includes 43 recommendations and conclusions, many of which are directed at improving public acceptance of nuclear power, rather than constituting an attack on the nuclear industry. Some of the major topics considered in the report include: waste disposal, waste classification, waste disposal policy, discharges, reprocessing, and public acceptance. (UK)

  19. Interim report of working group on development and examination of new material, high performance centrifuge technology, Advisory Committee on Nuclear Uranium Enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The industrialization of uranium enrichment in Japan has been advanced by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. by centrifugal separation technology. In April, 1988, the partial operation of the uranium enrichment prototype plant by centrifugal separation process (200 t SWU/year) was begun in Ningyo Pass, Okayama Prefecture, and its full operation is expected in January, 1989. Based on this achievement, Japan Nuclear Fuel Industry Co., Ltd. advances the construction of a commercial uranium enrichment plant in Rokkasho Village, Aomori Prefecture, aiming at the start of operation around 1991. On the other hand, the environment surrounding the uranium enrichment business in Japan is extremely severe at present, and due to the excessive supply capacity of world uranium enrichment service and the recent rapid appreciation of yen, the further improvement of the economical efficiency of Japanese uranium enrichment business is demanded. The working group held four meetings since May, 1988, and evaluated the present status of the research and development of new material, high performance centrifuges, and investigated and discussed the method of advancing the research and development hereafter. The results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. 49 CFR 92.21 - Deduction from pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... salary offset may be made, the chief of the accounting or finance office of the paying DOT operating... accounting or finance office of the paying DOT operating element before collection of the indebtedness by...

  1. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Ordinary meeting on 30 January 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 January 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 26: with the introduction of the merit recognition system in the framework of the 5-yearly review of CERN employment conditions, Administrative Circular No. 26 has been revised. The committee took note of the revised document which is being finalized for submission to the Director-General for approval in the near future. Technical analysis of CERN Health Insurance Scheme: the Committee was informed that a group has been set up by the Director-General to analyse the financial situation of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme in the short and long term, and to propose measures to ensure that the Scheme remains in financial balance, with adequate cover, over the medium term. The group's terms of reference and membership were communicated. Voluntary programmes It was announced that the programmes: 'part-time work as a pre-retirement measure...

  2. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 30 JANUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 30 January 2007 included: Administrative Circular No. 26: with the introduction of the merit recognition system in the framework of the 5-yearly review of CERN employment conditions, Administrative Circular No. 26 has been revised. The Committee took note of the revised document which is being finalized for submission to the Director-General for approval in the near future. Technical analysis of CERN Health Insurance Scheme: the Committee was informed that a group has been set up by the Director-General to analyse the financial situation of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme in the short and long term, and to propose measures to ensure that the Scheme remains in financial balance, with adequate cover, over the medium term. The group's terms of reference and membership were communicated. Voluntary programmes It was announced that the programmes: 'part-time work as a pre-retirement mea...

  3. Standing Concertation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 27 FEBRUARY 2007 The main items discussed at the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 27 February 2007 included: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): It was announced that a Management/Staff Association working group had been set up to discuss the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS): Members : M. Büttner, E. Chiaveri (chair), Ph. Defert, D. Klem, M. Vitasse, J.-M. Saint-Viteux. It was noted that the Staff Association was launching a questionnaire on SLS and distributed to all members of the personnel. Merit Recognition Guidelines: In the context of the new Merit Appraisal and Recognition Scheme (MARS), the committee took note of the CERN-wide 2007 Merit Recognition Guidelines, including the Frequently Asked Questions on HR Department's dedicated website. Information on CERN's medium and long-term plans (MTP-LTP)/Contract renewals/ External mobility The Committee took note of the information provided on CERN's MTP-LTP and of documentation distributed at the meeting by the Staff ...

  4. Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer compensation relationship to company performance in state-owned entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H.R. Bussin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optimal contracting continues to dominate boardroom and dinner discussions worldwide in light of the 2008 global financial crisis and especially in South Africa, due to the growing income gap. Increased scrutiny is being placed on South African state-owned entities (SOEs, as a result of the seemingly poor performance of SOEs. Some of the SOEs are reported to have received financial bailouts from taxpayers’ money, while executives are raking in millions of rands in remuneration, provoking some concerns on the alignment of executive pay to company performance in SOEs. Aim: The study will assist remuneration committees and policymakers in the structuring of executive pay in SOEs to ensure alignment to company performance. Setting: The study sought to assess, based on empirical evidence, if there is a positive relationship between Chief Executive Officer (CEO and Chief Financial Officer (CFO remuneration and company performance in South African SOEs in the period between 2010 and 2014. All 21 Schedule 2 SOEs were included in the study. Methods: The research was a quantitative archival research methodology. Correlation and multiple regression analysis were the main statistical techniques used in this study. Results: Contrary to popular media, a positive relationship between CEO and CFO remuneration (fixed pay and short-term incentives and company performance in SOEs was observed. Company size appears to be the key determiner of fixed pay in SOEs. The positive relationship was mainly noted on absolute profitability measurements like EBITDA (earnings before interest and tax and depreciation and amortisation and net profit. Conclusion: SOE remuneration committees and policymakers should maintain the positive relationship; however, more emphasis should be placed on financial efficiency measurements so as to enhance efficiencies in SOEs.

  5. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, D.J. [Consumers Power Co., Covert, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  6. Understanding the "Family Gap" in Pay for Women with Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Waldfogel

    1998-01-01

    As the gender gap in pay between women and men has been narrowing, the 'family gap' in pay between mothers and nonmothers has been widening. One reason may be the institutional structure in the United States, which has emphasized equal pay and opportunity policies but not family policies, in contrast to other countries that have implemented both. The authors now have evidence on the links between one such family policy and women's pay. Recent research suggests that maternity leave coverage, b...

  7. 27 CFR 70.103 - Failure to pay tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to pay tax. 70.103... § 70.103 Failure to pay tax. Whoever fails to pay any tax imposed by Part I of Subchapter A of Chapter... penalty of 5 percent of the tax due but unpaid. For additional penalties for failure to pay tax, see 27...

  8. Relative pay and job satisfaction: some new evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Anh; Taylor, Jim; Bradley, Steve

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of job satisfaction using data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study. The determinants of interest include actual pay, relative pay, hours of work, job autonomy and several personal characteristics. We also investigate the determinants of satisfaction with pay conditional on a worker's satisfaction with other domains of job satisfaction, such as satisfaction with job security. We find that relative pay is statistically significant but that i...

  9. Employee perspectives on individualized pay : Attitudes and fairness perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Stråberg, Teresia

    2010-01-01

    The use of various types of individualized pay setting has increased dramatically in Sweden. In order for individualized pay to work as an incentive, the pay system has to be perceived as fair. This thesis focuses on the various subjective perceptions that arise in relation to individualized pay setting, since such perceptions may have consequences for employee attitudes and behavior. Using survey data from Swedish human service workers (Study I and II) as well as other public employees (Stud...

  10. Incentive pay and gender gaps in the Nordic countries

    OpenAIRE

    Westling, Tatu

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of incentive pay on gender pay gaps in Finland, Norway and Sweden among professionals and managers within MNCs. Mercer 2009 Total Remuneration Survey data is utilised. Uniform job ladder, occupation, industry and wage definitions enable consistent cross-country comparisons. In addition to the between-country variation, the within-country variation of gender gap with respect to incentive pay is analysed. The results indicate that gender pay gaps differ among the ...

  11. Who pays for health care in Asia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Owen; van Doorslaer, Eddy; Rannan-Eliya, Ravi P; Somanathan, Aparnaa; Adhikari, Shiva Raj; Akkazieva, Baktygul; Harbianto, Deni; Garg, Charu C; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Herrin, Alejandro N; Huq, Mohammed N; Ibragimova, Shamsia; Karan, Anup; Kwon, Soon-man; Leung, Gabriel M; Lu, Jui-fen Rachel; Ohkusa, Yasushi; Pande, Badri Raj; Racelis, Rachel; Tin, Keith; Tisayaticom, Kanjana; Trisnantoro, Laksono; Wan, Quan; Yang, Bong-Min; Zhao, Yuxin

    2008-03-01

    We estimate the distributional incidence of health care financing in 13 Asian territories that account for 55% of the Asian population. In all territories, higher-income households contribute more to the financing of health care. The better-off contribute more as a proportion of ability to pay in most low- and lower-middle-income territories. Health care financing is slightly regressive in three high-income economies with universal social insurance. Direct taxation is the most progressive source of finance and is most so in poorer economies. In universal systems, social insurance is proportional to regressive. In high-income economies, the out-of-pocket (OOP) payments are proportional or regressive while in low-income economies the better-off spend relatively more OOP. But in most low-/middle-income countries, the better-off not only pay more, they also get more health care.

  12. Tabanidae (Diptera) des pays-bas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leclercq, M.

    1967-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cette mise au point des Tabanides des Pays-Bas a été rendue possible grâce à la collaboration de M. V. S. van der Goot, département d'Entomologie, Zoölogisch Museum, Amsterdam, que nous remercions pour son amabilité. Nous avons pu étudier aussi les collections du Rijksmuseum van

  13. The consumer pays the energy bill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meulmeester, P.; Haffner, R.C.G.

    2005-01-01

    The liberalization of the energy market for small-scale consumers in the Netherlands coincides with a period in which consumers have to pay high energy bills. However, the cause of this is not the liberalization, but the high oil prices and raised taxes. In this article an overview is given of the total energy bill n the Netherlands, its components and the first effects of the liberalization process [nl

  14. How to pay in LicenseScript

    OpenAIRE

    Corin, R.J.; Chong, C.N.; Etalle, Sandro; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2003-01-01

    Current DRM systems do not provide flexible payment methods, requiring the user to handle the payment by hand. For instance, when the user needs to pay for watching a movie, she needs to decide which available payment method is the most optimal and suitable. This is a rather cumbersome process for the user that can be avoided by the specification of payment policies. A payment policy automates the payment process of each content usage, choosing the best alternative among the possible payment ...

  15. Volume 10 No. 11 November 2010 4364 WILLINGNESS TO PAY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-11-11

    Nov 11, 2010 ... to pay a premium, to buy an organic vegetable instead of a conventional one. The amount is a percentage ... the attitude, motives and willingness to pay for a range of organic products. The author laid ... organic products, buying preferences and willingness to pay premiums for selected organic vegetables.

  16. Some Thoughts on the Equal Pay Act and Coaching Salaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boring, Phyllis

    This paper discusses the Equal Pay Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as it applies to women athletic coaches and physical education teachers. The following points are considered: (1) application of the Equal Pay Act; (2) advantage of voluntary compliance with the Equal Pay Act; (3) factors used to measure "equal work"; (4)…

  17. 29 CFR 1614.408 - Civil action: Equal Pay Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil action: Equal Pay Act. 1614.408 Section 1614.408... EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Appeals and Civil Actions § 1614.408 Civil action: Equal Pay Act. A..., three years of the date of the alleged violation of the Equal Pay Act regardless of whether he or she...

  18. 12 CFR 268.407 - Civil action: Equal Pay Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil action: Equal Pay Act. 268.407 Section... Civil action: Equal Pay Act. A complainant is authorized under section 16(b) of the Fair Labor Standards..., if the violation is willful, three years of the date of the alleged violation of the Equal Pay Act...

  19. 5 CFR 531.214 - Setting pay upon promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Setting pay upon promotion. 531.214... Changes § 531.214 Setting pay upon promotion. (a) General. An agency must set an employee's payable rate of basic pay upon promotion following the rules in this section, consistent with 5 U.S.C. 5334(b...

  20. 29 CFR 1614.202 - Equal Pay Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equal Pay Act. 1614.202 Section 1614.202 Labor Regulations... OPPORTUNITY Provisions Applicable to Particular Complaints § 1614.202 Equal Pay Act. (a) In its enforcement of the Equal Pay Act, the Commission has the authority to investigate an agency's employment practices on...

  1. 5 CFR 534.504 - Annual adjustment in pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual adjustment in pay. 534.504 Section 534.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.504 Annual adjustment...

  2. 38 CFR 3.754 - Emergency officers' retirement pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...' retirement pay. 3.754 Section 3.754 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... officers' retirement pay. A retired emergency officer of World War I has basic eligibility to retirement pay by the Department of Veterans Affairs under Pub. L. 87-875 (sec. 11(b), Pub. L. 85-857) from date...

  3. 76 FR 80191 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Order 13594 of December 19, 2011 Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay By the authority vested in me as... Appropriations and Surface Transportation Extensions Act, 2011 (Public Law 111-322), which freezes certain pay... full applicable locality pay rates in non-foreign areas pursuant to the Non-Foreign Area Retirement...

  4. 29 CFR 70.42 - Consent to Pay Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Consent to Pay Fees. 70.42 Section 70.42 Labor Office of the....42 Consent to Pay Fees. (a) The filing of a request under this subpart will be deemed to constitute an agreement by the requester to pay all applicable fees charged under this part up to and including...

  5. 22 CFR 512.22 - Deduction from pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Deduction from pay. 512.22 Section 512.22... 1982 Salary Offset § 512.22 Deduction from pay. (a) Deduction by salary offset, from an employee's disposable current pay, shall be subject to the following circumstances: (1) When funds are available, the...

  6. 36 CFR 1202.52 - How do I pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I pay? 1202.52 Section... REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 Individual Access to Records § 1202.52 How do I pay? You must pay by check or money order. Make your check or money order payable to the National Archives and...

  7. 12 CFR 268.202 - Equal Pay Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equal Pay Act. 268.202 Section 268.202 Banks... REGARDING EQUAL OPPORTUNITY Provisions Applicable to Particular Complaints § 268.202 Equal Pay Act. Complaints alleging violations of the Equal Pay Act shall be processed under this part. ...

  8. 29 CFR 778.409 - Provision for overtime pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Provision for overtime pay. 778.409 Section 778.409 Labor... Regular Rate Principles Guaranteed Compensation Which Includes Overtime Pay § 778.409 Provision for overtime pay. The section 7(f) contract must provide for compensation at not less than one and one-half...

  9. 77 FR 70381 - General Schedule Locality Pay Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... 3206-AM51 General Schedule Locality Pay Areas AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Proposed rule with request for comments. SUMMARY: On behalf of the President's Pay Agent, the Office of Personnel Management is issuing proposed regulations to tie the metropolitan area portion of locality pay...

  10. 44 CFR 353.7 - Failure to pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Failure to pay. 353.7 Section... LICENSEE RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PLANS AND PREPAREDNESS § 353.7 Failure to pay. In any case where there is a dispute over the FEMA bill or where FEMA finds that a licensee has failed to pay a prescribed fee required...

  11. 27 CFR 70.97 - Failure to pay tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to pay tax. 70.97... § 70.97 Failure to pay tax. (a) Negligence—(1) General. If any part of any underpayment (as defined in... section 6651 of the Internal Revenue Code (relating to failure to file such return or pay tax) shall be...

  12. 38 CFR 3.654 - Active service pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Active service pay. 3.654..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Adjustments and Resumptions § 3.654 Active service pay. (a) General. Pension, compensation, or retirement pay will be discontinued under the circumstances...

  13. 44 CFR 354.7 - Failure to pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Failure to pay. 354.7 Section 354.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... PROGRAM § 354.7 Failure to pay. Where a licensee fails to pay a prescribed fee required under this part...

  14. 5 CFR 531.603 - Locality pay areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Locality pay areas. 531.603 Section 531.603 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Locality-Based Comparability Payments § 531.603 Locality pay areas. (a) Locality rates of...

  15. 40 CFR 66.61 - Duty to pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duty to pay. 66.61 Section 66.61... COLLECTION OF NONCOMPLIANCE PENALTIES BY EPA Payment § 66.61 Duty to pay. (a) Except where the owner or... who submits a petition pursuant to § 66.52 shall pay the penalty amount calculated by the owner or...

  16. 78 FR 21503 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Order 13641 of April 5, 2013 Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay By the authority vested in me as... Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 (Public Law 113-6), which requires certain pay... follows: Section 1. Statutory Pay Systems. Pursuant to the Consolidated and Further Continuing...

  17. 78 FR 649 - Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the... certain pay schedules for civilian Federal employees may take effect on the first day of the first applicable pay period beginning after the date specified in section 106(3) of Public Law 112-175, it is...

  18. 29 CFR 1450.23 - Deduction from pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deduction from pay. 1450.23 Section 1450.23 Labor... OWED THE UNITED STATES Salary Offset § 1450.23 Deduction from pay. (a) Deduction by salary offset, from an employee's current disposable pay, shall be subject to the following conditions: (1) Ordinarily...

  19. Equal pay legislation and the gender wage gap

    OpenAIRE

    Polachek, Solomon W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite equal pay legislation dating back 50 years, American women still earn 22% less than their male counterparts. In the UK, with its Equal Pay Act of 1970, and France, which legislated in 1972, the gap is 21% and 17% respectively, and in Australia it remains around 17%. Thus, the gender pay gap continues to be an important policy issue.

  20. Reviving Pay Equity: New Strategies for Attacking the Wage Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Peggy; Figart, Deborah M.

    1998-01-01

    Pay equity remains a problem linked to the problem of low pay. Pay equity must be understood as one solution to the problem of securing a living wage for women and men in the restructuring economy as well as a means for challenging gender equity. (JOW)

  1. 75 FR 21155 - National Equal Pay Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ..., helps women achieve wage fairness. This law brings us closer to ending pay disparities based on gender... Enforcement Task Force to bolster enforcement of pay discrimination laws, making sure women get equal pay for... America A Proclamation Throughout our Nation's history, extraordinary women have broken barriers to...

  2. 78 FR 21811 - National Equal Pay Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ..., 2013 National Equal Pay Day, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Over... of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 9, 2013, as National Equal Pay Day. I call upon all... Vol. 78 Thursday, No. 70 April 11, 2013 Part V The President Proclamation 8955--National Equal Pay...

  3. Isotope-committee reports 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; McCarthy, G.

    2000-12-01

    In this compilation the use of radioactive substances in therapies and in vivo examinations during 1999 is presented. For each examination the nuclide, chemical form, way of administration, number of hospitals, total number of examinations, mean activity used, interval of mean activity for the different hospitals and maximum activity is presented. Some examinations may be found at several different places. This is due to diverse routines of reporting and the confused use of old and new classifications. A certain caution is recommended when interpreting the data. Of the compilation it becomes known that during 1999 approximately 109,000 examinations and 2900 therapies were performed. The isotope committees at two hospitals have not presented their statistics

  4. Paying attention to orthography: A visual evoked potential study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Thomas Herdman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In adult readers, letters and words are rapidly identified within visual networks to allow for efficient reading abilities. Neuroimaging studies of orthography have mostly used words and letter strings that recruit many hierarchical levels in reading. Understanding how single letters are processed could provide further insight into orthographic processing. The present study investigated orthographic processing using single letters and pseudoletters when adults were encouraged to pay attention to or away from orthographic features. We measured evoked potentials (EPs to single letters and pseudoletters from adults while they performed an orthographic-discrimination task (letters vs. pseudoletters, a colour-discrimination task (red vs. blue, and a target-detection task (respond to #1 and #2. Larger and later peaking N1 responses (~170ms and larger P2 responses (~250 ms occurred to pseudoletters as compared to letters. This reflected greater visual processing for pseudoletters. Dipole analyses localized this effect to bilateral fusiform and inferior temporal cortices. Moreover, this letter-pseudoletter difference was not modulated by task and thus indicates that directing attention to or away from orthographic features didn’t affect early visual processing of single letters or pseudoletters within extrastriate regions. Paying attention to orthography or colour as compared to disregarding the stimuli (target-detection task elicited selection negativities at about 175 ms, which were followed by a classical N2-P3 complexes. This indicated that the tasks sufficiently drew participant’s attention to and away from the stimuli. Together these findings revealed that visual processing of single letters and pseudoletters, in adults, appeared to be sensory-contingent and independent of paying attention to stimulus features (e.g., orthography or colour.

  5. The Effects of Introducing Advertising in Pay TV: A Model of Asymmetric Competition between Pay TV and Free TV

    OpenAIRE

    Helmut Dietl; Markus Lang; Panlang Lin

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops a theoretical model of asymmetric competition between a pay TV and a free TV broadcaster. Our model shows that the pay TV broadcaster has incentives to place advertising on its channel if the marginal return on advertising exceeds the viewers' disutility from advertising. In this case, however, the pay TV advertising level is always below the corresponding level on free TV. The pay TV advertising level can increase with a higher viewer disutility from advertising but the p...

  6. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomquist, Douglas D.

    2000-01-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2000, a 14-member external peer review panel (the Garwin Committee) was convened on May 17-19, 2000 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of the review included activities in inertial confinement fission (ICF), weapon physics, development of radiation sources for weapons effects simulation, x-ray radiography, basic research in high energy density physics (HEDP), and pulsed power technology research and development. In his charge to the committee, Jeffrey Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (1600) asked that the review be based on four criteria (1) quality of science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions, and (4) performance in the operation and construction of major research facilities. In addition, specific programmatic questions were posed by the director and by the DOE-Defense Programs (DP). The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the committee's findings

  7. Does obfuscating excessive CEO pay work? The influence of remuneration report readability on say-on-pay votes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, Reggy; Kuang, Yu Flora; Qin, Bo

    2017-01-01

    This paper assesses whether reducing ‘readability’ is an effective obfuscation strategy for influencing the level of shareholder say-on-pay voting dissent in firms with excessive CEO pay. Based on a sample of UK-listed firms, our results indicate that in cases of excessive CEO pay, a less readable

  8. Business ethics in ethics committees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, P

    1990-01-01

    The "Ethics committees" column in this issue of the Hastings Center Report features an introduction by Cynthia B. Cohen and four brief commentaries on the roles hospital ethics committees may play in the making of institutional and public health care policy in the 1990s. The pros and cons of a broader, more public role for ethics committees in reconciling the business and patient care aspects of health care delivery are debated by Cohen in "Ethics committees as corporate and public policy advocates," and by Philip Boyle in this article. Boyle is an associate for ethical studies at The Hastings Center.

  9. PAYING FOR PERFORMANCE: THE POWER OF INCENTIVES OVER HABITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Jody L.

    2010-01-01

    New evidence suggests that individuals do not always make rational decisions, especially with regard to health habits. Smoking, misuse of alcohol, overeating and illicit drug use are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Thus, influencing health habits is critical for improving overall health and well-being. This editorial argues that economists should take a more active role in shaping individuals’ health habits. Two recent innovations in economic theory pave the way. One change is that some economists now view rationality as bounded and willpower in short supply. Another, related to the first, is a more accepting perspective on paternalism, authorizing economists to help individuals make better choices when the neoclassical model breaks down. Findings from psychology offer incentive-based approaches; specifically, contingency management (CM). Economists could use this approach as a basis for developing public and private policies. PMID:18348117

  10. Performance related pay: what makes a successful scheme?

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Aisling; Monks, Kathy

    1997-01-01

    The complexities surrounding the issue of reward management can be seen as indicative of the contradictions that exist within the discipline labelled human resource management (HRM). For example, Storey's (1992: 27) distinction between 'hard' and 'soft' HRM identifies the need for 'strategic interventions designed to elicit commitment and to develop resourceful humans' ('soft' HRM) and 'strategic interventions designed to achieve full utilisation of labour resources' ('hard' HRM. The current ...

  11. 76 FR 5160 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). ADDRESSES: A copy of...

  12. 76 FR 64348 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission is to provide...

  13. 77 FR 57085 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission is to provide...

  14. 77 FR 6113 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission is to provide...

  15. 78 FR 21354 - Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Federal Advisory Committee Act; Advisory Committee on Diversity for Communications in the Digital Age AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice of... Communications in the Digital Age (``Diversity Committee''). The Committee's mission is to provide...

  16. Achieving equal pay for comparable worth through arbitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, S C

    1982-01-01

    Traditional "women's jobs" often pay relatively low wages because of the effects of institutionalized stereotypes concerning women and their role in the work place. One way of dealing with sex discrimination that results in job segregation is to narrow the existing wage differential between "men's jobs" and "women's jobs." Where the jobs are dissimilar on their face, this narrowing of pay differences involves implementing the concept of "equal pay for jobs of comparable worth." Some time in the future, far-reaching, perhaps even industrywide, reductions in male-female pay differentials may be achieved by pursuing legal remedies based on equal pay for comparable worth. However, as the author demonstrates, immediate, albeit more limited, relief for sex-based pay inequities found in specific work places can be obtained by implementing equal pay for jobs of comparable worth through the collective bargaining and arbitration processes.

  17. Double Marginalization in Performance-Based Advertising: Implications and Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Chrysanthos Dellarocas

    2012-01-01

    An important current trend in advertising is the replacement of traditional pay-per-exposure (pay-per-impression) pricing models with performance-based mechanisms in which advertisers pay only for measurable actions by consumers. Such pay-per-action (PPA) mechanisms are becoming the predominant method of selling advertising on the Internet. Well-known examples include pay-per-click, pay-per-call, and pay-per-sale. This work highlights an important, and hitherto unrecognized, side effect of PP...

  18. Evaluating the impact of a new pay system on nurses in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, James; Ball, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the impact of implementing a new pay system (Agenda for Change) on nursing staff in the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK. This new pay system covered approximately 400,000 nursing staff. Its objectives were to improve the delivery of patient care as well as staff recruitment, retention and motivation. The new system aimed to provide a simplified approach to pay determination, with a more systematic use of agreed job descriptions and job evaluation to 'price' individual jobs, linked to a new career development framework. Secondary analysis of survey data. Analysis of results of large-scale surveys of members of the Royal College of Nursing of the United Kingdom (RCN) to assess the response of nurses to questions about the implementation process itself and their attitude to pay levels. The results demonstrated that there was some positive change after implementation of Agenda for Change in 2006, mainly some time after implementation, and that the process of implementation itself raised expectations that were not fully met for all nurses. There were clear indications of differential impact and reported experiences, with some categories of nurse being less satisfied with the process of implementation. The overall message is that a national pay system has strengths and weaknesses compared to the local systems used in other countries and that these benefits can only be maximised by effective communication, adequate funding and consistent management of the system. How nurses' pay is determined and delivered can be a major satisfier and incentive to nurses if the process is well managed and can be a factor in supporting clinical practice, performance and innovation. This study highlights that a large-scale national exercise to reform the pay system for nurses is a major undertaking, carries risk and will take significant time to implement effectively. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. LLNL Electrical Safety Committee Summary report for 1993 and 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niven, W.A.; Trost, S.R.

    1995-03-01

    The ESC is presently organized with three subcommittees: Guidelines and Regulations, Programs and Training, and Performance Measurement and Analysis. Current membership is attached for information, as well as the charters of the three subcommittees. The committee at large meets once a quarter, the Executive Committee, comprised of the Committee Chair, the Executive Secretary and the Subcommittee Chairs meets twice quarterly, and the subcommittees meet once or twice per month. Minutes of meetings are distributed to the ES&H Working Group and senior Laboratory management.

  20. Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Elsayed, A.E.A.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the UK Skills Surveys, we show that the part-time pay penalty for female workers within low- and medium-skilled occupations decreased significantly over the period 1997-2006. The convergence in computer use between part-time and full-time workers within these occupations explains a large share of the decrease in the part-time pay penalty. However, the lower part-time pay penalty is also related to lower wage returns to reading and writing which are performed more intensively b...

  1. 76 FR 19176 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ...) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 89) to be held May 11-20, 2011. The primary matters to be considered at MSC... --Technical assistance sub-programme in maritime safety and security --Capacity-building for the... business --Report of the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend these two meetings up...

  2. 78 FR 29201 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Marine Safety Committee to be held at the IMO... session of the Sub-Committee) Technical co-operation activities relating to maritime safety and security... amendments to mandatory instruments Measures to enhance maritime security Goal-based new ship construction...

  3. 78 FR 32699 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... Session of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Sub-Committee on Safety of Navigation to be... --Report to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend this meeting up to the seating... system ``BeiDou'' in the maritime field --International Telecommunication Union (ITU) matters, including...

  4. 77 FR 47491 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... to the Maritime Safety Committee Members of the public may attend this meeting up to the seating... Session of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Sub-Committee on Dangerous Goods, Solid Cargoes... --Amendment 37-14 to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and supplements, including...

  5. 77 FR 57638 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Marine Safety Committee to be held at the IMO... seventeenth session of the Sub-Committee); Technical co-operation activities relating to maritime safety and... amendments to mandatory instruments; Measures to enhance maritime security; Goal-based new ship construction...

  6. 75 FR 63888 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Work Methods and Organization of Work of the Legal Committee --Any other business --Consideration of... for the ninety-seventh Session of the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Legal Committee to... Pollution Damage, 2001 --Consideration of a proposal to amend the limits of liability of the 1996 Protocol...

  7. 76 FR 12787 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... --Any other business. --The public should be aware that Legal Committee has received a proposal to... the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) Legal Committee to be held at the IMO headquarters in... treatment of seafarers in the event of a maritime accident; --Consideration of a proposal to amend the...

  8. [The Editorial Advisory Committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H

    1996-12-01

    Since 1970, Revista Médica de Chile applies the peer review system as a main step in the selection and improvement of the manuscripts to be published. Over 150 experts participate in this process annually, reviewing up to 5 manuscripts per year. The final decision with regards to to the acceptability of a manuscript remains a responsibility of the Editor. The reviewers are selected by the Editor and his Associates among clinical investigators, prominent subspecialits and basic scientists, according to the nature of the manuscript. Most of them work in Chile. Their names are published and their confidential work is acknowledged in a special chronicle published in the Revista once a year. A small number of these reviewers appears in every issue of the journal identified as Members of its Editorial Advisory Committee. They have been selected by the Editors among those reviewers who deal with a greater number of manuscripts and also those experienced specialists whose opinion is requested when an exceptional conflict of opinions is raised by the authors and their reviewers. After 5 to 10 years of a highly praised collaboration, the previous Committee has been changed and new names were included, starting in this issue of Revista Médica de Chile.

  9. STANDING CONCERTATION COMMITTEE

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    ORDINARY MEETING ON 29 SEPTEMBER 2003 Original: English This meeting was devoted to the main topics summarised below. 1 Follow-up from the meetings of TREF and the Finance Committee in September 2003 The last meeting of TREF had been devoted to presentations and clarifications on the 5-Yearly Review process. The content and planning of the 2005 Review are matters for the next Management, which will be presented to TREF next year. Underlining that due account has to be taken of the limited resources available to conduct such an exercise, the Staff Association stated that it looks forward to the concertation process at the SCC in preparing the next 5-Yearly Review to define an optimum set of topics in order to ensure that CERN can attract, retain and motivate the personnel that it needs to remain a centre of excellence. The Chairman of the SCC recalled that an information document on the Cost-Variation Index for 2004 had been transmitted to the Finance Committee last September and that complete information o...

  10. Who should set CEO pay? The press? Congress? Shareholders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, A R; Panner, M J

    1992-01-01

    Populist fervor in an election year has transformed executive compensation from a business issue into a political one. Critics, led by Graef Crystal, author of In Search of Excess: The Overcompensation of American Executives, charge that CEOs are ripping off shareholders with their outrageous salaries while running U.S. corporations into the ground. Politicians claim overpaid CEOs are the root cause of the U.S. competitiveness problem. Add a recessionary business climate to the fact that some CEOs earn 130 times more than their lowest paid employees, and you have the makings of a populist rebellion. In a bid to appease voters, Congress is considering several bills that would limit the deductibility of "excessive executive salaries," the SEC has opened the issue to shareholder comment, and the Financial Accounting Standards Board is looking at new accounting standards for granting stock options to executives as part of company compensation schemes. Andrew R. Brownstein and Morris J. Panner say it's time to put the debate back where it belongs--in a business context. The real question is not are executives paid too much, but are shareholders getting their money's worth. Most U.S. corporations use stock compensation to link company long-term performance to executive salaries. And because of the staggering market performance of U.S. corporations in the 1980s, an overwhelming majority of CEOs are actually paid in line with their performance. Rather than cut executive pay, Brownstein and Panner suggest that corporations extend incentive-based compensation plans to all employees, thus narrowing the salary gap and establishing pay for performance at every level of the organization.

  11. Pay-what-you-want pricing schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahsay, Goytom Abraha; Samahita, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Pay-What-You-Want (PWYW) pricing schemes are becoming increasingly popular. We develop a model incorporating self-image into the buyer’s utility function and introduce heterogeneity in consumption utility and image-sensitivity, generating different purchase decisions and optimal prices across...... individuals. When a good’s fixed price is lower than a threshold fair value, PWYW can lead to a lower utility. This may result in a lower purchase rate and higher average price, accounting for previously unexplained field experimental evidence. An increase in the threshold value decreases the buyer’s utility...... and may further lower the purchase rate, resulting in a further increase in purchase price....

  12. Willingness to pay for wholesome canteen takeaway

    OpenAIRE

    Nordström, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) for a new intervention at the workplace: wholesome canteen takeaways (CTA), i.e. a low fat meal with a large amount of vegetables prepared at the workplace canteen that only requires re-heating. The contingent valuation method was used to elicit the WTP. Two surveys were carried out in Denmark; one large-scale Internet based survey and one survey at a workplace that introduced CTA. The results from the large-scal...

  13. On the Effectiveness of Incentive Pay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ivar; Hansen, Allan; Vámosi, Tamás S.

    2015-01-01

    research addressing the need to better understand how interdependencies arise among management control system elements and how they affect organisational effectiveness. Based on an in-depth case study on the implementation of a new incentive system in a manufacturing firm, we seek to provide more research...... and insight into how incentive pay features in complementary and substitutional relationships in an individual organisational setting. Greater insight can help illustrate how complementary and substitutional relationships unfold in even more complex ways than current research indicates, as well as how...

  14. EMBL pay settlement will cost millions

    CERN Multimedia

    Abott, A

    1999-01-01

    A labour dispute at EMBL, Heidelberg, was settled last week at a cost of at least DM4 million for the organisation's 16 member states. The lab has asked for clarification on whether the ruling from the IL0 refers simply to a salary adjustment from 1995 or also to a backdated implementation of higher salary scales. This second option would cost considerably more - 8 percent of the budget in back pay and DM3.5 million per annum (1/2 page).

  15. Pay Matters: The Piece Rate and Health in the Developing World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary E

    Piece rate pay remains a common form of compensation in developing-world industries. While the piece rate may boost productivity, it has been shown to have unintended consequences for occupational safety and health, including increased accident and injury risk. This paper explores the relationship between worker pay and physical and emotional health, and questions the modern day business case for piece rate pay in the developing world. The relationship between piece rate and self-reported measures of physical and emotional health is estimated using a large survey of garment workers in 109 Vietnamese factories between 2010 and 2014. A random effects logit model controls for factory and year, predicting worker health as a function of pay type, demographics, and factory characteristics. Workers paid by the piece report worse physical and emotional health than workers paid by the hour (OR = 1.38-1.81). Wage incentives provide the most consistently significant evidence of all demographic and factory-level variables, including the factory's own performance on occupational safety and health compliance measures. These results highlight the importance of how workers are paid to understanding the variability in worker health outcomes. More research is needed to better understand the business case supporting the continued use of piece rate pay in the developing world. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 5 CFR 550.172 - Relation to overtime, night, and holiday pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relation to overtime, night, and holiday..., and holiday pay. Premium pay for Sunday work is in addition to premium pay for holiday work, overtime... used to compute the pay for holiday work, overtime pay, or night pay differential. Law Enforcement...

  17. 76 FR 29722 - Elko Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... (Pub. L. 110-343) (the Act) and operates in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The...- Determination Act; (2) Review roles of RAC committee members and Committee Chairman; (3) Overview of project...

  18. Risk Aversion and Effort in an Incentive Pay Scheme with Multiplicative Noise: Theory and Experimental Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.V. Zubanov (Nick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe application of the classical "linear" model of incentive pay to the case when the noise is multiplicative to effort generates two predictions for a given strength of incentives: 1) more risk-averse workers will put in less effort, and 2) setting a performance target will weaken the

  19. 5 CFR 9901.344 - Other performance payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RELATIONS SYSTEMS (DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NATIONAL SECURITY PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) Pay and Pay Administration Performance-Based Pay § 9901.344 Other... officials may make other performance payments to— (1) Reward extraordinary individual performance, as...

  20. Frontal Brain Asymmetry and Willingness to Pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsøy, Thomas Z; Skov, Martin; Christensen, Maiken K; Stahlhut, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    Consumers frequently make decisions about how much they are willing to pay (WTP) for specific products and services, but little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying such calculations. In this study, we were interested in testing whether specific brain activation-the asymmetry in engagement of the prefrontal cortex-would be related to consumer choice. Subjects saw products and subsequently decided how much they were willing to pay for each product, while undergoing neuroimaging using electroencephalography. Our results demonstrate that prefrontal asymmetry in the gamma frequency band, and a trend in the beta frequency band that was recorded during product viewing was significantly related to subsequent WTP responses. Frontal asymmetry in the alpha band was not related to WTP decisions. Besides suggesting separate neuropsychological mechanisms of consumer choice, we find that one specific measure-the prefrontal gamma asymmetry-was most strongly related to WTP responses, and was most coupled to the actual decision phase. These findings are discussed in light of the psychology of WTP calculations, and in relation to the recent emergence of consumer neuroscience and neuromarketing.