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Sample records for performance effects resulting

  1. Simple, cost effective & result oriented framework for supplier performance measurement in sports goods manufacturing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergences of global markets have increased competition worldwide. For the Sports Goods Manufacturing Industry which is considered to be an intensive supplier base industry with limited resources to sustain in what is already a very competitive market there is a need for the entire supply chain viz. raw material and machinery suppliers and manufacturers to measure their supplier's performance to reduce business risks and revenue losses. How to design & execute a simple, cost effective & result oriented Framework for Supplier Performance Measurement for sports goods manufacturing small - medium enterprises is the main aim of this research paper.

  2. Effect of altitude on physiological performance: a statistical analysis using results of international football games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, Patrick E

    2007-12-22

    To assess the effect of altitude on match results and physiological performance of a large and diverse population of professional athletes. Statistical analysis of international football (soccer) scores and results. FIFA extensive database of 1460 football matches in 10 countries spanning over 100 years. Altitude had a significant (Pnegative impact on physiological performance as revealed through the overall underperformance of low altitude teams when playing against high altitude teams in South America. High altitude teams score more and concede fewer goals with increasing altitude difference. Each additional 1000 m of altitude difference increases the goal difference by about half of a goal. The probability of the home team winning for two teams from the same altitude is 0.537, whereas this rises to 0.825 for a home team with an altitude difference of 3695 m (such as Bolivia v Brazil) and falls to 0.213 when the altitude difference is -3695 m (such as Brazil v Bolivia). Altitude provides a significant advantage for high altitude teams when playing international football games at both low and high altitudes. Lowland teams are unable to acclimatise to high altitude, reducing physiological performance. As physiological performance does not protect against the effect of altitude, better predictors of individual susceptibility to altitude illness would facilitate team selection.

  3. Management Challenges in Developing Performance Assessments and Effectively Communicating Their Results - 13612

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Steve; Mahoney, Mark [Savannah River Remediations LLC, Building 705-1C, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the cleaned waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making, performance assessments have been developed for the low-level waste disposal facility and for the SRS Tank Farms. Although these performance assessments share many similar features, the nature of the hazards and associated containments differ. As a management team, we are challenged to effectively communicate both the similarities and differences of these performance assessments, how they should be used to support sound decision making for treatment, disposal and waste tank cleaning decisions, and in defending their respective assumptions to the regulatory community and the public but, equally important, to our own corporate decision makers and operations personnel. Effective development and defense of these performance assessments, and effective interpretation and communication of the results are key to making cost-effective, pragmatic decisions for the safe disposal of the low-level waste and stabilization and operational closure of the cleaned tanks and associated structures. This paper will focus on the importance and challenges in communicating key attributes, conclusions and operational implications within a company. (authors)

  4. Effect of material selection and background impurity on interface property and resulted CIP-GMR performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xilin; Morrone, Augusto; Nikolaev, Konstantin; Kief, Mark; Ostrowski, Mark

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effect of background base pressure, wafer-transferring time between process modules, and stack layer material selection on the current-in-plane giant magneto-resistive (CIP-GMR) interface properties and the resulted CIP-GMR performance. Experimental results showed that seed layer/AFM interface, AFM/pinned layer (PL) interface, pinned layer/Ru interface, and reference layer (RL)/Cu spacer interface are among the most critical ones for a CIP-GMR device. By reducing the background impurity level (water moisture and oxygen), optimizing the wafer process flow sequence, and careful stack-layer material selection, such critical interfaces in a CIP-GMR device can be preserved. Consequently, a much robust GMR performance control can be achieved.

  5. The Effect of Marketing Strategies Construct on Firm Performance: Results from Pilot Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Akbar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties that face small and medium organization in any field are severe nowadays. The importance of SMEs is vital. Different researchers have proposed different success factors for small and medium organization, like finance, skilled workforce, technology, innovation and most importantly marketing. Marketing is the spine of any organization, through marketing firms bring innovation, awareness of competitors, awareness of products, building relation with customers. A good marketing strategy increases the sale of product for sure. The small and medium organization face difficulties in doing marketing, because of limited finance, limited or unskilled staff, unawareness of marketing strategies, no or less use of media. This paper presents the pilot survey result for the study of effect of marketing strategies construct (entrepreneurial, guerrilla, relationship, ambush, viral and niche marketing, on firm performance. Descriptive statistics, normality, reliability and preliminary factor analysis (EFA test were run, all the data were presented in tables below. The result shows that all the questionnaire were normally distributed, and the outcomes are all normal.

  6. Effects of creatine supplementation on exercise performance and muscular strength in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, L; Balzarini, C; Colombo, R; Mora, G; Pastore, I; De Ambrogio, R; Caligari, M

    2001-10-15

    Creatine supplementation in humans has been reported to enhance power and strength both in normal subjects and in patients with various neuromuscular diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of supplementation on exercise performance and maximal voluntary isometric muscular contraction (MVIC) in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients. We report the results obtained in 28 patients with probable/definite ALS. In each patient we acquired the dynamometric measurement of MVIC in 10 muscle groups of upper and lower limbs and a measure of fatigue by means of an high-intensity intermittent protocol in elbow flexors and knee extensors muscles. All patients completed the protocols at the baseline and after supplementation of 20 g per day for 7 days and after supplementation of 3 g per day for 3 and 6 months. MVIC increased after 7 days of supplementation in 20 patients (70%) in knee extensors and in 15 (53%) of them also in elbow flexors. A statistically significant difference between pre and post-treatment mean values of MVIC was found both in elbow flexors (P<0.05) and knee extensors (p<0.04). The analysis of the slopes of fatigue test showed a statistically significant improvement after 7 days of supplementation in 11 patients (39%) in elbow flexors and in 9 patients (32%) also in knee extensors muscles. During the 6-month follow-up period all the examined parameters showed a linear progressive decline. In conclusion, our preliminary results have demonstrated that supplementation temporary increases maximal isometric power in ALS patients so it may be of potential benefit in situations such as high intensity activity and it can be proposed as a symptomatic treatment.

  7. Effects of Crust Ingestion on Mixer Pump Performance in Tank 241-SY-101: Workshop Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennen, C.E.; Stewart, C.W.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    In August 1999, a workshop was held at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to discuss the effects of crust ingestion on mixer pump performance in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The main purpose of the workshop was to evaluate the potential for crust ingestion to degrade mixing and/or damage the mixer pump. The need for a previously determined 12-inch separation between the top of the mixer pump inlet and the crust base was evaluated. Participants included a representative from the pump manufacturer, an internationally known expert in centrifugal pump theory, Hanford scientists and engineers, and operational specialists representing relevant fields of expertise. The workshop focused on developing an understanding of the pump design, addressing the physics of entrainment of solids and gases into the pump, and assessing the effects of solids and gases on pump performance. The major conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) Entrainment of a moderate amount of solids or gas from the crust should not damage the pump or reduce its lifetime, though mixing effectiveness will be somewhat reduced. (2) Air binding should not damage the pump. Vibrations due to ingestion of gas, solids, and objects potentially could cause radial loads that might reduce the lifetime of bearings and seals. However, significant damage would require extreme conditions not associated with the small bubbles, fine solids, and chunks of relatively weak material typical of the crust. (3) The inlet duct extension opening, 235 inches from the tank bottom, should be considered the pump inlet, not the small gap at 262 inches. (4) A suction vortex exists at the inlet of all pumps. The characteristics of the inlet suction vortex in the mixer pump are very hard to predict, but its effects likely extend upward several feet. Because of this, the current 12-inch limit should be replaced with criteria based on actual monitored pump performance. The most obvious criterion (in addition to current operational

  8. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layton, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is

  9. Perform Tests and Document Results and Analysis of Oxide Layer Effects and Comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, E. D. [ORNL; DelCul, G. D. [ORNL; Spencer, B. B. [ORNL; Hunt, R. D. [ORNL; Ausmus, C. [ORNL

    2014-08-30

    During the initial feasibility test using actual used nuclear fuel (UNF) cladding in FY 2012, an incubation period of 30–45 minutes was observed in the initial dry chlorination. The cladding hull used in the test had been previously oxidized in a dry air oxidation pretreatment prior to removal of the fuel. The cause of this incubation period was attributed to the resistance to chlorination of an oxide layer imparted by the dry oxidation pretreatment on the cladding. Subsequently in 2013, researchers at the Korea Atomic Energy Institute (KAERI) reported on their chlorination study [R1] on ~9-gram samples of unirradiated ZirloTM cladding tubes that had been previously oxidized in air at 500oC for various time periods to impart oxide layers of varying thickness. In early 2014, discussions with Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracted technical consultants from Westinghouse described their previous development (and patents) [R2] on methods of chemical washing to remove some or all of the hydrous oxide layer imparted on UNF cladding during irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) . Thus, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) study, described herein, was planned to extend the KAERI study on the effects of anhydrous oxide layers, but on larger ~100-gram samples of unirradiated zirconium alloy cladding tubes, and to investigate the effects of various methods of chemical pretreatment prior to chlorination with 100% chlorine on the average reaction rates and Cl2 usage efficiencies.

  10. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, Mark [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Building 705-1C, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is

  11. Examining the Operational Effectiveness and Accountability of Federal Agencies as Indicated in the Performance and Accountability Reports Required by the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caron, Lenn E; Farricker, Daniel A; Underwood, Jeffrey R

    2007-01-01

    .... The agencies chosen were performing at different levels of effectiveness, according to the performance and accountability scorecard produced by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, a non...

  12. Effects of chronic Rhodiola Rosea supplementation on sport performance and antioxidant capacity in trained male: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A; Tranchita, E; Duranti, G; Ciminelli, E; Quaranta, F; Ceci, R; Cerulli, C; Borrione, P; Sabatini, S

    2010-03-01

    Rhodiola Rosea, is an adaptogen plant which has been reported to promote fatty acids utilisation, to ameliorate antioxidant function, and to improve body resistance to physical strenuous efforts. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects on physical performance as well as on the redox status of a chronic Rhodiola Rosea supplementation in a group of competitive athletes during endurance exercise. Following a chronic supplementation with Rhodiola Rosea for 4 weeks, 14 trained male athletes underwent a cardio-pulmonary exhaustion test and blood samples to evaluate their antioxidant status and other biochemical parameters. These data were compared with those coming from the same athletes after an intake of placebo. The evaluation of physical performance parameters showed that HR Max, Borg Scale level, VO(2) max and duration of the test were essentially unaffected by Rhodiola Rosea assumption. On the contrary, Rhodiola Rosea intake reduced, in a statistically significative manner, plasma free fatty acids levels. No effect on blood glucose was found. Blood antioxidant status and inflammatory parameters resulted unaffected by Rhodiola Rosea supplementation. Blood lactate and plasma creatine kinase levels were found significantly lower (P<0.05) in Rhodiola Rosea treated subjects when compared to the placebo treated group. Chronic Rhodiola Rosea supplementation is able to reduce both lactate levels and parameters of skeletal muscle damage after an exhaustive exercise session. Moreover this supplementation seems to ameliorate fatty acid consumption. Taken together those observation confirm that Rhodiola Rosea may increase the adaptogen ability to physical exercise.

  13. Effects of resistance training exercise on cognitive performance in elderly individuals with memory impairment: results of a controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Leopold Busse

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the effects of a resistance training programon cognitive performance and muscle strength in sedentaryelderly individuals with memory impairment. Methods: Thirty-onesedentary elderly persons with no dementia or depression wererandomly distributed into two groups: Physical Activity Group andControl Group. The resistance training exercise program lastednine months and consisted of three series of six exercises persession, carried out on lever-type equipment for approximatelyone hour, twice a week. Every three months, both groups weresubmitted to the following cognitive tests: Rivermead BehavioralMemory Test (RBMT, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAISDirect and Indirect Digit Span, Memory Complaints Scale, andCambridge Cognitive Test (CAMCOG. Results: After nine months,the group that did resistance exercises showed a significantincrease in the standardized RBMT score (p = 0.021 and in musclestrength (p < 0.001, with no significant difference in the otherparameters evaluated. Conclusions: These results indicate thatsupervised resistance exercises can improve memory performancein sedentary elderly individuals with prior memory compromise,besides increasing muscle strength.

  14. Brush Seals for Cryogenic Applications: Performance, Stage Effects, and Preliminary Wear Results in LN2 and LH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.; Perkins, H. Douglas; Hoopes, Joan F.; Williamson, G. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant contacting seals and have significantly lower leakage than labyrinth seals in gas turbine applications. Their long life and low leakage make them candidates for use in rocket engine turbopumps. Brush seals, 50.8 mm (2 in.) in diameter with a nominal 127-micron (0.005-in.) radial interference, were tested in liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) at shaft speeds up to 35,000 and 65,000 rpm, respectively, and at pressure drops up to 1.21 MPa (175 psid) per brush. A labyrinth seal was also tested in liquid nitrogen to provide a baseline. The LN2 leakage rate of a single brush seal with an initial radial shaft interference of 127 micron (0.005 in.) measured one-half to one-third the leakage rate of a 12-tooth labyrinth seal with a radial clearance of 127 micron (0.005 in.). Two brushes spaced 7.21 micron (0.248 in.) apart leaked about one-half as much as a single brush, and two brushes tightly packed together leaked about three-fourths as much as a single brush. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor with a surface finish of 0.81 micron (32 microinch) was 25 micron (0.0010 in.) after 4.3 hr of shaft rotation in liquid nitrogen. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25 to 76 micron (0.001 to 0.003 in.) under the same conditions. Wear results in liquid hydrogen were significantly different. In liquid hydrogen the rotor did not wear, but the bristle material transferred onto the rotor and the initial 127 micron (0.005 in.) radial interference was consumed. Relatively high leakage rates were measured in liquid hydrogen. More testing is required to verify the leakage performance, to validate and calibrate analysis techniques, and to determine the wear mechanisms. Performance, staging effects, and preliminary wear results are presented.

  15. Effect of a universal anxiety prevention programme (FRIENDS) on children's academic performance: results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryabina, Elena; Taylor, Gordon; Stallard, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Evaluations of school-based anxiety prevention programmes have reported improvements in psychological functioning although little is known about their effect upon educational outcomes. One thousand three hundred and sixty-two children from 40 primary schools in England took part in the randomised controlled trial, Preventing Anxiety in Children through Education in Schools. The trial investigated the effectiveness of a universal school-based cognitive behaviour therapy prevention programme, FRIENDS, delivered by health care staff or school staff compared with usual personal, social, health and education (PSHE) lessons. Self-report psychological outcomes and educational attainment on national standardised attainment tests in reading, writing and maths were collected 12 months postintervention. Analysis was performed at individual level using multivariable mixed effect models controlling for gender, type of intervention and school effect. Registered trial: ISRCTN: 23563048. At 12 months, anxiety reduced in the health-led FRIENDS group compared to school-led FRIENDS and PSHE. There were no between-group differences in academic performance regardless of gender, deprivation, ethnicity and additional educational needs. School-based mental health interventions should assess psychological and educational outcomes. Further research should directly compare the effects of interventions led by health and school staff. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  16. THE EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM DRUGS ON THE PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE OF YOUNG PEOPLE WITH MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE: RESULTS OF NONCOMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Dzeranova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the dynamics of physical performance in young people with mitral valve prolapse (MVP while taking magnesium orotate. Material and methods. Patients with MVP and phenotypic characteristics of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia (n=54, aged 19.2±0.3 years were included into the study. Hemodynamic parameters of physical performance were evaluated before and after taking magnesium orotate for 8 weeks. Results. Improvement of physical performance was found after magnesium orotate taking: threshold double product elevated from 1.86±0.05 to 2.06±0.05 units (p<0.001; threshold power increased - relative physical performance raised from 1.35±0.04 W/kg to 1.44±0.04 W/kg (p<0.05 and specific work from 12.3±0.65 W/kg to 14.2±0.71 W/kg (p<0.001; recovery time decreased. Conclusion. Improvement of hemodynamic maintenance of exercise load was found in adolescents with MVP during magnesium orotate taking. It was accompanied with physical performance and threshold power elevation and recovery time reduction.

  17. THE EFFECT OF ISLAMIC WORK ETHICS ON THE PERFORMANCE RESULT OF MUSLIM EMPLOYEES OF MARKETING SECTOR IN THE MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Hadisi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of Islam on efficiency of Muslim employees in multinational companies. The findings of the studies conducted to date examining the potential and actual impact of Islam in multinational setting indicates that although it seems that religion has no significant effect on multinational companies, but its internal effects such as internal and interpersonal conflicts with the type of activity of companies may be intensified. Moreover, these effects would be different based on the department of individual employees. For example, when the religious orientations of Muslims increase, their activities, according to the type of the product or service provided, in marketing sector of multinational companies may be affected. As the products and services offered would have more moral dimensions and marketing activities would be based on general moral rules, not a particular religion, we may achieve more effective results and personal and interpersonal conflicts can be reduced.

  18. Effect of the application of an electric field on the performance of a two-phase loop device: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creatini, F; Di Marco, P; Filippeschi, S; Fioriti, D; Mameli, M

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the continuous development of electronics has pointed out the need for a change in mind with regard to thermal management. In the present scenario, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are novel promising two-phase passive heat transport devices that seem to meet all present and future thermal requirements. Nevertheless, PHPs governing phenomena are quite unique and not completely understood. In particular, single closed loop PHPs manifest several drawbacks, mostly related to the reduction of device thermal performance and reliability, i.e. the occurrence of multiple operational quasi-steady states. The present research work proposes the application of an electric field as a technique to promote the circulation of the working fluid in a preferential direction and stabilize the device operation. The tested single closed loop PHP is made of a copper tube with an inner tube diameter equal to 2.00 mm and filled with pure ethanol (60% filling ratio). The electric field is generated by a couple of wire-shaped electrodes powered with DC voltage up to 20 kV and laid parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glass tube constituting the adiabatic section. Although the electric field intensity in the working fluid region is weakened both by the polarization phenomenon of the working fluid and by the interposition of the glass tube, the experimental results highlight the influence of the electric field on the device thermal performance and encourage the continuation of the research in this direction. (paper)

  19. Heat performance resulting from combined effects of radiation and mixed convection in a rectangular cavity ventilated by injection or suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzaraa, K.; Bahlaoui, A.; Arroub, I.; Raji, A.; Hasnaoui, M.; Naïmi, M.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we investigated numerically heat transfer by mixed convection coupled to thermal radiation in a vented rectangular enclosure uniformly heated from below with a constant heat flux. The fresh fluid is admitted into the cavity by injection or suction, by means of two openings located on the lower part of both right and left vertical sides. Another opening is placed on the middle of the top wall to ensure the ventilation. Air, a radiatively transparent medium, is considered to be the cooling fluid. The inner surfaces, in contact with the fluid, are assumed to be gray, diffuse emitters and reflectors of radiation with identical emissivities. The effects of some pertinent parameters such as the Reynolds number, 300 ≤ Re ≤ 5000, and the emissivity of the walls, 0 ≤ ɛ ≤ 0.85, on flow and temperature patterns as well as on the heat transfer rate within the enclosure are presented for the two ventilation modes (injection and suction). The results indicate that the flow and thermal structures are affected by the thermal radiation for the two modes of imposed flow. However, the suction mode is found to be more favorable to the heat transfer in comparison with the injection one.

  20. Mental skills training effectively minimizes operative performance deterioration under stressful conditions: Results of a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, N E; Beane, J; Yurco, A M; Howley, L D; Bean, E; Myers, E M; Stefanidis, D

    2018-02-01

    Stress can negatively impact surgical performance, but mental skills may help. We hypothesized that a comprehensive mental skills curriculum (MSC) would minimize resident performance deterioration under stress. Twenty-four residents were stratified then randomized to receive mental skills and FLS training (MSC group), or only FLS training (control group). Laparoscopic suturing skill was assessed on a live porcine model with and without external stressors. Outcomes were compared with t-tests. Twenty-three residents completed the study. The groups were similar at baseline. There were no differences in suturing at posttest or transfer test under normal conditions. Both groups experienced significantly decreased performance when stress was applied, but the MSC group significantly outperformed controls under stress. This MSC enabled residents to perform significantly better than controls in the simulated OR under unexpected stressful conditions. These findings support the use of psychological skills as an integral part of a surgical resident training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recent Performance Results of VPIC on Trinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, W. D.; Bergen, B.; Bird, R. F.; Bowers, K. J.; Daughton, W. S.; Guo, F.; Le, A.; Li, H.; Nam, H.; Pang, X.; Stark, D. J.; Rust, W. N., III; Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.

    2017-10-01

    Trinity is a new DOE compute resource now in production at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Trinity has several new and unique features including two compute partitions, one with dual socket Intel Haswell Xeon compute nodes and one with Intel Knights Landing (KNL) Xeon Phi compute nodes, use of on package high bandwidth memory (HBM) for KNL nodes, ability to configure KNL nodes with respect to HBM model and on die network topology in a variety of operational modes at run time, and use of solid state storage via burst buffer technology to reduce time required to perform I/O. An effort is in progress to optimize VPIC on Trinity by taking advantage of these new architectural features. Results of work will be presented on performance of VPIC on Haswell and KNL partitions for single node runs and runs at scale. Results include use of burst buffers at scale to optimize I/O, comparison of strategies for using MPI and threads, performance benefits using HBM and effectiveness of using intrinsics for vectorization. Work performed under auspices of U.S. Dept. of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and supported by LANL LDRD program.

  2. A performance indicator of the effectiveness of human-machine interfaces for nuclear power plants: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moray, N.; Lee, J.; Vicente, K.J.; Jones, B.G.; Brock, R.; Djemil, T.; Rasmussen, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the authors report the results of experiments based on deGroot's work to assess the value of memory tests for measuring the quality of displays and the level of expertise of operators. Three kinds of display and people with three levels of expertise were included in the experiments. The displays were computer generated versions of traditional analog meters, traditional analog meters supplemented by a dynamic graphic representing the relation between temperature and pressure in some subsystems, and a dynamic graphic representing the underlying thermodynamics of power generation using the Rankine Cycle. The levels of expertise were represented by undergraduates with one semester of thermodynamics, graduate students of thermodynamics and nuclear engineering, and professional nuclear power plant operators. Each group watched a set of transients presented on the displays, using data generated by a high fidelity NPP training simulator, and were then asked three kinds of questions. The first measured their ability to recall the exact values of system state variables. The second measured their ability to recall what qualitative states the system had entered during the transient. The third measured their ability diagnose the nature of the transient. The results of the experiments are reported in relation to the possible use of memory tests to evaluate displays and the interaction of the quality of displays with the level of expertise of operators

  3. ERNIE performance with TSA portals Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labov, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-05

    This project extends the “Enhanced Radiological Nuclear Inspection and Evaluation” (ERNIE) system developed with CBP and DNDO to improve performance of PVT-based Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs). ERNIE was designed to be used with any RPM system. The first implementation was with the SAIC (Leidos) RPM-8 systems. In this project, we are demonstrating how effective the ERNIE approach can be when applied to the VM250 TSA portals used in NSDD programs. Part of the challenge in adapting ERNIE to handle VM250 portals is the lack of gamma spectral information. We report here on the first results showing how the ERNIE analysis can improve analysis of measurements with the VM250 RPMs.

  4. Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Pensinger, Stuart; Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2014-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. Based upon the results of the 2009 distillation comparison test (DCT) and recommendations of the expert panel, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) project advanced the technology by increasing reliability of the system through redesign of bearing assemblies and improved rotor dynamics. In addition, the project improved the CDS power efficiency by optimizing the thermoelectric heat pump (TeHP) and heat exchanger design. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell d International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades as compared to previous system performance. The system was challenged with Solution 1 from the NASA Exploration Life Support (ELS) distillation comparison testing performed in 2009. Solution 1 consisted of a mixed stream containing human-generated urine and humidity condensate. A secondary objective of this testing is to evaluate the performance of the CDS as compared to the state of the art Distillation Assembly (DA) used in the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). This was done by challenging the system with ISS analog waste streams. This paper details the results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  5. Developing Effective Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-14

    University When Performance Measurement Goes Bad Laziness Vanity Narcissism Too Many Pettiness Inanity 52 Developing Effective...Kasunic, October 14, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Narcissism Measuring performance from the organization’s point of view, rather than from

  6. Putting HLW performance assessment results in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neall, F.; Smith, P.; Sumerling, T.; Umeki, H.

    1995-01-01

    According to performance assessment results for the different disposal concepts investigated, the maximum radiation doses to the population lie well below the limit set in the official Swiss Protection Objective and below the level of present-day natural background radiation. A comparison of different performance assessments has shown that the following key factors determine radionuclide release from a repository: radionuclide inventory, canister material and failure mode, nuclide solubility limits, the permeability of the buffer material, retardation during transport through the near-field, the presence of an excavation disturbed zone in the rock, the distance to the nearest major water-bearing fracture zone, the conceptual model for transport in fractured rock and near-surface dilution and dose factors. (author) 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. CMS Tracker Alignment Performance Results Summer 2016

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The tracking system of the CMS detector provides excellent resolution for charged particle tracks and an efficient way of tagging jets. In order to reconstruct good quality tracks, the position and orientation of each silicon pixel and strip modules need to be determined with a precision of several micrometers. The performance of the CMS tracker alignment in 2016 using cosmic-ray data recorded at 0 T magnetic field and proton-proton collision data recorded at 3.8 T magnetic field has been studied. The data-driven validation of the results are presented. The time-dependent movement of the pixel detector's large-scale structure is demonstrated.

  8. CMS Tracker Alignment Performance Results 2016

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The tracking system of the CMS detector provides excellent resolution for charged particle tracks and an efficient way of tagging jets. In order to reconstruct good quality tracks, the position and orientation of each silicon pixel and strip module needs to be determined with a precision of several micrometers. The presented alignment results are derived following a global (Millepede-II) and a local (HipPy) fit approach. The performance of the CMS tracker alignment in 2016 using cosmic-ray data and the complete set of proton-proton collision data recorded at 3.8 T magnetic field has been studied. The data-driven validation of the results are shown. The time-dependent movement of the pixel detector's large-scale structure is demonstrated.

  9. Effects of daily milk supplementation on improving the physical and mental function as well as school performance among children: Results from a school feeding program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Rahmani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: School feeding programs are important interventions for improving the nutritional status of students. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the effects of milk supplementation on physical, mental and school performance of students. Methods: This case-control population-based intervention was conducted on 469 students from 4 schools in a medium socio-economic status region in Tehran. The schools were chosen by Iranian ministry of education and training and they were allocated in case and control groups randomly. All the students in the first to third classes in the intervention schools were daily consumed sterilized and homogenized milk for three months (250 ml each. Anthropometric measurements were done according to the standard methods. For evaluating the mental function, the Raven′s Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children (verbal, non-verbal, total Intelligent Quotient were conducted on students. School performance was assessed by grade-point averages of each student. Results: The weight of children was significantly different between control and intervention group at the end of the study among girls (23.0 ± 3.8 vs. 23.8 ± 4.3 kg; p < 0.05. Psychological tests′ scores were significantly different between the control and the intervention groups (p < 0.05 at the end of the trial among boys. The grade-point average was significantly different at the end of the trial between the intervention and the control group among girls (p < 0.05. Conclusions: School feeding programs focus on milk supplementation had beneficial effects on the physical function and school performances specifically among girls in Iran.

  10. Stirling convertor performance mapping test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Songgang; Peterson, Allen A.; White, Maurice A.; Faultersack, Franklyn; Redinger, Darin L.; Petersen, Stephen L.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected Free-Piston Stirling Convertors as a technology for future advanced radioisotope space power systems. In August 2000, DOE awarded competitive Phase I, Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) power system integration contracts to three major aerospace contractors, resulting in SRG conceptual designs in February 2001. All three contractors based their designs on the Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC) for DOE. The contract award to a single system integration contractor for Phases II and III of the SRG program is anticipated in late 2001. The first potential SRG mission is targeted for a Mars rover. Recent TDC performance data are provided in this paper, together with predictions from Stirling simulation models. .

  11. Performance effect of Lean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Borup; Israelsen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    To understand how the practices of Lean affect performance, we tested and validated a system-wide approach using mediating relationships in a structural equation model. We used a cross-sectional survey of 200 Danish companies that indicated that they used Lean. Thus, this study is especially...... relevant to Denmark, but the approach is empirically more generalizable. We show that the effect of Lean standardized flow production practices on performance is mediated by analytical continuous improvement empowerment practices and by delegation of decision rights practices. Thus, standardized flow...... of decision rights. The paper provides evidence that supports the view that middle managers’ actions further enhance performance in Lean companies. The right Lean behavior by middle managers increases the level of analytical continuous improvement empowerment. In total, high-performing Lean companies...

  12. First stages chronic kidney disease have mild effects on cognitive performance. Results of a 15,105 brazilian adult baseline cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Maria de Azeredo Passos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The aging of the population may lead to an increased prevalence of dementia and chronic kidney disease (CKD and their overlap. Objective: We investigated the association between CKD and cognitive performance among Brazilian adults (35-74 years. Methods: Baseline data analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adults (ELSA-Brasil, a multicenter cohort comprising 15,105 civil servants, was performed. Kidney function was defined by the CKD-Epi-estimated GRF and albumin creatinin ratio (ACR. Cognitive performance was measured across tests that included the word memory tests, verbal fluency tests and Trail Making Test B. Multiple logistic and linear regressions were used to investigate the association between CKD and global as well as test-specific lowered cognitive performance. Results: More than 90% of participants did not present CKD even considering reduced GFR or increased ACR simultaneously. Lowered cognitive performance was detected among 15.8% of the participants and mean values of GFR were slightly higher among those with normal than with lowered cognitive performance (86 ± 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 x 85 ± 16 mL/min/1.73 m2, p < 0.01. Age, education, skin-color, smoking, drinking, hypertension, and diabetes were associated with lowered cognition. After adjustment for these variables, there was no association between CKD and lowered cognitive performance. Negligibly small beta values were observed when analyzing CKD and the scores of all tests. Conclusion: These results suggest that cognitive performance remains preserved until renal function reaches significant worsening. Preventive measures to maintain renal function may contribute to the preservation of cognitive function.

  13. Effects of daily milk supplementation on improving the physical and mental function as well as school performance among children: results from a school feeding program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Khadijeh; Djazayery, Abolghasem; Habibi, Mohsen Ibrahim; Heidari, Homa; Dorosti-Motlagh, Ahmad Reza; Pourshahriari, Mahsima; Azadbakht, Leila

    2011-04-01

    School feeding programs are important interventions for improving the nutritional status of students. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the effects of milk supplementation on physical, mental and school performance of students. This case-control population-based intervention was conducted on 469 students from 4 schools in a medium socio-economic status region in Tehran. The schools were chosen by Iranian ministry of education and training and they were allocated in case and control groups randomly. All the students in the first to third classes in the intervention schools were daily consumed sterilized and homogenized milk for three months (250 ml each). Anthropometric measurements were done according to the standard methods. For evaluating the mental function, the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM) and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children (verbal, non-verbal, total Intelligent Quotient) were conducted on students. School performance was assessed by grade-point averages of each student. The weight of children was significantly different between control and intervention group at the end of the study among girls (23.0 ± 3.8 vs. 23.8 ± 4.3 kg; p performances specifically among girls in Iran.

  14. The effects of fatty fish intake on adolescents' nutritional status and associations with attention performance: results from the FINS-TEENS randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handeland, Katina; Skotheim, Siv; Baste, Valborg; Graff, Ingvild E; Frøyland, Livar; Lie, Øyvind; Kjellevold, Marian; Markhus, Maria W; Stormark, Kjell M; Øyen, Jannike; Dahl, Lisbeth

    2018-02-23

    Adolescence involves changes in dietary habits that may induce imbalances in the intake of different nutrients. Fish is an important dietary source of omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), vitamin D, several minerals and high-quality protein. By using secondary outcomes and exploratory analyses, the aims of this paper were to evaluate if nutritional biomarkers (red blood cell fatty acids, serum (s)-25(OH)D, s-ferritin and urinary iodine concentration (UIC)) were altered during a dietary intervention, and if they mediated previously reported changes in attention performance. In addition, to examine the status of the biomarkers and explore associations between dietary pattern, biomarkers and attention performance cross-sectionally at baseline. The Fish Intervention Studies-TEENS (FINS-TEENS) was a three-armed intervention trial, including adolescents from eight secondary schools (n = 415; age: 14-15y) in Bergen, Norway. Participants were individually randomized to receive either fish meals, meat meals or n-3 LCPUFA supplements, three times a week for a total of 12 weeks. Blood and urine samples were collected pre and post intervention and attention performance was assessed with the d2 test of attention. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) assessed differences between groups in changes of biomarkers and linear mixed models were applied in analyses of attention performance and biomarkers. The trial is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02350322). At baseline, the mean omega-3 index was 5.8 ± 1.3% and deficient status were identified for s-25(OH)D (54%), s-ferritin (10%) and UIC (40%). The intervention resulted in an increase in DHA and the omega-3 index which was larger in the supplement group compared to the fish and meat group (P < 0.01), and in the fish group compared to the meat group (P < 0.01). No differences between the groups were observed for changes in 25(OH)D, s-ferritin or UIC. None of the biomarkers mediated

  15. RPC Detector Performance Results for 2016 and 2017

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This note presents the summary of the RPC detector performance during 2017 and the comparison with 2016. A part of the performance results have been obtained with the tracker tracks extrapolation method, explained here. The data driven predictions of the RPC rates and integrated charge to the HL-LHC conditions have been presented as well. The results after the detailed background study of the effect of the newly installed shielding are shown. The history of the efficiency and cluster size vs time and instantaneous luminosity have been presented, as well.

  16. First performance results of the Phobos silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pernegger, H; Baker, M D; Barton, D S; Betts, R R; Bindel, R; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A; Decowski, M P; García, E; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K H; Gushue, S; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Heintzelman, G A; Henderson, C; Holynski, R; Hofman, D J; Holzman, B; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Katzy, J; Khan, N; Kucewicz, W; Kulinich, P; Lin, W T; Manly, S; McLeod, D; Michalowski, J; Mignerey, A; Mülmenstädt, J; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Reuter, M; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rosenberg, L J; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Skulski, W; Steadman, S G; Stephans, G S F; Steinberg, P; Stodulski, M; Sukhanov, A; Tang, J L; Teng, R; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Verdier, R; Wadsworth, B; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wyslouch, B

    2001-01-01

    The Phobos experiment concluded its first year of operation at RHIC taking data in Au-Au nucleus collisions at s radical = 65 GeV and 130 GeV/nucleon pair. First preliminary results of the performances of our silicon detectors in the experiment are summarized. The Phobos experiment uses silicon pad detectors for both tracking and multiplicity measurements. The silicon sensors vary strongly in their pad geometry. In this paper, we compare the signal response, the signal uniformity and signal-to-noise performance as measured in the experiment for the different geometries. Additionally, we investigate effects of very high channel occupancy on the signal response.

  17. First performance results of the Phobos silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernegger, H.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hołyński, R.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michalowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Steinberg, P.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2001-11-01

    The Phobos experiment concluded its first year of operation at RHIC taking data in Au-Au nucleus collisions at s nn=65 GeV and 130 GeV/ nucleon pair. First preliminary results of the performances of our silicon detectors in the experiment are summarized. The Phobos experiment uses silicon pad detectors for both tracking and multiplicity measurements. The silicon sensors vary strongly in their pad geometry. In this paper, we compare the signal response, the signal uniformity and signal-to-noise performance as measured in the experiment for the different geometries. Additionally, we investigate effects of very high channel occupancy on the signal response.

  18. Conducting effective performance appraisals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    According to experts, performance appraisals rate just below firing someone as the least favorite thing managers do. Many factors contribute to this view--one is that current systems do a poor job of evaluating performance and in fact often impede both evaluation and performance. When used as part of an ongoing supportive process of goal setting and feedback, performance appraisals can enhance performance and morale. One alternative to traditional employee evaluation methods is full-circle or 360-degree feedback. Contained in this issue are practical suggestions for preparing employees for performance appraisals which, when followed daily, encourage employees to put their best feet forward as part of their regular routine. Also included is a template specific to assessing the performance of clinical laboratory technologists . Additionally, numerous resources are provided to help you refine appraisal systems to fit your needs. Full-circle feedback is proving to be a boon to managers. It relieves them from being the exclusive "heavies" in evaluating performance, integrates appraisal input from several sources, and incorporates increasing employee skills, competencies, and satisfaction, thus improving productivity of people and processes. And aren't integration and continuous improvement what the laboratory is all about?

  19. New results on performance analysis of opportunistic regenerative relaying

    KAUST Repository

    Tourki, Kamel

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate an opportunistic relaying scheme where the selected relay assists the source-destination (direct) communication. In our study, we consider a regenerative opportunistic relaying scheme in which the direct path may be unusable, and takes into account the effect of the possible erroneously detected and transmitted data at the selected relay. We first derive the signal-to-noise (SNR) statistics for each hop, which are used to determine accurate closed form expressions for end-to-end bit-error rate (BER) of binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulation and end-to-end outage probability for a transmission rate R over Rayleigh fading channels. Furthermore, we evaluate the asymptotical performance and deduce the diversity order. Finally, we validate our analysis by showing that performance simulation results coincide with our analytical results over linear network architecture. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  20. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M.

    1997-01-01

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted

  1. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Accounting for results: how conservation organizations report performance information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, Adena R; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council-US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  3. Performance Results of CMMI-Based Process Improvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gibson, Diane L; Goldenson, Dennis R; Kost, Keith

    2006-01-01

    .... There now is evidence that process improvement using the CMMI Product Suite can result in improvements in schedule and cost performance, product quality, return on investment and other measures of performance outcome...

  4. Data access performance through parallelization and vectored access. Some results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furano, F; Hanushevsky, A

    2008-01-01

    High Energy Physics data processing and analysis applications typically deal with the problem of accessing and processing data at high speed. Recent studies, development and test work have shown that the latencies due to data access can often be hidden by parallelizing them with the data processing, thus giving the ability to have applications which process remote data with a high level of efficiency. Techniques and algorithms able to reach this result have been implemented in the client side of the Scalla/xrootd system, and in this contribution we describe the results of some tests done in order to compare their performance and characteristics. These techniques, if used together with multiple streams data access, can also be effective in allowing to efficiently and transparently deal with data repositories accessible via a Wide Area Network

  5. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  6. Preliminary results of testing bioassay analytical performance standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.; Robinson, A.V.; Hadley, R.T.

    1983-08-01

    The analytical performance of both in vivo and in vitro bioassay laboratories is being studied to determine the capability of these laboratories to meet the minimum criteria for accuracy and precision specified in the draft ANSI Standard N13.30, Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay. This paper presents preliminary results of the first round of testing

  7. Effects of different limestone particle sizes in the diet of broiler breeders post molting on their performance, egg quality, incubation results, and pre-starter performance of their progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, I J M; Surek, D; Rocha, C; Schramm, V G; Muramatsu, K; Dahlke, F; Maiorka, A

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that a coarse limestone diet improves productivity, reproductive performance and the calcium utilization of molted broiler breeders. In total, 640 broiler breeder females, 73-week-old and sixty-four 27-week-old cockerels, Cobb 500, were evaluated during 10 weeks, according to a randomized block design composed of 4 treatments with 8 replicates each. Treatments consisted of diets with the inclusion of 100% fine limestone-fine PS (0.2 mm GMD-geometric mean diameter); PS1: 30% fine limestone+70% limestone with 1.0 mm GMD; PS2: 30% fine limestone+70% limestone with 2.0 mm GMD; and PS3: 30% fine limestone+70% limestone with 3.0 mm GMD. Calcium retention in the gizzard of the breeders, bone characteristics, and breeder performance, egg characteristics, eggshell quality, incubation performance, chick quality and yield, chick pre-starter live performance, and chick bone characteristics were determined. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in the rate of lay, percentage of non-settable eggs, egg weight, egg shape index, egg specific gravity, eggshell weight, thickness, and percentage hatchability and egg weight loss of broiler breeders fed with diets with different limestone particle sizes. The chick quality and yield, chick pre-starter live performance, and chick bone characteristics were not affected (P>0.05) by any of the limestone particle sizes. It was concluded that live and reproductive performance parameters of broiler breeders post molting is not affected by limestone particle size in the feed. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Constitutive Effects of Performance Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahler-Larsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    that are demonstrably problematic. Based on a distinction between trivial and advanced measure fixation, an argument is made for constitutive effects that are based on less problematic assumptions. Through this conceptual move, the political dimension of performance indicators is appreciated. The conceptual dimensions...... of constitutive effects are carved out, empirical illustrations of their applicability are offered and implications discussed....

  9. Robust performance results for discrete-time systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Magdi S.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of robust performance and feedback control synthesis for a class of linear discrete-time systems with time-varying parametric uncertainties are addressed in this paper. The uncertainties are bound and have a linear matrix fractional form. Based on the concept of strongly robust H ∞ -performance criterion, results of robust stability and performance are developed and expressed in easily computable linear matrix inequalities. Synthesis of robust feedback controllers is carried out for several system models of interest.

  10. Results of 2-year vitamin B treatment on cognitive performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaluw, van der N.L.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; Wijngaarden, van J.P.; Brouwer, E.M.; Rest, van de O.; Veld, in 't P.H.; Enneman, A.W.; Dijk, van S.C.; Ham, A.C.; Swart, K.M.A.; Velde, van der N.; Schoor, van N.M.; Cammen, van der T.J.M.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Lips, P.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of 2-year folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation on cognitive performance in elderly people with elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels. Methods: This multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 2,919 elderly participants (65 years

  11. Experimental results pertaining to the performance of thermal igniters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmel, M.K.

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of various experimental programs regarding the performance of thermal igniters for the deliberate ignition of hydrogen in light water reactors. Experiments involving both premixed combustion and combustion with continuous hydrogen injection are reviewed. Combustion characteristics examined include flammability limits of hydrogen:air and hydrogen:air:steam mixtures, combustion pressure rises, combustion completeness, flame speeds, and heat transfer aspects. Comparisons of igniter type and igniter reliability under simulated reactor accident conditions are included. The results of the research programs provide a broad data base covering nearly all aspects of hydrogen combustion related to the performance of deliberate ignition systems

  12. Unobservable Effects and Business Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Jacobson

    1990-01-01

    While “unobservable” factors such as corporate culture, access to scarce resources, management skill, and luck can be postulated to be principal determinants of business success, their effects are all but ignored in studies of business performance. This study, making use of the PIMS data base, reports empirical evidence indicating that failure to control for unobservable factors influencing profitability both biases and exaggerates the effect of strategic factors. Indeed, the influence of uno...

  13. Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware performance results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Keith O.

    1993-01-01

    The Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware activities, accomplishments, and test results are discussed. The Magnetic Gimbal Fabrication and Test (MGFT) program addressed the feasibility of using a magnetic gimbal to isolate an Electro-Optical (EO) sensor from the severe angular vibrations induced during the firing of divert and attitude control system (ACS) thrusters during space flight. The MGFT effort was performed in parallel with the fabrication and testing of a mechanically gimballed, flex pivot based isolation system by the Hughes Aircraft Missile Systems Group. Both servo systems supported identical EO sensor assembly mockups to facilitate direct comparison of performance. The results obtained from the MGFT effort indicate that the magnetic gimbal exhibits the ability to provide significant performance advantages over alternative mechanically gimballed techniques.

  14. Managing for Results--Linking Performance Measures and Budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William L.; Fountain, James R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The Government Accounting Standards Board notion of service efforts and accomplishments reporting is one step in a process of managing for results that includes strategic planning, development and use of performance measures of managing ongoing programs, and outputs to budgetary appropriation. Reports a trial application to one school district.…

  15. The Performance of Entik as Result Crossbreed of (Muscovy>

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roesdiyanto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A research has been conducted to investigate the performance of entik as result crossbreed of muscovy and duck as a meat producer. The method using of this research was experimental method. As the base design was Randomized Completely Design with factorial design (2x3x3 that consisted of the first factor was sex (S comprised : s1=male and s2=female. The second factor was feed from (P comprised: p1=mush, p2=crumble and p3=Paste, whereas the third factor was slaughtering age (U that comprised u1=six weeks and u2=eight weeks and u3=ten weeks. The investigated parameters were carcass weight, percentage of meat weight, meat weight of carcass. Result of the research obtained the lowest average of carcass weight for male entik aged 6.8 and 10 weeks respectively was 750.26 g, 1142.69 g, and the highest was 1024.93 g, 1336.08 g, and 760.40 g, 1098 g, 1180.26 g and the highest was 985.28 g, 1378.96 g and 1390.20 g. The lowest average parentage carcass for male entik respectively was 59.63%, 60.14% and 61.76%; the highest was 57.17%, 61.02% and 67.86%. Whereas for the female the lowest was 57.17%, 62.30%, and 61.02% and the highest was 68.99% ,67.59%, and 67.45 %. The average of meat carcass weight for the whole treatment was 733.99±158.23 g with range around 466.15 up to 956.42 g, and the highest average was reached by female entik aged eight weeks who was feeding by mash that was 916.95±39.36 g. The average of meat carcass weight was 64.57±1.35% with the range around 56.66 up to 73.60%. Result of the analysis of variances showed that the interaction factor between the sex, feed form ands slaughtering age affected no significantly (P>0.05 on the carcass weight, percentage of carcass weight, meat carcass weight and the percentage of carcass weight, meat carcass weight and the percentage of meat carcass weight and the percentage of meat carcass weight. Review for each treatment concludes that the sex factor highest effect just only for percentage of meat

  16. Accounting for Marketing: Marketing Performance Through Financial Results

    OpenAIRE

    Levent KOSAN

    2014-01-01

    Accounting, especially strategic management accounting, provides significant contributions to companies for decisions in environments of intense competition. Accounting, which has positive effects of company strategy development and management, has become a required facet of marketing, another area that has gained significance. The aim of this study is to assess the contributions of accounting to marketing performance management and other areas related to marketing development and to evaluate...

  17. ACCOUNTING FOR MARKETING: MARKETING PERFORMANCE THROUGH FINANCIAL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent KOSAN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Accounting, especially strategic management accounting, provides significant contributions to companies for decisions in environments of intense competition. Accounting, which has positive effects of company strategy development and management, has become a required facet of marketing, another area that has gained significance. The aim of this study is to assess the contributions of accounting to marketing performance management and other areas related to marketing development and to evaluate the relationship and synergies between marketing and accounting with comparative examples.

  18. Government Performance and Results Act Reporting on Defense Working Capital Funds Net Operating Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... The overall objective of the audit was to determine whether the net operating results for the activity groups of the Defense Working Capital Fund were consistently and accurately compiled. We also assessed internal controls to determine whether management complied with the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993.

  19. Wind effects on RVACS performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.

    1995-01-01

    The reactor vessel auxillary cooling system (RVACS) is a passive liquid-metal reactor decay-heat removal system. The RVACS performance is a function of the pressure difference between air flow inlet and outlet, of the air inlet temperature, of the air density variation along the flow path, and of the pressure loss characteristics of the path. The pressure difference can be affected by wind speed and direction. The objective of this project was to investigate the effects of wind on the performance of the RVACS, specifically, the heat release through the stacks, of a liquid-metal reactor

  20. New test methods for BIPV. Results from IP performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jol, J.C.; Van Kampen, B.J.M.; De Boer, B.J.; Reil, F.; Geyer, D.

    2009-11-01

    Within the Performance project new test procedures for PV building products and the building performance as a whole when PV is applied in buildings have been drafted. It has resulted in a first draft of new test procedures for PV building products and proposals for tests for novel BIPV technology like thin film. The test proposed are a module breakage test for BIPV products, a fire safety test for BIPV products and a dynamic load test for BIPV products. Furthermore first proposals of how flexible PV modules could be tested in an appropriate way to ensure long time quality and safety of these new products are presented.

  1. Relevant results of studies performed in North Rhine-Westfalia dealing with health effects of air pollutants due to mobile sources, compared with health effects of other urban pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, E [Ministry for Environment, Duesseldorf (Germany). Regional Planning and Agriculture

    1996-12-31

    In 1975 in North Rhine-Westfalia, Federal Republic of Germany, according to the Federal Immission Control Act, five areas with high air pollution were determined. For these areas Clean Air Plans were drawn up. Clean Air Plans shall comprise a representation of emissions and immissions established for all or specific air pollutants, information about the impacts recorded for assets worthy of protection (human beings, animals and plants, water, the atmosphere etc.), any findings obtained as to the causes and effects of such air pollution, an assessment of any forthcoming changes in emission and immission conditions, details on immission levels and characteristic immission values and the measures envisaged for the reduction and prevention of air pollution. In accordance with these requirements epidemiological investigations of adults and children were performed in connection with the Clean Air Plans

  2. Relevant results of studies performed in North Rhine-Westfalia dealing with health effects of air pollutants due to mobile sources, compared with health effects of other urban pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, E. [Ministry for Environment, Duesseldorf (Germany). Regional Planning and Agriculture

    1995-12-31

    In 1975 in North Rhine-Westfalia, Federal Republic of Germany, according to the Federal Immission Control Act, five areas with high air pollution were determined. For these areas Clean Air Plans were drawn up. Clean Air Plans shall comprise a representation of emissions and immissions established for all or specific air pollutants, information about the impacts recorded for assets worthy of protection (human beings, animals and plants, water, the atmosphere etc.), any findings obtained as to the causes and effects of such air pollution, an assessment of any forthcoming changes in emission and immission conditions, details on immission levels and characteristic immission values and the measures envisaged for the reduction and prevention of air pollution. In accordance with these requirements epidemiological investigations of adults and children were performed in connection with the Clean Air Plans

  3. Effect of Functional diversity on Software Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanatha Rao, Balajee

    2011-01-01

    For the past few decades, there has been numerous literature produced on functional diversity and performance. However, the relationship between functional diversity and performance in software industry is clearly not explained and results are found to be inconsistent. The main focus of this research is to explore the effects of functional diversity on software project performance by conducting a qualitative study. Four metrics were chosen from literature namely decision making, creativity an...

  4. Honeywell Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, distillation systems have been actively pursued as one of the technologies for water recovery. The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a vacuum rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. The CDS was previously under development through Honeywell and NASA. In 2009, an assessment was performed to collect data to support down-selection and development of a primary distillation technology for application in a lunar outpost water recovery system. Based on the results of this testing, an expert panel concluded that the CDS showed adequate development maturity, TRL-4, together with the best product water quality and competitive weight and power estimates to warrant further development. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) worked to address weaknesses identified by The Panel; namely bearing design and heat pump power efficiency. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades. The CDS will also have been challenged with ISS analog waste streams and a subset of those being considered for Exploration architectures. This paper details interim results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  5. SP-100 Fuel Pin Performance: Results from Irradiation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makenas, Bruce J.; Paxton, Dean M.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Marietta, Martin; Hoth, Carl W.

    1994-07-01

    A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pins are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

  6. Description and Flight Performance Results of the WASP Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pauw, J. F.; Steffens, L. E.; Yuska, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    A general description of the design and construction of the WASP sounding rocket and of the performance of its first flight are presented. The purpose of the flight test was to place the 862-pound (391-kg) spacecraft above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) on free-fall trajectory for at least 6 minutes in order to study the effect of "weightlessness" on a slosh dynamics experiment. The WASP sounding rocket fulfilled its intended mission requirements. The sounding rocket approximately followed a nominal trajectory. The payload was in free fall above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) for 6.5 minutes and reached an apogee altitude of 134 nautical miles (248 km). Flight data including velocity, altitude, acceleration, roll rate, and angle of attack are discussed and compared to nominal performance calculations. The effect of residual burning of the second stage motor is analyzed. The flight vibration environment is presented and analyzed, including root mean square (RMS) and power spectral density analysis.

  7. The Advanced Photon Source: Performance and results from early operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncton, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is now providing researchers with extreme-brilliance undulator radiation in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum. All technical facilities and components are operational and have met design specifications. Fourteen research teams, occupying 20 sectors on the APS experiment hall floor, are currently installing beamline instrumentation or actively taking data. An overview is presented for the first operational years of the Advanced Photon Source. Emphasis is on the performance of accelerators and insertion devices, as well as early scientific results and future plans

  8. Test results of the SMES model coil. Pulse performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamajima, Takataro; Shimada, Mamoru; Ono, Michitaka

    1998-01-01

    A model coil for superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES model coil) has been developed to establish the component technologies needed for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device. The SMES model coil was fabricated, and then performance tests were carried out in 1996. The coil was successfully charged up to around 30 kA and down to zero at the same ramp rate of magnetic field experienced in a 100 kWh SMES device. AC loss in the coil was measured by an enthalpy method as parameters of ramp rate and flat top current. The results were evaluated by an analysis and compared with short-sample test results. The measured hysteresis loss is in good agreement with that estimated from the short-sample results. It was found that the coupling loss of the coil consists of two major coupling time constants. One is a short time constant of about 200 ms, which is in agreement with the test results of a short real conductor. The other is a long time constant of about 30 s, which could not be expected from the short sample test results. (author)

  9. Performance of various mathematical methods for calculation of radioimmunoassay results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandel, P.; Vogt, W.

    1977-01-01

    Interpolation and regression methods are available for computer aided determination of radioimmunological end results. We compared the performance of eight algorithms (weighted and unweighted linear logit-log regression, quadratic logit-log regression, Rodbards logistic model in the weighted and unweighted form, smoothing spline interpolation with a large and small smoothing factor and polygonal interpolation) on the basis of three radioimmunoassays with different reference curve characteristics (digoxin, estriol, human chorionic somatomammotropin = HCS). Great store was set by the accuracy of the approximation at the intermediate points on the curve, ie. those points that lie midway between two standard concentrations. These concentrations were obtained by weighing and inserted as unknown samples. In the case of digoxin and estriol the polygonal interpolation provided the best results while the weighted logit-log regression proved superior in the case of HCS. (orig.) [de

  10. Result of desalinating filter performance at representative coastal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Nobuyosi; Wada, Tadamasa

    1989-01-01

    In Japan, Nuclear energy facilities are usually located within 1 km from sea shore. Lately, manufacturing plants for semiconductors and precision machines have also taken locations at the sea side. At these locations, salt particles coming from the sea flow into a plant through its air-intakes. This is a problem, because if can cause electric equipment and other important equipment to deteriorate and may influence production yield. An effective solution to this problem is to install a filter at the air-intake. However, few data in this area is available, because the salt concentration in the air is too low to verify acutual affects of installed filters. This report describes the performance of a filter system installed in an actual building located 300 m from the sea shore. We used a radioactivation analysis method with a detection limit up to 0.01 μg/m 3 to measure concentrations at the up stream and down stream of the filter. A flame spectrochemical analysis measured salt adhering to filter materials. The particle collection performance averaged 80 % for the prefilter and 90 % for a desalinating filter. We also investigated the possibility that captured NaCl might rescatter with the deliquescence due to high humidity, and we found this phenomenon at least in the prefilter. (author)

  11. Radiation effects in ice: New results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Fama, M.; Loeffler, M.J.; Raut, U.; Shi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of radiation effects in ice are motivated by intrinsic interest and by applications in astronomy. Here we report on new and recent results on radiation effects induced by energetic ions in ice: amorphization of crystalline ice, compaction of microporous amorphous ice, electrostatic charging and dielectric breakdown and correlated structural/chemical changes in the irradiation of water-ammonia ices

  12. School results and access test results as indicators of first-year performance at university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bothma

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The goals set by the National Plan for Higher Education, the fact that many schools are still severely disadvantaged as well as far-reaching changes in the school system demand that South African universities urgently reconsider their admission procedures. Redesigning admission procedures calls for a thorough understanding of the interrelationships between school marks, results in existing access tests and first-year university performance. These interrelationships were statistically investigated in the case of the 1999, 2000 and 2001 intake groups, who were compelled to write access tests before being admitted to Stellenbosch University. The results of this investigation confirm an alarming degree of unpreparedness among many prospective students regarding what is expected of them at university. This is aggravated by school marks creating a totally unrealistic expectation of performance in the first year at university. It is emphasised that schools and authorities dealing with admission of prospective students at universities should be cognisant of the findings reported here. Furthermore, the statistical analyses demonstrate several novel techniques for investigating the interrelationship between school marks, access test results and university performance.

  13. The Role of Leadership in Safety Performance and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravello, Halina E.

    Employee injury rates in U.S. land-based operations in the energy industry are 2 to 3 times higher relative to other regions in the world. Although a rich literature exists on drivers of safety performance, no previous studies investigated factors influencing this elevated rate. Leadership has been identified as a key contributor to safety outcomes and this grounded theory study drew upon the full range leadership model, situational leadership, and leader-member exchange theories for the conceptual framework. Leadership aspects influencing safety performance were investigated through guided interviews of 27 study participants; data analyses included open and axial coding, and constant comparisons identified higher-level categories. Selective coding integrated categories into the theoretical framework that developed the idealized, transformational leader traits motivating safe behaviors of leading by example, expressing care and concern for employees' well-being, celebrating successes, and communicating the importance of safety (other elements included visibility and commitment). Employee and supervisor participants reported similar views on the idealized leader traits, but low levels of these qualities may be driving elevated injury rates. Identifying these key elements provides the foundation to creating strategies and action plans enabling energy sector companies to prevent employee injuries and fatalities in an industry where tens of thousands of employees are subjected to significant hazards and elevated risks. Creating safer workplaces for U.S. employees by enhancing leaders' skills, building knowledge, and improving behaviors will improve the employees' and their families' lives by reducing the pain and suffering resulting from injuries and fatalities.

  14. Performance results from the first integrated NDA VXI safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bot, D.; Messner, R.

    1999-01-01

    The VIFM system is the first integrated safeguard system to be developed and deployed by the IAEA. The system is also noteworthy in that it is the most versatile of any NDA system thus far deployed. Due to the high level of functionality, the VIFM is probably the most 'tested' of all IAEA systems. This paper discusses the results obtained from detailed in field and laboratory testing of a variety of VIFM configurations ranging from simple single systems to highly integrated system implementations. A total of 4 sites have had VIFM equipment installed. Data collected from these sites have been of very high quality and consistency despite the failure of commercial hard disk drive equipment. The systematic failure of these drives have been corrected using a variety of methods and performance since those corrections have been excellent with no equipment failures. The tests carried out also included the test of a twisted pair to coaxial cable interface. This interface was required in order to allow installation even with a significant facility cabling limitation. The performance obtained from the system utilizing this device showed no degradation as compared to that of systems utilizing direct coaxial cable connections. To conclude, the VIFM system, has been reliable even after partial failure of commercial off-the-shelf components which required the systems to operate on full fail-safe backup. These tests have thus shown both the reliable operation of the VIFM in normal operating conditions as well as the most adverse

  15. The Results of Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Performed in Bayburt Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Ayar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We analyzed the results of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy performed between November 2011 and January 2013 in the endoscopy unit at Bayburt State Hospital. Methods: Endoscopic analyses were done with a PENTAX EPK 100P equipment. The results were assessed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1008 patients (664 women, 344 men aged between 17 and 88 (mean: 50±18 years have undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. 186 (18.4% patients were diagnosed with pangastritis, 81 - with esophagitis (8%, 68 - with antral gastritis (6.7%, 67 - with duodenal ulcer (6.6%, 57 - with gastric ulcer (5.6%, 35 - with alkaline reflux gastritis (3.6%, 21 - with duodenitis (2.1%, 5 - with gastric cancer (0.5%, 4 - with esophagial cancer (0.4%, 4 - with gastric polyp (0.4% and 3 patients were diagnosed with esophagial ulcer (0.3%. Conclusion: Lesions were most commonly observed in the stomach. Gastritis, esophagitis, duodenal and gastric ulcer were frequently observed in our city. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2013; 51: 116-9

  16. CMS Tracking Performance Results from Early LHC Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Haensel, Stephan; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Benucci, Leonardo; Ceard, Ludivine; De Wolf, Eddi A.; Janssen, Xavier; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Adler, Volker; Beauceron, Stephanie; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Devroede, Olivier; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Joris; Maes, Michael; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Villella, Ilaria; Chabert, Eric Christian; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wickens, John; Costantini, Silvia; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Marinov, Andrey; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Julien; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Demin, Pavel; Favart, Denis; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Militaru, Otilia; Ovyn, Severine; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Carvalho, Wagner; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Sznajder, Andre; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Ferreira Dias, Marco Andre; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Novaes, Sergio F.; Padula, Sandra; Darmenov, Nikolay; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Trayanov, Rumen; Vankov, Ivan; Dyulendarova, Milena; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Marinova, Evelina; Mateev, Matey; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Min; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Hu, Zhen; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Zhu, Bo; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Lelas, Karlo; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Fereos, Reginos; Galanti, Mario; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A.; Rykaczewski, Hans; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Kannike, Kristjan; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Klem, Jukka; Kortelainen, Matti J.; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Sarkar, Subir; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Sillou, Daniel; Besancon, Marc; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Descamps, Julien; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Gentit, François-Xavier; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Marionneau, Matthieu; Millischer, Laurent; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Rousseau, Delphine; Titov, Maksym; Verrecchia, Patrice; Baffioni, Stephanie; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Elgammal, Sherif; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Kalinowski, Artur; Miné, Philippe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Besson, Auguste; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Greder, Sebastien; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Mikami, Yoshinari; Speck, Joaquim; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Baty, Clement; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Boumediene, Djamel; Brun, Hugues; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Le Grand, Thomas; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Xiao, Hong; Roinishvili, Vladimir; Anagnostou, Georgios; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Mohr, Niklas; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Weber, Martin; Wittmer, Bruno; Actis, Oxana; Ata, Metin; Bender, Walter; Biallass, Philipp; Erdmann, Martin; Frangenheim, Jens; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Hof, Carsten; Kirsch, Matthias; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Sowa, Michael; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Zeidler, Clemens; Bontenackels, Michael; Davids, Martina; Duda, Markus; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Giffels, Manuel; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heydhausen, Dirk; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Thomas, Maarten; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katkov, Igor; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Olzem, Jan; Parenti, Andrea; Raspereza, Alexei; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Eckstein, Doris; Enderle, Holger; Gebbert, Ulla; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Klanner, Robert; Mura, Benedikt; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Schwandt, Joern; Srivastava, Ajay Kumar; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Wolf, Roger; Bauer, Julia; Buege, Volker; Cakir, Altan; Chwalek, Thorsten; Daeuwel, Daniel; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Piparo, Danilo; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Renz, Manuel; Sabellek, Andreas; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Zeise, Manuel; Zhukov, Valery; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Petrakou, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Katsas, Panagiotis; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Evangelou, Ioannis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A.; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Debreczeni, Gergely; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Laszlo, Andras; Sikler, Ferenc; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Veszpremi, Viktor; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Sharma, Richa; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jas Bir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Chauhan, Sushil; Choudhary, Brajesh C.; Gupta, Pooja; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Kumar, Ashok; Ranjan, Kirti; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Suggisetti, Praveenkumar; Aziz, Tariq; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Jafari, Abideh; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Dimitrov, Anton; Fedele, Francesca; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Roselli, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Trentadue, Raffaello; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Giunta, Marina; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Genta, Chiara; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Miccio, Vincenzo; Moroni, Luigi; Negri, Pietro; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Salerno, Roberto; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Tancini, Valentina; Taroni, Silvia; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cimmino, Anna; De Cosa, Annapaola; De Gruttola, Michele; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Noli, Pasquale; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Conti, Enrico; De Mattia, Marco; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gresele, Ambra; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Santocchia, Attilio; Servoli, Leonello; Valdata, Marisa; Volpe, Roberta; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Organtini, Giovanni; Palma, Alessandro; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Mila, Giorgia; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Trocino, Daniele; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ambroglini, Filippo; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Kim, Hyunsoo; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dohhee; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Hong, Byung-Sik; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Rhee, Han-Bum; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Janulis, Mindaugas; Martisiute, Dalia; Petrov, Pavel; Sabonis, Tomas; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A.; Allfrey, Philip; Krofcheck, David; Tam, Jason; Butler, Philip H.; Signal, Tony; Williams, Jennifer C.; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R.; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Sá Martins, Pedro; Mini, Giuliano; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Raposo, Luis; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Silva, Pedro; Soares, David; Varela, Joao; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr., Michael; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Bondar, Nikolai; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Kuleshov, Sergey; Oulianov, Alexei; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Shreyber, Irina; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V.; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Datsko, Kirill; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Slabospitsky, Sergey; Sobol, Andrei; Sytine, Alexandre; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Krpic, Dragomir; Maletic, Dimitrije; Milosevic, Jovan; Puzovic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cepeda, Maria; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M.; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Diaz Merino, Irma; Diez Gonzalez, Carlos; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Beaudette, Florian; Bell, Alan James; Benedetti, Daniele; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bolognesi, Sara; Breuker, Horst; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cano, Eric; Cattai, Ariella; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Covarelli, Roberto; Curé, Benoît; Dahms, Torsten; De Roeck, Albert; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Gennai, Simone; Gerwig, Hubert; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gowdy, Stephen; Guiducci, Luigi; Hansen, Magnus; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Henderson, Conor; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Honma, Alan; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Lecoq, Paul; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lourenco, Carlos; Macpherson, Alick; Maki, Tuula; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Orsini, Luciano; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stöckli, Fabian; Stoye, Markus; Tropea, Paola; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Voutilainen, Mikko; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Starodumov, Andrei; Caminada, Lea; Chen, Zhiling; Cittolin, Sergio; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hervé, Alain; Hintz, Wieland; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marchica, Carmelo; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Punz, Thomas; Rizzi, Andrea; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Schinzel, Dietrich; Stieger, Benjamin; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Weber, Matthias; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguiló, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jaeger, Andreas; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Regenfus, Christian; Robmann, Peter; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Schmidt, Alexander; Tsirigkas, Dimitrios; Wilke, Lotte; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Wan-Ting; Go, Apollo; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Ming-Hsiung; Lu, Yun-Ju; Wu, Jing-Han; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lin, Sheng-Wen; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Ueno, Koji; Wang, Chin-chi; Wang, Minzu; Wei, Jui-Te; Adiguzel, Aytul; Ayhan, Aydin; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Demir, Zahide; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gökbulut, Gül; Güler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Nart, Alisah; Önengüt, Gülsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatöz, Ayse; Sahin, Ozge; Sengul, Ozden; Sogut, Kenan; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Demir, Durmus; Gülmez, Erhan; Halu, Arda; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Özbek, Melih; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bell, Peter; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Cheng, Teh Lee; Cussans, David; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Hansen, Maria; Heath, Greg P.; Heath, Helen F.; Hill, Christopher; Huckvale, Benedickt; Jackson, James; Kreczko, Lukasz; Mackay, Catherine Kirsty; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M.; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Smith, Vincent J.; Ward, Simon; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W.; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M.; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David J.A.; Coughlan, John A.; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Kennedy, Bruce W.; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R.; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Ballin, Jamie; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Foudas, Costas; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardrope, David; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R.; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Bose, Tulika; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Clough, Andrew; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St. John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Andrea, Jeremy; Avetisyan, Aram; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Chou, John Paul; Cutts, David; Esen, Selda; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Borgia, Maria Assunta; Breedon, Richard; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Cebra, Daniel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Friis, Evan; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Liu, Haidong; Maruyama, Sho; Miceli, Tia; Nikolic, Milan; Pellett, Dave; Robles, Jorge; Schwarz, Thomas; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Veelken, Christian; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Deisher, Amanda; Erhan, Samim; Farrell, Chris; Felcini, Marta; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Wallny, Rainer; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Feng; Liu, Hongliang; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Pasztor, Gabriella; Satpathy, Asish; Shen, Benjamin C.; Stringer, Robert; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G.; Dusinberre, Elizabeth; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Mangano, Boris; Muelmenstaedt, Johannes; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Blume, Michael; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Garberson, Jeffrey; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lamb, James; Lowette, Steven; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Witherell, Michael; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Gataullin, Marat; Kcira, Dorian; Litvine, Vladimir; Ma, Yousi; Newman, Harvey B.; Rogan, Christopher; Shin, Kyoungha; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Terentyev, Nikolay; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T.; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Blekman, Freya; Chatterjee, Avishek; Das, Souvik; Eggert, Nicholas; Fields, Laura Johanna; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Henriksson, Kristofer; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Puigh, Darren; Riley, Daniel; Ryd, Anders; Saelim, Michael; Shi, Xin; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Cirino, Guy; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar A.T.; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; Bloch, Ingo; Borcherding, Frederick; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Demarteau, Marcel; Eartly, David P.; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M.; Hirschauer, James; James, Eric; Jensen, Hans; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Khatiwada, Rakshya; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Limon, Peter; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; McCauley, Thomas; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Popescu, Sorina; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Saoulidou, Niki; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Smith, Richard P.; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J.; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D.; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Kim, Bockjoo; Klimenko, Sergey; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Matchev, Konstantin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Prescott, Craig; Remington, Ronald; Schmitt, Michael; Scurlock, Bobby; Sellers, Paul; Wang, Dayong; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Ceron, Cristobal; Gaultney, Vanessa; Kramer, Laird; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Mesa, Dalgis; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F.; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Baarmand, Marc M.; Guragain, Samir; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Ralich, Robert; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Smoron, Agata; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Cankocak, Kerem; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Murray, Michael; Radicci, Valeria; Sanders, Stephen; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Bandurin, Dmitry; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Wan, Zongru; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferencek, Dinko; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G.; Kirn, Malina; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Santanastasio, Francesco; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C.; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; D'Enterria, David; Everaerts, Pieter; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Loizides, Constantinos; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cole, Perrie; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Franzoni, Giovanni; Haupt, Jason; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Sonnek, Peter; Summers, Don; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R.; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kelly, Tony; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Lundstedt, Carl; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R.; Baur, Ulrich; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Smith, Kenneth; Zennamo, Joseph; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Boeriu, Oana; Chasco, Matthew; Reucroft, Steve; Swain, John; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Kolberg, Ted; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Warchol, Jadwiga; Wayne, Mitchell; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Gu, Jianhui; Killewald, Phillip; Ling, Ta-Yung; Rodenburg, Marissa; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hunt, Adam; Jones, John; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E.; Bolla, Gino; Borrello, Laura; Bortoletto, Daniela; Everett, Adam; Garfinkel, Arthur F.; Gecse, Zoltan; Gutay, Laszlo; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Laasanen, Alvin T.; Leonardo, Nuno; Liu, Chang; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Potamianos, Karolos; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Jindal, Pratima; Parashar, Neeti; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank J.M.; Liu, Jinghua H.; Morales, Jafet; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Flacher, Henning; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Orbaker, Douglas; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Yan, Ming; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Rose, Keith; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Asaadi, Jonathan; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Gurrola, Alfredo; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Nguyen, Chi Nhan; Pivarski, James; Safonov, Alexei; Sengupta, Sinjini; Toback, David; Weinberger, Michael; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Yazgan, Efe; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Johns, Willard; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Buehler, Marc; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Neu, Christopher; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Gunthoti, Kranti; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Bellinger, James Nugent; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dutta, Suchandra; Efron, Jonathan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Lomidze, David; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Polese, Giovanni; Reeder, Don; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H.; Swanson, Joshua; Weinberg, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The first LHC pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV were recorded by the CMS detector in December 2009. The trajectories of charged particles produced in the collisions were reconstructed using the all-silicon Tracker and their momenta were measured in the 3.8 T axial magnetic field. Results from the Tracker commissioning are presented including studies of timing, efficiency, signal-to-noise, resolution, and ionization energy. Reconstructed tracks are used to benchmark the performance in terms of track and vertex resolutions, reconstruction of decays, estimation of ionization energy loss, as well as identification of photon conversions, nuclear interactions, and heavy-flavour decays.

  17. Resistive Plate Chambers commissioning and performance results for 2015

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector system at the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the LHC confers robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. During the first long shutdown of the LHC (2013-2014) the CMS muon RPC system has been upgraded with 144 double-gap chambers on the forth forward stations. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region up to 1.6. The main detector parameters are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC (13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing). Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) performance results for 2015 with pp collisions at 13 TeV are presented. These results include the occupancy, efficiency of newly installed detectors after applying new working point, history plots for the RPC relevant variables such as: Cluster Size, Efficiency, percentage of inactive detector during operation and Rates and overall system noise. RPC variables are studied as funct...

  18. CMS Tracker Alignment Performance Results Start-Up 2017

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    During the LHC shutdown in Winter 2016/17, the CMS pixel detector, the inner component of the CMS Tracker, was replaced by the Phase-1 upgrade detector. Among others improvements, the new pixel detector consists of four instead of three layers in the central barrel region (BPIX) and three instead of two disks in the endcap regions (FPIX). In this report, performance plots of the first pixel-detector alignment results are presented, which were obtained with cosmic-ray data taken prior to the start of the 2017 LHC pp operation. Alignment constants have been derived using the data collected initially at 0T and later at 3.8T magnetic field to the level of single module positions in the pixel detector, while keeping the alignment parameters of the strip detector fixed at the values determined in the end of 2016. The complete understanding of the alignment and biases was derived by using two algorithms, Millepede-II and HipPy. The results confirm each other.

  19. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülin Atan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to “slow rhythm music”, “fast rhythm music” or “no music”. 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p>0.05. On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise.

  20. Performance Test Results for the Laser-Powered Microthruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, Claude R.; Luke, James R.; Helgeson, Wesley; Johnson, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Microthrusters are useful for orienting and repositioning small craft above the atmosphere. We report technical results obtained during a successful 5-year program to develop a commercially-viable laser-powered microthruster. Its main advantage is the ability to generate a broad thrust range under programmable electronic control with minimal electrical power. The device applies millisecond-duration diode-laser pulses to a fuel tape to produce an ablation jet. By employing laser-initiated energetic polymers in our ablation fuel tapes, we obtained momentum coupling coefficients as large as 3mN/W of incident laser power, giving a continuous thrust range from 50μN to 10mN. With our standard 30m x 8mm fuel tape, fueled thruster mass is 0.5kg and 50N-s lifetime impulse is achieved. With an order-of-magnitude greater fuel mass, the thruster could accomplish re-entry or substantial orbit-raising of a 10-kg microsatellite. In its usual configuration, specific impulse is 200 seconds, and ablation efficiency, the ratio of exhaust kinetic energy to incident laser optical energy is 180%. We compare performance of several laser-initiated micropropellants which we studied, including polyvinyl nitrate (PVN), glycidyl azide polymer (GAP), and nitrocellulose (NC). All were doped with a laser-absorbing component, either carbon nanopearls with 10nm mean diameter or dyes tuned to the 920-nm laser wavelength but transparent at visible wavelengths. Our demonstrated momentum coupling coefficient is sufficient to levitate a 0.15-kg object with a 500-W laser beam having appropriate characteristics

  1. Towards a results-based performance management: practices and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Business and Administrative Studies ... Findings of this study indicate that performance management system is disconnected at the top that ... in introducing LAN, developing web pages and using the internet for information sharing.

  2. A simplified, result oriented supplier performance management system testing framework for SME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Parkash Kaushik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supplier performance management continues to be a significant concern for small & medium enterprises (SME. How can small & medium enterprises better position themselves to check and sustain actual supplier performance improvement? A key framework is the establishment of a value-added supplier performance audit program that places significant emphasis on supplier performance controls. A value-added supplier audit program can help SME mitigate business and regulatory risk while reducing the cost of poor quality (COPQ. Thus a good supplier performance audit program is the cornerstone of supplier performance management integrity. Methods: By acknowledging and addressing the challenges to an effective supplier Performance Audit program, this paper proposes an objective framework of supplier performance audit program, built on a strong, yet versatile statistical methodology - Analysis of variance (ANOVA. This performance audit framework considers process definition, standardization, review of the contemporary literature on ANOVA & its practical application in supplier performance scorecard of one of the reputed Sports Goods Industry in India. Results and conclusions: The advantages of this framework are that: it simultaneously considers multiple supplier performance in multiple time frames and effectively identifies the differences across the suppliers in terms of their performance. Through this framework the organization will be able to increase the odds of performing a predictable and successful implementation of a value-added supplier performance audit.

  3. Structural effects on electromagnetic flow coupler performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Goro; Yokota, Norikatsu; Mine, Masao; Watanabe, Takashi; Takuma, Tadasu; Takenaka, Kiyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype electromagnetic flow coupler was tested using 300degC liquid sodium to estimate the effect on performance of generator flow velocity, magnetic flux density, magnetic core length and bus bar length. Its performance was not affected by changes in fluid velocity and magnetic flux density up to 8.3 m/s and 0.51 T, respectively. Besides the experiments, a two-dimensional numerical analysis program based on Ohm's law and the current continuity equation was prepared to estimate the effects of magnetic core length and bus bar construction. The current transferred from the generator to the pump, the current transfer ratio, increased by lengthening the magnetic core being a maximum of 0.706 for a 100 mm core and 0.764 for a 300 mm core. The numerical results showed that the presence of the bus bar in the outer region of the magnetic core gave inferior performance to that in its absence. (author)

  4. Results of tritium tests performed on Sandia Laboratories decontamination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gildea, P.D.; Wall, W.R.; Gede, V.P.

    1978-05-01

    The Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL), a facility for performing experiments using gram amounts of tritium, became operational on October 1, 1977. As secondary containment, the TRL employs sealed glove boxes connected on demand to two central decontamination systems, the Gas Purification System and the Vacuum Effluent Recovery System. Performance tests on these systems show the tritium removal systems can achieve concentration reduction factors (ratio of inlet to exhaust concentrations) much in excess of 1000 per pass at inlet concentrations of 1 part per million or less for both tritium and tritiated methane

  5. Building America System Research Results. Innovations for High Performance Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-05-01

    This report provides a summary of key lessons learned from the first 10 years of the Building America program and also included a summary of the future challenges that must be met to reach the program’s long term performance goals.

  6. Results of performance tests on polymer zirconium compound (PZC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombrito, Elvira Z.; Bulos, Adelina DM.

    2006-01-01

    Three batches of polyzirconium compound (PZC) consisting of nine samples were tested for its application as column material for adsorbing reactor-produced molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo). Using low specific activity molybdenum solution (∼500 μCi/267 mg Mo), the adsorption capacity, elution yield, elution volume and molybdenum breakthrough were measured. The average adsorption capacity of the nine samples is 239 ± 17 mg Mo/g PZC. The elution yield values obtained are lower than previously obtained and averaged at 47% with 30% variability. Molybdenum breakthrough also exceeded the limits for 99m Tc eluates. Considering the better performance of 2002 PZC samples, the samples may have undergone some changes during storage (tests were performed in December 2003) and/or the adsorption process did not conform to the recommended procedure. If this were the case, it demonstrated the importance of strictly following the recommended protocol. Relative values showed that the last two batches (PZC 030718 and PC 030726) performed better than the first batch in terms of elution yield and elution profile. These two batches exhibited amorphous structure as seen by x-ray diffraction analysis of the PZC test samples. (author)

  7. Management-by-Results and Performance Measurement in Universities--Implications for Work Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Kirsi-Mari; Kallio, Tomi J.

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on the effects of management-by-results from the perspective of the work motivation of university employees. The study is based on extensive survey data among employees at Finnish universities. According to the results, performance measurement is based on quantitative rather than qualitative measures, and the current…

  8. PV Performance Modeling Methods and Practices: Results from the 4th PV Performance Modeling Collaborative Workshop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    In 2014, the IEA PVPS Task 13 added the PVPMC as a formal activity to its technical work plan for 2014-2017. The goal of this activity is to expand the reach of the PVPMC to a broader international audience and help to reduce PV performance modeling uncertainties worldwide. One of the main deliverables of this activity is to host one or more PVPMC workshops outside the US to foster more international participation within this collaborative group. This report reviews the results of the first in a series of these joint IEA PVPS Task 13/PVPMC workshops. The 4th PV Performance Modeling Collaborative Workshop was held in Cologne, Germany at the headquarters of TÜV Rheinland on October 22-23, 2015.

  9. Performance of CREAM Calorimeter Results of Beam Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, H S; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Castellina, A; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; Duvernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Hyun, H J; Kang, T G; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, M Y; Kim, T; Kim, Y J; Lee, J K; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Mognet, S I; Nam, S W; Nutter, S; Park, N H; Park, H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Syed, S; Song, C; Swordy, S; Wu, J; Yang, J; Zhang, H Q; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM), a balloon-borne experiment, is under preparation for a flight in Antarctica at the end of 2004. CREAM is planned to measure the energy spectrum and composition of cosmic rays directly at energies between 1 TeV and 1000 TeV. Incident particle energies will be measured by a transition radiation detector and a sampling calorimeter. The calorimeter was constructed at the University of Maryland and tested at CERN in 2003. Performance of the calorimeter during the beam tests is reported.

  10. RESULTS OF A PILOT FIELD STUDY TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CLEANING RESIDENTIAL HEATING AND AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEMS AND THE IMPACT ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses and gives results of a pilot field study to evaluate the effectiveness of air duct cleaning (ADC) as a source removal technique in residential heating and air-conditioning (HAC) systems and its impact on airborne particle, fiber, and bioaerosol concentrations...

  11. Planck Early Results: The thermal performance of Planck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the Planck instruments in space is enabled by their low operating temperatures, 20K for LFI and 0.1K for HFI, achieved through a combination of passive radiative cooling and three active mechanical coolers. Active coolers were chosen to minimize straylight on the detectors...... and to maximize lifetime. The scientific requirement for very broad frequency led to two detector technologies with widely dierent temperature and cooling needs. This made use of a helium cryostat, as used by previous cryogenic space missions (IRAS, COBE, ISO, SPITZER, AKARI), infeasible. Radiative cooling...... is provided by three V-groove radiators and a large telescope bae. The active coolers are a hydrogen sorption cooler (cooled in space to operating conditions...

  12. Tumescent liposuction report performance measurement initiative: national survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, William; Cox, Sue Ellen; Kuznets, Naomi; Coleman, William P

    2004-07-01

    This study was created by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement to measure clinical performance and improvement opportunities for physicians and ambulatory health-care organizations. Data were collected prospectively between February 2001 and August 2002. Thirty-nine study centers participated, and 688 patients who had tumescent liposuction were surveyed and followed for 6 months. The objective was to determine patient satisfaction with tumescent liposuction and examine current liposuction practice and the safety of tumescent liposuction in a representative cohort of patients. The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement collected prospective data from February 2001 to August 2002 from 68 organizations registered for this study. Ultimately 39 organizations submitted 688 useable cases performed totally with local anesthesia, "tumescent technique." The overall clinical complication rate found in the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care Institute for Quality Improvement study was 0.7% (5 of 702). There was a minor complication rate of 0.57%. The major complication rate was 0.14% with one patient requiring hospitalization. Seventy-five percent of the patients reported no discomfort during their procedures. Of the 59% of patients who responded to a 6-month postoperative survey, 91% were positive about their decision to have liposuction (rating of 4 or 5 on a scale of 1-5) and 84% had high levels (4 or 5 on a scale of 1-5) of overall satisfaction with the procedure. Our findings are consistent with others in that tumescent liposuction is a safe procedure with a low complication rate and high patient satisfaction.

  13. Theoretical performance of cross-wind axis turbines with results for a catenary vertical axis configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraca, R. J.; Stephens, M. V.; Dagenhart, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A general analysis capable of predicting performance characteristics of cross-wind axis turbines was developed, including the effects of airfoil geometry, support struts, blade aspect ratio, windmill solidity, blade interference and curved flow. The results were compared with available wind tunnel results for a catenary blade shape. A theoretical performance curve for an aerodynamically efficient straight blade configuration was also presented. In addition, a linearized analytical solution applicable for straight configurations was developed. A listing of the computer program developed for numerical solutions of the general performance equations is included in the appendix.

  14. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control ("speckle nulling"). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield greater than 90% Strehl ratio and enable 10(exp 6) -10(exp 7) contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  15. Workshift and Antihistamine Effects on Task Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilliland, Kirby

    1997-01-01

    Sixteen male subjects, well trained on a battery of cognitive performance assessment tasks, participated in a study to Investigate the effects on human operator performance of work shift (Day Shift vs. Mid shift...

  16. Do clinical safety charts improve paramedic key performance indicator results? (A clinical improvement programme evaluation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbs, Phillip; Middleton, Paul M; Bonner, Ann; Loudfoot, Allan; Elliott, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Is the Clinical Safety Chart clinical improvement programme (CIP) effective at improving paramedic key performance indicator (KPI) results within the Ambulance Service of New South Wales? The CIP intervention area was compared with the non-intervention area in order to determine whether there was a statistically significant improvement in KPI results. The CIP was associated with a statistically significant improvement in paramedic KPI results within the intervention area. The strategies used within this CIP are recommended for further consideration.

  17. Employee Post-Training Behaviour and Performance: Evaluating the Results of the Training Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantidis, Anastasios D.; Chatzoglou, Prodromos D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that firms invest in training, there is considerable evidence to show that training programmes often fail to achieve the intended result of improving worker and organization performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the medium- to long-term effects of training programmes on firms by means of an integrated research model…

  18. Management Control, Results-Oriented Culture and Public Sector Performance : Empirical Evidence on New Public Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeeten, Frank H M; Speklé, Roland F.

    2015-01-01

    New Public Management (NPM) has been guiding public sector reform for over 25 years. Its position on the design of effective management control rests on three key ideas: (1) performance improvement requires a results-oriented culture that emphasizes outcomes rather than inputs or processes; (2)

  19. Background music: effects on attention performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Nuo; Huang, Rong-Hwa; Chiang, Hsin-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that noise may affect worker attention. However, some background music in the work environment can increase worker satisfaction and productivity. This study compared how music with, and without, lyrics affects human attention. One hundred and two participants, aged 20-24 years, were recruited into this study. Fifty-six males and 46 females participated in this study. Background music with, and without lyrics, was tested for effects on listener concentration in attention testing using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) study. The comparison results revealed that background music with lyrics had significant negative effects on concentration and attention. The findings suggest that, if background music is played in the work environment, music without lyrics is preferable because songs with lyrics are likely to reduce worker attention and performance.

  20. Effects of creatine supplementation on exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demant, T W; Rhodes, E C

    1999-07-01

    While creatine has been known to man since 1835, when a French scientist reported finding this constitutent of meat, its presence in athletics as a performance enhancer is relatively new. Amid claims of increased power and strength, decreased performance time and increased muscle mass, creatine is being hailed as a true ergogenic aid. Creatinine is synthesised from the amino acids glycine, arginine and methionine in the kidneys, liver and pancreas, and is predominantly found in skeletal muscle, where it exists in 2 forms. Approximately 40% is in the free creatine form (Crfree), while the remaining 60% is in the phosphorylated form, creatine phosphate (CP). The daily turnover rate of approximately 2 g per day is equally met via exogenous intake and endogenous synthesis. Although creatine concentration (Cr) is greater in fast twitch muscle fibres, slow twitch fibres have a greater resynthesis capability due to their increased aerobic capacity. There appears to be no significant difference between males and females in Cr, and training does not appear to effect Cr. The 4 roles in which creatine is involved during performance are temporal energy buffering, spatial energy buffering, proton buffering and glycolysis regulation. Creatine supplementation of 20 g per day for at least 3 days has resulted in significant increases in total Cr for some individuals but not others, suggesting that there are 'responders' and 'nonresponders'. These increases in total concentration among responders is greatest in individuals who have the lowest initial total Cr, such as vegetarians. Increased concentrations of both Crfree and CP are believed to aid performance by providing more short term energy, as well as increase the rate of resynthesis during rest intervals. Creatine supplementation does not appear to aid endurance and incremental type exercises, and may even be detrimental. Studies investigating the effects of creatine supplementation on short term, high intensity exercises have

  1. FY17 NIF Performance Quad Campaign: laser performance results and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Nicola, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mennerat, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmayer, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-09

    The FY17 NIF Performance Quad Campaign exercised a single quad of NIF (Q45T) at elevated energy to assess the impact of recent improvements to the infrared (1ω) and ultraviolet (3ω) section of the laser on integrated performance.

  2. Nuisance levels of noise effects radiologists' performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Coffey, Amina; Ryan, John; O'Beirne, Aaron; Toomey, Rachel; Evanoff, Micheal; Manning, David; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to measure the sound levels in Irish x-ray departments. The study then established whether these levels of noise have an impact on radiologists performance Noise levels were recorded 10 times within each of 14 environments in 4 hospitals, 11 of which were locations where radiologic images are judged. Thirty chest images were then presented to 26 senior radiologists, who were asked to detect up to three nodular lesions within 30 posteroanterior chest x-ray images in the absence and presence of noise at amplitude demonstrated in the clinical environment. The results demonstrated that noise amplitudes rarely exceeded that encountered with normal conversation with the maximum mean value for an image-viewing environment being 56.1 dB. This level of noise had no impact on the ability of radiologists to identify chest lesions with figure of merits of 0.68, 0.69, and 0.68 with noise and 0.65, 0.68, and 0.67 without noise for chest radiologists, non-chest radiologists, and all radiologists, respectively. the difference in their performance using the DBM MRMC method was significantly better with noise than in the absence of noise at the 90% confidence interval (p=0.077). Further studies are required to establish whether other aspects of diagnosis are impaired such as recall and attention and the effects of more unexpected noise on performance.

  3. Evaluation of a draft standard on performance specifications for health physics instrumentation: results for environmental tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenoyer, J.L.; Swinth, K.L.; Mashburn, K.R.; Selby, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    Draft ANSI Standard N42.17 on performance specifications for health physics instrumentation is currently being evaluated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Evaluation is performed by testing a cross-section of currently available instruments with testing procedures based on specifications of the standard and then determining the degree of conformance to the various elements of the proposed standard. Data will be presented on the performance of a cross-section of beta-gamma survey instruments under various environmental tests. Test results that will be presented include temperature effects, humidity effects, radio frequency (r.f.) susceptibility, ambient pressure effects, vibration effects, and shock effects. Tests performed to date show that most instruments will meet the temperature, humidity, and ambient pressure tests. A large variability is noted among instruments from the same or different vendors. Preliminary r.f. susceptibility tests have shown large artificial responses at some frequencies for specific instruments. The presentation will also include a discussion of procedures used in the testing and weaknesses identified in the proposed standard

  4. The first OSCE; does students' experience of performing in public affect their results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michael; Bax, Nigel; Woodley, Caroline; Jennings, Michael; Nicolson, Rod; Chan, Philip

    2015-03-26

    Personal qualities have been shown to affect students' exam results. We studied the effect of experience, and level, of public performance in music, drama, dance, sport, and debate at the time of admission to medical school as a predictor of student achievement in their first objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). A single medical school cohort (n = 265) sitting their first clinical exam in 2011 as third year students were studied. Pre-admission statements made at the time of application were coded for their stated achievements in the level of public performance; participation in each activity was scored 0-3, where 0 was no record, 1 = leisure time activity, 2 = activity at school or local level, 3 = activity at district, regional or national level. These scores were correlated to OSCE results by linear regression and t-test. Comparison was made between the highest scoring students in each area, and students scoring zero by t-test. There was a bell shaped distribution in public performance score in this cohort. There was no significant linear regression relationship between OSCE results and overall performance score, or between any subgroups. There was a significant difference between students with high scores in theatre, debate and vocal music areas, grouped together as verbal performance, and students scoring zero in these areas. (p < 0.05, t-test) with an effect size of 0.4. We found modest effects from pre-admission experience of verbal performance on students' scores in the OSCE examination. As these data are taken from students' admission statements, we call into question the received wisdom that such statements are unreliable.

  5. Early effect of ApoE-epsilon 4 allele on cognitive results in a group of highly performing subjects: the EVA study. Etude sur le Vieillissement Artériel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, C; Dufouil, C; Brousseau, T; Richard, F; Amouyel, P; Marceteau, E; Alpérovitch, A

    1996-10-25

    We examined the association between apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon 4 allele and cognitive performances in a population sample of 1174 high functioning volunteers aged 59-71 years. The neuropsychological battery included the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and nine tests assessing visual attention, verbal memory, visual processing, logical reasoning, psychomotor rapidity, visual memory, auditory attention and verbal fluency. The ratio of genotypes with zero, one or two epsilon 4 alleles was 70.6%, 21.4% and 1.9%, respectively. The epsilon 4 allele was significantly associated with lower scores for visual attention, psychomotor rapidity and MMSE. In the best performer subgroup (MMSE score above 25, n = 1028), all relationships persisted. Our findings demonstrate that the ApoE-epsilon 4 allele is early associated with low normal cognitive performances in areas which are not specifically affected at the subclinical onset of dementia.

  6. Manual control analysis of drug effects on driving performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, A.; Ziedman, K.; Moskowitz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of secobarbital, diazepam, alcohol, and marihuana on car-driver transfer functions obtained using a driving simulator were studied. The first three substances, all CNS depressants, reduced gain, crossover frequency, and coherence which resulted in poorer tracking performance. Marihuana also impaired tracking performance but the only effect on the transfer function parameters was to reduce coherence.

  7. The role of kaizen in creating radical performance results in a logistics service provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erez Agmoni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study investigates the role of an incremental change in organizational process in creating radical performance results in a service provider company. The role of Kaizen is established prominently in manufacturing, but is nascent in service applications. This study examines the impact of introducing Kaizen as an ODI tool-how it is applied, how it works, and whether participants believe it helps service groups form more effective working relationships that result in significant performance improvements. Methods: Exploring the evolving role of Kaizen in service contexts, this study explores a variety of facets of human communication in the context of continuous improvement and teamwork inter-organizationally. The paper consists of an archival study and an action research case study. A pre-intervention study consisting of observations, interviews, and submission of questionnaires to employees of a manufacturing and air-sea freight firm was conducted. A Kaizen intervention occurred subsequently, and a post-intervention study was then conducted. Results: Radical improvements in both companies such as 30% financial growth, 81% productivity improvement and more are demonstrated in this paper. Conclusions: Findings offer unique insights into the effects of Kaizen in creating radical performance improvements in a service company and its customer. Both qualitative and quantitative results of business, satisfaction, and productivity suggest time invested in introducing Kaizen into a service organization helps the companies improve relationships and improve the bottom line dramatically.

  8. EFFECTS OF CIRCADIAN RHYTHM ON BALANCE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karagul Osman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of circadian rhythm on dynamic balance performance and to determine the role of physical activity level, body temperature, chronotype, and gender in this possible effect. Material and

  9. Effects of radiation on scintillating fiber performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.L.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Onopienko, D.; Savin, S.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.; Young, K.G.; Carey, R.; Rothman, M.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W.; Parr, H.

    1992-01-01

    Continued rapid improvements in formulations for scintillating fibers require the ability to parameterize and predict effects of radiation on detector performance. Experimental techniques necessary to obtain needed information and calculational procedures used in performing predications for hadron scintillating fiber calorimetry in the Superconducting Supercollider environment are described. The experimental techniques involve control of the testing environment, consideration of dose rate effects, and other factors. These calculations involve the behavior of particle showers in the detector, expected levels of radiation, and parameterization of the radiation effects. A summary of significant work is also presented

  10. Effects of radiation on scintillating fiber performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.G.; Bauer, M.L.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Onopienko, D.; Savin, S.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.; Carey, R.; Rothman, M.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W.; Paar, H.

    1993-01-01

    Continued rapid improvements in formulations for scintillating fibers require the ability to parameterize and predict effects of radiation on detector performance. Experimental techniques necessary to obtain desired information and calculational procedures used in performing predictions for hadron scintillating fiber calorimetry in the Superconducting Supercollider environment are described. The experimental techniques involve control of the testing environment, consideration of dose rate effects, and other factors. The calculations involve the behavior of particle showers in the detector, expected levels of radiation, and parameterization of the radiation effects. A summary of significant work is also presented

  11. Interventions for music performance anxiety: results from a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Burin

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Music performance anxiety (MPA is characterised by fears related to performing music. It may result in damages to personal life and professional career, so treatment and prevention are very important. Objective To undertake a systematic literature review on the effectiveness/efficacy of MPA interventions and to integrate these findings to those in the literature reviewed previously. Methods We used PubMed, PsycINFO and SciELO databases and keywords music*, performance anxiety, treatment, therapy and intervention and manual research. We selected articles published between October-2002/July-2016. Results Out of 97 articles, 23 were reviewed. Sixteen studies presented inter-group experimental design, and seven presented pre-post experimental design. The intervention modalities reviewed were cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT, virtual reality exposure, biofeedback, yoga, meditation, music therapy and the Alexander technique. Although the interventions presented some indicators of efficacy in the MPA outcomes and improvement in performance quality, important methodological limitations were observed: low number of individuals and non-specific criteria for their inclusion/exclusion. This reinforces previous findings regarding methodological fragilities associated with this context. Discussion CBT is the most frequently studied modality and with the greatest number of effectiveness indicators. The remaining modalities indicate tendencies in positive outcomes that require further and efficient investigation in more rigorous studies with greater methodological control.

  12. Postirradiation examination results for the Irradiation Effects Scoping Test 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehner, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    The postirradiation examination results are reported for two rods from the second scoping test (IE-ST-2) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Irradiation Effects Program. The rods were irradiated in the in-pile test loop of the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Rod IE-005 was fabricated from fresh fuel and cladding previously irradiated in the Saxton Reactor. Rod IE-006, fabricated from fresh fuel and unirradiated cladding, was equipped with six developmental cladding surface thermocouples. The rods were preconditioned, power ramped, and then subjected to film boiling operation. The performance of the rods and the developmental thermocouples are evaluated from the post irradiation examination results. The effects of prior irradiation damage in cladding are discussed in relation to fuel rod behavior during a power ramp and subsequent film boiling operation

  13. The Effects of Strategic Orientations on Innovation and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonyel OFLAZOĞLU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effects of strategic orientations (market, entrepreneurial, and technology orientations of firms on innovation and performance. A model is developed under the assumption that, with the help of innovations, strategic orientations have positive effects both on creating customer value and financial success. The study was limited with and questionnaires were completed by 845 industrial firms. The data was analyzed using a structural equation model. According to the results, strategic orientations have positive effect on innovation and performance. Although a positive relationship exist between innovation and performance and proactive market orientation, no significant and positive relationship was found between innovation and performance and reactive market orientation.

  14. Bullying effect on student’s performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Resende Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to measure the effect of bullying in math scores of students in the 6th grade of public (Nansel et al., 2001. school in the city of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil with the use of data from a survey by Joaquim Nabuco Foundation in 2013. The methodology applied is Propensity Score Matching (PSM in order to compare students who reported having suffered bullying with a control group, consisting of students who did not suffer bullying. Specifically, we aim to understand the role of social emotional skills and their potential influence on bullying. The results suggest that bullying has a negative impact on performance in mathematics and that social emotional skills can help students deal with bullying. Several econometric techniques were used to circumvent endogeneity problems. To identify personality traits, we use a factor model that also serves to correct for prediction error bias. The sensitivity analysis indicated potential problems of omitted variables. The results indicate that anti-bullying programs should take into account social emotional skills. JEL classification: I21, I28, J24, Keywords: Bullying, Propensity Score Matching, Impact evaluation, Personality traits, Mathematics

  15. The EU CONCERTO project Class 1 - Demonstrating cost-effective low-energy buildings - Recent results with special focus on comparison of calculated and measured energy performance of Danish buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Ove; Thomsen, K.E.; Rose, J.

    2012-01-01

    -chip heating plant has been added. The project demonstrates the benefits of ultra-low-energy buildings integrated with biomass- and solar heating energy supply. The CLASS1 project involves 4 other countries: Estonia, France, Italy and Romania. These countries develop training activities based on the results......In 2007 the Class1 project commenced. Originally, 442 dwellings were to be designed and constructed as "low-energy class 1" houses according to requirements set by the Municipality of Egedal/Denmark. This means that the energy consumption is 50% below the existing energy regulations. 65 dwellings...... and experiences gained from the Danish housing projects. This paper describes the comparisons between measured and calculated energy consumption in a social housing settlement and in a detached single-family house. Results show relatively large discrepancies between measured and calculated results...

  16. Human performance breakdowns are rarely accidents: they are usually very poor choices with disastrous results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besco, Robert O.

    2004-01-01

    When human error is involved in the error chain of accidents in complex systems, the causes of the errors are very seldom the result of: - a random slip,; - one inadvertent oversight,; - a single unintended action,; - one mis-perceived event,; - simple mal-performance of a complex action, or; - a poor training program for the human operators. Invariably, the cause of the break down is in a very poor conscious choice by someone from the operator back through system designer, the supervision, management and leadership through the entire organization. Usually the operator bears the burden of the blame and is either rebuked, retrained or replaced. In systems such as commercial aviation, complex manufacturing systems, power plants, process control systems, information-processing systems and communications networks, the replacement or retraining of individuals or even classes of individuals usually does not result in any long-term improvement of the safety or effectiveness of the system. What is needed is a system that identifies the reasons why the operators made the errors. Further a system is needed that can recommend what can be done to improve the future performance within the system. The professional performance analysis system (PPAS) has been developed and applied to more than 50 major aircraft accidents in the past 30 years. The PPAS is a direct outgrowth of the human performance analysis system developed by Robert Mager over 45 years ago. The PPAS system is applied after a complete and unbiased definition and description of the events of the accident or incident has been developed by the teams of accident investigation and accident reconstruction professionals. The PPAS then uses a systematic protocol and algorithm to determine the reasons as to why the humans committed the errors or why they performed at subnormal performance levels. This process is based on quantitative behavioral science principles and findings that have been demonstrated valid for many

  17. The Effect of Movement on Cognitive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Mualem

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the relationship between walking, cognitive, and academic skills. Students from elementary, middle, high school, and college were required to walk for 10 min prior to completing feature detection, Simon-type memory, and mathematical problem-solving tasks. Participants were counterbalanced to remove a time bias. Ten minutes of walking had a significant positive effect on Simon-type memory and critical feature-detection tasks among all age groups. Separately, with mathematical problem-solving ability, higher performing high-school students demonstrated significant positive effects on mathematical reasoning tasks based on the Bloom Taxonomy. However, poorly achieving high-school students performed significantly better than those with higher grades in mathematics on tests of mathematical problem-solving ability based on the Bloom’s Taxonomy. The study indicates that there is justification to employ relatively simple means to effect lifestyle, academic, and cognitive performance.

  18. The effect of fasting on surgical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schefte, David Fenger; Rosenstock, Steffen Jais

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether fasting has any impact on surgical performance. This simulator-based study investigates whether fasting affects surgical performance. METHODS: Twelve healthy medical students [seven women, mean age 26.5 years (range 23-34)] with no prior experience with surgical...... simulators underwent a short course introduction to the LapSim(®) simulator. After having reached a predefined level, the participants performed five simulated salpingectomies on the LapSim(®) simulator 5-30 days after the initial introduction. The procedures took place at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. after fasting...... in the longitudinal axis with the left hand. CONCLUSION: The simulator-based study suggests that 17 h of fasting does not deteriorate surgical performance. Further studies on the effect of fasting on surgical performance are needed....

  19. The performance of fully automated urine analysis results for predicting the need of urine culture test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Yüksel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Urinalysis and urine culture are most common tests for diagnosis of urinary tract infections. The aim of our study is to examine the diagnostic performance of urine analysis and the role of urine analysis to determine the requirements for urine culture. Methods: Urine culture and urine analysis results of 362 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Culture results were taken as a reference for chemical and microscopic examination of urine and diagnostic accuracy of the test parameters, that may be a marker for urinary tract infection, and the performance of urine analysis were calculated for predicting the urine culture requirements. Results: A total of 362 urine culture results of patients were evaluated and 67% of them were negative. The results of leukocyte esterase and nitrite in chemical analysis and leukocytes and bacteria in microscopic analysis were normal in 50.4% of culture negative urines. In diagnostic accuracy calculations, leukocyte esterase (86.1% and microscopy leukocytes (88.0% were found with high sensitivity, nitrite (95.4% and bacteria (86.6% were found with high specificity. The area under the curve was calculated as 0.852 in ROC analysis for microscopic examination for leukocytes. Conclusion: Full-automatic urine devices can provide sufficient diagnostic accuracy for urine analysis. The evaluation of urine analysis results in an effective way can predict the necessity for urine culture requests and especially may contribute to a reduction in the work load and cost. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 286-289

  20. The selective treatment of clinical mastitis based on on-farm culture results: II. Effects on lactation performance, including clinical mastitis recurrence, somatic cell count, milk production, and cow survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, A; Godden, S M; Bey, R; Ruegg, P L; Leslie, K

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this multi-state, multi-herd clinical trial was to report on the efficacy of using an on-farm culture system to guide strategic treatment decisions in cows with clinical mastitis. The study was conducted in 8 commercial dairy farms ranging in size from 144 to 1,795 cows from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Ontario, Canada. A total of 422 cows affected with mild or moderate clinical mastitis in 449 quarters were randomly assigned to either (1) a positive-control treatment program or (2) an on-farm culture-based treatment program. Quarter cases assigned to the positive-control group received immediate on-label intramammary treatment with cephapirin sodium. Quarters assigned to the culture-based treatment program were not treated until the results of on-farm culture were determined after 18 to 24h of incubation. Quarters in the culture-based treatment program that had gram-positive growth or a mixed infection were treated according to label instruction using intramammary cephapirin sodium. Quarters assigned to the culture-based treatment program that had gram-negative or no-growth did not receive intramammary therapy. It was already reported in a companion paper that the selective treatment of clinical mastitis based on on-farm culture results decreases antibiotic use by half and tends to decrease milk withholding time without affecting short-term clinical and bacteriological outcomes. The present article reports on long-term outcomes of the aforementioned study. No statistically significant differences existed between cases assigned to the positive-control program and cases assigned to the culture-based treatment program in risk and days for recurrence of clinical mastitis in the same quarter (35% and 78 d vs. 43% and 82 d), linear somatic cell count (4.2 vs. 4.4), daily milk production (30.0 vs. 30.7 kg), and risk and days for culling or death events (28% and 160 d vs. 32% and 137 d) for the rest of the lactation after enrollment of the clinical mastitis

  1. Effect of Managers on Public Service Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Maria Falk

    This report provides an overview of the PhD dissertation “Effects of Managers on Public Service Performance” carried out at the Department of Political Science, Aarhus University and SFI – The Danish National Centre for Social Research. The dissertation is part of the research project “School...... Management, Teaching, and Student Performance” supported by the Danish Strategic Research Council (now Innovation Fund Denmark) and headed by professor Søren Winter. The dissertation explores the effects of managers on public service performance. By combining theoretical insights and research designs from......?”, “How can we improve organizational performance?”, and “How can we measure public service performance?” The setting for the dissertation is Danish middle schools (folkeskoler). The education system is generally considered an important service area as it affects later life outcomes of individual children...

  2. Effects of weight training on power performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAUKAB AZEEM

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Harris et al. declared that some researchers claim the use of 80% of 1RM is recommended toimprove power characteristics, while others suggest 50-60% of 1RM and below. Kawamori and Haff agreed withHarris et al., stating that there is inconsistency in the optimal load to produce the highest power. They claimedthat some studies that used untrained subjects, single joint exercises, and upper-body exercises reported 30-45%of 1RM, while others using trained subjects, multi-joint exercises, and lower-body exercises reported 30-70% of1RM.Method: The purpose of the study was to find out the effect of weight training in the developing the powerperformance among 20 students between 16 to 18 years of age enrolled for physical education course for theacademic year 2010, were selected as subjects. Pre and post test was conducted for the group on 1RM of squats,bench press and dead lift. 45 minutes weight training program, twice a week, for 12 weeks was given to thesubjects. The statistical tools used were mean, SD, and ‘t’ –test.Results & Discussion: The analysis of the data reveals that the subjects with the training have shownimprovement in the performance of squats from pre to post test with the mean and S.D being (76.00, 26.59 and(93.75, 27.19 respectively. The improvement is quite encouraging and highly significant (p<0.0001.With regard to bench press exercise of the subjects the mean and S.D in the pre and post test were (53.00, 23.14and (70.25, 23.37. The data clearly speaks of an improved performance from pre to post scores of the studentswhich is highly significant at (p<0.0001. The mean and S.D in the pre and post test were (104.00, 28.31 and(135.00, 24.97 respectively with respect to dead lift exercise. There is an increase in the power of the studentswhich is encouraging and highly significant with (p<0.0001.Conclusions: It is concluded from this study, that there was a marked improvement in the performance of thestudents in

  3. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... made a part of and place on each job order issued for the performance of work discussed in this section... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance of work resulting from damage sustained... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting...

  4. Contaminant fluxes through site containment barriers: Performance assessment and illustrative results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vita, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    Contaminant mass flux by advective and diffusive transport is predicted for five containment barriers that use one or more clay liners, flexible membrane liners (FMLs), or liquid collection and removal systems (LCRS)s. Barriers are engineered systems intended to contain and isolate site contaminants from the environment. Barriers include liners, caps, and cutoff walls. Barriers may be used in contaminated-site cleanups (including CERCLA and RCRA), RCRA landfills, or other RCRA TSDFs. Concepts are provided for barrier performance assessment, including analysis and optimization, for meeting performance requirements and controlling risk at minimum cost. Concepts and results can help in planning, designing, or evaluating and communicating, the use or effectiveness of proposed or existing barriers for site cleanups or waste containment. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  5. The Effects of Customer Voice on Hotel Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, A. George; Josiassen, Alexander; Cvelbar, Ljubica Knežević

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of two critical customer voice variables on hotel performance. Specifically, the research provides a customer equity model in which the influences of both customer satisfaction and complaints are considered. The impact of the customer voice variables on hotel...... performance is investigated while considering the potential for moderating effects by hotel size and star rating. We use a more robust approach to measure firm performance than is traditionally used in satisfaction-performance studies. Finally the paper reports on the results of these investigations...

  6. Effects of respirator use on worker performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli, R. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1993, EPRI funded Yankee Atomic Electric Company to examine the effects of respirator use on worker efficiency. Phase I of Yankee`s effort was to develop a study design to determine respirator effects. Given success in Phase I, a larger population will be tested to determine if a stasitically significant respirator effect on performance can be measured. This paper summarizes the 1993 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Effects of Pilot Study, and describes the study design for the 1994 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Study to be conducted at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Also described is a summary of respirator effect studies that have been conducted during the last ten (10) years.

  7. The Logistics Performance Effect in International Trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmat Gani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth in world trade depends on the efficiency of trade support structures such as the logistics services. Despite logistics integral role in supporting commercial activities, there has generally been a low level of analysis and trade policy research focus from trade practitioners. This paper explores the effect of logistics performance in international trade. The analysis draws on overall logistics performance as well as disaggregated measures of logistics specificities data for a large sample of countries. The empirical analysis involved the estimation of standard export and import equations incorporating measures of logistics performance. The findings show that the overall logistics performance is positively and statistically significantly correlated with exports and imports. The analysis is also extended by investigating if logistics specificities mattered for international trade. The findings reveal that several dimensions capturing logistics performance have statistically significant and positive effect, mostly on exports. The main policy implication is that continuous investment in logistics infrastructure and services can positively impact international trade.

  8. The use of research results for effective aging management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.E.; Taylor, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The study of the degradation of structures, components, and systems due to aging is an important ongoing area of research in the nuclear industry. Efforts by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the utility industry, through organizations such as the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have produced substantial research results that can be used by inspectors and operators to effectively understand and manage the aging of nuclear power plants. One of the primary objectives of the NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program is to determine how aging affects the safety of nuclear power plants. This program uses operating experience, testing, and engineering analysis to identify failures caused by age-related degradation. Useful information on aging has also resulted from research being performed by the industry to support plant-life extension (PLEX). The EPRI program, for instance, is directed toward the resolution of issues related to materials and components. Degradation of equipment and systems due to aging can occur which, if unmitigated, could result in reduction of the nuclear power plant safety margin as the plant ages. This paper describes how aging research results may be used by plant operating management to effectively address the aging issue and by inspectors responsible for monitoring plant activities and programs

  9. Usability Results from Human Performance Feedback and Development (HPFD) and ePerformance System Users: Technical Report #1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dean, Elizabeth; Aspinwall, Kimberly R; Schwerin, Michael J; Kendrick, Douglas E

    2006-01-01

    ...) and ePerformance system. This second and final iteration of usability testing was designed to verify the functionality of system revisions made as a result of recommendations offered in Schwerin et al. (2004...

  10. Effects of distances and company resources for enterprise export performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Givanildo Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to evaluate the effect of distance on the export performance of companies in Santa Catarina, and to what extent this effect is moderated by organizational resource characteristics. Multiple linear regression and variance analysis were used for a perception survey of export managers with a final sample of 49 exporting producers. The constructs showed internal validity and allowed the data to be analyzed. The results only revealed evidence regarding the effect of psychic distance, showing a positive relationship with export performance. Also, the model estimation showed that the organization's resources moderate the relation between distance and export performance. Finally the study also shows that the export team and the organizational structure moderate the effect of distance on the performance and future performance expectations of the companies.

  11. Age at treatment and long-term performance results in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, H.W.; Maruyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is highly radioresponsive, and recent treatment results have improved greatly since the introduction of megavoltage machine in 1960s. There is increasing evidence for the potential cure of medulloblastoma if properly treated in its early stages. The curable group represents approximately 75% of diagnosed patients. Long-term treatment effects were examined in this study. The study reveals age-dependent late effects in learning ability; the patients less than 4-years-old at treatment had major learning problems; patients of 5 to 7 years old performed at satisfactory-to-low passing levels in school work; patients older than 8 years old had no major intellectual impairment. Short stature was common when growth potential was present at the time of therapy, but endocrine tests were generally negative. These observations indicate special educational requirement needs, especially for children treated at a young age

  12. Performance investigation of a lab–scale latent heat storage prototype – Numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyas, Hakeem; Prasad, Sunku; Muthukumar, P.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Developed a numerical tool for analyzing a shell-and-tube LHS system. • Effective heat capacity method is used for incorporating the latent heat. • Number of heat transfer fluid tubes and fins are optimized. • Partial charging/discharging is efficient than complete charging/discharging. • Numerically predicted values match well with the experimental results. - Abstract: In the current study, numerical analysis of the charging and discharging characteristics of a lab-scale latent heat storage (LHS) prototype is presented. A mathematical model is developed to analyze the performance characteristics of the LHS prototype of shell and tube heat exchanger configuration. Effective heat capacity (EHC) method is implemented to consider the latent heat of the phase change material (PCM) and Boussinesq approximation is used to incorporate the buoyancy effect of the molten layer of the PCM in the model. For proper modeling of velocities in the PCM, Darcy law’s source term is added. The governing equations involved in the model are solved using a finite element based software product, COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3a. The number of embedded tubes and fins on the embedded tubes are optimized based on the discharging time of the model. Various performance parameters such as charging/discharging time, energy storage/discharge rate and melt fraction are evaluated. Numerically predicted temperature variations of the model during charging and discharging processes were compared with the experimental data extracted from the lab-scale LHS prototype and a good agreement was found between them.

  13. Radiation effect on rocket engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Huei-Huang; Kross, K. W.; Krebsbach, A. N.

    1990-01-01

    Critical problem areas involving the effect of radiation on the combustion of bipropellants are addressed by formulating a universal scaling law in combination with a radiation-enhanced vaporization combustion model. Numerical algorithms are developed and data pertaining to the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) and the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are used to conduct parametric sensitivity studies to predict the principal intercoupling effects of radiation. The analysis reveals that low-enthalpy engines, such as the VTE, are vulnerable to a substantial performance setback due to radiative loss, whereas the performance of high-enthalpy engines such as the SSME are hardly affected over a broad range of engine operation. Combustion enhancement by radiative heating of the propellant has a significant impact on propellants with high absorptivity.

  14. School Effects on Performance of Minority Pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, W. H. Adriaan

    1994-01-01

    Presents results of a study examining the comparative effects of school (system) determinants on the educational careers of minority students in the Netherlands, drawing on rational choice and empowerment theories. Results indicate the importance of a school policy aimed at improving minority student achievement. Pull-out programs are detrimental,…

  15. Concerta cf Ritalin Effects on Driving Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different methylphenidate (MPH delivery profiles on driving performance of 6 male ADHD adolescents, aged 16 to 19 years, were evaluated by a randomized, crossover, single-blind study comparing controlled-release (OROS MPH (Concerta given q.d. to immediate-release MPH (Ritalin in equal doses t.i.d. in a study at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

  16. Physical performance and antioxidant effects in triathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dékány

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Exercise results in an increased production of reactive oxygen species. Two major classes of endogenous protective mechanisms work together to ameliorate the harmful effects of oxidants in the cell: (1 components of the enzymatic scavenging system such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase and catalase and (2 nonenzymatic antioxidants. The purpose of this study was to identify any relationship between duration and intensity of prolonged physical exercise and markers of oxidative stress with the primary antioxidant system. Eleven triathletes performed a field test, which consisted of 1.9 km swimming, 60 km cycling and 21 km running. Venous and arterialized blood enzymatic activities of SOD, CAT, GPX, and creatine kinase and concentrations of glucose, lactate, malondialdehyde and bilirubin were determined. Athletes were divided into two groups: the more efficient group (A, and the less efficient group (B, according to their duration of the field test. The activity of GPX was significantly higher in Group A than Group B, irrespective of the duration of the exercise, but bilirubin concentration was lower. For Group B, SOD activity increased during running while CAT activity decreased after cycling and after running. Upon completion of the test, CK activity was elevated in both groups. The free radical scavenging system appears to be directly related to individiual physiological efficiency with prolonged submaximal physical exercise. According to our estimation of the individual training status and the adequate adaptation level, it is important to take into consideration the markers of free radical production and the activities of the scavenging compounds. Abbreviations: SOD - superoxide dismutase, GPX - glutathione peroxidase, CAT - catalase, MDA - malondialdehyde, CK - creatine kinase.

  17. The Effects of Goal Setting on Rugby Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellalieu, Stephen D.; Hanton, Sheldon; O'Brien, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Goal-setting effects on selected performance behaviors of 5 collegiate rugby players were assessed over an entire competitive season using self-generated targets and goal-attainment scaling. Results suggest that goal setting was effective for enhancing task-specific on-field behavior in rugby union. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. The Effects of Distraction on Cognitive Task Performance during Toddlerhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Nancy M.; Kannass, Kathleen N.; Haden, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of distraction on attention and task performance during toddlerhood. Thirty toddlers (24- to 26-month-olds) completed different tasks (2 of each: categorization, problem solving, memory, free play) in one of two conditions: No Distraction or Distraction. The results revealed that the distractor had varying effects on…

  19. The effect of subconscious performance goals on academic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bipp, T.; Kleingeld, P.A.M.; van Mierlo, H.; Kunde, W.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the impact of subconscious goals on academic performance in two field experiments. We show that unobtrusive priming of goals with regard to achievement motivation by means of a photograph improves performance in different educational contexts. High-school students who were exposed to

  20. The Effect of Subconscious Performance Goals on Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipp, Tanja; Kleingeld, Ad; van Mierlo, Heleen; Kunde, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the impact of subconscious goals on academic performance in two field experiments. We show that unobtrusive priming of goals with regard to achievement motivation by means of a photograph improves performance in different educational contexts. High-school students who were exposed to an achievement-related photograph achieved…

  1. Frequent Immediate Knowledge of Results Enhances the Increase of Throwing Velocity in Overarm Handball Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štirn, Igor; Carruthers, Jamie; Šibila, Marko; Pori, Primož

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, the effect of frequent, immediate, augmented feedback on the increase of throwing velocity was investigated. An increase of throwing velocity of a handball set shot when knowledge of results was provided or not provided during training was compared. Fifty female and seventy-three male physical education students were assigned randomly to the experimental or control group. All participants performed two series of ten set shots with maximal effort twice a week for six weeks. The experimental group received information regarding throwing velocity measured by a radar gun immediately after every shot, whereas the control group did not receive any feedback. Measurements of maximal throwing velocity of an ordinary handball and a heavy ball were performed, before and after the training period and compared. Participants who received feedback on results attained almost a four times greater relative increase of the velocity of the normal ball (size 2) as compared to the same intervention when feedback was not provided (8.1 ± 3.6 vs. 2.7 ± 2.9%). The velocity increases were smaller, but still significant between the groups for throws using the heavy ball (5.1 ± 4.2 and 2.5 ± 5.8 for the experimental and control group, respectively). Apart from the experimental group throwing the normal ball, no differences in velocity change for gender were obtained. The results confirmed that training oriented towards an increase in throwing velocity became significantly more effective when frequent knowledge of results was provided.

  2. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency`s strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended.

  3. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency's strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended

  4. Effect of effective microorganisms on broiler chicken performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted between January and March 2001 to assess the effects of Effective Microorganisms (EM) as feed additive in broiler chicken production on growth performance. The experiment involved 210 day-old broiler chicks which were randomly allocated to 14 pens of 15 birds each. There were seven ...

  5. Cardiovascular Effects of Performance-Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Gerche, André; Brosnan, Maria J

    2017-01-03

    Exercise and competitive sports should be associated with a wide range of health benefits with the potential to inspire a positive community health legacy. However, the reputation of sports is being threatened by an ever-expanding armamentarium of agents with real or perceived benefits in performance enhancement. In addition to the injustice of unfair advantage for dishonest athletes, significant potential health risks are associated with performance-enhancing drugs. Performance-enhancing drugs may have an effect on the cardiovascular system by means of directly altering the myocardium, vasculature, and metabolism. However, less frequently considered is the potential for indirect effects caused through enabling athletes to push beyond normal physiological limits with the potential consequence of exercise-induced arrhythmias. This review will summarize the known health effects of PEDs but will also focus on the potentially greater health threat posed by the covert search for performance-enhancing agents that have yet to be recognized by the World Anti-Doping Agency. History has taught us that athletes are subjected to unmonitored trials with experimental drugs that have little or no established efficacy or safety data. One approach to decrease drug abuse in sports would be to accept that there is a delay from when athletes start experimenting with novel agents to the time when authorities become aware of these drugs. This provides a window of opportunity for athletes to exploit with relative immunity. It could be argued that all off-label use of any agent should be deemed illegal. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Performance effect of multiple control forms in a Lean organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Borup; Israelsen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decades Lean has developed into a prominent management philosophy reaching beyond shop floor tools. However, substantial support of performance effects from Lean is still scarce and at best with mixed results. Recently, research has turned its focus towards perceiving Lean...... as a control package. In this paper we present statistical support for enhanced performance coming from Lean. Furthermore, our results strongly support the perception of Lean as a set of multiple control forms (output, behavioral, and social controls) that complement each other. Therefore, performance...... is increased if the average level of control forms is increased, and performance is further increased if the control forms are balanced at the same level representing a complementary effect between them. Our data are archival data spanning multiple years in a strong Lean organization. The dependent performance...

  7. Training Stiffness perception: Knowledge of results and modality effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korman Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Perception of compliant objects demands integration of haptic and visual position information with force information. Multisensory interactions are ubiquitous in perception, even at early processing stages, and thus can potentially play a role in learning. In this study we explored humans' improvement on uni-sensory stiffness discrimination as a function of different sensory conditions and immediate knowledge of results (KR during training. Two by two design was used: subjects were trained over two days on stiffness discrimination task with either matched visual-tactile, or tactile only stimuli and either with or without immediate feedback on their performance during training trials. Training resulted in both immediate but also latent, overnight learning in the proportion of correctly discriminated pairs of targets (PC, in all groups. Discrimination decision time (DT gains were obtained only during practice, while between sessions partial deterioration was evident. Affordance of visual information during training blocks resulted in higher PC during training blocks, but lower PC in the haptic-only retests. This finding challenges the notion that long-term unisensory learning mechanisms operate optimally under multisensory training conditions, at least for the combination of the visual and haptic modalities. We didn’t find evidence that information feedback during training enhances discrimination ability in terms of PC. However, we found transient within-session effects of KR and visual-haptic trainings on DT: while visualhaptic training resulted in slower responses, KR training induced faster responses.

  8. Effects of ownership and financial performance on corporate environmental performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Earnhart, D.; Lízal, Lubomír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1, (2006), s. 111-129 ISSN 0147-5967 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM0021620846 Keywords : Czech Republic * environmental protection * financial performance Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.964, year: 2006

  9. Insomnia and the Performance of US Workers: Results from the America Insomnia Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Berglund, Patricia A.; Coulouvrat, Catherine; Hajak, Goeran; Roth, Thomas; Shahly, Victoria; Shillington, Alicia C.; Stephenson, Judith J.; Walsh, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and associations of broadly defined (i.e., meeting full ICD-10, DSM-IV, or RDC/ICSD-2 inclusion criteria) insomnia with work performance net of comorbid conditions in the America Insomnia Survey (AIS). Design/Setting: Cross-sectional telephone survey. Participants: National sample of 7,428 employed health plan subscribers (ages 18+). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Broadly defined insomnia was assessed with the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire (BIQ). Work absenteeism and presenteeism (low on-the-job work performance defined in the metric of lost workday equivalents) were assessed with the WHO Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ). Regression analysis examined associations between insomnia and HPQ scores controlling 26 comorbid conditions based on self-report and medical/pharmacy claims records. The estimated prevalence of insomnia was 23.2%. Insomnia was significantly associated with lost work performance due to presenteeism (χ21 = 39.5, P absenteeism (χ21 = 3.2, P = 0.07), with an annualized individual-level association of insomnia with presenteeism equivalent to 11.3 days of lost work performance. This estimate decreased to 7.8 days when controls were introduced for comorbid conditions. The individual-level human capital value of this net estimate was $2,280. If we provisionally assume these estimates generalize to the total US workforce, they are equivalent to annualized population-level estimates of 252.7 days and $63.2 billion. Conclusions: Insomnia is associated with substantial workplace costs. Although experimental studies suggest some of these costs could be recovered with insomnia disease management programs, effectiveness trials are needed to obtain precise estimates of return-on-investment of such interventions from the employer perspective. Citation: Kessler RC; Berglund PA; Coulouvrat C; Hajak G; Roth T; Shahly V; Shillington AC; Stephenson JJ; Walsh JK. Insomnia and the performance

  10. 75 FR 32484 - Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ...] Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and Interpretation... public meeting: Array-Based Cytogenetic Tests: Questions on Performance Evaluation, Result Reporting and... cytogenetic tests. Date and Time: The meeting will be held on June 30, 2010, from 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Location...

  11. Personality traits affect teaching performance of attending physicians: results of a multi-center observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée A Scheepers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Worldwide, attending physicians train residents to become competent providers of patient care. To assess adequate training, attending physicians are increasingly evaluated on their teaching performance. Research suggests that personality traits affect teaching performance, consistent with studied effects of personality traits on job performance and academic performance in medicine. However, up till date, research in clinical teaching practice did not use quantitative methods and did not account for specialty differences. We empirically studied the relationship of attending physicians' personality traits with their teaching performance across surgical and non-surgical specialties. METHOD: We conducted a survey across surgical and non-surgical specialties in eighteen medical centers in the Netherlands. Residents evaluated attending physicians' overall teaching performance, as well as the specific domains learning climate, professional attitude, communication, evaluation, and feedback, using the validated 21-item System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ. Attending physicians self-evaluated their personality traits on a 5-point scale using the validated 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI, yielding the Five Factor model: extraversion, conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness and openness. RESULTS: Overall, 622 (77% attending physicians and 549 (68% residents participated. Extraversion positively related to overall teaching performance (regression coefficient, B: 0.05, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10, P = 0.02. Openness was negatively associated with scores on feedback for surgical specialties only (B: -0.10, 95% CI: -0.15 to -0.05, P<0.001 and conscientiousness was positively related to evaluation of residents for non-surgical specialties only (B: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.22, p = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Extraverted attending physicians were consistently evaluated as better supervisors. Surgical attending physicians who display high levels of

  12. Study of Tungsten effect on CFETR performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengyu; Xiang Gao Collaboration; Guoqiang Li Collaboration; Nan Shi Collaboration; Vincent Chan Collaboration; Xiang Jian Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    An integrated modeling workflow using OMFIT/TGYRO is constructed to evaluate W impurity effects on China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) performance. Self-consistent modeling of tungsten(W) core density profile, accounting for turbulence and neoclassical transport, is performed based on the CFETR steady-state scenario developed by D.Zhao (ZhaoDeng, APS, 2016). It's found that the fusion performance degraded in a limited level with increasing W concentration. The main challenge arises in sustainment of H-mode with significant W radiation. Assuming the power threshold of H-L back transition is approximately the same as that of L-H transition, using the scaling law of Takizuka (Takizuka etc, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 2004), it is found that the fractional W concentration should not exceed 3e-5 to stay in H-mode for CFETR phase I. A future step is to connect this requirement to W wall erosion modeling. We are grateful to Dr. Emiliano Fable and Dr. Thomas Pütterich and Ms. Emily Belli for very helpful discussions and comments. We also would like to express our thanks to all the members of the CFETR Physics Group, and we appreciate the General Atomic Theory Group for permission to use the OMFIT framework and GA code suite, and for their valuable technical support. Numerical computations were performed on the ShenMa High Performance Computing Cluster in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This work was mainly supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB110001, 2014GB110002, 2014GB110003) and supported in part by the National ITER Plans Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013GB106001, 2013GB111002, 2015GB110001).

  13. Preliminary results on performance testing of a turbocharged rotary combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, P. R.; Rice, W. J.; Schock, H. J.; Pringle, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of a turbocharged rotary engine at power levels above 75 kW (100 hp) was studied. A twin rotor turbocharged Mazda engine was tested at speeds of 3000 to 6000 rpm and boost pressures to 7 psi. The NASA developed combustion diagnostic instrumentation was used to quantify indicated and pumping mean effect pressures, peak pressure, and face to face variability on a cycle by cycle basis. Results of this testing showed that a 5900 rpm a 36 percent increase in power was obtained by operating the engine in the turbocharged configuration. When operating with lean carburetor jets at 105 hp (78.3 kW) and 4000 rpm, a brake specific fuel consumption of 0.45 lbm/lb-hr was measured.

  14. Effect of alternating postures on cognitive performance for healthy people performing sedentary work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Bernhard; Kapellusch, Jay M; Schrempf, Andreas; Probst, Kathrin; Haller, Michael; Baca, Arnold

    2018-06-01

    Prolonged sitting is a risk factor for several diseases and the prevalence of worksite-based interventions such as sit-to-stand workstations is increasing. Although their impact on sedentary behaviour has been regularly investigated, the effect of working in alternating body postures on cognitive performance is unclear. To address this uncertainty, 45 students participated in a two-arm, randomised controlled cross-over trial under laboratory conditions. Subjects executed validated cognitive tests (working speed, reaction time, concentration performance) either in sitting or alternating working postures on two separate days (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02863731). MANOVA results showed no significant difference in cognitive performance between trials executed in alternating, standing or sitting postures. Perceived workload did not differ between sitting and alternating days. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant learning effects regarding concentration performance and working speed for both days. These results suggest that working posture did not affect cognitive performance in the short term. Practitioner Summary: Prior reports indicated health-related benefits based on alternated (sit/stand) body postures. Nevertheless, their effect on cognitive performance is unknown. This randomised controlled trial showed that working in alternating body postures did not influence reaction time, concentration performance, working speed or workload perception in the short term.

  15. Impeller inlet geometry effect on performance improvement for centrifugal pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Xianwu; Zhang, Yao; Peng, Junqi; Xu, Hongyuan; Yu, Weiping

    2008-01-01

    This research treats the effect of impeller inlet geometry on performance improvement for a boiler feed pump, who is a centrifugal pump having specific speed of 183 m.m 3 min -1 .min -1 and close type impeller with exit diameter of 450 mm. The hydraulic performance and cavitation performance of the pump have been tested experimentally. In order to improve the pump, five impellers have been considered by extending the blade leading edge or applying much larger blade angle at impeller inlet compared with the original impeller. The 3-D turbulent flow inside those pumps has been analyzed basing on RNG k-ε turbulence model and VOF cavitation model. It is noted that the numerical results are fairly good compared with the experiments. Based on the experimental test and numerical simulation, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Impeller inlet geometry has important influence on performance improvement in the case of centrifugal pump. Favorite effects on performance improvement have been achieved by both extending the blade leading edge and applying much larger blade angle at impeller inlet: (2) It is suspected that the extended leading edge have favorite effect for improving hydraulic performance, and the much larger blade angle at impeller inlet have favorite effect for improving cavitation performance for the test pump: (3) Uniform flow upstream of impeller inlet is helpful for improving cavitation performance of the pump

  16. Impeller inlet geometry effect on performance improvement for centrifugal pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xianwu; Zhang, Yao; Peng, Junqi; Xu, Hongyuan [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Yu, Weiping [Zhejiang Pump Works, Zhejiang (China)

    2008-10-15

    This research treats the effect of impeller inlet geometry on performance improvement for a boiler feed pump, who is a centrifugal pump having specific speed of 183 m.m{sup 3}min{sup -1}.min{sup -1} and close type impeller with exit diameter of 450 mm. The hydraulic performance and cavitation performance of the pump have been tested experimentally. In order to improve the pump, five impellers have been considered by extending the blade leading edge or applying much larger blade angle at impeller inlet compared with the original impeller. The 3-D turbulent flow inside those pumps has been analyzed basing on RNG k-{epsilon} turbulence model and VOF cavitation model. It is noted that the numerical results are fairly good compared with the experiments. Based on the experimental test and numerical simulation, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Impeller inlet geometry has important influence on performance improvement in the case of centrifugal pump. Favorite effects on performance improvement have been achieved by both extending the blade leading edge and applying much larger blade angle at impeller inlet: (2) It is suspected that the extended leading edge have favorite effect for improving hydraulic performance, and the much larger blade angle at impeller inlet have favorite effect for improving cavitation performance for the test pump: (3) Uniform flow upstream of impeller inlet is helpful for improving cavitation performance of the pump

  17. Dehydration: physiology, assessment, and performance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of dehydration assessment and presents a unique evaluation of the dehydration and performance literature. The importance of osmolality and volume are emphasized when discussing the physiology, assessment, and performance effects of dehydration. The underappreciated physiologic distinction between a loss of hypo-osmotic body water (intracellular dehydration) and an iso-osmotic loss of body water (extracellular dehydration) is presented and argued as the single most essential aspect of dehydration assessment. The importance of diagnostic and biological variation analyses to dehydration assessment methods is reviewed and their use in gauging the true potential of any dehydration assessment method highlighted. The necessity for establishing proper baselines is discussed, as is the magnitude of dehydration required to elicit reliable and detectable osmotic or volume-mediated compensatory physiologic responses. The discussion of physiologic responses further helps inform and explain our analysis of the literature suggesting a ≥ 2% dehydration threshold for impaired endurance exercise performance mediated by volume loss. In contrast, no clear threshold or plausible mechanism(s) support the marginal, but potentially important, impairment in strength, and power observed with dehydration. Similarly, the potential for dehydration to impair cognition appears small and related primarily to distraction or discomfort. The impact of dehydration on any particular sport skill or task is therefore likely dependent upon the makeup of the task itself (e.g., endurance, strength, cognitive, and motor skill). © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  18. Effect of music tempo on task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, C; Moss, S

    1989-12-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of music tempo on task performance. In Study 1, 44 undergraduate business students were asked to be "workers" in a stock market project by collecting closing stock prices and calculating the percentage of change in the price from week to week. Subjects were randomly divided into groups such that they either listened to fast-paced music while they worked, to slow-paced music, or to no music. Analyses of variance and covariance were conducted on both the quantity and quality of the subjects' work, using music listening habits as a covariate. There were no differences in either the quantity or quality of the work produced by the groups. There were some methodological concerns regarding Study 1, so a second study was conducted. The 70 undergraduate business students in Study 2 completed the same task under the same music conditions as in Study 1. Analyses of variance indicated women performed significantly better than men, performance was significantly higher in the rock condition than in the heartbeat condition, and subjects in the rock condition had a significantly higher perceived level of distraction by the music.

  19. Evaluating performance measures to determine training effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemm, R.W.; Feiza, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This research was conceived and dedicated to helping the CECo training organization become a more integrated part of the corporate business. The target population for this study was nuclear and fossil generating station employees who directly impacted the production of electricity. The target sample (n = 150) included: instrument, mechanical, and electrical maintenance personnel; control room operators; engineers, radiation chemists, and other technical specialists; and equipment operators and attendants. A total of four instruments were utilized by this study. Three instruments were administered to the generating station personnel. These included a demographic form, a learning style profile, and a motivational style profile. The focal instrument, a performance skills rating form, was administered to supervisory personnel. Data analysis consisted of three major parts. Part one established internal consistency through Cronbach alpha statistics. Part two provides summary statistics and breakdown tables for important variables. Part three provides inferential statistics responding to the research questions. All six Performance Skills variables discriminated significantly between the trained and non-trained groups (p .001). In all cases, the mean value for the trained group exceeded the mean value for the non-trained group. Implications for further research indicate that training does have a quantifiable effect on job performance

  20. The Effect of Job Performance Aids on Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosshage, Erik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). System Surety Engineering

    2014-06-01

    Job performance aids (JPAs) have been studied for many decades in a variety of disciplines and for many different types of tasks, yet this is the first known research experiment using JPAs in a quality assurance (QA) context. The objective of this thesis was to assess whether a JPA has an effect on the performance of a QA observer performing the concurrent dual verification technique for a basic assembly task. The JPA used in this study was a simple checklist, and the design borrows heavily from prior research on task analysis and other human factors principles. The assembly task and QA construct of concurrent dual verification are consistent with those of a high consequence manufacturing environment. Results showed that the JPA had only a limited effect on QA performance in the context of this experiment. However, there were three important and unexpected findings that may draw interest from a variety of practitioners. First, a novel testing methodology sensitive enough to measure the effects of a JPA on performance was created. Second, the discovery that there are different probabilities of detection for different types of error in a QA context may be the most far-reaching results. Third, these results highlight the limitations of concurrent dual verification as a control against defects. It is hoped that both the methodology and results of this study are an effective baseline from which to launch future research activities.

  1. Effects of Gas Turbine Component Performance on Engine and Rotary Wing Vehicle Size and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Christopher A.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, Subsonic Rotary Wing Project, further gas turbine engine studies have been performed to quantify the effects of advanced gas turbine technologies on engine weight and fuel efficiency and the subsequent effects on a civilian rotary wing vehicle size and mission fuel. The Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) vehicle and mission and a previous gas turbine engine study will be discussed as a starting point for this effort. Methodology used to assess effects of different compressor and turbine component performance on engine size, weight and fuel efficiency will be presented. A process to relate engine performance to overall LCTR vehicle size and fuel use will also be given. Technology assumptions and levels of performance used in this analysis for the compressor and turbine components performances will be discussed. Optimum cycles (in terms of power specific fuel consumption) will be determined with subsequent engine weight analysis. The combination of engine weight and specific fuel consumption will be used to estimate their effect on the overall LCTR vehicle size and mission fuel usage. All results will be summarized to help suggest which component performance areas have the most effect on the overall mission.

  2. The effects of stereotypes and observer pressure on athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krendl, Anne; Gainsburg, Izzy; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-02-01

    Although the effects of negative stereotypes and observer pressure on athletic performance have been well researched, the effects of positive stereotypes on performance, particularly in the presence of observers, is not known. In the current study, White males watched a video either depicting Whites basketball players as the best free throwers in the NBA (positive stereotype), Black basketball players as the best free throwers in the NBA (negative stereotype), or a neutral sports video (control). Participants then shot a set of free throws, during which half the participants were also videotaped (observer condition), whereas the other half were not (no observer condition). Results demonstrated that positive stereotypes improved free throw performance, but only in the no observer condition. Interestingly, observer pressure interacted with the positive stereotype to lead to performance decrements. In the negative stereotype condition, performance decrements were observed both in the observer and no observer conditions.

  3. Revisiting the Impact of Perceived Empowerment on Job Performance: Results from Front-Line Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Devrim Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine the probable effect of perceived empowerment on job performance and the sample of research consisted of 230 participants working in tourism sector as front-line employees. The outcomes of this study indicated that psychological empowerment was positively correlated with employee job performance and employees’ job performance were mostly effected from self-determination and impact dimensions of empowerment. Moreover, tests were conducted to analyze the significant differences in participants’ perception of empowerment and job performance according to their demographic characteristics. There was a significant difference between perceived empowerment and gender, age and work experience where as there was no significant difference between empowerment and education levels. On the other hand, the relationship between job performance and work experience was supported however no relationship was found between job performance and gender, age and education level of the participants. Trying to find out what might possibly lead front-line employees to increased job performance, it can be claimed that psychological empowerment still turns out to be a central issue and therefore this research makes useful contributions to the current knowledge by entirely investigating the direct effect of perceived empowerment on employee job performance in hospitality industry where especially front-line employees spend most of their time directly with customers.

  4. Experimental results of the SMART ECC injection performance with reduced scale of test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Il; Cho, Seok; Ko, Yung Joo; Shin, Yong Cheol; Kwon, Tae Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    SMART pressurized water reactor type is different from the existing integral NSSS commercial pressurized water reactor system which is equipped with the main features. In addition, RCS piping is removed and the feature of the SBLOCA is a major design break accident. SWAT (SMART ECC Water Asymmetric Two-phase choking test facility) test facility is to simulate the 2 inch SBLOCA of the SMART using with reduced scale. The Test was performed to produce experimental data for the validation of the TASS/SMR-S thermal hydraulic analysis code, and to investigate the related thermal hydraulic phenomena in the down-comer region during the 2 inch SBLOCA of the safety inject line. The particular phenomena for the observation are ECC bypass and multi-dimensional flow characteristics to verify the effectiveness and performance of the safety injection system. In this paper, the corresponding steady state test conditions, including initial and boundary conditions along with major measuring parameters, and related experimental results were described

  5. Effects of Text Messaging on Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barks Amanda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available University students frequently send and receive cellular phone text messages during classroominstruction. Cognitive psychology research indicates that multi-tasking is frequently associatedwith performance cost. However, university students often have considerable experience withelectronic multi-tasking and may believe that they can devote necessary attention to a classroomlecture while sending and receiving text messages. In the current study, university students whoused text messaging were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: 1. a group that sent andreceived text messages during a lecture or, 2. a group that did not engage in text messagingduring the lecture. Participants who engaged in text messaging demonstrated significantlypoorer performance on a test covering lecture content compared with the group that did notsend and receive text messages. Participants exhibiting higher levels of text messaging skill hadsignificantly lower test scores than participants who were less proficient at text messaging. It ishypothesized that in terms of retention of lecture material, more frequent task shifting by thosewith greater text messaging proficiency contributed to poorer performance. Overall, the findingsdo not support the view, held by many university students, that this form of multitasking has littleeffect on the acquisition of lecture content. Results provide empirical support for teachers andprofessors who ban text messaging in the classroom.

  6. The effect of friction on indentation test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsono, E; Swaddiwudhipong, S; Liu, Z S

    2008-01-01

    A smooth contact analysis is commonly adopted in simulated indentation. Limited studies have been performed to investigate the possibility of deviation due to this simplification. This study involves the finite element simulation of indentation by conical indenters and the Berkovich family of indenters with three different apex angles of indenter tips of 50°, 60° and 70.3°. Loading curvatures and the ratio of the remaining work done to the total work done of the load-indentation curves resulting from the simulated indentation tests considering friction and smooth contact surfaces were compared and discussed. A wide range of elasto-plastic materials obeying the power law strain hardening model were considered in this study. The results as presented herein demonstrate that the effect of friction on the two essential basic parameters from the load–indentation curves, namely, the loading curvatures and the ratio of the work done, varies depending on both mechanical properties of the target materials and the geometries of the indenter tips adopted in the investigation

  7. Effect of Injector Nozzle Holes on Diesel Engine Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Semin,; Yusof, Mohd Yuzri Mohd; Arof, Aminuddin Md; Shaharudin, Daneil Tomo; Ismail, Abdul Rahim

    2010-01-01

    All of the injector nozzle holes have examined and the results are shown that the seven holes nozzle have provided the best burning result for the fuel in-cylinder burned in any different engine speeds and the best burning is in low speed engine. In engine performance effect, all of the nozzles have examined and the five holes nozzle provided the best result in indicted power, indicated torque and ISFC in any different engine speeds.

  8. A comparison between students' attitudes and their performance regarding the factors influencing learning and exam results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ebrahimi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various educational approaches to learning have been proposed. It is, of course, of vital importance to study those that have resulted in effective educational achievements.Purpose: To assess the student's attitudes and performance in order to evaluate educational approaches and identify the variables leading to students gaining good marks.Methods: The subjects of the study were medical students at pathophysiology  phase. A multiple-choice questionnaire was prepared, the reliability and validity of which were confirmed. A paired-sample T­ test was used to compare and analyze  the student's  Basic Sciences Comprehensive  Exam scores in each discipline and their average score during the basic sciences course.Results: With respect to attitudes, the students highly valued the importance of teacher's methodology and mutual  respect, as an influential  factor in Learning. Furthermore, the majority  of the students relied heavily  on their textbooks  as the main source of information  and preferred to study at home, rather than any other places. Most of the students prefer to study in the morning. They believed that mid-term exams, quizzes, and active class participation do not have much effect on learning. However, it was of high importance to them to attend practical claSSfS (labs. With respect to performance, most of the students used lecture notes as the main references, and considered their home as a good place to study and  preferred to study in the morning,  but have  participated  in theoretical  and  practical classes regularly.Conclusion: Most successful students attributed their success to active class participation,  takingmid-term exams, quizzes, and using library. Having analyzed the data, we recommend the authorities to provide more methodology  workshops for teachers,  sufficient  number of textbooks,  expanding  or increasing the number of the reading rooms with essential equipment

  9. How Should an Effective Performance Appraisal Be: EFL Teachers’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holi Ibrahim Holi Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is set to examine EFL teachers’ perceptions, views about what makes an effective performance appraisal system by adopting a quantitative survey design for data collection. A total number of 45 college instructors in the Sultanate of Oman responded to survey on: how is an effective performance appraisal perceived by EFL teachers? How do teachers perceive their participation in developing the appraisal system? And how might the present performance appraisal practices be improved? The result reveals that staff participation in developing performance appraisal system and goals, feedback confidentiality, quality appraiser, quality of place and time of appraisal, appraiser-appraisee relationships, and developmental nature of performance appraisal would help in making effective appraisal and the overall PA effectiveness depends mostly on these factors. The result has a significant implication for improving the process of teacher performance appraisal in Oman and enriches the body knowledge of PA in general. The study puts forwards suggestions and recommendations for improving PA practices and exercises in EFL contexts.

  10. The effects of fatigue on performance in simulated nursing work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Linsey M; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2011-09-01

    Fatigue is associated with increased rates of medical errors and healthcare worker injuries, yet existing research in this sector has not considered multiple dimensions of fatigue simultaneously. This study evaluated hypothesised causal relationships between mental and physical fatigue and performance. High and low levels of mental and physical fatigue were induced in 16 participants during simulated nursing work tasks in a laboratory setting. Task-induced changes in fatigue dimensions were quantified using both subjective and objective measures, as were changes in performance on physical and mental tasks. Completing the simulated work tasks increased total fatigue, mental fatigue and physical fatigue in all experimental conditions. Higher physical fatigue adversely affected measures of physical and mental performance, whereas higher mental fatigue had a positive effect on one measure of mental performance. Overall, these results suggest causal effects between manipulated levels of mental and physical fatigue and task-induced changes in mental and physical performance. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Nurse fatigue and performance has implications for patient and provider safety. Results from this study demonstrate the importance of a multidimensional view of fatigue in understanding the causal relationships between fatigue and performance. The findings can guide future work aimed at predicting fatigue-related performance decrements and designing interventions.

  11. Performance Prismas an Innovative Concept of the Organizational Activity Results Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Jagiełło

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an innovative method of the organization activity results measurement which is called Performance Measurement System. It is kind of control system which can help to improve the competitive advantages of organization.

  12. Cultural values and performance appraisal: assessing the effects of rater self-construal on performance ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vipanchi; Roch, Sylvia G

    2013-01-01

    Much of the prior research investigating the influence of cultural values on performance ratings has focused either on conducting cross-national comparisons among raters or using cultural level individualism/collectivism scales to measure the effects of cultural values on performance ratings. Recent research has shown that there is considerable within country variation in cultural values, i.e. people in one country can be more individualistic or collectivistic in nature. Taking the latter perspective, the present study used Markus and Kitayama's (1991) conceptualization of independent and interdependent self-construals as measures of individual variations in cultural values to investigate within culture variations in performance ratings. Results suggest that rater self-construal has a significant influence on overall performance evaluations; specifically, raters with a highly interdependent self-construal tend to show a preference for interdependent ratees, whereas raters high on independent self-construal do not show a preference for specific type of ratees when making overall performance evaluations. Although rater self-construal significantly influenced overall performance evaluations, no such effects were observed for specific dimension ratings. Implications of these results for performance appraisal research and practice are discussed.

  13. 10 CFR 436.13 - Presuming cost-effectiveness results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Presuming cost-effectiveness results. 436.13 Section 436... Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.13 Presuming cost-effectiveness results. (a) If the investment and other costs for an energy or water conservation measure considered for retrofit to...

  14. Cardiovascular Effects of Altitude on Performance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankit B; Coplan, Neil

    Altitude plays an important role in cardiovascular performance and training for athletes. Whether it is mountaineers, skiers, or sea-level athletes trying to gain an edge by training or living at increased altitude, there are many potential benefits and harms of such endeavors. Echocardiographic studies done on athletes at increased altitude have shown evidence for right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension, but no change in left ventricular ejection fraction. In addition, 10% of athletes are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension and high-altitude pulmonary edema. Some studies suggest that echocardiography may be able to identify athletes susceptible to high-altitude pulmonary edema prior to competing or training at increased altitudes. Further research is needed on the long-term effects of altitude training, as repeated, transient episodes of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction may have long-term implications. Current literature suggests that performance athletes are not at higher risk for ventricular arrhythmias when training or competing at increased altitudes. For sea-level athletes, the optimal strategy for attaining the benefits while minimizing the harms of altitude training still needs to be clarified, although-for now-the "live high, train low" approach appears to have the most rationale.

  15. Methodology of the Integrated Analysis of Company's Financial Status and Its Performance Results

    OpenAIRE

    Mackevičius, Jonas; Valkauskas, Romualdas

    2010-01-01

    Information about company's financial status and its performance results is very important for the objective evaluation of company's position in the market and competitive possibilities in the future. Such information is provided in the financial statement. It is important to apply and investigate this information properly. The methodology of company's financial status and performance results integrated analysis is recommended in this article. This methodology consists of these three elements...

  16. Performance limits of direct cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators - experimental results at the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-K.; Fernandez, P.; Mills, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    The successful use of cryogenically cooled silicon monochromators at third-generation synchrotron facilities is well documented. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS) it has been shown that, at 100 mA operation with the standard APS undulator A, the cryogenically cooled silicon monochromator performs very well with minimal (<2 arcsec) or no observable thermal distortions. However, to date there has not been any systematic experimental study on the performance limits of this approach. This paper presents experimental results on the performance limits of these directly cooled crystals. The results show that if the beam is limited to the size of the radiation central cone then, at the APS, the crystal will still perform well at twice the present 100 mA single 2.4 m-long 3.3 cm-period undulator heat load. However, the performance would degrade rapidly if a much larger incident white-beam size is utilized

  17. Effect of chicken genotype on growth performance and feed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was conducted to assess the effect of chicken genotype on the growth performance, feed intake and feed efficiency of the progenies resulting from pure, straight and reciprocal cross of Giriraja (Gr) and Alpha chickens. Data obtained on body weight, body length, breast girth, keel length, feed intake and feed ...

  18. The effect of land fragmentation on farm performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jakob Vesterlund; Czekaj, Tomasz Gerard; Henningsen, Arne

    and fields. Fragmented land is expected to increase costs and reduce production and, thus, decrease the performance of farms. Preliminary results based on two methodological approaches both indicate no statistically significant effect of field shape, while smaller field sizes and longer distances...

  19. Effect of Varying Controller Parameters on the Performance of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the results of computer simulation studies designed to isolate the effects of the major parameters of a fuzzy logic controller namely the range of the universe of discourse, the extent of overlap of the fuzzy sets, the rules in the rule base and the modes of the output fuzzy sets on the performance of a fuzzy ...

  20. Effects of different housing systems on growth performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of different housing systems on growth performance and carcass yield of two breeds of turkey. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... The results on carcass yield showed a significantly (p<0.05) higher plucked weight ...

  1. Performance of laboratories analysing welding fume on filter samples: results from the WASP proficiency testing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Peter; Butler, Owen

    2008-06-01

    This paper emphasizes the need for occupational hygiene professionals to require evidence of the quality of welding fume data from analytical laboratories. The measurement of metals in welding fume using atomic spectrometric techniques is a complex analysis often requiring specialist digestion procedures. The results from a trial programme testing the proficiency of laboratories in the Workplace Analysis Scheme for Proficiency (WASP) to measure potentially harmful metals in several different types of welding fume showed that most laboratories underestimated the mass of analyte on the filters. The average recovery was 70-80% of the target value and >20% of reported recoveries for some of the more difficult welding fume matrices were welding fume trial filter samples. Consistent rather than erratic error predominated, suggesting that the main analytical factor contributing to the differences between the target values and results was the effectiveness of the sample preparation procedures used by participating laboratories. It is concluded that, with practice and regular participation in WASP, performance can improve over time.

  2. Enhancing Thermoelectric Performance Using Nonlinear Transport Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-Hua; Imry, Yoseph

    2017-06-01

    We study nonlinear transport effects on the maximum efficiency and power for both inelastic and elastic thermoelectric generators. The former device refers to phonon-assisted hopping in double quantum dots, while the latter device is represented by elastic tunneling through a single quantum dot. We find that nonlinear thermoelectric transport can lead to enhanced efficiency and power for both types of devices. A comprehensive survey of various quantum-dot energy, temperature, and parasitic heat conduction reveals that the nonlinear transport-induced improvements of the maximum efficiency and power are overall much more significant for inelastic devices than for elastic devices, even for temperature biases as small as Th=1.2 Tc (Th and Tc are the temperatures of the hot and cold reservoirs, respectively). The underlying mechanism is revealed as due to the fact that, unlike the Fermi distribution, the Bose distribution is not bounded when the temperature bias increases. A large flux density of absorbed phonons leads to a great enhancement of the electrical current, output power, and energy efficiency, dominating over the concurrent increase of the parasitic heat current. Our study reveals that nonlinear transport effects can be a useful tool for improving thermoelectric performance.

  3. CPV performance versus soiling effects: Cleaning policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, D.; Trujillo, P.; Martinez, M.; Ferrer, J. P.; Rubio, F.

    2012-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of the CPV Plants in a cost effective way it is important to define the best cleaning policies, analyzing the effect of soiling in the surface of CPV modules. The energy generation of a CPV technology based in Fresnel Lens improves up to 7% when the surface of the module is cleaned. Some experimental measurements have been carried out over CPV modules and a model has been defined to analyze what is the best cleaning policy for that Technology in Puertollano. The power losses because of soiling and the critical time until the power losses stabilizes are obtained from the measurements; they are used as an input for the simulation. Using an established cleaning cost and the feeding tariff from Spain in 2007 it has been obtained that cleaning only reports a profit during the summer. The conclusion of the work is that the cleaning tasks have to be carefully planned together with the meteorological forecast in order to maximize the investment made in the cleaning.

  4. Sex Differences in Familiality Effects on Neurocognitive Performance in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Monica E.; Ray, Amrita; Gur, Ruben C.; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Light, Gregory A.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D.; Seidman, Larry J.; Siever, Larry J.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Stone, William S.; Sugar, Catherine; Swerdlow, Neal R.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Braff, David L.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have documented that patients with schizophrenia show neurocognitive impairments, which are also heritable in schizophrenia families. In view of these findings, the current investigation tested the hypothesis that neurocognitive performance of schizophrenia probands can predict the neurocognitive performance of their unaffected family members. Methods Participants (n=1,967; schizophrenia=369; first-degree relatives=1,072; community comparison subjects=526) in the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia (COGS) were administered the Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB). Results Consistent with prior work, probands showed significant neurocognitive impairment, and neurocognitive ability was significantly heritable, across domains. On average, unaffected relatives did not differ from community comparison subjects in their neurocognitive performance. However, in 6 of 7 domains, probands’ score predicted the performance of their unaffected siblings. Male, but not female, probands’ performance was predictive of their unaffected relatives (siblings and mothers) performance, most consistently in face memory and spatial processing. Conclusions Using a novel approach in which individual probands are paired with their respective unaffected relatives within each family, we found that male probands’ performance predicted both sister and brother performance, an effect that was most powerfully observed for face memory and spatial processing. Results suggest that the familial transmission of sexually dimorphic neurocognitive domains, in which a particular sex tends to show a performance advantage over the other, may not itself be sex specific in schizophrenia families. PMID:23395246

  5. CREATIVE MARKETING STRATEGY AND EFFECTIVE EXECUTION ON PERFORMANCE IN PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ishtiaq Ishaq

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current research is to determine the influence of creative marketing strategies and effective execution on business unit performance. Moreover, strategic orientation and environmental uncertainty are used as moderating variables. Data are collected from 368 key informants working in Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG, banking, pharmaceutical, chemical, insurance, and engineering industries using a multi-stage random sampling technique. Factor analysis and multiple hierarchal regressions are used to test the study hypotheses. The results indicate that creative marketing strategy and effective execution are positively associated with business performance. Moreover, environmental uncertainty and strategic orientation play a moderating role in the above relationships.

  6. Performance of flash ADCs in the 100 MHz range: I. Test bench and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, H.B.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W.T.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Thomas, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a systematic study of the performance of commercially available Flash ADCs in the 100 Megasample per second range, which might be suitable for use in the Superconducting Super Collider. Performance characteristics are measured using a CAMAC based test bench which is described. Among the FADC performance characteristics reported are linearity, differential linearity and the effective number of bits. This paper is the first in a series of reports to be presented within the next year as our tests continue. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. The Impact of Knowledge Management Practices on NPP Organizational Performance - Results of a Global Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA has been asked by Member States in the 2012 General Conference Resolutions to ''further increase the level of awareness of efforts in managing nuclear knowledge'' and to continue ''to further develop and disseminate guidance and methodologies for planning, designing, and implementing nuclear knowledge management programs''. The present report summarizes the results of empirical research on the relationship between KM practices in nuclear power plants, their impact on the quality of organizational knowledge processes and the resulting effects on the organizational effectiveness of nuclear power plants. It presents the basic findings of the ''IAEA Global Nuclear Power Plant Survey: Investigating the Link Between Knowledge Management Practices and Organizational Performance'', which was conducted in 2010. This benchmark survey of KM practices in nuclear power plants was developed using a standard research methodology. The survey was made available on a global basis to all nuclear power plant sites. Senior operations managers were asked to complete the survey with input, as required, from their plant management team. Data from individual survey responses were treated as confidential, and only aggregate findings were reported. A total of 124 station ''site organizations'' participated in the survey, representing a response rate of approximately 60%. The findings provide empirical evidence of the importance of KM practices in improving the organizational effectiveness of nuclear power plants. They provide information about the current state of the industry with respect to KM practices, illustrating the direct and tangible benefits of implementing such practices and justifying continued or further efforts to ensure that KM programmes and systems are strategically planned and implemented in operating nuclear power plants. The research provides insights into the mechanisms by which KM practices have an impact on organizational effectiveness and provides a basis for

  8. The acute potentiating effects of back squats on athlete performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewther, Blair T; Kilduff, Liam P; Cook, Christian J; Middleton, Matt K; Bunce, Paul J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2011-12-01

    Crewther, BT, Kilduff, LP, Cook, CJ, Middleton, MK, Bunce, PJ, and Yang, G-Z. The acute potentiating effects of back squats on athlete performance. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3319-3325, 2011-This study examined the acute potentiating effects of back squats on athlete performance with a specific focus on movement specificity and the individual timing of potentiation. Nine subelite male rugby players performed 3 protocols on separate occasions using a randomized, crossover, and counterbalanced design. Each protocol consisted of performance testing before a single set of 3 repetition maximum (3RM) back squats, followed by retesting at ∼15 seconds, 4, 8, 12, and 16 minutes. The 3 tests were countermovement jumps (CMJs), sprint performance (5 and 10 m), and 3-m horizontal sled pushes with a 100-kg load. Relationships between the individual changes in salivary testosterone and cortisol concentrations and performance were also examined. The 3RM squats significantly (p squats was found effective in acutely enhancing CMJ height in the study population, especially when the recovery period was individualized for each athlete. The study results also suggest that the potentiating effects of squats may exhibit some degree of movement specificity, being greater for those exercises with similar movement patterns. The current findings have practical implications for prescribing warm-up exercises, individualizing training programs, and for interpreting postactivation potentiation research.

  9. A comprehensive performance evaluation on the prediction results of existing cooperative transcription factors identification algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fu-Jou; Chang, Hong-Tsun; Huang, Yueh-Min; Wu, Wei-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcriptional regulation is known to be highly connected through the networks of cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Measuring the cooperativity of TFs is helpful for understanding the biological relevance of these TFs in regulating genes. The recent advances in computational techniques led to various predictions of cooperative TF pairs in yeast. As each algorithm integrated different data resources and was developed based on different rationales, it possessed its own merit and claimed outperforming others. However, the claim was prone to subjectivity because each algorithm compared with only a few other algorithms and only used a small set of performance indices for comparison. This motivated us to propose a series of indices to objectively evaluate the prediction performance of existing algorithms. And based on the proposed performance indices, we conducted a comprehensive performance evaluation. We collected 14 sets of predicted cooperative TF pairs (PCTFPs) in yeast from 14 existing algorithms in the literature. Using the eight performance indices we adopted/proposed, the cooperativity of each PCTFP was measured and a ranking score according to the mean cooperativity of the set was given to each set of PCTFPs under evaluation for each performance index. It was seen that the ranking scores of a set of PCTFPs vary with different performance indices, implying that an algorithm used in predicting cooperative TF pairs is of strength somewhere but may be of weakness elsewhere. We finally made a comprehensive ranking for these 14 sets. The results showed that Wang J's study obtained the best performance evaluation on the prediction of cooperative TF pairs in yeast. In this study, we adopted/proposed eight performance indices to make a comprehensive performance evaluation on the prediction results of 14 existing cooperative TFs identification algorithms. Most importantly, these proposed indices can be easily applied to measure the performance of new

  10. Wind Tunnel and Hover Performance Test Results for Multicopter UAS Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carl R.; Jung, Jaewoo; Willink, Gina; Glasner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    There is currently a lack of published data for the performance of multicopter unmanned aircraft system (UAS) vehicles, such as quadcopters and octocopters, often referred to collectively as drones. With the rapidly increasing popularity of multicopter UAS, there is interest in better characterizing the performance of this type of aircraft. By studying the performance of currently available vehicles, it will be possible to develop models for vehicles at this scale that can accurately predict performance and model trajectories. This paper describes a wind tunnel test that was recently performed in the U.S. Army's 7- by 10-ft Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. During this wind tunnel entry, five multicopter UAS vehicles were tested to determine forces and moments as well as electrical power as a function of wind speed, rotor speed, and vehicle attitude. The test is described here in detail, and a selection of the key results from the test is presented.

  11. MULTICRITERIA METHODS IN PERFORMING COMPANIES’ RESULTS USING ELECTRONIC RECRUITING, CORPORATE COMMUNICATION AND FINANCIAL RATIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Bilić

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Human resources represent one of the most important companies’ resources responsible in creation of companies’ competitive advantage. In search for the most valuable resources, companies use different methods. Lately, one of the growing methods is electronic recruiting, not only as a recruitment tool, but also as a mean of external communication. Additionally, in the process of corporate communication, companies nowadays use the electronic corporate communication as the easiest, the cheapest and the simplest form of business communication. The aim of this paper is to investigate relationship between three groups of different criteria; including main characteristics of performed electronic recruiting, corporate communication and selected financial performances. Selected companies were ranked separately by each group of criteria by usage of multicriteria decision making method PROMETHEE II. The main idea is to research whether companies which are the highest performers by certain group of criteria obtain the similar results regarding other group of criteria or performing results.

  12. The Combined Effect of Cold and Moisture on Manual Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Matthew; Sanli, Elizabeth; Brown, Robert; Ennis, Kerri Ann; Carnahan, Heather

    2018-02-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effect of cold and moisture on manual performance and tactile sensitivity. Background People working in the ocean environment often perform manual work in cold and wet conditions. Although the independent effects of cold and moisture on hand function are known, their combined effect has not been investigated. Method Participants completed sensory (Touch-Test, two-point discrimination) and motor (Purdue Pegboard, Grooved Pegboard, reef knot untying) tests in the following conditions: dry hand, wet hand, cold hand, and cold and wet hand. Results For the Purdue Pegboard and knot untying tasks, the greatest decrement in performance was observed in the cold-and-wet-hand condition, whereas the decrements seen in the cold-hand and wet-hand conditions were similar. In the Grooved Pegboard task, the performance decrements exhibited in the cold-and-wet-hand condition and the cold-hand condition were similar, whereas no decrement was observed in the wet-hand condition. Tactile sensitivity was reduced in the cold conditions for the Touch-Test but not the two-point discrimination test. The combined effect of cold and moisture led to the largest performance decrements except when intrinsic object properties helped with grasp maintenance. The independent effects of cold and moisture on manual performance were comparable. Application Tools and equipment for use in the cold ocean environment should be designed to minimize the effects of cold and moisture on manual performance by including object properties that enhance grasp maintenance and minimize the fine-dexterity requirements.

  13. Effect of yoga on academic performance in relation to stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauts Amit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Academic performance is concerned with the quantity and quality of learning attained in a subject or group of subjects after a long period of instruction. Excessive stress hampers students′ performance. Improvement in academic performance and alertness has been reported in several yogic studies. Aims and Objectives: The main objective of the study was to assess the effect of yoga on academic performance in relation to stress. Materials and Methods: The study started with 800 adolescent students; 159 high-stress students and 142 low-stress students were selected on the basis of scores obtained through Stress Battery. Experimental group and control group were given pre test in three subjects, i.e., Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. A yoga module consisting of yoga asanas, pranayama, meditation, and a value orientation program was administered on experimental group for 7 weeks. The experimental and control groups were post-tested for their performance on the three subjects mentioned above. Results: The results show that the students, who practiced yoga performed better in academics. The study further shows that low-stress students performed better than high-stress students, meaning thereby that stress affects the students′ performance.

  14. Results of data base management system parameterized performance testing related to GSFC scientific applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carchedi, C. H.; Gough, T. L.; Huston, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a variety of tests designed to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of several commercially available data base management system (DBMS) products compatible with the Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 11/780 computer system are summarized. The tests were performed on the INGRES, ORACLE, and SEED DBMS products employing applications that were similar to scientific applications under development by NASA. The objectives of this testing included determining the strength and weaknesses of the candidate systems, performance trade-offs of various design alternatives and the impact of some installation and environmental (computer related) influences.

  15. Results and Lessons Learned from Performance Testing of Humans in Spacesuits in Simulated Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program has plans to return to the Moon within the next 10 years. Although reaching the Moon during the Apollo Program was a remarkable human engineering achievement, fewer than 20 extravehicular activities (EVAs) were performed. Current projections indicate that the next lunar exploration program will require thousands of EVAs, which will require spacesuits that are better optimized for human performance. Limited mobility and dexterity, and the position of the center of gravity (CG) are a few of many features of the Apollo suit that required significant crew compensation to accomplish the objectives. Development of a new EVA suit system will ideally result in performance close to or better than that in shirtsleeves at 1 G, i.e., in "a suit that is a pleasure to work in, one that you would want to go out and explore in on your day off." Unlike the Shuttle program, in which only a fraction of the crew perform EVA, the Constellation program will require that all crewmembers be able to perform EVA. As a result, suits must be built to accommodate and optimize performance for a larger range of crew anthropometry, strength, and endurance. To address these concerns, NASA has begun a series of tests to better understand the factors affecting human performance and how to utilize various lunar gravity simulation environments available for testing.

  16. Development of Mitsubishi high thermal performance grid 2 - overview of the development and Dnb test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, M.; Imaizumi, M.; Mori, M.; Hori, K.; Ikeda, K.

    2001-01-01

    Spacer grid plays fundamental role in thermal performance of PWR fuel assembly. Grid spacer with higher thermal performance gives greater DNB (Departure from Nucleate Boiling) margin for the core. Mitsubishi has developed a prototype Zircaloy grid with higher thermal performance. In this paper, process of the development and DNB test results of the grid is presented. To achieve a goal to design grid with higher DNB performance, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) and Freon DNB test are employed in the development. It is also concerned that the grid should be hydraulically compatible to existing grid. CFD is used in examining mixing capability and pressure drop for early stage of the development. Freon DNB test is used for preliminary checking of DNB performance for several design of the grids. After the final design is fixed, DNB test has been carried out at a high pressure / high temperature water test loop to verify the DNB performance. Also, hydraulic test has been done in a water test loop. The test results show that the grid has higher DNB performance and lower pressure loss coefficient compared with existing grid. It is also concluded that a combination of CFD and Freon DNB testing is successful tool for designing and development of grid. (authors)

  17. Results of 2-year vitamin B treatment on cognitive performance Secondary data from an RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaluw, N.L.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; van Wijngaarden, J.P.; Brouwer-Brolsma, E.M.; van de Rest, O.; 't Veld, P.H.I.; Enneman, A.W.; van Dijk, S.C.; van der Ham, A.C.; Swart, K.M.A.; van der Velde, N.; van Schoor, N.M.; van der Cammen, T.J.M.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Lips, P.T.A.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; de Groot, L.C.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of 2-year folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation on cognitive performance in elderly people with elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels. Methods: This multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 2,919 elderly participants (65 years

  18. Results of 2-year vitamin B treatment on cognitive performance Secondary data from an RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaluw, N.L. van der; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M.; Wijngaarden, J.P. van; Brouwer-Brolsma, E.M.; Rest, O. van de; Veld, P.H. in 't; Enneman, A.W.; Dijk, S.C. van; Ham, A.C.; Swart, K.M.A.; Velde, N. van der; Schoor, N.M. van; Cammen, T.J.M. van der; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Lips, P.J.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Groot, L.C.P.G.M. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of 2-year folic acid and vitamin B-12 supplementation on cognitive performance in elderly people with elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels. Methods: This multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 2,919 elderly participants (65 years

  19. The Role of the Patrimonial Result Account in Rendering Performance in the Secondary Educational Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Vitan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through its tools, in particular through patrimonial result account, accounting gives information about the performance in the secondary educational institutions and beyond. In the work ”Informational valence regarding the role of the patrimonial result account in rendering performance at secondary educational institutions” it is presented an analysis model of the performance in the pre-university education institutions based on the economic-financial indicators. These indicator simply an analysis of the dynamics and structure of revenues, costs, results and enable the knowledge of the resource management in order to cover expenses from the revenue, their evolution and their total balance. The analysis was based on hypothetical data over a period of two years, and after this period it was determined that the institution has managed to maintain its level of efficiency in resource management.

  20. Effect of temperature on task performance in officeenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.; Lei, Q.H.

    2006-07-01

    Indoor temperature is one of the fundamental characteristics of the indoor environment. It can be controlled with a degree of accuracy dependent on the building and its HVAC system. The indoor temperature affects several human responses, including thermal comfort, perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance at work. In this study, we focused on the effects of temperature on performance at office work. We included those studies that had used objective indicators of performance that are likely to be relevant in office type work, such as text processing, simple calculations (addition, multiplication), length of telephone customer service time, and total handling time per customer for call-center workers. We excluded data from studies of industrial work performance. We calculated from all studies the percentage of performance change per degree increase in temperature, and statistically analyzed measured work performance with temperature. The results show that performance increases with temperature up to 21-22 C, and decreases with temperature above 23-24 C. The highest productivity is at temperature of around 22 C. For example, at the temperature of 30 C, the performance is only 91.1% of the maximum i.e. the reduction in performance is 8.9%

  1. Sex differences in familiality effects on neurocognitive performance in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Monica E; Ray, Amrita; Gur, Ruben C; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Greenwood, Tiffany A; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Gur, Raquel E

    2013-05-15

    Numerous studies have documented that patients with schizophrenia show neurocognitive impairments, which are also heritable in schizophrenia families. In view of these findings, the current investigation tested the hypothesis that neurocognitive performance of schizophrenia probands can predict the neurocognitive performance of their unaffected family members. Participants (n=1967; schizophrenia=369; first-degree relatives=1072; community comparison subjects=526) in the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia were administered the Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery. Consistent with prior work, probands showed significant neurocognitive impairment, and neurocognitive ability was significantly heritable across domains. On average, unaffected relatives did not differ from community comparison subjects in their neurocognitive performance. However, in six of seven domains, proband scores predicted the performance of their unaffected siblings. Male, but not female, proband performance was predictive of their unaffected relatives' (siblings and mothers) performance, most consistently in face memory and spatial processing. Using a novel approach in which individual probands are paired with their respective unaffected relatives within each family, we found that male proband performance predicted both sister and brother performance, an effect that was most powerfully observed for face memory and spatial processing. Results suggest that the familial transmission of sexually dimorphic neurocognitive domains, in which a particular sex tends to show a performance advantage over the other, may not itself be sex specific in schizophrenia families. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Personality traits affect teaching performance of attending physicians: results of a multi-center observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Renée A; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H; van Aken, Marcel A G; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, attending physicians train residents to become competent providers of patient care. To assess adequate training, attending physicians are increasingly evaluated on their teaching performance. Research suggests that personality traits affect teaching performance, consistent with studied effects of personality traits on job performance and academic performance in medicine. However, up till date, research in clinical teaching practice did not use quantitative methods and did not account for specialty differences. We empirically studied the relationship of attending physicians' personality traits with their teaching performance across surgical and non-surgical specialties. We conducted a survey across surgical and non-surgical specialties in eighteen medical centers in the Netherlands. Residents evaluated attending physicians' overall teaching performance, as well as the specific domains learning climate, professional attitude, communication, evaluation, and feedback, using the validated 21-item System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ). Attending physicians self-evaluated their personality traits on a 5-point scale using the validated 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI), yielding the Five Factor model: extraversion, conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness and openness. Overall, 622 (77%) attending physicians and 549 (68%) residents participated. Extraversion positively related to overall teaching performance (regression coefficient, B: 0.05, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10, P = 0.02). Openness was negatively associated with scores on feedback for surgical specialties only (B: -0.10, 95% CI: -0.15 to -0.05, Pwork on development paths of attending physicians in medical education.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of barium enemas performed by radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lorraine; Desai, Sharad

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To assess the cost-effectiveness of barium enemas performed by radiographers compared to those performed by consultant radiologists. METHOD: Prospective study of 200 barium enemas carried out by a senior radiographer and a consultant radiologist. The sample was a consecutive sample of adult out-patients over a 3-month period, with no exclusion. The length of time of the enema and the numbers and grades of staff involved in the procedure were recorded. This was translated into staffing costs using the appropriate pay scales. RESULTS: The barium enemas performed by the superintendent radiographer were more cost-effective than those performed by the consultant radiologist (1406 pounds for 100 radiographer-performed barium enemas compared to 1787 pounds for 100 carried out by the consultant radiologist). CONCLUSION: In terms of staffing costs, radiographers performing barium enemas not only liberates radiologist time, it is also a cost-effective method of providing an out-patient barium enema service. Brown, L. and Desai, S. (2002)

  4. 14th annual Results and Review Workshop on High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Nagel, Wolfgang E; Resch, Michael M; Transactions of the High Performance Computing Center, Stuttgart (HLRS) 2011; High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering '11

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in simulation on supercomputers. Leading researchers present results achieved on systems of the High Performance Computing Center Stuttgart (HLRS) for the year 2011. The reports cover all fields of computational science and engineering, ranging from CFD to computational physics and chemistry, to computer science, with a special emphasis on industrially relevant applications. Presenting results for both vector systems and microprocessor-based systems, the book allows readers to compare the performance levels and usability of various architectures. As HLRS

  5. Temperature effects on waste glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazer, J.J.

    1991-02-01

    The temperature dependence of glass durability, particularly that of nuclear waste glasses, is assessed by reviewing past studies. The reaction mechanism for glass dissolution in water is complex and involves multiple simultaneous reaction proceeded, including molecular water diffusion, ion exchange, surface reaction, and precipitation. These processes can change in relative importance or dominance with time or changes in temperature. The temperature dependence of each reaction process has been shown to follow an Arrhenius relationship in studies where the reaction process has been isolated, but the overall temperature dependence for nuclear waste glass reaction mechanisms is less well understood, Nuclear waste glass studies have often neglected to identify and characterize the reaction mechanism because of difficulties in performing microanalyses; thus, it is unclear if such results can be extrapolated to other temperatures or reaction times. Recent developments in analytical capabilities suggest that investigations of nuclear waste glass reactions with water can lead to better understandings of their reaction mechanisms and their temperature dependences. Until a better understanding of glass reaction mechanisms is available, caution should be exercised in using temperature as an accelerating parameter. 76 refs., 1 tab

  6. Investigation of turbidity effect on exergetic performance of solar ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiz, Ayhan; Bozkurt, Ismail; Karakilcik, Mehmet; Dincer, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A comprehensive experimental work on a turbidity of the solar pond. • Percentage transmission evaluation of the turbid and clean salty water of the zones. • Exergy analysis of the inner zones for turbid and clean salty water. • Turbidity effect on exergy efficiencies of the solar pond. • The thermal performance assessment by comparing the exergetic efficiencies of the solar pond. - Abstract: The present paper undertakes a study on the exergetic performance assessment of a solar pond and experimental investigation of turbidity effect on the system performance. There are various types of solar energy applications including solar ponds. One of significant parameters to consider in the assessment of solar pond performance is turbidity which is caused by dirty over time (e.g., insects, leaf, dust and wind bringing parts fall down). Thus, the turbidity in the salty water decreases solar energy transmission through the zones. In this study, the samples are taken from the three zones of the solar pond and analyzed using a spectrometer for three months. The transmission aspects of the solar pond are investigated under calm and turbidity currents to help distinguish the efficiencies. Furthermore, the maximum exergy efficiencies are found to be 28.40% for the calm case and 22.27% with turbidity effects for the month of August, respectively. As a result, it is confirmed that the solar pond performance is greatly affected by the turbidity effect

  7. Using leg muscles as shock absorbers: theoretical predictions and experimental results of drop landing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, A E; Ardigò, L P; Susta, D; Cotelli, F

    1998-12-01

    The use of muscles as power dissipators is investigated in this study, both from the modellistic and the experimental points of view. Theoretical predictions of the drop landing manoeuvre for a range of initial conditions have been obtained by accounting for the mechanical characteristics of knee extensor muscles, the limb geometry and assuming maximum neural activation. Resulting dynamics have been represented in the phase plane (vertical displacement versus speed) to better classify the damping performance. Predictions of safe landing in sedentary subjects were associated to dropping from a maximum (feet) height of 1.6-2.0 m (about 11 m on the moon). Athletes can extend up to 2.6-3.0 m, while for obese males (m = 100 kg, standard stature) the limit should reduce to 0.9-1.3 m. These results have been calculated by including in the model the estimated stiffness of the 'global elastic elements' acting below the squat position. Experimental landings from a height of 0.4, 0.7, 1.1 m (sedentary males (SM) and male (AM) and female (AF) athletes from the alpine ski national team) showed dynamics similar to the model predictions. While the peak power (for a drop height of about 0.7 m) was similar in SM and AF (AM shows a +40% increase, about 33 W/kg), AF stopped the downward movement after a time interval (0.219 +/- 0.030 s) from touch-down 20% significantly shorter than SM. Landing strategy and the effect of anatomical constraints are discussed in the paper.

  8. The Effect of Noise on Human Performance: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nassiri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise is defined as unwanted or meaningless sound that apart from auditory adverse health effects may distract attention from cues that are important for task performance. Human performance is influenced by many job-related factors and workplace conditions including noise level. Objective: To study the effect of noise on human performance. Methods: The participants included 40 healthy male university students. The experimental design consisted of 3 (sound pressure level x 3 (noise schedule x 2 (noise type factors. To investigate occupational skill performance, some specific test batteries were used: 1 steadiness test, 2 Minnesota manual dexterity test, 3 hand tool dexterity test, and 4 two-arm coordination test. Time duration of test completion was measured as speed response; to determine error response, the time taken during committing an error by participants while performing a task was measured. Results: Speed response obtained from the 4 tests in combined conditions of noise schedule, harmonic index, and sound pressure level was highest for (intermittent, treble, 95 dB, (continuous, treble, 95 dB, (continuous, treble, 85 dB and (intermittent, treble, 95 dB, respectively. Conclusion: Treble noise was found significant in reducing human performance; also, intermittent noise, especially at high pressure levels, was responsible for worsening environmental conditions during performing a task.

  9. Results of performance testing the Russian RPV temperature measurement probe used for annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakos, J.T.; Selsky, S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper provides information on three (3) topics related to temperature measurements in an annealing procedure: (1) results of a series of experiments performed by CNIITMASH of the Russian consortium MOHT on their reactor pressure vessel (RPV) temperature measurement probe, (2) a discussion regarding uncertainties and errors in RPV temperature measurements, and (3) predictions from a thermal model of a spherical RPV temperature measurement probe. MOHT teamed with MPR Associates and was to perform the Annealing Demonstration Project (ADP) on behalf of the US Department of Energy, ESEERCo, EPRI, CRIEPI, Framatome, and Consumers Power Co. at the Midland plant. Experimental results show that the CNIITMASH probe errors are a maximum of about 27 C (49 F) during a 15 C/hr (27 F/hr) heat-up but only about 3 C (5.4 F) (0.6%) during the hold portion at 470 C (878 F). These errors are much smaller than those obtained from a similar series of experiments performed by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The discussion about uncertainties and errors shows that results presented as a temperature difference provides a measure of the probe error. Qualitative agreement is shown between the model predictions, the experimental results of the CNIITMASH probe and the experimental results of a series of similar experiments performed by Sandia

  10. Effect of Customer Satisfaction on Company Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Suchánek; Maria Králová

    2015-01-01

    The subject of this article is customer satisfaction and its impact on company performance through satisfaction with its products, including a comparison with the competition. Research was conducted in search of factors which affect customer satisfaction on the one hand and the performance of the company on the other hand. We constructed a model explaining what specific factors (affecting customer satisfaction) have an impact on the performance of a company. This model can help management to ...

  11. Set size influences the relationship between ANS acuity and math performance: a result of different strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Julia Felicitas; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian; Huber, Stefan

    2017-08-29

    Previous research has proposed that the approximate number system (ANS) constitutes a building block for later mathematical abilities. Therefore, numerous studies investigated the relationship between ANS acuity and mathematical performance, but results are inconsistent. Properties of the experimental design have been discussed as a potential explanation of these inconsistencies. In the present study, we investigated the influence of set size and presentation duration on the association between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and math performance. Moreover, we focused on strategies reported as an explanation for these inconsistencies. In particular, we employed a non-symbolic magnitude comparison task and asked participants how they solved the task. We observed that set size was a significant moderator of the relationship between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and math performance, whereas presentation duration of the stimuli did not moderate this relationship. This supports the notion that specific design characteristics contribute to the inconsistent results. Moreover, participants reported different strategies including numerosity-based, visual, counting, calculation-based, and subitizing strategies. Frequencies of these strategies differed between different set sizes and presentation durations. However, we found no specific strategy, which alone predicted arithmetic performance, but when considering the frequency of all reported strategies, arithmetic performance could be predicted. Visual strategies made the largest contribution to this prediction. To conclude, the present findings suggest that different design characteristics contribute to the inconsistent findings regarding the relationship between non-symbolic magnitude comparison and mathematical performance by inducing different strategies and additional processes.

  12. EFFECTS OF MUSIC ON WORK PERFORMANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MUSIC , *HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING), (*ATTENTION, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN)), REACTION(PSYCHOLOGY), REFLEXES, ATTITUDES(PSYCHOLOGY), QUESTIONNAIRES, STIMULATION(PHYSIOLOGY), EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN, CORRELATION TECHNIQUES

  13. The reliability of test results from simple test samples in predicting the fatigue performance of automotive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourlaris, G.; Ellwood, R.; Jones, T.B.

    2007-01-01

    The use of high strength steels (HSS) in automotive components is steadily increasing as automotive designers use modern steel grades to improve structural performance, reduce vehicle weight and enhance crash performance. Weight reduction can be achieved by substituting mild steel with a thinner gauge HSS, however, it must be ensured that no deterioration in performance including fatigue capability occurs. In this study, tests have been carried out to determine the effects that gauge and material strength have on the fatigue performance of a fusion welded automotive suspension arm. Current finite element (FE) modelling and fatigue prediction techniques have been evaluated to determine their reliability when used for thin strip steels. Results have shown the fatigue performance of welded components to be independent of the strength of the parent material for the steel grades studied, with material thickness and joining process the key features determining the fatigue performance. The correlation between the fatigue performance of simple welded samples under uniaxial, constant amplitude loading and complex components under biaxial in service road load data, has been shown to be unreliable. This study also indicates that with the application of modern technologies, such as tailor-welded blanks (TWB), significant weight savings can be achieved. This is demonstrated by a 19% weight reduction with no detrimental effect on the fatigue performance

  14. Transitivity performance, relational hierarchy knowledge and awareness: results of an instructional framing manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Dharshan; Ludwig, Hans

    2013-12-01

    The transitive inference (TI) paradigm has been widely used to examine the role of the hippocampus in generalization. Here we consider a surprising feature of experimental findings in this task: the relatively poor transitivity performance and levels of hierarchy knowledge achieved by adult human subjects. We focused on the influence of the task instructions on participants' subsequent performance--a single-word framing manipulation which either specified the relation between items as transitive (i.e., OLD-FRAME: choose which item is "older") or left it ambiguous (i.e., NO-FRAME: choose which item is "correct"). We show a marked but highly specific effect of manipulating prior knowledge through instruction: transitivity performance and levels of relational hierarchy knowledge were enhanced, but premise performance unchanged. Further, we show that hierarchy recall accuracy, but not conventional awareness scores, was a significant predictor of inferential performance across the entire group of participants. The current study has four main implications: first, our findings establish the importance of the task instructions, and prior knowledge, in the TI paradigm--suggesting that they influence the size of the overall hypothesis space (e.g., to favor a linear hierarchical structure over other possibilities in the OLD-FRAME). Second, the dissociable effects of the instructional frame on premise and inference performance provide evidence for the operation of distinct underlying mechanisms (i.e., an associative mechanism vs. relational hierarchy knowledge). Third, our findings suggest that a detailed measurement of hierarchy recall accuracy may be a more sensitive index of relational hierarchy knowledge, than conventional awareness score--and should be used in future studies investigating links between awareness and inferential performance. Finally, our study motivates an experimental setting that ensures robust hierarchy learning across participants

  15. Effects of nano-silica on mechanical performance and microstructure of ultra-high performance concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, T. M., E-mail: thiagomendes@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Londrina, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Ambiental; Repette, W.L., E-mail: wellington.repette@gmail.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Reis, P.J., E-mail: pjlondrina@yahoo.com.br [Univeridade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada

    2017-07-15

    The use of nanoparticles in ultra-high strength concretes can result in a positive effect on mechanical performance of these cementitious materials. This study evaluated mixtures containing 10 and 20 wt% of silica fume, for which the optimum nano-silica content was determined, i.e. the quantity of nano-silica that resulted on the higher gain of strength. The physical characterization of raw materials was done in terms of particle size distribution, density and specific surface area. Chemical and mineralogical compositions of materials were obtained through fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. The mechanical performance was evaluated by compressive strength, flexural strength and dynamic elastic modulus measurements. The microstructural analysis of mixtures containing nano-silica was performed by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Obtained results indicate an optimum content of nano-silica of 0.62 wt%, considering compressive and flexural strengths. This performance improvement was directly related to two important microstructural aspects: the packing effect and pozzolanic reaction of nano-silica. (author)

  16. Effects of nano-silica on mechanical performance and microstructure of ultra-high performance concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, T. M.; Repette, W.L.; Reis, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in ultra-high strength concretes can result in a positive effect on mechanical performance of these cementitious materials. This study evaluated mixtures containing 10 and 20 wt% of silica fume, for which the optimum nano-silica content was determined, i.e. the quantity of nano-silica that resulted on the higher gain of strength. The physical characterization of raw materials was done in terms of particle size distribution, density and specific surface area. Chemical and mineralogical compositions of materials were obtained through fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. The mechanical performance was evaluated by compressive strength, flexural strength and dynamic elastic modulus measurements. The microstructural analysis of mixtures containing nano-silica was performed by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Obtained results indicate an optimum content of nano-silica of 0.62 wt%, considering compressive and flexural strengths. This performance improvement was directly related to two important microstructural aspects: the packing effect and pozzolanic reaction of nano-silica. (author)

  17. CORPORATE FORESIGHT AND PERFORMANCE: A CHAIN-OF-EFFECTS MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jissink, Tymen; Huizingh, Eelko K.R.E.; Rohrbeck, René

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop and validate a measurement scale for corporate foresight and examine its impact on performance in a chain-of-effects model. We conceptualize corporate foresight as an organizational ability consisting of five distinct dimensions: information scope, method usage, people......, formal organization, and culture. We investigate the relation of corporate foresight with three innovation performance dimensions – new product success, new product innovativeness, and financial performance. We use partial-least-squares structural equations modelling to assess our measurement mode ls...... and test our research hypotheses. Using a cross-industry sample of 153 innovative firms, we find that corporate foresight can be validly and reliably measured by our measurement instrument. The results of the structural model support the hypothesized positive effects of corporate foresight on all...

  18. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION AND LABOR PERFORMANCE IN BASIC EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumaira Matilde Quero Romero

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research is correlational descriptive, is framed in positivist approach why a quantitative statistical analysis was used to process the data obtained from the subjects surveyed to measure the relationship of the variables: Effective Communication and Job Performance of Directors and their respective dimensions and indicators. The study design is not experimental, transeccioanal. A population census was performed by the population being comprised of 99 subjects, 9 of which belong to the management staff and 90 teachers of Basic Schools Altagracia parish, municipality Miranda, Zulia state. Type two survey instruments comprised of 39 itemes each designed to measure effective communication and job performance of managers of national primary schools of Altagracia parish, with alternatives of Likert responses which variables were always, sometimes, almost never, never the statistical analysis used to analyze the results in this research was descriptive, with frequency distribution per item. In conclusion a significant positive correlation at the level of 0.00 was detected.

  19. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  20. Key Performance Indicators: From Promise to Payoff. The Productivity for Results Series No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casserly, Michael; Eugene, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws upon the expertise of two leading educators, Michael Casserly, director of the Council of the Great City Schools, and Michael Eugene, chief operating officer of the Orange County Public Schools in Florida. They outline a set of key performance indicators that some urban districts use to benchmark the results of their operating…

  1. Performance results of a solar greenhouse combining electrical and thermal energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Campen, J.B.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Performance results are given of a new type of greenhouse, which combines reflection of near infrared radiation (NIR) with electrical power generation using hybrid photovoltaic cell/thermal collector modules. Besides the generation of electrical and thermal energy, the reflection of the NIR will

  2. Effects of user mental state on EEG-BCI performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eMyrden

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in psychological state have been proposed as a cause of variation in brain-computer interface performance, but little formal analysis has been conducted to support this hypothesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of three mental states - fatigue, frustration, and attention - on BCI performance. Twelve able-bodied participants were trained to use a two-class EEG-BCI based on the performance of user-specific mental tasks. Following training, participants completed three testing sessions, during which they used the BCI to play a simple maze navigation game while periodically reporting their perceived levels of fatigue, frustration, and attention. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a significant relationship between frustration and BCI performance while the relationship between fatigue and BCI performance approached significance. BCI performance was 7% lower than average when self-reported fatigue was low and 10% lower than average when self-reported frustration was low. A multivariate analysis of mental state revealed the presence of contiguous regions in mental state space where BCI performance was more accurate than average, suggesting the importance of moderate fatigue for achieving effortless focus on BCI control, frustration as a potential motivating factor, and attention as a compensatory mechanism to increasing frustration. Finally, a visual analysis showed the sensitivity of underlying class distributions to changes in mental state. Collectively, these results indicate that mental state is closely related to BCI performance, encouraging future development of psychologically adaptive BCIs.

  3. The results of research on the effectiveness of line management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Lapushkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proves the relevance of research concerning the management system effectiveness in the project company. It shows that the emergence of independent commercial enterprises in the electrical power sector led both to deterioration of continuous processes controllability and to serious failures in functioning of infrastructure processes (repairs, invoice, and receipt of monetary funds. But, at the same time, a number of processes showed an increase of operation efficiency due to decrease in expenses when functioning.Coordination of activities between holding and company showed that process to come up with the weighty arguments in favor of one or other management decisions was the most complicated.The objective of the article is worded as follows: to reveal the regularities for the management efficiency to depend both on the echelons of regulation to make a decision at various times of delay (time from the decision-making moment before impact on object/subject of management and on the abovementioned factors.The research was carried out using the model of the control loop. When conducting research, the model used only line (proportional link, as the most often encountered in the development of management systems in organizations. Line (proportional link is the link with the output value changing with time according to the same law, as the input value. In management the proportional link means that managerial decisions and the impact on employees is proportional to the rejection of planned and actual performances of company activities.To assess the quality of management at different stages of the regulation, principles of regulation and management structures the article suggests to use the indicators of management costs, the integrated indicator of management error, the coefficient of regulation quality, the ratio of discounted costs, and the efficiency of regulation. It also proposes to use the efficiency factor of regulation to show which

  4. Effects of music interventions on emotional States and running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew M; Davis, Paul A; Devonport, Tracey J

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of two different music interventions on changes in emotional states before and during running, and also explored effects of music interventions upon performance outcome. Volunteer participants (n = 65) who regularly listened to music when running registered online to participate in a three-stage study. Participants attempted to attain a personally important running goal to establish baseline performance. Thereafter, participants were randomly assigned to either a self-selected music group or an Audiofuel music group. Audiofuel produce pieces of music designed to assist synchronous running. The self-selected music group followed guidelines for selecting motivating playlists. In both experimental groups, participants used the Brunel Music Rating Inventory-2 (BMRI-2) to facilitate selection of motivational music. Participants again completed the BMRI-2 post- intervention to assess the motivational qualities of Audiofuel music or the music they selected for use during the study. Results revealed no significant differences between self-selected music and Audiofuel music on all variables analyzed. Participants in both music groups reported increased pleasant emotions and decreased unpleasant emotions following intervention. Significant performance improvements were demonstrated post-intervention with participants reporting a belief that emotional states related to performance. Further analysis indicated that enhanced performance was significantly greater among participants reporting music to be motivational as indicated by high scores on the BMRI-2. Findings suggest that both individual athletes and practitioners should consider using the BMRI-2 when selecting music for running. Key pointsListening to music with a high motivational quotient as indicated by scores on the BMRI-2 was associated with enhanced running performance and meta-emotional beliefs that emotions experienced during running helped performance.Beliefs on the

  5. Effects of orientation on Rey complex figure performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, F Richard; Grossman, Jennifer; Bren, Amy; Hoverson, Allysa

    2002-10-01

    An experiment was performed that examined the impact of stimulus orientation on performance on the Rey complex figure. A total of 48 undergraduates (24 men, 24 women) were randomly assigned to one of four Rey figure orientation groups (0 degrees, 90 degrees, 180 degrees, and 270 degrees ). Participants followed standard procedures for the Rey figure, initially copying it in whatever orientation group they were assigned to. Next, all participants performed a 15-20 min lexical decision experiment, used as a filler task. Finally, and unbeknownest to them, participants were asked to recall as much of the figure as they could. As expected, results revealed a main effect of Task (F = 83.92, p orientation was not significant, nor did orientation interact with task (Fs .57). The results are important from an applied setting, especially if testing conditions are less than optimal and a fixed stimulus position is not possible (e.g., testing at the bedside).

  6. Effects of Reynold's number on flight performance of turbofan engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozu, Masao; Yajima, Satoshi [Defense Agency Tokyo (Japan); Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1988-12-10

    Concerning the performance of the F3-30 turbofan engine which is carried on the intermediate trainer XT-4 of the Air Self Defense Force, tests simulating its flight conditions were conducted at the Altitude Test Facility (ATF) of the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), U.S. Air Force in order to adjust the effect of Reynold's number corresponding to the flight condition. This report summarizes the results of the above tests. As the results of the tests, it was revealed that in order to calculate with precision the flight performance of the F3-30 turbofan engine, it was required to adjust Reynold's number against the following figures, namely the fan air flow, compressor air flow, compressor adiabatic efficiency, low pressure turbine gas flow and low pressure turbine adiabatic efficiency. The engine performance calculated by using the above adjustments agreed well with the measured values of the ATF tests. 7 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Financial analysis and forecasting of the results of small businesses performance based on regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana O. Musienko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop the economicmathematical model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies. Methods using comparative analysis the article studies the existing approaches to the construction of the company management models. Applying the regression analysis and the least squares method which is widely used for financial management of enterprises in Russia and abroad the author builds a model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies which can be used in the financial analysis and prediction of small enterprisesrsquo performance. Results the article states the need to identify factors affecting the financial management efficiency. The author analyzed scientific research and revealed the lack of comprehensive studies on the methodology for assessing the small enterprisesrsquo management while the methods used for large companies are not always suitable for the task. The systematized approaches of various authors to the formation of regression models describe the influence of certain factors on the company activity. It is revealed that the resulting indicators in the studies were revenue profit or the company relative profitability. The main drawback of most models is the mathematical not economic approach to the definition of the dependent and independent variables. Basing on the analysis it was determined that the most correct is the model of dependence between revenues and total assets of the company using the decimal logarithm. The model was built using data on the activities of the 507 small businesses operating in three spheres of economic activity. Using the presented model it was proved that there is direct dependence between the sales proceeds and the main items of the asset balance as well as differences in the degree of this effect depending on the economic activity of small

  8. Effects of exercise training on performance and function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of exercise training on performance and function in individuals with cerebral palsy: ... performance capabilities, and the effect of exercise training interventions, ... The physiology underlying the functional and physical impairments in CP ...

  9. The Effects of Aerobic Exercise and Gaming on Cognitive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douris Peter C.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of video gaming, aerobic exercise (biking, and the combination of these two activities on the domains of cognitive performance: selective attention, processing speed, and executive functioning. The study was a randomized clinical trial with 40 subjects (mean age 23.7 ± 1.8 years randomized to one of four thirty-minute conditions: video gaming, biking, simultaneous gaming and biking, and a control condition. Cognitive performance was measured pre and post condition using the Stroop test and Trails B test. A mixed design was utilized. While video gaming, biking, simultaneous gaming and biking conditions improved selective attention and processing speed (p < 0.05, only the bike condition improved the highest order of cognitive performance, executive function (p < 0.01. There were no changes in cognitive performance for the control condition. Previous studies have shown that if tasks approach the limits of attentional capacity there is an increase in the overall chance for errors, known as the dual-task deficit. Simultaneous biking and gaming may have surpassed attentional capacity limits, ultimately increasing errors during the executive function tests of our cognitive performance battery. The results suggest that the fatiguing effects of a combined physically and mentally challenging task that extends after the exercise cessation may overcome the eventual beneficial cognitive effects derived from the physical exercise.

  10. Effectively Managing Nuclear Risk Through Human Performance Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, Richard; Lake, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. commercial nuclear industry has just completed an outstanding decade of plant performance. Safety levels and electric production are at unprecedented high levels and continue to exceed even high industry goals. Nuclear energy continues to keep the highest priority on performance improvement programs and highly trained and qualified people that maintain its record setting safety and reliability of operations. While the industry has maintained a high level of performance, the advent of deregulation and the consolidation of nuclear power plant ownership, as well as the current climate for concern about both rising energy costs and the availability of power, have raised the standard for nuclear energy's level of competitiveness in today's market place. The resulting challenge is how to more effectively manage risk and to improve performance even further in a generally high-performing industry. One of the most effective ways to develop this culture is to apply the principles of Hum an Performance Technology, or HPT. HPT is a relatively new field. Its principles are derived from the research and practice of behavioral and cognitive psychologists, instructional technologists, training designers, organizational developers, and various human resource specialists. Using the principles of HPT can help the nuclear industry successfully meet ever-changing environmental and business demands

  11. Clinical effects of pranayama on performance of rifle shooters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amte Snehal Shekhar, Mistry Hetal M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Yoga has an enormous scientifically proven effect on man’s physical and psychological functioning. Pranayama constitute the most vital aspects of yoga. Various methods of pranayama have a sound scientific basis and are traditionally believed to produce equilibrium between psychic and somatic aspects of bodily functions. The link between body and mind is obligatory for the better performance of sports persons. Aim: The aim of the study is to find out the effect of pranayama on the performance of Rifle shooters by measuring the parameters like-breath holding time, lung functional capacity and shooting performance. Method: 52 state level shooters subjects were chosen from 2 centres between the age group of 15-30years. Out of them, 26 shooters were given training in the techniques of pranayama for 3weeks.The other 26 subjects served as control i.e. with out Pranayama training. Variables like shooting performance, breath holding time (BHT, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR, respiratory rate (RR and pulse rate (PR were measured in both the groups. Results: The study showed highly significant improvement in all the five variables shooting performance (in mm, BHT, PEFR, RR and PR with p value of 3.62E-05, 2.78E-07, 1.31E-09, 0.013, 3.40E-04respectively. Conclusion: So it can be concluded that pranayama is efficacious for better performance of Rifle shooters and should be included in their training practice.

  12. Effect of handedness on auditory attentional performance in ADHD students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt SL

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sergio L Schmidt,1,2 Ana Lucia Novais Carvaho,3 Eunice N Simoes2 1Department of Neurophysiology, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 2Neurology Department, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 3Department of Psychology, Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi, Brazil Abstract: The relationship between handedness and attentional performance is poorly understood. Continuous performance tests (CPTs using visual stimuli are commonly used to assess subjects suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, auditory CPTs are considered more useful than visual ones to evaluate classroom attentional problems. A previous study reported that there was a significant effect of handedness on students’ performance on a visual CPT. Here, we examined whether handedness would also affect CPT performance using only auditory stimuli. From an initial sample of 337 students, 11 matched pairs were selected. Repeated ANOVAs showed a significant effect of handedness on attentional performance that was exhibited even in the control group. Left-handers made more commission errors than right-handers. The results were interpreted considering that the association between ADHD and handedness reflects that consistent left-handers are less lateralized and have decreased interhemispheric connections. Auditory attentional data suggest that left-handers have problems in the impulsive/hyperactivity domain. In ADHD, clinical therapeutics and rehabilitation must take handedness into account because consistent sinistrals are more impulsive than dextrals. Keywords: attention, ADHD, consistent left-handers, auditory attention, continuous performance test

  13. Comparison between the performance of some KEK-klystrons and simulation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Shigeki [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    Recent developments of various klystron simulation codes have enabled us to realistically design klystrons. This paper presents various simulation results using the FCI code and the performances of tubes manufactured based on this code. Upgrading a 30-MW S-band klystron and developing a 50-MW S-band klystron for the KEKB projects are successful examples based on FCI-code predictions. Mass-productions of these tubes have already started. On the other hand, a discrepancy has been found between the FCI simulation results and the performance of real tubes. In some cases, the simulation results lead to high-efficiency results, while manufactured tubes show the usual value, or a lower value, of the efficiency. One possible cause may come from a data mismatch between the electron-gun simulation and the input data set of the FCI code for the gun region. This kind of discrepancy has been observed in 30-MW S-band pulsed tubes, sub-booster pulsed tubes and L-band high-duty pulsed klystrons. Sometimes, JPNDSK (one-dimensional disk-model code) gives similar results. Some examples using the FCI code are given in this article. An Arsenal-MSU code could be applied to the 50-MW klystron under collaboration with Moscow State University; a good agreement has been found between the prediction of the code and performance. (author)

  14. Encounter Group Effects of Soccer Team Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Zipora

    1980-01-01

    Suggests that a positive relationship exists between encounter group experience and the soccer team performance--a conclusion worthy of consideration in further research in the fields of psychology and sociology of sports. (Author)

  15. The desert environmental effect on the photovoltaic performance analyzing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Khuffash, K.; Lamont, L.A.; El Chaar, L.

    2014-01-01

    Solar power is commonly accepted to have the highest potential among other renewable energy sources. As a photovoltaic (PV) panel directly converts light into electricity it is preferred over concentrated solar power. However, PV modules are affected by the surrounding climate and implementing it in a desert location may cause an undesired effect. Therefore, this research studies the effect of different weather aspects on the performance of the PV panels, by obtaining a relation between each weather aspect and the performance of the panel. In addition, coating is tested in order to evaluate its effectiveness as a feasible solution for locations which have high dust accumulation. The results showed that coating can be a solution for dust accumulation at high irradiation levels. (author)

  16. Vanishing theorems and effective results in algebraic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demailly, J.P.; Goettsche, L.; Lazarsfeld, R.

    2001-01-01

    The School on Vanishing Theorems and Effective Results in Algebraic Geometry took place in ICTP, Trieste from 25 April 2000 to 12 May 2000. It was organized by J. P. Demailly (Universite de Grenoble I) and R. Lazarsfeld (University of Michigan). The main topics considered were vanishing theorems, multiplyer ideal sheaves and effective results in algebraic geometry, tight closure, geometry of higher dimensional projective and Kahler manifolds, hyperbolic algebraic varieties. The school consisted of two weeks of lectures and one week of conference. This volume contains the lecture notes of most of the lectures in the first two weeks

  17. Vanishing theorems and effective results in algebraic geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demailly, J P [Universite de Grenoble (France); Goettsche, L [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Lazarsfeld, R [University of Michigan (United States)

    2001-12-15

    The School on Vanishing Theorems and Effective Results in Algebraic Geometry took place in ICTP, Trieste from 25 April 2000 to 12 May 2000. It was organized by J. P. Demailly (Universite de Grenoble I) and R. Lazarsfeld (University of Michigan). The main topics considered were vanishing theorems, multiplyer ideal sheaves and effective results in algebraic geometry, tight closure, geometry of higher dimensional projective and Kahler manifolds, hyperbolic algebraic varieties. The school consisted of two weeks of lectures and one week of conference. This volume contains the lecture notes of most of the lectures in the first two weeks.

  18. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012, 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average.

  19. Results of the First Performance Tests of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Adzic, Petar; Almeida, Carlos; Almeida, Nuno; Anagnostou, Georgios; Anfreville, Marc; Anicin, Ivan; Antunovic, Zeljko; Asimidis, Asimakis; Auffray, Etiennette; Baccaro, Stefania; Barney, David; Barone, Luciano; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Bell, Ken W; Benetta, Robert; Bercher, Michel; Beteva, B; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhardwa, A; Biino, Cristina; Bimbot, Stephane; Bloch, Philippe; Blyth, Simon; Bonesini, Maurizio; Bordalo, Paula; Bornheim, Adolf; Bourotte, Jean; Britton, David; Brown, Robert M; Brunelière, Renaud; Busson, Philippe; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cavallari, Francesca; Chamont, David; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Charlot, Claude; Chen, E Augustine; Chipaux, Rémi; Cockerill, David J A; Collard, Caroline; Combaret, Christophe; Costantini, Silvia; Da Silva, J C; Dafinei, Ioan; Daskalakis, Georgios; Davatz, Giovanna; De Min, Alberto; Deiters, Konrad; Dejardin, Marc; Della Negra, Rodolphe; Depasse, Pierre; Descamp, J; Dewhirst, Guy; Dhawan, Satish; Diemoz, Marcella; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Djambazov, Lubomir; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Drndarevic, Snezana; Dupanloup, Michel; Dzelalija, Mile; Ehlers, Jan; El-Mamouni, H; Peisert, Anna; Evangelou, Ioannis; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Fay, Jean; Ferri, Federico; Flower, Paul S; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaillac, Anne-Marie; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gascon-Shotkin, S; Geerebaert, Yannick; Gentit, François-Xavier; Ghezzi, Alessio; Gilly, Jean; Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie; Givernaud, Alain; Gninenko, Sergei; Go, Apollo; Godinovic, Nikola; Golubev, Nikolai; Gómez-Reino, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Grahl, James; Gras, Philippe; Greenhalgh, Justin; Guillaud, Jean-Paul; Haguenauer, Maurice; Hamel De Montechenault, G; Hansen, Magnus; Heath, Helen F; Hill, Jack; Hobson, Peter R; Holmes, Daniel; Holzner, André; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Ille, Bernard; Ingram, Quentin; Jain, Adarsh; Janot, Patrick; Jarry, Patrick; Karar, M A; Kataria, Sushil Kumar; Katchanov, V A; Kennedy, Bruce W; Kloukinas, Kostas; Koblitz, Birger; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Korjik, M; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Krpic, Dragomir; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Lebeau, Michel; Lecomte, Pierre; Lecoq, Paul; Lemaire, Marie-Claude; Lethuillier, Morgan; Lin, Willis; Lintern, A L; Lister, Alison; Locci, Elizabeth; Lodge, Anthony B; Longo, Egidio; Loukas, Demetrios; Lustermann, Werner; Lynch, Clare; MacKay, Catherine Kirsty; Maletic, Dimitrije; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Manthos, Nikolaos; Markou, Athanasios; Mathez, Hervé; Matveev, Viktor; Maurelli, Georges; Menichetti, Ezio; Meridiani, Paolo; Milenovic, Predrag; Milleret, Gérard; Miné, Philippe; Montecchi, Marco; Mur, Michel; Musienko, Yuri; Nardulli, Alessandro; Nash, Jordan; Neal, Homer; Nédélec, Patrick; Negri, Pietro; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Newman, Harvey B; Nikitenko, Alexander; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Organtini, Giovanni; Paganini, Pascal; Paganoni, Marco; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paramatti, Riccardo; Pastrone, Nadia; Pauss, Felicitas; Poilleux, Patrick; Puljak, Ivica; Pullia, Antonino; Puzovic, Jovan; Ragazzi, Stefano; Ramos, Sergio; Rander, John; Ravat, Olivier; Raymond, M; Razis, Panos A; Redaelli, Nicola; Regnault, Nicolas; Renker, Dieter; Reucroft, Steve; Reymond, Jean-Marc; Reynaud, Michel; Reynaud, Serge; Romanteau, Thierry; Rondeaux, Françoise; Rosowsky, André; Rovelli, Chiara; Rusack, Roger; Rusakov, Sergey V; Ryan, Matthew John; Rykaczewski, Hans; Sakhelashvili, Tariel; Salerno, Roberto; Santos, Marcelino; Schinzel, Dietrich; Seez, Christopher; Semeniouk, Igor; Sempere-Roldan, P; Sharif, Omar; Sharp, Peter; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Shevchenko, Sergey; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Sidiropoulos, Georgios; Sillou, Daniel; Singovsky, Alexander; Sirois, Yves; Sirunyan, Albert M; Smith, Brian; Smith, Vincent J; Sproston, Martin; Suter, Henry; Swain, John; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Takahashi, Maiko; Tapper, Robert J; Tcheremoukhine, Alexandre; Teixeira, Isabel; Teixeira, Joao Paulo; Teller, Olivier; Triantis, Frixos A; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Udriot, Stève; Ueno, Koji; Uzunian, Andrey; Van Vulpen, Ivo; Varela, Joao; Vaz-Cardoso, N; Verrecchia, Patrice; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Viertel, Gert; Virdee, Tejinder; Wang, Minzu; Williams, Jennifer C; Yaselli, Ignacio; Zamiatin, Nikolai; Zelepoukine, Serguei; Zeller, Michael E; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Kejun; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    Performance tests of some aspects of the CMS ECAL were carried out on modules of the "barrel" sub-system in 2002 and 2003. A brief test with high energy electron beams was made in late 2003 to validate prototypes of the new Very Front End electronics. The final versions of the monitoring and cooling systems, and of the high and low voltage regulation were used in these tests. The results are consistent with the performance targets including those for noise and overall energy resolution, required to fulfil the physics programme of CMS at the LHC.

  20. Performance and scientific results of the BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feroci, M.; Costa, E.; Cinti, M. N.; Frontera, F.; Dal Fiume, D.; Nicastro, L.; Orlandini, M.; Palazzi, E.; Amati, L.; Zavattini, G.; Coletta, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Italian-Dutch satellite for X-ray Astronomy BeppoSAX is successfully operating on a 600 km equatorial orbit since May 1996. We present here the in-flight performance of the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GRBM) experiment during its first year of operation. The GRBM is performing very well, providing an amount of data on GRBs, some of which confirmed by other experiments onboard satellites. It also joined the 3rd Interplanetary Network as a new near-earth node. Important results have been obtained for GRBs (e.g. GRB970228) simultaneously detected in the Wide Field Cameras onboard the same satellite

  1. The AMS silicon tracker readout, performance results with minimum ionizing particles

    CERN Document Server

    Alpat, B; Battiston, R; Bourquin, Maurice; Burger, W J; Extermann, Pierre; Chang, Y H; Hou, S R; Pauluzzi, M; Produit, N; Qiu, S; Rapin, D; Ribordy, R; Toker, O; Wu, S X

    2000-01-01

    First results for the AMS silicon tracker readout performance are presented. Small 20.0*20.0*0.300 mm/sup 3/ silicon microstrip detectors were installed in a 50 GeV electron beam at CERN. The detector readout consisted of prototypes of the tracker data reduction card equipped with a 12-bit ADC and the tracker frontend hybrid with VA_hdr readout chips. The system performance is assessed in terms of signal-to-noise, position resolution, and efficiency. (13 refs).

  2. First results of CMS RPC performance at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Pedraza-Morales, M.I.; Shopova, M.

    2016-12-01

    The muon spectrometer of the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is equipped with a redundant system made of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and Drift Tube (DT) chambers in the barrel, RPC and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) in the endcap region. In this paper, the first results of the performance of the RPC system during 2015 with the LHC running at 13 TeV is presented. The stability of the RPC performance, in terms of efficiency, cluster size and noise, is reported.

  3. Effect of Customer Satisfaction on Company Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Suchánek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this article is customer satisfaction and its impact on company performance through satisfaction with its products, including a comparison with the competition. Research was conducted in search of factors which affect customer satisfaction on the one hand and the performance of the company on the other hand. We constructed a model explaining what specific factors (affecting customer satisfaction have an impact on the performance of a company. This model can help management to better run the business and achieve higher performance. The article is based on research that focused on companies in the food industry in Czech Republic and on their customers. First, we found the financial performance of surveyed companies (based on indicators ROA, ROE and assets turnover and on this basis they have been divided on companies efficient and inefficient. Furthermore factors were identified (based on previous research of authors that have an impact on customer satisfaction (among these factors include product quality, customer requirements for product, comparison with competitive products, etc.. With the use of non-parametric statistical methods, logistic regression and discriminant analysis was analyzed, what factors affecting customer satisfaction also affect business performance.

  4. Influence of Electrode Density on the Performance of Li-Ion Batteries: Experimental and Simulation Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle Smekens

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion battery (LIB technology further enabled the information revolution by powering smartphones and tablets, allowing these devices an unprecedented performance against reasonable cost. Currently, this battery technology is on the verge of carrying the revolution in road transport and energy storage of renewable energy. However, to fully succeed in the latter, a number of hurdles still need to be taken. Battery performance and lifetime constitute a bottleneck for electric vehicles as well as stationary electric energy storage systems to penetrate the market. Electrochemical battery models are one of the engineering tools which could be used to enhance their performance. These models can help us optimize the cell design and the battery management system. In this study, we evaluate the ability of the Porous Electrode Theory (PET to predict the effect of changing positive electrode density in the overall performance of Li-ion battery cells. It can be concluded that Porous Electrode Theory (PET is capable of predicting the difference in cell performance due to a changing positive electrode density.

  5. Poor Gait Performance and Prediction of Dementia: Results From a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchet, Olivier; Annweiler, Cédric; Callisaya, Michele L; De Cock, Anne-Marie; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Kressig, Reto W; Srikanth, Velandai; Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Blumen, Helena M; Verghese, Joe; Allali, Gilles

    2016-06-01

    Poor gait performance predicts risk of developing dementia. No structured critical evaluation has been conducted to study this association yet. The aim of this meta-analysis was to systematically examine the association of poor gait performance with incidence of dementia. An English and French Medline search was conducted in June 2015, with no limit of date, using the medical subject headings terms "Gait" OR "Gait Disorders, Neurologic" OR "Gait Apraxia" OR "Gait Ataxia" AND "Dementia" OR "Frontotemporal Dementia" OR "Dementia, Multi-Infarct" OR "Dementia, Vascular" OR "Alzheimer Disease" OR "Lewy Body Disease" OR "Frontotemporal Dementia With Motor Neuron Disease" (Supplementary Concept). Poor gait performance was defined by standardized tests of walking, and dementia was diagnosed according to international consensus criteria. Four etiologies of dementia were identified: any dementia, Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), and non-AD (ie, pooling VaD, mixed dementias, and other dementias). Fixed effects meta-analyses were performed on the estimates in order to generate summary values. Of the 796 identified abstracts, 12 (1.5%) were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Poor gait performance predicted dementia [pooled hazard ratio (HR) combined with relative risk and odds ratio = 1.53 with P analysis provides evidence that poor gait performance predicts dementia. This association depends on the type of dementia; poor gait performance is a stronger predictor of non-AD dementias than AD. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigating The Effect Of Job Stress On Performance Of Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Oyungerel Altangerel; Wang Ruimei; Ehsan Elahi; Bayandalai Dash

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study is conducted to investigate the effect of job stress on job performance. A random sampling technique is used to collect primary data of 120 employees of four telecommunication companies of Mongolia i.e. Mobicom Unitel Skytel and G-mobile. A well-structured questionnaire is utilized to collect relevant data descriptive and logistic analysis is used to estimate and describe the findings of results. It is found that work overload is major reason of stress among employees and ...

  7. Effectively managing nuclear risk through human performance improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coe, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The US commercial nuclear industry has just completed an outstanding decade of plant performance. Safety levels and electric production are at unprecedented high levels and continue to exceed even high industry goals. Nuclear energy continues to keep the highest priority on performance improvement programs and highly trained/qualified people that maintain its record setting safety and reliability of operations. While the industry has maintained a consistently high level of performance, the advent of deregulation and the consolidation of NPP ownership, as well as the current climate of concern about both rising energy costs and availability of power, has raised the standard for nuclear energy's level of competitiveness in today's market place. The resulting challenge is how to more effectively manage risk and improve performance even further in a generally high performing organization. Newer technology and more training by themselves are not the answer. Rather, the answer will lie in the human side of the organization and management's ability to tap into the unused potential of employee commitment and productivity. It is people who offer the greatest potential for organizational success. Given the fact that human performance has been demonstrated to yield higher rates of return than physical capital, it makes good business sense to determine how to encourage the behaviors in the workplace to manage the risk that will accompany efforts to boost the nuclear industry to new heights of excellence. This means effectively developing a performance improvement culture through identifying measurable performance indicators and determining how behaviors can best be influenced to improve those indicators. It also means seeing a culture of performance improvement and risk management as a strategic planning tool rather than a solution to a particular problem. One of the most effective ways to develop this culture of performance improvement and effectively managing risk

  8. Effect of background music on auditory-verbal memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Matloubi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Music exists in all cultures; many scientists are seeking to understand how music effects cognitive development such as comprehension, memory, and reading skills. More recently, a considerable number of neuroscience studies on music have been developed. This study aimed to investigate the effects of null and positive background music in comparison with silence on auditory-verbal memory performance.Methods: Forty young adults (male and female with normal hearing, aged between 18 and 26, participated in this comparative-analysis study. An auditory and speech evaluation was conducted in order to investigate the effects of background music on working memory. Subsequently, the Rey auditory-verbal learning test was performed for three conditions: silence, positive, and null music.Results: The mean score of the Rey auditory-verbal learning test in silence condition was higher than the positive music condition (p=0.003 and the null music condition (p=0.01. The tests results did not reveal any gender differences.Conclusion: It seems that the presence of competitive music (positive and null music and the orientation of auditory attention have negative effects on the performance of verbal working memory. It is possibly owing to the intervention of music with verbal information processing in the brain.

  9. The Effects of Reward, Punishment, and Knowledge of Results on Children's Discrimination Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Barbara; Ratliff, Richard G.

    1976-01-01

    The differential effects of contingent reward (candy), punishment (loss of candy), and knowledge of results (KOR) were investigated in eighty 9- to 10-year-old males. Level of performance of groups receiving KOR was significantly higher than performance on groups rewarded or punished with candy. (MS)

  10. Error framing effects on performance: cognitive, motivational, and affective pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele-Johnson, Debra; Kalinoski, Zachary T

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine whether positive error framing, that is, making errors salient and cuing individuals to see errors as useful, can benefit learning when task exploration is constrained. Recent research has demonstrated the benefits of a newer approach to training, that is, error management training, that includes the opportunity to actively explore the task and framing errors as beneficial to learning complex tasks (Keith & Frese, 2008). Other research has highlighted the important role of errors in on-the-job learning in complex domains (Hutchins, 1995). Participants (N = 168) from a large undergraduate university performed a class scheduling task. Results provided support for a hypothesized path model in which error framing influenced cognitive, motivational, and affective factors which in turn differentially affected performance quantity and quality. Within this model, error framing had significant direct effects on metacognition and self-efficacy. Our results suggest that positive error framing can have beneficial effects even when tasks cannot be structured to support extensive exploration. Whereas future research can expand our understanding of error framing effects on outcomes, results from the current study suggest that positive error framing can facilitate learning from errors in real-time performance of tasks.

  11. The Plumbing of Land Surface Models: Is Poor Performance a Result of Methodology or Data Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Ned; Abramowitz, Gab; Pitman, Andy J.; Or, Dani; Best, Martin J.; Johnson, Helen R.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boone, Aaron; Cuntz, Matthais; Decharme, Bertrand; hide

    2016-01-01

    The PALS Land sUrface Model Benchmarking Evaluation pRoject (PLUMBER) illustrated the value of prescribing a priori performance targets in model intercomparisons. It showed that the performance of turbulent energy flux predictions from different land surface models, at a broad range of flux tower sites using common evaluation metrics, was on average worse than relatively simple empirical models. For sensible heat fluxes, all land surface models were outperformed by a linear regression against downward shortwave radiation. For latent heat flux, all land surface models were outperformed by a regression against downward shortwave, surface air temperature and relative humidity. These results are explored here in greater detail and possible causes are investigated. We examine whether particular metrics or sites unduly influence the collated results, whether results change according to time-scale aggregation and whether a lack of energy conservation in fluxtower data gives the empirical models an unfair advantage in the intercomparison. We demonstrate that energy conservation in the observational data is not responsible for these results. We also show that the partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes in LSMs, rather than the calculation of available energy, is the cause of the original findings. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that the nature of this partitioning problem is likely shared among all contributing LSMs. While we do not find a single candidate explanation forwhy land surface models perform poorly relative to empirical benchmarks in PLUMBER, we do exclude multiple possible explanations and provide guidance on where future research should focus.

  12. Performances of the snow accumulation melting model SAMM: results in the Northern Apennines test area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Daniela; Martelloni, Gianluca; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo; Fanti, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    In this work we propose a snow accumulation-melting model (SAMM) to forecast the snowpack height and we compare the results with a simple temperature index model and an improved version of the latter.For this purpose we used rainfall, temperature and snowpack thickness 5-years data series from 7 weather stations in the Northern Apennines (Emilia Romagna Region, Italy). SAMM is based on two modules modelling the snow accumulation and the snowmelt processes. Each module is composed by two equations: a mass conservation equation is solved to model snowpack thickness and an empirical equation is used for the snow density. The processes linked to the accumulation/depletion of the snowpack (e.g. compression of the snowpack due to newly fallen snow and effects of rainfall) are modelled identifying limiting and inhibitory factors according to a kinetic approach. The model depends on 13 empirical parameters, whose optimal values were defined with an optimization algorithm (simplex flexible) using calibration measures of snowpack thickness. From an operational point of view, SAMM uses as input data only temperature and rainfall measurements, bringing the additional advantage of a relatively easy implementation. In order to verify the improvement of SAMM with respect to a temperature-index model, the latter was applied considering, for the amount of snow melt, the following equation: M = fm(T-T0), where M is hourly melt, fm is the melting factor and T0 is a threshold temperature. In this case the calculation of the depth of the snowpack requires the use of 3 parameters: fm, T0 and ?0 (the mean density of the snowpack). We also performed a simulation by replacing the SAMM melting module with the above equation and leaving unchanged the accumulation module: in this way we obtained a model with 9 parameters. The simulations results suggest that any further extension of the simple temperature index model brings some improvements with a consequent decrease of the mean error

  13. Framing of task performance strategies: effects on performance in a multiattribute dynamic decision making environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, T E

    1997-09-01

    It is well documented that the way a static choice task is "framed" can dramatically alter choice behavior, often leading to observable preference reversals. This framing effect appears to result from perceived changes in the nature or location of a person's initial reference point, but it is not clear how framing effects might generalize to performance on dynamic decision making tasks that are characterized by high workload, time constraints, risk, or stress. A study was conducted to examine the hypothesis that framing can introduce affective components to the decision making process and can influence, either favorably (positive frame) or adversely (negative frame), the implementation and use of decision making strategies in dynamic high-workload environments. Results indicated that negative frame participants were significantly impaired in developing and employing a simple optimal decision strategy relative to a positive frame group. Discussion focuses on implications of these results for models of dynamic decision making.

  14. Performance and Environmental Test Results of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator Engineering Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Mathers, Alex

    2012-01-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorate's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is sponsoring the development of a 3.5 kW-class engineering development unit Hall thruster for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. NASA Glenn and Aerojet are developing a high fidelity high voltage Hall accelerator that can achieve specific impulse magnitudes greater than 2,700 seconds and xenon throughput capability in excess of 300 kilograms. Performance, plume mappings, thermal characterization, and vibration tests of the high voltage Hall accelerator engineering development unit have been performed. Performance test results indicated that at 3.9 kW the thruster achieved a total thrust efficiency and specific impulse of 58%, and 2,700 sec, respectively. Thermal characterization tests indicated that the thruster component temperatures were within the prescribed material maximum operating temperature limits during full power thruster operation. Finally, thruster vibration tests indicated that the thruster survived the 3-axes qualification full-level random vibration test series. Pre and post-vibration test performance mappings indicated almost identical thruster performance. Finally, an update on the development progress of a power processing unit and a xenon feed system is provided.

  15. Competitiveness of firms, performance and customer orientation measures – empirical survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Klapalová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to presents results from two empirical surveys concerning selected factors which can be connected to customer orientation, performance and competitiveness of firms. The purpose of the surveys was also to reveal potential differences between sectors arising from not only the different influences of internal but as well as external environment. A survey instrument was developed to analyse the relationship between several variables measuring customer orientation of surveyed firms and between these factors and level of financial performance. Several statistical methods were applied to analyse the data, specifically descriptive statistics (means and standard deviations, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc test using financial performance for clustering firms and for assessment of potential differences of customer orientation criteria evaluation and Spearman rank correlation coefficients to assess the linear bivariate relationship between customer orientation variables. The results of ANOVA show that only the innovativeness is distinctive distinguishing criteria in conformity with the indicators of financial prosperity and that there are some differences between companies from two groups of sectors within the managers’ perception of customer orientation criteria performance.

  16. Effects of Sound Painting Applications on Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskuner, Sonat

    2016-01-01

    Today, some of the important dilemmas of music education are that performers are too dependent on the notes in a written musical score and they are not being so able to improvise. Stage phobia, lack of motivation and problematic of perception regarding today's modern music are additional problems facing musicians. This research aims at revealing…

  17. Effects of Text Messaging on Academic Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Barks Amanda; Searight H. Russell; Ratwik Susan

    2011-01-01

    University students frequently send and receive cellular phone text messages during classroominstruction. Cognitive psychology research indicates that multi-tasking is frequently associatedwith performance cost. However, university students often have considerable experience withelectronic multi-tasking and may believe that they can devote necessary attention to a classroomlecture while sending and receiving text messages. In the current study, university students whoused text messaging were ...

  18. Teaching effectiveness and students' performance in conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been a proliferation of coaching centres in Lagos State. These run side-by-side conventional schools offering general education. Stakeholders in the education industry have raised questions on the relevance of these coaching centres particularly in terms of students' academic performance, teaching ...

  19. Effects of Onchocerciasis Manifestations on Academic Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in order to reduce the parasite reservoir in man, and also breaking the man-fly contact either by use of repellents or through proper covering of the body during outdoor activities. Key Words: Onchocerciasis, manifestation, academic performance, weighted average, visual impairment. Bio-Research Vol.1(2) 2003: 77-85 ...

  20. First performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Chengxin; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Appelshäuser, Harald; Bratrud, Lars Karlot Stubberud; Castro, Andrew; Costa, Filippo; David, Ernö; Gunji, Tako; Kirsch, S; Kiss, Tivadar; Langøy, Rune; Lien, Jørgen; Lippmann, C; Oskarsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    - This paper presents the first performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2 (RCU2). With the upgraded hardware typology and the new readout scheme in FPGA design, the RCU2 is designed to achieve twice the readout speed of the present Readout Control Unit. Design choices such as using the flash-based Microsemi Smartfusion2 FPGA and applying mitigation techniques in interfaces and FPGA design ensure a high degree of radiation tolerance. This paper presents the system level ir...

  1. 7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinge, Dennis C. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Michael E. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

    2011-04-01

    The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

  2. Results of the RAMI analyses performed for the IFMIF accelerator facility in the engineering design phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargalló, Enric, E-mail: enric.bargallo@esss.se [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Arroyo, Jose Manuel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Abal, Javier; Dies, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Moya, Joaquin; Ibarra, Angel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • RAMI methodology used for IFMIF accelerator facility is presented. • Availability analyses and results are shown. • Main accelerator design changes are proposed. • Consequences and conclusions of the RAMI analyses are described. - Abstract: This paper presents a summary of the RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) analyses done for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) Accelerator facility in the Engineering Design Phase. The methodology followed, the analyses performed, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn are described. Moreover, the consequences of the incorporation of the RAMI studies in the IFMIF design are presented and the main outcomes of these analyses are shown.

  3. Results of the RAMI analyses performed for the IFMIF accelerator facility in the engineering design phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargalló, Enric; Arroyo, Jose Manuel; Abal, Javier; Dies, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos; Moya, Joaquin; Ibarra, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • RAMI methodology used for IFMIF accelerator facility is presented. • Availability analyses and results are shown. • Main accelerator design changes are proposed. • Consequences and conclusions of the RAMI analyses are described. - Abstract: This paper presents a summary of the RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) analyses done for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) Accelerator facility in the Engineering Design Phase. The methodology followed, the analyses performed, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn are described. Moreover, the consequences of the incorporation of the RAMI studies in the IFMIF design are presented and the main outcomes of these analyses are shown.

  4. French fission products experiments performed in Cadarache and Valduc. Results comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, Jacques; Barreau, Anne; Hudelot, Jean Pascal; Girault, Emmanuel; Fouillaud, Patrick; Toubon, Herve

    2003-01-01

    Cofunded by Cogema, two complementary experimental programmes on burn up credit (BUC) related to fission products (FPs) are performed by CEA and IRSN at Cadarache and Valduc. After shortly recalling the main characteristics of each experiment, a first comparison of some results is presented, especially the energy range in which most part of cross section absorption are qualified. Both experiments exhibit great quality and accurate results, giving a high degree of confidence to the whole experimental French process of qualification devoted to BUC. (author)

  5. EFFECTS OF MUSIC INTERVENTIONS ON EMOTIONAL STATES AND RUNNING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Lane

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared the effects of two different music interventions on changes in emotional states before and during running, and also explored effects of music interventions upon performance outcome. Volunteer participants (n = 65 who regularly listened to music when running registered online to participate in a three-stage study. Participants attempted to attain a personally important running goal to establish baseline performance. Thereafter, participants were randomly assigned to either a self-selected music group or an Audiofuel music group. Audiofuel produce pieces of music designed to assist synchronous running. The self-selected music group followed guidelines for selecting motivating playlists. In both experimental groups, participants used the Brunel Music Rating Inventory-2 (BMRI-2 to facilitate selection of motivational music. Participants again completed the BMRI-2 post- intervention to assess the motivational qualities of Audiofuel music or the music they selected for use during the study. Results revealed no significant differences between self-selected music and Audiofuel music on all variables analyzed. Participants in both music groups reported increased pleasant emotions and decreased unpleasant emotions following intervention. Significant performance improvements were demonstrated post-intervention with participants reporting a belief that emotional states related to performance. Further analysis indicated that enhanced performance was significantly greater among participants reporting music to be motivational as indicated by high scores on the BMRI-2. Findings suggest that both individual athletes and practitioners should consider using the BMRI-2 when selecting music for running

  6. Masticatory performance alters stress relief effect of gum chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigawa, Keisuke; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Matsuka, Yoshizo

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of gum chewing on the response to psychological stress induced by a calculation task and investigated the relationship between this response and masticatory performance. Nineteen healthy adult volunteers without dental problems undertook the Uchida-Kraepelin (UK) test (30 min of reiterating additions of one-digit numbers). Before and immediately after the test, saliva samples were collected from the sublingual area of the participants. Three min after the UK test, the participants were made to chew flavorless gum for 3 min, and the final saliva samples were collected 10 min after the UK test. The experiment was performed without gum chewing on a different day. Masticatory performance was evaluated using color-changing chewing gum. Salivary CgA levels at immediately and 10 min after the UK test were compared with and without gum chewing condition. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant interaction between gum chewing condition and changes in CgA levels during post 10 min UK test period. A significant correlation was found between changes in CgA levels and masticatory performance in all participants. Our results indicate that gum chewing may relieve stress responses; however, high masticatory performance is required to achieve this effect. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of chronic nonmalignant pain on highway driving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuijzen, D S; van Wijck, A J M; Wille, F; Verster, J C; Kenemans, J L; Kalkman, C J; Olivier, B; Volkerts, E R

    2006-05-01

    Most pain patients are treated in an outpatient setting and are engaged in daily activities including driving. Since several studies showed that cognitive functioning may be impaired in chronic nonmalignant pain, the question arises whether or not chronic nonmalignant pain affects driving performance. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the effects of chronic nonmalignant pain on actual highway driving performance during normal traffic. Fourteen patients with chronic nonmalignant pain and 14 healthy controls, matched on age, educational level, and driving experience, participated in the study. Participants performed a standardized on-the-road driving test during normal traffic, on a primary highway. The primary parameter of the driving test is the Standard Deviation of Lateral Position (SDLP). In addition, driving-related skills (tracking, divided attention, and memory) were examined in the laboratory. Subjective assessments, such as pain intensity, and subjective driving quality, were rated on visual analogue scales. The results demonstrated that a subset of chronic nonmalignant pain patients had SDLPs that were higher than the matched healthy controls, indicating worse highway driving performance. Overall, there was a statistically significant difference in highway driving performance between the groups. Further, chronic nonmalignant pain patients rated their subjective driving quality to be normal, although their ratings were significantly lower than those of the healthy controls. No significant effects were found on the laboratory tests.

  8. Flux gain for a next-generation neutron reflectometer resulting from improved supermirror performance

    CERN Document Server

    Rehm, C

    2002-01-01

    Next-generation spallation neutron source facilities will offer instruments with unprecedented capabilities through simultaneous enhancement of source power and usage of advanced optical components. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and scheduled to be completed by 2006, will provide greater than an order of magnitude more effective source flux than current state-of-the-art facilities, including the most advanced research reactors. An additional order of magnitude gain is expected through the use of new optical devices and instrumentation concepts. Many instrument designs require supermirror neutron guides with very high critical angles for total reflection. In this contribution, we will discuss how the performance of a modern neutron-scattering instrument depends on the efficiency of these supermirrors. We summarize current limitations of supermirror coatings and outline ideas for enhancing their performance, particularly for improving the reflec...

  9. Effects of Pretreatment Methods on Electrodes and SOFC Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Bin Jung

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available tapes (anode, electrolyte and paste (cathode were choosen to prepare anode-supported cells for solid oxide fuel cell applications. For both anode-supported cells or electrolyte-supported cells, the anode needs pretreatment to reduce NiO/YSZ to Ni/YSZ to increase its conductivity as well as its catalytic characteristics. In this study, the effects of different pretreatments (open-circuit, closed-circuit on cathode and anodes as well as SOFC performance are investigated. To investigate the influence of closed-circuit pretreatment on the NiO/YSZ anode alone, a Pt cathode is utilized as reference for comparison with the LSM cathode. The characterization of the electrical resistance, AC impedance, and SOFC performance of the resulting electrodes and/or anode-supported cell were carried out. It’s found that the influence of open-circuit pretreatment on the LSM cathode is limited. However, the influence of closed-circuit pretreatment on both the LSM cathode and NiO/YSZ anode and the resulting SOFC performance is profound. The effect of closed-circuit pretreatment on the NiO/YSZ anode is attributed to its change of electronic/pore structure as well as catalytic characteristics. With closed-circuit pretreatment, the SOFC performance improved greatly from the change of LSM cathode (and Pt reference compared to the Ni/YSZ anode.

  10. Effect of inlet straighteners on centrifugal fan performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayomi, N.N.; Abdel Hafiz, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Mataria, Helwan University, 11718 Masaken, El-Helmia, Cairo (Egypt); Osman, A.M. [Faculty of Engineering, Shoubra, Zagazig University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2006-11-15

    The use of straighteners in the inlet duct of centrifugal fans is suggested for eliminating any inlet distortion. An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of inlet straighteners on the performance characteristics of centrifugal fans. Two types of straighteners were used, circular tubes and zigzag cross section, with different lengths. Circular tubes with different diameters have been investigated. The study was conducted on three types of fans, namely radial, backward with exit blade angles 60{sup o} and 75{sup o} and forward with 105{sup o} and 120{sup o}. The results confirm that the inlet straighteners exhibit different effects on the fan performance for the different blade angles. Accordingly, the results indicate the selection of long circular tube straighteners with large diameter for radial blades, long zigzag type for backward 60{sup o} blade angle and short zigzag type for backward 75{sup o} blade angle. Generally, good improvements in efficiency are observed for radial and backward blades on account of a slight drop in static head. In addition, an increase in the flow margin up to 12% and a decrease in the noise level from 3 to 5dB are indicated compared to the free inlet condition. On the contrary, unfavorable influences are exerted on the forward fan performance. (author)

  11. The Effects of Aerobic Exercise and Gaming on Cognitive Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douris, Peter C; Handrakis, John P; Apergis, Demitra; Mangus, Robert B; Patel, Rima; Limtao, Jessica; Platonova, Svetlana; Gregorio, Aladino; Luty, Elliot

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of video gaming, aerobic exercise (biking), and the combination of these two activities on the domains of cognitive performance: selective attention, processing speed, and executive functioning. The study was a randomized clinical trial with 40 subjects (mean age 23.7 ± 1.8 years) randomized to one of four thirty-minute conditions: video gaming, biking, simultaneous gaming and biking, and a control condition. Cognitive performance was measured pre and post condition using the Stroop test and Trails B test. A mixed design was utilized. While video gaming, biking, simultaneous gaming and biking conditions improved selective attention and processing speed (p bike condition improved the highest order of cognitive performance, executive function (p biking and gaming may have surpassed attentional capacity limits, ultimately increasing errors during the executive function tests of our cognitive performance battery. The results suggest that the fatiguing effects of a combined physically and mentally challenging task that extends after the exercise cessation may overcome the eventual beneficial cognitive effects derived from the physical exercise.

  12. Standalone BISON Fuel Performance Results for Watts Bar Unit 1, Cycles 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pawlowski, Roger [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stimpson, Shane [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-07

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is moving forward with more complex multiphysics simulations and increased focus on incorporating fuel performance analysis methods. The coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics capabilities within the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS) have become relatively stable, and major advances have been made in analysis efforts, including the simulation of twelve cycles of Watts Bar Nuclear Unit 1 (WBN1) operation. While this is a major achievement, the VERA-CS approaches for treating fuel pin heat transfer have well-known limitations that could be eliminated through better integration with the BISON fuel performance code. Several approaches are being implemented to consider fuel performance, including a more direct multiway coupling with Tiamat, as well as a more loosely coupled one-way approach with standalone BISON cases. Fuel performance typically undergoes an independent analysis using a standalone fuel performance code with manually specified input defined from an independent core simulator solution or set of assumptions. This report summarizes the improvements made since the initial milestone to execute BISON from VERA-CS output. Many of these improvements were prompted through tighter collaboration with the BISON development team at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A brief description of WBN1 and some of the VERA-CS data used to simulate it are presented. Data from a small mesh sensitivity study are shown, which helps justify the mesh parameters used in this work. The multi-cycle results are presented, followed by the results for the first three cycles of WBN1 operation, particularly the parameters of interest to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) screening (fuel-clad gap closure, maximum centerline fuel temperature, maximum/minimum clad hoop stress, and cumulative damage index). Once the mechanics of this capability are functioning, future work will target cycles with

  13. Portfolio Effects of Renewable Energies - Basics, Models, Exemplary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Andreas; Herrmann, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    The combination of sites and technologies to so-called renewable energy portfolios, which are being developed and implemented under the same financing umbrella, is currently the subject of intense discussion in the finance world. The resulting portfolio effect may allow the prediction of a higher return with the same risk or the same return with a lower risk - always in comparison with the investment in a single project. Models are currently being developed to analyse this subject and derive the portfolio effect. In particular, the effect of the spatial distribution, as well as the effects of using different technologies, suppliers and cost assumptions with different level of uncertainties, are of importance. Wind parks, photovoltaic, biomass, biogas and hydropower are being considered. The status of the model development and first results are being presented in the current paper. In a first example, the portfolio effect has been calculated and analysed using selected parameters for a wind energy portfolio of 39 sites distributed over Europe. Consequently it has been shown that the predicted yield, with the predetermined probabilities between 75 to 90%, is 3 - 8% higher than the sum of the yields for the individual wind parks using the same probabilities. (auth)

  14. Postirradiation examination results for the Irradiation Effects Test IE-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, T.F.; Ploger, S.A.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1978-03-01

    The results are presented of the postirradiation examination of four pressurized water reactor type fuel rods which were tested in-pile under a fast power ramp and film boiling operation during Irradiation Effects (IE) Test 5. The major objectives of this test were to evaluate the effects of simulated fission products on fuel rod behavior during a fast power ramp, to determine the effects of high initial internal pressure on a fuel rod during film boiling, and to assess fuel rod property changes that occur during film boiling in a fuel rod with previously irradiated cladding. The overall condition of the rods and changes that occurred in fuel and cladding as a result of the power ramp and film boiling operation, as determined from the postirradiation examination, are reported and analyzed. Effects of the simulated fission products on fuel rod behavior during a power ramp are discussed. The effect of high internal pressure on rod behavior during film boiling is evaluated. Cladding temperatures are estimated at various axial and circumferential locations. Cladding embrittlement by oxidation is also assessed

  15. The effect of query complexity on Web searching results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Jansen

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents findings from a study of the effects of query structure on retrieval by Web search services. Fifteen queries were selected from the transaction log of a major Web search service in simple query form with no advanced operators (e.g., Boolean operators, phrase operators, etc. and submitted to 5 major search engines - Alta Vista, Excite, FAST Search, Infoseek, and Northern Light. The results from these queries became the baseline data. The original 15 queries were then modified using the various search operators supported by each of the 5 search engines for a total of 210 queries. Each of these 210 queries was also submitted to the applicable search service. The results obtained were then compared to the baseline results. A total of 2,768 search results were returned by the set of all queries. In general, increasing the complexity of the queries had little effect on the results with a greater than 70% overlap in results, on average. Implications for the design of Web search services and directions for future research are discussed.

  16. The Effects of Performance-Based Assessment Criteria on Student Performance and Self-Assessment Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastre, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based…

  17. Effect of sample stratification on dairy GWAS results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artificial insemination and genetic selection are major factors contributing to population stratification in dairy cattle. In this study, we analyzed the effect of sample stratification and the effect of stratification correction on results of a dairy genome-wide association study (GWAS. Three methods for stratification correction were used: the efficient mixed-model association expedited (EMMAX method accounting for correlation among all individuals, a generalized least squares (GLS method based on half-sib intraclass correlation, and a principal component analysis (PCA approach. Results Historical pedigree data revealed that the 1,654 contemporary cows in the GWAS were all related when traced through approximately 10–15 generations of ancestors. Genome and phenotype stratifications had a striking overlap with the half-sib structure. A large elite half-sib family of cows contributed to the detection of favorable alleles that had low frequencies in the general population and high frequencies in the elite cows and contributed to the detection of X chromosome effects. All three methods for stratification correction reduced the number of significant effects. EMMAX method had the most severe reduction in the number of significant effects, and the PCA method using 20 principal components and GLS had similar significance levels. Removal of the elite cows from the analysis without using stratification correction removed many effects that were also removed by the three methods for stratification correction, indicating that stratification correction could have removed some true effects due to the elite cows. SNP effects with good consensus between different methods and effect size distributions from USDA’s Holstein genomic evaluation included the DGAT1-NIBP region of BTA14 for production traits, a SNP 45kb upstream from PIGY on BTA6 and two SNPs in NIBP on BTA14 for protein percentage. However, most of these consensus effects had

  18. Conflict in organizations : Beyond effectiveness and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Dreu, Carsten K W; Beersma, Bianca

    Conflict theory and research has traditionally focused on conflict management strategies, in relation to individual and work-team effectiveness and productivity. Far less attention has been devoted to "soft" outcomes including job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intentions, and

  19. Factors affecting effective performance of rural producers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    %) and marketing (40%) and credit. (40%). Linkages ... of quality service provision included having plans in addition to establishment of adequate and effective market linkages. On ... role in the agricultural development mix, leading to chronic.

  20. Performance Feedback: Individual Based Reflections and the Effect on Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaymaz, Kurtulus

    2011-01-01

    There is also enough scientific research proved the positive effect of performance on motivation. The common idea is that the performance feedback improve the technical and behavioral effectiveness of employees which then reflect on the job motivation. Around this idea, performance feedback effect motivation via reducing the performance ambiguity, improving the manager-subordinate relationships, making more easy to achieve goals, supporting the personal development and adapting to change. In ...

  1. Effect of Number of Blades on Performance of Ceiling Fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeeb Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of number of blades on ceiling fan performance is discussed. This approach helps to satisfy tradeoff between high air flow (performance and power consumption (energy efficiency. Specifically, variation from two to six blades is considered with nonlinear forward sweep profile. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS technique is used to model the flow field induced by the ceiling fan inside a generic room. The performance is gauged through response parameters namely volumetric flow rate, mass flow rate, torque and energy efficiency. The results indicate that mass and volumetric flow rates are maximized for six blade configuration and energy efficiency is maximized for two blade configuration. The study indicates the importance of tradeoff between high air flow through ceiling fan and associated energy efficiency.

  2. Driving performance in adults with ADHD: results from a randomized, waiting list controlled trial with atomoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobanski, E; Sabljic, D; Alm, B; Dittmann, R W; Wehmeier, P M; Skopp, G; Strohbeck-Kühner, P

    2013-08-01

    To investigate effects of a 12-week treatment with atomoxetine (ATX) on driving performance in real traffic, driving-related neuropsychological performance tests and self-evaluation of driving in adult patients with ADHD compared to an untreated control group with ADHD. Parallel group design with an ATX and a waiting list group. At baseline and endpoint patients were evaluated with a standardized on-road driving test (SDBO), a driving-related neuropsychological test battery (Act and React Test System [ART2020]), and subjective measures of driving performance (one-week driving diary, Driver Coping Questionnaire). Forty-three of the 64 included patients completed the study (n=22 ATX, n=21 controls). Mean intervention period was 11.9±3.0 weeks, mean daily ATX dosage was 71.6±14.9mg. At endpoint, 60.1% of patients treated with ATX and 0% of waiting list group had reduced ADHD symptoms by greater or equal to 30%. In SDBO, ATX group reduced driving errors in three of four driving performance categories (attention, Pself-control, Pdriving errors remained stable in control group. At endpoint, 47.6% of control group and 18.2% of ATX group (Pdriving fitness criteria according to German Guidelines (percentile rank less or equal to 16 in one or more subtests in ART2020). Total number of self-reported critical traffic situations decreased from 12.0 to 6.8 per week in ATX group (Ptraffic situations did not change within both groups. Our study provides first evidence that treatment with ATX improves driving performance in real traffic in adults with ADHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Insomnia and the performance of US workers: results from the America insomnia survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Berglund, Patricia A; Coulouvrat, Catherine; Hajak, Goeran; Roth, Thomas; Shahly, Victoria; Shillington, Alicia C; Stephenson, Judith J; Walsh, James K

    2011-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence and associations of broadly defined (i.e., meeting full ICD-10, DSM-IV, or RDC/ICSD-2 inclusion criteria) insomnia with work performance net of comorbid conditions in the America Insomnia Survey (AIS). Cross-sectional telephone survey. National sample of 7,428 employed health plan subscribers (ages 18+). None. Broadly defined insomnia was assessed with the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire (BIQ). Work absenteeism and presenteeism (low on-the-job work performance defined in the metric of lost workday equivalents) were assessed with the WHO Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ). Regression analysis examined associations between insomnia and HPQ scores controlling 26 comorbid conditions based on self-report and medical/pharmacy claims records. The estimated prevalence of insomnia was 23.2%. Insomnia was significantly associated with lost work performance due to presenteeism (χ² (1) = 39.5, P absenteeism (χ² (1) = 3.2, P = 0.07), with an annualized individual-level association of insomnia with presenteeism equivalent to 11.3 days of lost work performance. This estimate decreased to 7.8 days when controls were introduced for comorbid conditions. The individual-level human capital value of this net estimate was $2,280. If we provisionally assume these estimates generalize to the total US workforce, they are equivalent to annualized population-level estimates of 252.7 days and $63.2 billion. Insomnia is associated with substantial workplace costs. Although experimental studies suggest some of these costs could be recovered with insomnia disease management programs, effectiveness trials are needed to obtain precise estimates of return-on-investment of such interventions from the employer perspective.

  4. The Relative Age Effect and Its Influence on Academic Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-José Navarro

    Full Text Available The policy of school organisation for grouping students in the same academic year is based on date of birth. The differences in the experiences and maturation of older students involve a relatively better performance in academic settings, which is known as the relative age effect (RAE. This effect is more important the younger the student is. The goal of this study is to identify the connections of influence that RAE, socioeconomic status (SES, and type of institution have on academic performance in a school population of eighth graders.The study is based on a population-based, representative sample of 15,234 8th graders (50.4% female; average age = 13.61 years in the 2011 National System of Quality Assessment in Education Survey (SIMCE from Chile. The SIMCE for global academic performance consists of 4 tests: reading, mathematics, social studies, and science. All tests consist of multiple-choice and closed questions. In addition, in order to have the information of general academic performance, an extra variable expressing the average score of each student was created. Also, the SIMCE includes additional variables for the evaluation process such as SES or type of school. Students were assigned to one of five age groups in terms of date of birth (G1, G2, G3, G4, and G5, in which students belonging to G1 are the oldest and students belonging to G5 are the youngest.The results achieved in the structural equation modelling indicate a good global fit. Individual relationships show significant effects of the three variables observed on academic performance, although SES received the highest values. The influence of RAE took place both in the full sample and sub-samples composed according to the SES and academic performance, showing higher values for students with lower scores. Although the influence of RAE decreases when SES is controlled, its effect is still significant and contributes to additionally explain the performance.The RAE remains, even

  5. The Relative Age Effect and Its Influence on Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Juan-José; García-Rubio, Javier; Olivares, Pedro R

    2015-01-01

    The policy of school organisation for grouping students in the same academic year is based on date of birth. The differences in the experiences and maturation of older students involve a relatively better performance in academic settings, which is known as the relative age effect (RAE). This effect is more important the younger the student is. The goal of this study is to identify the connections of influence that RAE, socioeconomic status (SES), and type of institution have on academic performance in a school population of eighth graders. The study is based on a population-based, representative sample of 15,234 8th graders (50.4% female; average age = 13.61 years) in the 2011 National System of Quality Assessment in Education Survey (SIMCE) from Chile. The SIMCE for global academic performance consists of 4 tests: reading, mathematics, social studies, and science. All tests consist of multiple-choice and closed questions. In addition, in order to have the information of general academic performance, an extra variable expressing the average score of each student was created. Also, the SIMCE includes additional variables for the evaluation process such as SES or type of school. Students were assigned to one of five age groups in terms of date of birth (G1, G2, G3, G4, and G5), in which students belonging to G1 are the oldest and students belonging to G5 are the youngest. The results achieved in the structural equation modelling indicate a good global fit. Individual relationships show significant effects of the three variables observed on academic performance, although SES received the highest values. The influence of RAE took place both in the full sample and sub-samples composed according to the SES and academic performance, showing higher values for students with lower scores. Although the influence of RAE decreases when SES is controlled, its effect is still significant and contributes to additionally explain the performance. The RAE remains, even with residual

  6. The effects of opening areas on solar chimney performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, L. S.; Rahman, M. M.; Chu, C. M.; Misaran, M. S. bin; Tamiri, F. M.

    2017-07-01

    To enhance natural ventilation at day time, solar chimney is one of the suitable options for topical country like Malaysia. Solar chimney creates air flow due to stack effect caused by temperature difference between ambient and inside wall. In the solar chimney, solar energy is harvested by the inner wall that cause temperature rise compare to ambient. Therefore, the efficiency of the solar chimney depends on the availability of solar energy as well as the solar intensity. In addition, it is very hard to get good ventilation at night time by using a solar chimney. To overcome this problem one of the suitable valid option is to integrate solar chimney with turbine ventilator. A new type of solar chimney is designed and fluid flow analyzed with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. The aim of CFD and theoretical study are to investigate the effect of opening areas on modified solar chimney performance. The inlet and outlet area of solar chimney are varied from 0.0224m2 to 0.6m2 and 0.1m2 to 0.14m2 respectively based on the changes of inclination angle and gap between inner and outer wall. In the CFD study the constant heat flux is considered as 500W/m2. CFD result shows that there is no significant relation between opening areas and the air flow rate through solar chimney but the ratio between inlet and outlet is significant on flow performance. If the area ratio between inlet and outlet are equal to two or larger, the performance of the solar chimney is better than the solar chimney with ratio lesser than two. The solar chimney performance does not effect if the area ratio between inlet and outlet varies from 1 to 2. This result will be useful for design and verification of actual solar chimney performance.

  7. Core size effects on safety performances of LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Hahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    An oxide fuel small size core (1200 MWt) was analyzed in comparison with a large size core (3600 MWt) in order to evaluate the size effects on transient safety performances of liquid-metal reactors (LMRs). In the first part of the study, main static safety parameters (i.e., Doppler coefficient, sodium void effect, etc.) of the two cores were characterized, and the second part of the study was focused on the dynamic behavior of the cores in two representative transient events: the unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) and the unprotected transient overpower (UTOP). Margins to fuel melting and sodium boiling have been evaluated for these representative transients. Results show that the small core has a generally better or equivalent level of safety performances during these events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  8. Core size effects on safety performances of LMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Hahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    An oxide fuel small size core (1200 MWt) was analyzed in comparison with a large size core (3600 MWt) in order to evaluate the size effects on transient safety performances of liquid-metal reactors (LMRs). In the first part of the study, main static safety parameters (i.e., Doppler coefficient, sodium void effect, etc.) of the two cores were characterized, and the second part of the study was focused on the dynamic behavior of the cores in two representative transient events: the unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) and the unprotected transient overpower (UTOP). Margins to fuel melting and sodium boiling have been evaluated for these representative transients. Results show that the small core has a generally better or equivalent level of safety performances during these events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  9. Planck early results. IV. First assessment of the High Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Bréelle, E.; Bucher, M.

    2011-01-01

    heat load on the sub-Kelvin stage. Temporal variation and the inhomogeneous distribution of the flux results in thermal fluctuations that are a probable source of low frequency noise. The removal of systematic effects in the time ordered data provides a signal with an average noise equivalent power...

  10. EFFECT OF FLEXIBILITY ON THE RESULTS OF DOLPHIN SWIMMING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slađana Tošić

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the impact of flexibility on the results in swimming, we conducted a study on a sample of 50 female patients aged 11-14 years of age who are in the training process in the swimming clubs „Nis 2005“ and „Sveti Nikola“ in Nis. The study is applied to 14 measuring instruments that were divided into three groups: Measuring instruments for the assessment of flexibility (11; Measuring instruments for assessing the results of swimming (1; Measuring instruments for evaluation of morphological characteristics (2. The regression analysis determined the impact of flexibility on the results in swimming. The regression analysis didn't confirmed the assumption that there is a statistically significant effect of flexibility variables on results in swimming for female swimmers

  11. Effect of blanket assembly shuffling on LMR neutronic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, H.; Fujita, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    Neutronic analyses of advanced liquid-metal reactors (LMRs) have generally been performed with assemblies in different batches scatter-loaded but not shuffled among the core lattice positions between cycles. While this refueling approach minimizes refueling time, significant improvements in thermal performance are believed to be achievable by blanket assembly shuffling. These improvements, attributable to mitigation of the early-life overcooling of the blankets, include reductions in peak clad temperatures and in the temperature gradients responsible for thermal striping. Here the authors summarize results of a study performed to: (1) assess whether the anticipated gains in thermal performance can be realized without sacrificing core neutronic performance, particularly the burnup reactivity swing rho/sub bu/, which determines the rod ejection worth; (2) determine the effect of various blanket shuffling operations on reactor performance; and (3) determine whether shuffling strategies developed for an equilibrium (plutonium-fueled) core can be applied during the transition from an initial uranium-fueled core as is being considered in the US advanced LMR program

  12. Effects of supervised Self Organising Maps parameters on classification performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabio, Davide; Vasighi, Mahdi; Filzmoser, Peter

    2013-02-26

    Self Organising Maps (SOMs) are one of the most powerful learning strategies among neural networks algorithms. SOMs have several adaptable parameters and the selection of appropriate network architectures is required in order to make accurate predictions. The major disadvantage of SOMs is probably due to the network optimisation, since this procedure can be often time-expensive. Effects of network size, training epochs and learning rate on the classification performance of SOMs are known, whereas the effect of other parameters (type of SOMs, weights initialisation, training algorithm, topology and boundary conditions) are not so obvious. This study was addressed to analyse the effect of SOMs parameters on the network classification performance, as well as on their computational times, taking into consideration a significant number of real datasets, in order to achieve a comprehensive statistical comparison. Parameters were contemporaneously evaluated by means of an approach based on the design of experiments, which enabled the investigation of their interaction effects. Results highlighted the most important parameters which influence the classification performance and enabled the identification of the optimal settings, as well as the optimal architectures to reduce the computational time of SOMs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of FEAST-Metal Fuel Performance Code: Initial Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, Paul Guy; Williams, Brian J.; Unal, Cetin; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2012-01-01

    This memo documents the completion of the LANL milestone, M3FT-12LA0202041, describing methodologies and initial results using FEAST-Metal. The FEAST-Metal code calculations for this work are being conducted at LANL in support of on-going activities related to sensitivity analysis of fuel performance codes. The objective is to identify important macroscopic parameters of interest to modeling and simulation of metallic fuel performance. This report summarizes our preliminary results for the sensitivity analysis using 6 calibration datasets for metallic fuel developed at ANL for EBR-II experiments. Sensitivity ranking methodology was deployed to narrow down the selected parameters for the current study. There are approximately 84 calibration parameters in the FEAST-Metal code, of which 32 were ultimately used in Phase II of this study. Preliminary results of this sensitivity analysis led to the following ranking of FEAST models for future calibration and improvements: fuel conductivity, fission gas transport/release, fuel creep, and precipitation kinetics. More validation data is needed to validate calibrated parameter distributions for future uncertainty quantification studies with FEAST-Metal. Results of this study also served to point out some code deficiencies and possible errors, and these are being investigated in order to determine root causes and to improve upon the existing code models.

  14. Results from Tight and Loose Coupled Multiphysics in Nuclear Fuels Performance Simulations using BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. Andrs; R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez

    2013-05-01

    The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled won’t converge and vice versa.

  15. Results from tight and loose coupled multiphysics in nuclear fuels performance simulations using BISON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novascone, S. R.; Spencer, B. W.; Andrs, D.; Williamson, R. L.; Hales, J. D.; Perez, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled won't converge and vice versa. (authors)

  16. Effects of variable transformations on errors in FORM results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Quan; Lin Daojin; Mei Gang; Chen Hao

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of studies on second partial derivatives of the variable transformation functions for nine different non-normal variables the paper comprehensively discusses the effects of the transformation on FORM results and shows that senses and values of the errors in FORM results depend on distributions of the basic variables, whether resistances or actions basic variables represent, and the design point locations in the standard normal space. The transformations of the exponential or Gamma resistance variables can generate +24% errors in the FORM failure probability, and the transformation of Frechet action variables could generate -31% errors

  17. Effects of the Use of Social Network Sites on Task Performance: Toward a Sustainable Performance in a Distracting Work Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyoung Min

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As the use of social network sites (SNS has become increasingly prevalent, its effect on sustainable performance has received much attention. The existing literature has taken either a positive or negative view of SNS, arguing that it either decreases performance by taking time and effort away from work, or increases performance by providing social benefits for enhancing performance. In contrast, this experimental study, investigates how SNS use can disturb or enhance the performance of different types of tasks differently, thus influencing the sustainability of task performance. Based on distraction-conflict theory, this study distinguishes between simple and complex tasks, examines the role of SNS, and analyzes data including electroencephalography data captured by a brain-computer interface. The results show that task performance can be sustainable such that SNS use positively influences performance when participants are engaged in a simple task and influences performance neither positively nor negatively when participants are engaged in a complex task. The study finds the former result is attributable to the positive effect of the psychological arousal induced by SNS use and the latter result to the negative effect of the psychological arousal offsetting the positive effect of reduced stress resulting from SNS use.

  18. Irradiation effects test series test IE-1 test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Allison, C.M.; Farrar, L.C.; Mehner, A.S.

    1977-03-01

    The report describes the results of the first programmatic test in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Irradiation Effects Test Series. This test (IE-1) used four 0.97m long PWR-type fuel rods fabricated from previously irradiated Saxton fuel. The objectives of this test were to evaluate the effect of fuel pellet density on pellet-cladding interaction during a power ramp and to evaluate the influence of the irradiated state of the fuel and cladding on rod behavior during film boiling operation. Data are presented on the behavior of irradiated fuel rods during steady-state operation, a power ramp, and film boiling operation. The effects of as-fabricated gap size, as-fabricated fuel density, rod power, and power ramp rate on pellet-cladding interaction are discussed. Test data are compared with FRAP-T2 computer model predictions, and comments on the consequences of sustained film boiling operation on irradiated fuel rod behavior are provided

  19. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission

  20. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission

  1. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  2. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Augsburger, M.; Borchert, G.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; El-Khoury, P.; Egger, J.-P.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O. W. B.; Siems, Th.; Simons, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction

  3. The Effects of Noise on Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Performance" by C. S. Harris in W. D. Ward (Ed.) Proceedings of the International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem (EPA 550/9-73-008), 1973, U.S...141a duration tracking for primary task. Suggestion 35 at 1-9s Intervals Secondary task-response ot addivity for secondary 55 time task decrement. 95...In G. Rossi (Ed.) Pro eedings of the Fourth International Congress on Noise as a Public Health Problem, Vol- 2. Milan: Centro Ricerche e Studi

  4. The effect of specialization on operational performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Lueg, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    -methods approach that includes proprietary data from the management control system of the hospital, public documentation on the policy change, as well as interviews with key informants. These data suggest that operational deficiency is related to the fact that specialization was externally enforced through......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyze how specialization in hospitals affects operational performance, measured by the length of stay and readmission rate. The authors assess a public policy change in the Danish healthcare sector from 2011 which required that some hospital services had...

  5. Analytical performances of food microbiology laboratories - critical analysis of 7 years of proficiency testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Massih, M; Planchon, V; Polet, M; Dierick, K; Mahillon, J

    2016-02-01

    Based on the results of 19 food microbiology proficiency testing (PT) schemes, this study aimed to assess the laboratory performances, to highlight the main sources of unsatisfactory analytical results and to suggest areas of improvement. The 2009-2015 results of REQUASUD and IPH PT, involving a total of 48 laboratories, were analysed. On average, the laboratories failed to detect or enumerate foodborne pathogens in 3·0% of the tests. Thanks to a close collaboration with the PT participants, the causes of outliers could be identified in 74% of the cases. The main causes of erroneous PT results were either pre-analytical (handling of the samples, timing of analysis), analytical (unsuitable methods, confusion of samples, errors in colony counting or confirmation) or postanalytical mistakes (calculation and encoding of results). PT schemes are a privileged observation post to highlight analytical problems, which would otherwise remain unnoticed. In this perspective, this comprehensive study of PT results provides insight into the sources of systematic errors encountered during the analyses. This study draws the attention of the laboratories to the main causes of analytical errors and suggests practical solutions to avoid them, in an educational purpose. The observations support the hypothesis that regular participation to PT, when followed by feed-back and appropriate corrective actions, can play a key role in quality improvement and provide more confidence in the laboratory testing results. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Operation of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker: commissioning and performance results with cosmic ray data

    CERN Document Server

    González-Sevilla, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) is one of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS internal tracker. Its complete installation and sign-off took about 18 months and was finished at the beginning of 2008. Since then, the SCT has been run successfully taking data in combined mode with the other ATLAS sub-systems. The major problems related with cooling failures and the mortality of off-detector opto-chips have been solved. As in summer 2009, more than 99% of the main detector components are fully working. Detailed calibration procedures have been applied to optimize the detector performance. An initial alignment has been achieved using cosmic ray real data. Some results in terms of tracking performance and Lorentz angle measurements are also shown.

  7. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with CUORE-0: Physics Results and Detector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonica, L.

    2016-08-01

    The CUORE-0 experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta decay in ^{130}Te. It consists of an array of 52 tellurium dioxide crystals, operated as bolometers at a temperature of 10 mK, with a total mass of about 39 kg of TeO_2. CUORE-0 has been built to test the performance of the upcoming CUORE experiment and represents the largest ^{130}Te bolometric setup currently in operation. This experiment has been running in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy, since March 2013. We report the results of a search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 9.8 kg years ^{130}Te exposure, which allowed us to set the most stringent limit to date on this half-life. The performance of the detector in terms of background rate and energy resolution are also reported.

  8. Stirling Convertor Performance Mapping Test Results for Future Radioisotope Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Songgang; Peterson, Allen A.; Faultersack, Franklyn D.; Redinger, Darin L.; Augenblick, John E.

    2004-02-01

    Long-life radioisotope-fueled generators based on free-piston Stirling convertors are an energy-conversion solution for future space applications. The high efficiency of Stirling machines makes them more attractive than the thermoelectric generators currently used in space. Stirling Technology Company (STC) has been performance-testing its Stirling generators to provide data for potential system integration contractors. This paper describes the most recent test results from the STC RemoteGen™ 55 W-class Stirling generators (RG-55). Comparisons are made between the new data and previous Stirling thermodynamic simulation models. Performance-mapping tests are presented including variations in: internal charge pressure, cold end temperature, hot end temperature, alternator temperature, input power, and variation of control voltage.

  9. 8 years of CPV: ISFOC CPV plants, long-term performance analysis and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, María; Sánchez, Daniel; Calvo-Parra, Gustavo; Gil, Eduardo; Hipólito, Ángel; de Gregorio, Fernando; de la Rubia, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    ISFOC is an R&D center focused on CPV in Puertollano (Spain). It was founded in 2006 and has 2.3MW of CPV plants in operation and connected to the grid since 2008. Therefore, for the time of the conference ISFOC has more than 8 years of real operation data. The performance analysis has been focused on ISFOC - La Nava CPV plant: 800kW of Concentrix (Soitec), SolFocus and Isofotón and one flat PV plant mounted on two-axis tracker. The main result obtained is that the rate of performance decrease obtained for a mature CPV technology and IEC 62108 certified is in the range of flat PV values, this means that the CPV technology does not present higher degradation rates than flat PV.

  10. Results of the PEP`93 intercomparison of reference cell calibrations and newer technology performance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Emery, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Anevsky, S. [All-Union Research Inst. for Optophysical Measurements, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents the results of an international intercomparison of photovoltaic (PV) performance measurements and calibrations. The intercomparison, which was organized and operated by a group of experts representing national laboratories from across the globe (i.e., the authors of this paper), was accomplished by circulating two sample sets. One set consisted of twenty silicon reference cells that would, hopefully, form the basis of an international PV reference scale. A qualification procedure applied to the calibration results gave average calibration numbers with an overall standard deviation of less than 2% for the entire set. The second set was assembled from a wide range of newer technologies that present unique problems for PV measurements. As might be expected, these results showed much larger differences among laboratories. Methods were then identified that should be used to measure such devices, along with problems to avoid.

  11. Factors effecting paint performance on wood siding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher G. Hunt; R. Sam Williams; Mark Knaebe; Peter Sotos; Steven Lacher

    2009-01-01

    Several different studies are compared to assess the effectiveness of commercial water repellent preservatives (WRP’s) in the late 1990’s on vertical and horizontal siding. Besides WRP, variables included wood species, exposure location (Wisconsin or Mississippi), and solid color stain vs. primer + paint. Data on substrate checking and paint flaking are presented....

  12. Effect of Peer Mentors on Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate peer mentoring programs strive to retain students who solve their own problems, develop options, unravel obstacles, and establish a process of figuring out solutions. A crucial component of obtaining that goal is to effectively train peer mentors to serve as advocates to freshman undergraduate students. Terrion and Philion (2008)…

  13. Understanding the Effectiveness of Performance Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    practitioners.” Priem and Rosenstein (2001) and Rynes, Bartunek, and Daft (2001) have documented the science- practice gap between OB and other...provided the foundation for effective leadership and project management. Informally the author sought ways to motivate and focus the efforts of...predominate part of his leadership and project management philosophy. This thesis further investigates leadership and management practices focused

  14. Flux Gain for Next-Generation Neutron-Scattering Instruments Resulting From Improved Supermirror Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, C.

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation spallation neutron source facilities will offer instruments with unprecedented capabilities through simultaneous enhancement of source power and usage of advanced optical components. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and scheduled to be completed by 2006, will provide greater than an order of magnitude more effective source flux than current state-of-the-art facilities, including the most advanced research reactors. An additional order of magnitude gain is expected through the use of new optical devices and instrumentation concepts. Many instrument designs require supermirror (SM) neutron guides with very high critical angles for total reflection. In this contribution, they discuss how the performance of modern neutron scattering instruments depends on the efficiency of these supermirrors. They outline ideas for enhancing the performance of the SM coatings, particularly for improving the reflectivity at the position of the critical wave vector transfer. A simulation program has been developed which allows different approaches for SM designs to be studied. Possible instrument performance gains are calculated for the example of the SNS reflectometer

  15. Performance and cost results from a DOE Micro-CHP demonstration facility at Mississippi State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giffin, Paxton K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examine the cost and performance results of a Micro-CHP demonstration facility. ► Evaluation includes both summer and winter performance. ► Evaluation in comparison to a conventional HVAC system using grid power. ► Influence of improperly sized equipment. ► Influence of natural gas prices on the viability of CHP projects using that fuel. - Abstract: Cooling, Heating, and Power (CHP) systems have been around for decades, but systems that utilize 20 kW or less, designated as Micro-CHP, are relatively new. A demonstration site has been constructed at Mississippi State University (MSU) to show the advantages of these micro scale systems. This study is designed to evaluate the performance of a Micro-CHP system as opposed to a conventional high-efficiency Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system that utilizes electrical power from the existing power grid. Raw data was collected for 7 months to present the following results. The combined cycle efficiency from the demonstration site was averaged at 29%. The average combined boiler and engine cost was $1.8 h −1 of operation for heating season and $3.9 h −1 of operation for cooling season. The cooling technology used, an absorption chiller exhibited an average Coefficient of Performance (COP) of 0.27. The conventional high-efficiency system, during cooling season, had a COP of 4.7 with a combined cooling and building cost of $0.2 h −1 of operation. During heating mode, the conventional system had an efficiency of 47% with a fuel and building electrical cost of $0.28 h −1 of operation.

  16. Effects of Impeller-Diffuser Interaction on Centrifugal Compressor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choon S.

    2003-01-01

    This research program focuses on characterizing the effect of impeller-diffuser interactions in a centrifugal compressor stage on its performance using unsteady threedimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. The computed results show that the interaction between the downstream diffuser pressure field and the impeller tip clearance flow can account for performance changes in the impeller. The magnitude of performance change due to this interaction was examined for an impeller with varying tip clearance followed by a vaned or vaneless diffuser. The impact of unsteady impeller-diffuser interaction, primarily through the impeller tip clearance flow, is reflected through a time-averaged change in impeller loss, blockage and slip. The results show that there exists a tip clearance where the beneficial effect of the impeller-diffuser interaction on the impeller performance is at a maximum. A flow feature that consists of tip flow back leakage was shown to occur at design speed for the centrifugal compressor stage. This flow phenomenon is described as tip flow that originates in one passage, flows downstream of the impeller trailing edge and then returns to upstream of the impeller trailing edge of a neighboring passage. Such a flow feature is a source of loss in the impeller. A hypothesis is put forth to show that changing the diffuser vane count and changing impeller-diffuser gap has an analogous effect on the impeller performance. The centrifugal compressor stage was analyzed using diffusers of different vane counts, producing an impeller performance trend similar to that when the impeller-diffuser gap was varied, thus supporting the hypothesis made. This has the implication that the effect impeller performance associated with changing the impeller-diffuser gap and changing diffuser vane count can be described by the non-dimensional ratio of impeller-diffuser gap to diffuser vane pitch. A procedure is proposed and developed for isolating impeller passage

  17. The Effects of Level of Training on Employee Perceived Empowerment, Commitment and Job Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Backeberg, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of level of training on employees' perceived psychological empowerment, commitment, and resultant job performance within the hospitality industry...

  18. The Monte Carlo performance benchmark test - AIMS, specifications and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard, E-mail: j.e.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Martin, William R., E-mail: wrm@umich.edu [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Petrovic, Bojan, E-mail: Bojan.Petrovic@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Monte Carlo performance benchmark for detailed power density calculation in a full-size reactor core is organized under the auspices of the OECD NEA Data Bank. It aims at monitoring over a range of years the increase in performance, measured in terms of standard deviation and computer time, of Monte Carlo calculation of the power density in small volumes. A short description of the reactor geometry and composition is discussed. One of the unique features of the benchmark exercise is the possibility to upload results from participants at a web site of the NEA Data Bank which enables online analysis of results and to graphically display how near we are at the goal of doing a detailed power distribution calculation with acceptable statistical uncertainty in an acceptable computing time. First results are discussed which show that 10 to 100 billion histories must be simulated to reach a standard deviation of a few percent in the estimated power of most of the requested the fuel zones. Even when using a large supercomputer, a considerable speedup is still needed to reach the target of 1 hour computer time. An outlook is given of what to expect from this benchmark exercise over the years. Possible extensions of the benchmark for specific issues relevant in current Monte Carlo calculation for nuclear reactors are also discussed. (author)

  19. The Monte Carlo performance benchmark test - AIMS, specifications and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard; Martin, William R.; Petrovic, Bojan

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo performance benchmark for detailed power density calculation in a full-size reactor core is organized under the auspices of the OECD NEA Data Bank. It aims at monitoring over a range of years the increase in performance, measured in terms of standard deviation and computer time, of Monte Carlo calculation of the power density in small volumes. A short description of the reactor geometry and composition is discussed. One of the unique features of the benchmark exercise is the possibility to upload results from participants at a web site of the NEA Data Bank which enables online analysis of results and to graphically display how near we are at the goal of doing a detailed power distribution calculation with acceptable statistical uncertainty in an acceptable computing time. First results are discussed which show that 10 to 100 billion histories must be simulated to reach a standard deviation of a few percent in the estimated power of most of the requested the fuel zones. Even when using a large supercomputer, a considerable speedup is still needed to reach the target of 1 hour computer time. An outlook is given of what to expect from this benchmark exercise over the years. Possible extensions of the benchmark for specific issues relevant in current Monte Carlo calculation for nuclear reactors are also discussed. (author)

  20. Differentiating Performance Approach Goals and Their Unique Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ordene V.

    2014-01-01

    The study differentiates between two types of performance approach goals (competence demonstration performance approach goal and normative performance approach goal) by examining their unique effects on self-efficacy, interest, and fear of failure. Seventy-nine students completed questionnaires that measure performance approach goals,…

  1. A study on the propagation of measurement uncertainties into the result on a turbine performance test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Soo Yong; Park, Chan Woo

    2004-01-01

    Uncertainties generated from the individual measured variables have an influence on the uncertainty of the experimental result through a data reduction equation. In this study, a performance test of a single stage axial type turbine is conducted, and total-to-total efficiencies are measured at the various off-design points in the low pressure and cold state. Based on an experimental apparatus, a data reduction equation for turbine efficiency is formulated and six measured variables are selected. Codes are written to calculate the efficiency, the uncertainty of the efficiency, and the sensitivity of the efficiency uncertainty by each of the measured quantities. The influence of each measured variable on the experimental result is figured out. Results show that the largest Uncertainty Magnification Factor (UMF) value is obtained by the inlet total pressure among the six measured variables, and its value is always greater than one. The UMF values of the inlet total temperature, the torque, and the RPM are always one. The Uncertainty Percentage Contribution (UPC) of the RPM shows the lowest influence on the uncertainty of the turbine efficiency, but the UPC of the torque has the largest influence to the result among the measured variables. These results are applied to find the correct direction for meeting an uncertainty requirement of the experimental result in the planning or development phase of experiment, and also to offer ideas for preparing a measurement system in the planning phase

  2. Modifications to JLab 12 GeV Refrigerator and Wide Range Mix Mode Performance Testing Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, P.; Ganni, V.; Hasan, N.; Dixon, K.; Norton, R.; Creel, J.

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of data obtained during the spring 2013 commissioning of the new 4.5 K refrigeration system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade indicated a wide capacity range with good efficiency and minimal operator interaction. Testing also showed that the refrigerator required higher liquid nitrogen (LN) consumption for its pre-cooler than anticipated by the design. This does not affect the capacity of the refrigerator, but it does result in an increased LN utility cost. During the summer of 2015 the modifications were implemented by the cold box manufacturer, according to a design similar to the JLab 12 GeV cold box specification. Subsequently, JLab recommissioned the cold box and performed extensive performance testing, ranging from 20% to 100% of the design maximum capacity, and in various modes of operation, ranging from pure refrigeration, pure liquefaction, half-and-half mix mode and at selected design modes using the Floating Pressure - Ganni Cycle. The testing demonstrated that the refrigerator system has a good and fairly constant performance over a wide capacity range and different modes of operation. It also demonstrated the modifications resulted in a LN consumption that met the design for the pure refrigeration mode (which is the most demanding) and was lower than the design for the nominal and maximum capacity modes. In addition, a pulsed-load test, similar to what is expected for cryogenic systems supporting fusion experiments, was conducted to observe the response using the Floating Pressure - Ganni Cycle, which was stable and robust. This paper will discuss the results and analysis of this testing pertaining to the LN consumption, the system efficiency over a wide range of capacity and different modes and the behaviour of the system to a pulsed load.

  3. Acute effects of firefighting on cardiac performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernhall, Bo; Fahs, Christopher A; Horn, Gavin; Rowland, Thomas; Smith, Denise

    2012-02-01

    This study examined standard echocardiographic measures of cardiac size and performance in response to a 3-h firefighting training exercise. Forty experienced male personnel completed a standardized 3 h live firefighting exercise. Before and after the firefighting activities, participants were weighed, height, heart rate, blood pressure and blood samples were obtained, and echocardiographic measurements were made. Firefighting produced significant decreases in left ventricular diastolic dimension, stroke volume, fractional shortening, and mitral E velocity, tachycardia, a rise in core temperature, and a reduction in calculated plasma volume. On tissue Doppler imaging, there were no changes in systolic contractile function, but a decreased lateral wall diastolic velocity was observed. These findings show that 3 h of live firefighting produced cardiac changes consistent with cardiac fatigue, coupled with a decrease in systemic arterial compliance. These data show that live firefighting produces significant cardiovascular changes and future work is needed to evaluate if these changes are related to the increase in cardiovascular risk during live firefighting.

  4. EDF: Solid 2009 results despite a difficult year in France. Improvement in operating performance expected in 2010. 2009 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    As the world's biggest electricity generator, the EDF Group covers every sector of expertise, from generation to trading and transmission grids. EDF builds on the expertise of its people, its R and D and engineering skills, its experience as a leading industry operator and the attentive support of its customers to deliver competitive solutions that successfully reconcile economic growth with climate protection. This document presents the 2009 annual results and Consolidated financial statements of the Group at 31 December 2009: Consolidated Income Statements; Consolidated Balance Sheets; Consolidated Cash Flow Statements; Changes in Consolidated Equity; Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements: Group accounting standards; Summary of the principal accounting and valuation methods; Regulatory events in France in 2009; Major external growth operations; Other major events and transactions; Changes in the scope of consolidation; Segment reporting; Sales; Fuel and energy purchases; Other external expenses; Contractual obligations and commitments; Personnel expenses; Other operating income and expenses; Prolongation of the transition tariff system (TaRTAM) - Law of August 4, 2008; Impairments / reversals; Other income and expenses; Financial result; Income taxes; Goodwill; Other intangible assets; Property, plant and equipment operated under French public electricity distribution concessions; Property, plant and equipment operated under concessions for other activities; Property, plant and equipment used in generation and other tangible assets owned by the Group; Investments in companies accounted for under the equity method; Current and non-current financial assets; Inventories, including work-in-process; Trade receivables; Other receivables; Cash and cash equivalents; Held-for-sale assets and liabilities; Equity; Provisions; Specific French public electricity distribution concession liabilities for existing assets and assets to be replaced; Current and non

  5. The THU-NAOC transient survey: the performance and results from the first year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tian-Meng; Zhou Xu; Nie Jun-Dan; Jiang Zhao-Ji; Ma Jun; Wang Ling-Zhi; Zhou Zhi-Min; Zou Hu; Wang Xiao-Feng; Chen Jun-Cheng; Zhou Li; Li Wen-Xiong; Liu Qing; Mo Jun; Zhang Kai-Cheng; Yao Xin-Yu; Zhao Xu-Lin; Huang Fang; Zhang Ju-Jia; Wu Chao

    2015-01-01

    The Tsinghua University-National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) Transient Survey is an automatic survey that conducts a systematic exploration of optical transients. This project utilizes a 60/90 cm Schmidt telescope at the Xinglong Station of NAOC. This survey repeatedly covers ∼ 1000 square degrees of the northern sky with a cadence of 3–4 d. With an exposure of 60 s, the survey reaches a limiting unfiltered magnitude of about 19.5 mag, which enables us to discover supernovae in their relatively young stages. We describe the overall performance of our survey during the first year and present some preliminary results. (research papers)

  6. Latest results on the performance of the multigap resistive plate chamber used for the ALICE TOF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akindinov, A.N.; Alici, A.; Anselmo, F.

    2004-01-01

    For the identification of particles in the momentum range 0.5-2.5GeV/c, the ALICE experiment uses a Time Of Flight array consisting of Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) in the form of long strips. The design of the detector elements is as follows : double stack MRPCs with glass resistive plates and 5 gas gaps of 250μm per stack. The latest results on the performance of these MRPCs are presented. Typical values of time resolution σ are better than 50ps, with an efficiency of 99.9% and a long, more than 1.5kV, streamer-free plateau

  7. More performance results and implementation of an object oriented track reconstruction model in different OO frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, Irwin; Qian Sijin

    2001-01-01

    This is an update of the report about an Object Oriented (OO) track reconstruction model, which was presented in the previous AIHENP'99 at Crete, Greece. The OO model for the Kalman filtering method has been designed for high energy physics experiments at high luminosity hadron colliders. It has been coded in the C++ programming language and successfully implemented into a few different OO computing environments of the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN. We shall report: (1) more performance result: (2) implementing the OO model into the new SW OO framework 'Athena' of ATLAS experiment and some upgrades of the OO model itself

  8. Performance test results of noninvasive characterization of RCRA surrogate waste by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Propp, W.A.

    1997-11-01

    A performance evaluation to determine the feasibility of using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for noninvasive, quantitative assay of mixed waste containers was sponsored by DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD), the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The evaluation was conducted using a surrogate waste, based on Portland cement, that was spiked with three RCRA metals, mercury, cadmium, and lead. The results indicate that PGNAA has potential as a process monitor. However, further development is required to improve its sensitivity to meet regulatory requirements for determination of these RCRA metals

  9. Latest results on the performance of the multigap resistive plate chamber used for the ALICE TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Akindinov, A; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Basile, M; Cara Romeo, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cosenza, F; D'Antone, I; De Caro, A; De Pasquale, S; Di Bartolomeo, A; Fusco-Girard, M; Golovine, V; Guerzoni, M; Guida, M; Hatzifotiadou, D; Kaidalov, A B; Kim, D H; Kim, D W; Kisselev, S M; Laurenti, G; Lioublev, E; Lee, K; Lee, S C; Luvisetto, M L; Margotti, A; Martemyanov, A N; Massera, F; Meneghini, S; Michinelli, R; Nania, R; Otiougova, P; Pancaldi, G; Pesci, A; Pilastrini, R; Pinazza, O; Polozov, P A; Rizzi, M; Scapparone, E; Scioli, G; Sellitto, S B; Semeria, F; Serra, S; Smirnitsky, A V; Tchoumakov, M M; Ugolini, E; Usenko, E; Valenti, G; Voloshin, K G; Williams, M C S; Zagreev, B V; Zampolli, C; Zichichi, A; Zucchini, A; Zuffa, M

    2004-01-01

    For the identification of particles in the momentum range 0.5-2.5 GeV /c, the ALICE experiment uses a Time Of Flight array consisting of Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) in the form of long strips. The design of the detector elements is as follows: double stack MRPCs with glass resistive plates and 5 gas gaps of 250 mum per stack. The latest results on the performance of these MRPCs are presented. Typical values of time resolution sigma are better than 50 ps, with an efficiency of 99.9% and a long, more than 1.5kV, streamer-free plateau.

  10. Status, performance, and first results of the IceTop array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    We describe the design and performance of IceTop, the air shower array on top of the IceCube neutrino detector. After the 2008/09 antarctic summer season both detectors are deployed at almost 3/4 of their design size. With the current IceTop 59 stations we can start the study of showers of energy well above 10{sup 17}eV. The paper also describes the first results from IceTop and our plans to study the cosmic ray composition using several different types of analysis.

  11. Towards Effective Educational Politics through Improving the Performance Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuuli Reisberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Educational field is impelled to increase performance and quality, financial discipline, strategic behaviour and its goals in order to enhance “effectiveness”. As a result the incorporation of private sector management practices into the educational field is taking place. But it is important to notice that a proliferation of private managerial practices into the educational field goes along with a conflict-laden and contradictory process. Education provides an important area of implementation for techniques of performance evaluation aimed at improving the performance of public services. One of the most common conceptual frameworks in measuring organisational performance takes the form of a production function where the educational institution is seen as analogous to a company transforming inputs into outputs and outcomes through a production process. But the problems and the vagueness in determining educational system’s inputs, outputs and outcomes cause difficulties in making political decisions and that is why clear policy prescriptions have been difficult to derive. The purpose of this article is to create a discussion whether performance measurement should be a part of decision-making in educational politics. The authors debate about incorporating private sector management practices into the educational field. The debate is based on the example of evaluating the social impact in the educational field and the performance of teachers’ work in the educational system. The article consists of three parts. Firstly, the theoretical background of the performance measurement in educational field is discussed. Secondly, the important criteria for performance measurement design and political issues are argued. Thirdly, the evaluated shortcomings in Estonian educational organisations, which restrict them to be effective, are brought out. Relieving some of these shortcomings could be in authority of Estonian educational politics.

  12. Periodization of Carbohydrate Intake: Short-Term Effect on Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie-Anne Marquet

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: “Sleep-low” consists of a sequential periodization of carbohydrate (CHO availability—low glycogen recovery after “train high” glycogen-depleting interval training, followed by an overnight-fast and light intensity training (“train low” the following day. This strategy leads to an upregulation of several exercise-responsive signaling proteins, but the chronic effect on performance has received less attention. We investigated the effects of short-term exposure to this strategy on endurance performance. Methods: Following training familiarization, 11 trained cyclists were divided into two groups for a one-week intervention—one group implemented three cycles of periodized CHO intake to achieve the sleep-low strategy over six training sessions (SL, CHO intake: 6 g·kg−1·day−1, whereas the control group consumed an even distribution of CHO over the day (CON. Tests were a 2 h submaximal ride and a 20 km time trial. Results: SL improved their performance (mean: +3.2%; p < 0.05 compared to CON. The improvement was associated with a change in pacing strategy with higher power output during the second part of the test. No change in substrate utilization was observed after the training period for either group. Conclusion: Implementing the “sleep-low” strategy for one week improved performance by the same magnitude previously seen in a three-week intervention, without any significant changes in selected markers of metabolism.

  13. Periodization of Carbohydrate Intake: Short-Term Effect on Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Laurie-Anne; Hausswirth, Christophe; Molle, Odeline; Hawley, John A.; Burke, Louise M.; Tiollier, Eve; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2016-01-01

    Background: “Sleep-low” consists of a sequential periodization of carbohydrate (CHO) availability—low glycogen recovery after “train high” glycogen-depleting interval training, followed by an overnight-fast and light intensity training (“train low”) the following day. This strategy leads to an upregulation of several exercise-responsive signaling proteins, but the chronic effect on performance has received less attention. We investigated the effects of short-term exposure to this strategy on endurance performance. Methods: Following training familiarization, 11 trained cyclists were divided into two groups for a one-week intervention—one group implemented three cycles of periodized CHO intake to achieve the sleep-low strategy over six training sessions (SL, CHO intake: 6 g·kg−1·day−1), whereas the control group consumed an even distribution of CHO over the day (CON). Tests were a 2 h submaximal ride and a 20 km time trial. Results: SL improved their performance (mean: +3.2%; p < 0.05) compared to CON. The improvement was associated with a change in pacing strategy with higher power output during the second part of the test. No change in substrate utilization was observed after the training period for either group. Conclusion: Implementing the “sleep-low” strategy for one week improved performance by the same magnitude previously seen in a three-week intervention, without any significant changes in selected markers of metabolism. PMID:27897989

  14. GPRA (Government Performance and Results Act) and research evaluation for basic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shoji

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) is to ask federal agencies for evaluating their program performance especially from cost-efficiency aspect and to report to Congress. GPRA is to hold agencies accountable for their programs by requiring that they think strategically (in most cases every 5 years) and set, measure and report goals annually. The agencies which have responsibilities for enhancing basic science like Department of Energy (DOE) and National Science Fund (NSF) are not excluded by reasons of the difficulties of economic evaluations. In Japan, based on 'the Rationalization program for the public corporations' of 2001, the research developing type corporations should make a cost-performance evaluation in addition to the conventional ones. They have same theme as US agencies struggles. The purpose of this report is to get some hints for this theme by surveying GPRA reports of DOE and NSF and analyzing related information. At present, I have to conclude although everybody accepts the necessities of socio-economic evaluations and investment criteria for basic research, studies and discussions about ways and means are still continuing even in the US. (author)

  15. Field Test: Results of Tandem Walk Performance Following Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Gadd, N. E.; May-Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    performed as part of pilot FT. To perform the Tandem Walk, subjects begin with their feet together, their arms crossed at their chest and eyes closed. When ready, they brought one foot forward and touched the heel of their foot to their toe, repeating with the other foot, and continuing for about 10 steps. Three trials were collected with the eyes closed and a fourth trial was collected with eyes open. There are four metrics which are used to determine the performance level of the Tandem Walk. The first is percent correct steps. For a step to be counted as correct, the foot could not touch the ground while bringing it forward (no side stepping), eyes must stay closed during the eyes closed trials, the heel and toe should be touching, or almost touching (no large gaps) and there shouldn't be more than a three second pause between steps. Three judges score each step and the median of the three scores is kept. The second metric is the average step speed, or the number of steps/time to complete them. Thirdly, the root mean squared (RMS) error in the resultant trunk acceleration is used to determine the amount of upper body instability observed during the task. Finally, the RMS error of the mediolateral center of pressure as measured by the Moticon insoles is used to determine the mediolateral instability at the foot level. These four parameters are combined into a new overall Tandem Walk Parameter. RESULTS: Preliminary results show that crewmembers perform the Tandem Walk significantly worse the first 24 hours after landing as compared to their baseline performance. We find that each of the four performance metrics is significantly worse immediately after landing. We will present the results of tandem walk performance during the FT thus far. We will also combine these with the 18 crewmembers that participated in the pilot FT, concentrating on the level of performance and recovery rate. CONCLUSION: The Tandem Walk data collected as part of the FT experiment will provide

  16. The effect of extrinsic motivation on cycle time trial performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulleman, M.; de Koning, J.J.; Hettinga, F.J.; Foster, C.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Athletes occasionally follow pacing patterns that seem unreasonably aggressive compared with those of prerace performances, potentially because of the motivation provided by competition. This study evaluated the effect of extrinsic motivation on cyclists' time trial performance. METHODS:

  17. Effect of different flocculants on the flocculation performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of different flocculants on the flocculation performance of flocculation performance of microalgae, Chaetoceros calcitrans, cells. ZT Harith, FM Yusoff, MS Mohamed, M Shariff, M Din, AB Ariff ...

  18. [Effect of physical activity on functional performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaus, T

    2001-02-01

    Epidemiological studies clearly show a connection between physical activity and the occurrence of disabilities in old age. Physical exercise is possible and useful at every age. Numerous intervention trials have shown that training of endurance, strength and coordination has positive effects on the cardiovascular system, the lung, the musculo-skeletal system, metabolism and the immune system in elderly people. Even very frail elderly people can increase their muscle strength and functional capabilities by strength training. Group sessions may improve social interactions and additionally increase the quality of life.

  19. Effects of tritium on electron multiplier performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerst, R.A.; Malinowski, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    In developing diagnostic instruments for fusion reactors, it is necessary to measure the effects of tritium contamination on channel electron multipliers (CEM). A CEM was exposed to T 2 pressures of up to 1.5 x 10 -1 Pa, with exposure quantities ranging up to 8800 Pa-s. The counting rate of the CEM is shown to consist of a prompt (Type I) signal caused by gas-phase tritium and a residual (Type II) signal, probably caused by near-surface tritium. The potential for using CEMs for observing the dynamics of tritium adsorption and absorption is discussed

  20. Planck 2015 results. XXI. The integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casaponsa, B.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R.T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B.M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the ISW effect from the Planck 2015 temperature and polarization data release. The CMB is cross-correlated with different LSS tracers: the NVSS, SDSS and WISE catalogues, and the Planck 2015 convergence lensing map. This cross-correlation yields a detection at $4\\,\\sigma$, where most of the signal-to-noise is due to the Planck lensing and NVSS. In fact, the ISW effect is detected only from the Planck data (through the ISW-lensing bispectrum) at $\\approx 3\\,\\sigma$, which is similar to the detection level achieved by combining the cross-correlation signal coming from all the catalogues. This cross-correlation analysis is performed only with the Planck temperature data, since the polarization scales available in the 2015 release do not permit significant improvement of the CMB-LSS cross-correlation detectability. Nevertheless, polarization data is used to study the anomalously large ISW signal previously reported through the aperture photometry on stacked CMB features at the locat...

  1. Development of radiological performance objectives interim results: trade-offs in attitudes toward radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lathrop, J.W.

    1978-07-01

    In order to measure the risk associated with radioactive waste it is necessary to ascertain public opinion concerning the relative significance of the different possible health effects of radiation, and public attitudes towards uncertainty. LLL has directed Decisions and Designs, Incorporated (DDI), to elicit such views from various members of the public. Purpose of this note is to give a brief account of some of the views so far obtained, provide some interpretation of these results, and briefly demonstrate how these results can be used to guide the drafting of regulations

  2. Effect of Guide Vane Clearance Gap on Francis Turbine Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Koirala

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Francis turbine guide vanes have pivoted support with external control mechanism, for conversion of pressure to kinetic energy and to direct them to runner vanes. This movement along the support is dependent on variation of load and flow (operating conditions. Small clearance gaps between facing plates and the upper and lower guide vane tips are available to aid this movement, through which leakage flow occurs. This secondary flow disturbs the main flow stream, resulting performance loss. Additionally, these increased horseshoe vortex, in presence of sand, when crosses through the gaps, both the surfaces are eroded. This causes further serious effect on performance and structural property by increasing gaps. This paper discusses the observation of the severity in hydropower plants and effect of clearance gaps on general performance of the Francis turbine through computational methods. It also relates the primary result with the empirical relation for leakage flow prediction. Additionally, a possible method to computationally estimate thickness depletion has also been presented. With increasing clearance gap, leakage increases, which lowers energy conversion and turbine efficiency along with larger secondary vortex.

  3. Effects of buffer thickness on ATW blanket performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Sik

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) system, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using an 840 MWt LBE cooled ATW design, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performances have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performances have been estimated by a series of calculations using MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance change are studied by investigating the low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. As the irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. The results show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable

  4. Test results for the Oasis 3C high performance water-pumping windmill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggleston, D.M. [DME Engineering, Midland, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The WINDTech International, L.L.C. Oasis 3C, a 3 m diameter, high-performance water-pumping windmill, was tested at the DME Engineering Wind Test Site just south of Midland, Texas from August through December, 1996. This machine utilizes a 3:1 gearbox with rotating counterweights, similar to a conventional oilfield pumping unit, driven by a multibladed rotor. The rotating counterweight system balances most of the pumping loads and reduces gear loads and starting torque by a factor of at least two and often by a factor of four or more. The torque reduction substantially extends gear and bearing life, and reduces wind speeds required for starting by 30 to 50% or more. The O3C was tested pumping from a quiescent fluid depth of 12.2 m (40 ft) from a 28.3 m (93 ft)-deep well, with additional pumping depth simulated using a pressure regulator valve system. A 9.53 cm (3.75 in.) diameter Harbison-Fischer seal-less single-acting piston pump was used to eliminate pump seal friction as a variable, and standard O3C stroke lengths of 30.5 and 15.2 cm (12 and 6 inches) were used. The regulator spring was set to give a maximum stroke rate of 33 strokes per minute. The water pumped was returned to the well after flowing through a settling tank. The tests were performed in accordance with AWEA WECS testing standards. Instrumentation provided 16 channels of data to accurately measure machine performance, including starting wind speeds, flow rates, O3C azimuth, tail furl angle, wind direction tracking errors, RPM, sucker rod loads, and other variables. The most significant performance data is summarized herein. A mathematical model of machine performance was developed that fairly accurately predicts performance for each of three test conditions. The results verify that the O3C is capable of pumping water at wind speeds from 30% to more than 50% lower than comparable un-counterbalanced units.

  5. The Effect of the Reader's Background on Reading Comprehension Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Saadoon Mohammed Al-Noori

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at measuring the amount of the effect of the reader's background knowledge on performance in reading comprehension tests through the assessment of information gained in reading comprehension (RC tests across-four testing techniques, short answer questions ,true-false items , multiple - choice items , and cloze test and re-test. This technique involves the examinees in two types of tasks, i.e. pre-reading and post -reading task. Two hypotheses have been proposed to achieve the aims of this study. They are  1-There are no significant differences between the pre-reading and post-reading performances of examinees on reading comprehension(RC. 2-There are no significant differences in information gain scores across the different techniques of testing reading comprehension (RC in EFL. To verify the validity of these two hypotheses, a number of statistical procedures have been used such as arithmetical mean, t-test for correlated and independent samples to analyze the performance of third and fourth year College students studying at the Department of English at University of Baghdad /Ibn Rushd College of Education for Humanities on two reading passages taken from TOEFL practice tests (2011. The analysis of the data has shown the following results: 1-The background knowledge has an effect on the performance on reading comprehension (RC. 2-There is a significant difference in students' performance on reading comprehension (RC. 3-The effect of background knowledge is investable on reading comprehension (RC tests, but it can be identified or neutralized. Based on these conclusions, the researcher presented a number of recommendations.

  6. Performance of various mathematical methods for computer-aided processing of radioimmunoassay results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, W.; Sandel, P.; Langfelder, Ch.; Knedel, M.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of 6 algorithms were compared for computer aided determination of radioimmunological end results. These were weighted and unweighted linear logit log regression; quadratic logit log regression, smoothing spline interpolation with a large and small smoothing factor, respectively, and polygonal interpolation and the manual curve fitting on the basis of three radioimmunoassays with different reference curve characteristics (digoxin, estriol, human chorionic somatomammotrophin (HCS)). Great store was set by the accuracy of the approximation at the intermediate points on the curve, i.e. those points that lie midway between two standard concentrations. These concentrations were obtained by weighing and inserted as unknown samples. In the case of digoxin and estriol the polygonal interpolation provided the best results, while the weighted logit log regression proved superior in the case of HCS. (Auth.)

  7. Irradiation Effects Test Series: Test IE-2. Test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, C.M.; Croucher, D.W.; Ploger, S.A.; Mehner, A.S.

    1977-08-01

    The report describes the results of a test using four 0.97-m long PWR-type fuel rods with differences in diametral gap and cladding irradiation. The objective of this test was to provide information about the effects of these differences on fuel rod behavior during quasi-equilibrium and film boiling operation. The fuel rods were subjected to a series of preconditioning power cycles of less than 30 kW/m. Rod powers were then increased to 68 kW/m at a coolant mass flux of 4900 kg/s-m 2 . After one hour at 68 kW/m, a power-cooling-mismatch sequence was initiated by a flow reduction at constant power. At a flow of 2550 kg/s-m 2 , the onset of film boiling occurred on one rod, Rod IE-011. An additional flow reduction to 2245 kg/s-m 2 caused the onset of film boiling on the remaining three rods. Data are presented on the behavior of fuel rods during quasiequilibrium and during film boiling operation. The effects of initial gap size, cladding irradiation, rod power cycling, a rapid power increase, and sustained film boiling are discussed. These discussions are based on measured test data, preliminary postirradiation examination results, and comparisons of results with FRAP-T3 computer model calculations

  8. Pseudocapacitance effects for enhancement of capacitor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lota, G.; Frackowiak, E. [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry, 60-965 Poznan, Piotrowo 3 (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    We report on the pseudo-capacitance induced by a nitrogen substituted in the carbon network composite prepared by a simple carbonisation (750 C) of formaldehyde and melamine in the presence of carbon nanotubes. Nitrogen content in the composites varied from 7.4 to 21.7 wt.%. Such materials have a higher density than activated carbons, hence, they can supply better volumetric capacity. N-rich composites show an excellent charge propagation at current loads from 500 mA g{sup -1} to 50 A g{sup -1} because of multiwalled nanotubes which play a conducting as well as a supporting role. The electrochemical performance of various composites was investigated in two- and three-electrode cells using acidic (1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), alkaline (6 mol L{sup -1}KOH), neutral (1 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) and organic electrolytes (1 mol L{sup -1} TEABF{sub 4} in acetonitrile). Organic and neutral medium is not adapted for N-rich carbon electrodes of supercapacitor. The detailed electrochemical characterisation pointed out the differences of charge propagation of electrodes with the different polarity. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-14

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  10. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B. Baker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h. Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1 potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2 the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3 what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports. Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before

  11. Topical Peptide Treatments with Effective Anti-Aging Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Karin Schagen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, many new peptides have been developed, and new knowledge on how peptides improve the skin has been uncovered. The spectrum of peptides in the field of cosmetics is continuously growing. This review summarizes some of the effective data on cosmeceutical peptides that work against intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Some peptides have been proven in their efficacy through clinical skin trials. Well-known and documented peptides like copper tripeptide are still under research to obtain more details on their effectiveness, and for the development of new treatments. Palmitoyl pentapeptide-4 and Carnosine are other well-researched cosmeceuticals. Additionally, there are many more peptides that are used in cosmetics. However, study results for some are sparse, or have not been published in scientific journals. This article summarizes topical peptides with proven efficacy in controlled in vivo studies.

  12. Five-Year Safety and Performance Results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D; Humayun, Mark S; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C; Ho, Allen C; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    The Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc, Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind as a result of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception resulting from end-stage RP. Prospective, multicenter, single-arm clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the nonimplanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared with their vision with the Argus II. Thirty participants in 10 centers in the United States and Europe. The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by 3 computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively scored real-world tasks. Twenty-four of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years after implantation. Only 1 additional serious adverse event was experienced after the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the Argus II on than off on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. The 5-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind as a result of RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Performance and first results of fission product release and transport provided by the VERDON facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallais-During, A., E-mail: annelise.gallais-during@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bonnin, J.; Malgouyres, P.-P. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Morin, S. [IRSN, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bernard, S.; Gleizes, B.; Pontillon, Y.; Hanus, E.; Ducros, G. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • A new facility to perform experimental LWR severe accidents sequences is evaluated. • In the furnace a fuel sample is heated up to 2600 °C under a controlled gas atmosphere. • Innovative thermal gradient tubes are used to study fission product transport. • The new VERDON facility shows an excellent consistency with results from VERCORS. • Fission product re-vapourization results confirm the correct functioning of the gradient tubes. - Abstract: One of the most important areas of research concerning a hypothetical severe accident in a light water reactor (LWR) is determining the source term, i.e. quantifying the nature, release kinetics and global released fraction of the fission products (FPs) and other radioactive materials. In line with the former VERCORS programme to improve source term estimates, the new VERDON laboratory has recently been implemented at the CEA Cadarache Centre in the LECA-STAR facility. The present paper deals with the evaluation of the experimental equipment of this new VERDON laboratory (furnace, release and transport loops) and demonstrates its capability to perform experimental sequences representative of LWR severe accidents and to supply the databases necessary for source term assessments and FP behaviour modelling.

  14. Effects on Task Performance and Psychophysiological Measures of Performance During Normobaric Hypoxia Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Chad; Kennedy, Kellie; Napoli, Nicholas; Demas, Matthew; Barnes, Laura; Crook, Brenda; Williams, Ralph; Last, Mary Carolyn; Schutte, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Human-autonomous systems have the potential to mitigate pilot cognitive impairment and improve aviation safety. A research team at NASA Langley conducted an experiment to study the impact of mild normobaric hypoxia induction on aircraft pilot performance and psychophysiological state. A within-subjects design involved non-hypoxic and hypoxic exposures while performing three 10-minute tasks. Results indicated the effect of 15,000 feet simulated altitude did not induce significant performance decrement but did produce increase in perceived workload. Analyses of psychophysiological responses evince the potential of biomarkers for hypoxia onset. This study represents on-going work at NASA intending to add to the current knowledge of psychophysiologically-based input to automation to increase aviation safety. Analyses involving coupling across physiological systems and wavelet transforms of cortical activity revealed patterns that can discern between the simulated altitude conditions. Specifically, multivariate entropy of ECG/Respiration components were found to be significant predictors (pTask performance was not appreciably impacted by the effect of 15,000 feet simulated altitude. Analyses of psychophysiological responses evince the potential of biomarkers for mild hypoxia onset.The potential for identifying shifts in underlying cortical and physiological systems could serve as a means to identify the onset of deteriorated cognitive state. Enabling such assessment in future flightdecks could permit increasingly autonomous systems-supported operations. Augmenting human operator through assessment of cognitive impairment has the potential to further improve operator performance and mitigate human error in safety critical contexts. This study represents ongoing work at NASA intending to add to the current knowledge of psychophysiologically-based input to automation to increase aviation safety.

  15. The effects of monitoring environment on problem-solving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Brian K; Bailey, Charles D; Hester, Kim

    2018-01-01

    While effective and efficient solving of everyday problems is important in business domains, little is known about the effects of workplace monitoring on problem-solving performance. In a laboratory experiment, we explored the monitoring environment's effects on an individual's propensity to (1) establish pattern solutions to problems, (2) recognize when pattern solutions are no longer efficient, and (3) solve complex problems. Under three work monitoring regimes-no monitoring, human monitoring, and electronic monitoring-114 participants solved puzzles for monetary rewards. Based on research related to worker autonomy and theory of social facilitation, we hypothesized that monitored (versus non-monitored) participants would (1) have more difficulty finding a pattern solution, (2) more often fail to recognize when the pattern solution is no longer efficient, and (3) solve fewer complex problems. Our results support the first two hypotheses, but in complex problem solving, an interaction was found between self-assessed ability and the monitoring environment.

  16. EFFECT OF THE ROTOR CRANK SYSTEM ON CYCLING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A. Jobson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a novel crank system on laboratory time-trial cycling performance. The Rotor system makes each pedal independent from the other so that the cranks are no longer fixed at 180°. Twelve male competitive but non-elite cyclists (mean ± s: 35 ± 7 yr, Wmax = 363 ± 38 W, VO2peak = 4.5 ± 0.3 L·min-1 completed 6-weeks of their normal training using either a conventional (CON or the novel Rotor (ROT pedal system. All participants then completed two 40.23-km time-trials on an air-braked ergometer, one using CON and one using ROT. Mean performance speeds were not different between trials (CON = 41.7 km·h-1 vs. ROT = 41.6 km·h-1, P > 0.05. Indeed, the pedal system used during the time-trials had no impact on any of the measured variables (power output, cadence, heart rate, VO2, RER, gross efficiency. Furthermore, the ANOVA identified no significant interaction effect between main effects (Time-trial crank system*Training crank system, P > 0.05. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to examine the effects of the Rotor system on endurance performance rather than endurance capacity. These results suggest that the Rotor system has no measurable impact on time-trial performance. However, further studies should examine the importance of the Rotor 'regulation point' and the suggestion that the Rotor system has acute ergogenic effects if used infrequently

  17. Effects of weathering on impregnated charcoal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitz, V.R.

    1977-10-01

    Commercial activated charcoals have been exposed to known contaminants under controlled laboratory conditions and also to large volumes of outdoor air and each sample then evaluated for methyl iodide penetration. There is strong evidence that the interaction of water vapor and the charcoal is a significant factor in the degradation of the charcoals when the relative humidity is 70% and greater. The laboratory air mixtures studied were water vapor, water vapor and sulfur dioxide, water vapor and ozone, and water vapor and carbon monoxide. The charcoal in each of the four 0.5-in. layers making up the 2-in. test bed was degraded by the contaminants, but the first layer was influenced most. For the same charcoal the cumulative effect during one, two, and three months of weathering with outdoor air led to a progressive increase in methyl iodide penetration. The experimentation is being extended to additional commercial charcoals and to additional contaminant species in the laboratory experiments

  18. Effect of School Climate, Work Stress and Work Motivation on the Performance of Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    Sinaulan, Ramlani Lina

    2016-01-01

    Performance is a form of behavior of a person or organization with achievement orientation. The study results are known (a) the school climate affect performance of teachers, b) there is influence of work stress on teacher performance, (c) work motivation effect on teacher performance, d) school climate influence on job motivation of teachers, and (e) work stress effect on work motivation of teachers. Suggestions studies (a) improving teacher performance should the top priority schools in sch...

  19. Constraining performance assessment models with tracer test results: a comparison between two conceptual models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Sean A.; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    Tracer tests are conducted to ascertain solute transport parameters of a single rock feature over a 5-m transport pathway. Two different conceptualizations of double-porosity solute transport provide estimates of the tracer breakthrough curves. One of the conceptualizations (single-rate) employs a single effective diffusion coefficient in a matrix with infinite penetration depth. However, the tracer retention between different flow paths can vary as the ratio of flow-wetted surface to flow rate differs between the path lines. The other conceptualization (multirate) employs a continuous distribution of multiple diffusion rate coefficients in a matrix with variable, yet finite, capacity. Application of these two models with the parameters estimated on the tracer test breakthrough curves produces transport results that differ by orders of magnitude in peak concentration and time to peak concentration at the performance assessment (PA) time and length scales (100,000 years and 1,000 m). These differences are examined by calculating the time limits for the diffusive capacity to act as an infinite medium. These limits are compared across both conceptual models and also against characteristic times for diffusion at both the tracer test and PA scales. Additionally, the differences between the models are examined by re-estimating parameters for the multirate model from the traditional double-porosity model results at the PA scale. Results indicate that for each model the amount of the diffusive capacity that acts as an infinite medium over the specified time scale explains the differences between the model results and that tracer tests alone cannot provide reliable estimates of transport parameters for the PA scale. Results of Monte Carlo runs of the transport models with varying travel times and path lengths show consistent results between models and suggest that the variation in flow-wetted surface to flow rate along path lines is insignificant relative to variability in

  20. Performance of the Opalinus Clay under thermal loading: experimental results from Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gens, A. [Universitat Politència de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Gaus, I. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); and others

    2017-04-15

    The paper presents an overview of the behaviour of Opalinus Clay under thermal loading as observed in three in situ heating tests performed in the Mont Terri rock laboratory: HE-B, HE-D and HE-E. The three tests are summarily described; they encompass a broad range of test layouts and experimental conditions. Afterwards, the following topics are examined: determination of thermal conductivity, thermally-induced pore pressure generation and thermally-induced mechanical effects. The mechanisms underlying pore pressure generation and dissipation are discussed in detail and the relationship between rock damage and thermal loading is examined using an additional in situ test: SE-H. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the various thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) interactions identified in the heating tests. (authors)

  1. Ionizing radiation: effects upon acquisition and performance of behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Laercia Abreu

    1999-03-01

    in procedure A, defined as less complex than procedure B, but with a higher level of difficulty, This shows that difficulty and not complexity might be the more sensitive variable to the effects of ionizing radiation. On the other hand, the changes is response rate were not followed by comparable changes in errors and moreover, the effects were more evident in the performance component. These results suggest that learning of a new behavior is more radioresistant to the effects of sublethal doses of ionizing radiation than the performance of a behavior well established. (author)

  2. Performance test results of mock-up test facility of HTTR hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Nishihara, Tetsuo

    2004-01-01

    For the purpose to demonstrate effectiveness of high-temperature nuclear heat utilization, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing a hydrogen production system and has planned to connect the hydrogen production system to High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Prior to construction of a HTTR hydrogen production system, a mock-up test facility was constructed to investigate transient behavior of the hydrogen production system and to establish system controllability. The Mock-up test facility with a full-scale reaction tube is an approximately 1/30-scale model of the HTTR hydrogen production system and an electric heater is used as a heat source instead of a reactor. After its construction, a performance test of the test facility was carried out in the same pressure and temperature conditions as those of the HTTR hydrogen production system to investigate its performance such as hydrogen production ability, controllability and so on. It was confirmed that hydrogen was stably produced with a hot helium gas about 120m 3 /h, which satisfy the design value, and thermal disturbance of helium gas during the start-up could be mitigated within the design value by using a steam generator. The mock-up test of the HTTR hydrogen production system using this facility will continue until 2004. (author)

  3. Treatment of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms and Cognitive Performance: Preliminary Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bründl, Elisabeth; Böhm, Christina; Lürding, Ralf; Schödel, Petra; Bele, Sylvia; Hochreiter, Andreas; Scheitzach, Judith; Zeman, Florian; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Few studies have addressed the effect of treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) on cognitive function. Neuropsychological assessment after UIA treatment is underreported, and prospective trials have repeatedly been demanded. In 2014, we conducted a prospective controlled study to evaluate the differences in cognitive processing caused by the treatment of anterior circulation UIAs. Thirty patients were enrolled until September 2015. Ten patients received endovascular aneurysm occlusion (EV), 10 patients were treated microsurgically (MS), and 10 patients with surgically treated degenerative lumbar spine disease (LD) served as control. All patients underwent extended standardized neuropsychological assessment before (t 1 ) and 6 weeks after treatment (t 2 ). Tests included verbal, visual, and visuospatial memory, psychomotor functioning, executive functioning, and its subdomains verbal fluency and cognitive flexibility. We statistically evaluated intragroup and intergroup changes. Intragroup comparisons and group-rate analysis showed no significant impairment in overall neuropsychological performance, either postinterventionally or postoperatively. However, the postoperative performance in cognitive processing speed, cognitive flexibility, and executive functioning was significantly worse in the MS group than in the EV (P = 0.038) and LD group (P = 0.02). Compared with the EV group, patients with MS showed significant postoperative impairment in a subtest for auditory-verbal memory (Wechsler Memory Scale, Fourth Edition, Logical Memory II; MS vs. EV P = 0.011). The MS group trended toward posttreatment impairment in subtests for verbal fluency and semantic memory (Regensburg Word Fluency Test; MS vs. EV P = 0.083) and in auditory-verbal memory (Wechsler Memory Scale, Fourth Edition, Logical Memory II; MS vs. LD P = 0.06). Our preliminary data showed no effect of anterior circulation UIA treatment on overall neuropsychological function but impaired

  4. Effect- and Performance-Based Auditory Feedback on Interpersonal Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong-Hun Hwang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available When two individuals interact in a collaborative task, such as carrying a sofa or a table, usually spatiotemporal coordination of individual motor behavior will emerge. In many cases, interpersonal coordination can arise independently of verbal communication, based on the observation of the partners' movements and/or the object's movements. In this study, we investigate how social coupling between two individuals can emerge in a collaborative task under different modes of perceptual information. A visual reference condition was compared with three different conditions with new types of additional auditory feedback provided in real time: effect-based auditory feedback, performance-based auditory feedback, and combined effect/performance-based auditory feedback. We have developed a new paradigm in which the actions of both participants continuously result in a seamlessly merged effect on an object simulated by a tablet computer application. Here, participants should temporally synchronize their movements with a 90° phase difference and precisely adjust the finger dynamics in order to keep the object (a ball accurately rotating on a given circular trajectory on the tablet. Results demonstrate that interpersonal coordination in a joint task can be altered by different kinds of additional auditory information in various ways.

  5. The effect of liner hydraulic conductivity on disposal cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Chia, Y.P.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayered disposal cells are frequently used for the disposal of radioactive and hazardous wastes. These disposal cells consist of materials with different permeabilities that are placed in various thicknesses at the bottom as well as in the cover of the cell. Typically, a layer of permeable material is placed above a layer with low permeability; the permeable layer functions as a drainage/leachate collection system and the low-permeability layer functions as a migration barrier/liner. This paper analyzes the effects of infiltration through unsaturated soil liners on the long-term performance of the disposal cell. Based on the results of this study, it is concluded that the long-term performance of a disposal cell is dependent on a well-designed cell cover. The design should emphasize a cap with less permeable material to prevent water from infiltrating the disposal cell. An impermeable bottom liner is effective only in the short term; however, it can eventually result in saturation of the wastes and cause the bathtub effect over the long term

  6. The use of performance measurement systems in the public sector: effects on performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speklé, R.; Verbeeten, F.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    We study the use of performance measurement systems in the public sector. We hypothesize that the way in which these systems are being used affects organizational performance, and that these performance effects depend on contractibility. Contractibility encompasses clarity of goals, the ability to

  7. The Effect of Implied Performer Age and Group Membership on Evaluations of Music Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Ann M.

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effects of implied performer age and group membership on listeners' evaluations of music performances. Undergraduate music majors (n = 23), nonmusic majors (n = 17), and members of a New Horizons ensemble (n = 16) were presented with six 30-second excerpts of concert band performances. Excerpts were presented to all…

  8. Is there a relationship between health care models and their performance assessment? The results of an extensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferruccio Pelone

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Health system performance is a multi-dimensional concept related to the achievement of several objectives such as effectiveness, efficiency and equity. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between models of health care systems (Beveridge, Bismarck and voluntary health insurance and performance frameworks available in the scientific literature.

    Methods: An extensive literature search in several electronic databases was carried out. According to a preliminary classification of performance domains and dimensions, we analysed, among the selected articles, the relationship between domains/dimensions and the three main models of health care systems.Results: 12.6% of the children were obese and 26.3% overweight, with the percentage of obesity nearly double in those who do not practice organized sports activities at least once a week, in those who don’t have breakfast in the morning and in those who don’t spend their free time in movement games. From a multiple logistic regression it results that the risk of being obese is twice and three times higher for the children living respectively in medium and small towns than for the ones living in large towns.

    Results: From 540 references found, 17 papers were considered relevant for the purposes of this research. A total of 39 frameworks were identified: 41% referred to the “Beveridge model, 10% to the “Bismarck model”, and 23% to the “Voluntary health insurance” model and 26% to “Umbrella organizations” (e.g. OECD. Domains of effectiveness and responsiveness were covered by all of the frameworks while fewer covered equity and efficiency. The most frequent dimensions in all the models were effectiveness and technical efficiency, but relevant differences exist among the healthcare system models about dimensions of performance considered.

    Conclusions: Although the need of

  9. Results of the gamma-neutron mapper performance test on 55-gallon drums at the RWMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, R.J.; Lawrence, R.S.; Roybal, L.G.; Svoboda, J.M.; Harker, D.J.; Thompson, D.N.; Carpenter, M.V.; Josten, N.E.

    1995-07-01

    The primary purpose of the gamma-neutron mapper (G at sign) is to provide accurate and quantitative spatial information of the gamma-ray and neutron radiation fields as a function of position about the excavation of a radioactive waste site. The GNM is designed to operate remotely and can be delivered to any point on an excavation by the robotic gantry crane developed by the dig-face project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). It can also be easily adapted to other delivery systems. The GNM can be deployed over a waste site at a predetermined scan rate and has sufficient accuracy to identify and quantify radioactive contaminants of importance. The results reported herein are from a performance test conducted at the Transuranic Storage Area, Building 628, of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex located at the INEL. This building is an active interim-storage area for 55-gal drums of transuranic waste from the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Plant. The performance test consisted of scanning a stack of drums five high by five wide. Prior to the test, radiation fields were measured by a health physicist at the center of the drums and ranged from 0.5 mR/h to 35 mR/h. Scans of the drums using the GNM were taken at standoff distances from the vertical drum stack of 15 cm, 30 cm, 45 cm, and 90 cm. Data were acquired at scan speeds of 7.5 cm/s and 15 cm/s. The results of these scans and a comparison of these results with the manifests of these drums are compared and discussed

  10. Planck 2015 results: XXI. The integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.

    2016-01-01

    Here, this paper presents a study of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from the Planck 2015 temperature and polarization data release. This secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy caused by the large-scale time-evolving gravitational potential is probed from different perspectives. The CMB is cross-correlated with different large-scale structure (LSS) tracers: radio sources from the NVSS catalogue; galaxies from the optical SDSS and the infrared WISE surveys; and the Planck 2015 convergence lensing map. The joint cross-correlation of the CMB with the tracers yields a detection at 4σ where most of the signal-to-noise is due to the Planck lensing and the NVSS radio catalogue. In fact, the ISW effect is detected from the Planck data only at ≈3σ (through the ISW-lensing bispectrum), which is similar to the detection level achieved by combining the cross-correlation signal coming from all the galaxy catalogues mentioned above. We study the ability of the ISW effect to place constraints on the dark-energy parameters; in particular, we show that Ω Λ is detected at more than 3σ. This cross-correlation analysis is performed only with the Planck temperature data, since the polarization scales available in the 2015 release do not permit significant improvement of the CMB-LSS cross-correlation detectability. Nevertheless, the Planck polarization data are used to study the anomalously large ISW signal previously reported through the aperture photometry on stacked CMB features at the locations of known superclusters and supervoids, which is in conflict with ΛCDM expectations. We find that the current Planck polarization data do not exclude that this signal could be caused by the ISW effect. In addition, the stacking of the Planck lensing map on the locations of superstructures exhibits a positive cross-correlation with these large-scale structures. Finally, we have improved our previous reconstruction of the ISW temperature fluctuations by combining

  11. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Neuhauser, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  12. Varying performance in mammographic interpretation across two countries: Do results indicate reader or population variances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, BaoLin P.; Lee, Warwick B.; Wong, Jill; Sim, Llewellyn; Hillis, Stephen L.; Tapia, Kriscia A.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Aim: To compare the performance of Australian and Singapore breast readers interpreting a single test-set that consisted of mammographic examinations collected from the Australian population. Background: In the teleradiology era, breast readers are interpreting mammographic examinations from different populations. The question arises whether two groups of readers with similar training backgrounds, demonstrate the same level of performance when presented with a population familiar only to one of the groups. Methods: Fifty-three Australian and 15 Singaporean breast radiologists participated in this study. All radiologists were trained in mammogram interpretation and had a median of 9 and 15 years of experience in reading mammograms respectively. Each reader interpreted the same BREAST test-set consisting of sixty de-identified mammographic examinations arising from an Australian population. Performance parameters including JAFROC, ROC, case sensitivity as well as specificity were compared between Australian and Singaporean readers using a Mann Whitney U test. Results: A significant difference (P=0.036) was demonstrated between the JAFROC scores of the Australian and Singaporean breast radiologists. No other significant differences were observed. Conclusion: JAFROC scores for Australian radiologists were higher than those obtained by the Singaporean counterparts. Whilst it is tempting to suggest this is down to reader expertise, this may be a simplistic explanation considering the very similar training and audit backgrounds of the two populations of radiologists. The influence of reading images that are different from those that radiologists normally encounter cannot be ruled out and requires further investigation, particularly in the light of increasing international outsourcing of radiologic reporting.

  13. Effect of beta limits on reactor performance in EBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Spong, D.A.; Nelson, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    Because of uncertainties in extrapolating results of simplified models to a reactor plasma, the parameters that influence the beta limits cannot be determined accurately at the present time. Also, the reasonable changes within the models and/or assumptions are seen to affect the core beta limits by almost an order of magnitde. Hence, at the present, these limits cannot be used as a rigid (and reliable) requirement for ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor engineering considerations. However, sensitivity studies can be carried out to determine the boundaries of the operating regime and to demonstrate the effects of various modes, assumptions, and models on reactor performance (Q value). First, the modes believed to limit the core β and ring plasma performance are discussed, and the simplifications and/or assumptions involved in deriving these limits are highlighted. Then, the implications of these limits for a reactor are given

  14. What results when firms implement practices: the differential relationship between specific practices, firm financial performance, customer service, and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Cristina B; Porath, Christine L; Benson, George S; Lawler, Edward E

    2007-11-01

    Previous research on organizational practices is replete with contradictory evidence regarding their effects. Here, the authors argue that these contradictory findings may have occurred because researchers have often examined complex practice combinations and have failed to investigate a broad variety of firm-level outcomes. Thus, past research may obscure important differential effects of specific practices on specific firm-level outcomes. Extending this research, the authors develop hypotheses about the effects of practices that (a) enable information sharing, (b) set boundaries, and (c) enable teams on 3 different firm-level outcomes: financial performance, customer service, and quality. Relationships are tested in a sample of observations from over 200 Fortune 1000 firms. Results indicate that information-sharing practices were positively related to financial performance 1 year following implementation of the practices, boundary-setting practices were positively related to firm-level customer service, and team-enabling practices were related to firm-level quality. No single set of practices predicted all 3 firm-level outcomes, indicating practice-specific effects. These findings help resolve the theoretical tension in the literature regarding the effects of organizational practices and offer guidance as to how to best target practices to increase specific work-related outcomes. Implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed. (c) 2007 APA

  15. Evolution in performance assessment modeling as a result of regulatory review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowat, J.H.; Dolinar, G.M.; Stephens, M.E. [AECL Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    AECL is planning to build the IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) facility for near-surface disposal of LLRW. The PSAR (preliminary safety assessment report) was subject to an initial regulatory review during mid-1992. The regulatory authority provided comments on many aspects of the safety assessment documentation including a number of questions on specific PA (Performance Assessment) modelling assumptions. As a result of these comments as well as a separate detailed review of the IRUS disposal concept, changes were made to the conceptual and mathematical models. The original disposal concept included a non-sorbing vault backfill, with a strong reliance on the wasteform as a barrier. This concept was altered to decrease reliance on the wasteform by replacing the original backfill with a sand/clinoptilolite mix, which is a better sorber of metal cations. This change lead to changes in the PA models which in turn altered the safety case for the facility. This, and other changes that impacted performance assessment modelling are the subject of this paper.

  16. Ray Tracing Results for Elevation Angle Spread of Departure and its Impact on System Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondal, Bishwarup; Thomas, Timothy; Nguyen, Huan Cong

    2014-01-01

    Elevation spread of departure angles (ESD) is the key parameter characterizing a 3D fast-fading channel model. 3D channel mod-eling is currently being studied in 3GPP to enable the develop-ment of MIMO techniques exploiting both azimuth and elevation dimensions of the channel. In this paper we use...... ray-tracing techniques to estimate the ESD behavior in Manhattan and Copenhagen city environments and compare it with the 3GPP ESD model. We also investigate the ESD spread within a cluster of rays and show that the ESD within a cluster depends significantly on the distance of the mobile from the base......-station. This char-acterization addresses a gap in the existing literature. Simulation results show that the performance of MIMO techniques such as vertical sectorization depends significantly on the ESD of the underlying environment. This observation also underscores the importance of an accurate ESD model....

  17. Results from the RESUME-95 exercise. In-situ gamma spectrometry performed at Vesivehmaa Airport, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C.L. [Univ. Hospital MAS, Lund Univ., Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    The Department of Radiation Physics in Malmoe has an agreement with the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, in which we are obliged to perform instantaneous field measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in case of a major release of radionuclides in the environment. The department possesses a High Purity Germanium detector system (35 % commercial at 1.33 MeV) with a PC software spectrum analyser that was purchased and calibrated for this reason. The aim of our participation in the RESUME-95{sup 1} exercise, which took place in Vaeaexsy, Finland, in August 1995, was both to obtain efficiency values for different source geometries (both artificial and natural radionuclides) in field and to compare our results with those of other groups. Furthermore, this exercise was an ideal opportunity to test the full equipment under field conditions. (au).

  18. Results from the RESUME-95 exercise. In-situ gamma spectrometry performed at Vesivehmaa Airport, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C L [Univ. Hospital MAS, Lund Univ., Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    The Department of Radiation Physics in Malmoe has an agreement with the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, in which we are obliged to perform instantaneous field measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in case of a major release of radionuclides in the environment. The department possesses a High Purity Germanium detector system (35 % commercial at 1.33 MeV) with a PC software spectrum analyser that was purchased and calibrated for this reason. The aim of our participation in the RESUME-95{sup 1} exercise, which took place in Vaeaexsy, Finland, in August 1995, was both to obtain efficiency values for different source geometries (both artificial and natural radionuclides) in field and to compare our results with those of other groups. Furthermore, this exercise was an ideal opportunity to test the full equipment under field conditions. (au).

  19. Major results and lessons learned for performance assessments of spent fuel geological disposal: the SPA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudoin, P.; Serres, C.; Certes, C.; Gay, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the results obtained in the framework of the SPA (spent fuel disposal performance assessment) project. The project was undertaken by ENRESA, E; GRS, D; IPSN, F; NRG, NL; SCK.CEN, B and VTT, FIN between May 1996 and April 1999. Devoted to the study of spent fuel disposal in various host rock formations (clay, crystalline rocks and salt formation), it notably had the objective to evaluate the long-term performance of different repository systems and to identify the most influential elements. The variety of concepts, sites and scenarios considered in the framework of this project provides a wide range of information from which some general conclusions can be drawn. Focusing on the work done in the case of granite host rock formations, this paper describes the various approaches adopted and states the main sources of differences. It particularly stresses the differences related to the geosphere and biosphere modelling. For the geosphere modelling, ENRESA, GRS and VTT use one dimensional discrete approaches to model the migration of contaminants through the geosphere taking into account for matrix diffusion, whereas IPSN uses a three dimensional continuum approach based on a single porosity model. The comparison of the biosphere conversion factors shows the high influence on the calculated radionuclide dose contributions that can results from biosphere modelling assumptions. It notably points out the differences existing between a simplified ''water drinking'' approach as implemented by VTT and a more classical one in which a wider range of exposure pathways are taken into account. (orig.)

  20. Five-year safety and performance results from the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Lyndon; Dorn, Jessy D.; Humayun, Mark S.; Dagnelie, Gislin; Handa, James; Barale, Pierre-Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Stanga, Paulo E.; Hafezi, Farhad; Safran, Avinoam B.; Salzmann, Joel; Santos, Arturo; Birch, David; Spencer, Rand; Cideciyan, Artur V.; de Juan, Eugene; Duncan, Jacque L.; Eliott, Dean; Fawzi, Amani; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Ho, Allen C.; Brown, Gary; Haller, Julia; Regillo, Carl; Del Priore, Lucian V.; Arditi, Aries; Greenberg, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System (Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., Sylmar, CA) was developed to restore some vision to patients blind from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or outer retinal degeneration. A clinical trial was initiated in 2006 to study the long-term safety and efficacy of the Argus II System in patients with bare or no light perception due to end-stage RP. Design The study is a prospective, multicenter, single-arm, clinical trial. Within-patient controls included the non-implanted fellow eye and patients' native residual vision compared to their vision when using the System. Subjects There were 30 subjects in 10 centers in the U.S. and Europe. Methods The worse-seeing eye of blind patients was implanted with the Argus II System. Patients wore glasses mounted with a small camera and a video processor that converted images into stimulation patterns sent to the electrode array on the retina. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome measures were safety (the number, seriousness, and relatedness of adverse events) and visual function, as measured by three computer-based, objective tests. Secondary measures included functional vision performance on objectively-scored real-world tasks. Results Twenty-four out of 30 patients remained implanted with functioning Argus II Systems at 5 years post-implant. Only one additional serious adverse event was experienced since the 3-year time point. Patients performed significantly better with the System ON than OFF on all visual function tests and functional vision tasks. Conclusions The five-year results of the Argus II trial support the long-term safety profile and benefit of the Argus II System for patients blind from RP. The Argus II is the first and only retinal implant to have market approval in the European Economic Area, the United States, and Canada. PMID:27453256

  1. Sleep and athletic performance: the effects of sleep loss on exercise performance, and physiological and cognitive responses to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Hugh H K; Skorski, Sabrina; Duffield, Rob; Hammes, Daniel; Coutts, Aaron J; Meyer, Tim

    2015-02-01

    Although its true function remains unclear, sleep is considered critical to human physiological and cognitive function. Equally, since sleep loss is a common occurrence prior to competition in athletes, this could significantly impact upon their athletic performance. Much of the previous research has reported that exercise performance is negatively affected following sleep loss; however, conflicting findings mean that the extent, influence, and mechanisms of sleep loss affecting exercise performance remain uncertain. For instance, research indicates some maximal physical efforts and gross motor performances can be maintained. In comparison, the few published studies investigating the effect of sleep loss on performance in athletes report a reduction in sport-specific performance. The effects of sleep loss on physiological responses to exercise also remain equivocal; however, it appears a reduction in sleep quality and quantity could result in an autonomic nervous system imbalance, simulating symptoms of the overtraining syndrome. Additionally, increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines following sleep loss could promote immune system dysfunction. Of further concern, numerous studies investigating the effects of sleep loss on cognitive function report slower and less accurate cognitive performance. Based on this context, this review aims to evaluate the importance and prevalence of sleep in athletes and summarises the effects of sleep loss (restriction and deprivation) on exercise performance, and physiological and cognitive responses to exercise. Given the equivocal understanding of sleep and athletic performance outcomes, further research and consideration is required to obtain a greater knowledge of the interaction between sleep and performance.

  2. Effects in Plant Populations Resulting from Chronic Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, Stanislav A.; Volkova, Polina Yu.; Vasiliyev, Denis V.; Dikareva, Nina S.; Oudalova, Alla A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Human industrial activities have left behind a legacy of ecosystems strongly impacted by a wide range of contaminants, including radionuclides. Phyto-toxic effects of acute impact are well known, but the consequences of long-term chronic exposure to low pollutant concentrations is neither well understood nor adequately included in risk assessments. To understand effects of real-world contaminant exposure properly we must pay attention to what is actually going on in the field. However, for many wildlife groups and endpoints, there are no, or very few, studies that link accumulation, chronic exposure and biological effects in natural settings. To fill the gaps, results of field studies carried out on different plant species (winter rye and wheat, spring barley, oats, Scots pine, wild vetch, crested hair-grass) in various radioecological situations (nuclear weapon testing, the Chernobyl accident, uranium and radium processing) to investigate effects of long-term chronic exposure to radionuclides are discussed. Because each impacted site developed in its own way due to a unique history of events, the experience from one case study is rarely directly applicable to another situation. In spite of high heterogeneity in response, we have detected several general patterns. Plant populations growing in areas with relatively low levels of pollution are characterized by the increased level of both cytogenetic alterations and genetic diversity. Accumulation of cellular alterations may afterward influence biological parameters important for populations such as health and reproduction. Presented data provide evidence that in plant populations inhabiting heavily contaminated territories cytogenetic damage were accompanied by decrease in reproductive ability. In less contaminated sites, because of the scarcity of data available, it is impossible to establish exactly the relationship between cytogenetic effects and reproductive ability. Radioactive contamination of the plants

  3. ESBWR - Robust design for natural circulation and stability performance effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamgir, M. D.; Marquino, W.; Yang, J.; Saha, P.; Fennern, L.; Colby, M. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy, M/C A65, 3901Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, NC 28401 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    ESBWR is a 4500 MWt Generation III+ natural circulation reactor with an array of robust design features and passive safety systems to deliver highly effective plant performance during normal operation and to keep the reactor safe during postulated transients and accidents. With the submittal of the latest revision of the Design Control Document (DCD) to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ESBWR is nearing the completion of the US design certification process. This paper focuses on the natural circulation-driven plant performance aspects during normal operation, and stability evaluation of the robust ESBWR design. The TRACG computer code is used for the analysis of ESBWR plant performance, safety analysis, and stability margins. The paper describes the evaluation of ESBWR stability performance during normal power operation including operation in the Core Power-Feed Water Temperature Operating Domain. For ESBWR the normal power operation condition has the highest power/flow ratio and is limiting from the perspective of stability. The paper includes results from detailed evaluation of the most limiting decay ratio for out-of-phase regional oscillations calculated by perturbing the core inlet flow rate in this out-of-phase mode about the line of symmetry for the azimuthal harmonic mode. The paper also summarizes the ESBWR regional mode stability evaluations during a limiting transient (Loss of Feedwater Heating), and during ATWS (Anticipated Transient without Scram). Nominal decay ratios of limiting Channel oscillation, Core wide oscillation and Regional oscillation are within the maximum acceptance criterion of 0.8, at 95% content and 95% confidence. These stability evaluation results indicate decay ratio is within design limits. The paper also describes the evaluation of ESBWR stability performance during plant startup, and summarizes the defense-in-depth stability solution for ESBWR. (authors)

  4. ESBWR - Robust design for natural circulation and stability performance effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M. D.; Marquino, W.; Yang, J.; Saha, P.; Fennern, L.; Colby, M.

    2012-01-01

    ESBWR is a 4500 MWt Generation III+ natural circulation reactor with an array of robust design features and passive safety systems to deliver highly effective plant performance during normal operation and to keep the reactor safe during postulated transients and accidents. With the submittal of the latest revision of the Design Control Document (DCD) to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ESBWR is nearing the completion of the US design certification process. This paper focuses on the natural circulation-driven plant performance aspects during normal operation, and stability evaluation of the robust ESBWR design. The TRACG computer code is used for the analysis of ESBWR plant performance, safety analysis, and stability margins. The paper describes the evaluation of ESBWR stability performance during normal power operation including operation in the Core Power-Feed Water Temperature Operating Domain. For ESBWR the normal power operation condition has the highest power/flow ratio and is limiting from the perspective of stability. The paper includes results from detailed evaluation of the most limiting decay ratio for out-of-phase regional oscillations calculated by perturbing the core inlet flow rate in this out-of-phase mode about the line of symmetry for the azimuthal harmonic mode. The paper also summarizes the ESBWR regional mode stability evaluations during a limiting transient (Loss of Feedwater Heating), and during ATWS (Anticipated Transient without Scram). Nominal decay ratios of limiting Channel oscillation, Core wide oscillation and Regional oscillation are within the maximum acceptance criterion of 0.8, at 95% content and 95% confidence. These stability evaluation results indicate decay ratio is within design limits. The paper also describes the evaluation of ESBWR stability performance during plant startup, and summarizes the defense-in-depth stability solution for ESBWR. (authors)

  5. Effects of roof tile permeability on the thermal performance of ventilated roofs. Analysis of annual performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Orazio, M.; Di Perna, C.; Principi, P.; Stazi, A. [DACS, Universita politecnica delle Marche, 60100 Ancona (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    This paper shows the results of the second part of an experimental study aimed at analysing the effects of roof tile permeability on the thermal performances of ventilation ducts. Ventilation ducts under the layer of tiles are typically used in south European countries to limit the energy load during the summer period. The results of the first part of the study, carried out by analysing 14 different types of roof, proved that the air permeability of the layer of tiles determines a certain amount of heat to be released, in addition to the release connected with the stack effect, in ventilation ducts which have the same characteristics but are perfectly airtight. However, the study did not completely resolve some issues since it was carried out on a model roof (6 m x 1.5 m) with devices to raise the layer of tiles and to create the ventilation duct but without those building elements which are present in real roofs and are used to stop insects and small animals from entering the ventilation duct. These elements narrow the inlet and outlet and consequently cause important reductions in pressure. Moreover, the measurements were based on data collected for limited periods of time during the summer season. So as to eliminate any possible uncertainty from the results of the research, the study continued with the creation of a model building on which five types of ventilated roof with different cross sections of the ventilation duct were analysed. The results show that the presence of air permeable layers and elements to protect the ventilation duct eliminate any differences in performance which were due to the cross section of the ventilation duct. (author)

  6. Ten-year results of thoracoscopic unilateral extended thymectomy performed in nonthymomatous myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomulescu, Victor; Sgarbura, Olivia; Stanescu, Codrut; Valciu, Crisanda; Campeanu, Ana; Herlea, Vlad; Popescu, Irinel

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the 10-year results of thoracoscopic unilateral extended thymectomy (TUET) performed in nontumoral myasthenia gravis according to the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America recommendations. Thoracoscopic unilateral extended thymectomy has the benefits of a minimally invasive approach. Previous data have shown promising midterm results but long-term results were lacking. Two hundred forty patients with nontumoral myasthenia gravis who underwent surgery between 1999 and 2009 were eligible for the study. The mean follow-up was of 67 months (range: 12-125), 134 patients completed follow-up assessments more than 60 months after TUET. There were 39 males (16.3%) and 201 females (83.7%), with an age range from 8 to 60 years. The mean preoperative disease duration was 21.5 months. All patients underwent preoperative steroid therapy. Anticholinesterase drugs were required for 123 patients (51.3%), and immunosuppressive drugs were required for 87 (36.3%) patients. The pathologic findings were as follows: normal thymus in 13 patients (5.5%), involuted thymus in 65 patients (27%), and hyperplastic thymus in 162 patients (67.5%). The average weight of the thymus was 110 ± 45 g. Ectopic thymic tissue was found in 147 patients (61.3%). There was no mortality, and morbidity consisted of 12 patients (5%). Complete stable remission was achieved in 61% of the patients, and the cumulative probability of achieving complete stable remission was 0.88 at 10 years. With zero mortality, low morbidity, and comparable long-term results to open surgery, TUET can be regarded as the best treatment option for patients undergoing surgery for myasthenia gravis.

  7. Effects of Different Practice Conditions on Advanced Instrumentalists' Performance Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Roseanne K.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examines the relative effects of the five practice conditions of modeling, singing, silent analysis, free practice, and control on instrumentalists' performance. Finds significant differences in subjects' performance of correct rhythms, phrasing or dynamics, and tempo, and insignificant differences among performances of correct notes and…

  8. Effects of Tempo and Context on Transfer of Performance Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Robert A.; Pierce, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses research that examined the effects of melodic content and performance tempo on the ability of university music majors to perform previously learned music passages in new settings. Finds tempo accuracy and pitch accuracy were adversely affected by differences between originally learned tempo and tempi at which works were later performed.…

  9. Postirradiation examination results for the Irradiation Effects Test 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploger, S.A.; Kerwin, D.K.; Croucher, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the postirradiation examination results of Test IE-2 in the Irradiation Effects Test Series conducted under the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program. The objectives of this test were to evaluate the influence of previous cladding irradiation and fuel-cladding diametral gap on fuel rod behavior during a power ramp and during film boiling operation. Test IE-2, conducted in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, employed two 0.97-m-long pressurized water reactor type fuel rods fabricated from previously irradiated zircaloy-4 cladding and two similar rods fabricated from unirradiated cladding. The four rods were subjected to a preconditioning period, followed by a power ramp to an average peak rod power of 68 kW/m and steady state operation for one hour at an individual rod coolant mass flux of 4880 kg/s . m 2 . After a flow reduction to 2550 kg/s . m 2 , film boiling occurred on three rods. An additional flow reduction to 2245 kg/s . m 2 produced film boiling on the remaining fuel rod. Maximum time in film boiling was 90 s. None of the four fuel rods failed during the test. Damage caused by film boiling, as characterized by oxidation, oxide spalling, and collapse at fuel pellet interfaces, was found on all four rods. Film boiling regions on these rods showed evidence of fuel melting, fuel centerline void formation, and internal cladding oxidation resulting from fuel-cladding reaction. Effects of fuel-cladding diametral gap and cladding irradiation are summarized. Measured temperatures and metallographically estimated temperatures are compared at several axial fuel rod locations

  10. Irradiation Effects Test Series: Test IE-3. Test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, L.C.; Allison, C.M.; Croucher, D.W.; Ploger, S.A.

    1977-10-01

    The objectives of the test reported were to: (a) determine the behavior of irradiated fuel rods subjected to a rapid power increase during which the possibility of a pellet-cladding mechanical interaction failure is enhanced and (b) determine the behavior of these fuel rods during film boiling following this rapid power increase. Test IE-3 used four 0.97-m long pressurized water reactor type fuel rods fabricated from previously irradiated fuel. The fuel rods were subjected to a preconditioning period, followed by a power ramp to 69 kW/m at a coolant mass flux of 4920 kg/s-m 2 . After a flow reduction to 2120 kg/s-m 2 , film boiling occurred on the fuel rods. One rod failed approximately 45 seconds after the reactor was shut down as a result of cladding embrittlement due to extensive cladding oxidation. Data are presented on the behavior of these irradiated fuel rods during steady-state operation, the power ramp, and film boiling operation. The effects of a power ramp and power ramp rates on pellet-cladding interaction are discussed. Test data are compared with FRAP-T3 computer model calculations and data from a previous Irradiation Effects test in which four irradiated fuel rods of a similar design were tested. Test IE-3 results indicate that the irradiated state of the fuel rods did not significantly affect fuel rod behavior during normal, abnormal (power ramp of 20 kW/m per minute), and accident (film boiling) conditions

  11. Effects of buffer thickness on ATW blanket performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W. S.; Mercatali, L.; Taiwo, T. A.; Hill, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for liquid metal cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using 840 MWt liquid metal cooled ATW designs, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performance have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performance parameters have been estimated by a series of calculations using the MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance variation are studied by investigating the low-energy ( and lt; 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. For investigating irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. Results for the liquid-metal-cooled designs show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable. Investigation of the impact of the proton beam energy on the target and buffer design shows that for a given blanket power level, a lower beam energy (0.6 GeV versus 1 GeV) results in a higher irradiation damage to the beam window. This trend occurs because of the increase in the beam intensity required to maintain the power level

  12. Effects of Buffer Thickness on ATW Blanket Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.S.; Mercatali, L.; Taiwo, T.A.; Hill, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for liquid metal cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using 840 MWt liquid metal cooled ATW designs, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performance have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performance parameters have been estimated by a series of calculations using the MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance variation are studied by investigating the low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. For investigating irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. Results for the liquid-metal-cooled designs show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable. Investigation of the impact of the proton beam energy on the target and buffer design shows that for a given blanket power level, a lower beam energy (0.6 GeV versus 1 GeV) results in a higher irradiation damage to the beam window. This trend occurs because of the increase in the beam intensity required to maintain the power level. (authors)

  13. Effect of lecture instruction on student performance on qualitative questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula R. L.

    2015-06-01

    The impact of lecture instruction on student conceptual understanding in physics has been the subject of research for several decades. Most studies have reported disappointingly small improvements in student performance on conceptual questions despite direct instruction on the relevant topics. These results have spurred a number of attempts to improve learning in physics courses through new curricula and instructional techniques. This paper contributes to the research base through a retrospective analysis of 20 randomly selected qualitative questions on topics in kinematics, dynamics, electrostatics, waves, and physical optics that have been given in introductory calculus-based physics at the University of Washington over a period of 15 years. In some classes, questions were administered after relevant lecture instruction had been completed; in others, it had yet to begin. Simple statistical tests indicate that the average performance of the "after lecture" classes was significantly better than that of the "before lecture" classes for 11 questions, significantly worse for two questions, and indistinguishable for the remaining seven. However, the classes had not been randomly assigned to be tested before or after lecture instruction. Multiple linear regression was therefore conducted with variables (such as class size) that could plausibly lead to systematic differences in performance and thus obscure (or artificially enhance) the effect of lecture instruction. The regression models support the results of the simple tests for all but four questions. In those cases, the effect of lecture instruction was reduced to a nonsignificant level, or increased to a significant, negative level when other variables were considered. Thus the results provide robust evidence that instruction in lecture can increase student ability to give correct answers to conceptual questions but does not necessarily do so; in some cases it can even lead to a decrease.

  14. How many replicate tests do I need?$-$ Variability of cookstove performance and emissions has implications for obtaining useful results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yungang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Gadgil, Ashok J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Wang, Yilun [ISO Innovative Analytics San Francisco, CA (United States); Lask, Kathleen M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). College of Engineering Applied Science and Technology Program; Kirchstetter, Thomas W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-02-01

    Almost half of the world’s population still cooks on biomass cookstoves of poor efficiency and primitive design, such as three stone fires (TSF). Emissions from biomass cookstoves contribute to adverse health effects and climate change. A number of “improved cookstoves” with higher energy efficiency and lower emissions have been designed and promoted across the world. During the design development, and for selection of a stove for dissemination, the stove performance and emissions are commonly evaluated, communicated and compared using the arithmetic average of replicate tests made using a standardized laboratory-based test, commonly the water boiling test (WBT). However, published literature shows different WBT results reported from different laboratories for the same stove technology. Also, there is no agreement in the literature on how many replicate tests should be performed to ensure “significance” in the reported average performance. This matter has not received attention in the rapidly growing literature on stoves, and yet is crucial for estimating and communicating the performance of a stove, and for comparing the performance between stoves. We present results of statistical analyses using data from a number of replicate tests of performance and emission of the Berkeley-Darfur Stove (BDS) and the TSF under well-controlled laboratory conditions. We observed moderate variability in the test results for the TSF and BDS when measuring several characteristics. Here we focus on two as illustrative: time-to-boil and PM2.5 (particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers in diameter) emissions. We demonstrate that interpretation of the results comparing these stoves could be misleading if only a small number of replicates had been conducted. We then describe a practical approach, useful to both stove testers and designers, to assess the number of replicates needed to obtain useful data. Caution should be exercised in attaching high credibility to

  15. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Effects and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzi, James L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Goodenow, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some exposure to gamma irradiation. Non-condensable gas formation from radiation may breakdown water over time and render a portion of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature with accelerated gamma irradiation exposures on the same order of magnitude that is expected in eight years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon; evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some non-condensable gas was evident, however thermosyphon performance was not affected because the non-condensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of non-condensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the non-condensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of selected thermosyphons at temperature and in a vacuum chamber revealed that the non-condensable gas likely diffused out of the thermosyphons over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  16. The Effects of Assertive Training on Performance in Highly Anxious Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, Sara H.; Kaufman, Melvin E.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated the effects of assertive training on measures of assertiveness, state anxiety, and mathematics performance in highly anxious ninth graders (N=96). Found that assertive training resulted in increased assertiveness and decreased state anxiety, with no significant effect on mathematics performance, and no significant effect due to sex.…

  17. Integrated design of castings: effect of porosity on mechanical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardin, R A; Beckermann, C

    2012-01-01

    Porosity can significantly reduce the strength and durability of castings in service. An integrated design approach has been developed where casting simulation is combined with mechanical performance simulations. Predictions of the porosity distribution from the casting process simulation are transferred to and used in stress and fatigue life simulations. Thus, the effect of casting quality on service performance can be evaluated. Results of a study are presented where the measured porosity distribution in cast steel specimens is transferred to an elasto-plastic finite-element stress analysis model. Methods are developed to locally reduce the mechanical properties according to the porosity present, without having to resolve individual pores. Plastic deformation is modeled using porous metal plasticity theory. The predictions are compared to tensile measurements performed on the specimens. The complex deformations and the reductions in the ductility of the specimens due to porosity are predicted well. The predicted stresses are transferred to a fatigue analysis code that takes the porosity distribution into account as well. The measured and predicted fatigue lives are also in good agreement. Finally, the results of a case study are presented that illustrate the utility of the present integrated approach in optimizing the design of a steel casting.

  18. Safety parameter display systems' effect on operator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerven, F.; Ford, R.E.; Blackman, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Computer generated displays are a powerful and flexible tool for presenting data to the operators of nuclear power plants. Such displays are currently being developed in industry for use as safety parameter displays and for use in advanced control rooms. There exists a need for methods to objectively evaluate the effect of these displays, positive or negative, on the performance of control room personnel. Results of developing one such method, noninteractive simulation, and the two experiments that were performed to determine if it can be used as a method for evaluating computer displays are presented. This method is more objective and powerful than pencil and paper methods because it measures human performance rather than opinion or perference, has excellent control of the experimental variables, and has a higher fidelity to the control room environment. The results of these experiments indicates that the present methodology does not differentiate among the display types tested at a statistically significant level. In other words, all display types tested worked equally well in providing operators needed information

  19. Investigating The Effect Of Job Stress On Performance Of Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyungerel Altangerel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study is conducted to investigate the effect of job stress on job performance. A random sampling technique is used to collect primary data of 120 employees of four telecommunication companies of Mongolia i.e. Mobicom Unitel Skytel and G-mobile. A well-structured questionnaire is utilized to collect relevant data descriptive and logistic analysis is used to estimate and describe the findings of results. It is found that work overload is major reason of stress among employees and majority of employees reduce their productivity and loss of interest in job due to stress. As for concern health issue eyes strain dizziness and disorder in sleep are due to job stress. According to results of logit model parameters of education experience and salary per month are statistically significant and have positive impact on employees performance but age family size no relaxation time giving to employees during working hours and work overload are statistically significant and have negative impact on employees job performance. For suggestions companies should increase salaries of employees and give reward to employees those have work overload. Workload of employees should reduce by proper work redesign and efficient management by proper allocation of job. It is also found that stress also becomes reason of several illnesses and majority of employees dont have medical facilities first aid at working place therefore it is suggested that companies should also provide medical facilities first aid for employees at work place.

  20. The Red Effect, Anxiety, and Exam Performance: A Multistudy Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smajic, Adnan; Merritt, Stephanie; Banister, Christina; Blinebry, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies have established a negative relationship between the color red and academic performance. This research examined whether this effect would generalize to classroom performance and whether anxiety and negative affect might mediate the effect. In two studies, students taking classroom exams were randomly assigned an exam color. We…

  1. A Model for Effective Performance in the Indonesian Navy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    NAVY LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT COM PETENCY M ODEL .................................. 15 D. MCBER COMPETENT MANAGERS MODEL ................ IS E. SU M M... leadership and managerial skills which emphasize on effective performance of the officers in managing the human resources under their cormnand and...supervision. By effective performance we mean officers who not only know about management theories , but who possess the characteristics, knowledge, skill, and

  2. Effect of Family Type on Secondary School Students\\' Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of family type on Secondary School students\\' performance in physics in Ilorin metropolis. The sample comprised one hundred Senior Secondary II students from four schools in Ilorin metropolis. The instrument for the study titled \\"Effect of Family type on Students\\' Performance in Physics ...

  3. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  4. The Overall Research Results of Prestressed I-beams Made of Ultra-high Performance Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tej, P.; Kolísko, J.; Kněž, P.; Čech, J.

    2017-09-01

    The design process of short-term and long-term loading of prestressed I-beams made of ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) and the overall research results are presented in this article. The prestressed I-beams are intended and designed to replace steel HEB beams mainly in the construction of railway bridges with fully concreted height of the beams. These types of structures have the advantage of a low construction height. The prestressed I-beams were made of UHPC with dispersed steel fibres and are reinforced by prestressing cables in the bottom flange. Two specimens of 9 m span, three specimens of 7 m span and two specimens of 12 m span were made for the short-term loading. For the purpose of the long-term loading, two specimens of 12 m span were made and subsequently loaded for 450 days. All specimens were tested in four-point bending tests in the laboratory. The article presents also comparison of results of the experiments with computer simulations.

  5. Performance test results of ion beam transport for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, M R; Mattoo, S K [Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428, Gujarat (India); Uhlemann, R, E-mail: mukti@ipr.res.i [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute fur Energieforschung IEF-4, Plasmaphysik D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    A neutral beam injector is built at IPR to heat the plasma of SST-1 and its upgrade. It delivers a maximum beam power of 1.7 MW for 55 kV Hydrogen beam or 80 kV Deuterium beam. At lower beam voltage, the delivered power falls to 500 kW at 30 kV Hydrogen beam which is adequate to heat SST-1 plasma ions to {approx} 1 keV. Process of acceleration of ions to the required beam voltage, conversion of ions to neutrals and removal of un-neutralized ions and the beam diagnostic systems occupy a large space. The consequence is that linear extent of the neutral beam injector is at least a few meters. Also, port access provides a very narrow duct. Even a very good injector design and fabrication practices keep beam divergence at a very low but finite value. The result is beam transport becomes an important issue. Since a wide area beam is constructed by hundreds of beam lets, it becomes essential they be focused in such a way that beam transport loss is minimized. Horizontal and vertical focal lengths are two parameters, in addition to beam divergence, which give a description of the beam transport. We have obtained these two parameters for our injector by using beam transport code; making several hundred simulation runs by varying optical parameters of the beam. The selected parameters set has been translated into the engineering features of the extractor grid set of the ion source. Aperture displacement technique is used to secure the horizontal beam focusing at 5.4 m. Combination of both aperture displacement and inclining of two grid halves to {approx} 17 mrad are secured for vertical beam focusing at 7 m from earth grid of the ion source. The gaps between the design, engineered and performance tested values usually arise due to lack of exercising control over fabrication processes or due to inaccuracies in the assumption made in the model calculations of beam optics and beam transport. This has been the case with several injectors, notably with JET injector. To overcome

  6. Effects of plant phenols of performance of southern armyworm larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, R L; Peterson, S S

    1988-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of two classes of phenols on performance of penultimate instar southern armyworms, Spodoptera eridania. One class consisted of phenols containing a catechol (ortho-dihydroxybenzene) moiety and included chlorogenic acid, quercetin, rutin, and rhamnetin. A second group consisted of the phenolic glycoside salicin and its derivatives salicortin and tremulacin. The compounds were painted onto lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) leaves and fed to larvae for the duration of the fifth instar. Chlorogenic acid and rhamnetin had no deleterious effects; rutin and quercetin caused some mortality and rutin reduced growth rates by decreasing consumption and digestion efficiency. Results showed that ortho-dihydroxybenzene groups may be necessary, but are not sufficient for biological activity. Salicin did not affect larvae; salicortin and tremulacin reduced growth rates primarily by decreasing consumption. These two compounds also caused degenerative lesions in midgut tissues. The presence of a benzoyl ester group in tremulacin accentuates its toxicity, relative to that of salicortin.

  7. Effect of Blade Roughness on Transition and Wind Turbine Performance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrmann, Robert S. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); White, E. B. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The real-world effect of accumulated surface roughness on wind-turbine power production is not well understood. To isolate specific blade roughness features and test their effect, field measurements of turbine-blade roughness were made and simulated on a NACA 633-418 airfoil in a wind tunnel. Insect roughness, paint chips, and erosion were characterized then manufactured. In the tests, these roughness configurations were recreated as distributed roughness, a forward-facing step, and an eroded leading edge. Distributed roughness was tested in three heights and five densities. Chord Reynolds number was varied between 0:8 to 4:8 × 106. Measurements included lift, drag, pitching moment, and boundary-layer transition location. Results indicate minimal effect from paint-chip roughness. As distributed roughness height and density increase, the lift-curve slope, maximum lift, and lift-to-drag ratio decrease. As Reynolds number increases, natural transition is replaced by bypass transition. The critical roughness Reynolds number varies between 178 to 318, within the historical range. At a chord Reynolds number of 3:2 × 106, the maximum lift-to-drag ratio decreases 40% for 140 μm roughness, corresponding to a 2.3% loss in annual energy production. Simulated performance loss compares well to measured performance loss of an in-service wind turbine.

  8. Personality traits affect teaching performance of attending physicians: results of a multi-center observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, attending physicians train residents to become competent providers of patient care. To assess adequate training, attending physicians are increasingly evaluated on their teaching performance. Research suggests that personality traits affect teaching performance, consistent with studied

  9. Irradiation effects test Series Scoping Test 1: test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Allison, C.M.; Farrar, L.C.

    1977-09-01

    The report describes the results of the first scoping test in the Irradiation Effects Test Series conducted by the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program, which is part of the Water Reactor Research Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc. The research is sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This test used an unirradiated, three-foot-long, PWR-type fuel rod. The objective of this test was to thoroughly evaluate the remote fabrication procedures to be used for irradiated rods in future tests, handling plans, and reactor operations. Additionally, selected fuel behavior data were obtained. The fuel rod was subjected to a series of preconditioning power cycles followed by a power increase which brought the fuel rod power to about 20.4 kW/ft peak linear heat rating at a coolant mass flux of 1.83 x 10 6 lb/hr-ft 2 . Film boiling occurred for a period of 4.8 minutes following flow reductions to 9.6 x 10 5 and 7.5 x 10 5 lb/hr-ft 2 . The test fuel rod failed following reactor shutdown as a result of heavy internal and external cladding oxidation and embrittlement which occurred during the film boiling operation

  10. Effects of phosphate environments on turbine materials: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.C.; Shalvoy, R.S.; Gould, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a serious hazard to large steam turbines. In many cases, this cracking is thought caused by concentrated deposits of caustics or chlorides, formed from the steam by concentrating mechanisms. To minimize the likelihood of forming these corrosive deposits, turbine manufacturers recommend that the levels of contaminants in the steam be maintained at low levels. The steam purity needed to prevent the formation of corrosive deposits is at present uncertain. As an aid in judging the steam purity needed to avoid corrosive deposits, the General Electric Company surveyed the utility industry to determine current feedwater practices, the levels of steam purity attained, and the nature of the corrosion problems encountered. One hypothesis to explain the lower corrosivity of steam from drum boilers concerns the sodium phosphate to compounds commonly added to drum boiler water for pH control. To test this hypothesis, the present program was undertaken to study the effect of sodium phosphate on the corrosivity of the two most common corrosive turbine deposits, sodium chloride and sodium hydroxide. Four turbine materials - a rotor steel, a disc steel, and two turbine blade steels - were chosen for this study. The results from the first half of a two-year project are described. So far the corrosivity of the deposits without phosphate has been determined. Work to determine the corrosivity of deposits with phosphate is presently under way and only the electrochemical test results are discussed

  11. Computer and compiler effects on code results: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of the international effort on the assessment of computer codes, which are designed to describe the overall reactor coolant system (RCS) thermalhydraulic response, core damage progression, and fission product release and transport during severe accidents, there has been a continuous debate as to whether the code results are influenced by different code users or by different computers or compilers. The first aspect, the 'Code User Effect', has been investigated already. In this paper the other aspects will be discussed and proposals are given how to make large system codes insensitive to different computers and compilers. Hardware errors and memory problems are not considered in this report. The codes investigated herein are integrated code systems (e. g. ESTER, MELCOR) and thermalhydraulic system codes with extensions for severe accident simulation (e. g. SCDAP/RELAP, ICARE/CATHARE, ATHLET-CD), and codes to simulate fission product transport (e. g. TRAPMELT, SOPHAEROS). Since all of these codes are programmed in Fortran 77, the discussion herein is based on this programming language although some remarks are made about Fortran 90. Some observations about different code results by using different computers are reported and possible reasons for this unexpected behaviour are listed. Then methods are discussed how to avoid portability problems

  12. Effects of preparation process on performance of rubber modified asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanbing; Luo, Guobao; Wang, Xianqiang; Jiao, Yubo

    2015-06-01

    The rational utilization of waste rubber tire is essential for the environmental protection. Utilizing rubber particles to modify asphalt can not only improve asphalt performance, but also help the recycling of waste materials. Considering the effect of different preparation process parameters on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, this paper analyzes the effects of the shear temperature, shear time and shear rate on the performance of rubber modified asphalt, and provided a reference for its preparation.

  13. Technostress : negative effect on performance and possible mitigations

    OpenAIRE

    Tarafdar, Monideepa; Pullins, Ellen; Ragu-Nathan, T. S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of conditions that create technostress, on technology-enabled innovation, technology-enabled performance and overall performance. We further look at the role of technology self-efficacy, organizational mechanisms that inhibit technostress and technology competence as possible mitigations to the effects of technostress creators. Our findings show a negative association between technostress creators and performance. We find that, while traditional effort-based mechanis...

  14. Performance Enhancement of Power Transistors and Radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassn, Th.A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this scientific research is studying the characteristic of bipolar junction transistor device and its performance under radiation fields and temperature effect as a control element in many power circuits. In this work we present the results of experimental measurements and analytical simulation of gamma – radiation effects on the electrical characteristics and operation of power transistor types 2N3773, 2N3055(as complementary silicon power transistor are designed for general-purpose switching and amplifier applications), three samples of each type were irradiated by gamma radiation with doses, 1 K rad, 5 K rad, 10 K rad, 30 K rad, and 10 Mrad, the experimental data are utilized to establish an analytical relation between the total absorbed dose of gamma irradiation and corresponding to effective density of generated charge in the internal structure of transistor, the electrical parameters which can be measured to estimate the generated defects in the power transistor are current gain, collector current and collected emitter leakage current , these changes cause the circuit to case proper functioning. Collector current and transconductance of each device are calibrated as a function of irradiated dose. Also the threshold voltage and transistor gain can be affected and also calibrated as a function of dose. A silicon NPN power transistor type 2N3773 intended for general purpose applications, were used in this work. It was designed for medium current and high power circuits. Performance and characteristic were discusses under temperature and gamma radiation doses. Also the internal junction thermal system of the transistor represented in terms of a junction thermal resistance (Rjth). The thermal resistance changed by ΔRjth, due to the external intended, also due to the gamma doses intended. The final result from the model analysis reveals that the emitter-bias configuration is quite stable by resistance ratio RB/RE. Also the current

  15. A simplified, result oriented supplier performance management system testing framework for SME

    OpenAIRE

    Satya Parkash Kaushik; Veerender Kumar Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Background: Supplier performance management continues to be a significant concern for small & medium enterprises (SME). How can small & medium enterprises better position themselves to check and sustain actual supplier performance improvement? A key framework is the establishment of a value-added supplier performance audit program that places significant emphasis on supplier performance controls. A value-added supplier audit program can help SME mitigate business and regulatory risk w...

  16. EDF - 2011 full-year results: Solid results and commitments upheld amid a troubled environment. Excellent industrial performance. Annual results 2011, Consolidated financial statements at December 31, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proglio, Henri

    2012-01-01

    As the world's biggest electricity generator, the EDF Group covers every sector of expertise, from generation to trading and transmission grids. EDF builds on the expertise of its people, its R and D and engineering skills, its experience as a leading industry operator and the attentive support of its customers to deliver competitive solutions that successfully reconcile economic growth with climate protection. This document presents the 2011 annual results and Consolidated financial statements of the Group at 31 December 2011: Group accounting standards; comparability; significant events and transactions; regulatory events in France; changes in the scope of consolidation; segment reporting; sales; fuel and energy purchases; other external expenses; personnel expenses; taxes other than income taxes; other operating income and expenses; prolongation of the transition tariff system (TaRTAM) - laws of June 7 and December 7, 2010; impairment / reversals; other income and expenses; financial result; income taxes; basic earnings per share and diluted earnings per share; operating assets and liabilities, equity; goodwill; other intangible assets; property, plant and equipment operated under French public electricity distribution concessions; property, plant and equipment operated under concessions for other activities; property, plant and equipment used in generation and other tangible assets owned by the group; investments in associates; inventories; trade receivables; other receivables; equity; provisions; provisions related to nuclear generation - back-end nuclear cycle, plant decommissioning and last cores; provisions for decommissioning of non-nuclear facilities; provisions for employee benefits; other provisions; special French public electricity distribution concession liabilities for existing assets and assets to be replaced; trade payable; other liabilities; current and non-current financial assets; cash and cash equivalents; current and non-current financial

  17. Experimental results to determine the separation performance of the packages used in cryogenic distillation isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornea, A.M.; Stefanescu, I.; Zamfirache, M.; Balteanu, O.; Preda, A.

    2007-01-01

    The cryogenic distillation of the hydrogen isotopes represents the back-end separation process most efficient and usually used in detritiation technologies. In our institute there were made many researches in the field of hydrogen isotopes separation. The first results were obtained based on an experimental installation - Pilot Plant for heavy water production - and in present days using a Detritiation Pilot Plant. In our Institute, was manufactured and patented a lot of hydrophilic package for isotopic distillation of water and hydrogen and also catalysts used for isotopic exchange waterhydrogen. This items was continuously developed in order to increase the isotopic separation efficiency. The goal of this paper is to determine by experimental work the performance of the package manufactured in our institute used in the cryogenic distillation process. To describe the separation performances was developed a mathematical model for the cryogenic distillation of the hydrogen isotopes. In order to determine the characteristics of the package, the installation was operated in the total reflux mode, for different flow rate for the liquid. There were made several experiments considering different operating conditions corresponding to various values for the refrigeration power in the column condenser. From the bottom and the top of the distillation column there were extracted samples in order to determine the isotopic composition. Processing the experimental data obtained from these tests using the Fenske relation, we obtained the separation efficiency function of the power inside the column boiler, operating pressure and also pressure drop along the package. This efficiency is describe by the number of theoretical plates per meter (NTT/m) or by equivalent height of one theoretical plate (IETT). (orig.)

  18. Experimental results to determine the separation performance of the packages used in cryogenic distillation isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornea, A.M.; Stefanescu, I.; Zamfirache, M.; Balteanu, O.; Preda, A.

    2007-07-01

    The cryogenic distillation of the hydrogen isotopes represents the back-end separation process most efficient and usually used in detritiation technologies. In our institute there were made many researches in the field of hydrogen isotopes separation. The first results were obtained based on an experimental installation - Pilot Plant for heavy water production - and in present days using a Detritiation Pilot Plant. In our Institute, was manufactured and patented a lot of hydrophilic package for isotopic distillation of water and hydrogen and also catalysts used for isotopic exchange waterhydrogen. This items was continuously developed in order to increase the isotopic separation efficiency. The goal of this paper is to determine by experimental work the performance of the package manufactured in our institute used in the cryogenic distillation process. To describe the separation performances was developed a mathematical model for the cryogenic distillation of the hydrogen isotopes. In order to determine the characteristics of the package, the installation was operated in the total reflux mode, for different flow rate for the liquid. There were made several experiments considering different operating conditions corresponding to various values for the refrigeration power in the column condenser. From the bottom and the top of the distillation column there were extracted samples in order to determine the isotopic composition. Processing the experimental data obtained from these tests using the Fenske relation, we obtained the separation efficiency function of the power inside the column boiler, operating pressure and also pressure drop along the package. This efficiency is describe by the number of theoretical plates per meter (NTT/m) or by equivalent height of one theoretical plate (IETT). (orig.)

  19. Performance analysis and pilot plant test results for the Komorany fluidized bed retrofit project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, G.C. [POWER International, Inc., Coeur d`Alene, ID (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Detailed heat and mass balance calculations and emission performance projections are presented for an atmospheric fluidized bed boiler bottom retrofit at the 927 MWt (steam output) Komorany power station and district heating plant in the Czech Republic. Each of the ten existing boilers are traveling grate stoker units firing a local, low-rank brown coal. This fuel, considered to be representative of much of the coal deposits in Central Europe, is characterized by an average gross calorific value of 10.5 MJ/kg (4,530 Btu/lb), an average dry basis ash content of 47 %, and a maximum dry basis sulfur content of 1.8 % (3.4 % on a dry, ash free basis). The same fuel supply, together with limestone supplied from the region will be utilized in the retrofit fluidized bed boilers. The primary objectives of this retrofit program are, (1) reduce emissions to a level at or below the new Czech Clean Air Act, and (2) restore plant capacity to the original specification. As a result of the AFBC retrofit and plant upgrade, the particulate matter emissions will be reduced by over 98 percent, SO{sub 2} emissions will be reduced by 88 percent, and NO{sub x} emissions will be reduced by 38 percent compared to the present grate-fired configuration. The decrease in SO{sub 2} emissions resulting from the fluidized bed retrofit was initially predicted based on fuel sulfur content, including the distribution among organic, pyritic, and sulfate forms; the ash alkalinity; and the estimated limestone calcium utilization efficiency. The methodology and the results of this prediction were confirmed and extended by pilot scale combustion trials at a 1.0 MWt (fuel input), variable configuration test facility in France.

  20. Effect of high wind conditions on AHX performance for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, P.; Datta, Anu; Verma, Vishnu; Singh, R.K.

    2013-05-01

    In case of normal shut down or station blackout condition the core decay heat is removed by Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal System (SGDHRS) in PFBR. The Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is under construction at Kalpakkam. SGDHRS remove decay heat from the core and dissipate it into the environment with the help of Air Heat Exchanger (AHX). SGDHRS consists of four redundant numbers of totally independent circuits capable of removing decay heat from the hot pool through natural convection in the primary and intermediate sodium sides as well as in the air side. Each circuit consists of a sodium to sodium heat exchanger (DHX) and a sodium to AHX connected to intermediate sodium circuit, AHX is located at a higher elevation compared to DHX. AHX is serpentine type finned tube compact heat exchanger with sodium in the tube side and air flowing over finned tubes. A tall stack provides the driving force for the natural convection of air flow through the AHX, when the dampers are opened. The AHX is placed outside of Reactor Control Building (RCB), on the roof of Steam Generator Building. Due to the presence of nearby buildings around the stack, the AHX performance under high wind condition may be affected. A CFD simulation using CFD-ACE+ code has been carried in which effect of high wind condition and nearby building on AHX performance have been studied. For high wind condition various orientation of wind movement was considered for parametric studies. AHX performance for all the cases were compared with the results that obtained for the absence of nearby buildings. A comparative table was prepared to understand how the AHX performance is effected with the high wind condition for various direction and with the presence of nearby building. It was observed that AHX performance is influenced by high wind conditions in most of the cases for with and without presence of nearby building. Hence to ensure the optimal performance of the AHX under high wind conditions its

  1. Photochemical and Spectroscopic Effects Resulting from Excimer Laser Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan Xiao

    I. Photochemical production of ozone from pure oxygen using excimer lasers. Production of ozone was observed from experiments when oxygen was under a broadband pulsed KrF laser radiation. The production process was found to be autocatalytic. Mechanisms for the ozone formation were proposed. Experimental results over a range of oxygen pressure and laser pulse energy (irradiance) provided evidences in favor of the proposed mechanisms. Experiments were also numerically modeled. Good agreement between the experimental and the numerical results were observed, which provided further evidence to support the proposed mechanisms. Cross sections for some photochemical processes in the mechanisms were estimated. Production of ozone from pure oxygen under a ArF excimer laser radiation (193 nm) was also studied and numerically modeled. Effects of ambient water vapor on ozone production were investigated. Experimental results showed a fast ozone destruction when water vapor was present in the cell. However, numerical results obtained from the well-known OH and HO _2 chain ozone destruction mechanism predicted a slower ozone destruction. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed. II. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of N_2 at 193 and 248 nm detected by N_sp{2}{+} fluorescence. Using a broadband excimer laser operating at 193 and 248 nm multiphoton ionization at high pressures in air and pure nitrogen has been detected by fluorescence from N_sp{2}{+} in the B-X firstnegative system. Measurements of the fluorescence intensity as a function of beam irradiance indicate resonance in N_2 at the energy of two 193 nm photons (2 + 1 REMPI) and three 248 nm photons (3 + 1 REMPI). Possible intermediate states are discussed. III. Excimer laser-induced fluorescence from some organic solvents. Fluorescence was observed from vapor phase benzene, toluene, p-xylene, benzyl chloride, methyl benzoate, acetic anhydride, ether, methanol, ethyl acetone, acetone, and 2-butanone using

  2. The surface roughness effect on the performance of supersonic ejectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezgin, D. V.; Aronson, K. E.; Mazzelli, F.; Milazzo, A.

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the numerical simulation results of the surface roughness influence on gas-dynamic processes inside flow parts of a supersonic ejector. These simulations are performed using two commercial CFD solvers (Star- CCM+ and Fluent). The results are compared to each other and verified by a full-scale experiment in terms of global flow parameters (the entrainment ratio: the ratio between secondary to primary mass flow rate - ER hereafter) and local flow parameters distribution (the static pressure distribution along the mixing chamber and diffuser walls). A detailed comparative study of the employed methods and approaches in both CFD packages is carried out in order to estimate the roughness effect on the logarithmic law velocity distribution inside the boundary layer. Influence of the surface roughness is compared with the influence of the backpressure (static pressure at the ejector outlet). It has been found out that increasing either the ejector backpressure or the surface roughness height, the shock position displaces upstream. Moreover, the numerical simulation results of an ejector with rough walls in the both CFD solvers are well quantitatively agreed with each other in terms of the mean ER and well qualitatively agree in terms of the local flow parameters distribution. It is found out that in the case of exceeding the "critical roughness height" for the given boundary conditions and ejector's geometry, the ejector switches to the "off-design" mode and its performance decreases considerably.

  3. Combining Results from Distinct MicroRNA Target Prediction Tools Enhances the Performance of Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur C. Oliveira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Target prediction is generally the first step toward recognition of bona fide microRNA (miRNA-target interactions in living cells. Several target prediction tools are now available, which use distinct criteria and stringency to provide the best set of candidate targets for a single miRNA or a subset of miRNAs. However, there are many false-negative predictions, and consensus about the optimum strategy to select and use the output information provided by the target prediction tools is lacking. We compared the performance of four tools cited in literature—TargetScan (TS, miRanda-mirSVR (MR, Pita, and RNA22 (R22, and we determined the most effective approach for analyzing target prediction data (individual, union, or intersection. For this purpose, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, precision, and correlation of these approaches using 10 miRNAs (miR-1-3p, miR-17-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-24-3p, miR-29a-3p, miR-34a-5p, miR-124-3p, miR-125b-5p, miR-145-5p, and miR-155-5p and 1,400 genes (700 validated and 700 non-validated as targets of these miRNAs. The four tools provided a subset of high-quality predictions and returned few false-positive predictions; however, they could not identify several known true targets. We demonstrate that union of TS/MR and TS/MR/R22 enhanced the quality of in silico prediction analysis of miRNA targets. We conclude that the union rather than the intersection of the aforementioned tools is the best strategy for maximizing performance while minimizing the loss of time and resources in subsequent in vivo and in vitro experiments for functional validation of miRNA-target interactions.

  4. Tests results and performance comparisons of coated and un-coated skutterudite based segmented unicouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Saber, Hamed H.; Caillat, Thierry; Sakamoto, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Skutterudite based thermoelectric unicouples are being considered for use in Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPSs) to support NASA's planetary exploration missions. For these systems, which would be much lighter than state of the art Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), it is important to ensure minimal degradation in the performance of unicouples that may be caused by material sublimation. In this work, two unicouples, JAN-04 with a thin metallic coating on the legs near the hot junction to suppress antimony sublimation and SEP-03 without coating, are tested for >1000 and 3600 h, respectively. The legs in the two unicouples are of almost the same dimensions and compositions; the p-legs are made of CeFe 3.5 Co 0.5 Sb 12 and Bi 0.4 Sb 1.6 Te 3 segments and the n-legs are made of CoSb 3 and Bi 2 Te 2.95 Se 0.05 segments. SEP-03 is tested at average hot and cold junction temperatures of 961.5 ± 22.0 and 296.3 ± 5.7 K, respectively, in argon gas at ∼0.068 MPa, and JAN-04 is tested at 962.8 ± 20.5 and 294.5 ± 3.3 K, respectively, initially in argon gas at the same pressure for ∼26.5 h then in vacuum ∼9.0 x 10 -7 Torr for >973.5 h. The measured open circuit voltage V oc (240 mV) and peak electrical power (1.64 W e ) for SEP-03 at the beginning of test (BOT) are higher than those for JAN-04 (188 mV and 0.84 W e , respectively). Although the argon gas effectively decreased the antimony loss from the legs of SEP-03, marked degradations in performance occurred. The estimated peak efficiency for SEP-03 decreased from 13.8% at BOT to 5.8% at end of test (EOT), and the peak power decreased from 1.64 W e at BOT to 0.48 W e at EOT, however, V oc decreased by ∼14%. The latter for JAN-04 decreased only by ∼3%, the estimated peak efficiency (∼12%) changed very little and the peak power decreased by ∼20%. Unlike SEP-03, the measured total and contact resistances of the legs in JAN-04 changed very little

  5. ACCOUNTING FOR THE EFFECTS OF INFLATION THE FINANCIAL RESULTS ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Shirobokov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Modern foreign political and economic situation in Russia contributes to the development of inflation in our country, which has a negative impact on the financial results of business. In this case, the application of IAS 29 «Financial reporting in hyperinflationary economies» is not possible because of a default specified in the standard criteria for the current situation in the Russian economy. It reduces the reliability of the financial statements. The aim of the work is to improve the methodology for the application of IAS 29 «Financial reporting in hyperinflationary economies» in the current economic environment by identifying existing problems in the application of standards and their solutions. In this paper, using scientific methods of analysis, synthesis, and abstraction it is identified shortcomings in the methodology for the application of IAS 29 and the ways to overcome them. In order to improve the methodology for the application of IAS 29 «Financial reporting in hyperinflationary economies» it is justified materiality level the impact of inflation, which is five per cent; developed criteria for materiality of influence. For accounting for a significant impact of inflation on income (loss of the business it is offered a special accounting mechanism, which includes a separate bookkeeping account 85 «Profit (loss from inflationary price changes» the new sub-account for 90 «Sales» and 91«Other income and expenses», register Help-calculation of the effects of inflation, as well as developed form as part of disclosures in the financial statements. It is concluded that the application of IAS 29 «Financial reporting in hyperinflationary economies» is not always possible, despite the need for taking into account the negative impact of inflation on the financial results of the business entity. The proposed accounting mechanism satisfies this need, which increases the reliability of accounting data and reporting.

  6. Experimental performance and results of the critical pebble bed facility KAHTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, F. J.; Drueke, V.; Kirch, N.; Neef, R. D.

    1974-10-15

    The paper provides a description and results of critical experiments performed in KAHTER fueled with pebbles containing coated particles of HEU/Th oxide with a ratio of uranium-to-thorium of 1.1:5. Core loadings with varying amounts of fuel and solid graphite pebbles were tested with fuel-to-graphite pebble ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3. Tests included criticality for various fuel loadings with all control rods removed, control rod worths for reflector-mounted control as single rods and in a bank and control worths for a central control rod, reaction rates by flux wire activations (Dy, Mn, In, Au, and U-235) and detector measurements (BF3 and fission chamber), simulated xenon stability testing using the motions of a Cf-252 source and Cd-absorber observed by an externally-located BF3 detector, and the reactivity worth of a Hf burnable absorber. For calculations of the room-temperature zero-power critical experiment, the values for nitrogen and hydrogen contents of the graphite were taken from previous experiments in CESAR.

  7. Executive functioning performance predicts subjective and physiological acute stress reactivity: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrawan, Donny; Yamakawa, Kaori; Kimura, Motohiro; Murakami, Hiroki; Ohira, Hideki

    2012-06-01

    Individual differences in baseline executive functioning (EF) capacities have been shown to predict state anxiety during acute stressor exposure. However, no previous studies have clearly demonstrated the relationship between EF and physiological measures of stress. The present study investigated the efficacy of several well-known EF tests (letter fluency, Stroop test, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test) in predicting both subjective and physiological stress reactivity during acute psychosocial stress exposure. Our results show that letter fluency served as the best predictor for both types of reactivity. Specifically, the higher the letter fluency score, the lower the acute stress reactivity after controlling for the baseline stress response, as indicated by lower levels of state anxiety, negative mood, salivary cortisol, and skin conductance. Moreover, the predictive power of the letter fluency test remained significant for state anxiety and cortisol indices even after further adjustments for covariates by adding the body mass index (BMI) as a covariate. Thus, good EF performance, as reflected by high letter fluency scores, may dampen acute stress responses, which suggests that EF processes are directly associated with aspects of stress regulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance Test Results of Safety I and C Systems of SMART MMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Yong Suk; Keum, Jong Yong; Jeong, Kwang Il; Lee, Joon Ku; Lee, Sang Seok; Kim, Kwan Woong

    2011-01-01

    KAERI has developed SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor), a 330MWt integral pressurized light water reactor that integrates four reactor coolant pumps, one pressurizer, eight steam generators, and one reactor core into a reactor vessel, since 1997 and submitted a SSAR (Standard design Safety Analysis Report) to Korea institute of nuclear safety (KINS) at the end of 2010 for the purpose of achieving the standard design approval (SDA) by the end of 2011. SMART MMIS has been designed with fully digitalized systems. Non-safety instrumentation and control (I and C) systems are designed based on the commercial distributed control systems. The safety I and C systems are designed using a new platform that was developed and validated by KAERI. Safety I and C systems are modularized using the platform. In the protection systems (PSs), datalinks are used to transmit data in a one-way direction in order to meet the independency requirement. In the engineered safety features-component control system (ESF-CCS), network switch devices (NSDs) are used to connect the group and loop controllers. The NSD was also newly developed and validated by KAERI. After validating the platform and NSD, a test facility was developed using the platform and NSDs to validate the performance of safety I and C systems. This paper presents the development and test results from the test facility

  9. Performance of PZC-Mo generator and labeling results prepared with its eluate and MDP kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yishu Liu

    2006-01-01

    This paper described the performance of Tc-99m generator prepared with Mo adsorbent PZC and irradiated nature MoO 3 , and the labeling results of MDP kit prepared with Tc-99m eluted from PZC-Mo generator and MDP was report as well. ThreeTc-99m generators was prepared with different batches of PZC and reactor irradiated nature Mo. The adsorption efficiency of two batches of the PZC is good (96.4% and 93.4%) and that of one batch of PZC is not satisfy (77.8%). The elution efficiency is not so high, and it increases along with the elution date. The elution file is very broad till to 30 ml and the Mo breakthrough is high to unacceptable. The labelling efficiency of MDP kit, prepared with Tc-99m eluate eluted with saline containing 0.05% NaClO from Mo-PZC generator, is approximately 77∼84% and it can reach to >98% labelling with eluate without containing 0.05%HClO in eluate. (author)

  10. Overview of JT-60U results toward high integrated performance in reactor-relevant regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.

    2002-01-01

    Toward steady sustainment of high integrated performance, we have developed weak magnetic shear (high β p mode) and reversed magnetic shear plasmas. As a large-sized tokamak equipped with a variety of devices for heating, current drive and profile/shape control, JT-60U has high ability to approach the conditions required in reactors: low values of normalized Larmor radius and collisionality, high temperatures with T e > or approx. T i , etc. This paper reviews recent JT-60U results with the emphasis on the projection to the reactor-relevant regime. Full non-inductive current drive has been achieved in a 1.8 MA high β p H-mode plasma with β N 2:4, HH y2 =1.2 and high fusion triple product (3 x 10 20 m -3 keVs) owing to increased N-NB power. In a reversed shear plasma, HH y2 =1.4 at n e /n GW 0.8 under the full non-inductive current drive has been achieved with injection of LHRF and N-NB. In box-type ITBs with reversed shear, barriers for ions and electrons were sustained in a regime with T e > or approx. T i . The pedestal pressure was doubled with increased total poloidal beta in pellet-injected high triangularity plasmas with type I and II ELMs. Stable existence of current hole was demonstrated. (author)

  11. Overview of diagnostic performance and results for the first operation phase in Wendelstein 7-X (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychowiak, M; Adnan, A; Alonso, A; Andreeva, T; Baldzuhn, J; Barbui, T; Beurskens, M; Biel, W; Biedermann, C; Blackwell, B D; Bosch, H S; Bozhenkov, S; Brakel, R; Bräuer, T; Brotas de Carvalho, B; Burhenn, R; Buttenschön, B; Cappa, A; Cseh, G; Czarnecka, A; Dinklage, A; Drews, P; Dzikowicka, A; Effenberg, F; Endler, M; Erckmann, V; Estrada, T; Ford, O; Fornal, T; Frerichs, H; Fuchert, G; Geiger, J; Grulke, O; Harris, J H; Hartfuß, H J; Hartmann, D; Hathiramani, D; Hirsch, M; Höfel, U; Jabłoński, S; Jakubowski, M W; Kaczmarczyk, J; Klinger, T; Klose, S; Knauer, J; Kocsis, G; König, R; Kornejew, P; Krämer-Flecken, A; Krawczyk, N; Kremeyer, T; Książek, I; Kubkowska, M; Langenberg, A; Laqua, H P; Laux, M; Lazerson, S; Liang, Y; Liu, S C; Lorenz, A; Marchuk, A O; Marsen, S; Moncada, V; Naujoks, D; Neilson, H; Neubauer, O; Neuner, U; Niemann, H; Oosterbeek, J W; Otte, M; Pablant, N; Pasch, E; Sunn Pedersen, T; Pisano, F; Rahbarnia, K; Ryć, L; Schmitz, O; Schmuck, S; Schneider, W; Schröder, T; Schuhmacher, H; Schweer, B; Standley, B; Stange, T; Stephey, L; Svensson, J; Szabolics, T; Szepesi, T; Thomsen, H; Travere, J-M; Trimino Mora, H; Tsuchiya, H; Weir, G M; Wenzel, U; Werner, A; Wiegel, B; Windisch, T; Wolf, R; Wurden, G A; Zhang, D; Zimbal, A; Zoletnik, S

    2016-11-01

    Wendelstein 7-X, a superconducting optimized stellarator built in Greifswald/Germany, started its first plasmas with the last closed flux surface (LCFS) defined by 5 uncooled graphite limiters in December 2015. At the end of the 10 weeks long experimental campaign (OP1.1) more than 20 independent diagnostic systems were in operation, allowing detailed studies of many interesting plasma phenomena. For example, fast neutral gas manometers supported by video cameras (including one fast-frame camera with frame rates of tens of kHz) as well as visible cameras with different interference filters, with field of views covering all ten half-modules of the stellarator, discovered a MARFE-like radiation zone on the inboard side of machine module 4. This structure is presumably triggered by an inadvertent plasma-wall interaction in module 4 resulting in a high impurity influx that terminates some discharges by radiation cooling. The main plasma parameters achieved in OP1.1 exceeded predicted values in discharges of a length reaching 6 s. Although OP1.1 is characterized by short pulses, many of the diagnostics are already designed for quasi-steady state operation of 30 min discharges heated at 10 MW of ECRH. An overview of diagnostic performance for OP1.1 is given, including some highlights from the physics campaigns.

  12. Result Summary for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Performance Assessment Model Version 4.110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Results for Version 4.110 of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) performance assessment (PA) model are summarized. Version 4.110 includes the fiscal year (FY) 2010 inventory estimate, including a future inventory estimate. Version 4.110 was implemented in GoldSim 10.11(SP4). The following changes have been implemented since the last baseline model, Version 4.105: (1) Updated the inventory and disposal unit configurations with data through the end of FY 2010. (1) Implemented Federal Guidance Report 13 Supplemental CD dose conversion factors (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Version 4.110 PA results comply with air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives (Tables 2 and 3, Figures 1 and 2). Air pathways results decrease moderately for all scenarios. The time of the maximum for the air pathway open rangeland scenario shifts from 1,000 to 100 years (y). All-pathways annual TED increases for all scenarios except the resident scenario. The maximum member of public all-pathways dose occurs at 1,000 y for the resident farmer scenario. The resident farmer dose was predominantly due to technetium-99 (Tc-99) (82 percent) and lead-210 (Pb-210) (13 percent). Pb-210 present at 1,000 y is produced predominantly by radioactive decay of uranium-234 (U-234) present at the time of disposal. All results for the postdrilling and intruder-agriculture scenarios comply with the performance objectives (Tables 4 and 5, Figures 3 and 4). The postdrilling intruder results are similar to Version 4.105 results. The intruder-agriculture results are similar to Version 4.105, except for the Pit 6 Radium Disposal Unit (RaDU). The intruder-agriculture result for the Shallow Land Burial (SLB) disposal units is a significant fraction of the performance objective and exceeds the performance objective at the 95th percentile. The intruder-agriculture dose is due predominantly to Tc-99 (75 percent) and U-238 (9.5 percent). The acute

  13. An empirical assessment of high-performing medical groups: results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, Stephen M; Schmittdiel, Julie; Wang, Margaret C; Li, Rui; Gillies, Robin R; Casalino, Lawrence P; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Rundall, Thomas G

    2005-08-01

    The performance of medical groups is receiving increased attention. Relatively little conceptual or empirical work exists that examines the various dimensions of medical group performance. Using a national database of 693 medical groups, this article develops a scorecard approach to assessing group performance and presents a theory-driven framework for differentiating between high-performing versus low-performing medical groups. The clinical quality of care, financial performance, and organizational learning capability of medical groups are assessed in relation to environmental forces, resource acquisition and resource deployment factors, and a quality-centered culture. Findings support the utility of the performance scorecard approach and identification of a number of key factors differentiating high-performing from low-performing groups including, in particular, the importance of a quality-centered culture and the requirement of outside reporting from third party organizations. The findings hold a number of important implications for policy and practice, and the framework presented provides a foundation for future research.

  14. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geelhood, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bignell, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Gregg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Jy-An [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sanborn, Scott [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spears, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klymyshyn, Nick [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  15. Review of Statistical Analyses Resulting from Performance of HLDWD-DWPF-005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The Engineering Department at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has reviewed two reports from the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) involving the statistical analysis of test results for analysis of small sample inserts (references 1 ampersand 2). The test results cover two proposed analytical methods, a room temperature hydrofluoric acid preparation (Cold Chem) and a sodium peroxide/sodium hydroxide fusion modified for insert samples (Modified Fusion). The reports support implementation of the proposed small sample containers and analytical methods at DWPF. Hydragard sampler valve performance was typical of previous results (reference 3). Using an element from each major feed stream. lithium from the frit and iron from the sludge, the sampler was determined to deliver a uniform mixture in either sample container.The lithium to iron ratios were equivalent for the standard 15 ml vial and the 3 ml insert.The proposed method provide equivalent analyses as compared to the current methods. The biases associated with the proposed methods on a vitrified basis are less than 5% for major elements. The sum of oxides for the proposed method compares favorably with the sum of oxides for the conventional methods. However, the average sum of oxides for the Cold Chem method was 94.3% which is below the minimum required recovery of 95%. Both proposed methods, cold Chem and Modified Fusion, will be required at first to provide an accurate analysis which will routinely meet the 95% and 105% average sum of oxides limit for Product Composition Control System (PCCS).Issued to be resolved during phased implementation are as follows: (1) Determine calcine/vitrification factor for radioactive feed; (2) Evaluate covariance matrix change against process operating ranges to determine optimum sample size; (3) Evaluate sources for low sum of oxides; and (4) Improve remote operability of production versions of equipment and instruments for installation in 221-S.The specifics of

  16. Effects of geometry on slot-jet film cooling performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyams, D.G.; McGovern, K.T.; Leylek, J.H. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The physics of the film cooling process for shaped, inclined slot-jets with realistic slot-length-to-width ratios (L/s) is studied for a range of blowing ratio (M) and density ratio (DR) parameters typical of gas turbine operations. For the first time in the open literature, the effect of inlet and exit shaping of the slot-jet on both flow and thermal field characteristics is isolated, and the dominant mechanisms responsible for differences in these characteristics are documented. A previously documented computational methodology was applied for the study of four distinct configurations: (1) slot with straight edges and sharp corners (reference case); (2) slot with shaped inlet region; (3) slot with shaped exit region; and (4) slot with both shaped inlet and exit regions. Detailed field results as well as surface phenomena involving adiabatic film effectiveness ({eta}) and heat transfer coefficient (h) are presented. It is demonstrated that both {eta} and h results are vital in the proper assessment of film cooling performance. All simulations were carried out using a multi-block, unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching solver with multi-grid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing type acceleration techniques. Special attention was paid to and full documentation provided for: (1) proper modeling of the physical phenomena; (2) exact geometry and high quality grid generation techniques; (3) discretization schemes; and (4) turbulence modeling issues. The key parameters M and DR were varied from 1.0 to 2.0 and 1.5 to 2.0, respectively, to show their influence. Simulations were repeated for slot length-to-width ratio (L/s) of 3.0 and 4.5 in order to explain the effects of this important parameter. Additionally, the performance of two popular turbulence models, standard k-F, and RNG k-E, were studied to establish their ability to handle highly elliptic jet/crossflow interaction type processes.

  17. Raven's Test Performance of Sub-Saharan Africans: Average Performance, Psychometric Properties, and the Flynn Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Dolan, Conor V.; Carlson, Jerry S.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of published data on the performance of sub-Saharan Africans on Raven's Progressive Matrices. The specific goals were to estimate the average level of performance, to study the Flynn Effect in African samples, and to examine the psychometric meaning of Raven's test scores as measures of general intelligence.…

  18. The effects of performance-based assessment criteria on student performance and self-assessment skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fastré, Greet; Van der Klink, Marcel; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Fastré, G. M. J., Van der Klink, M. R., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010). The effects of performance-based assessment criteria on student performance and self-assessment skills. Advances in Health Science Education, 15(4), 517-532.

  19. Boon and Bane of Being Sure: The Effect of Performance Certainty and Expectancy on Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Simon; Reinhard, Marc-André; Dickhäuser, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has suggested certainty to be an important factor when investigating effects of level of expectancies on future behavior. With the present study, we addressed the interplay of expectancy certainty and level of expectancies regarding task performance. We assumed that certain performance expectancies provide a better basis for the…

  20. Effect of magnetic therapy on selected physical performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, David M; Ishee, Jimmy H; Titlow, Larry W

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of magnetic therapy in the form of shoe insoles on vertical jump, bench squat, 40-yd dash, and a soccer-specific fitness test performance. Subjects were 14 collegiate male soccer players who were pretested, retested 3 weeks later, and then placed into a double-blind control or treatment group using a matching procedure. The control group received magnetic shoe insoles with a rating of 125 gauss, and the treatment group received insoles with a rating of 600 gauss. Subjects wore the insoles during practice and games for 7 weeks and were then retested. Results indicated significant differences among test scores during the 3 time periods but not between the treatment and control groups. There was a decline in 40-yd dash performance from the initial evaluation (5.10 seconds) to the final evaluation (5.08 seconds). There were no other significant differences. Within the limitations of the study, magnetic therapy did not improve physical performance.

  1. CT colonography: effect of experience and training on reader performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Stuart A.; Burling, David; Morley, Simon; Bartram, Clive I.; Halligan, Steve; Bassett, Paul; Atkin, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effect of radiologist experience and increasing exposure to CT colonography on reader performance. Three radiologists of differing general experience (consultant, research fellow, trainee) independently analysed 100 CT colonographic datasets. Readers had no prior experience of CT colonography and received feedback and training after the first 50 cases from an independent experienced radiologist. Diagnostic performance and reporting times were compared for the first and second 50 datasets and compared with the results of a radiologist experienced in CT colonography. Before training only the consultant reader achieved statistical equivalence with the reference standard for detection of larger polyps. After training, detection rates ranged between 25 and 58% for larger polyps. Only the trainee significantly improved after training (P=0.007), with performance of other readers unchanged or even worse. Reporting times following training were reduced significantly for the consultant and fellow (P<0.001 and P=0.03, respectively), but increased for the trainee (P<0.001). In comparison to the consultant reader, the odds of detection of larger polyps was 0.36 (CI 0.16, 0.82) for the fellow and 0.36 (CI 0.14, 0.91) for the trainee. There is considerable variation in the ability to report CT colonography. Prior experience in gastrointestinal radiology is a distinct advantage. Competence cannot be assumed even after directed training via a database of 50 cases. (orig.)

  2. The Effects of Collaboration on Logistical Performance and Transaction Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira, J.G.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the effect of supplier-retailer collaboration on logistical performance and transaction costs from the viewpoint of retail sector suppliers. The methodology consists of an empirical study conducted over nine months in the logistics department of a large Brazilian supermarket retailer and a survey of 125 representatives of 90 manufacturers. The results show collaboration contributes to an improvement in logistical performance related to urgent deliveries and deliveries that occur during periods of high demand. Interpersonal collaboration and joint actions contribute to the reduction of uncertainties among the participants. These joint actions, together with strategic collaboration, contribute to an increase in investment in specific assets, such as dedicated production lines or specialised vehicle fleets to serve partners. The study provides an analysis of logistical performance and transaction cost elements not previously investigated, including urgent deliveries and deliveries during periods of high demand, contract negotiation and renegotiation, waiting time for agreements to be reached, contingency logistics planning, and various cultural, psychosocial and geographical aspects of the supplier-retailer relationship. Managerial implications, research limitation and future research are also discussed.

  3. Radiation loading effect proportional chamber on the performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, T.D.; Kalinina, N.A.; Karpukhin, V.V.; Kruglov, V.V.; Khazins, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of a space charge which appears under the effect of radiation loading on counting characteristics of a proportional chamber, is experimentally investigated. Calculations are made which take into account the effect of a space charge of positive ions formed in the chamber. The investigations have been carried out on the test board which consists of a one-coordinate proportional chamber, a telescope of two scintillation counters and a collimated 90 Sr β-source. The proportional chamber has the 160x160 mm dimensions. The signal wires with the 50 μm diameter are located with the step of s=10 mm. High-voltage planes are coiled with a wire with the 100 μm diameter and a 2 mm step. The distance between high-voltage planes are 18 mm. The chamber is blown through with a gaseous mixture, its composition is 57% Ar+38% CH 4 +5% (OCH 3 ) 2 CH 2 . When carrying out measurements in wide ranges, the density of radiation loading and the amplifier threshold are changed. The experimental results show a considerable effect of radiation loading and the value of amplifier threshold on the value of a counting characteristic. This should be taken into account when estimating the performance of a proportional chamber according to board testing using radioactive sources, as conditions for investigations are usually different from those of a physical experiment on an accelerator

  4. The effect of mild motion sickness and sopite syndrome on multitasking cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsangas, Panagiotis; McCauley, Michael E; Becker, William

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of mild motion sickness and sopite syndrome on multitasking cognitive performance. Despite knowledge on general motion sickness, little is known about the effect of motion sickness and sopite syndrome on multitasking cognitive performance. Specifically, there is a gap in existing knowledge in the gray area of mild motion sickness. Fifty-one healthy individuals performed a multitasking battery. Three independent groups of participants were exposed to two experimental sessions. Two groups received motion only in the first or the second session, whereas the control group did not receive motion. Measurements of motion sickness, sopite syndrome, alertness, and performance were collected during the experiment Only during the second session, motion sickness and sopite syndrome had a significant negative association with cognitive performance. Significant performance differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic participants in the second session were identified in composite (9.43%), memory (31.7%), and arithmetic (14.7%) task scores. The results suggest that performance retention between sessions was not affected by mild motion sickness. Multitasking cognitive performance declined even when motion sickness and soporific symptoms were mild. The results also show an order effect. We postulate that the differential effect of session on the association between symptomatology and multitasking performance may be related to the attentional resources allocated to performing the multiple tasks. Results suggest an inverse relationship between motion sickness effects on performance and the cognitive effort focused on performing a task. Even mild motion sickness has potential implications for multitasking operational performance.

  5. The correlation between tonsil size and academic performance is not a direct one, but the results of various factors

    OpenAIRE

    Kargoshaie, AA; Najafi, M; Akhlaghi, M; Khazraie, HR; Hekmatdoost, A

    2009-01-01

    Chronic upper airway obstruction most often occurs when both tonsils and adenoid are enlarged but may occur when either is enlarged. Obstructive sleep syndrome in young children has been reported to be associated with an adverse effect on learning and academic performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of relative size of the tonsil on academic performance in 4th grade school children. In 320 children, physical examination to determine the size of tonsils was performed by t...

  6. Effect of various probiotics on growth performance of Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Sirsat

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the effect of various probiotics on the performance of Japanese Quails. One hundred Japanese quail chicks were weighed individually and they were uniformly distributed equally to four dietary treatments consisting 25 birds in each. The starter and finisher diets were containing ME 2800 and 2600 Kcal/kg and protein 25 and 23 % respectively. The group T0(Controll fed standard quail diet and T1,T2 and T3 were fed probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus sporogenes and Saccharomyces boulardii @ 0.05 % in diet. The study was conducted for six weeks in the same managemental condition. Weekly live body weight and feed consumption were recorded. The group supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in significantly higher growth rate and showed higher weight gain. The average feed efficiency and nitrogen retention were significantly higher in group supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cost of production /100gm of meat was found to be Rs.7.10, 6.84, 7.55 and 8.37 respectively in T0 to T3 groups. Thus, the study indicated that supplementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the diet of Japanese quails was effective in improving performance of the quails. [Vet World 2009; 2(8.000: 321-322

  7. The Effect of Perceived Abusive Management of Workers to Their Performance and the Role of Emotional Intelligence on This Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut AKIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research it is evaluated the effect of perceived abusive management of workers to their performance and the role of emotional intelligence on this effect. Research is realized with 253 civil servants in Kırşehir. Workers performance is handled two dimensional. One of them is task performance and the other one is contextual performance. According to the results, emotional intelligence is diminished or eliminated the effects of abusive management on workers performance. Additionally; emotional intelligence has a positive oriented relationship with task and contextual performance, abusive management has a negative oriented relationship with task and contextual performance. There is a positive oriented relationship between task and contextual performance. Another result of the research is the negative oriented relationship between emotional intelligence and the perceived abusive management.

  8. TIMSS 2011 Science Assessment Results: A Review of Ghana's Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buabeng, Isaac; Owusu, Kofi Acheaw; Ntow, Forster Danso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews Ghana's performance in the TIMSS 2011 survey in comparison with other African and some high performing countries which participated in the TIMSS assessment. Students' achievement in the science content areas assessed were summarized and teacher preparation constructs of teachers of the students who took part in the assessment…

  9. Preliminary Results of Testing of Flow Effects on Evaporator Scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, M.Z.

    2002-02-15

    This investigation has focused on the effects of fluid flow on solids deposition from solutions that simulate the feed to the 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site. Literature studies indicate that the fluid flow (or shear) affects particle-particle and particle-surface interactions and thus the phenomena of particle aggregation in solution and particle deposition (i.e., scale formation) onto solid surfaces. Experimental tests were conducted with two configurations: (1) using a rheometer to provide controlled shear conditions and (2) using controlled flow of reactive solution through samples of stainless steel tubing. All tests were conducted at 80 C and at high silicon and aluminum concentrations, 0.133 M each, in solutions containing 4 M sodium hydroxide and 1 A4 each of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Two findings from these experiments are important for consideration in developing approaches for reducing or eliminating evaporator scaling problems: (1) The rheometer tests suggested that for the conditions studied, maximum solids deposition occurs at a moderate shear rate, approximately 12 s{sup -1}. That value is expected to be on the order of shear rates that will occur in various parts of the evaporator system; for instance, a 6 gal/min single-phase liquid flow through the 2-in. lift or gravity drain lines would result in a shear rate of approximately 16 s{sup -1}. These results imply that engineering approaches aimed at reducing deposits through increased mixing would need to generate shear near all surfaces significantly greater than 12 s{sup -1}. However, further testing is needed to set a target value for shear that is applicable to evaporator operation. This is because the measured trend is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval due to variability in the results. In addition, testing at higher temperatures and lower concentrations of aluminum and silicon would more accurately represent conditions in the evaporator. Without

  10. Effectiveness of Human Research Protection Program Performance Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Nguyen, Yen

    2017-10-01

    We analyzed human research protection program performance metric data of all Department of Veterans Affairs research facilities obtained from 2010 to 2016. Among a total of 25 performance metrics, 21 (84%) showed improvement, four (16%) remained unchanged, and none deteriorated during the study period. The overall improvement from these 21 performance metrics was 81.1% ± 18.7% (mean ± SD), with a range of 30% to 100%. The four performance metrics that did not show improvement all had initial noncompliance/incidence rates of performance metrics that showed improvement ranged from 0.05% to 60%. However, of the 21 performance metrics that showed improvement, 10 had initial noncompliance/incidence rates of performance measurement is an effective tool in improving the performance of human research protection programs.

  11. Results of a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at a meson factory beam-stop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.W.

    1989-04-01

    This document describes a neutrino oscillation experiment performed at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The oscillation mode searched for is /bar /nu///sub μ/ → /bar /nu///sub e/. The first chapter is a review of the known properties of the neutrino and a description of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillation. Previous experimental limits on this unobserved phenomenon are also given. The second chapter describes the experimental apparatus used by the E645 experiment to detect neutrinos produced in the LAMPF beam stop. The salient features of the detector are its large mass (20 tons of CH 2 ), its fine segmentation (to allow good particle tracking), good energy resolution, its recording of the history both before and after tracks appear in the detector, an active cosmic-ray anticoincidence shield, and 2000 gm/cm 2 of passive cosmic-ray shielding. It is located 26.8 m from the neutrino source, which has a mean neutrino energy of 40 MeV. The third chapter details the reduction of the 1.3 million event data sample to a 49 event sample of neutrino candidates. Principle backgrounds are Michel electrons from stopping cosmic-ray muons and protons from np elastic scattering by cosmic-ray neutrons. The fourth chapter explains how background levels from neutrino-nuclear scattering are predicted. The result of a maximum-likelihood analysis reveals no evidence for oscillation. 90% confidence levels are set at δm 2 = .10 eV 2 for large mixing and sin 2 (2θ) = .014 for large δm 2 . 82 refs., 18 figs., 55 tabs

  12. Overview of JT-60U results toward high integrated performance in reactor-relevant regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent JT-60U results toward high integrated performance are reported with emphasis on the projection to the reactor-relevant regime. N-NB and EC power increased up to 6.2 MW and 3 MW, respectively. A high β p H-mode plasma with full non-inductive current drive has been obtained at 1.8 MA and the fusion triple product reached 3.1x10 20 m -3 keVs. High beta with β N =2.7 was maintained for 7.4 s. NTM suppression with EC was accomplished using a real-time feedback control system and improvement in β N was obtained. A stable existence of current hole was observed. High DT-equivalent fusion gain of 0.8 was maintained for 0.55 s in a plasma with a current hole. The current profile control in high bootstrap current reversed shear plasmas was demonstrated using N-NB and LH. A new operation scenario has been established in which a plasma with high bootstrap current fraction and ITBs is produced without the use of OH coil. ECCD study was undertaken in a reactor-relevant high T e regime. A new type of AE mode has been proposed and found to explain the observed frequency chirp quite well. High confinement reversed shear plasmas with T e >T i were obtained. Ar exhaust with EC heating was obtained in a high β p mode plasma. Impurity accumulation related to strong ITBs in a reversed shear plasma and degradation of ITB by ECH in a weak positive shear plasma have been found. Dedicated measurement of ELM dynamics and SOL plasma flow advanced the physics understanding. N-NB heating in an Ar-seed plasma extended the density region to 95% of Greenwald density with HH y2 =0.9. The enhancement of pedestal pressure was obtained with an increase of β p in a high triangularity configuration. (author)

  13. AREVA - 2012 annual results: significant turnaround in performance one year after launching the Action 2016 plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duperray, Julien; Berezowskyj, Katherine; Kempkes, Vincent; Rosso, Jerome; Thebault, Alexandre; Scorbiac, Marie de; Repaire, Philippine du

    2013-01-01

    One year after launching Areva's Action 2016 strategic plan, the first results are in. AREVA is ahead of schedule in executing its recovery plan. While pursuing its efforts in the management of a few difficult projects (such as OL3), Areva group was able to return to a virtuous performance cycle rooted in strong growth in nuclear order intake and good progress on its cost reduction program. Commercially, despite the difficult economic environment, AREVA was able to capitalize on its leadership in the installed base and on its long-term partnerships with strategic customers, beginning with EDF, with which AREVA renewed a confident and constructive working relationship. Areva has secured 80% of its objective of one billion euros of savings by the end of 2015 to improve its competitiveness. The group also continued efforts to optimize working capital requirement and control the capital expenditure trajectory. Together, these results enabled AREVA to exceed the objectives set for 2012 for two key indicators of its strategic plan: EBITDA and free operating cash flow. Nearly 60% of the 2.1 billion euros devoted to capital expenditures for future growth in 2012 were funded by operations, a quasi-doubled share compared to 2011. Areva's floor target for asset disposals was achieved one year ahead of schedule, also helping the Group to control its net debt, which remained below 4 billion euros. In 2013, Areva is continuing to implement the Action 2016 plan to keep its turnaround on track. In summary: - Backlog renewed over the year 2012 to euro 45.4 bn thanks to the increase in nuclear order intake; - Sales revenue growth: euro 9.342 bn (+5.3% vs. 2011), led by nuclear and renewables operations; - Very sharp upturn in EBITDA: euro 1.007 bn (+euro 586 m vs. 2011) - Very net improvement in free operating cash flow: -euro 854 m (+euro 512 m vs. 2011); - Back to positive reported operating income: euro 118 m (+euro 1.984 bn vs. 2011); - 2012-2013 floor target for asset disposals

  14. Performance Study of optical Modulator based on electrooptic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palodiya, V; Raghuwanshi, S K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied and derive performance parameter of highly integrated Lithium Niobate optical modulator. This is a chirp free modulator having low switching voltage and large bandwidth. For an external modulator in which travelling-wave electrodes length L imposed the modulating switching voltage, the product of V_π and L is fixed for a given electro optic material Lithium Niobate. We investigate to achieve a low V_π by both magnitude of the electro-optic coefficient for a wide variety of electro-optic materials. A Sellmeier equation for the extraordinary index of congruent lithium niobate is derived. For phase-matching, predictions are accmate for temperature between room temperature 250°C and wavelength ranging from 0.4 to 5µm. The Sellmeier equations predict more accmately refractive indices at long wavelengths. Theoretical result is confirmed by simulated results. We have analysed the various parameters such as switching voltage, device performance index, time constant, transmittance, cut-off frequency, 3-dB bandwidth, power absorption coefficient and transmission bit rate of Lithium Niobate optical Modulator based on electro -optic effect. (paper)

  15. [Job performance in work organizations: the effects of management by group goals and job interdependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Hisataka

    2015-04-01

    cThis study examined the interactive effect of management by group goals and job interdependence on employee's activities in terms of task and contextual performance. A survey was conducted among 140 Japanese employees. Results indicated that management by group goals was related only to contextual performance. Job interdependence, however, had a direct effect on both task and contextual performance. Moreover, moderated regression analyses revealed that for work groups requiring higher interdependence among employees, management by group goals had a positive relation to contextual performance but not to task performance. When interdependence was not necessarily required, however, management by group goals had no relation to contextual performance and even negatively impacted task performance, respectively. These results show that management by group goals affects task and contextual performance, and that this effect is moderated by job interdependence. This provides a theoretical extension as well as a practical application to the setting and management of group goals.

  16. Diagnostic performance of 320-detector CT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lei; Yang, Lin; Fan, Zhanming; Yu, Wei; Lv, Biao; Zhang, Zhaoqi [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2011-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and radiation dose of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) using 320-detector CT. Thirty-seven patients with persistent AF and suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) were enrolled. All patients underwent both 320-detector CTCA and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). CT image quality and the presence of significant ({>=}50%) stenosis were evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the results of CCA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated using CCA as the reference standard. Differences in detection of coronary artery stenosis between 320-detector CTCA and CCA were evaluated with McNemar's test. Patient radiation dose was calculated by multiplying dose length product by conversion coefficient of 0.017. In total 474 evaluated coronary segments, 459 (96.8%) segments were diagnostically evaluable. On per-segment analysis, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 90.0% (18 of 20), 99.3% (436 of 439), 85.7% (18 of 21) and 99.5% (436 of 438). No significant difference was found between 320-detector CTCA and CCA on the detection of significant stenosis (P = 1.000). Effective doses of 320-detector CTCA was 13.0 {+-} 4.7 mSv. 320-detector CTCA is feasible and accurate in excluding CAD in patients with AF. (orig.)

  17. SEE - Sight Effectiveness Enhancement. Results of the aeronautical evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.B.; Alapetite, Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    in Bordeaux, France. The simulator was equipped with a head-up display and the simulated environments specified and established in the project. Theevaluation has involved as test subjects six professional 737 airline pilots. The document describes objective and subjective measures of performance. The analysis...

  18. Effect of duct geometry on Wells turbine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, S.; Abdel Hafiz, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A Wells turbine duct design in the form of venturi duct is proposed and investigated. ► Optimum duct geometry is identified. ► Up to 14% increase of the turbine power can be achieved using the optimized duct geometry. ► Up to 9% improve of the turbine efficiency is attained by optimizing the turbine duct geometry. ► The optimized duct geometry results in tangible delay of the turbine stalling point. - Abstract: Wells turbines can represent important source of renewable energy for many countries. An essential disadvantage of Wells turbines is their low aerodynamic efficiency and consequently low power produced. In order to enhance the Wells turbine performance, the present research work proposes the use of a symmetrical duct in the form of a venturi tube with turbine rotor located at throat. The effects of duct area ratio and duct angle are investigated in order to optimize Wells turbine performance. The turbine performance is numerically investigated by solving the steady 3D incompressible Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stocks equation (RANS). A substantial improve of the turbine performance is achieved by optimizing the duct geometry. Increasing both the duct area ratio and duct angle increase the acceleration and deceleration upstream and downstream the rotor respectively. The accelerating flow with thinner boundary layer thickness upstream the rotor reduces the flow separation on the rotor suction side. The downstream diffuser reduces the interaction between tip leakage flow and blade suction side. Up to 14% increase in turbine power and 9% increase in turbine efficiency are achieved by optimizing the duct geometry. On other hand, a tangible delay of the turbine stall point is also detected.

  19. Comparison of accelerated pavement test results with long term pavement behaviour and performance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jooste, FJ

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the following:how accelerated pavement testing predictions compare with actual road behaviour and performance the relative influences of load and environmental factors on pavement deterioration and how well...

  20. Managing for Results Opportunities for Continued Improvements in Agencies' Performance Plans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    .... As you requested, this report provides summary information based on our review and evaluation of the fiscal year 2000 performance plans of the 24 agencies covered by the Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Act...

  1. Fuel Economy and Performance of Mild Hybrids with Ultracapacitors: Simulations and Vehicle Test Results (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.; Lustbader, J.; Tataria, H.

    2009-06-01

    NREL worked with GM and demonstrated equivalent performance in the Saturn Vue Belt Alternator Starter (BAS) hybrid vehicle whether running with its stock batteries or a retrofit ultracapacitor system.

  2. Novel Scanning Lens Instrument for Evaluating Fresnel Lens Performance: Equipment Development and Initial Results (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, R.; Miller, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.; Anton, I.; Sala, G.

    2013-07-01

    A system dedicated to the optical transmittance characterization of Fresnel lenses has been developed at NREL, in collaboration with the UPM. The system quantifies the optical efficiency of the lens by generating a performance map. The shape of the focused spot may also be analyzed to understand change in the lens performance. The primary instrument components (lasers and CCD detector) have been characterized to confirm their capability for performing optical transmittance measurements. Measurements performed on SoG and PMMA lenses subject to a variety of indoor conditions (e.g., UV and damp heat) identified differences in the optical efficiency of the evaluated lenses, demonstrating the ability of the Scanning Lens Instrument (SLI) to distinguish between the aged lenses.

  3. The effects of bedrest on crew performance during simulated shuttle reentry. Volume 2: Control task performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jex, H. R.; Peters, R. A.; Dimarco, R. J.; Allen, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A simplified space shuttle reentry simulation performed on the NASA Ames Research Center Centrifuge is described. Anticipating potentially deleterious effects of physiological deconditioning from orbital living (simulated here by 10 days of enforced bedrest) upon a shuttle pilot's ability to manually control his aircraft (should that be necessary in an emergency) a comprehensive battery of measurements was made roughly every 1/2 minute on eight military pilot subjects, over two 20-minute reentry Gz vs. time profiles, one peaking at 2 Gz and the other at 3 Gz. Alternate runs were made without and with g-suits to test the help or interference offered by such protective devices to manual control performance. A very demanding two-axis control task was employed, with a subcritical instability in the pitch axis to force a high attentional demand and a severe loss-of-control penalty. The results show that pilots experienced in high Gz flying can easily handle the shuttle manual control task during 2 Gz or 3 Gz reentry profiles, provided the degree of physiological deconditioning is no more than induced by these 10 days of enforced bedrest.

  4. The Effect Of Stereotype On Cognitive Performance: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender and Behaviour ... Abstract. This study investigated the effect stereotypes have on cognitive performance. ... Therefore understanding the nature of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination is the first step in combating these practices.

  5. the negative effect of child labour on academic performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    This could be done through the use of mass media, schools and social ... KEYWORDS: Child labour, Abuse, Academic performance and Effect. ... have overtime given the researcher a cause for ... Child labour is not significantly dependent.

  6. Effects of Tempo and Performing Medium on Children's Music Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Albert; Cote, Richard

    1983-01-01

    This study measured the effect of three levels of tempo and two levels of performing medium, vocal and instrumental, on the expressed preference of fifth- and sixth-grade students for traditional jazz music listening examples. (Author/SR)

  7. Task demands moderate stereotype threat effects on memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Thomas M; Emery, Lisa; Queen, Tara L

    2009-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults' memory performance is adversely affected by the explicit activation of negative stereotypes about aging. In this study, we examined the impact of stereotype threat on recognition memory, with specific interest in (a) the generalizability of previously observed effects, (b) the subjective experience of memory, and (c) the moderating effects of task demands. Older participants subjected to threat performed worse than did those in a nonthreat condition but only when performance constraints were high (i.e., memory decisions had to be made within a limited time frame). This effect was reflected in the subjective experience of memory, with participants in this condition having a lower ratio of "remember" to "know" responses. The absence of threat effects when constraints were minimal provides important boundary information regarding stereotype influences on memory performance.

  8. The Effects of Medical Conditions on Driving Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This project investigated the effect of selected medical conditions on the exposure and performance of older drivers. A review of recent literature, followed by a panel meeting with driving safety experts, prioritized four medical conditions for furt...

  9. Effects of stocking density on growth performance, carcass grade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ada

    2016-09-09

    Sep 9, 2016 ... This study determined the effect of space allowance on performance, carcass .... The individual pen for the pigs was considered the experimental unit for the ..... This work was carried out with the support of the Cooperative ...

  10. Effects of glucose oxidase on the growth performance, serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Martina

    2016-02-06

    Feb 6, 2016 ... The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of diets supplemented with ... Keywords: Glucose oxidase, intestinal health, performance, swine ..... This work was supported by the National High-Tech Research and ...

  11. Effects of non-antibiotic feed additives on performance, immunity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    Condition of use: The user may copy, distribute, transmit and adapt the work, but .... probiotic had no significant effects on performance traits. .... Some information on the gut health could be obtained by studying the structure of the intestinal.

  12. Effect Of Dietary Protein Levels On The Performance And Carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect Of Dietary Protein Levels On The Performance And Carcass ... Nigerian Journal of Animal Production ... Response criteria such as weight gain and feed conversion ratio, among others, and carcass characteristics were measured.

  13. Effect of capacity building on organizational performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of capacity building on organizational performance of multipurpose ... is need for re-orientation and sensitization of members and the employees of the ... assist by making cooperative extension services compulsory and accessible to all ...

  14. The Effect of Capital Adequacy on Banks' Performance: Evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Business Research ... This study estimates the effect of capital adequacy on bank earnings and profitability in Nigeria. ... regulatory framework in the management liquidity and bank capital to shore-up bank performance in Nigeria.

  15. Effects of sweet potato meal on performance and carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of sweet potato meal on performance and carcass characteristics of broiler finisher birds. ... International Journal of Tropical Agriculture and Food Systems ... Feed and water were supplied ad libitum to the experimental birds, while ...

  16. OBJECTIVES, PERFORMANCES, RESULTS – VIEWS ON THEIR USE IN THE PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacanu Bogdan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on the management associated with relatively common concepts: objective, result and performance (ORP. The study is important because in the Romania of the year 2011, a state reform is being planned, which will substantiate into the reorganization of public institutions, as the improvement of their activity is set forth by utilizing the set of tools associated with the aforementioned concepts. The study represents an analysis related to the use of the set of management tools associated with the aforementioned concepts within the Romanian public organizations. The study is concerned with a qualitative estimation involving the translation of the existing theory into the practice of the present moment. The review of the specialized literature is aimed at selecting the most common theoretical milestones, in order to increase the probability to retrieve them from the practice of the organizations. The works of Drucker represent the first theoretical system of reference. The way the ORP concepts have been utilized within the American organizations generate the guiding elements of the present study. The research presents a longitudinal segmentation, the frontier between the two parts being the present moment. The current state of facts is studied by means of an inductive approach. The hypothesis related to the ORP management in the near future is actually built on the grounds provided by the estimation of this state of facts. Its deductive approach starts from evaluating the pragmatic premises, involving the support of the process that will utilize the ORP in the near future, according to the theoretical percepts. The analysis is qualitative in nature. The identification of the cases that represented the exception was taken into account. The analysis focused on public institutions considered a priori as more transparent: the university, the hospital and the town hall. Even if in the case of the university there are regulations

  17. Sleep and academic performance in later adolescence: results from a large population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysing, Mari; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J; Askeland, Kristin G; Sivertsen, Børge

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the association between sleep duration and sleep patterns and academic performance in 16-19 year-old adolescents using registry-based academic grades. A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland-survey, surveyed 7798 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53.5% girls). The survey was linked with objective outcome data on school performance. Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep deficit and bedtime differences between weekday and weekend. School performance [grade point average (GPA)] was obtained from official administrative registries. Most sleep parameters were associated with increased risk for poor school performance. After adjusting for sociodemographic information, short sleep duration and sleep deficit were the sleep measures with the highest odds of poor GPA (lowest quartile). Weekday bedtime was associated significantly with GPA, with adolescents going to bed between 22:00 and 23:00 hours having the best GPA. Also, delayed sleep schedule during weekends was associated with poor academic performance. The associations were somewhat reduced after additional adjustment for non-attendance at school, but remained significant in the fully adjusted models. In conclusion, the demonstrated relationship between sleep problems and poor academic performance suggests that careful assessment of sleep is warranted when adolescents are underperforming at school. Future studies are needed on the association between impaired sleep in adolescence and later functioning in adulthood. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  18. Effects of Extreme Sleep Deprivation on Human Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuan Tran; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Elizabeth T. Cady; Bradford Amstutz; Pete D. Elgin; Christopher Vowels; Gerald Deehan

    2007-04-01

    Sleep is a fundamental recuperative process for the nervous system. Disruption of this homeostatic drive can lead to severe impairments of the operator’s ability to perceive, recognize, and respond to emergencies and/or unanticipated events, putting the operator at risk. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive understanding of how sleep deprivation influences human performance is essential in order to counter fatigue or to develop mitigation strategies. The goal of the present study was to examine the psychological effects of prolonged sleep deprivation (approx. 75 hrs) over a four-day span on a general aviation pilot flying a fixed-based flight simulator. During the study, a series of tasks were employed every four hours in order to examine the pilot’s perceptual and higher level cognitive abilities. Overall, results suggest that the majority of cognitive and perceptual degradation occurs between 30-40 hours into the flight. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed.

  19. Performance investigation of low – Concentration photovoltaic systems under hot and arid conditions: Experimental and numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousef, Mohamed S.; Abdel Rahman, Ali K.; Ookawara, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Influence of cooling on the performance of photovoltaic systems. • A comprehensive model (optical, thermal, and electrical) was developed. • Experimental measurements were conducted under hot climate conditions. • For conventional photovoltaic with cooling, about 11% more power was obtained. • For concentrated photovoltaic with cooling, about 15% more power was obtained. - Abstract: In this study, a comparative performance analysis was performed between a conventional photovoltaic system and a low-concentration photovoltaic system. Two typical photovoltaic modules and two compound parabolic concentrating photovoltaic systems were examined. A Cooling system was employed to lower the temperature of the solar cells in each of the two configurations. Experimental and numerical investigations of the performance of the two arrangements with and without cooling were presented. Experiments were conducted outdoors at the Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology, subjected to the hot climate conditions of New Borg El-Arab City, Alexandria, Egypt (Longitude/Latitude: E 029°42′/N 30°55′). A comprehensive system model was established, which comprises an optical model, coupled with thermal and electrical models. The coupled model was developed analytically and solved numerically, using MATLAB software, to assess the overall performance of the two configurations, considering the concentration ratio of the concentrated photovoltaic system to be 2.4X. The results indicated that cooling the solar panels considerably improved the electrical power yield of the photovoltaic systems. By employing cooling, the temperatures of the conventional photovoltaic system and the concentrated photovoltaic system were effectively lowered by approximately 25% and 30%, respectively, resulting in a significant enhancement in the electrical power output of the photovoltaic system by 11% and that of the concentrated photovoltaic system by 15%. Furthermore, the

  20. Effect of housing, initial weight and season on feedlot performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feedlot information, submitted by Iowa cattle producers to the Iowa State University Feedlot Performance and Cost Monitoring Program, was examined to determine the effects of housing, initial weight and season interactions on beef steer performance. Feedlot information, consisting of 1225 pens of steers, contained ...

  1. Effects of Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity on Mathematics Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David S.; Hannon, James C.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an acute bout of physical activity on academic performance in school-based settings is under researched. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between a single, vigorous (70-85%) bout of physical activity completed during physical education on standardized mathematics test performance among 72, eighth grade students…

  2. Effect of feeding frequencies on growth performance of Clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of feeding frequencies on growth performance of Clarias gariepinus. CI Ayo-Olalusi, AAA Ugwumba. Abstract. Investigations were carried out on the growth performance of juvenile Clarias gariepinus using four different feeding frequencies. Two hundred and forty juveniles (8.6 +0.0 g) were stocked in eight aquaria ...

  3. Product, Organizational and Performance Effects of Product Modularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boer, Henrike Engele Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    beyond these industries. To be able to establish whether firms not part of these industries would experience the same performance effects, survey research will be needed. To support future survey research, this paper proposes an operationalization of product modularity and details the link between...... product modularity and firm performance, to support the future development of measures and hypotheses....

  4. Effect of Painting Series Package on the Performances of Junior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of Painting Series Package on the performance of Junior Secondary School Cultural and Creative Arts in Ogbomoso, Nigeria. Gender influence on the students' performances was also examined. Sample comprised 60 students drawn purposively from two secondary schools.

  5. An Examination of Stereotype Threat Effects on Girls' Mathematics Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganley, Colleen M.; Mingle, Leigh A.; Ryan, Allison M.; Ryan, Katherine; Vasilyeva, Marina; Perry, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Stereotype threat has been proposed as 1 potential explanation for the gender difference in standardized mathematics test performance among high-performing students. At present, it is not entirely clear how susceptibility to stereotype threat develops, as empirical evidence for stereotype threat effects across the school years is inconsistent. In…

  6. Effects of Cognitive Interventions on Sports Anxiety and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shane M.; Woolfolk, Robert L.

    Oxendine (1970) hypothesized that the arousal-performance relationship varies across tasks, such that gross motor activities will require high arousal for optimal performance while fine motor activities will be facilitated by low arousal, but adversely affected by high arousal. Although the effects of preparatory arousal on strength performance…

  7. The effect of alliance block membership on innovative performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duysters, G.M.; Hagedoorn, J.; Lemmens, C.E.A.V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper longitudinally explores the technology positioning strategies, i.e. block membership or non-block membership, in interorganizational networks that maximize innovative performance. Hence, we will derive some basic propositions on the effect of block membership on innovative performance

  8. Effects of diets containing alkali-treated Soybeans on performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of diets containing alkali-treated Soybeans on performance traits, nutrient digestibility and cost benefits of broiler chickens. ... These factors accounted for the overall best performance recorded in 1% K2CO3 - treated soybeans which was closely followed by 1% Na2CO3 treated soybean base diets. Keywords: ...