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Sample records for percutaneous gastrostomy a

  1. Percutaneous gastrostomy -a report of twenty-seven cases-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Lee, Ho Suk; Kim, Yong Joo; Kim, Tae Hun; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kang, Duk Sik

    1991-01-01

    Nutritional support by gastrostomy feeding is an important treatment adjunct when major swallowing difficulty or debilitating diseases is present. This technique for percutaneous placement of a gastric feeding tube now provides many patients with a simple, safe, and well-tolerated alternative to surgical feeding gastrostomy. We experienced 27 cases of percutaneous gastrostomy from January 1989 to February 1991 at Kyungpook National University Hospital. The underlying diseases of the patients were esophageal cancer (11), pyriform sinus cancer (4), laryngeal cancer (3), tongue cancer (2), lye stricture (1), lung cancer (1), chordoma (1), lethal midline granuloma (1), malignant lymphoma (1), maxillary cancer (1), and tonsil cancer (1). Selding method was used in all cases. In five patients it was difficult to insert the nasogastric tube for air insufflation, and one patient had subtotal gastrectomy with gastrojejunostomy, but gastrostomy was performed in all cases. The general condition improved in all patients. We experienced one case of mild peritonitis, but no other significant complications were observed. Gastrostomy tubes were patient in all patients during their survival period, except two patients who experienced obstruction 2 and 6 months after the procedure. Percutaneous gastrostomy can be used safely and effectively in such patients who have pharyngoesophageal or CNS lesions precluding oral intake

  2. Radiologic Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Nondistended Stomach: A Modified Approach

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    Petrocelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.petrocelli@hsanmartino.it; Salsano, Giancarlo, E-mail: giancarlo.salsano@yahoo.it; Bovio, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.bovio@hsanmartino.it; Camerano, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.camerano@gmail.com; Utili, Alice, E-mail: aliceutili@gmail.com; Ferro, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ferro@hsanmartino.it [IRCCS San Martino University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    IntroductionGastrostomy tube placement for patients requiring long-term nutritional support may be performed using different techniques including endoscopic, surgical, and percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG), typically performed when percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is not possible, requires proper gastric distension that is achieved by insufflating air through a nasogastric tube. We describe a simple technique to prevent air escape from the stomach during gastrostomy tube placement. To the best of our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described in the literature.Materials and MethodsFour patients with unsuccessful percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy were referred for fluoroscopic-guided gastrostomy. One patient had a pyriform sinus tumor and three had an ischemic stroke causing dysphagia. Gastric distention was not achieved in the patients due to air escaping into the bowel during the standard RIG procedure. A modified approach using a balloon catheter inflated in the pylorus to avoid air passing into the duodenum permitted successful RIG.ResultsThe modified RIG procedure was successfully carried out in all cases without complications.DiscussionInadequate air distension of the stomach is an unusual event that causes a failure of gastrostomy tube placement and an increased risk of both major and minor complications. The use of a balloon catheter inflated in the first part of the duodenum prevents the air passage into the bowel allowing the correct positioning of the gastrostomy.

  3. Peritonitis following percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertions in children

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    Dookhoo, Leema [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Mahant, Sanjay [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Pediatrics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Parra, Dimitri A.; John, Philip R.; Amaral, Joao G.; Connolly, Bairbre L. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    Percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy has a high success rate, low morbidity, and can be performed under different levels of sedation or local anesthesia in children. Despite its favourable safety profile, major complications can occur. Few studies have examined peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children. To identify potential risk factors and variables influencing the development and early diagnosis of peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of children who developed peritonitis within 7 days of percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy between 2003 and 2012. From the 1,504 patients who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy, patients who developed peritonitis (group 1) were matched by closest date of procedure to those without peritonitis (group 2). Peritonitis was defined according to recognized clinical criteria. Demographic, clinical, procedural, management and outcomes data were collected. Thirty-eight of 1,504 children (2.5%; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy developed peritonitis ≤7 days post procedure (group 1). Fever (89%), irritability (63%) and abdominal pain (55%) occurred on presentation of peritonitis. Group 1 patients were all treated with antibiotics; 41% underwent additional interventions: tube readjustments (8%), aspiration of pneumoperitoneum (23%), laparotomy (10%) and intensive care unit admission (10%). In group 1, enteral feeds started on average 3 days later and patients were discharged 5 days later than patients in group 2. There were two deaths not directly related to peritonitis. Neither age, gender, weight, underlying diagnoses nor operator was identified as a risk factor. Peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children occurs in approximately 2.5% of cases. No risk factors for its development were identified. Medical management is usually sufficient for a good outcome

  4. Peritonitis following percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertions in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dookhoo, Leema; Mahant, Sanjay; Parra, Dimitri A.; John, Philip R.; Amaral, Joao G.; Connolly, Bairbre L.

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy has a high success rate, low morbidity, and can be performed under different levels of sedation or local anesthesia in children. Despite its favourable safety profile, major complications can occur. Few studies have examined peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children. To identify potential risk factors and variables influencing the development and early diagnosis of peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of children who developed peritonitis within 7 days of percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy between 2003 and 2012. From the 1,504 patients who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy, patients who developed peritonitis (group 1) were matched by closest date of procedure to those without peritonitis (group 2). Peritonitis was defined according to recognized clinical criteria. Demographic, clinical, procedural, management and outcomes data were collected. Thirty-eight of 1,504 children (2.5%; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy developed peritonitis ≤7 days post procedure (group 1). Fever (89%), irritability (63%) and abdominal pain (55%) occurred on presentation of peritonitis. Group 1 patients were all treated with antibiotics; 41% underwent additional interventions: tube readjustments (8%), aspiration of pneumoperitoneum (23%), laparotomy (10%) and intensive care unit admission (10%). In group 1, enteral feeds started on average 3 days later and patients were discharged 5 days later than patients in group 2. There were two deaths not directly related to peritonitis. Neither age, gender, weight, underlying diagnoses nor operator was identified as a risk factor. Peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children occurs in approximately 2.5% of cases. No risk factors for its development were identified. Medical management is usually sufficient for a good outcome

  5. Peritonitis following percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dookhoo, Leema; Mahant, Sanjay; Parra, Dimitri A; John, Philip R; Amaral, Joao G; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2016-09-01

    Percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy has a high success rate, low morbidity, and can be performed under different levels of sedation or local anesthesia in children. Despite its favourable safety profile, major complications can occur. Few studies have examined peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children. To identify potential risk factors and variables influencing the development and early diagnosis of peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of children who developed peritonitis within 7 days of percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy between 2003 and 2012. From the 1,504 patients who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy, patients who developed peritonitis (group 1) were matched by closest date of procedure to those without peritonitis (group 2). Peritonitis was defined according to recognized clinical criteria. Demographic, clinical, procedural, management and outcomes data were collected. Thirty-eight of 1,504 children (2.5%; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) who underwent percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy developed peritonitis ≤7 days post procedure (group 1). Fever (89%), irritability (63%) and abdominal pain (55%) occurred on presentation of peritonitis. Group 1 patients were all treated with antibiotics; 41% underwent additional interventions: tube readjustments (8%), aspiration of pneumoperitoneum (23%), laparotomy (10%) and intensive care unit admission (10%). In group 1, enteral feeds started on average 3 days later and patients were discharged 5 days later than patients in group 2. There were two deaths not directly related to peritonitis. Neither age, gender, weight, underlying diagnoses nor operator was identified as a risk factor. Peritonitis following percutaneous retrograde gastrostomy in children occurs in approximately 2.5% of cases. No risk factors for its development were identified. Medical management is usually sufficient for a good outcome

  6. Percutaneous gastrostomy and jejunostomy: Technique, results, and complications in 55 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.R.; Brown, A.; Saini, S.; Hahn, P.F.; Steiner, E.; Ferrucci, J.T.; Forman, B.H.; Silverman, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy is a well-described method that has not been widely adopted by radiologists. The authors reviewed their experience to highlight technical points and clinical results. Direct percutaneous gastrostomy was performed in 51 patients and percutaneous jejunostomy in four. Indications for gastrostomy procedures were the need for general nutrition (n = 31), complications of use of a nasogastric feeding tube (n = 7), gastric or small bowel decompression (n = 4) and endoscopic failure (n = 5). The major indication for percutaneous jejunostomy was decompression of small bowel obstruction. Key technical aspects include the use of a novel needle device that tacks the abdominal wall to the stomach, thus assuring a seal between the two structures. In the percutaneous gastrostomies, 18-F Foley catheters were introduced through the tacked portion of the stomach with a Seldinger technique and dilators. For percutaneous jejunostomy, 18-F feeding tubes were placed. All procedures were performed under local anesthesia. The authors conclude that a radiologic percutaneous gastrostomy is a safe and effective procedure and should be pursued aggressively by interventional radiologists

  7. Percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts

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    Sane, S.S.; Towbin, A.; Bergey, E.A.; Kaye, R.D.; Fitz, C.R.; Albright, L.; Towbin, R.B. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital of Pittsburgh, 3705 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to determine the risk of CNS and/or peritoneal infection in children with ventriculoperitoneal shunts in whom a percutaneous gastrostomy tube is placed. Materials and methods. We placed 205 gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy tubes from January of 1991 to December 1996. Twenty-three patients (10 boys, 13 girls) had ventriculoperitoneal shunts at the time of placement. All shunts were placed at least 1 month prior to placement of the gastrostomy tube. The patients ranged in age from 8 months to 16 years with a mean age of 6 years, 9 months. Patient weight ranged from 2 kg to 60 kg. All 23 children required long-term nutritional support due to severe neurologic impairment. No prophylactic antibiotics were given prior to the procedure. Of the patients, 21/23 had a 14-F Sacks-Vine gastrostomy tube with a fixed terminal retention device inserted, using percutaneous fluoroscopic antegrade technique. Two of the 23 patients had a Ross 14-F Flexi-flo gastrostomy tube which required a retrograde technique due to a small caliber esophagus in these children. Results. All 23 children had technically successful placements of percutaneous gastrostomy (7) or gastrojejunostomy (16) tubes. Of the children, 21/23 (91 %) had no complications from the procedure. Two of 23 (9 %) patients demonstrated signs of peritonitis after placement of their gastrostomy tubes and subsequently had shunt infections. In both, children CSF culture grew gram-positive cocci. The antegrade technique was used in both children who developed peritonitis. Conclusion. Our study indicates children with ventriculoperitoneal shunts who undergo percutaneous gastrostomy are at greater risk for infection and subsequent shunt malfunction. Therefore, we recommend prophylactic antibiotic therapy to cover for skin and oral flora. (orig.) With 1 fig., 7 refs.

  8. Effects of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on survival of patients in a persistent vegetative state after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kunpeng; Chen, Ying; Yan, Caihong; Huang, Zhijia; Wang, Deming; Gui, Peigen; Bao, Juan

    2017-10-01

    To assess the effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on short- and long-term survival of patients in a persistent vegetative state after stroke and determine the relevant prognostic factors. Stroke may lead to a persistent vegetative state, and the effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on survival of stroke patients in a persistent vegetative state remains unclear. Prospective study. A total of 97 stroke patients in a persistent vegetative state hospitalised from January 2009 to December 2011 at the Second Hospital, University of South China, were assessed in this study. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed in 55 patients, and mean follow-up time was 18 months. Survival rate and risk factors were analysed. Median survival in the 55 percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-treated patients was 17·6 months, higher compared with 8·2 months obtained for the remaining 42 patients without percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy treatment. Univariate analyses revealed that age, hospitalisation time, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy treatment status, family financial situation, family care, pulmonary infection and nutrition were significantly associated with survival. Multivariate analysis indicated that older age, no gastrostomy, poor family care, pulmonary infection and poor nutritional status were independent risk factors affecting survival. Indeed, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy significantly improved the nutritional status and decreased pulmonary infection rate in patients with persistent vegetative state after stroke. Interestingly, median survival time was 20·3 months in patients with no or one independent risk factors of poor prognosis (n = 38), longer compared with 8·7 months found for patients with two or more independent risk factors (n = 59). Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy significantly improves long-term survival of stroke patients in a persistent vegetative state and is associated with improved nutritional status

  9. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens; Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo

    2017-01-01

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  10. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

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    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (HUCAM/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Cassiano Antonio de Morais. Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2017-03-15

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  11. [Indication and effectiveness of endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for the home care patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, T; Hida, S; Higasa, K; Shinomiya, S; Matsumoto, T; Fukuoka, K; Yamanaka, E; Ozaki, S; Takayama, E

    2000-12-01

    We are managing 8 home care patients who have a gastrostomy made using an endoscopic percutaneous technique as a route of parenteral alimentation. Based on our experience, the preconditions for an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation are 1. normal gastrointestinal function, 2. difficulty in swallowing, 3. possibility that the caregiver can manage the gastrostomy. When we performed an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for 8 home care patients, we obtained the several advantages mentioned below. 1. Swallowing pneumonia was prevented. 2. Adequate amount of alimental liquid could be infused. 3. Patient could take a bath or shower with the gastrostomy, and good QOL was realized. 4. The home care patient with the gastrostomy could have a satisfactorily long life.

  12. Peristomal infection after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: a 7-year surveillance of 297 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Duarte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Healthcare-associated infection represents the most frequent adverse event during care delivery. Medical advances like percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy have brought improvement on quality of life to patients but an increased risk of healthcare-associated infection. Predictive risk factors for peristomal wound infection are largely unknown but evidence suggests that antibiotic prophylaxis and preventive strategies related to infection control may reduce infection rates. OBJECTIVES: The primary aim was to evaluate the global prevalence rate of peristomal infection. Secondary objectives were to characterise the positive culture results, to evaluate the prophylactic antibiotic protocol and to identify potential risk factors for peristomal infection. METHODS: Retrospective study of 297 patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy performed at a general hospital between January 2004 and September 2010. Patients received prophylactic cefazolin before the endoscopic gastrostomy procedure. Medical records were reviewed for demographic data, underling disease conditions to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and patient potential intrinsic risk factors. Statistical analysis was made with the statistical program SPSS 17.0. RESULTS: A total of 297 percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes were inserted. Wound infection occurred in 36 patients (12.1%. Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistant was the most frequently isolated microorganism (33.3% followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.6%. The incidence rate had been rising each year and differ from 4.65% in 2004/2007 to 17.9% in 2008/2010. This finding was consistent with the increasing of prevalence global infection rates of the hospital. Most of the infections (55.6% were detected in the first 10 days post procedure. There was no significant difference in age, body mass index values, mean survival time and duration of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding between patients with and

  13. CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: success rate, early and late complications; CT-gesteuerte perkutane Gastrostomie: Technischer Erfolg, Frueh- und Spaetkomplikationen

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    Gottschalk, A.; Voelk, M. [Radiologie, Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Ulm (Germany); Strotzer, M. [Radiologie, Klinikum Hohe Warte (Germany); Feuerbach, S.; Rogler, G. [Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Regensburg (Germany); Seitz, J. [Radiologie, MVZ Dr. Neumaier und Kollegen (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) are the standard methods of ensuring long-term enteral food intake in patients with dysphagia caused by neoplasia or neurological disorders. High-grade obstructions of the upper digestive tract or inadequate transillumination can prevent PEG. CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) represents a special technique for enabling gastrostomy in patients for whom the endoscopic method is impossible. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. Materials and Methods: CT-guided PG was performed in 83 patients, mostly with malignancy of the upper respiratory or digestive tract. Medical records for these patients were reviewed, and the results and complications of the CT-guided PG were analyzed retrospectively. Complications were grouped into four categories: Major and minor complications as well as early and late complications. Results: In 95.2 % of all cases (79/83), CT-guided PG was successful in the first attempt. Within the first 3 days, 5 major complications including 4 tube dislocations and one case of peritonitis were found in 4/79 patients (5.1 %). One of these patients experienced two early major complications. Early minor complications, mainly local skin irritations and temporary stomachache, were observed in 31 patients (39.2 %). Three days after CT-guided PG, 4 cases of major complications were documented, yielding a total rate of major complications was 8.7 % (7/79). Hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion or perforation after gastrostomy was not observed. 29.1 % of the patients (23/79) experienced late minor complications. (orig.)

  14. Percutaneous Gastrostomy in Patients Who Fail or Are Unsuitable for Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, Frank J.; Varghese, Jose C.; Haslam, Philip J.; McGrath, Frank P.; Keeling, Frank; Lee, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is not possible or fails in some patients. We aimed to categorize the reasons for PEG failure, to study the success of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) in these patients, and to highlight the associated technical difficulties and complications.Methods: Forty-two patients (28 men, 14 women; mean age 60 years, range 18-93 years) in whom PEG failed or was not possible, underwent PRG. PEG failure or unsuitability was due to upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction or other pathology precluding PEG in 15 of the 42 patients, suboptimal transillumination in 22 of 42 patients, and advanced cardiorespiratory decompensation precluding endoscopy in five of 42 patients. T-fastener gastropexy was used in all patients and 14-18 Fr catheters were inserted.Results: PRG was successful in 41 of 42 patients (98%). CT guidance was required in four patients with altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy. PRG failed in one patient despite CT guidance. In the 16 patients with high subcostal stomachs who failed PEG because of inadequate transillumination, intercostal tube placement was required in three and cephalad angulation under the costal margin in six patients. Major complications included inadvertent placement of the tube in the peritoneal cavity. There was one case of hemorrhage at the gastrostomy site requiring transfusion and one case of superficial gastrostomy site infection requiring tube removal. Minor complications included superficial wound infection in six patients, successfully treated with routine wound toilette.Conclusion: We conclude that PRG is a safe, well-tolerated and successful method of gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy insertion in the technically difficult group of patients who have undergone an unsuccessful PEG. In many such cases optimal clinical evaluation will suggest primary referral for PRG as the preferred option

  15. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  16. Comparison of fluoroscopy-guided pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) with conventional percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG): clinical results in 253 patients

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    Yang, Yang; Schneider, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.B. [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    To analyze the clinical results and complications of fluoroscopy guided internal-external pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) and conventional external-internal percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG). A total of 253 patients underwent radiological gastrostomy between January 2002 and January 2010. Data were collected retrospectively from radiology reports, Chart review of clinical notes, procedure reports, discharge summaries and subsequent hospital visits. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the two methods for gastrostomy with respect to peri-interventional aspects and clinical results. 128 patients received the Pull-type-PRG whereas the other 125 patients were served with the Push-type-PRG. Indications for gastrostomy were similar in these two groups. The most frequent indications for the both methods were stenotic oesophageal tumors or head/neck tumors (54.7% in pull-type-PRG, 68% in push-type-PRG). Gastrostomy procedures were successful in 98.3% in pull-type-PRG compared to 92% in push-type-PRG. There was no procedure-related mortality. Compared to Push-type-PRG, the peri-interventional complication rate was significantly reduced in pull-type-PRG (14.8% versus 34.4%, P = 0.002). Compared to the external-internal push-type-PRG, the internal-external Pull-type-PRG showed a high primary success rate and a decreased incidence of peri-interventional complications. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of fluoroscopy-guided pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) with conventional percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG): clinical results in 253 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yang; Schneider, J.; Dueber, C.; Pitton, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the clinical results and complications of fluoroscopy guided internal-external pull-type percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (pull-type-PRG) and conventional external-internal percutaneous radiological gastrostomy (push-type-PRG). A total of 253 patients underwent radiological gastrostomy between January 2002 and January 2010. Data were collected retrospectively from radiology reports, Chart review of clinical notes, procedure reports, discharge summaries and subsequent hospital visits. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the two methods for gastrostomy with respect to peri-interventional aspects and clinical results. 128 patients received the Pull-type-PRG whereas the other 125 patients were served with the Push-type-PRG. Indications for gastrostomy were similar in these two groups. The most frequent indications for the both methods were stenotic oesophageal tumors or head/neck tumors (54.7% in pull-type-PRG, 68% in push-type-PRG). Gastrostomy procedures were successful in 98.3% in pull-type-PRG compared to 92% in push-type-PRG. There was no procedure-related mortality. Compared to Push-type-PRG, the peri-interventional complication rate was significantly reduced in pull-type-PRG (14.8% versus 34.4%, P = 0.002). Compared to the external-internal push-type-PRG, the internal-external Pull-type-PRG showed a high primary success rate and a decreased incidence of peri-interventional complications. (orig.)

  18. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in the Enteral Feeding of the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Lin Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Today we are faced with an aging society that may develop malnutrition because of dysphagia related to dementia, stroke, and malignancy seen often in the elderly. The preferred form of nutritional supplementation for this group is enteral nutrition, and the most appropriate long-term method is by use of a gastrostomy. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG was first introduced in 1980 as an alternative to the traditional operative procedure and rapidly became the preferred procedure. In geriatric patients, the principal indications are neurological dysphagia and malnutrition, related to an underlying disease or anorexia-cachexia in very elderly. PEG is contraindicated in the presence of respiratory distress, previous gastric resection, total esophageal obstruction, coagulation disorders and sepsis in the elderly. Common complications include wound infection, leakage, hemorrhage, and fistula in the general population, but aspiration pneumonia is the major case of death in this group. Risks and complications of PEG must be discussed with patients and their families; and the decision for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion should only be made after careful consideration and discussion between managing physicians, allied health professionals, and the patient and/or family. Four ethical principles may help make feeding decisions: beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice. Attentive long-term care after tube replacement is mandatory. Acceptance of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement by patients and their families tends to increase once favorable outcomes are offered.

  19. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for nutritional palliation of upper esophageal cancer unsuitable for esophageal stenting

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    Ana Grilo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. Most patients with advanced esophageal cancer have significant dysphagia that contributes to weight loss and malnutrition. Esophageal stenting is a widespread palliation approach, but unsuitable for cancers near the upper esophageal sphincter, were stents are poorly tolerated. Generally, guidelines do not support endoscopic gastrostomy in this clinical setting, but it may be the best option for nutritional support. OBJECTIVE: Retrospective evaluation of patients with dysphagia caused advanced esophageal cancer, no expectation of resuming oral intake and with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for comfort palliative nutrition. METHOD: We selected adult patients with unresecable esophageal cancer histological confirmed, in whom stenting was impossible due to proximal location, and chemotherapy or radiotherapy were palliative, using gastrostomy for enteral nutrition. Clinical and nutritional data were evaluated, including success of gastrostomy, procedure complications and survival after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, and evolution of body mass index, albumin, transferrin and cholesterol. RESULTS: Seventeen males with stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 60.9 years. Most of the patients had toxic habits. All underwent palliative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Gastrostomy was successfully performed in all, but nine required prior dilatation. Most had the gastrostomy within 2 months after diagnosis. There was a buried bumper syndrome treated with tube replacement and four minor complications. There were no cases of implantation metastases or procedure related mortality. Two patients were lost and 12 died. Mean survival of deceased patients was 5.9 months. Three patients are alive 6, 14 and 17 months after the gastrostomy procedure, still increasing the mean survival. Mean body mass index and laboratory

  20. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akio, E-mail: a.akahane@gmail.com; Kato, Kenichi, E-mail: kkato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Suzuki, Michiko, E-mail: mamimichiko@me.com [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Tanaka, Ryoichi, E-mail: rtanaka@iwate-med.ac.jp; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: nakasato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Ehara, Shigeru, E-mail: ehara@iwate-med.ac.jp [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC.

  1. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Akio; Kato, Kenichi; Suzuki, Michiko; Sone, Miyuki; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC

  2. CT findings in gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Suki; McHugh, Kieran; Ledermann, Sarah; Pierro, Agostino

    2007-01-01

    We describe the CT findings in an initially asymptomatic boy aged 2 years 9 months with a gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. The findings consisted of an unusual configuration of the gastrostomy tubing on an abdominal radiograph and upper gastrointestinal study indicating the possibility of transcolic PEG placement, which was confirmed with limited section CT. This well-known and major complication following a common procedure may be recognized on plain abdominal radiography, but it has not to our knowledge been documented previously on CT in a child. (orig.)

  3. CT findings in gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Suki [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); St. George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Ledermann, Sarah [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Pierro, Agostino [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    We describe the CT findings in an initially asymptomatic boy aged 2 years 9 months with a gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. The findings consisted of an unusual configuration of the gastrostomy tubing on an abdominal radiograph and upper gastrointestinal study indicating the possibility of transcolic PEG placement, which was confirmed with limited section CT. This well-known and major complication following a common procedure may be recognized on plain abdominal radiography, but it has not to our knowledge been documented previously on CT in a child. (orig.)

  4. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy versus nasogastric tube feeding for patients with head and neck cancer. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinfeng; Liu Minjie; Ye Yun; Liu Chao; Huang Guanhong

    2014-01-01

    There are two main enteral feeding strategies—namely nasogastric (NG) tube feeding and percutaneous gastrostomy—used to improve the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). But up till now there has been no consistent evidence about which method of enteral feeding is the optimal method for this patient group. To compare the effectiveness of percutaneous gastrostomy and NGT feeding in patients with HNC, relevant literature was identified through Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane, Wiley and manual searches. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-experimental studies comparing percutaneous gastrostomy—including percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy (PFG)—with NG for HNC patients. Data extraction recorded characteristics of intervention, type of study and factors that contributed to the methodological quality of the individual studies. Data were then compared with respect to nutritional status, duration of feeding, complications, radiotherapy delays, disease-free survival and overall survival. Methodological quality of RCTs and non-experimental studies were assessed with separate standard grading scales. It became apparent from our studies that both feeding strategies have advantages and disadvantages. (author)

  5. Pneumoperitoneum with Subcutaneous Emphysema after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Iscan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is a safe way for enteral nutrition in selected patients. Generally, complications of this procedure are very rare but due to patients general health condition, delayed diagnosis and treatment of complications can be life threatening. In this study, we present a PEG-related massive pneumoperitoneum and subcutaneous emphysema in a patient with neuro-Behçet.

  6. ''Push-pull'' gastrostomy: a new technique for percutaneous gastrostomy tube insertion in the neonate and young infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, A.M.; Kaye, R.D.; Fitz, C.R.; Towbin, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate a newly developed method combining antegrade and retrograde techniques for percutaneous gastrostomy tube (PGT) insertion in the neonate and young infant. Materials and methods. From January 1994 to December 2000, 85 children (47 male, 38 female), mean age 4.5 months (range 0.44-9.13 months) underwent PGT insertion using the ''push-pull'' technique. With the addition, 57 children had a jejunostomy tube placed as well at or within 24 h of the PGT procedure. The mean weight was 3.74 kg, range 1.5-7.0 kg. The indications for the procedure included failure to thrive in 40 patients (25 %), static encephalopathy in 21 (25 %), neurological/congenital abnormalities in 12 (14 %), aspiration in 7 (8 %), and cardiac problems in 5 (6 %). Results. Eighty-five PGTs were successfully inserted in 85 children. One procedure was initially unsuccessful due to failed conscious sedation and was completed under general anesthesia. Four of 85 patients initially had attempted antegrade placement that failed, and the procedure was successfully completed using the ''push-pull'' method. One major complication occurred: a gastrocolic fistula at day 5 post-procedure, which was surgically repaired without sequelae. Tube-related problems included; tube dislodgement (n = 1) and procedure-related stomal infection (n = 3). Conclusion. The ''push-pull'' gastrostomy technique is a safe, effective method of percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement in neonates. It facilitates successful placement of the PGT in patients in whom the classic antegrade method is not possible. It has become the procedure of choice in this group. (orig.)

  7. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, F; el Nawar, A; Van Gossum, A

    1992-01-01

    From March 87 to March 92, fifty eight patients were referred to our department for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). The modality of the feeding tube insertion is described. The most common indications for placement were neurologic disorders in 62% of the cases (n = 36) and malignant diseases in 32% (n = 19). The success rate of the technique was 98.3% (n = 57). No procedure-related mortality was observed. A low rate of major complication (1.7%) and minor complication (10.5%) was noted. Feeding tubes were removed in 21% of patients (n = 12); none of them with malignant disease. Survival curve analysis demonstrated that 50% of patients died within 3 months of PEG placement. Such results raise questions about the selection of patients undergoing PEG. Our experience of patients undergoing PEG. Our experience suggests that PEG is easy and safe, even in debilitated patients, having an acceptable life expectancy.

  8. Clinical application of percutaneous gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianping; Wang Zhongmin; Liu Tao; Chen Kemin; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Chen Zhijin; Shen Jieyun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous gastrostomy (PRG) and gastrojejunostomy (PRGJ) under fluoroscopic guidance, and to discuss its technical manipulation, the indications and contraindications as well as the complications. Methods: During the period from May 2002 to June 2010 in authors' hospital fluoroscopically-guided PRG or PRGJ was carried out in 40 patients. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. With Seldinger technique and under fluoroscopic guidance, a 14 F radiopaque gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy feeding catheter was successfully placed. The indications, operation procedures, clinical success rate, procedure-related complications, and tube indwelling time, etc. were discussed and analyzed. Results: PRG was conducted in 30 patients. The reasons for performing PRG included neurologic disease (n=13), recurrent aspiration pneumonia (n=6), gastroesophageal reflux due to disfunction of gastrointestinal tract (n=3), subtotal gastrectomy (n=2), esophagomediastinal fistula (n=1) and esophageal carcinoma (n=5). PRGJ was carried out in 10 patients. The disorders included bulbar paralysis (n=3), malignant duodenal obstruction (n=4) and previous gastrostomy-related complications (n=3). Two anchors were used in all patients receiving PRG or PRGJ. Clinical success was achieved in all study patients. No procedure-related or severe complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in four patients (10%), which included local soft tissue infection (n=1), severe puncture site pain (n=1), gastrostomy tube dislodgement (n=1) and obstruction of gastrojejunostomy tube (n=1). During the follow-up period, no aggravation of gastroesophageal reflux or aspiration pneumonia was observed in all patients. The tube indwelling time was 115 to 585 days (mean of 150 days) after tube placement. Conclusion: Fluoroscopically-guided percutaneous gastrostomy or gastrojejunostomy is a safe, simple and minimally-invasive technique. This

  9. Difficulties with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG): a practical guide for the endoscopist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, S

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used and effective means of providing long-term nutrition in patients with inadequate oral intake. The demand for this intervention has risen steadily since the early 1990s. Endoscopists who perform PEG insertion have become increasingly concerned about inappropriate use of this intervention.

  10. Pain and Swelling after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Removal: An Unexpected Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Queirós

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastrostomy site metastization is considered an uncommon complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement in patients with head and neck tumours, but it is important to consider this possibility when evaluating gastrostomy-related symptoms. The authors present the case of a 40-year-old male with excessive alcohol consumption and active smoking, diagnosed with a stage IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The patient developed a paraneoplastic demyelinating motor polyneuropathy that, associated with tumour mass effect, caused dysphagia with need for nasogastric tube feeding. Treatment with radiotherapy and then chemoradiotherapy was administered and a PEG was placed with the pull method. Cancer remission and resolution of polyneuropathy was achieved, so PEG was removed. Two weeks later, the patient presented with pain and swelling at the gastrostomy site suggesting a local abscess, with improvement after drainage and antibiotic therapy. After 1 month, there was a tumour mass at the gastrostomy site and an oropharyngeal cancer metastasis was diagnosed. The patient underwent surgical excision of abdominal wall metastasis and abdominal disease was controlled. Nevertheless, there was subsequent oropharyngeal neoplasia recurrence and the patient died 6 months later. This case raises the discussion about gastrostomy placement methods that could avoid gastrostomy site metastization, the possible differential diagnosis, and diagnostic workout. Surgical resection may allow metastatic disease control, but by primary disease evolution greatly affects prognosis.

  11. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy versus percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: A comparison of indications, complications and outcomes in 370 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silas, Anne M.; Pearce, Lindsay F.; Lestina, Lisa S.; Grove, Margaret R.; Tosteson, Anna; Manganiello, Wendy D.; Bettmann, Michael A.; Gordon, Stuart R.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Percutaneous access to the stomach can be achieved by endoscopic or fluoroscopic methods. Our objective was to compare indications, complications, efficacy and outcomes of these two techniques. Methods: Records of 370 patients with feeding tubes placed either endoscopically by gastroenterology, or fluoroscopically by radiology, at our university-based tertiary care center over a 54-month period were reviewed. Results: 177 gastrostomies were placed endoscopically and 193 fluoroscopically. Nutrition was the most common indication in each group (94 and 92%), but the most common underlying diagnosis was neurologic impairment in the endoscopic group (n = 89, 50%) and malignancy in the fluoroscopic group (n = 134, 69%) (p < 0.001). Complications in the first 30 days were more common with fluoroscopic placement (23% versus 11%, p = 0.002), with infection most frequent. Correlates of late complications were inpatient status (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.13-0.51) and a diagnosis of malignancy (OR 2.2, 95%CI: 1.03-4.84). Average follow-up time was 108 days in the fluoroscopic group and 174 days in the endoscopic group. Conclusions: Both endoscopic and fluoroscopic gastrostomy tube placement are safe and effective. Outpatient status was associated with greater early and late complication rates; minor complications such as infection were greater in the fluoroscopic group, while malignancy was associated with late complications

  12. Unsuccessful Practice of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in an Infant with Gastric Volvulus: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Duman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is an easy and safe procedure for long-term enteral feeding in children with inadequate oral intake. Although PEG has been used for treatment of gastric volvulus in adults, there is a little relevant data for its use in children. Here, we report a 17-month-old male infant who was admitted to our hospital with a 1-month history of vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal contrast study revealed an organoaxial gastric volvulus. Then PEG was inserted for the purpose of nutritional support. Because the patient continued to vomit after feeding via gastrostomy, surgery was planned. Laparotomy revealed that the entry of the PEG tube was at the posterior wall of the stomach. The gastrostomy tube was removed, and the opening was repaired. Then the stomach was repositioned, and Nissen fundoplication and a Stamm gastrostomy at the anterior wall of the stomach were performed. The patient had no further episodes of vomiting after surgery and was discharged following an uneventful recovery period.

  13. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bucourt, Maximilian; Collettini, Federico; Althoff, Christian; Streitparth, Florian; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd (Dept. of Radiology, Charite - Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany)), Email: mdb@charite.de; Teichgraeber, U.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Jena Univ. (Germany))

    2012-04-15

    Background: In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with respiratory impairment and/or advanced disease, performing even mild sedation - as is usually necessary for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placements - is fraught with risk. These patients are often referred to Interventional Radiology for alternative percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement options. Purpose: To report our experience with CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with a novel loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in ALS patients as an alternative to endoscopic techniques. Material and Methods: A consecutive series of 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy was considered too dangerous or impossible to perform underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastropexy and gastrostomy and prospective follow-up. All procedures were performed with a 15 FR Freka Pexact gastrostomy kit, a 16-row CT scanner (Aquilion 16) and single shot CT fluoroscopy mode. Results: The procedure was performed successfully in 30 of 31 patients (20 men, 11 women; median age 60 years, range 38-80 years). In the remaining case the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy and CO2 insufflation was initiated thereafter, leading to successful gastrostomy without prior gastropexy and without further adverse events during follow-up. Two patients reported unproblematic exchange of a balloon tube due to skin irritations with no further adverse events. One patient reported accidental displacement of an exchanged new balloon tube in domestic environment due to balloon leakage: A new balloon tube was easily re-inserted in a hospital the same day. No serious adverse events such as peritonitis, persistent local bleeding, systemic blood loss, or any local infection requiring surgical intervention were observed. Until August 11, 2011 follow-up resulted in 7473 cumulative gastrostomy-days from the date of first placement. Conclusion: Initial results suggest that the described

  14. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bucourt, Maximilian; Collettini, Federico; Althoff, Christian; Streitparth, Florian; Greupner, Johannes; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, U.K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with respiratory impairment and/or advanced disease, performing even mild sedation - as is usually necessary for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placements - is fraught with risk. These patients are often referred to Interventional Radiology for alternative percutaneous gastrostomy tube placement options. Purpose: To report our experience with CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with a novel loop gastropexy and peel-away sheath trocar technique in ALS patients as an alternative to endoscopic techniques. Material and Methods: A consecutive series of 31 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy was considered too dangerous or impossible to perform underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastropexy and gastrostomy and prospective follow-up. All procedures were performed with a 15 FR Freka Pexact gastrostomy kit, a 16-row CT scanner (Aquilion 16) and single shot CT fluoroscopy mode. Results: The procedure was performed successfully in 30 of 31 patients (20 men, 11 women; median age 60 years, range 38-80 years). In the remaining case the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy and CO2 insufflation was initiated thereafter, leading to successful gastrostomy without prior gastropexy and without further adverse events during follow-up. Two patients reported unproblematic exchange of a balloon tube due to skin irritations with no further adverse events. One patient reported accidental displacement of an exchanged new balloon tube in domestic environment due to balloon leakage: A new balloon tube was easily re-inserted in a hospital the same day. No serious adverse events such as peritonitis, persistent local bleeding, systemic blood loss, or any local infection requiring surgical intervention were observed. Until August 11, 2011 follow-up resulted in 7473 cumulative gastrostomy-days from the date of first placement. Conclusion: Initial results suggest that the described

  15. Abdominal Plain Film Before Gastrostomy Tube Placement to Predict Success of Percutaneous Endoscopic Procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruijsen, J. M.; de Bruin, A.; Sekema, G.; Koetse, H. A.; van Rheenen, P. F.

    Objectives: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube feeding is a convenient method for children requiring long-term enteral nutrition. Preoperative fitness of the majority of pediatric PEG candidates is graded as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status >= III, indicating

  16. Acute gastric volvulus treated with laparoscopic reduction and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sang-Ho; Ha, Chang-Youn; Lee, Young-Joon; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan; Jung, Eun-Jung; Ju, Young-Tae; Jeong, Chi-Young; Ha, Woo-Song

    2013-07-01

    Acute gastric volvulus requires emergency surgery, and a laparoscopic approach for both acute and chronic gastric volvulus was reported recently to give good results. The case of a 50-year-old patient with acute primary gastric volvulus who was treated by laparoscopic reduction and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is described here. This approach seems to be feasible and safe for not only chronic gastric volvulus, but also acute gastric volvulus.

  17. Tips and Tricks of Percutaneous Gastrostomy Under Image Guidance in Patients with Limited Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Figl, Andrea; Thariat, Juliette [Sophia Antipolis University, Nice cedex (France); Lacout, Alexis [Centre Me' dico-Chirurgical, Aurillac (France)

    2011-10-15

    We read with great interest the article by Chan et al. (1) in the March issue of Korean Journal of Radiology on their experience of modified radiology-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (MRPG). The authors proposed a technique to access the stomach in patients with upper digestive tract obstruction (UDTO). Following marking a patient's left liver inferior margin and room air-colonography, the authors punctured the gastric area using a 21G fine needle under X-ray guidance and withdrew their syringe gradually while injecting contrast medium. We noted that the gastrostomy may be performed using a 0.0035-inch hydrophilic guide wire and a 6.5-Fr angled catheter in almost 100% of patients contraindicated for endoscopy gastrostomy, including those with tortuous or tight cervical stenosis (2). In patients with a collapsed stomach, orally administered effervescent sodium bicarbonate powder can produce sufficient gas in the stomach to allow for a percutaneous needle puncture. In UDTO patients, diatrizoate meglumine can be directly injected into the gastric lumen under ultrasound (US) guidance, as reported by Pugash et al. (3) in 1995. Since the stomach appears collapsed with apposed multi-layer walls and virtual lumen on US, the needle tip is hardly seen. In such circumstances, after having transfixed the stomach with a 21G Chiba needle, further gradual needle withdrawing is performed under fluoroscopic guidance while injecting small amounts of diatrizoate meglumine until a ruga pattern is seen. Moreover, a cancer patient's subcutaneous fat is often absent and the anterior gastric wall is close to the abdominal wall. High frequency US monitoring does improve needle visualization in such a circumstance. Conversely, in obese patients, back- and forth motions of the needle stylet under Doppler color US guidance clearly improves needle visualization. We noted that by using this technique we successfully performed percutaneous fluoroscopy gastrostomy (PFG) in two partially

  18. Tips and Tricks of Percutaneous Gastrostomy Under Image Guidance in Patients with Limited Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Figl, Andrea; Thariat, Juliette; Lacout, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    We read with great interest the article by Chan et al. (1) in the March issue of Korean Journal of Radiology on their experience of modified radiology-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (MRPG). The authors proposed a technique to access the stomach in patients with upper digestive tract obstruction (UDTO). Following marking a patient's left liver inferior margin and room air-colonography, the authors punctured the gastric area using a 21G fine needle under X-ray guidance and withdrew their syringe gradually while injecting contrast medium. We noted that the gastrostomy may be performed using a 0.0035-inch hydrophilic guide wire and a 6.5-Fr angled catheter in almost 100% of patients contraindicated for endoscopy gastrostomy, including those with tortuous or tight cervical stenosis (2). In patients with a collapsed stomach, orally administered effervescent sodium bicarbonate powder can produce sufficient gas in the stomach to allow for a percutaneous needle puncture. In UDTO patients, diatrizoate meglumine can be directly injected into the gastric lumen under ultrasound (US) guidance, as reported by Pugash et al. (3) in 1995. Since the stomach appears collapsed with apposed multi-layer walls and virtual lumen on US, the needle tip is hardly seen. In such circumstances, after having transfixed the stomach with a 21G Chiba needle, further gradual needle withdrawing is performed under fluoroscopic guidance while injecting small amounts of diatrizoate meglumine until a ruga pattern is seen. Moreover, a cancer patient's subcutaneous fat is often absent and the anterior gastric wall is close to the abdominal wall. High frequency US monitoring does improve needle visualization in such a circumstance. Conversely, in obese patients, back- and forth motions of the needle stylet under Doppler color US guidance clearly improves needle visualization. We noted that by using this technique we successfully performed percutaneous fluoroscopy gastrostomy (PFG) in two partially

  19. The results of the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion: Analysis of 113 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazım Ekin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the results and experiences of the patients who received percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG. Methods: A total of 113 patients who admitted to the Dicle University Medical Faculty , Department of Gastroenterology between January 2012 and December 2014 and in whom received PEG was performed. The patients were assessed in terms of indications, complications and results. Results: Among these patients, 70 (61.9% were male and 40 (38.1% were female. Though 8 (7% patients had head, neck and esophageal cancer; 105 (93% patients had primer or seconder neurological disorders. After the PEG, any serious complication was seen in patients. Wound infections were encountered in five patients (4.4% and the rate of minor complications was found to be 9.7%. The risk of complications was higher in patients over sixty years and men (p values of 0.049 and 0.022. Conclusion: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, a simple and safe method of enteral nutrition with a low complication rate, should be the first choice when extended period enteral nutrition is required. There is increased risk of complications in elderly males.

  20. Gastrostomia endoscópica em pacientes com cardiopatia complicada Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in cardiologic complicated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso CUKIER

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes cardiopatas complicados com isquemia cerebral e insuficiência cardíaca necessitam terapia nutricional enteral prolongada por se apresentarem em situação de risco nutricional. Complicações advindas do uso prolongado da sonda nasoenteral poderiam ser evitadas com a execução da gastrostomia endoscópica. Esta é alternativa técnica para acesso ao tubo digestivo em nutrição enteral. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o tempo de indicação para gastrostomia endoscópica em pacientes com nutrição enteral com uso de sonda nasoenteral e as principais complicações do procedimento. Doze pacientes foram submetidos a gastrostomia endoscópica, sendo oito do sexo masculino. A idade média foi de 62,42 + 22,10 anos. A indicação principal foi síndrome isquêmica cerebral após parada cardiorespiratória por patologia clínica (sete pacientes ou cirurgia cardiovascular complicada (cinco. O tempo médio para indicação da gastrostomia endoscópica foi de 35,58 + 26,79 dias após introdução da nutrição enteral. Não houve intercorrências com o procedimento e, no período pós-operatório tardio, ocorreu infecção do orifício de inserção da gastrostomia endoscópica em um caso, resolvida com cuidados locais. Em conclusão, a gastrostomia endoscópica é técnica segura, com baixa incidência de complicações. Pode ser realizada em ambulatório, no leito do paciente, ou em centro de terapia intensiva e sua indicação deveria ser mais precoce.Complicated cardiologic patients with brain ischemia and heart failure need long term enteral nutrition. Long term nasoenteral tuibe feeding may cause complications that could be avoided with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and its main complications. Twelve patients were submitted to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (eight male with main age of 62,42 ± 22,10 years old. Brain ischemia

  1. [Severe diarrhea after the original well-functioning percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube was replaced by a Mic-Key button].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Susanne Wigh; Eriksen, Jan; Kristensen, Kurt

    2006-03-06

    We report two cases of colocutaneous fistula as a complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in small children. Both children developed severe osmotic diarrhoea immediately after the original PEG tube was replaced by a Mic-Key button which subsequently migrated to the colon.

  2. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation with a facial interface during sedation for a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Frasquet, M C; García-Covisa, N; Vidagany-Espert, L; Herranz-Gordo, A; Llopis-Calatayud, J E

    2015-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a chronic neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system which affects the motor neurons and produces a progressive muscle weakness, leading to atrophy and muscle paralysis, and ultimately death. Performing a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with sedation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis can be a challenge for the anesthesiologist. The case is presented of a 76-year-old patient who suffered from advanced stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ASA III, in which a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed with deep sedation, for which non-invasive ventilation was used as a respiratory support to prevent hypoventilation and postoperative respiratory complications. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on gastro-esophageal reflux in mechanically-ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douzinas, Emmanuel E; Tsapalos, Andreas; Dimitrakopoulos, Antonios; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Rapidis, Alexandros D; Roussos, Charis

    2006-01-07

    To investigate the effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) on gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in mechanically-ventilated patients. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study 36 patients with recurrent or persistent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and GER > 6% were divided into PEG group (n = 16) or non-PEG group (n = 20). Another 11 ventilated patients without reflux (GER Patients were strictly followed up for semi-recumbent position and control of gastric nutrient residue. A significant decrease of median (range) reflux was observed in PEG group from 7.8 (6.2 - 15.6) at baseline to 2.7 (0 - 10.4) on d 7 post-gastrostomy (P position and absence of nutrient gastric residue reduces the gastroesophageal reflux in ventilated patients.

  4. A simple gastropexy for the loop-gastrostomy tube

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    Pang Ah-San

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy has been in clinical use for more than three decades. A recent innovation, the loop-gastrostomy, is more suitable for developing countries because the tube cannot be dislodged and is easy to change. Gastropexy and gastrostomy are separate but related moieties. We describe a novel technique to add a gastropexy to the loop-gastrostomy, using it successfully in a man with permanent dysphagia. It involved creating a secondary loop at the mid-portion of the LOOPPEG® 3G tube with absorbable ligatures.

  5. CIRSE Standards of Practice Guidelines on Gastrostomy

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    Sutcliffe, James, E-mail: jasutcliffe@gmail.com; Wigham, Andrew, E-mail: a.wigham@doctors.org.uk [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Mceniff, Niall, E-mail: nmceniff@stjames.ie [St. James’s Hospital, Radiology (DiagIm) (Ireland); Dvorak, Petr, E-mail: petr-dvorak@email.cz [Faculty Hospital Charles University, Radiology Department (Czech Republic); Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: laura.crocetti@med.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Hepatology and Liver Transplants (Italy); Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: Raman.Uberoi@ouh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    PurposeSurgical Gastrostomy has been around since the 19th century but in 1980 the first successful percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was reported. A year later the first successful percutaneous gastrostomy was performed using fluoroscopic guidance. The technique for percutaneous insertion and the equipment used has been refined since then and it is now considered the gold standard for gastrostomy insertion. Here we present guidelines for image-guided enteral feeding tubes in adults.Material and MethodWe performed a review and analysis of the scientific literature, other national and international guidelines and expert opinion.ResultsStudies have shown fluoroscopic techniques have consistently higher success rates with lower rates of major complications than endoscopic techniques. However, the Achilles' heel of many fluoroscopic techniques is the requirement for smaller gastrostomy tube sizes resulting in them being more prone to blockages and thus requiring further intervention.ConclusionRadiological feeding tube insertion is a safe and effective procedure. Success rates are higher, and complication rates lower than PEG or surgical gastrostomy tube placement and innovative techniques for gastric and jejunal access mean that there are very few cases in which RIG is not possible. The principal weakness of radiologically inserted gastrostomies is the limitiation on tube size which leads to a higher rate of tube blockage. Per-oral image-guided gastrostomies have to an extent addressed this but have not been popularised. Currently many centres still consider endoscopic gastrostomies as the first line unless patients are too unwell to undergo this procedure or previous attempts have failed, in which case radioloically inserted gastrostomies are the technique of choice.

  6. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

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    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2012-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  7. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

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    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  8. [Pull percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: personal experience].

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    Geraci, G; Sciumè, C; Pisello, F; Li Volsi, F; Facella, T; Tinaglia, D; Modica, G

    2007-04-01

    To review the indications, complications, and outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), that are placed routinely in patients unable to obtain adequate nutrition from oral feeding for swallowing disorders (neurological diseases, head and neck cancer, oesophageal cancer, psychological disorders). Retrospective review of patients referred for PEG placement from 2003 to 2005. Endoscopic Surgery in Section of General and Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Palermo, Italy. A total of 50 patients, 11 women and 39 men, referred our Section for PEG placement. Indications for PEG placement included various neurologic impairment (82%), oesophageal non-operable cancer (6%), cardia non-operable cancer (4%), cerebrovascular accident (2%), anorexia (2%), pharyngeal esophageal obstruction (2%), head and neck cancer (2%). All patients received preoperative antibiotics as short-term profilaxis. 51 PEGs were positioned in 50 patients. No major complications were registered; 45 patients (90%) were alive at 1 year follow-up and no mortality procedure-related was registered. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrotomy removal had been performed on 2 patients as end-point of treatment, and 43 patients continued to have PEGs in use at 2006. Outpatients PEG placement using conscious sedation is a safe and effective method for providing enteral nutrition. This technique constitutes the gold standard treatment for enteral nutrition in patients with neurologic impairment or as prophylactic in patients affected by head and neck cancer who needs demolitive surgery. Patients should be carefully assessed, and discussion with the patient and their families should be held to determine that the patient is an appropriate candidate. The Authors feel prophylactic antibiotics lessened the incidence of cutaneous perigastrostomy infection.

  9. Long-term results of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomies

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    Faruk Aksoy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In order to provide enteral nutrition for patientsin intensive-care units who cannot be fed orally, weaimed to present our percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy(PEG experience, which is a minimally invasivemethod.Materials and methods: In this study, 700 patients whoapplied to our clinic between January 2000 and June2011 and who had a PEG because they could not be fedorally were retrospectively assessed in terms of indications,complications, and results.Results: Among these patients, 400 (57% were maleand 300 (43% were female. Most of the patients withfeeding problems had also neurologically caused pathologies.After the PEG, 50 (7.1% patients had under-skininfections, 18 (2.5% patients had leakage from the edgeof the PEG, and 16 (2.0% patients had bleeding from theedge of the PEG.Conclusion: PEG is a secure and effective nutritionmethod as it can be performed with a minimally invasiveprocedure and it has low mortality and morbidity.

  10. Acceptability and outcomes of the Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG tube placement- patients' and care givers' perspectives

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    Shah Hasnain A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube has now become a preferred option for the long-term nutritional support device for patients with dysphagia. There is a considerable debate about the health issues related to the quality of life of these patients. Our aim of the study was to assess the outcome and perspectives of patients/care givers, about the acceptability of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement. Methods This descriptive analytic study conducted in patients, who have undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement during January 1998 till December 2004. Medical records of these patients were evaluated for their demographic characteristics, underlying diagnosis, indications and complications. Telephonic interviews were conducted till March 2005, on a pre-tested questionnaire to address psychological, social and physical performance status, of the health related quality of life issues. Results A total of 191 patients' medical records were reviewed, 120 (63% were males, and mean age was 63 years. Early complication was infection at PEG tube site in 6 (3% patients. In follow up over 365 ± 149 days, late complications (occurring 72 hours later were infection at PEG tube site in 29 (15 % patient and dislodgment/blockage of the tube in 26 (13.6%. Interviews were possible with 126 patients/caretakers. Karnofsky Performance Score of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 was found in 13(10%, 18(14%, 21(17%, 29(23% and 45(36% with p-value Conclusion PEG-tube placement was found to be relatively free from serious immediate and long- term complications. Majority of caregivers and patient felt that PEG-tube helped in feeding and prolonging the survival. Studies are needed to assess the real benefit in terms of actual nutritional gain and quality of life in such patients.

  11. Laparoscopic versus percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement in children: Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Nutnicha Suksamanapun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG and laparoscopic-assisted gastrostomy (LAG are widely used in the paediatric population. The aim of this study was to determine which one of the two procedures is the most effective and safe method. Methods: This systematic review was conducted according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement. Primary outcomes were success rate, efficacy of feeding, quality of life, gastroesophageal reflux and post-operative complications. Results: Five retrospective studies, comparing 550 PEG to 483 LAG placements in children, were identified after screening 2347 articles. The completion rate was similar for both procedures. PEG was associated with significantly more adjacent bowel injuries (P = 0.047, early tube dislodgements (P = 0.02 and complications that require reintervention under general anaesthesia (P < 0.001. Minor complications were equally frequent after both procedures. Conclusions: Because of the lack of well-designed studies, we have to be cautious in making definitive conclusions comparing PEG to LAG. To decide which type of gastrostomy placement is best practice in paediatric patients, randomised controlled trials comparing PEG to LAG are highly warranted.

  12. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF COMPLICATIONS RELATED TO PERCUTANEOUS ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY IN ICU PATIENTS

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    Lokanath S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The first percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy performed on a child was on June 12, 1979, at the Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Dr. Michael W.L. Gauderer, paediatric surgeon; Dr. Jeffrey Ponsky, endoscopist; and Dr. James Bekeny, surgical resident, performed the procedure on a 4 1 ⁄2-month-old child with inadequate oral intake. The authors of the technique, Dr. Michael W.L. Gauderer and Dr. Jeffrey Ponsky, first published the technique in 1980. In 2001, the details of the development of the procedure were published. Gastrostomy maybe indicated in numerous situations usually those in which normal or nutrition (or nasogastric feeding is impossible. The causes for these situations maybe neurological (e.g. stroke, anatomical (e.g. cleft lip and palate during the process of correction or other (e.g. radiation therapy for tumours in head and neck region. In certain situations where normal or nasogastric feeding is not possible, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy maybe of clinical benefit. This provides enteral nutrition (making use of the natural digestion process of the gastrointestinal tract despite bypassing the mouth; enteral nutrition is generally preferable to parenteral nutrition (which is only used when the GI tract must be avoided. The PEG procedure is an alternative to open surgical gastrostomy insertion and does not require a general anaesthetic; mild sedation is typically used. PEG tubes may also be extended into the small intestine by passing a jejunal extension tube (PEG-J tube through the PEG tube and into the jejunum via the pylorus. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was carried out in the Department of General Medicine on 32 patients who underwent PEG placement by gastroenterologist at Gayatri Vidya Parishad Hospital, Visakhapatnam, from January 2016 to December 2016. Patients were aged 18 years and above. All patients had placement of Ponsky pull PEs either in the

  13. Indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and survival in old adults

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    Gerd Faxén-Irving

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background : Many diseases striking old adults result in eating difficulties. Indications for selecting individuals for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG are unclear and everybody may not benefit from the procedure. Objective : The aim of this study was to evaluate indications for and survival after PEG insertion in patients older than 65 years. Design and Methods : A retrospective analysis including age, gender, diagnosis, indication, and date of death was made in 201 consecutive individuals, 94 male, mean age 79±7 years, who received a nutritional gastrostomy. Results: Dysphagia was present in 86% of the patients and stroke was the most common diagnosis (49%. Overall median survival was 123 days and 30-day mortality was 22%. Patients with dementia and Mb Parkinson had the longest survival (i.e. 244 and 233 days, while those with other neurological diseases, and head and neck malignancy had the shortest (i.e. 75 and 106 days. There was no difference in mortality in patients older or younger than 80 years, except in patients with dementia. Conclusions: Old age should not be a contraindication for PEG. A high 30-day mortality indicates that there is a need of better criteria for selection and timing of PEG insertion in the elderly.

  14. Percutaneous sonographically assisted endoscopic gastrostomy for difficult cases with interposed organs.

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    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Otani, Jun; Okuda, Junzo; Zotani, Hitomi; Kasuga, So

    2018-03-27

    The aim of this retrospective observational study was to clarify the usefulness and safety of percutaneous sonographically assisted endoscopic gastrostomy or duodenostomy (PSEGD) using the introduction method. The information for the sequential 22 patients who could not undergo standard percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and underwent PSEGD for 3 y was extracted and was reviewed. In standard PEG, we performed pushing out of the stomach from the mediastinum and full distention to adhere the gastric wall to the peritoneal wall without interposing of the intraperitoneal tissues by air inflation and a turning-over procedure of the endoscope, four-point square fixation of the stomach to the peritoneal wall by using a Funada-style gastric wall fixation kit under diaphanoscopy, extracorporeal thumb pushing, and in difficult cases extracorporeal ultrasound guidance, and if necessary confirmation of fixation of the gastric wall to the peritoneal wall and placement of the PEG tube without any interposed tissues by using ultrasound. Twenty-one patients (95.5%) successfully underwent PSEGD. Early complications (more than grade 2 in Clavien-Dindo classification) just after the procedure occurred in one case (active oozing). We did not encounter a case with mispuncture of the intraperitoneal organs and tissues. Delayed complications occurring within 1 mo were pneumonia in five patients, including death in three cases; bleeding from puncture site in two patients; and atrial fibrilation in one patient. PSEGD using the introduction method is a useful procedure for difficult patients in whom intraperitoneal organ or tissue is suspected to be interposed between the abdominal wall and stomach. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Esophageal stents, percutaneous gastrostomy, gastrojejunostomy and celiac ganglion block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroglu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Indications, contraindications, procedure and complications will be discussed along with the technical aspects. Interesting cases will be demonstrated. Fluoroscopic guided placement of a metallic (bare or covered) stent is increasingly being used for the treatment of malignant and benign esophageal strictures. Percutaneously placed feeding catheters (e.g. gastrostomy) offer the best option for the patients who require long term nutrition. These procedures are generally simpler, have higher technical success rates and considered to be safer than endoscopic or surgical placement techniques. Celiac ganglia block is effective in relieving chronic abdominal pain, especially originating from the malignancies of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and alimentary tract from the stomach to the transverse portion of the large colon. The relevant anatomy, indications, contraindications, different application techniques and results of celiac blockade will be reviewed.

  16. Replacement of Mushroom Cage Gastrostomy Tube Using a Modified Technique to Allow Percutaneous Replacement with an Endoscopic Tube in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammar, Thoraya; Rio, Alan; Ampong, Mary Ann; Sidhu, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiologic inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is the preferred method in our institution for enteral feeding in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Skin-level primary-placed mushroom cage gastrostomy tubes become tight with weight gain. We describe a minimally invasive radiologic technique for replacing mushroom gastrostomy tubes with endoscopic mushroom cage tubes in ALS. All patients with ALS who underwent replacement of a RIG tube were included. Patients were selected for a modified replacement when the tube length of the primary placed RIG tube was insufficient to allow like-for-like replacement. Replacement was performed under local anesthetic and fluoroscopic guidance according to a preset technique, with modification of an endoscopic mushroom cage gastrostomy tube to allow percutaneous placement. Assessment of the success, safety, and durability of the modified technique was undertaken. Over a 60-month period, 104 primary placement mushroom cage tubes in ALS were performed. A total of 20 (19.2%) of 104 patients had a replacement tube positioned, 10 (9.6%) of 104 with the modified technique (male n = 4, female n = 6, mean age 65.5 years, range 48-85 years). All tubes were successfully replaced using this modified technique, with two minor complications (superficial wound infection and minor hemorrhage). The mean length of time of tube durability was 158.5 days (range 6-471 days), with all but one patient dying with a functional tube in place. We have devised a modification to allow percutaneous replacement of mushroom cage gastrostomy feeding tubes with minimal compromise to ALS patients. This technique allows tube replacement under local anesthetic, without the need for sedation, an important consideration in ALS.

  17. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in neurological rehabilitation: a report of six cases.

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    Annoni, J M; Vuagnat, H; Frischknecht, R; Uebelhart, D

    1998-08-01

    This study reports the cases of six patients with severe chronic neurological disability and swallowing difficulties due to traumatic brain injury (TBI), anoxia and multiple sclerosis (MS). The patients required nutritional supplement through percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Their clinical follow-up showed a decrease of intercurrent medical complications, especially pressure sores. In addition, an improvement of oropharyngeal function was observed in some patients, also accompanied by slightly better basic psychomotor functions such as vigilance, sustained attention and tone or motor control. However, not every patient did improve with this procedure. The two MS patients benefited most, while the improvement was less homogenous in the three TBI patients. The advantages of PEG over nasogastric tube on oropharyngeal function can be related to the absence of pharyngeal irritation and its role in overall recovery could be due to an increase in social activities, a control of infections, a better rehabilitation schedule and a long-term effect on brain function due to better nutritional support.

  18. An evaluation of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with the pull technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Chang Wook; Won, Jong Yun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (FPG) using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied with the pull technique, and without the use of an endoscopy or a gastropexy. From March 2005 to February 2007, 25 patients underwent an FPG using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied by the pull technique, in which a 24F pull-type tube was inserted into a patient's mouth and was pulled to the upper abdominal puncture site using a snare, under fluoroscopy. The 18 patients with difficulty swallowing due to muscular atrophic lateral sclerosis or transitional myodystrophy included 5 cases of quadriplegia, 1 case of Parkinson's disease, and 1 metastatic mediastinal tumor. The technical success rate, occurrence of complications, and clinical outcomes were examined. The technical success rate was found to be 100%. In addition, the retention periods for the indwelling tube ranged from 1 to 24 months (mean: 6.5 months), with all tubes retained at a normal position with normal function. No procedure-related mortality occurred. One patient (4%) did however develop a complication in the form of ascites and ascitic fluid leakage around the tube, which was of hepatic origin and was ultimately resolved after the drainage of ascites. As a result of this study the FPG, accompanied with the pull technique using a 24F tube, should be considered as a safe and effective method for examining patients. It was found to have a high success rate and a low complication rate

  19. An evaluation of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with the pull technique

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    Uhm, Chang Wook; Won, Jong Yun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (FPG) using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied with the pull technique, and without the use of an endoscopy or a gastropexy. From March 2005 to February 2007, 25 patients underwent an FPG using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied by the pull technique, in which a 24F pull-type tube was inserted into a patient's mouth and was pulled to the upper abdominal puncture site using a snare, under fluoroscopy. The 18 patients with difficulty swallowing due to muscular atrophic lateral sclerosis or transitional myodystrophy included 5 cases of quadriplegia, 1 case of Parkinson's disease, and 1 metastatic mediastinal tumor. The technical success rate, occurrence of complications, and clinical outcomes were examined. The technical success rate was found to be 100%. In addition, the retention periods for the indwelling tube ranged from 1 to 24 months (mean: 6.5 months), with all tubes retained at a normal position with normal function. No procedure-related mortality occurred. One patient (4%) did however develop a complication in the form of ascites and ascitic fluid leakage around the tube, which was of hepatic origin and was ultimately resolved after the drainage of ascites. As a result of this study the FPG, accompanied with the pull technique using a 24F tube, should be considered as a safe and effective method for examining patients. It was found to have a high success rate and a low complication rate.

  20. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57–93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 ± 13 (SD) min (range 24–78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7–812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  1. Initial experience with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with T-fastener fixation in pediatric patients

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    Kvello, Morten; Knatten, Charlotte Kristensen; Perminow, Gøri; Skari, Hans; Engebretsen, Anders; Schistad, Ole; Emblem, Ragnhild; Bjørnland, Kristin

    2018-01-01

    Background and study aims  Insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) with push-through technique and T-fastener fixation (PEG-T) has recently been introduced in pediatric patients. The T-fasteners allow a primary insertion of a balloon gastrostomy. Due to limited data on the results of this technique in children, we have investigated peri- and postoperative outcomes after implementation of PEG-T in our department. Patients and methods  This retrospective chart review included all patients below 18 years who underwent PEG-T placement from 2010 to 2014. Main outcomes were 30-day postoperative complications and late gastrostomy-related complications. Results  In total, 87 patients were included, and median follow-up time was 2.4 years (1 month – 4.9 years). Median age and weight at PEG-T insertion were 1.9 years (9.4 months – 16.4 years) and 10.4 kg (5.4 – 33.0 kg), respectively. Median operation time was 28 minutes (10 – 65 minutes), and 6 surgeons and 3 endoscopists performed the procedures. During the first 30 days, 54 complications occurred in 41 patients (47 %). Most common were peristomal infections treated with either local antibiotics in 11 patients (13 %) or systemic antibiotics in 11 other patients (13 %). 9 patients (10 %) experienced tube dislodgment. Late gastrostomy-related complications occurred in 33 patients (38 %). The T-fasteners caused early and late complications in 9 (10 %) and 11 patients (13 %), respectively. Of these, 4 patients (5 %) had subcutaneously migrated T-fasteners which were removed under general anesthesia. Conclusion  We found a high rate of complications after PEG-T. In particular, problems with the T-fasteners and tube dislodgment occurred frequently after PEG-T insertion. PMID:29399615

  2. Clinical significance of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for patients with severe craniocerebral injury

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    Du Hanggen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the application of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG to patients with severe craniocerebral injury for the purpose of nutritional support therapy and pulmonary infection prevention. Methods: A total of 43 patients with severe craniocerebral injury admitted to our department from January 2008 to December 2012 received PEG followed by nutritional therapy. There were other 82 patients who were prescribed nasal-feeding nutrition. Nutrition status was evaluated by comparing serum albumin levels, and the incidence of pulmonary infection 1 week before and 2 weeks after operation was identifi ed and compared. Results: Both PEG and nasal-feeding nutrition therapies have significantly levated serum albumin levels (P<0.05. Serum albumin levels before and after nutritional therapies showed no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05. The incidence of pulmonary infection in PEG group was significantly decreased compared with that in nasal-feeding nutrition group (P<0.05. Conclusion: PEG is an effective method for severe craniocerebral injury patients. It can not only provide enteral nutrition but also prevent pulmonary infection induced by esophageal refl ux. Key words: Gastrostomy; Craniocerebral trauma; Enteral nutrition

  3. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children

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    Jye Hae Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG can improve nutritional status and reduce the amount of time needed to feed neurologically impaired children. We evaluated the characteristics, complications, and outcomes of neurologically impaired children treated with PEG. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 32 neurologically impaired children who underwent PEG between March 2002 and August 2008 at our medical center. Forty-two PEG procedures comprising 32 PEG insertions and 10 PEG exchanges, were performed. The mean follow-up time was 12.2 (6.6 months. Results: Mean patient age was 9.4 (4.5 years. The main indications for PEG insertion were swallowing difficulty with GI bleeding due to nasogastric tube placement and/or the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The overall rate of complications was 47%, with early complications evident in 25% of patients and late complications in 22%. The late complications included one gastro-colic fistula, two cases of aggravated GERD, and four instances of wound infection. Among the 15 patients with histological evidence of GERD before PEG, 13 (87% had less severe GERD, experienced no new aspiration events, and showed increased body weight after PEG treatment. Conclusion: PEG is a safe, effective, and relatively simple technique affording long-term enteral nutritional support in neurologically impaired children. Following PEG treatment, the body weight of most patients increased and the levels of vomiting, GI bleeding, and aspiration fell. We suggest that PEG with post-procedural observation be considered for enteral nutritional support of neurologically impaired children.

  4. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube Insertion in Neurodegenerative Disease: A Retrospective Study and Literature Review

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    Pamela Sarkar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims With the notable exceptions of dementia, stroke, and motor neuron disease, relatively little is known about the safety and utility of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG tube insertion in patients with neurodegenerative disease. We aimed to determine the safety and utility of PEG feeding in the context of neurodegenerative disease and to complete a literature review in order to identify whether particular factors need to be considered to improve safety and outcome. Methods A retrospective case note review of patients referred for PEG insertion by neurologists in a single neuroscience center was conducted according to a pre-determined set of standards. For the literature review, we identified references from searches of PubMed, mainly with the search items “percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy” and “neurology” or “neurodegenerative disease.” Results Short-term mortality and morbidity associated with PEG in patients with neurological disease were significant. Age greater than 75 years was associated with poor outcome, and a trend toward adverse outcome was observed in patients with low serum albumin. Conclusions This study highlights the relatively high risk of PEG in patients with neurodegenerative disease. We present points for consideration to improve outcome in this particularly vulnerable group of patients.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-07-14

    Jul 14, 2003 ... Surgery, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital and School of Child and. Adolescent ... gastrostomy (viz. no need for a laparotomy, short anaesthetic time or ... long-term nasogastric tube feeding with all its inherent ...

  6. Radiologic percutaneous gastrostomy and gastroenterostomy: Indications, results, and difficulties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casola, G.; Van Sonnenberg, E.; Sukthankar, R.; Varney, R.A.; Stavas, J.; Cohen, M.; Christensen, R.A.; Wittich, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' experience with 130 radiologic percutaneous gastrostomies (PG) and percutaneous gastroenterostomies (PGE). Procedures were accomplished successfully in 127 of 130 candidates. One case was unsuccessful and two were unfeasible. Indications were for feeding, decompression, or both. Underlying diseases included neurologic disorders, head and neck and esophageal tumors, pelvic and abdominal malignancies, trauma, and a variety of other diseases. Various guidance systems, techniques, and catheters were used. Complications occurred in 8%, most being minor. Three patients were operated on after PG/PGE-two had peritonitis, one due to tube dislodgment. Difficulties were encountered at different portions of the procedure. During catheter insertion the following problems were most common: (1) the access route was difficult because of overlying colon, (2) inability to insert a nasogastric tube in patients with esophageal carcinoma or large head and neck tumors, (3) inability to keep the stomach distended in patients with increased motility and those with surgical gastroenterostomies (Billroth I or II), (4) high position of the residual stomach in patients with hemigastrectomy, (5) the presence of ascites or peritoneal tumor anterior to the stomach in patients with ovarian carcinoma, and (6) tenting or herniation of the anterior wall of the stomach during dilatation. Difficulties that were encountered following catheter insertion included (1) chemical peritonitis from leakage of gastric juices, (2) peritonities from leakage of gastric feedings, (3) leakage around the skin entry site in patients with ascites, (4) catheters backing out and forming an intraperitorial loop, (5) catheters kinking and becoming occluded, and (6) catheters being pulled out

  7. Assessment of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Risako; Matsuura, Kazuto; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Katsunori; Imai, Takayuki; Ishida, Eichi; Saijyo, Shigeru; Kato, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    As nutrition support for head and neck cancer patients who receive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and whose oral cavity or pharynx is exposed to radiation, we perform percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement. We examined 235 patients who underwent PEG in our division between January 2003 and December 2009. For 64% of them, the purpose of performing PEG was nutrition support for CRT, of whom 74% actually used the tube. However, the situation varied according to the primary sites of patients. Forty-four percent of laryngeal cancer patients who underwent PEG actually used the tube, which was a significantly lower rate than others. Also, 81% of them removed the PEG tube within one year. These findings suggest that PEG-tube placement for nutrition support is not indispensable for all CRT cases. Therefore, we recommend performing PEG for oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancer patients. (author)

  8. Laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy using a "Funada-kit II" device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Miyano, Go; Shiyanagi, Satoko; Lane, Geoffrey J; Yamataka, Atsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    We aimed at assessing the effect of using a "Funada-kit II" device during laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (Lap-PEG), by reviewing 29 cases of Lap-PEG we performed from 2001 to 2011. We started using the "Funada-kit II" (CREATE MEDIC CO., Kanagawa, Japan) device with two parallel needles to puncture the stomach and assist suturing the anterior gastric wall to the anterior abdominal wall during Lap-PEG in 2011 (F-PEG). By introducing a loop through the lumen of one needle which allows placement of a suture introduced through the lumen of the other needle. Once repeated, the stomach can be pexied at two points, approximately 2 cm apart. We compared Lap-PEG (n = 23) with F-PEG (n = 6) where the mean ages and weights at surgery and sex ratios were similar. All cases were uneventful without intraoperative complications, although one postoperative wound infection occurred in a Lap-PEG case. There were no differences in the duration of analgesia, time taken to commence tube feeding, and return to full feeding. However, mean operating time was significantly shorter in F-PEG (28.1 min) versus Lap-PEG (46.1 min) p < 0.05. As per results F-PEG would appear to be as safe as Lap-PEG, but much quicker.

  9. Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Foley Catheter: A Complication when Substituting for Commercial Gastrostomy Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda B. Lewis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of using percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG for long-term enteral feeding is well established and commonly used. While the technique is relatively safe and simple, the gastrostomy tube itself may deteriorate or malfunction, requiring a replacement tube. We present a case of a 58-year-old woman who was found to have gastric outlet obstruction from the inflated balloon of a Foley catheter being used as a replacement for her PEG tube. This case illustrates a potential complication of using a Foley catheter in place of commercially available gastrostomy tubes.

  10. O uso da gastrostomia percutânea endoscópica The use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Ferreira Minicucci

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A gastrostomia percutânea endoscópica foi introduzida na prática clínica como via alternativa de alimentação enteral. É procedimento que não necessita de anestesia ou laparotomia, como a gastrostomia cirúrgica. A gastrostomia percutânea endoscópica tem como objetivos a manutenção do aporte nutricional e a melhoria da qualidade de vida e sobrevida dos pacientes. É indicada quando o paciente necessita de dieta enteral por período superior a um mês. A freqüência de complicações varia de 1,0% a 10,0% e a mortalidade de 0,3% a 1,0%. É propósito deste trabalho abordar aspectos relevantes desse método de alimentação enteral, aprimorar seu manejo, bem como facilitar o manejo pelos pacientes que dele se utilizam. Para isso, vamos comentar as indicações e contra-indicações da gastrostomia percutânea endoscópica, técnica de colocação, material das sondas, antibiótico profilático, início de utilização, custo do procedimento, além de suas complicações, aspectos legais e éticos.Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is an alternative way to administer enteral diets. It is a procedure requiring no anesthetic or abdominal incision as required in open surgical gastrostomy. The main objective of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is to prevent deterioration of the nutritional status and improve the quality of life and it is now the method of choice when the patient requires an enteral diet for more than a month. Complications occur in 1.0% to10.0% of the cases and mortality in 0.3% to 1.0%. This paper deals with aspects relevant to this method of enteral feeding, how to improve handling procedures and deal with the patients who use it, commenting on the indications and contraindications for its use, placement techniques, materials used for the probes, prophylactic antibiotics, start-up of its use and costs, in addition to discussing some of its complications and legal and ethical aspects.

  11. Radiologically assisted percutaneous gastrostomy or enterostomy. A retrospective analysis of 90 procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildenberger, P.; Oberholzer, K.; Kauczor, H.U.; Dueber, C.; Kurz, S.; Schild, H.; Thelen, M.

    1996-01-01

    To analyse retrospectively the indications, technique and results of radiologically induced gastrostomies or enterostomies. Radiologically assisted gastrostomies or enterostomies were induced in 90 patients, mostly with high grade obstructions due to head and neck tumours or oesophageal tumours. 19/90 patients had had previous resection of the oesophagus or gastric operations. A catheter was successfully introduced in all patients. In 11/90 patients this was followed by a two-stage procedure. In 16/90 patients puncture was performed under CT control because of some anatomical peculiarity. Serious complication occurred in 9/90 patients but in only one was surgery necessary. There were no deaths resulting from the procedure but mortality after 30 days was 6.7%. Radiologically assisted gastrostomies or enterostomies are a reliable and effective form of treatment even amongst difficult patients. The results and complications are comparable to those from endoscopic procedures. (orig.) [de

  12. Multidisciplinary approach to the management of a case of classical respiratory diphtheria requiring percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Matthew James; Vijendren, Ananth; Acharya, Vikas; Mulla, Rohinton; Panesar, Miss Jaan

    2017-03-06

    We present a case of a Caucasian woman aged 67 years referred with a 4-day history of sore throat, dysphagia, fever and nasal blockage. Examination revealed a swollen neck and pharyngeal pseudomembrane. A throat swab was positive on culture for Corynebacterium ulcerans , with toxin expression confirmed on PCR and Elek testing. A diagnosis of classical respiratory diphtheria was made, with subsequent confirmation of the patient's domesticated dog as the source of infection. The dog had recently been attacked by a wild badger and was being treated for an ear infection. The patient made a good recovery with intravenous antimicrobial and supportive therapy; however, she subsequently developed a diphtheritic polyneuropathy in the form of a severe bulbar palsy with frank aspiration necessitating percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding. A mild sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy was also diagnosed. The patient eventually made an almost complete recovery. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Percutaneous transesophageal gastro-tubing (PTEG) as an alternative long-term tube feeding procedure when gastrostomy is not feasible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Nishihara, Kazuki

    2017-12-01

    Percutaneous transesophageal gastro-tubing (PTEG) is a minimally invasive technique to access the gut via an esophagostomy. However, this procedure is not well known and the literature available is still fairly limited. This observational study was conducted to evaluate our experience using this method as an alternative long-term tube feeding procedure when gastrostomy is not suitable. A total of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females) who underwent PTEG at our institution from 2012 to 2016 were observed and analyzed in this study. The average age was 80.1 (71-93) years. Underlying conditions that required PTEG were previous gastric resection in 11 patients, left diaphragm disorder in 2 patients, interposing transverse colon between the abdominal wall and anterior gastric wall in 1 patient, and severe gastrostomy site leakage in 1 patient. Tube placement was successful in all patients by approaching the left side of the neck, using a 15 Fr size tube. The mean postoperative length of stay was 22 (8-48) days. Postoperative adverse events included accidental tube dislodgement in three patients, tracheoesophageal fistula in one patient, inferior thyroid artery injury in one patient and thyroid gland mispuncture in one patient. There was no procedure-related mortality nor mortality at 30 days. Eight patients were discharged with some oral intake. PTEG is feasible in patients requiring long-term tube feeding for whom gastrostomy is unsuitable. It is an effective long-term tube feeding procedure and should be offered as a more comfortable alternative to nasogastric tubing.

  14. Peritonitis related to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy using the direct method for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osera, Shozo; Yano, Tomonori; Odagaki, Tomoyuki; Oono, Yasuhiro; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) using the direct method is generally indicated for cancer patients. However, there are little available data about peritonitis related to this method. The aim of this retrospective analysis was to assess peritonitis related to PEG using the direct method in patients with cancer. We assessed the prevalence of peritonitis and the relationship between peritonitis and patients' backgrounds, as well as the clinical course after peritonitis. Between December 2008 and December 2011, peritonitis was found in 9 (2.1 %) of 421 patients. Of the 9 patients with peritonitis, 4 had received PEG prior to chemoradiotherapy. Emergency surgical drainage was required in 1 patient, and the remaining 8 recovered with conservative treatment. Peritonitis occurred within 8 days of PEG for 8 of the 9 patients and occurred within 2 days of suture removal for 4 of the 9 patients. Peritonitis related to PEG using the direct method was less frequent for cancer patients. Peritonitis tended to occur within a few days after removal of securing suture and in patients with palliative stage.

  15. Use of a novel laparoscopic gastrostomy technique in children with severe epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kamlesh; Wells, Jonathan; Jones, Rosie; Browne, Fiona; Moss, Celia; Parikh, Dakshesh

    2014-05-01

    Supplementing nutrition in children with severe epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is challenging because of skin and mucosal fragility. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated in EB, whereas more invasive open surgical gastrostomy placement can be complicated by chronic leakage. The aim of the study was to review the efficacy and acceptability, in children with severe EB, of our modified 2-port laparoscopic approach using the Seldinger technique with serial dilatation and tube insertion through a peel-away sheath. Retrospective review of children with EB who underwent laparoscopic feeding gastrostomy at our centre since 2009. Seven children (6 severe generalised recessive dystrophic EB, 1 non-Herlitz junctional EB; 2 girls, 5 boys) underwent modified laparoscopic gastrostomy placement at median age 4.85 years (range 1.0-8.8), with fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux in 1 case, with follow-up for 0.3 to 3.9 years. The procedure was well tolerated with oral feeds usually given after 4 hours and whole protein gastrostomy feeds within 24 hours in 6 patients. Improved growth was reflected in mean weight and height z scores: -1.36 (range -2.6 to 0.5) to -0.61 (range -2.34 to 2.0) and -1.09 (range -2.42 to 1.0) to 0.71 (range -1.86 to 1.0), respectively. Postoperatively, 5 patients experienced minor local complications: minimal leakage without skin damage in 3 and transient peristomal granulation rapidly responsive to topical treatment in 2; this followed acute gastrostomy site infection in 1. There was no leakage after the immediate postoperative period. We conclude that our less-invasive laparoscopic gastrostomy technique is effective and better tolerated in children with severe EB, at least in the medium term, than open gastrostomy placement. Longer follow-up is required.

  16. Push versus pull gastrostomy in cancer patients: A single center retrospective analysis of complications and technical success rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, B M; Getrajdman, G I; Covey, A M; Alago, W; Erinjeri, J P; Maybody, M; Boas, F E

    2018-04-28

    To compare the technical success and complication rates of push versus pull gastrostomy tubes in cancer patients, and to examine their dependence on operator experience. A retrospective review was performed of 304 cancer patients (170 men, 134 women; mean age 60.3±12.6 [SD], range: 19-102 years) referred for primary gastrostomy tube placement, 88 (29%) of whom had a previously unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. Analyzed variables included method of insertion (push versus pull), indication for gastrostomy, technical success, operator experience, and procedure-related complications within 30 days of placement. Gastrostomy tubes were placed for feeding in 189 patients and palliative decompression in 115 patients. Technical success was 91%: 78% after endoscopy had previously been unsuccessful and 97% when excluding failures associated with prior endoscopy. In the first 30 days, there were 29 minor complications (17.2%) associated with push gastrostomies, and only 8 minor complications (7.5%) with pull gastrostomies (Ptechnical success rates for more versus less experienced operators. Pull gastrostomy tube placement had a lower rate of complications than push gastrostomy tube placement, especially when the indication was decompression. The technical success rate was high, even after a failed attempt at endoscopic placement. Both the rates of success and complications were independent of operator experience. Copyright © 2018 Société française de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Effectiveness of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for oropharyngeal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Masanori; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Kiyota, Naomi; Okuno, Shinya; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with head and neck carcinoma are often provided concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), but they experience severe mucositis and dysphagia. These side effects can lead to decreased oral intake, resulting in interruption of treatment. In our hospital, from September 2007, all patients with oropharyngeal cancer who were to receive CCRT, were principally offered percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) before the start of treatment, and tube feeding was started when swallowing became impaired, to accomplish the treatment as planned. To evaluate the effect of prophylactic PEG, outcome measures in this study included the frequency of unplanned break from CCRT, nutritional deterioration and required analgesic during CCRT, complication of PEG, and patient satisfaction between 15 patients with PEG and 11 patients without PEG as a control group. Although no significant weight loss occurred in either group, there were fewer patients with a Body Mass Index <18.5 in the PEG group after CCRT than in the control group. Regarding the treatment, most patients were satisfied with their PEG and considered that prophylactic PEG was necessary and helpful in completing the CCRT. This study suggests that prophylactic PEG helps patients to complete CCRT both mentally and nutritionally. (author)

  18. Comprehensive approach to the child with gastrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Šmid

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement is the method of choice for enteral feeding of adults and children. It is most commonly needed in children with neurological impairment, and in those with swallowing difficulties. Complications are relatively common but in most cases not severe. Among the most common complications are bacterial and fungal infections of the skin around the tube.In adults, it is usually performed with local anesthesia, whereas in children general anesthesia is recommended.During the child’s hospitalization, parents are usually present in order to learn how to take care of the child at home. We offer them theoretical and practical knowledge about the life of a child with gastrostomy. We provide them information on feeding, skin care, possible complications, and actively include them in all steps of the process of gastrostomy nursing care as soon as possible.Likewise adults, children also have to be treated as equals, andfor this reason we have to know how to communicate with them, with special attention on child’s non-verbal communication. Nursing care to the child often presents an unfamiliar and even undesirable situation. It is therefore the role of the nurse to mitigate it by appropriate communication.It takes four to five days for parents to obtain sufficient information to be able to take care of their child at home. Upon discharge, they receive written information on percutaneous gastrostomy care.

  19. Clinical Experience of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Taiwanese Patients—310 Cases in 8 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Hsi Lee

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Although percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG has become a popular method for long-term tube feeding worldwide, there are only a few reports about its application in Taiwan. From May 1997 to May 2005, we performed 302 PEG insertions successfully in 310 attempts (97.4% success rate using modified Ponsky's pull method with 24-Fr feeding tubes. All the patients received PEG for tube feeding except for two patients with cancerous peritonitis for decompression. The underlying diseases in these 308 patients who received PEG for tube feeding were 161 cerebrovascular accidents (52.3%, 62 head and neck cancers (20.1%, 21 cases of Parkinsonism (6.8%, and others. There were 11 major complications (3.6% and 57 minor complications (18.9%. Ten patients (3.3% died within 30 days after PEG insertion. However, no procedure-related mortality occurred. In conclusion, PEG is an effective method for tube feeding and drainage with a high success rate. PEG insertion was often indicated for patients with dysphagia caused by cerebrovascular accident, head and neck cancer, and Parkinsonism in Taiwan. It is a relatively safe procedure, with a 3.6% rate of major complications and 18.9% rate of minor complications.

  20. Analysis of Patients' X-ray Exposure in 146 Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Tim-Ole; Reinhardt, Martin; Fuchs, Jochen; Gosch, Dieter; Surov, Alexey; Stumpp, Patrick; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Purpose  Analysis of patient´s X-ray exposure during percutaneous radiologic gastrostomies (PRG) in a larger population. Materials and Methods  Data of primary successful PRG-procedures, performed between 2004 and 2015 in 146 patients, were analyzed regarding the exposition to X-ray. Dose-area-product (DAP), dose-length-product (DLP) respectively, and fluoroscopy time (FT) were correlated with the used x-ray systems (Flatpanel Detector (FD) vs. Image Itensifier (BV)) and the necessity for periprocedural placement of a nasogastric tube. Additionally, the effective X-ray dose for PRG placement using fluoroscopy (DL), computed tomography (CT), and cone beam CT (CBCT) was estimated using a conversion factor. Results  The median DFP of PRG-placements under fluoroscopy was 163 cGy*cm 2 (flat panel detector systems: 155 cGy*cm 2 ; X-ray image intensifier: 175 cGy*cm 2 ). The median DLZ was 2.2 min. Intraprocedural placement of a naso- or orogastric probe (n = 68) resulted in a significant prolongation of the median DLZ to 2.5 min versus 2 min in patients with an already existing probe. In addition, dose values were analyzed in smaller samples of patients in which the PRG was placed under CBCT (n = 7, median DFP = 2635 cGy*cm 2 ), or using CT (n = 4, median DLP = 657 mGy*cm). Estimates of the median DFP and DLP showed effective doses of 0.3 mSv for DL-assisted placements (flat panel detector 0.3 mSv, X-ray image converter 0.4 mSv), 7.9 mSv using a CBCT - flat detector, and 9.9 mSv using CT. This corresponds to a factor 26 of DL versus CBCT, or a factor 33 of DL versus CT. Conclusion  In order to minimize X-ray exposure during PRG-procedures for patients and staff, fluoroscopically-guided interventions should employ flat detector systems with short transmittance sequences in low dose mode and with slow image frequency. Series recordings can be dispensed with. The intraprocedural placement of a naso- or orogastric probe

  1. Percutaneous transgastric irrigation drainage in combination with endoscopic necrosectomy in necrotizing pancreatitis (with videos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczynski, Susanne; Teich, Niels; Borte, Gudrun; Wittenburg, Henning; Mössner, Joachim; Caca, Karel

    2006-09-01

    Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic acute and chronic pseudocysts and pancreatic necrosectomy have been shown to be beneficial for critically ill patients, with complete endoscopic resolution rates of around 80%. Our purpose was to describe an improved endoscopic technique used to treat pancreatic necrosis. Case report. University hospital. Two patients with large retroperitoneal necroses were treated with percutaneous transgastric retroperitoneal flushing tubes and a percutaneous transgastric jejunal feeding tube by standard percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy access in addition to endoscopic necrosectomy. Intensive percutaneous transgastric flushing in combination with percutaneous normocaloric enteral nutrition and repeated endoscopic necrosectomy led to excellent outcomes in both patients. Small number of patients. The "double percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy" approach for simultaneous transgastric drainage and normocaloric enteral nutrition in severe cases of pancreatic necroses is safe and effective. It could be a promising improvement to endoscopic transgastric treatment options in necrotizing pancreatitis.

  2. Effectiveness of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy on nutritional status and mucositis in oropharyngeal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Miki; Takemoto, Naoko; Sano, Ayaka

    2012-01-01

    Recently, concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is frequently used for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. However, CCRT induces mucositis and dysphagia and causes inadequate oral nutrition intake. Thus, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in advance is recently recommended. To evaluate the effectiveness of PEG on nutritional intake, nutritional status, blood test, and grade of mucositis of 29 patients who had CCRT with PEG were investigated retrospectively. The results were statistically compared with those of 13 patients who had CCRT without PEG as a control group. Regarding the total energy, no significant change was observed in the PEG group, while the total energy intake significantly decreased in the control group (P=0.026). A significant correlation was observed between the rate of body weight loss during CCRT and total energy intake (R=0.78). The total energy intake of patients who could maintain body weight was 34.1 kcal/kg/day. Taken together, these results suggested that early nutritional administration using PEG can reduce the weight loss during CCRT. (author)

  3. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Mortality and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbó Perseguer, J; Madejón Seiz, A; Romero Portales, M; Martínez Hernández, J; Mora Pardina, J S; García-Samaniego, J

    2018-03-26

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that causes severe dysphagia and weight loss. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is currently the technique of choice for the enteral nutrition of these patients. To analyse mortality and complications in a series of patients diagnosed with ALS who underwent PEG, and to evaluate factors related to patient survival after the procedure. We performed a prospective, observational study including all patients diagnosed with ALS and treated by our hospital's Gastroenterology Department in the period 1997-2013. We studied mortality, complications, and clinical and biochemical parameters, and correlated these with the survival rate. The study included a total of 57 patients, of whom 49 were ultimately treated with PEG. ALS onset was bulbar in 30 patients and spinal in 19. Mortality during the procedure and at 30 days was 2% (n = 1). Six patients (12.2%) experienced major complications; 17 (34.7%) experienced less serious complications which were easily resolved with conservative treatment. No significant differences were observed in forced vital capacity, albumin level, or age between patients with (n = 6) and without (n = 43) major complications. PEG is an effective, relatively safe procedure for the enteral nutrition of patients with ALS, although not without morbidity and mortality. Neither forced vital capacity nor the form of presentation of ALS were associated with morbidity in PEG. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Buried bumber syndrome (internal button buried of the gastrostomy): Unearthing the solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Nelson; Otero, William; Gomez, Martin; Bula, Rodrigo; Otero, Elder

    2006-01-01

    The Buried bumper syndrome is a major complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and the literature of in of having described of rarely. The physiopathology is the gastric isquemy of the mucous one for an excessive pressure for the ends that fix the gastrostomy. Their clinical manifestations that depend on the depth of migration of the end go from the absence of symptoms, spill of the nutrition enteral being the most frequent, until peritonitis. The diverse described treatment modalities are based on the depth of migration of the end valued endoscopically. The successful use of the ecoendosonography is described for the estimate of the depth of the migration, when you cannot visualize the end internal endoscopically and we propose a handling .algorithm based on this technique

  5. Current microbiology of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (PEG tube) insertion site infections in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, Kenneth V I; Mihu, Coralia; Tarrand, Jeffrey J

    2011-08-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is frequently used to provide enteral access in cancer patients who are unable to swallow. Infection is an important complication in this setting. Current microbiological data are needed to guide infection prevention and treatment strategies. The microbiological records of our institution (a 550-bed comprehensive cancer center) were retrospectively reviewed over an 8-month study period in order to identify patients who developed PEG tube insertion site infections, and review their microbiological details and susceptibility/resistance data. Fifty-eight episodes of PEG tube insertion site infections were identified. Of these, 31 (53%) were monomicrobial, and the rest were polymicrobial. The most common organisms isolated were Candida species, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All infections were local (cellulitis, complicated skin, and skin structure infections including abdominal wall abscess) with no cases of concomitant bacteremia being documented. Most of the organisms isolated were susceptible to commonly used antimicrobial agents, although some quinolone-resistant and some multidrug-resistant organisms were isolated. This retrospective study provides descriptive data regarding PEG tube insertion site infections. These data have helped us update institutional guidelines for infection prevention and treatment as part of our focus on antimicrobial stewardship.

  6. A case report of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy left-side gastropexy to resolve a recurrent gastric dilatation in a dog previously treated with right-side gastropexy for gastric dilatation volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Giuseppe; Cinti, Filippo; Pietra, Marco; Capitani, Ombretta; Valentini, Simona

    2014-12-01

    A 6-year-old, large-breed, female dog was evaluated for gastric dilatation (GD). The dog was affected by GD volvulus, which had been surgically treated with gastric derotation and right incisional gastropexy. Recurrence of GD appeared 36 hours after surgery. The dilatation was immediately treated with an orogastric probe but still recurred 4 times. Therefore, a left-side gastropexy by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) was performed to prevent intermittent GD. After PEG tube placement, the patient recovered rapidly without side effects. Several techniques of gastropexy have been described as a prophylactic method for gastric dilatation volvulus, but to the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of left-sided PEG gastropexy performed in a case of canine GD recurrence after an incisional right gastropexy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Growth outcomes and complications after radiologic gastrostomy in 120 children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Evan Cole [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Ottawa (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre; Temple, Michael; John, Philip; Chait, Peter G.; Vaughan, Jennifer; Amaral, Joao G. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Image Guided Therapy, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-09-15

    Enteral feeding is ideal for children with low caloric intake. It can be provided through different methods, including nasogastric, nasojejunal, gastrostomy, or gastrojejunostomy tubes. To assess growth outcomes of pediatric patients following retrograde percutaneous gastrostomy (RPG) and compare complications with those following other gastrostomy methods. We retrospectively reviewed 120 random RPG patients from 2002 to 2003 (mean follow-up, 2.7 years). Patient weights and growth percentiles were recorded at insertion, and at 0-5 months, 6-12 months, and 18-24 months after insertion, and then compared using a Student's t-test. Complications and tube maintenance issues (TMIs) were recorded. Gastrostomy tube insertion was successful in all 120 patients (59 boys, 61 girls; mean age 4.3 years). The most common underlying diagnosis was neurologic disease (29%, 35/120) and the main indication was inadequate caloric intake (24%, 29/120). Significant increases in growth percentile for the entire population were demonstrated between insertion and 0-5 months (18.7-25.3; P<0.001) and between insertion and 18-24 months (18.7-25.8; P<0.001). In boys and girls significant growth increases occurred between insertion and 0-5 months (boys P=0.004; girls P=0.01). There were 11 major postprocedural complications, 100 minor complications and 169 TMIs. RPG provides long-term enteral nutrition in the pediatric population and increases growth significantly 6 and 24 months after insertion. Minor complications and TMIs are frequent. (orig.)

  8. Growth outcomes and complications after radiologic gastrostomy in 120 children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Evan Cole; Connolly, Bairbre; Temple, Michael; John, Philip; Chait, Peter G.; Vaughan, Jennifer; Amaral, Joao G.

    2008-01-01

    Enteral feeding is ideal for children with low caloric intake. It can be provided through different methods, including nasogastric, nasojejunal, gastrostomy, or gastrojejunostomy tubes. To assess growth outcomes of pediatric patients following retrograde percutaneous gastrostomy (RPG) and compare complications with those following other gastrostomy methods. We retrospectively reviewed 120 random RPG patients from 2002 to 2003 (mean follow-up, 2.7 years). Patient weights and growth percentiles were recorded at insertion, and at 0-5 months, 6-12 months, and 18-24 months after insertion, and then compared using a Student's t-test. Complications and tube maintenance issues (TMIs) were recorded. Gastrostomy tube insertion was successful in all 120 patients (59 boys, 61 girls; mean age 4.3 years). The most common underlying diagnosis was neurologic disease (29%, 35/120) and the main indication was inadequate caloric intake (24%, 29/120). Significant increases in growth percentile for the entire population were demonstrated between insertion and 0-5 months (18.7-25.3; P<0.001) and between insertion and 18-24 months (18.7-25.8; P<0.001). In boys and girls significant growth increases occurred between insertion and 0-5 months (boys P=0.004; girls P=0.01). There were 11 major postprocedural complications, 100 minor complications and 169 TMIs. RPG provides long-term enteral nutrition in the pediatric population and increases growth significantly 6 and 24 months after insertion. Minor complications and TMIs are frequent. (orig.)

  9. Safety of pull-type and introducer percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes in oncology patients: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelckmans Paul A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG allows long-term tube feeding. Safety of pull-type and introducer PEG placement in oncology patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies is unknown. Methods Retrospective analysis of 299 patients undergoing PEG tube placement between January 2006 and December 2008 revealed 57 oncology patients. All patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancy were treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. In case of high-grade stenosis introducer Freka® Pexact PEG tube was placed (n = 24 and in all other patients (n = 33 conventional pull-type PEG tube. Short-term complications and mortality rates were compared. Results Patients' characteristics and clinical status were comparable in both groups. Short-term complications were encountered in 11/24 (48% introducer PEG patients as compared to only 4/33 (12% pull-type PEG patients (P vs. 0/33 (0%, P vs. 3/33 (9%, NS. Finally, 3/24 gastrointestinal perforations (12% resulted from a difficult placement procedure vs. 1/33 (3%, leading to urgent surgical intervention and admission to ICU. Two introducer PEG patients died at ICU, resulting in an overall mortality rate of 8% vs. 0% (P = 0.091. Conclusion The introducer Freka® Pexact PEG procedure for long-term tube feeding may lead to significantly higher complication and mortality rates in patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. It is suggested to use the conventional pull-type PEG tube placement in this group of patients, if possible.

  10. Outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion in respiratory impaired amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients under noninvasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czell, David; Bauer, Matthias; Binek, Janek; Schoch, Otto D; Weber, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with impaired respiratory function is associated with an increased risk of peri-procedural and post-interventional complications. It was the aim of the study to analyze peri- and post-interventional complications and survival after PEG tube placement under noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in ALS patients with various degrees of respiratory impairment. Twenty-six subjects were included in this retrospective case study. Prior to PEG tube placement, training with ventilatory support via an oronasal mask was performed with ALS subjects on the pneumology ward. PEG placement was then performed under continuous NIV. FVC, sniff nasal inspiratory pressure, and demographic data were assessed. Complication rates and 1-month and overall survival rates were analyzed. There were no deaths within 24 hours after PEG placement. One subject died within the first month. The mean survival rate after PEG was 12 ± 10 months (range 0.6-42 months). There was no difference in post-PEG survival between subjects with moderately (> 50%) and severely (NIV in ALS subjects.

  11. [Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in a myotrophic lateral sclerosis. Experience in a district general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Herrera-Martínez, Aura Dulcinea; Tenorio Jiménez, Carmen; Molina Puerta, María José; Calañas Continente, Alfonso Jesús; Manzano García, Gregorio; Gálvez Moreno, María Ángeles

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disorder that affects the pyramidal tract, producing progressive motor dysfunctions leading to paralysis. These patients can present with dysphagia, requiring nutritional support with a nasogastric tube or Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG). PEG is associated with increased survival rates. However, the timing of PEG placement remains a significant issue for clinicians. To analyse the characteristics of ALS patients at the moment of PEG placement and their progression. Descriptive retrospective study including patients diagnosed with ALS and PEG who were assessed during the 2005-2014 period in our hospital. Nutritional parameters and respiratory function were assessed for all patients, as well as their progression. The data was analysed using SPSS15. 37 patients were included (56.8% men, 43.2% women) with an average age of 60 at diagnosis, and an average age of 63.1 at PEG placement. 48.6% started with spinal affection and 51.4%, with bulbar affection. 43.2% of the patients received oral nutritional supplements prior to PEG placement for a mean period of 11.3 months. The mean forced vital capacity at diagnosis was 65.45±13.67%, with a negative progression up to 39.47±14.69% at the moment of PEG placement. 86.5% of patients required non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation. 86.5% presented with dysphagia, 64.9% with weight loss > 5-10% from their usual weight, 8.1% with low Body Mass Index, 27% with malnutrition and 73% with aworsened breathing function; therefore, 100% met the criteria for PEG placement according to our protocol. The period on enteral feeding was extended for 10.1 months with a mortality of 50% during the first 6 months from PEG placement. There is evidence of a 3-year delay between diagnosis and PEG placement, with a survival rate of 50% at 6 months from PEG insertion. Further studies are required to establish whether an earlier placement might increase survival rates. Copyright AULA

  12. Outcome of Rehabilitation and Swallowing Therapy after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Dysphagia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Hirao, Jun; Minoda, Naoko

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the outcomes of rehabilitation (with swallowing therapy) after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in patients with neurogenic dysphagia. Forty-seven patients (29 males and 18 females) who were transferred to the rehabilitation ward of our hospital after receiving PEG tube placements during a 5-year period were enrolled in this study. Patients' demographic data, comorbidities, nutritional statuses, and laboratory biomarkers before the PEG procedure were collected. Rehabilitation (with swallowing therapy) outcomes such as changes in Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and dysphagia grade (using Fujishima's classification) were evaluated. Significant improvements in FIM scores and dysphagia grades after rehabilitation therapy were observed. Twenty-seven patients (57.4 %) were discharged with some oral intake and 10 patients (21.3%) were discharged PEG-free (defined as the PEG tube not being used or removed). Factors associated with being discharged with some oral intake were increase in FIM score (adjusted OR 1.10, 95 % CI 1.02-1.19) and higher baseline dysphagia grade (adjusted OR 1.88, 95 % CI 1.04-3.39). Factors associated with being discharged PEG-free were longer rehabilitation period (OR 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), absence of respiratory disorders (OR 0.12, 95 % CI 0.03-0.35), and increase in FIM score (OR 1.17, 95 % CI 1.08-1.28). Changes in dysphagia grade were significantly correlated with changes in FIM score (r 2  = 0.46, p dysphagia.

  13. Comparison between gastrostomy feeding and self-expandable metal stent insertion for patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yang Won; Jang, Eun Young; Jung, Ji Hey; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J

    2017-01-01

    Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) insertion and percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) feeding are commonly used for patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia. This study aimed to compare outcomes between SEMS insertion and PG feeding for them. We retrospectively analyzed 308 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent fully covered SEMS insertion (stent group) or PG (gastrostomy group) for dysphagia due to tumor. Patients with other causes of dysphagia, such as radiation-induced or postoperative stricture, were excluded from the study. Clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups, including overall survival and need for additional intervention and postprocedural nutritional status. At baseline, the stent group (n = 169) had more stage IV patients, less cervical cancers, and received radiotherapy and esophagectomy less often than the gastrostomy group (n = 64). The Kaplan-Meier curves showed higher overall survival in the gastrostomy group than in the stent group. Multivariate analysis revealed that PG was associated with better survival compared with SEMS insertion (hazard ratio 0.541, 95% confidence interval 0.346-0.848, p = 0.007). In addition, the gastrostomy group needed additional intervention less often (3.1% vs. 21.9%, p esophageal cancer and dysphagia. Stabilized nutritional status by PG may play a role in improving patient survival.

  14. The sky blue method as a screening test to detect misplacement of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube at exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yutaka; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshida, Hideki; Iwase, Tsuyoshi; Kura, Toshiroh; Imazato, Shin; Kudo, Michiaki; Ohta, Tomoyuki; Mizuhara, Akihiro; Tamamori, Yutaka; Muramatsu, Hirohito; Nishiguchi, Yukio; Nishiyama, Yorihiro; Takahashi, Mikako; Nishiwaki, Shinji; Matsumoto, Masami; Goshi, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Shigeo; Uchida, Nobuyuki; Ijima, Masashi; Ogawa, Tetsushi; Shimazaki, Makoto; Takei, Shinichi; Kimura, Chikou; Yamashita, Satoyoshi; Endo, Takao; Nakahori, Masato; Itoh, Akihiko; Kusakabe, Toshiro; Ishizuka, Izumi; Iiri, Takao; Fukasawa, Shingo; Arimoto, Yukitsugu; Kajitani, Nobuaki; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Onishi, Koji; Taira, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Makoto; Itano, Yasuto; Kobuke, Toshiya

    2009-01-01

    During tube exchange for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), a misplaced tube can cause peritonitis and death. Thus, endoscopic or radiologic observation is required at tube exchange to make sure the tube is placed correctly. However, these procedures cost extensive time and money to perform in all patients at the time of tube exchange. Therefore, we developed the "sky blue method" as a screening test to detect misplacement of the PEG tube during tube exchange. First, sky blue solution consisting of indigocarmine diluted with saline was injected into the gastric space via the old PEG tube just before the tube exchange. Next, the tube was exchanged using a standard method. Then, we checked whether the sky blue solution could be collected through the new tube or not. Finally, we confirmed correct placement of the tube by endoscopic or radiologic observation for all patients. A total of 961 patients were enrolled. Each tube exchange took 1 to 3 minutes, and there were no adverse effects. Four patients experienced a misplaced tube, all of which were detectable with the sky blue method. Diagnostic parameters of the sky blue method were as follows: sensitivity, 94% (95%CI: 92-95%); specificity, 100% (95%CI: 40-100%); positive predictive value, 100% (95%CI: 100-100%); negative predictive value, 6% (95%CI: 2-16%). These results suggest that the number of endoscopic or radiologic observations to confirm correct replacement of the PEG tube may be reduced to one fifteenth using the sky blue method.

  15. Randomized study of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy versus nasogastric tubes for enteral feeding in head and neck cancer patients treated with (chemo)radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, J.; Poon, W.; McPhee, N.; Milner, A. D.; Cruickshank, D.; Rischin, D.; Peters, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes have largely replaced nasogastric tubes (NGT) for nutritional support of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing curative (chemo)radiotherapy without any good scientific basis. A randomized trial was conducted to compare PEG tubes and NGT in terms of nutritional outcomes, complications, patient satisfaction and cost. The study was closed early because of poor accrual, predominantly due to patients' reluctance to be randomized. There were 33 patients eligible for analysis. Nutritional support with both tubes was good. There were no significant differences in overall complication rates, chest infection rates or in patients' assessment of their overall quality of life. The cost of a PEG tube was 10 times that of an NGT. The duration of use of PEG tubes was significantly longer, a median 139 days compared with a median 66 days for NGT. We found no evidence to support the routine use of PEG tubes over NGT in this patient group

  16. Current status of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in a general hospital in Japan: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Chika; Yamada, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Masaji; Gotoda, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been debate over the indications for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) in recent years in Japan. In addition, the level of satisfaction of patients and patient’s family after PEG remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the current status of PEG and the level of satisfaction of patients and patients’ families after PEG in Japan. Methods: We reviewed the existing data of all patients who underwent PEG tube insertion at Yuri Kumiai General Hospital (Akita, Japan) between February 2000 and December 2010. We examined the following points: underlying diseases requiring PEG, levels of consciousness, and performance status. We also sent a questionnaire to the patients and patient’s families to ask about their satisfaction with and thoughts about PEG. Results: The data of 545 patients who underwent PEG were reviewed. There were 295 men and 250 women, with a mean age of 77.2 ± 11.4 years. PEG was indicated most frequently for cerebrovascular disorders (48.2%, 239/545). There were 515 (94.4%, 515/545) patients showing consciousness disturbance and 444 (81.5%, 444/545) bedridden patients. The questionnaire was answered by one patient himself and 316 patients’ families. When asked, “Was performing PEG a good decision?”, 57.5% (182/316) of the patients’ families answered yes. Meanwhile, when patients’ family members were asked if they would wish to undergo PEG if they were in the same condition as the patient, 28.4% (90/316) answered yes, whereas 55.3% (175/316) answered no. Conclusions: Few patients were able to make their own decision about PEG tube placement because of consciousness disturbance. As a result, many family members of the patients did not want to experience PEG for themselves. Future studies should be performed to clarify the quality of life and ethical aspects associated with PEG. PMID:27313796

  17. A very feasible alternative in patients with feeding difficulties from gastrostomy: Jejunal tube advanced through the gastrostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Karabulut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our aim is to share our experiences regarding patients who cannot be fed effectively through the gastrostomy tube, but were inserted feeding jejunostomy through the gastrostomy orifice using scopic fluoroscopic techniques utilised by the interventional radiology. Patients and Methods: Between January 2010 and May 2013 the patients that were inserted jejunostomy tube through the gastrostomy orifice using fluoroscopic techniques were retrospectively analysed. Data including primary indication for gastrostomy, sex, concomitant disease and the requirement for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD were all recorded. Results: There were five patients with these criteria. They all received either medical or surgical GERD therapy; nevertheless enteral feeding failed to reach an effective level, they all had vomiting and did not gain any weight. Following conversion, all the patients gained minimum 2 kg in 2-5 months; all the patients tolerated enteral feeding and were discharged in the early period. There were neither procedure related complications such as perforation, bleeding nor sedation related complications. Procedure took no more than 30 min as a whole. There was no need for surgical intervention. However in one patient re-intervention was required due to accidental removal of the catheter. Conclusions: In case of feeding difficulties following the gastrostomy; instead of an invasive surgical intervention; physicians should consider jejunal feeding that is advanced through the gastrostomy, which does not require any anaesthesia.

  18. Perioperative management of gastrostomy tube placement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy adolescent and young adult patients: A role for a perioperative surgical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Ariane; Antonelli, Richard; Sethna, Navil F

    2018-02-01

    In past decades, Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have been living longer and as the disease advances, patients experience multisystemic deterioration. Older patients often require gastrostomy tube placement for nutritional support. For optimizing the perioperative care, a practice of multidisciplinary team can better anticipate, prevent, and manage possible complications and reduce the overall perioperative morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to review our experience with perioperative care of adolescent and young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy undergoing gastrostomy by various surgical approaches in order to identify challenges and improve future perioperative care coordination to reduce morbidity. We retrospectively examined cases of gastrostomy tube placement in patients of ages 15 years and older between 2005 and 2016. We reviewed preoperative evaluation, anesthetic and surgical management, and postoperative complications. Twelve patients were identified; 1 had open gastrostomy, 3 laparoscopic gastrostomies, 5 percutaneous endoscopic guided, and 3 radiologically inserted gastrostomy tubes. All patients had preoperative cardiac evaluation with 6 patients demonstrating cardiomyopathy. Nine patients had preoperative pulmonary consultations and the pulmonary function tests reported forced vital capacity of ≤36% of predicted. Eight patients were noninvasive positive pressure ventilation dependent. General anesthesia with tracheal intubation was administered in 8 patients, and intravenous sedation in 4 patients; 1 received sedation supplemented with regional anesthesia and 3 received deep sedation. One patient had a difficult intubation that resulted in trauma and prolonged tracheal intubation. Three patients developed postoperative respiratory complications. Two patients' procedures were postponed due to inadequate preoperative evaluation and 1 because of disagreement between anesthesia and procedural services as to the optimal

  19. Disease-based mortality after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: utility of the enterprise data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Benjamin K; Kaiser, Joan; Beck, William C; Jackson, Pearlie; Nealon, William H; Sharp, Kenneth W; Holzman, Michael D

    2013-11-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) remains a mainstay of enteral access. Thirty-day mortality for PEG has ranged from 16 to 43 %. This study aims to discern patient groups that demonstrate limited survival after PEG placement. The Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) concept allows an efficient means of integrating administrative, clinical, and quality-of-life data. On the basis of this concept, we developed the Vanderbilt Procedural Outcomes Database (VPOD) and analyzed these data for evaluation of post-PEG mortality over time. Patients were identified using the VPOD from 2008 to 2010 and followed for 1 year after the procedure. Patients were categorized according to common clinical groups for PEG placement: stroke/CNS tumors, neuromuscular disorders, head and neck cancers, other malignancies, trauma, cerebral palsy, gastroparesis, or other indications for PEG. All-cause mortality at 30, 60, 90, 180, and 360 days was determined by linking VPOD information with the Social Security Death Index. Chi-square analysis was used to determine significance across groups. Nine hundred fifty-three patients underwent PEG placement during the study period. Mortality over time (30-, 60-, 90-, 180-, and 360-day mortality) was greatest for patients with malignancies other than head and neck cancer (29, 45, 57, 66, and 72 %) and least for cerebral palsy or patients with gastroparesis (7 % at all time points). Patients with neuromuscular disorders had a similar mortality curve as head and neck cancer patients. Stroke/CNS tumor patients and patients with other indications had the second highest mortality, while trauma patients had low mortality. PEG mortality was much higher in patients with malignancies other than head and neck cancer compared to previously published rates. PEG should be used with great caution in this and other high-risk patient groups. This study demonstrates the power of an EDW-based database to evaluate large numbers of patients with clinically meaningful

  20. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002937.htm Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A gastrostomy feeding tube insertion is the placement of a feeding ...

  1. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding of locally advanced oro-pharygo-laryngeal cancer patients: Blenderized or commercial food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakostas, Pyrros; Tsaousi, Georgia; Stavrou, George; Rachovitsas, Dimitrios; Tsiropoulos, Gavriil; Rova, Constantina; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Michalopoulos, Antonios; Grosomanidis, Vasilios; Kotzampassi, Katerina

    2017-11-01

    Head and neck cancer patients commonly suffer from severe malnutrition at the time of tentative diagnosis. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy [PEG] feeding is now considered as an efficient tool to reduce nutritional deterioration alongside concurrent treatment. We undertook the challenge to retrospectively evaluate the impact of a commercial, disease-specific, feeding formula [Supportan, Fresenius Kabi, Hellas] versus blenderized family food on nutritional outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected nutritional and anthropometric data at the time of PEG placement, at the 8th week [after treatment termination] and at 8 months [6mo of recovery from treatment]. All patients were prescribed a commercial feeding formula. The final dataset included 212 patients: 112 received the commercial formula, 69 voluntarily decided to switch into blenderized-tube-feeding, and 31 were prescribed to receive a home-made formula of standard ingredients. The commercial formula seemed to help patients to fight the catabolism of concurrent treatment, since, at the 8mo assessment, both Body Mass index and Fat Free Mass had almost recovered to the values at the time of first diagnosis. Neither group on blenderized or home-made formulas exhibited nutritional improvement, but experienced a significant deterioration throughout the study period, with the home-made formula group being the worst. These findings clearly indicate that home-made and blenderized foods do not adequately support the nutritional requirements of patients with HNC scheduled to receive concurrent CRT treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. De novo radiologic placement of button gastrostomy: a feasibility study in children with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richioud, Bertrand; Beji, Hedi; Kalenderian, Anne-Charlotte; Cuinet, Marie; Pilleul, Frank; Louazon, Typhaine; Bertrand, Amandine; Roux, Pascale; Marec-Berard, Perrine

    2015-01-01

    Primary placement of percutaneous radiologic button gastrostomy has been successfully performed in adults but research is lacking as to its success in children during cancer treatment. To assess the safety and effectiveness of such treatment at a single center. We conducted a 3-year retrospective feasibility study reporting on placement procedure, feeding plan, acute complications and effectiveness of this technique based on the evolution of the weight and weight-to-height during a period of 3 months. Eleven gastrostomies were performed in 11 children and young adults (3-20 years old) during oncological treatment. No major complications occurred. Two patients experienced minor side effects - local leakage and granulation tissue formation - both easily treated. In all cases, enteral feeding started within 24 h following the button placement. The patients were able to go home within 72 h. After 1 month, 64% (7/11) had gained weight, 18% (2/11) had maintained weight and 9% (1/11) had lost weight. After 3 months, 73% (8/11) had gained weight and 9% (1/11) had lost weight. The procedure and devices were well tolerated and mostly effective in our cohort. (orig.)

  3. De novo radiologic placement of button gastrostomy: a feasibility study in children with cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richioud, Bertrand; Beji, Hedi; Kalenderian, Anne-Charlotte; Cuinet, Marie; Pilleul, Frank [Centre Leon Berard, Department of Radiology, Lyon (France); Louazon, Typhaine; Bertrand, Amandine; Roux, Pascale; Marec-Berard, Perrine [Institut d' Hematologie et d' Oncologie Pediatrique, Pediatric Oncology, Lyon (France)

    2015-12-15

    Primary placement of percutaneous radiologic button gastrostomy has been successfully performed in adults but research is lacking as to its success in children during cancer treatment. To assess the safety and effectiveness of such treatment at a single center. We conducted a 3-year retrospective feasibility study reporting on placement procedure, feeding plan, acute complications and effectiveness of this technique based on the evolution of the weight and weight-to-height during a period of 3 months. Eleven gastrostomies were performed in 11 children and young adults (3-20 years old) during oncological treatment. No major complications occurred. Two patients experienced minor side effects - local leakage and granulation tissue formation - both easily treated. In all cases, enteral feeding started within 24 h following the button placement. The patients were able to go home within 72 h. After 1 month, 64% (7/11) had gained weight, 18% (2/11) had maintained weight and 9% (1/11) had lost weight. After 3 months, 73% (8/11) had gained weight and 9% (1/11) had lost weight. The procedure and devices were well tolerated and mostly effective in our cohort. (orig.)

  4. Efficacy of pectin solution for preventing gastro-esophageal reflux events in patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Aimi, Masahito; Fukazawa, Kousuke; Shimura, Shino; Ohara, Shunji; Nakata, Shuji; Inoue, Yukiko; Ryuko, Kanji; Ishine, Junichi; Katoh, Kyoko; Hirata, Toshiaki; Ohhata, Shuzo; Katoh, Setsushi; Moriyama, Mika; Sumikawa, Masuko; Sanpei, Mari; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of pectin solution, which increases the viscosity of liquid nutrient, for prevention of gastro-esophageal reflux in comparison with half-solid nutrient. The subjects were 10 elderly patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding. Twenty-four-hour esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH testing was performed during intake of half-solid nutrient and a combination of pectin solution and liquid nutrient. During 4 h after delivery, there was no significant difference in the total number of gastro-esophageal reflux events between the feeding of the half-solid nutrient and the combination of pectin solution and liquid nutrient (5.7 ± 1.2 vs 5.3 ± 1.0/4 h). Acidic reflux after delivery of the half-solid nutrient was significantly more frequent than that after delivery of the combination of pectin solution and liquid nutrient (80.7% vs 60.4%, p = 0.018). The incidence of gastro-esophageal reflux reaching the upper portion of the esophagus tended to be higher during delivery of the half-solid nutrient than during delivery of the combination of pectin solution and liquid nutrient (47.4% vs 34.0%, p = 0.153). In conclusion, the usage of pectin solution combined with liquid nutrient is effective for preventing acidic gastro-esophageal reflux and gastro-esophageal reflux reaching the upper portion of the esophagus.

  5. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... KEY, 3 to 8 weeks after surgery. These feedings will help your child grow strong and healthy. ...

  6. Video assisted gastrostomy in children

    OpenAIRE

    Backman, Torbjörn

    2014-01-01

    Children with severe diseases can be provided nutritional support through a gastrostomy if needed. At the Department of Paediatric Surgery in Lund we have used the Video Assisted Gastrostomy (VAG) procedure since 1994 when establishing gastrostomies. In this thesis, children with different diseases, who all had undergone the VAG procedure, were studied in five different clinical studies. Postoperative complications were collected and validated. We have not seen any major complications associa...

  7. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalea Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%; one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%; four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates.

  8. SERUM ELECTROLYTES AND OUTCOME IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana VIEIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is a gold standard for long term enteral feeding. Neurologic dysphagia and head/neck cancer are the most common indications for PEG as they can lead to protein-energy malnutrition and serum electrolyte abnormalities, with potential negative impact on metabolic balance. Refeeding syndrome may also be related with severe electrolyte changes in PEG-fed patients and contribute to poor prognosis. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the changes in serum concentrations of the main electrolytes and its possible association with the outcome. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients followed in our Artificial Nutrition Clinic, submitted to PEG from 2010 to 2016, having head/neck cancer or neurologic dysphagia, who died under PEG feeding. Serum electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chlorine, magnesium, calcium and phosphorus were evaluated immediately before the gastrostomy procedure. Survival after PEG until death was recorded in months. RESULTS: We evaluated 101 patients, 59 with electrolyte alterations at the moment of the gastrostomy. Sodium was altered in 32 (31.7%, magnesium in 21 (20.8%, chlorine in 21 (20.8%, potassium in 14 (13.8%, calcium in 11 (10.9 % and phosphorus in 11 (10.9%. The survival of patients with low sodium (<135 mmol/L was significantly lower when compared to patients with normal/high values, 2.76 months vs 7.80 months, respectively (P=0.007. CONCLUSION: Changes in serum electrolytes of patients undergoing PEG were very common. More than half showed at least one abnormality, at the time of the procedure. The most frequent was hyponatremia, which was associated with significantly shorter survival, probably reflecting severe systemic metabolic distress.

  9. Comparison between gastrostomy feeding and self-expandable metal stent insertion for patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Won Min

    Full Text Available Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS insertion and percutaneous gastrostomy (PG feeding are commonly used for patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia. This study aimed to compare outcomes between SEMS insertion and PG feeding for them.We retrospectively analyzed 308 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent fully covered SEMS insertion (stent group or PG (gastrostomy group for dysphagia due to tumor. Patients with other causes of dysphagia, such as radiation-induced or postoperative stricture, were excluded from the study. Clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups, including overall survival and need for additional intervention and postprocedural nutritional status.At baseline, the stent group (n = 169 had more stage IV patients, less cervical cancers, and received radiotherapy and esophagectomy less often than the gastrostomy group (n = 64. The Kaplan-Meier curves showed higher overall survival in the gastrostomy group than in the stent group. Multivariate analysis revealed that PG was associated with better survival compared with SEMS insertion (hazard ratio 0.541, 95% confidence interval 0.346-0.848, p = 0.007. In addition, the gastrostomy group needed additional intervention less often (3.1% vs. 21.9%, p < 0.001 and experienced less decrease in serum albumin levels (-0.15 ± 0.56 g/dL vs. -0.39 ± 0.58 g/dL, p = 0.011 than the stent group after procedure.Our data suggested that, compared with SEMS insertion, PG is associated with better overall survival in patients with esophageal cancer and dysphagia. Stabilized nutritional status by PG may play a role in improving patient survival.

  10. Impact of the prophylactic gastrostomy for unresectable squamous cell head and neck carcinomas treated with radio-chemotherapy on quality of life: Prospective randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, Sebastien; Baumstarck-Barrau, Karine; Alfonsi, Marc; Digue, Laurence; Bagarry, Danielle; Feham, Nasreddine; Bensadoun, Rene Jean; Pignon, Thierry; Loundon, Anderson; Deville, Jean-Laurent; Zanaret, Michel; Favre, Roger; Duffaud, Florence; Auquier, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Concomitant radio-chemotherapy is the gold standard treatment for unresectable head and neck carcinomas. Placement of prophylactic gastrostomy has been proposed to provide adequate nutrition during the therapeutic sequence. The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of prophylactic gastrostomy on the 6-month quality of life, and to determine the factors related to this quality of life. Materials and methods: Design. randomized, controlled, open study ('systematic percutaneous gastrostomy' versus 'no systematic gastrostomy'). Patients. squamous cell head and neck carcinoma (stages III and IV, UICC 1997). Setting. oncological departments of French university teaching hospitals. Treatment. optimal concomitant radio-chemotherapy. Evaluations. T0 baseline evaluation, T1 during the treatment, T2 end of the treatment, and T3 6-month post-inclusion. Primary endpoint. 6-month quality of life (Qol) assessed using SF36, EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ H and N35 questionnaires. Results: The Qol changes from baseline included a decline (T1 and T2) followed by an improvement (T3). Qol at 6 months was significantly higher in the group receiving systematic prophylactic gastrostomy (p = 10 -3 ). Higher initial BMI and lower initial Karnofsky index were significant factors related to a higher 6-month Qol. Conclusions: The study results suggest that prophylactic gastrostomy improves post-treatment quality of life for unresectable head and neck cancer patients, after adjusting for other potential predictive quality of life factors.

  11. Comparative Study of Esophageal Self-expandable Metallic Stent Insertion and Gastrostomy Feeding for Dysphagia Caused by Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Min, Yang Won; Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung Hoon; Lee, Joon Haeng; Rhee, Poong Lyul; Kim, Jae J

    2018-03-25

    Dysphagia is encountered in a large proportion of patients with lung cancer and is associated with malnutrition and a poor quality of life. This study compared the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) insertion and percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) feeding for patients with lung cancer and dysphagia. A total of 261 patients with lung cancer, who underwent either SEMS insertion (stent group) or PG (gastrostomy group) as an initial treatment procedure for dysphagia between July 1997 and July 2015 at the Samsung Medical Center, were reviewed retrospectively, and 84 patients with esophageal obstruction were identified. The clinical outcomes, including the overall survival, additional intervention, complications, and post-procedural nutritional status in the two groups, were compared. Among the 84 patients finally analyzed, 68 patients received SEMS insertion and 16 had PG. The stent group had less cervical obstruction and more mid-esophageal obstruction than the gastrostomy group. The Kaplan-Meier curves revealed similar overall survival in the two groups. Multivariate analysis showed that the two modalities had similar survival rates (PG compared with SEMS insertion, hazard ratio 0.682, p=0.219). Fifteen patients (22.1%) in the stent group received additional intervention, whereas there was no case in the gastrostomy group (p=0.063). The decrease in the serum albumin level after the procedure was lower in the gastrostomy group than in the stent group (-0.20±0.54 g/dL vs. -0.65±0.57 g/dL, p=0.013). SEMS insertion and PG feeding for relieving dysphagia by lung cancer had a comparable survival outcome. On the other hand, PG was associated with a better nutritional status.

  12. A New Tube Gastrostomy Model in Animal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Sezer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The orogastric route is the most preferred application method in the vast majority of the animal experiments in which application can be achieved by adding the material to the water of the experiment animal, through an orogastric tube or with a surgically managed ostomy. Material and Method: This experiment was constructed with twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats which were randomly assigned to one of two groups consist of control group ( group C, n: 6 and tube gastrostomy group ( group TG, n: 6.A novel and simple gastrostomy tube was derivated from a silicone foley catheter. Tube gastrostomy apparatus was constituted with a silicone foley catheter (6 French. In the group TG an incision was performed, and the stomach was visualized. A 1 cm incision was made in the midline and opening of the peritoneum. Anchoring sutures were placed and anterior gastric wall was lifted. The gastric wall is then opened. The apparatus was placed into the stomach and pulled through from a tunnel under the skin and fixed to the lateral abdominal wall with a 2/0 silk suture. Result: The procedure was ended in the 10th day of experiment. No mortality was observed in group C. The rats were monitored daily and no abnormal behavior consists of self harming incision site, resistance to oral intake or attending to displace. There was statistically significant difference in increasing alanine transaminase level (p<0.05 and decrease in the total protein and body weight (p<0.05 at the group TG at the end of experiment. There was significant increase in urea levels in Group C (p<0.05 at the end of experiment. The statistically significant decrease was observed in the same period in group C between aspartate transaminase, albumin, total protein, and body weight (p<0.05.  Glucose (p=0.047 and aspartate transaminase (p=0.050 level decrease changes and weight loose (p=0.034 from preoperative period to the end of the experiment between gastrostomy and laparotomy groups were

  13. Sedation with propofol controlled by endoscopists during percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy Sedación con propofol controlada por endoscopista durante la realización de gastrostomía percutánea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. García-Suárez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: propofol is a hypnotic used with increasing frequency for sedation during endoscopic procedures. Most of the reports published related with its employment by non-anaesthesiologists, refers to basic endoscopy, with little reference to its use in advanced endoscopy. Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of propofol sedation administered by endoscopists, while performing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, an advanced technique that is usually performed in high anesthetic level risk patients. Material and methods: prospective study of a series of endoscopic gastrostomy performed consecutively in our department; the sedation was carried out exclusively with propofol. The staff in the room consisted of two medical gastroenterologists, a nurse and a nursing assistant. Propofol was administered by bolus doses adjusted to patient weight. Arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate and blood pressure were monitored; respiratory activity was monitored visually by observing respiratory excursions of the patient. Results: we included 47 patients, with an average age of 82 years. 87% were ASA III and the rest, ASA IV. The mean dose of propofol was 51 mgr. Complications were recorded: 8 cases of desaturation and two of hypotension, all of them minor and quickly reversible. All procedures were carried out successfully, at a median time of 8 minutes. Conclusion: the propofol sedation carried out by non-anaesthesiologist trained staff, seems to appear as a safe and effective procedure while performing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.Introducción: el propofol es un hipnótico usado cada vez con más frecuencia para la sedación durante procedimientos endoscópicos. La mayor parte de los trabajos publicados en relación con su empleo por personal no anestesista se refiere a exploraciones de endoscopia básica, siendo escasas las referencias a su empleo en endoscopia avanzada. Objetivo: valorar la eficacia y la seguridad de la sedaci

  14. Percutaneous gastroenterostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittich, G.R.; Van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Jantsch, H.; Walter, R.; Lechner, G.

    1987-05-01

    Percutaneous gastrostomies or gastroenterostomies serve for temporary or permanent enteric feeding in patients with obstruction or functional derangement of the esophagus or hypopharynx. In addition, this radiological procedure may be indicated for small bowel decompression. The authors present their experience in 71 patients. Insufflation of air through a nasogastric tube or catheter is the preferred method for gastric distension. The inferior margin of the left lobe of the liver and the transverse colon are localized sonographically and fluoroscopically prior to puncture. Either Seldinger or Trocartechniques have proven effective in establishing access to the stomach. The feeding tube is advanced into the proximal jejunum to reduce the likelyhood of gastroesophageal reflux and possible aspiration. Complications were encountered in four patients and included catheter dislocation in three and respiratory distress in one patient.

  15. Gastric Emptying of Elemental Liquid Diets Versus Semisolid Diets in Bedridden Gastrostomy-fed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Akira; Sakai, Ryosei; Tamaki, Michio; Kajiyama, Masashi; Tanaka, Naoki; Morikawa, Akio

    2018-03-21

    Aspiration is a common problem in bedridden gastrostomy-fed patients. We compared gastric emptying of an elemental liquid diet and a commercial semisolid diet in bedridden gastrostomy-fed patients. Study 1: from January 2013 to December 2016, consecutive bedridden patients receiving percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) semisolid feeding hospitalized due to aspiration pneumonia were switched to elemental liquid diet feedings. The frequency of defecation, tube feed contents aspirated from the trachea, and aspiration pneumonia during hospitalization were retrospectively reviewed. Study 2 was a randomized, crossover trial comparing C sodium acetate gastric emptying of a commercial elemental liquid or a commercial semisolid diet in bedridden PEG patients and controls. Study 1: 18 patients were enrolled. Elemental liquid diet was aspirated from the trachea in 1 (5.6%) (once in 24 observations); neither aspiration pneumonia nor diarrhea developed during elemental liquid diet feeding over 2 weeks observation. Study 2: 8 PEG patients and 8 healthy subjects were separately randomized to assess gastric emptying of the commercial elemental and semisolid diets. The elemental liquid diet was associated with a significant decrease of the 10%, 30%, or 50% emptying (excretion) time (Pbedridden PEG patients. They may prevent or reduce aspiration pneumonia compared with semisolid diets.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  16. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in porcines performed with standard medical instruments used in a general hospital routine Gastrostomia percutânea endoscópica em suínos realizada com instrumentos de uso rotineiro em hospital geral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Roberto do Nascimento

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To perform a endoscopic gastrostomy by the introducer method with routine instruments used in a general hospital, without special instruments or special kits. METHODS: This procedure was performed in pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus under observation for seven days and then submitted to euthanasia.The technique was evaluated for macroscopic and histologic parameters. RESULTS: All animals had a good evolution without major complications. Some minor complications occurred like a rupture of Foley catheter balloon and subcutaneous space abscess. CONCLUSION: The percutaneous gastrostomy with routine general hospital instruments is successful performed, is safe,cheap and must be performed by skilled endoscopists.OBJETIVO: Realizar uma gastrostomia endoscópica pelo método de punção, porém feita com instrumentos de uso rotineiro em um hospital geral, abolindo o uso de instrumentos especiais e de kits industrializados. MÉTODOS: O procedimento foi realizado em suinos da raça Landrace (Sus scrofa domesticus , que permaneceram em observação por sete dias, quando foram submetidos a eutanasia e avaliados por parâmetros macroscópicos e histológicos. RESULTADOS: Todos os animais tiveram boa evolução, não apresentando complicações importantes. Pequenas complicações, como ruptura do balão da sonda de Foley e abscesso subcutâneo ocorreram. CONCLUSÃO: A gastrostomia percutânea endoscópica é um procedimento seguro, barato e perfeitamente realizável com materiais de uso rotineiro em um hospital geral, porém deve ser realizada por endoscopistas devidamente treinados.

  17. Insertion of Balloon Retained Gastrostomy Buttons: A 5-Year Retrospective Review of 260 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Sarah; Kavanagh, Liam N.; Shields, Mary C.; Given, Mark F.; Keeling, Aoife N.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is an established way of maintaining enteral nutrition in patients who cannot maintain nutrition orally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of primary placement of a wide bore button gastrostomy in a large, varied patient population through retrospective review. All patients who underwent gastrostomy placement from January 1, 2004 to January 1, 2009 were identified. 18-Fr gastrostomy buttons (MIC-Key G) were inserted in the majority. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 4.5 years. A total of 260 patients (M:F 140:120, average age 59.2 years) underwent gastrostomy during the study period. Overall success rate for RIG placement was 99.6 %, with success rate of 95.3 % for primary button insertion. Indications included neurological disorders (70 %), esophageal/head and neck malignancy (21 %), and other indications (9 %). Major and minor complication rates were 1.2 and 12.8 %, respectively. Thirty-day mortality rate was 6.8 %. One third of patients underwent gastrostomy reinsertion during the study period, the main indication for which was inadvertent catheter removal. Patency rate was high at 99.5 %. The maximum number of procedures in any patient was 8 (n = 2), and the average tube dwell time was 125 days. Primary radiological insertion of a wide bore button gastrostomy is a safe technique, with high success rate, high patency rate, and low major complication rate. We believe that it is feasible to attempt button gastrostomy placement in all patients, once tract length is within limits of tube length. If difficulty is encountered, then a standard tube may simply be placed instead.

  18. Insertion of Balloon Retained Gastrostomy Buttons: A 5-Year Retrospective Review of 260 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Sarah, E-mail: sarahpower28@yahoo.co.uk; Kavanagh, Liam N.; Shields, Mary C.; Given, Mark F.; Keeling, Aoife N.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2013-04-15

    Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is an established way of maintaining enteral nutrition in patients who cannot maintain nutrition orally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of primary placement of a wide bore button gastrostomy in a large, varied patient population through retrospective review. All patients who underwent gastrostomy placement from January 1, 2004 to January 1, 2009 were identified. 18-Fr gastrostomy buttons (MIC-Key G) were inserted in the majority. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 4.5 years. A total of 260 patients (M:F 140:120, average age 59.2 years) underwent gastrostomy during the study period. Overall success rate for RIG placement was 99.6 %, with success rate of 95.3 % for primary button insertion. Indications included neurological disorders (70 %), esophageal/head and neck malignancy (21 %), and other indications (9 %). Major and minor complication rates were 1.2 and 12.8 %, respectively. Thirty-day mortality rate was 6.8 %. One third of patients underwent gastrostomy reinsertion during the study period, the main indication for which was inadvertent catheter removal. Patency rate was high at 99.5 %. The maximum number of procedures in any patient was 8 (n = 2), and the average tube dwell time was 125 days. Primary radiological insertion of a wide bore button gastrostomy is a safe technique, with high success rate, high patency rate, and low major complication rate. We believe that it is feasible to attempt button gastrostomy placement in all patients, once tract length is within limits of tube length. If difficulty is encountered, then a standard tube may simply be placed instead.

  19. Fluoroscopic-guided primary single-step percutaneous gastrostomy. Initial results using the Freka {sup registered} GastroTube; Primaere einzeitige durchleuchtungsgesteuerte perkutane Gastrostomie (PG). Erste Ergebnisse mit dem Freka {sup registered} GastroTube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahne, J.D.; Schoennagel, B.P.; Arndt, C.; Bannas, P.; Koops, A.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Zentrum fuer Radiologie; Herrmann, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Zentrum fuer Radiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Abt. Paediatrische Radiologie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the practicability and outcome of fluoroscopic-guided primary one-step treatment of percutaneous gastrostomy (PG) with the system Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube (Fresenius Kabi, Germany). Materials and Methods: In 39 patients (mean age 62.7 {+-} 12.0 years), primary PG was performed based on clinical indication from August 2009 to April 2010. The intervention was performed by an experienced radiologist under aseptic conditions by direct puncture with Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube under fluoroscopic guidance. The clinical data and outcome as well as any complications originated from the electronic archive of the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Results: The intervention was technically successful in all 39 patients. Within the mean follow-up time of 155.3 {+-} 73.6 days, 29 patients (74.4 %) did not experience complications. 10 patients (25.6 %) had to be revised. Complications manifested after a mean of 135.6 {+-} 61.2 days and mainly corresponded to accidental dislocation (50 %). One patient had to be surgically revised under suspicion of a malpositioned tube and suspected intestinal perforation. Clinically relevant wound infections were not detected. The total costs per patient were 553.17 Euro for our single-step treatment (OPS 5 - 431.x) vs. 963.69 Euro (OPS 5 - 431.x and OPS 8 - 123.0) for the recommended two-step treatment. Conclusion: Fluoroscopic-guided primary single-step treatment with Freka {sup registered} Gastro Tube system is feasible and not associated with an increased complication rate when compared to published literature applying a two-step treatment approach. Material costs as well as human and time resources could be significantly reduced using the single-step treatment. (orig.)

  20. Long-term outcomes of children undergoing video-assisted gastrostomy

    OpenAIRE

    Sal?, Martin; Santimano, Ana; Helmroth, Sofia; Stenstr?m, Pernilla; Arnbjornsson, Einar ?lafur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to assess the short- and long-term complication rates after video-assisted gastrostomy (VAG), the effects of age and gender on long-term complications and the effect of duration of gastrostomy tube retention on the need for gastroraphy when the gastrostomy device was removed. Methods This was a retrospective study of children undergoing VAG at a single institution. Children who died or moved from the area were excluded. The rates of short- and long-term com...

  1. Gastrostomy tube feeding of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlseng, Magnus O; Andersen, Guro L; DA Graca Andrada, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries.......To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries....

  2. [Nursing Experience With a Patient With Gastrostomy Leakage Resulting in Moisture-Associated Skin Damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Yu; Hsu, Hsiao-Hui; Lyu, Ji-Yan

    2016-10-01

    Leakage is a common complication of gastrostomy. Exposure of the skin surrounding the gastrostomy tube to moisture or chemical irritants may cause moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) and seriously affect the patient's quality of life. This case study describes a nursing experience with gastrostomy leakage that resulted in MASD. An assessment conducted from July 29, 2015 to August 20, 2015 revealed that heavy gastronomy leakage had caused extensive skin erosion, ulceration, hyperplasia, and superficial infection. Simultaneously, the patient was required to conduct complex stoma care, which resulted in physical and psychological exhaustion. Changes in traditional tube and wound care were discussed on multiple occasions with an interdisciplinary healthcare team. Based on the evidence-based literature, we provide gastrostomy and MASD management strategies. Through team collaboration, we prevented gastric contents from contacting the patient's skin directly, improved patient comfort, controlled effluent and skin infections, maintained fluid and electrolyte balances, and acce-lerated the healing of the damaged skin. We recommend that healthcare professionals caring for patients with gastrostomy leakage be provided with early skin protection programs to learn the standard methods for identifying and correcting leakage factors, containing effluent, and adequately stabilizing the gastrostomy tube in order to reduce the impact on the patient's quality of life. In addition, patient education on tube and skin care should be provided to prevent the reoccurrence of complications.

  3. Maternal psychological distress and parenting stress after gastrostomy placement in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitsland, Tone Lise; Faugli, Anne; Pripp, Are Hugo; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik; Bjørnland, Kristin; Emblem, Ragnhild

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate stress in mothers of children with feeding problems before and after gastrostomy placement, and to identify changes in child health and variables affecting maternal stress. Psychological distress and parenting stress in 34 mothers of children referred for gastrostomy were assessed using general health questionnaire (GHQ) (overall psychological distress), impact of event scale (IES) (intrusive stress related to child's feeding problems), and parenting stress index (PSI) (stress related to parenting) before, 6, and 18 months after placement of a gastrostomy. Information of child health and long-term gastrostomy complications were recorded. A semistructured interview constructed for the present study explored maternal preoperative expectations and child's quality of life. Insertion of a gastrostomy did not significantly influence vomiting or the number of children with a low weight-for-height percentile. All of the children experienced peristomal complications. Despite this, mothers' overall psychological distress was significantly reduced after 6 and 18 months, and the majority of mothers (85%) reported that their preoperative expectations were fulfilled and that the child's quality of life was improved after gastrostomy placement. Maternal concerns for the child's feeding problems, measured as intrusive stress, had effect on maternal overall psychological distress. Despite frequent stomal complications the gastrostomy significantly reduced the mothers' psychological distress and improved the child's quality of life as reported by the mother.

  4. Malnutrition in healthcare settings and the role of gastrostomy feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Matthew; Williams, Jake; Sanders, David S

    2017-08-01

    Malnutrition can adversely affect physical and psychological function, influencing both morbidity and mortality. Despite the prevalence of malnutrition and its associated health and economic costs, malnutrition remains under-detected and under-treated in differing healthcare settings. For a subgroup of malnourished individuals, a gastrostomy (a feeding tube placed directly into the stomach) may be required to provide long-term nutritional support. In this review we explore the spectrum and consequences of malnutrition in differing healthcare settings. We then specifically review gastrostomies as a method of providing nutritional support. The review highlights the origins of gastrostomies, and discusses how endoscopic and radiological advances have culminated in an increased demand and placement of gastrostomy feeding tubes. Several studies have raised concerns about the benefits derived following this intervention and also about the patients selected to undergo this procedure. These studies are discussed in detail in this review, alongside suggestions for future research to help better delineate those who will benefit most from this intervention, and improve understanding about how gastrostomies influence nutritional outcomes.

  5. Gastrostomy and gastroesophageal reflux in neurologically impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cappellano

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastrostomy has been increasingly indicated for daily feeding ofneurologically impaired children with swallowing abnormalitiesthat hinder the use of the mouth. Therefore, the enteral route hasstill been used by means of oral, nasogastric or nasojejunal tube.However it is no longer the preferential method, mainly in cases ofprolonged use. Today gastrostomy is the most often utilizedprocedure, particularly Stamm gastrostomy. Many of thesepatients present pulmonary abnormalities due to a possiblegastroesophageal reflux (GER. After the study by Jolley et al.(1, in1985, fundoplication has become a systematic and routinecomplement to gastrostomy. The neurologically impaired patientshave been submitted to two surgeries, leading to possible andpredictable increase in morbidity and mortality rates. Althougheffective when properly indicated, this simple management hasrecently been very much debated and rejected. Thus, an updatingbased on recent studies is necessary to make pediatric surgeonsand pediatricians aware of other manners to solve this problem,which aim at correctly feeding these children with impairedswallowing and GER and helping them have a better quality of life.The literature reviewed was searched in PubMed/Medline, fromJanuary 1994 to May 2003. Other articles read and mentioned inthis review and published before 1994 were collected based onarticles cited in the references. Thus, we could assess thechronological progression in management of neurologicallyimpaired children who need gastrostomy for their feeding, andcarry out an analysis of current fundoplication and the questionwhether the use of a prophylactic antireflux valve is compulsoryor not.

  6. Practice and problems with gastrostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHattie, Gill

    2005-08-01

    The development of gastrostomy placement has been an important technological advance in the enteral-access field. However, its rapid growth in popularity could be viewed as problematic. The endoscopist or intervention radiologist can no longer act as a technician but requires to follow-up this group of patients in order to determine outcomes that will inform future practice. There has been emphasis on the importance of the multidisciplinary team in informing and assessing patients referred for gastrostomy insertion. Communication between all the professionals caring for a patient and between the carers and the patient allows information to be collated that will determine the benefits and burdens of long-term gastrostomy feeding. At present much of the published experience is limited to the acute care setting. The incidence of complications varies, depending on the investigator's definition of complication and the diagnosis of the patient group. Many reported studies are retrospective, which puts limitations on documentation. Increasing numbers of patients with diverse needs are now being discharged into the community with gastrostomy tubes in place. Whilst the hospital should ensure that written protocols are provided and that all carers involved should have adequate training, it is not unusual for patients to receive mixed messages from the different care teams responsible for their care. In South Glasgow NHS Hospital Division key members of all teams caring for these patients (acute care, community district nurses, learning disabilities team, physical disabilities team and commercial homecare companies) meet regularly to discuss equipment and protocols. The members of this group feel that this approach has improved communication, standardised practice and reduced complications by providing a service that delivers artificial nutrition support but is primarily suited to the patient's disease process.

  7. Indications, medical conditions and services related to gastrostomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gastrostomy, is used in paediatric patients when long-term enteral feeding is required.1 This form of ... Gastrostomy feeding may also be indicated in paediatric patients with structural abnormalities, or those who ... with cardiac defects may have difficulty with feeding endurance, resulting in poor weight gain and the need for.

  8. Insertion of balloon retained gastrostomy buttons: a 5-year retrospective review of 260 patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is an established way of maintaining enteral nutrition in patients who cannot maintain nutrition orally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of primary placement of a wide bore button gastrostomy in a large, varied patient population through retrospective review.

  9. Feasibility study of EUS-NOTES as a novel approach for peroral cholecysto-gastrostomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, P; Bhutani, M S

    2013-01-01

    EUS-guided cholecysto-gastrostomy might be a useful minimally invasive procedure used for salvage drainage in advanced pancreaticobiliary cancers, but also for drainage of the gallbladder in acute cholecystitis in patients deemed unfit for laparoscopic surgery.......EUS-guided cholecysto-gastrostomy might be a useful minimally invasive procedure used for salvage drainage in advanced pancreaticobiliary cancers, but also for drainage of the gallbladder in acute cholecystitis in patients deemed unfit for laparoscopic surgery....

  10. A novel silk suture-assisted laparoscopic technique for the repair of a gastrocolic fistula in a pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher Mughal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous placement of gastrostomy was first described in 1980. Since then it has become widely used in pediatric surgery throughout the world. Inherent in the technique is the possibility of inadvertent damage to adjacent anatomical structures, most commonly the transverse colon. Management previously had involved laparotomy and correction of the gastrocolic fistula. Here we describe a novel laparoscopic approach to the repair of a gastrocolic fistula following percutaneous gastrostomy, avoiding the morbidity of laparotomy in an immunocompromised patient with a rotund abdomen secondary to steroid usage.

  11. A retrospective matched cohort study evaluating the effects of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes on nutritional status and survival in patients with advanced gastroesophageal malignancies undergoing systemic anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Scott; Williams, John P; Bhatti, Harsimrandeep; Kachaamy, Toufic; Weber, Jeffrey; Weiss, Glen J

    2017-01-01

    Many patients with cancer or other systemic illnesses can experience malnutrition. One way to mitigate malnutrition is by insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tube (PEG tube). The goal of this retrospective matched cohort study is to evaluate if PEG tube placement improved nutritional status and overall survival (OS) in advanced gastroesophageal (GE) cancer patients who are undergoing anti-neoplastic therapy. GE cancer patients who were treated and evaluated by a nutritionist and had at least 2 nutritionist follow-up visits were identified. Patients with PEG tube were matched to patients that did not undergo PEG placement (non-PEG). Clinical characteristics, GE symptoms reported at nutrition follow-up visits, and OS were recorded. 20 PEG and 18 non-PEG cases met criteria for further analyses. After correction for multiple testing, there were no OS differences between PEG and non-PEG, treatment naive and previously treated. However, PEG esophageal carcinoma has statistically significant inferior OS compared with non-PEG esophageal carcinoma. PEG placement did not significantly reduce the proportion of patients with weight loss between the initial nutrition assessment and 12-week follow-up. In this small study, PEG placement had inferior OS outcome for GE esophageal carcinoma, no improvement in OS for other evaluated groups, and did not reduce weight loss between baseline and 12-week follow-up. Unless there is prospective randomized trial that can show superiority of PEG placement in this population, PEG placement in this group cannot be endorsed.

  12. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: an update on its indications, management, complications, and care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J. Lucendo

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous disorders impairing or diminishing a patient's ability to swallow may benefit from a PEG tube placement. This is considered the elective feeding technique if a functional digestive system is present. Methods: A PubMed-based search restricted to the English literature from the last 20 years was conducted. References in the results were also reviewed to identify potential sources of information. Results: PEG feeding has consistently demonstrated to be more effective and safe than nasogastric tube feeding, having also replaced surgical and radiological gastrostomy techniques for long term feeding. PEG is considered a minimally invasive procedure to ensure an adequate source for enteral nutrition in institutionalized and at home patients. Acute and chronic conditions associated with risk of malnutrition and dysphagia benefit from PEG placement: Beyond degenerative neuro-muscular disorders, an increasing body of evidence supports the advantages of PEG tubes in patients with head and neck cancer and in a wide range of situations in pediatric settings. The safety of PEG placement under antithrombotic medication is discussed. While antibiotic prophylaxis reduces peristomal wound infection rates, co-trimoxazole solutions administered through a newly inserted catheter constitutes an alternative to intravenous antibiotics. Early feeding (3-6 hours after PEG placement firmly supports on safety evidences, additionally resulting in reduced costs and hospital stays. Complications of PEG are rare and the majority prevented with appropriated nursing cares. Conclusions: PEG feeding provides the most valuable access for nutrition in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system. Its high effectiveness, safety and reduced cost underlie increasing worldwide popularity.

  13. Factors Associated with the Risk of Persistent Gastrostomy Site Infection Following Laparoscopic or Open Nissen Fundoplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayuki Miyagi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastrostomy for feeding disorders or swallowing dysfunctions can be complicated by persistent gastrostomy site infection (PGSI. PGSI causes nutrient leakage, with dilated PGSI requiring gastrostomy reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the causes, patient characteristics, and perioperative management of PGSI after Nissen fundoplication and gastrostomy for patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux. Patients and Methods: The records of all patients who underwent Nissen fundoplication and gastrostomy for gastro-oesophageal reflux over the past 12 years were retrieved. Risk factors were analysed, including age at surgery, gender, operative procedure, use of postoperative ventilator management, gastrostomy tube migration towards the pylorus, bacterial culture results, and length of hospital stay. PGSI as a cause of inflammation was analysed statistically. Results: Forty patients were identified, ranging in age from 1 to 49 years (median, 11 years surgically. Twenty each underwent laparoscopic and open surgery, with all undergoing gastrostomy using the Stamm technique. Four patients developed PGSI. Gastrostomy tubes had migrated postoperatively to the pyloric side in three of these four patients (P < 0.005, increasing intragastric pressure. Three of these four patients also required positive pressure ventilation during the perioperative period (P < 0.001. Conclusion: PGSI correlates with the perioperative management of positive pressure and with increased intragastric pressure resulting from pyloric obstruction, which is caused by aberrant distribution of the gastrostomy tube to the pyloric side. Statistical Analysis Used: Factors in the two groups were compared statistically by Mann–Whitney U-test to determine whether PGSI caused inflammation. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05.

  14. Disc-retained tubes for radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG): Not up to the job?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibriya, N.; Wilbraham, L.; Mullan, D.; Puro, P.; Vasileuskaya, S.; Edwards, D.W.; Laasch, H.-U.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the insertion procedure and performance of disc-retained gastrostomy tubes, recording complications and accidental displacements by prospective audit, and to determine whether primary placement of the tube off-licence was feasible. Materials and methods: Disc-retained 12 F single-lumen Monarch gastrostomy tubes (Enteral UK, Selby, UK) were inserted by three gastrointestinal interventional radiologists in a supra-regional cancer centre. The 12 F tubes required a 20 F peel-away sheath with four-point gastropexy fixation and were placed under conscious sedation, using electrocardiogram (EEG) bispectral index monitoring. Follow-up was performed in an in-house gastrostomy drop-in clinic at 1 week and 1 month, supplemented with weekly telephone follow-up. Patients also had open access to the gastrostomy drop-in clinic for immediate advice and complication management. Results: Eighteen patients underwent primary insertion of a Monarch gastrostomy tube over 5 months. A total of 6/18 (33%) tubes displaced; 4/18 (22%) completely, 2/18 (11%) occult into the peritoneum. Four of 18 (22%) patients developed infection at the stoma site. Due to the unexpectedly poor performance of the tube, the study was terminated early. Conclusion: Initial experience with the Monarch disc-retained gastrostomy tube demonstrates it unsuitable for primary placement with current protocols. In view of the potentially serious complications, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has been informed. A request has been made to the distributer to reassess the tube design and/or review the procedure promoted for primary placement

  15. Ostomy metastasis after pull endoscopic gastrostomy: a unique favorable outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Adriana, Carla; Fróis-Borges, Miguel; Meira, Tânia; Oliveira, Gabriel; Santos, José Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients tend to develop dysphagia. In order to preserve the nutritional support, many undergo endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). In HNC patients, ostomy metastasis is considered a rare complication of PEG, but there are no reports of successful treatment of these metastatic cancers. We report the case of a 65 years old pharyngeal/laryngeal cancer patient who underwent a PEG before the neck surgery. He was considered to be cured, resumed oral intake and the PEG tube was removed. Ten months after, he returned with a metastasis at the ostomy site. A block resection of the stomach and abdominal wall was performed. Two years after the abdominal surgery, he is free of disease. Although usually considered a rare complication of the endoscopic gastrostomy, ostomy metastasis may be more frequent than usually considered and the present case report demonstrates that these patients may have a favourable outcome. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Removal of T-fasteners 2 days after gastrostomy is feasible.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foster, A

    2009-03-01

    T-fastener gastropexy is widely performed as part of gastrostomy insertion. The current literature recommends removal of T-fasteners at 2 weeks. We present a series of patients in whom T-fasteners were removed at 2 days with no major complications. We removed T-fasteners in 109 patients (male-to-female ratio 59:50, age range 18 to 88 years, mean age 62 years) at 2 days after gastrostomy insertion. Indications for gastrostomy included amytrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebrovascular accidents, head and neck carcinoma, multiple sclerosis, and others, including brain tumours and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. No peritubal leaks or other major complications were seen in the study population. In the study group, 15 minor complications were recorded (14%), including localised infection and pain, both of which resolved on removal of T-fasteners. We conclude that it is feasible and safe to remove T-fasteners at 2 days.

  17. Serum Zn levels in dysphagic patients who underwent endoscopic gastrostomy for long term enteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Santos, Carla; Fonseca, Jorge; Brito, José; Fernandes, Tânia; Gonçalves, Luísa; Sousa Guerreiro, António

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Dysphagic patients who underwent endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) usually present protein-energy malnutrition, but little is known about micronutrient malnutrition. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of serum zinc in patients who underwent endoscopic gastrostomy and its relationship with serum proteins, whole blood zinc, and the nature of underlying disorder. Methods: From patients that underwent gastrostomy a blood sample was obtained minutes before the procedur...

  18. A simple technique for laparoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C; Rosemurgy, A S; Albrink, M H; Carey, L C

    1992-05-01

    While endoscopically placed gastrostomy tubes are routinely simple, they are not always feasible. Endoscopic technique also does not uniformly secure the tube to the abdominal wall, which presents possible complications, including leakage, accidental early tube removal, intraperitoneal catheter migration and necrosis of the stomach or abdominal wall because of excessive traction. Presented herein is a technique that is rapid, simple and eliminates some of these potential complications. The technique is easily combined with other operative procedures, such as tracheostomy, is done under direct vision, can be performed quickly with intravenous sedation and local anesthetic and is a safe method of tube placement for enteral feeding or gastric decompression.

  19. Weekly Dose-Volume Parameters of Mucosa and Constrictor Muscles Predict the Use of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy During Exclusive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Gunn, G. Brandon; Parker, Brent C.; Endres, Eugene J.; Zeng Jing; Fiorino, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To define predictors of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Data for 59 consecutive patients treated with exclusive IMRT at a single institution were recovered. Of 59 patients, 25 were treated with hyperfractionation (78 Gy, 1.3 Gy per fraction, twice daily; 'HYPER'); and 34 of 59 were treated with a once-daily fractionation schedule (66 Gy, 2.2 Gy per fraction, or 70 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction; 'no-HYPER'). On the basis of symptoms during treatment, a PEG tube could have been placed as appropriate. A number of clinical/dosimetric factors, including the weekly dose-volume histogram of oral mucosa (OM DVHw) and weekly mean dose to constrictors and larynx, were considered. The OM DVHw of patients with and without PEG were compared to assess the most predictive dose-volume combinations. Results: Of 59 patients, 22 needed a PEG tube during treatment (for 15 of 22, ≥3 months). The best cutoff values for OM DVHw were V9.5 Gy/week 3 and V10 Gy/week 3 . At univariate analysis, fractionation, mean weekly dose to OM and superior and middle constrictors, and OM DVHw were strongly correlated with the risk of PEG use. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, OM V9.5 Gy/week (≥64 vs. 3 ) was the most predictive parameter (odds ratio 30.8, 95% confidence interval 3.7-254.2, p = 0.0015), confirmed even in the no-HYPER subgroup (odds ratio 21, 95% CI 2.1 confidence interval 210.1, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The risk of PEG use is drastically reduced when OM V9.5-V10 Gy/week is 3 . These data warrant prospective validation.

  20. [Button gastrostomy in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Iu A; Novozhilov, V A; Rasputin, A A; Us, G P; Kuznetsova, N N

    2015-01-01

    For the period January 2002 to December 2013 it was performed 84 interventions for introduction of gastrostomy tube. The first group included 24 open operations and the second group had 60 laparoscopic operations by using of button devices MIC-KEY (Kimberly-Clark, Roswell, USA) in neonates and infants. Statistically significant difference was not observed during comparison of demographic data of patients. Differences in groups were found in statistical analysis of intra- and postoperative parameters (p<0.05). Mean duration of surgery in the first group was 37.29 min, in the second group - 23.97 min. Time to start of feeding and transition to complete enteral nutrition was less in patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery than after open intervention (10.5 and 19.13 hours, 23.79 and 35.88 hours respectively; p<0.05). It was revealed augmentation of hospital stay in the 1st group in comparison with the 2(nd) group (11.71 and 7.09 days respectively; p<0.05). Frequency of postoperative complications was 18.33% in the 2(nd) group and 24% - in the 1st group (p<0.05). The authors consider that button devices are simply and effective technique of gastrostomy establishment in children. It is associated with minimal surgery duration and allows to start early enteral nutrition in comparison with open techniques.

  1. Fluoroscopy-Guided Removal of Pull-Type Gastrostomy Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlers, Christopher M.; Schneider, Jens; Lachmann, Ricarda; Herber, Sascha; Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    These case reports demonstrate a radiologic interventional technique for removal of pull-type gastrostomy tubes. This approach proved to be a safe and efficient procedure in two patients. The procedure may be applicable in situations where endoscopic attempts fail.

  2. Healthcare professionals' views on the provision of gastrostomy and noninvasive ventilation to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffell, Tamatha O; Martin, Naomi H; Janssen, Anna; Wijesekera, Lokesh; Knights, Catherine; Burman, Rachel; Oliver, David J; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Goldstein, Laura H

    2013-01-01

    Gastrostomy and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) are recommended interventions for the management of symptoms associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This study aimed to quantify the views of a range of healthcare professionals (HCPs) on the provision of these interventions in the United Kingdom. A total of 177 HCPs participated in an online survey. Significant differences were found between medical and allied HCPs' views on: whether HCPs adhere to policy and accept legal constraints when it comes to making gastrostomy available to people with ALS; the impressions that HCPs receive of the way patients and caregivers understand the effects of gastrostomy and NIV on symptoms and quality of life; and the challenges HCPs face when caring for patients who have refused gastrostomy. More widely available guidelines for the provision of gastrostomy and advice on the best way to impart information to patients and caregivers about gastrostomy and NIV appear to be needed.

  3. Buried bumper syndrome revisited: a rare but potentially fatal complication of PEG tube placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Dontukurthy, Sujana; Rosenzweig, Mathew G; Kothuru, Ravi; Abrol, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has been used for providing enteral access to patients who require long-term enteral nutrition for years. Although generally considered safe, PEG tube placement can be associated with many immediate and delayed complications. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is one of the uncommon and late complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement. It occurs when the internal bumper of the PEG tube erodes into the gastric wall and lodges itself between the gastric wall and skin. This can lead to a variety of additional complications such as wound infection, peritonitis, and necrotizing fasciitis. We present here a case of buried bumper syndrome which caused extensive necrosis of the anterior abdominal wall.

  4. Factors Associated With Gastrostomy Tube Removal in Patients With Dysphagia After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmskoetter, Janina; Herbert, Teri Lynn; Bonilha, Heather S

    2017-04-01

    Gastrostomy feeding tubes are commonly placed in patients with dysphagia after stroke. The subsequent removal of the tube is a primary goal during rehabilitation. The purpose of our review was to identify predictors and factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. We conducted a literature review following the PRISMA statement and included the search databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CINAHL. Articles were included in the final analysis per predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Our search retrieved a total of 853 results consisting of 416 articles (after eliminating duplicates). Six articles met our final eligibility criteria. The following factors were identified in at least 1 article as being significantly associated with gastrostomy tube removal: reduced age, decreased number of comorbidities, prolonged inpatient rehabilitation stay, absence of bilateral stroke, nonhemorrhagic stroke, reduced dysphagia severity, absence of aspiration, absence of premature bolus loss, and timely initiation of pharyngeal swallow. Aspiration was the only factor that was investigated by 2 studies-both using multiple regression and both showing stable results, with absence of aspiration increasing the chances for tube removal. In conclusion, little is known about factors associated with gastrostomy tube removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. Most of the identified factors are associated with stroke or disease severity; however, the role of the individual factors remains unclear. The strongest predictor appears to be absence of aspiration on modified barium swallow studies emphasizing the importance of instrumental swallow studies in this patient population.

  5. Vitamin D status of gastrostomy-fed children with special needs: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuter, Hayley; Das, Geeta; Mughal, M Zulf

    2017-12-01

    To assess the vitamin D status of gastrostomy-fed children. Vitamin D status was measured in 32 children aged five to 16 years recruited from special schools in Manchester, UK (53° 48 ' N). All children were receiving a nutritionally complete, commercially prepared enteral feed via gastrostomy, and had been established on this regimen for over 12 months. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) were measured at the end of winter. Children with serum concentrations of 25OHD >50 nmol/L were considered to be sufficient, and those with concentrations 50 nmol/L). One subject was vitamin D deficient (serum 25OHD vitamin D insufficient (serum 25OHD >25 nmol/L - vitamin D derived from enteral feeds was 9.45 μg/day; range 3.5-30; 13 children (41%) received less than 10 μg of vitamin D per day from their enteral feed. Nutritionally complete gastrostomy feeds may be protective against vitamin D deficiency in the majority of children with special needs. We recommend that all children over 1 year of age receive 10 μg (400 IU) of vitamin D, as recommended by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN). ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Mothers' process of decision making for gastrostomy placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Ailsa; Abbott, Janice

    2012-05-01

    In this article we present the findings of an exploration of mothers' discourses on decision making for gastrostomy placement for their child. Exploring in-depth interviews of a purposive sample, we analyzed the mothers' discourses of the decision-making process to understand how their experiences of the process influenced their subsequent constructions of decision making. Mothers negotiated decision making by reflecting on their personal experiences of feeding their child, either orally or via a tube, and interwove their background experiences with the communications from members of the health care team until a decision was reached. Decision making was often fraught with difficulty, resulting in anxiety and guilt. Experiences of decision making ranged from perceived coercion to true choice, which encompasses a truly child-centered decision. The resulting impact of the decision-making process on the mothers was profound. We conclude with an exploration of the implications for clinical practice and describe how health care professionals can support mothers to ensure that decision-making processes for gastrostomy placement in children are significantly improved.

  7. Replacement of Dislodged Gastrostomy Tubes After Stoma Dilation in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiloni Bhambani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A dislodged gastrostomy tube (GT is a common complaint that requires evaluation in the pediatric emergency department (ED and, on occasion, will require stoma dilation to successfully replace the GT. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency that stoma dilation is required, the success rate of replacement, complications encountered, and the techniques used to confirm placement of the GT after dilation. Methods: We conducted a retrospective medical record review of children 0–18 years who presented to the pediatric ED from February 2013 through February 2015 with a dislodged GT that required stoma dilation by pediatric emergency physicians with serially increasing Foley catheter sizes prior to successful placement of the GT. Results: We reviewed a total of 302 encounters in 215 patients, with 97 (32% of the encounters requiring stoma dilation prior to replacing a GT. The median amount of dilation was 2 French between the initial Foley catheter size and the final GT size. There was a single complication of a mal-positioned balloon that was identified at the index visit. No delayed complications were encountered. We performed confirmation of placement in all patients. The two most common forms of confirmation were aspiration of gastric contents (56/97 [58%] followed by contrast radiograph in 39 (40%. Conclusion: The practice of serial dilation of a gastrostomy stoma site to allow successful replacement of a gastrostomy tube in pediatric patients who present to the ED with a dislodged gastrostomy tube is generally successful and without increased complication. All patients received at least one form of confirmation for appropriate GT placement with the most common being aspiration of gastric contents.

  8. Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy for adults with chronic constipation: Retrospective case series of 12 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbos, D; Keszthelyi, D; Masclee, A A M; Gilissen, L P L

    2018-05-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy (PEC) is a technique derived from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. When conservative treatment of chronic obstipation fails, colon irrigation via PEC seems less invasive than surgical interventions. However, previous studies have noted high complication rates of PEC, mostly related to infections. Our aim was to report our experiences with PEC in patients with chronic refractory constipation. Retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent PEC for refractory constipation in our secondary referral hospital between 2009 and 2016. Twelve patients received a PEC for chronic, refractory constipation. Short-term efficacy for relief of constipation symptoms was good in 8 patients and moderate in 4 patients. Two patients had the PEC removed because of spontaneous improvement of constipation. Three patients, who initially noticed a positive effect, preferred an ileostomy over PEC after 1-5 years. One PEC was removed because of an abscess. Long-term efficacy is 50%: 6 patients still use their PEC after 3.3 years of follow-up. No mortality occurred. PEC offers a technically easily feasible and safe treatment option for patients with chronic constipation not responding to conventional therapy. Long-term efficacy of PEC in our patients is 50%. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy using single-balloon enteroscopy without fluoroscopy: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bernardes

    Full Text Available Background: Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ is a useful method to provide enteral nutrition to individuals when gastric feeding is not possible or contraindicated. The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy and safety of DPEJ tube placement with the Gauderer-Ponsky technique by the pull method, using single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE without fluoroscopy. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing SBE for DPEJ placement in a referral hospital between January 2010 and March 2016. Technical success, clinical success and procedure related complications were recorded. Results: Twenty-three patients were included (17 males, median age 71 years, range 37-93 years. The most frequent indications for DPEJ were gastroesophageal cancer (n = 10 and neurological disease (n = 8. Eighty-seven percent of the patients had a contraindication to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG and PEG was unsuccessful in the remaining patients. The technical success rate was 83% (19/23, transillumination was not possible in three patients and an accidental exteriorization of the bumper resulting in a jejunal perforation occurred in one patient. The clinical success was 100% (19/19. The median follow-up was five months (range 1-35 months. Apart from the case of jejunal perforation and the two cases of accidental exteriorization, there were no other complications during follow-up. The 6-month survival was 65.8% and the 1-year survival was 49.3%. Conclusion: DPEJ can be carried out successfully via SBE without fluoroscopy with a low rate of significant adverse events. Although, leaving the overtube in place during the bumper pulling can be useful for distal jejunal loops, it can be safely removed in proximal loops to minimize complications.

  10. Temporary percutaneous T-fastener gastropexy and continuous decompressive gastrostomy in dogs with experimentally induced gastric dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Alvarez, W Alexander; Case, J Brad; Cooke, Kirsten L; Garcia-Pereira, Fernando L; Buckley, Gareth J; Monnet, Eric; Toskich, Beau B

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate a percutaneous, continuous gastric decompression technique for dogs involving a temporary T-fastener gastropexy and self-retaining decompression catheter. ANIMALS 6 healthy male large-breed dogs. PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized and positioned in dorsal recumbency with slight left-lateral obliquity. The gastric lumen was insufflated endoscopically until tympany was evident. Three T-fasteners were placed percutaneously into the gastric lumen via the right lateral aspect of the abdomen, caudal to the 13th rib and lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle. Through the center of the T-fasteners, a 5F locking pigtail catheter was inserted into the gastric lumen and attached to a device measuring gas outflow and intragastric pressure. The stomach was insufflated to 23 mm Hg, air was allowed to passively drain from the catheter until intraluminal pressure reached 5 mm Hg for 3 cycles, and the catheter was removed. Dogs were hospitalized and monitored for 72 hours. RESULTS Mean ± SD catheter placement time was 3.3 ± 0.5 minutes. Mean intervals from catheter placement to a ≥ 50% decrease in intragastric pressure and to ≤ 6 mm Hg were 2.1 ± 1.3 minutes and 8.4 ± 5.1 minutes, respectively. After catheter removal, no gas or fluid leakage at the catheter site was visible laparoscopically or endoscopically. All dogs were clinically normal 72 hours after surgery. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The described technique was performed rapidly and provided continuous gastric decompression with no evidence of postoperative leakage in healthy dogs. Investigation is warranted to evaluate its effectiveness in dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus.

  11. Therapeutic effects of mosapride citrate and lansoprazole for prevention of aspiration pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Kento; Yoshida, Rihito; Horai, Aya; Satake, Shinya; Ose, Takayuki; Kitajima, Naoto; Yoneda, Shushi; Adachi, Kyoichi; Amano, Yuji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2013-10-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is an emerging problem in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding. This study is designed to clarify the therapeutic effects of mosapride citrate and lansoprazole for prevention of aspiration pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding. The study subjects were 119 patients with dysphasia who required gastrostomy feeding. They were randomly assigned to the control (without medication), lansoprazole (15 mg, 1/day), and mosapride (5 mg, 3/day) groups. The number of days with fever (≥37.8 °C), vomiting, and antibiotics administration, as well as the occurrence of pneumonia were investigated during the 6-month observation period. The incidence of pneumonia during the observation period was significantly lower in the mosapride group as compared to the control (7/38 vs. 16/40, p = 0.038) and lansoprazole (vs. 20/41, p = 0.005) groups. The mosapride group also showed a significant decrease in days with fever and antibiotics administration as compared to the other groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of hiatal hernia was a significant risk factor and administration of mosapride was a significant preventive factor for pneumonia. Mosapride has a preventive effect on occurrence of pneumonia in patients receiving gastrostomy feeding.

  12. Accepting or declining non-invasive ventilation or gastrostomy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenaway, L P; Martin, N H; Lawrence, V; Janssen, A; Al-Chalabi, A; Leigh, P N; Goldstein, L H

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to identify factors associated with decisions made by patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to accept or decline non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and/or gastrostomy in a prospective population-based study. Twenty-one people with ALS, recruited from the South-East ALS Register who made an intervention decision during the study timeframe underwent a face-to-face in-depth interview, with or without their informal caregiver present. Sixteen had accepted an intervention (11 accepted gastrostomy, four accepted NIV and one accepted both interventions). Five patients had declined gastrostomy. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes: (1) patient-centric factors (including perceptions of control, acceptance and need, and aspects of fear); (2) external factors (including roles played by healthcare professionals, family, and information provision); and (3) the concept of time (including living in the moment and the notion of 'right thing, right time'). Many aspects of these factors were inter-related. Decision-making processes for the patients were found to be complex and multifaceted and reinforce arguments for individualised (rather than 'algorithm-based') approaches to facilitating decision-making by people with ALS who require palliative interventions.

  13. Colojejunal Fistula Resulting from a D-PEJ Feeding Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin D. Zielinski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous procedures have been developed to provide adequate enteral nutrition to patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Previously, operative placement of a feeding gastrostomy or jejunostomy tube was the accepted means of gaining chronic enteral access. However, improved technology and experience with endoscopic techniques have quickly replaced primary operative placement of enteral access. Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (D-PEJ is a procedure that was designed to deliver enteral feeding solutions for patients with proximal disease after unsatisfactory results from percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes with jejunal extensions (PEG-J. As with any procedure, it is associated with complications. We present the first reported case of a colojejunal fistula resulting from a D-PEJ placement. While D-PEJ has been shown to be relatively safe, complications related to the inherent limitations of the procedure need to be considered when the patient experiences unusual post-procedure symptoms and worked up appropriately.

  14. The role of gastrostomy tube placement in advanced dementia with dysphagia: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg LS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Leanne S Goldberg,1 Kenneth W Altman2 1Department of Otolaryngology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAPurpose: Over 4.5 million people in North America had a diagnosis of dementia in the year 2000, and more than half had advanced disease with potential aspiration risk. There is much controversy regarding the use and timing of enteral feeding support in these patients with dysphagia. The management of dysphagia is far more complex when considering quality of life, “comfort care” hand feeding, the use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (PEG, and associated mortality rates. This study seeks to critically review the literature that evaluates PEG placement in this population. Methods: A systematic literature review of PubMed, from 1995–2012, was conducted to identify studies relating to PEG placement in dementia patients with dysphagia. The principal outcomes and related survival rates for this population were compared. Results: In total, 100 articles were identified in the search. Of these, ten met the search criteria and were analyzed. There was one study with a 2b level of evidence, one with 3b, and the remainder had level 4. All studies discussed long-term survival in the PEG versus non-PEG populations. No studies showed definitive evidence to suggest long-term survival rates improved in patients who underwent PEG placement as compared to those who did not. Two studies documented median survival worse in patients over age 80 with dementia and PEG placement.Conclusion: There is presently no evidence to suggest long-term survival rates improved in patients with advanced dementia who underwent PEG placement for dysphagia. Relevance to quality of life, need for nutrition and hydration, and ethical considerations in the decision process are discussed.Keywords: PEG, aspiration, elderly, feeding tube, swallow

  15. [Gastric aspiration therapy is a possible alternative to treatment of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marie Møller; Jorsal, Tina; Naver, Lars Peter Skat

    2017-01-01

    Aspiration therapy with AspireAssist is a novel endoscopic obesity treatment. Patients aspirate approximately 30% of an ingested meal through a draining system connected to a percutanous endoscopic gastrostomy tube. AspireAssist was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration...

  16. Decision Making About Gastrostomy and Noninvasive Ventilation in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Naomi H; Lawrence, Vanessa; Murray, Joanna; Janssen, Anna; Higginson, Irene; Lyall, Rebecca; Burman, Rachel; Leigh, P Nigel; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Goldstein, Laura H

    2016-08-01

    We used thematic analysis to investigate factors affecting decision making about gastrostomy and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) by people with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) from the viewpoint of the health care professionals (HCPs) supporting them. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with 19 HCPs nominated by people with ALS who had made a decision to accept or decline NIV or gastrostomy. We found the main themes influencing decision making were patient-centric, caregiver-related or related to HCPs' own beliefs, perspectives, and actions. HCPs felt patients should be, and were, in control of decision making, although caregivers and HCPs played a role. The patient's evaluation of quality of life, the desirability of prolonging life, and acceptance of the disease and its progression by both patient and caregiver were the most important factors identified by HCPs. HCPs should be aware of the importance of multiprofessional discussions, and the potential influences (identified above) that might require discussion with patients and caregivers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Paediatric gastrostomy stoma complications and treatments: A rapid scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Ashleigh; Wincentak, Joanne; Krog, Kim; Schippke, Julia; Kingsnorth, Shauna

    2018-04-01

    To provide a scoping review of the types of treatments used to address paediatric skin-related stoma complications specific to infection, hypergranulation and gastric leakage, and explore their effectiveness and indications for use. Stoma-related complications can be a common occurrence for children with gastrostomy (G) and gastrojejunostomy (GJ) tubes. Nurses require guidance to inform decision-making of the broad spectrum of treatments used in clinical practice. A scoping review using a rapid review approach. Working with a multidisciplinary health professional team, search terms were generated. A systematic search of CINAHL, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was completed, coupled with an Internet search to identify relevant clinical practice guidelines and hand searching of citation lists. Eligible articles were peer-reviewed English publications, focused on paediatric populations aged 18 years and under, dating from 2002-2016 and described complications and treatment approaches related to G- and GJ-tube stomas. Pertinent information was extracted using a standardised template, and a narrative synthesis approach was used to analyse the data. Twenty-five articles were included in this review. Study designs varied, and complication management was often a secondary focus. A broad spectrum of treatments was used to manage each complication type. There was a lack of consensus on lines of therapy; however, a stepwise approach was often used for complication management, particularly for infections. The evidence on the comparative effectiveness of different treatment strategies of skin-related gastrostomy stoma complications in paediatric practice is sparse. Current evidence is generally limited to expert opinions. Future studies examining efficacy of treatments and their indications for use with children are warranted. Effective management of skin-related stoma complications is important to maintain health and wellness among children who rely on G- and GJ-tubes for

  18. The establishment of enteral nutrition with minimally-invasive interventional procedure under endoscopic or imaging guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feng; Cheng Yingsheng

    2010-01-01

    For patients unable to get the necessary nutrition orally, a variety of techniques,including surgical way, to make gastrostomy with tube placement have been employed. For recent years, gastrostomy and tube placement with the help of endoscopic guidance or percutaneous interventional management has been developed, which is superior to surgical procedure in minimizing injuries, decreasing cost and reducing complications. In certain clinical situations, both endoscopic method and interventional method can be employed. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the indications, techniques and skills, advantages and disadvantages of both the endoscopy-guided and the imaging-guided percutaneous gastrojejunostomy for the establishment of enteral nutrition. (authors)

  19. Elemental diets may reduce the risk of aspiration pneumonia in bedridden gastrostomy-fed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Akira; Nakayama, Yoshiko; Sakai, Ryosei; Suzuki, Manabu; Kajiyama, Masashi; Tanaka, Naoki

    2013-05-01

    Our clinical experience suggested that elemental diets were associated with a reduction in aspiration pneumonia among bedridden patients with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). We compared the effects of elemental and standard liquid diets on the risk of clinical aspiration pneumonia and gastric emptying in bedridden patients receiving PEG feedings. Study 1: consecutive bedridden PEG patients received elemental diets or standard liquid diets in the same fashion. The frequency of defecation, diet aspirated from the trachea, and aspiration pneumonia during hospitalization were prospectively recorded. Study 2: a randomized, crossover trial using elemental or standard liquid diets containing (13)C sodium acetate as a tracer given to bedridden PEG patients who had experienced aspiration pneumonia. (13)C breath tests were performed to estimate gastric emptying. Study 1: 127 patients were enrolled, 60 with elemental and 67 with standard liquid diets. The diet was aspirated from the trachea in none (0%) with the elemental diet vs. 8 (11.9%) with standard liquid diets (P=0.0057); aspiration pneumonia developed none with the elemental diet vs. 5 (7.5%) with standard liquid diets (P=0.031) (number needed to treat 14, 95% confidence interval 7-85). Study 2: 19 patients were enrolled. The elemental diet was associated with a significant increase in the 10, 30 or 50% emptying (excretion) time (Pbedridden PEG patients. They may be preferred for bedridden PEG patients especially who have experienced aspiration pneumonia. Properly performed randomized-controlled trials are needed to prove this potential benefit.

  20. Percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy feeding tubes: a retrospective review at Auckland Hospital 1993-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrie, M W; Lane, M R

    1996-08-09

    A retrospective review of patients being treated by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) at Auckland Hospital from 1993-4 was undertaken in order to determine patient characteristics, clinical outcome and to compare these results with published series. The case notes of all patients having PEGs performed in the Auckland Hospital gastroenterology unit during the defined period were reviewed. Demographic details, indications, morbidity and mortality data were obtained. Data were supplemented with information obtained from the general practitioner. Fifty procedures (18 in 1993, 32 in 1994) were performed on 41 patients (29 male 12 female), with a mean age of 61 years. Neurological disorders represented the most common clinical indication (25) followed by head and neck malignancy (9). Three patients (7) died within 30 days of the procedure and 13 (32) had early complications (less than 30 days) with four (10) having late complications. Significant pain requiring narcotics occurred in 18. Results were in general comparable to published series apart from a higher early complication rate (32% vs 16%). Pain may be significant post procedure and should be anticipated. The increasing use of this procedure in our hospital reflects its acceptability to patients, relatives and staff as a means of providing nutritional support to the patient with disorders of swallowing.

  1. Usage of prophylactic radiologically inserted gastrostomy in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, P.I.; Tun, J. Kyaw; Byass, O.R.; Cast, J.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess outcomes and usage rate of prophylactic radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Materials and methods: Outcome data of all HNC patients who underwent prophylactic RIG over a 22-month period (November 2007 to September 2009) in a tertiary referral centre were collected retrospectively. Thirty-day mortality, major and minor complication rates, and subsequent usage of the RIG were analysed. Results: Fifty-one HNC patients underwent prophylactic RIG. Three minor and no major immediate complications were identified. Sixteen minor and three major complications at 30-days were identified. Three (5.9%) major complications were identified. There was one death due to disease progression and not RIG insertion. The RIG was not used in 17.7% of patients post-procedure. Conclusion: Prophylactic RIG in HNC patients has a comparable mortality rate to RIG insertion in HNC patients with mixed indications. However, the number of cases where the gastrostomy is not used raises important concerns and warrants further investigation.

  2. Psychological as well as illness factors influence acceptance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and gastrostomy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS):A prospective population study

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Naomi H; Landau, Sabine; Janssen, Anna; Lyall, Rebecca; Higginson, Irene; Burman, Rachel; McCrone, Paul; Sakel, Mohammed; Ellis, Catherine M; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Leigh, P Nigel; Goldstein, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to identify factors associated with acceptance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and gastrostomy in an exploratory population-based study. Seventy-eight people with ALS at least six months post-diagnosis, and 50 caregivers, were recruited from the South-East ALS Register. Baseline physical, cognitive and psychological measures were obtained. Three-monthly follow-ups monitored whether patients had accepted or refused NIV or gastrostomy. Following an intervention decision, pos...

  3. Endoscopic gastrostomy, nasojejunal and oral feeding comparison in aspiration pneumonia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge E Onur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aspiration pneumonia is a potentially preventable illness requiring attention to small details of patient care. The type, management, and care of feeding should be carried out properly. Materials andMethods: This is a prospective clinical study of enteral feeding on patients admitted to hospital with aspiration pneumonia. The known enteral nutritional methods, advantages, and disadvantages were told to the patient or proxy. If they didn′t accept Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG, nasojejunal tube (NJT was advised. If they denied all of the procedures, oral feeding education was given. A total of 94 patients were enrolled to the study, 29 of them accepted PEG, 42 preferred NJT, and 23 preferred oral route. Results: A total of 94 patients with a mean age of 77.84, standard deviation 10.784; 95% confidence interval (CI 75.63-80.03 were enrolled to the study of which 27 (28.7% patients had a history of aspiration pneumonia. Oral feeding was prominently preferred for patients nursed by a relative (15; 65.2% of Oral feeding group and 16% of total or a caregiver (7; 30.4% of Oral feeding group and 7.4% of total while only 1 (4.3% of Oral feeding group and 1.1% of total with a health-care worker (P = 0.001. Overall re-aspiration rates at the 6 th month were 58%, 78%, 91% in EG, NJT, oral groups, respectively. Sixth months′ survival rates of the different feeding groups were not significantly divergent from each other. History of aspiration was also found to be a significant contributor of mortality. Conclusion: In aspiration pneumonia patients′ long-term survival rates of the different feeding groups were not significantly divergent from each other.

  4. [Gastric aspiration therapy is a possible alternative to treatment of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marie Møller; Jorsal, Tina; Naver, Lars Peter Skat

    2017-01-01

    Aspiration therapy with AspireAssist is a novel endoscopic obesity treatment. Patients aspirate approximately 30% of an ingested meal through a draining system connected to a percutanous endoscopic gastrostomy tube. AspireAssist was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and it......-term effects are warranted....

  5. Single port laparoscopic long-term tube gastrostomy in Göttingen minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birck, Malene Muusfeldt; Vegge, Andreas; Moesgaard, S G

    2015-01-01

    it was evident that the catheter had entered the stomach in the fundus region in 11/12 of the animals. In one animal the catheter had entered the antrum region. None of the animals developed leakage or clinically detectable reactions to the gastrostomy tube. Histopathologically, only discrete changes were...

  6. PEG Tube Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptarshi Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG has been used for providing enteral access to patients who require long-term enteral nutrition for years. Although generally considered safe, PEG tube placement can be associated with many immediate and delayed complications. Buried bumper syndrome (BBS is one of the uncommon and late complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement. It occurs when the internal bumper of the PEG tube erodes into the gastric wall and lodges itself between the gastric wall and skin. This can lead to a variety of additional complications such as wound infection, peritonitis, and necrotizing fasciitis. We present here a case of buried bumper syndrome which caused extensive necrosis of the anterior abdominal wall.

  7. Practical Guidance on How to Handle Levodopa/Carbidopa Intestinal Gel Therapy of Advanced PD in a Movement Disorder Clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stephen Wørlich; Clausen, Jesper Bøje; Gregerslund, Mie Manon

    2012-01-01

    , (Duodopa®, Abbott Laboratories) is delivered continuously through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with the inner tube placed in the duodenum by means of a device (CADD legacy Duodopa pump (CE 0473)). The therapy implies continuous dopaminergic delivery directly to the duodenum and is therefore...

  8. Analysis of patients' X-ray exposure in 146 percutaneous radiologic gastrostomies; Analyse der Strahlenexposition fuer Patienten bei 146 perkutanen radiologischen Gastrostomien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Tim-Ole; Reinhardt, Martin; Fuchs, Jochen; Gosch, Dieter; Surov, Alexey; Stumpp, Patrick; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael [Univ. Hospital Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-09-15

    Analysis of patient's X-ray exposure during percutaneous radiologic gastrostomies (PRG) in a larger population. Data of primary successful PRG-procedures, performed between 2004 and 2015 in 146 patients, were analyzed regarding the exposition to X-ray. Dose-area-product (DAP), dose-length-product (DLP) respectively, and fluoroscopy time (FT) were correlated with the used x-ray systems (Flatpanel Detector (FD) vs. Image Itensifier (BV)) and the necessity for periprocedural placement of a nasogastric tube. Additionally, the effective X-ray dose for PRG placement using fluoroscopy (DL), computed tomography (CT), and cone beam CT (CBCT) was estimated using a conversion factor. The median DFP of PRG-placements under fluoroscopy was 163 cGy{sup *}cm{sup 2} (flat panel detector systems: 155 cGy{sup *}cm{sup 2}; X-ray image intensifier: 175 cGy{sup *}cm{sup 2}). The median DLZ was 2.2min. Intraprocedural placement of a naso- or orogastric probe (n=68) resulted in a significant prolongation of the median DLZ to 2.5min versus 2min in patients with an already existing probe. In addition, dose values were analyzed in smaller samples of patients in which the PRG was placed under CBCT (n=7, median DFP=2635 cGy{sup *}cm{sup 2}), or using CT (n=4, median DLP=657mGy{sup *}cm). Estimates of the median DFP and DLP showed effective doses of 0.3mSv for DL-assisted placements (flat panel detector 0.3mSv, X-ray image converter 0.4mSv), 7.9mSv using a CBCT - flat detector, and 9.9mSv using CT. This corresponds to a factor 26 of DL versus CBCT, or a factor 33 of DL versus CT. In order to minimize X-ray exposure during PRG-procedures for patients and staff, fluoroscopically-guided interventions should employ flat detector systems with short transmittance sequences in low dose mode and with slow image frequency. Series recordings can be dispensed with. The intraprocedural placement of a naso- or orogastric probe significantly extends FT, but has little effect on the overall dose of the

  9. Interventional Radiology Techniques for Provision of Enteral Feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given, M.F.; Hanson, J.J.; Lee, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Gastrostomy placement in patients who are unable to maintain their nutrition orally has been attempted using a variety of techniques over the past century. This includes surgical, endoscopic, and, more recently, percutaneous radiologically guided methods. Surgical gastrostomy placement was the method of choice for almost a century, but has since been superseded by both endoscopic and radiological placement. There are a number of indications for gastrostomy placement in clinical practice today, with fewer contraindications due to the recent innovations in technique placement and gastrostomy catheter type. We describe the technique of gastrostomy placement, which we use in our institution, along with appropriate indications and contraindications. In addition, we will discuss the wide variety of catheter types available and their perceived advantages. There remains some debate with regard to gastropexy performance and the use of primary gastrojejunal catheters, which we will address. In addition, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the three major types of gastrostomy placement currently available (i.e., surgical, endoscopic, and radiological) and their associated complications

  10. Comparative effects of different enteral feeding methods in head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy: a network meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZH

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhihong Zhang,1,2 Yu Zhu,1 Yun Ling,3 Lijuan Zhang,1 Hongwei Wan1 1Department of Nursing, Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, 2Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 3Department of Human Resource, Shanghai Proton and Heavy Ion Center, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Nasogastric tube (NGT and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy were frequently used in the head and neck cancer patients when malnutrition was present. Nevertheless, the evidence was inclusive in terms of the choice and the time of tube placement. The aim of this network meta-analysis was to evaluate the comparative effects of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (pPEG, reactive percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (rPEG, and NGT in the head and neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Databases of PubMed, Web of Science, and Elsevier were searched from inception to October 2015. Thirteen studies enrolling 1,631 participants were included in this network meta-analysis. The results indicated that both pPEG and NGT were superior to rPEG in the management of weight loss. pPEG was associated with the least rate of treatment interruption and nutrition-related hospital admission among pPEG, rPEG, and NGT. Meanwhile, there was no difference in tube-related complications. Our study suggested that pPEG might be a better choice in malnutrition management in the head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. However, its effects need to be further investigated in more randomized controlled trials. Keywords: malnutrition, tube feeding, weight loss, treatment interruption, readmission, complication

  11. Psychological as well as illness factors influence acceptance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and gastrostomy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS): a prospective population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Naomi H; Landau, Sabine; Janssen, Anna; Lyall, Rebecca; Higginson, Irene; Burman, Rachel; McCrone, Paul; Sakel, Mohammed; Ellis, Catherine M; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Leigh, P Nigel; Goldstein, Laura H

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to identify factors associated with acceptance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and gastrostomy in an exploratory population-based study. Seventy-eight people with ALS at least six months post-diagnosis, and 50 caregivers, were recruited from the South-East ALS Register. Baseline physical, cognitive and psychological measures were obtained. Three-monthly follow-ups monitored whether patients had accepted or refused NIV or gastrostomy. Following an intervention decision, post-decision interviews repeated baseline measures and included further intervention-specific questionnaires. Results showed that 32 people with ALS made at least one intervention decision and of these 10 decided about both NIV and gastrostomy. While illness factors predicted those needing to make an intervention decision, cognitive and education status, and level of executive dysfunction were associated with decision-making and acceptance or refusal of interventions. Patients' understanding of their illness, their early approach to considering interventions and carer-related factors were also associated with treatment decisions. In conclusion, our findings highlight the complexity of decision-making and provide a platform for designing further studies. Cognitive and psychosocial factors may assume a greater role in palliative care decisions for people with ALS than has been explicitly recognized. Future work must clarify how to ensure patients are not inadvertently being denied suitable interventions.

  12. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis overlap: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinniah, Keith J; Mody, Girish M

    2017-06-01

    Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic sclerosis (SSC) - myositis overlap and interstitial lung disease. She responded to high dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide followed by azathioprine, with improvement in her lung function and regression of the skin changes. Six years later she had a myositis flare with severe dysphagia. Her myositis improved after high doses of corticosteroids, azathioprine and two doses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). As her dysphagia persisted, she was fed via a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube and given a course of rituximab. Her dysphagia gradually resolved and the PEG tube was removed within two months. She received another dose of rituximab six months later and continued low dose prednisone and azathioprine. Her muscle power improved, weight returned to normal and she remained well 20 months after hospital discharge. Our patient with SSC-myositis overlap and severe dysphagia requiring PEG feeding, improved with high dose corticosteroids, azathioprine, two courses of IVIG and rituximab, and remained in remission 20 months after hospital discharge.

  13. Multicentre survey of radiologically inserted gastrostomy feeding tube (RIG) in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, A.S.; Laasch, H.U.; Stephenson, S.; Butterfield, C.; Goodwin, M.; Kay, C.L.; Glancy, S.; Jackson, S.; Brown, D.; McLean, P.; Keanie, J.; Thrower, A.; Briggs, R.; Punekar, S.; Krishnan, S.; Thomas, B.; Yap, K.; Mullan, D.; Maskell, G.; Hancock, J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the variance in current UK clinical practice and clinical outcomes for direct percutaneous radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG). Materials and methods: A prospective UK multicentre survey of RIG performed between October 2008 and August 2010 was performed through the British Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (BSGAR). Results: Data from 684 patients were provided by 45 radiologists working at 17 UK centres. Two hundred and sixty-three cases (40%) were performed with loop-retained catheters, and 346 (53%) with balloon-retained devices. Sixty percent of all patients experienced pain in the first 24 h, but settled in the majority thereafter. Early complications, defined as occurring in the first 24 h, included minor bleeding (1%), wound infection (3%), peritonism (2%), and tube misplacement (1%). Late complications, defined as occurring between day 2 and day 30 post-procedure, included mild pain (30%), persisting peritonism (2%), and 30 day mortality of 1% (5/665). Pre-procedural antibiotics or anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prophylaxis did not affect the rate of wound infection, peritonitis, post-procedural pain, or mortality. Ninety-three percent of cases were performed using gastropexy. Gastropexy decreased post-procedural pain (p < 0.001), but gastropexy-related complications occurred in 5% of patients. However, post-procedure pain increased with the number of gastropexy sutures used (p < 0.001). The use of gastropexy did not affect the overall complication rate or mortality. Post-procedure pain increased significantly as tube size increased (p < 0.001). The use of balloon-retention feeding tubes was associated with more pain than the deployment of loop-retention devices (p < 0.001). Conclusion: RIG is a relatively safe procedure with a mortality of 1%, with or without gastropexy. Pain is the commonest complication. The use of gastropexy, fixation dressing or skin sutures, smaller tube sizes, and

  14. Minority race and male sex as risk factors for non-beneficial gastrostomy tube placements after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigle, Roland; Carrese, Joseph A; Cooper, Lisa A; Urrutia, Victor C; Gottesman, Rebecca F

    2018-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes are widely used for enteral feeding after stroke; however, PEG tubes placed in patients in whom death is imminent are considered non-beneficial. We sought to determine whether placement of non-beneficial PEG tubes differs by race and sex. In this retrospective cohort study, inpatient admissions for stroke patients who underwent palliative/withdrawal of care, were discharged to hospice, or died during the hospitalization, were identified from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2007 and 2011. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between race and sex with PEG placement. Of 36,109 stroke admissions who underwent palliative/withdrawal of care, were discharge to hospice, or experienced in-hospital death, a PEG was placed in 2,258 (6.3%). Among PEG recipients 41.1% were of a race other than white, while only 22.0% of patients without PEG were of a minority race (prace was associated with PEG placement compared to whites (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.57-1.96), and men had 1.27 times higher odds of PEG compared to women (95% CI 1.16-1.40). Racial differences were most pronounced among women: ethnic/racial minority women had over 2-fold higher odds of a PEG compared to their white counterparts (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.81-2.41), while male ethnic/racial minority patients had 1.44 increased odds of a PEG when compared to white men (95% CI 1.24-1.67, p-value for interaction race and male sex are risk factors for non-beneficial PEG tube placements after stroke.

  15. Gastrisk aspirationsbehandling er et muligt alternativ til behandling af fedme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marie Møller; Jorsal, Tina; Naver, Lars Peter Skat

    2017-01-01

    Aspiration therapy with AspireAssist is a novel endoscopic obesity treatment. Patients aspirate approximately 30% of an ingested meal through a draining system connected to a percutanous endoscopic gastrostomy tube. AspireAssist was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration...

  16. Recovery from severe dysphagia in systemic sclerosis - myositis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dysphagia is common in inflammatory myopathies and usually responds to corticosteroids. Severe dysphagia requiring feeding by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is associated with significant morbidity and high mortality. Clinical case: A 56-year old African Black woman initially presented with systemic ...

  17. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA Carriage Certainly Poses a Risk in Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Bagheri

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Patients with a history of hospitalization, surgery, dialysis, or residence in a long-term care facility within 1 year of enrollment, a permanent indwelling catheter or percutaneous medical device (eg, tracheostomy tube, gastrostomy tube, or Foley catheter as well as pregnancy are known positive culture for MRSA and require an extensive check up to role out this problem. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 28-35

  18. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Kroupa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG. Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274, dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001. Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9% of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76. Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76. Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  19. Different clinical utility of oropharyngeal bacterial screening prior to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in oncological and neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Radek; Jurankova, Jana; Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66-41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08-18.76). During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  20. Complications of Percutaneous Nephrostomy, Percutaneous Insertion of Ureteral Endoprosthesis, and Replacement Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaskarelis, Ioannis S.; Papadaki, Marina G.; Malliaraki, Niki E.; Robotis, Epaminondas D.; Malagari, Katerina S.; Piperopoulos, Ploutarchos N.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to record and identify the frequency of complications following percutaneous nephrostomy, replacement of nephrostomy drains and percutaneous insertion of ureteral endoprostheses.Methods: During a 10-year period 341 patients were referred to our department with indications for percutaneous nephrostomy and/or percutaneous insertion of a ureteral endoprosthesis, and a total of 1036 interventional procedures were performed (nephrostomy, catheter change, stenting).Results: There were three major complications (0.29%): two patients died during the first 30 days after the procedure, due to aggravation of their condition caused by the procedure, and one patient had retroperitoneal bleeding requiring surgery. There were 76 complications of intermediate severity (7.33%): catheter or stent displacement (n = 37, 3.57%) catheter occlusion (n = 18, 1.73%), hematuria (n = 12, 1.16%), and urinary tract infection (n = 9, 0.87%). The 55 minor complications (5.3%) comprised inflammation of the skin at the site of insertion of the percutaneous catheter.Conclusion: The small number of complications observed during acts of interventional uroradiology prove transcutaneous manipulations to be safe medical procedures

  1. Percutaneous Ureteral stent insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook; Choi, Woo Suk; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-10-15

    Percutaneous ureteral stent insertion is a treatment of permanent or temporary urinary diversion to maintain continuity and function of the obstructed and injured ureter. We performed 31 cases of percutaneous double pig tall ureteral stent insertion in 21 patients, included 13 patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and eight patients with injured ureter as well as benign inflammatory stricture. Satisfactory resulted was obtained in all patients but one, who need percutaneous nephrostomy on week later for urinary diversion. No significant complication was encountered. The authors concluded that percutaneous ureteral stent insertion, an interventional procedure alternative to urologic retrograde method, is an effective method for urinary diversion.

  2. A simple suture-retrieval device for the placement of u-stitches during laparoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Peter

    2009-02-01

    During minimally invasive operations, it is sometimes necessary to retrieve the end of a suture or a suture needle and bring it out through the abdominal wall. Using a standard needle and a length of suture, we have developed a simple device that allows the retrieval of a suture end during minimally invasive operations that require the placement of U-or stay stitches. The author has used the device described during more than 100 laparoscopic gastrostomy placement procedures and other operations involving the placement of U- or stay stitches with excellent results and no complications. Using a beveled hollow-bore needle and a loop of polypropylene suture, one can construct a simple device that allows the retrieval of a suture from within a body cavity during minimally invasive surgery, making the placement of U- and stay stitches easier and more precise.

  3. Percutaneous Cystgastrostomy as a Single-Step Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curry, L.; Sookur, P.; Low, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Fotheringham, T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of percutaneous transgastric cystgastrostomy as a single-step procedure. We performed a retrospective analysis of single-step percutaneous transgastric cystgastrostomy carried out in 12 patients (8 male, 4 female; mean age 44 years; range 21-70 years), between 2002 and 2007, with large symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts for whom up to 1-year follow-up data (mean 10 months) were available. All pseudocysts were drained by single-step percutaneous cystgastrostomy with the placement of either one or two stents. The procedure was completed successfully in all 12 patients. The pseudocysts showed complete resolution on further imaging in 7 of 12 patients with either enteric passage of the stent or stent removal by endoscopy. In 2 of 12 patients, the pseudocysts showed complete resolution on imaging, with the stents still noted in situ. In 2 of 12 patients, the pseudocysts became infected after 1 month and required surgical intervention. In 1 of 12 patients, the pseudocyst showed partial resolution on imaging, but subsequently reaccumulated and later required external drainage. In our experience, percutaneous cystgastrostomy as a single-step procedure has a high success rate and good short-term outcomes over 1-year follow-up and should be considered in the treatment of large symptomatic cysts.

  4. Gastric volvulus following diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: a rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ram, Duvuru; Rajkumar, Nagarajan

    2014-02-10

    Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is a commonly used, safe diagnostic modality for evaluation of epigastric pain and rarely its major complications include perforation, haemorrhage, dysrhythmias and death. Gastric volvulus has been reported to complicate percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy but its occurrence after diagnostic EGD has not yet been reported in literature. The successful management relies on prompt diagnosis and gastric untwisting, decompression and gastropexy or gastrectomy in full thickness necrosis of the stomach wall. A 38-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain and EGD showed pangastritis. Immediately after EGD she developed increased severity of pain, vomiting and abdominal distension. Emergency laparotomy carried out for peritoneal signs revealed eventration of left hemidiaphragm with the stomach twisted anticlockwise in the longitudinal axis. After gastric decompression and untwisting of volvulus, anterior gastropexy and gastrostomy was carried out. Hence, we report this rare complication of diagnostic endoscopy and review the existing literature on the management.

  5. Case Report Percutaneous Dilational Tracheostomy A bed side ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Tracheostomy is one of the most commonly performed procedures in critically ill patients. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT), according to ciaglias technique described in 1985, has become the most popular technique for percutaneous tracheostomy and is demonstrably as safe as surgical.

  6. Factors Predicting Recovery of Oral Intake in Stroke Survivors with Dysphagia in a Convalescent Rehabilitation Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Yasunori; Nakayama, Sayaka; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Ohori, Isao; Komatsu, Nahoko; Nishimura, Hitoshi; Katsuki, Yasuo

    2017-05-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy may be performed in dysphagic stroke patients. However, some patients regain complete oral intake without gastrostomy. This study aimed to investigate the predictive factors of intake, thereby determining gastrostomy indications. Stroke survivors admitted to our convalescent rehabilitation ward who underwent gastrostomy or nasogastric tube placement from 2009 to 2015 were divided into 2 groups based on intake status at discharge. Demographic data and Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Dysphagia Severity Scale (DSS), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores on admission were compared between groups. We evaluated the factors predicting intake using a stepwise logistic regression analysis. Thirty-four patients recovered intake, whereas 38 achieved incomplete intake. Mean age was lower, mean body mass index (BMI) was higher, and mean time from stroke onset to admission was shorter in the complete intake group. The complete intake group had less impairment in terms of GCS, FIM, and DSS scores. In the stepwise logistic regression analysis, BMI, FIM-cognitive score, and DSS score were significant independent factors predicting intake. The formula of BMI × .26 + FIM cognitive score × .19 + DSS score × 1.60 predicted recovery of complete intake with a sensitivity of 88.2% and a specificity of 84.2%. Stroke survivors with dysphagia with a high BMI and FIM-cognitive and DSS scores tended to recover oral intake. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bilio-entero-gastrostomy: prospective assessment of a modified biliary reconstruction with facilitated future endoscopic access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamad Mostafa A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepaticojejunostomy (HJ is the classical reconstruction for benign biliary stricture. Endoscopic management of anastomotic complications after hepaticojejunostomy is extremely difficult. In this work we assess a modified biliary reconstruction in the form of bilio-entero-gastrostomy (BEG regarding the feasibility of endoscopic access to HJ and management of its stenosis if encountered. Methods From October 2008 till February 2011 all patients presented to the authors with benign biliary stricture who needed bilio-enteric shunt were considered. For each patient bilio-entero-gastrostomy (BEG of either type I, II or III was constructed. In the fourth week postoperatively, endoscopy was performed to explore the possibility to access the biliary anastomosis and perform cholangiography. Results BEG shunt was performed for seventeen patients, one of whom, with BEG type I, died due to myocardial infarction leaving sixteen patients with a diagnosis of postcholecystectomy biliary injury (9, inflammatory stricture with or without choledocholithiasis (5 and strictured biliary shunt (2. BEG shunts were either type I (3, type II (3 or type III (10. Endoscopic follow up revealed successful access to the anastomosis in 14 patients (87.5%, while the access failed in one type I and one type II BEG (12.5%. Mean time needed to access the anastomosis was 12.6 min (2-55 min. On a scale from 1–5, mean endoscopic difficulty score was 1.7. One patient (6.25%, with BEG type I, developed anastomotic stricture after 18 months that was successfully treated endoscopically by stenting. These preliminary results showed that, in relation to the other types, type III BEG demonstrated the tendency to be surgically simpler to perform, endoscopicall faster to access, easier and with no failure. Conclusions BEG, which is a modified biliary reconstruction, facilitates endoscopic access of the biliary anastomosis, offers management option for its

  8. Percutaneous intervention in obstructive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souftas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous intervention procedures in obstructive uropathy include percutaneous nephrostomy tube placements, nephroureteral stents, percutaneous nephrostomy combined with ureteral embolization, percutaneous management of stone disease, suprapubic tube placements into the bladder, and perinephric/retroperitoneal urinomas/abscesses drainages. Percutaneous nephrostomy is performed to relieve urinary obstruction or divert the urinary stream away from the ureter or bladder. Patients are given preprocedure antibiotics. Percutaneous nephrostomies can be emergent cases because of risk of pyuria and sepsis from a stagnant urine collection. The procedure is performed using both ultrasound and fluoroscopy (or fluoroscopy alone using anatomic landmarks, or an internal radiopaque calculus, or delayed phase excretion of the contrast into the renal collecting system) under local anesthesia or conscious sedation. Ureteral stents are placed to bypass an obstructing stone or to stent across of an area of stricture or ureteral laceration. Stents may be placed by the urologist via a transurethral approach or by the interventional radiologist via a percutaneous approach. The decision as to method of stent placement is based upon the location and accessibility of the ureteral pathology. Ureteral embolization is performed in patients with unresectable tumors of the pelvis with long-standing nephrostomy tubes and distal urine leaks refractory to other treatments. Coils, gelfoam and liquid embolic materials can be used. Ureteral embolization for ureteral fistulas and incontinence is technically successful in 100% of the patients. Complications include bleeding, infection, ureteral or renal injury, and deployment (or movement) of the coils within the renal pelvis. Percutaneous management of stone disease, including renal, ureteral, and bladder stones requires close cooperation between the urologist and interventional radiologist, because of availability of sonographic lithotripsy

  9. Does Imaging Modality Used For Percutaneous Renal Access Make a Difference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andonian, Sero; Scoffone, Cesare; Louie, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess peri-operative outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) using ultrasound or fluoroscopic guidance for percutaneous access. METHODS A prospectively collected international CROES database containing 5806 patients treated with PCNL was used for the study. Patients were...... divided into two groups based on the methods of percutaneous access: ultrasound vs. fluoroscopy. Patient characteristics, operative data and post-operative outcomes were compared. RESULTS Percutaneous access was obtained using ultrasound guidance only in 453 patients (13.7%) and fluoroscopic guidance only...

  10. Estimating the palliative effect of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in an observational registry using principal stratification and generalized propensity scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra-Kalyani, Pallavi S.; Johnson, Brent A.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Long, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Clinical disease registries offer a rich collection of valuable patient information but also pose challenges that require special care and attention in statistical analyses. The goal of this paper is to propose a statistical framework that allows for estimating the effect of surgical insertion of a percutaneous endogastrostomy (PEG) tube for patients living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using data from a clinical registry. Although all ALS patients are informed about PEG, only some patients agree to the procedure which, leads to the potential for selection bias. Assessing the effect of PEG is further complicated by the aggressively fatal disease, such that time to death competes directly with both the opportunity to receive PEG and clinical outcome measurements. Our proposed methodology handles the “censoring by death” phenomenon through principal stratification and selection bias for PEG treatment through generalized propensity scores. We develop a fully Bayesian modeling approach to estimate the survivor average causal effect (SACE) of PEG on BMI, a surrogate outcome measure of nutrition and quality of life. The use of propensity score methods within the principal stratification framework demonstrates a significant and positive effect of PEG treatment, particularly when time of treatment is included in the treatment definition.

  11. Percutaneous rendezvous technique for the management of a bile duct injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, James; Fletcher, Savannah; Crumley, Kristen; Culp, W C; Meek, Mary

    2018-02-01

    The rendezvous technique typically involves combined efforts of interventional radiology, endoscopy, and surgery. It can be done solely percutaneously, whereby the interventionalist gains desired access to one point in the body by approaching it from two different access sites. We present the case of a woman who underwent cholecystectomy complicated by a bile duct injury. A percutaneous rendezvous procedure enabled placement of an internal-external drain from the intrahepatic ducts through the biloma and distal common bile duct and into the duodenum. Thus, a percutaneous rendezvous technique is feasible for managing a bile duct injury when endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram alone has been unsuccessful.

  12. Percutaneous rendezvous technique for the management of a bile duct injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Meek, DO

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The rendezvous technique typically involves combined efforts of interventional radiology, endoscopy, and surgery. It can be done solely percutaneously, whereby the interventionalist gains desired access to one point in the body by approaching it from two different access sites. We present the case of a woman who underwent cholecystectomy complicated by a bile duct injury. A percutaneous rendezvous procedure enabled placement of an internal-external drain from the intrahepatic ducts through the biloma and distal common bile duct and into the duodenum. Thus, a percutaneous rendezvous technique is feasible for managing a bile duct injury when endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram alone has been unsuccessful.

  13. Percutaneous tracheostomy: a comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Ashraf O.

    2017-01-01

    Tracheostomy is a common procedure. It can be done surgically or percutaneously by dilating the stoma using Seldinger technique. Percutaneous tracheostomy (PT) is now routinely performed by surgeons and non-surgeons such as intensivists and anesthesiologists in the intensive care units (ICU) all over the world. Although obesity, emergent tracheostomy, coagulopathy, inability to extend the neck and high ventilator demand (HVD) were initially thought to be a relative contraindication, recent data suggest safety of PT in these patient population. Ultrasound can be helpful in limited cases to identify the neck structure especially in patients with a difficult anatomy. Bronchoscopy during PT can shorten the duration and avoid complications. PT has favorable complication rate, lower infection rate, shorter procedural duration and is cost-effective. Experience with the technique and careful planning is needed to minimize any avoidable potential complication. PMID:29214070

  14. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Hong, Seong Mo; Han, Man Chung

    1982-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was successfully made 20 times on 17 patients of obstructive jaundice for recent 1 year since June 1981 at Department of Radiology in Seoul National University Hospital. The causes of obstructive jaundice was CBD Ca in 13 cases, metastasis in 2 cases, pancreatic cancer in 1 case and CBD stone in 1 case. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a relatively ease, safe and effective method which can be done after PTC by radiologist. It is expected that percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage should be done as an essential procedure for transient permanent palliation of obstructive jaundice

  15. Percutaneous anterior C1/2 transarticular screw fixation: salvage of failed percutaneous odontoid screw fixation for odontoid fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ai-Min; Jin, Hai-Ming; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Chi, Yong-Long; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate the outcomes and safety of using percutaneous anterior C1/2 transarticular screw fixation as a salvage technique for odontoid fracture if percutaneous odontoid screw fixation fails. Methods Fifteen in 108 odontoid fracture patients (planned to be treated by percutaneous anterior odontoid screw fixation) were failed to introduce satisfactory odontoid screw trajectory. To salvage this problem, we chose the percutaneous anterior C1/2 trans...

  16. Nephron-sparing percutaneous ablation of a 5 cm renal cell carcinoma by superselective embolization and percutaneous RF-ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.; Buecker, A.; Guenther, R.W.; Rohde, D.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the nephron-sparing, percutaneous ablation of a large renal cell carcinoma by combined superselective embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation. Materials and Methods: A 5 cm renal cell carcinoma of a 43-year-old drug abusing male with serologically proven HIV, hepatitis B and C infection, who refused surgery, was superselectively embolized using microspheres (size: 500 - 700 μm) and a platinum coil under local anesthesia. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation using a 7F LeVeen probe (size of expanded probe tip: 40 mm) and a 200 Watt generator was performed one day after transcatheter embolization under general anesthesia. Results: The combined treatment resulted in complete destruction of the tumor without relevant damage of the surrounding healthy renal tissue. The patient was discharged 24 hours after RF ablation. No complications like urinary leaks or fistulas were observed and follow up CT one day and 4 weeks after the radiofrequency intervention revealed no signs of residual tumor growth. Conclusion: The combined transcatheter embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma has proved technically feasible, effective, and safe in this patient. It may be offered as an alternative treatment to partial or radical nephrectomy under certain circumstances. Abbreviations: RF = radiofrequency ablation; CT = computed tomography; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus. (orig.) [de

  17. A novel technique of percutaneous stone extraction in choledocholithiasis after cholecystostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Yong Joo

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous common bile duct stone extraction via cystic duct after percutaneous cholecystostomy. Twenty-five consecutive patients with choledocholithiasis underwent percutaneous stone extraction under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance via cystic duct after percutaneous trnas-hepatic cholecystostomy. Common bile duct stones were successfully removed in 22 of the 25 patients (88%) by this new technique. The causes of failure in three patients were bile leakage, hematoma of the gallbladder and failure of cystic duct cannulation. Cystic duct injury during this procedure did not occur and there was no post-procedure mortality. The mean period of indwelling catheter was 8.7±4.6 days and the mean duration of hospitalization was 13.4±5.9 days. Percutaneous commmon bile duct stone extraction via the cystic duct through percutaneous cholecystostomy route is effective and feasible for treating choledocholithiasis.

  18. Is survival improved by the use of NIV and PEG in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? A post-mortem study of 80 ALS patients

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhardt, Christian; Neuwirth, Christoph; Sommacal, Andreas; Andersen, Peter M.; Weber, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) are guideline-recommended interventions for symptom management in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Their effect on survival is controversial and the impact on causes of death is unknown. Objective: To investigate the effect of NIV and PEG on survival and causes of death in ALS patients. Methods: Eighty deceased ALS patients underwent a complete post mortem analysis for causes of death between 2003 and 2015. Fort...

  19. Use of Noninvasive Ventilation During Feeding Tube Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Paolo; Volpato, Eleonora; Valota, Chiara; D'Ascenzo, Salvatore; Alunno, Chiara Bani; Lax, Agata; Nicolini, Antonello; Ticozzi, Nicola; Silani, Vincenzo; Bach, John R

    2017-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is indicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) when dysphagia, loss of appetite, and difficulty protecting the airways cause malnutrition, severe weight loss, dehydration, and increased risk of aspiration pneumonia. The aim of this review is to compare percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), radiologically inserted G-tube (RIG), and percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) in patients with ALS, performed with or without noninvasive ventilation (NIV). We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the EBSCO Online Research Database, and Scopus up to December 2015. A priori selection included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomized trials, and prospective and retrospective studies. The primary outcome was 30-d survival. We found no RCTs or quasi-RCTs. Seven studies about the implementation of the PEG/RIG procedure during the use of NIV and 5 studies without NIV were included. In another study of 59 subjects undergoing open gastrostomy, all with vital capacity NIV at full ventilatory support settings, there were no respiratory complications. Thus, the use of NIV during the implementation of these procedures, especially when used at full ventilatory support settings of pressure preset 18-25 cm H 2 O, can support alveolar ventilation before, during, and after the procedures and prevent respiratory complications. The procedures investigated appear equivalent, but the methodological quality of the studies could be improved. Possible benefits with regard to nutrition parameters, quality of life, and psychological features need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  20. Total laryngectomy and permanent tracheostomy for treatment of laryngeal rhabdomyosarcoma in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, G.; Clarke, K.; Salisbury, S.K.; DeNicola, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    An extensive, laryngeal tumor was identified in a nine-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog. Clinical staging of the tumor included computed tomography. Six days prior to surgery, a percutaneous gastrostomy tube was placed under endoscopic guidance. Surgical treatment included total laryngectomy and permanent tracheostomy. The histologic diagnosis of the tumor was rhabdomyosarcoma. There were no major postoperative complications, and there have been no signs of local recurrence, metastatic disease, or long-term complications associated with the surgical procedure during an 18-month follow-up period

  1. Percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Gumus, Burcak; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Ekinci, Saniye [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Akcoren, Zuhal [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Pathology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Kutluk, Tezer [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    There is limited experience of percutaneous biliary interventions in children although they are safe and effective procedures. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. Percutaneous biliary interventions were performed in eight children (six boys, two girls) with a mean age of 10.5 years (range 4-17 years). The interventions included percutaneous biliary drainage (five patients), percutaneous biliary drainage and placement of a self-expanding metallic stent (two patients), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (one patient). All patients had signs of obstructive jaundice and two had cholangitis. All procedures were successful. No procedure-related mortality was observed. Bilirubin levels returned to normal in four of the eight patients. Findings of cholangitis resolved in the two affected patients after the procedure and antibiotic treatment. Two patients underwent surgery after percutaneous biliary drainage procedures. A self-expanding metallic stent was placed in two patients with malignancy and the stents remained patent until death. Percutaneous biliary interventions can be performed safely for the management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. (orig.)

  2. Percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Gumus, Burcak; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan; Ekinci, Saniye; Akcoren, Zuhal; Kutluk, Tezer

    2007-01-01

    There is limited experience of percutaneous biliary interventions in children although they are safe and effective procedures. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. Percutaneous biliary interventions were performed in eight children (six boys, two girls) with a mean age of 10.5 years (range 4-17 years). The interventions included percutaneous biliary drainage (five patients), percutaneous biliary drainage and placement of a self-expanding metallic stent (two patients), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (one patient). All patients had signs of obstructive jaundice and two had cholangitis. All procedures were successful. No procedure-related mortality was observed. Bilirubin levels returned to normal in four of the eight patients. Findings of cholangitis resolved in the two affected patients after the procedure and antibiotic treatment. Two patients underwent surgery after percutaneous biliary drainage procedures. A self-expanding metallic stent was placed in two patients with malignancy and the stents remained patent until death. Percutaneous biliary interventions can be performed safely for the management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. (orig.)

  3. A self-retaining looped catheder for percutaneous biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.; Klose, K.; Daehnert, W.

    1983-01-01

    A percutaneous catheter which can be looped by means of a nylon thread was used in 32 patients for percutaneous biliary drainage. The catheter can be fixed in this way and is thereby prevented from migrating from the biliary system. The catheter is not suitable for proximal obstructions. Problems may arise during the removal of the nylon thread and loss of looping of the point of catheter. (orig.) [de

  4. Outcome of percutaneous continuous drainage of psoas abscess: A clinically guided technique

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat R Dave; Ranganatha Babu Kurupati; Dipak Shah; Devanand Degulamadi; Nitu Borgohain; Ajay Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous aspiration of abscesses under ultrasonography (USG) and computer tomography (CT) scan has been well described. With recurrence rate reported as high as 66%. The open drainage and percutaneous continuous drainage (PCD) has reduced the recurrence rate. The disadvantage of PCD under CT is radiation hazard and problems of asepsis. Hence a technique of clinically guided percutaneous continuous drainage of the psoas abscess without real-time imaging overcomes these problems...

  5. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (pv): indications, contraindications, and technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, R.T.; Jakobs, T.F.; Wallnoefer, A.; Reiser, M.F.; Helmberger, T.K.

    2003-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (pv) is a worldwide increasingly performed interventional therapeutic procedure. This article addresses indications, patient preparation, technical requirements and approach as well as possible complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a technique consisting in an injection of bone cement into a vertebral body under imaging guidance. This procedure is performed to relief pain and support the mechanical stability in partially collapsed vertebral bodies. In the management of spinal compression fractures secondary to osteoporosis, myeloma, osteolytic metastases and aggressive hemangiomas, percutaneous vertebroplasty yields analgesic effect, and provides additional fortification in weakened segments of the vertebral column. Contraindications include major bleeding disorders, radicular pain and pain caused by compression of the myelon. Percutaneous vertebroplasty results in prompt pain relief and rapid rehabilitation. In experienced hands, using correct technique, pv is a safe and effective procedure for treating pain, caused either by osteoporotic or malignant vertebral compression fractures. (orig.) [de

  6. Percutaneous transhepatic sphincterotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandin, G.; Zanon, E.; Righi, D.; Fonio, P.; Ferrari, A.; Recchia, S.

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe the techique employed for percutaneous trans-hepatic sphincterotomy as performed on 3 patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones. In all patients, previous endoscopic attempt had failed for anatomical reasons (Billroth II gastric resection or partial gastric resection with brown anastomosis), and the ampulla could not be correctly incannulated with the sphincterotome. In all aptients endoscopy was useful to check the position of the diethermic loop inserted percutaneously. Conplete and immediate success was obtained in all 3 cases. No major complications occurred during transhepatic treatment. To date, 1 recurrence has been observed, and the patient has been retreated with bilioplasty. All patients were followed after 5-6 months with US, plain X-rays of the abdomen and blood tests (γGt, alkaline phosphatase, and bilirubinemia). The authors suggest that percutaneous transhepatic sphincterotomy be employed electively in patients with biliary tree diseases in case the endoscopic approach failes

  7. Gastrostomy Tube Feeding in Children With Developmental or Acquired Disorders: A Longitudinal Comparison on Healthcare Provision and Eating Outcomes 4 Years After Gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Ellen; Karlsson, Ann-Kristin; Sjögreen, Lotta

    2018-03-30

    Studies on long-term feeding and eating outcomes in children requiring gastrostomy tube feeding (GT) are scarce. The aim of this study was to describe children with developmental or acquired disorders receiving GT and to compare longitudinal eating and feeding outcomes. A secondary aim was to explore healthcare provision related to eating and feeding. This retrospective cohort study reviewed medical records of children in 1 administrative region of Sweden with GT placement between 2005 and 2012. Patient demographics, primary diagnoses, age at GT placement, and professional healthcare contacts prior to and after GT placement were recorded and compared. Feeding and eating outcomes were assessed 4 years after GT placement. The medical records of 51 children, 28 boys and 23 girls, were analyzed and grouped according to "acquired" (n = 13) or "developmental" (n = 38) primary diagnoses. At 4 years after GT placement, 67% were still using GT. Only 6 of 37 (16%) children with developmental disorders transferred to eating all orally, as opposed to 10 of 11 (91%) children with acquired disorders. Children with developmental disorders were younger at the time of GT placement and displayed a longer duration of GT activity when compared with children with acquired disorders. This study demonstrates a clear difference between children with developmental or acquired disorders in duration of GT activity and age at GT placement. The study further shows that healthcare provided to children with GT is in some cases multidisciplinary, but primarily focuses on feeding rather than eating. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Percutaneous penetration studies for risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sartorelli, Vittorio; Andersen, Helle Raun; Angerer, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    . In order to predict the systemic risk of dermally absorbed chemicals and to enable agencies to set safety standards, data is needed on the rates of percutaneous penetration of important chemicals. Standardization of in vitro tests and comparison of their results with the in vivo data could produce...... internationally accepted penetration rates and/or absorption percentages very useful for regulatory toxicology. The work of the Percutaneous Penetration Subgroup of EC Dermal Exposure Network has been focussed on the standardization and validation of in vitro experiments, necessary to obtain internationally...... accepted penetration rates for regulatory purposes. The members of the Subgroup analyzed the guidelines on percutaneous penetration in vitro studies presented by various organizations and suggested a standardization of in vitro models for percutaneous penetration taking into account their individual...

  9. Percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa N

    1999-10-01

    Hydatic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus is an endemic disease and an important public health problem in some countries of the world. The results of surgical treatment are associated with a high rate of mortality, morbidity, postoperative recurrence and a long period of hospital stay and the medical treatment results are still controversial. Although the percutaneous aspiration and treatment of liver hydatid cysts were considered to be contraindicated due to risks of anaphylactic shock and dissemination of clear-crystal fluid into the abdomen, several reports of successful percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts have been published in the literature. Today, percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts is the most effective and reliable treatment procedure in the selected cases. In this review, indications, contraindications, method and techniques, healing criteria, complications, results and importance of the percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts are discussed.

  10. Percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa N.

    1999-01-01

    Hydatic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus is an endemic disease and an important public health problem in some countries of the world. The results of surgical treatment are associated with a high rate of mortality, morbidity, postoperative recurrence and a long period of hospital stay and the medical treatment results are still controversial. Although the percutaneous aspiration and treatment of liver hydatid cysts were considered to be contraindicated due to risks of anaphylactic shock and dissemination of clear-crystal fluid into the abdomen, several reports of successful percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts have been published in the literature. Today, percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts is the most effective and reliable treatment procedure in the selected cases. In this review, indications, contraindications, method and techniques, healing criteria, complications, results and importance of the percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts are discussed

  11. Removal of a Trapped Endoscopic Catheter from the Gallbladder via Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholecystostomy: Technical Innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stay, Rourke M.; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Goodacre, Brian W.; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Wittich, Gerhard R.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is used for a variety of clinical problems. Methods. Percutaneous cholecystostomy was utilized in a novel setting to resolve a problematic endoscopic situation. Observations. Percutaneous cholecystostomy permitted successful removal of a broken and trapped endoscopic biliary catheter, in addition to helping treat cholecystitis. Conclusion. Another valuable use of percutaneous cholecystostomy is demonstrated, as well as emphasizing the importance of the interplay between endoscopists and interventional radiologists

  12. A novel vacuum assisted closure therapy model for use with percutaneous devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Saranne J; Nichols, Francesca R; Brunker, Lucille B; Bachus, Kent N

    2014-06-01

    Long-term maintenance of a dermal barrier around a percutaneous prosthetic device remains a common clinical problem. A technique known as Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) uses negative pressure to facilitate healing of impaired and complex soft tissue wounds. However, the combination of using negative pressure with percutaneous prosthetic devices has not been investigated. The goal of this study was to develop a methodology to apply negative pressure to the tissues surrounding a percutaneous device in an animal model; no tissue healing outcomes are presented. Specifically, four hairless rats received percutaneous porous coated titanium devices implanted on the dorsum and were bandaged with a semi occlusive film dressing. Two of these animals received NPWT; two animals received no NPWT and served as baseline controls. Over a 28-day period, both the number of dressing changes required between the two groups as well as the pressures were monitored. Negative pressures were successfully applied to the periprosthetic tissues in a clinically relevant range with a manageable number of dressing changes. This study provides a method for establishing, maintaining, and quantifying controlled negative pressures to the tissues surrounding percutaneous devices using a small animal model. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Percutaneous dilational tracheostomy--a 3 year experience in a general hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C C; Lee, H S; Balan, S

    2004-12-01

    All percutaneous tracheostomies performed in the general intensive care unit (ICU), Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru, Malaysia, from July 1999 to June 2002 were studied. The tracheostomies were performed as an elective bedside technique in the ICU. A total of 352 percutaneous tracheostomies were performed. Eighty-eight percent of the tracheostomies were completed within 15 minutes. The most common complication was bleeding which occurred in 52 patients (14.7%). The rest of the complications encountered were:- transient hypoxia twelve (3.4%), inability/ difficulty to insert tracheostomy tube eight (2.3%), false passage four (1.1%), transient hypotension two (0.6%), pneumothorax two (0.6%), peristomal infection two (0.6%), subcutaneous emphysema one (0.3%), cuff rupture one (0.3%), oesophageal cannulation one (0.3%), and granuloma formation one (0.3%). Conversion to conventional tracheostomies were performed on 7 patients (2%). There was one unfortunate death related to percutaneous tracheostomy. In conclusion, percutaneous dilational tracheostomy can be used safely to manage the airway of critically ill patients.

  14. Robotics in percutaneous cardiovascular interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourdjabbar, Ali; Ang, Lawrence; Behnamfar, Omid; Patel, Mitul P; Reeves, Ryan R; Campbell, Paul T; Madder, Ryan D; Mahmud, Ehtisham

    2017-11-01

    The fundamental technique of performing percutaneous cardiovascular (CV) interventions has remained unchanged and requires operators to wear heavy lead aprons to minimize exposure to ionizing radiation. Robotic technology is now being utilized in interventional cardiology partially as a direct result of the increasing appreciation of the long-term occupational hazards of the field. This review was undertaken to report the clinical outcomes of percutaneous robotic coronary and peripheral vascular interventions. Areas covered: A systematic literature review of percutaneous robotic CV interventions was undertaken. The safety and feasibility of percutaneous robotically-assisted CV interventions has been validated in simple to complex coronary disease, and iliofemoral disease. Studies have shown that robotically-assisted PCI significantly reduces operator exposure to harmful ionizing radiation without compromising procedural success or clinical efficacy. In addition to the operator benefits, robotically-assisted intervention has the potential for patient advantages by allowing more accurate lesion length measurement, precise stent placement and lower patient radiation exposure. However, further investigation is required to fully elucidate these potential benefits. Expert commentary: Incremental improvement in robotic technology and telecommunications would enable treatment of an even broader patient population, and potentially provide remote robotic PCI.

  15. Percutaneous management of urolithiasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavoussi, L R; Albala, D M; Basler, J W; Apte, S; Clayman, R V

    1992-09-01

    A total of 6 pregnant women with obstructing urinary calculi was managed by percutaneous nephrostomy drainage placed under ultrasound guidance with the patient under local anesthesia. All patients initially had relief of acute obstruction. However, occlusion of the percutaneous nephrostomy tubes with debris necessitated tube changes in 5 of 6 patients. In 2 patients recurrent nephrostomy tube obstruction, fever and pain led to percutaneous stone removal during pregnancy. In the remaining 4 patients the nephrostomy tubes were left indwelling through delivery. During the postpartum period 3 patients successfully underwent ureteroscopic stone extraction and 1 passed the stone spontaneously. Bacteriuria developed in each patient despite the use of preventive antibiotics. All 6 women had uncomplicated vaginal deliveries of healthy newborns and are currently asymptomatic with no evidence of obstruction. Percutaneous drainage of an acutely obstructed kidney in a pregnant woman is an effective temporizing alternative to ureteral stent placement until definitive treatment can be performed.

  16. Italian Percutaneous EVAR (IPER) Registry: outcomes of 2381 percutaneous femoral access sites' closure for aortic stent-graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesi, G; Barbante, M; Pulli, R; Fargion, A; Dorigo, W; Bisceglie, R; Ippoliti, A; Pratesi, C

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to report outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair with percutaneous femoral access (pEVAR) using Prostar XL and Proglide closure systems (Abbot Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA), from the multicenter Italian Percutaneous EVAR (IPER) registry. Consecutive patients affected by aortic pathology treated by EVAR with percutaneous access (pEVAR) between January 2010 and December 2014 at seven Italian centers were enrolled in this multicenter registry. All the operators had an experience of at least 50 percutaneous femoral access procedures. Data were prospectively collected into a dedicated online database including patient's demographics, anatomical features, intra- and postoperative outcomes. A retrospective analysis was carried out to report intraoperative and 30-day technical success and access-related complication rate. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors potentially associated with an increased risk of percutaneous pEVAR failure. A total of 2381 accesses were collected in 1322 patients, 1249 (94.4%) male with a mean age of 73.5±8.3 years (range 45-97). The overall technical success rate was 96.8% (2305/2381). Major intraoperative access-related complications requiring conversion to surgical cut-down were observed in 3.2% of the cases (76/2381). One-month pEVAR failure-rate was 0.25% (6/2381). Presence of femoral artery calcifications resulted to be a significant predictor of technical failure (OR: 1.69; 95% CI: 1.03-2.77; P=0.036) at multivariate analysis. No significant association was observed with sex (P=0.28), obesity (P=0.64), CFA diameter (P=0.32), level of CFA bifurcation (P=0.94) and sheath size >18 F (P=0.24). The use of Proglide was associated with a lower failure rate compared to Prostar XL (2.5% vs. 3.3%) despite not statistically significant (P=0.33). The results of the IPER registry confirm the high technical success rate of percutaneous EVAR when performed by experienced operators, even in

  17. Risk of bleeding in patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrotrostomy (PEG tube insertion under antiplatelet therapy: a systematic review with a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J. Lucendo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG tube placement often are under antiplatelet therapy with a potential thromboembolic risk if these medications are discontinued. This systematic review aims to assess if maintaining aspirin and/or clopidogrel treatment increases the risk of bleeding following PEG placement. Methods: A systematic search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCOPUS databases was developed for studies investigating the risk of bleeding in patients on antiplatelet therapy undergoing PEG tube insertion. Summary estimates, including 95 % confidence intervals (CI, were calculated. A fixed or random effects model was used depending on heterogeneity (I². Publication bias risks were assessed by means of funnel plot analysis. Results: Eleven studies with a total of 6,233 patients (among whom 3,665 were undergoing antiplatelet treatment, met the inclusion criteria and were included in the quantitative summary. Any PEG tube placement-related bleeding was found in 2.67 % (95 % CI 1.66 %, 3.91 % of the entire population and in 2.7 % (95 % CI 1.5 %, 4.1 % of patients not receiving antiplatelet therapy. Pooled relative risk (RR for bleeding in patients under aspirin, when compared to controls, was 1.43 (95 % CI 0.89, 2.29; I² = 0 %; pooled RR for clopidogrel was 1.21 (95 % CI 0.48, 3.04; I² = 0 % and for dual antiplatelet therapy, 2.13; (95 % CI 0.77, 5.91; I² = 47 %. No significant publication bias was evident for the different medications analyzed. Conclusion: Antiplatelet therapy was safe among patients undergoing PEG tube insertion. Future prospective and randomized studies with larger sample sizes are required to confirm the results of this study.

  18. Percutaneous Catheter Drainage of Periappendiceal abscess due to Appendicolith : A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Dae Sik; Kim, Heung Chueol; Han, Tae Kyun; Hur, Hun; Yum, Kung Tae; Namkung, Sook; Park, Man Soo; Hwang, Woo Chueol

    1996-01-01

    Percutaneous catheter drainage of periappendiceal abscess is an effective and safe method of treatment. It is known that CT guided approach is the first choice of method. We experienced a successful percutaneous catheter drainage under ultrasound guidance for periappendiceal abscess with appendicolith

  19. Percutaneous transcatheter sclerotherapy of oophoritic cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Youhua; Xu Qiang; Sun Jun; Shen Tao; Shi Hongjian; Tang Qingfang; Chen Qiying; Zhou Mingxia; Li Hongyao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of percutaneous transcatheter sclerotherapy in oophoritic cysts. Methods: Seventy six oophoritic cysts incluoling 48 simple and 28 chocolate cysts of 64 patients were treated with percutaneous transcatheter sclerotherapy under CT guidance. 4F multisideholes pigtail catheter was introduced into cyst using absolute alcohol as sclerosing agents. Results: The successful rate of percutaneous oophoritc cyst puncture was 100% in all 64 patients. Among them 58 were cured (90.6%), 6 improved significantly (9.4%). The total effective rate reached 100% with no serious complications. Conclusions: Catheterization sclerotherapy for oophoritic cyst is a simple, complete, safe and effective method. (authors)

  20. Extended indications for percutaneous tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Nun, Alon; Altman, Eduard; Best, Lael Anson

    2005-10-01

    In recent years, percutaneous tracheostomy has become a routine practice in many hospitals. In the early publications, most authors considered adverse conditions such as short, fat neck or obesity as relative contraindications whereas cervical injury, coagulopathy, and emergency were regarded as absolute contraindications. More recently, several reports demonstrated the feasibility of percutaneous tracheostomy in patients with some of these contraindications. The aim of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of percutaneous tracheostomy in conditions commonly referred to as contraindications. Between June 2000 and July 2001, 157 consecutive percutaneous tracheostomy procedures were performed on 154 critically ill adult patients in the general intensive care unit of a major tertiary care facility. The Griggs technique and Portex set were used at the bedside. All procedures were performed by staff thoracic surgeons and anesthesiologists experienced with the technique. Anatomical conditions, presence of coagulopathy and anti-coagulation therapy, demographics, and complication rates were recorded. Five of 157 procedures (154 patients owing to three repeat tracheostomies) had complications. In patients with normal anatomical conditions and coagulation profiles, there was one case of bleeding (50 cc to 120 cc) and one case of mild cellulitis around the stoma. In patients with adverse conditions, there was one case of bleeding (50 cc to 120 cc) and two cases of minor bleeding (< 50 cc). Patients with adverse conditions had a low complication rate similar to patients with normal conditions. For this reason, we believe that percutaneous tracheostomy is indicated in patients with short, fat neck; inability to perform neck extension; enlarged isthmus of thyroid; previous tracheostomy; or coagulopathy and anti-coagulation therapy.

  1. Duodenal perforation during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Bansal

    2016-06-03

    Jun 3, 2016 ... Calculus;. Duodenum;. Injury;. Paediatric;. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Abstract. Introduction: Colonic perforations are known complications of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, to the best of our knowledge, small bowel perforation has rarely been reported.. Observation: We report the ...

  2. [Enteral alimentation at home: why PEG now?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y; Hanyu, N; Kashiwagi, H; Kubo, T; Aoki, T

    1996-12-01

    The history of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is relatively short. In 1980, a report entitled "Gastrostomy without laparotomy: A percutaneous endoscopic technique" by Ponsky and Gaudere was first published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery. Thereafter, PEG soon saw widespread use in Western countries because of its clinical efficacy and economy. It has been performed in about 170,000 cases annually in the US. In contrast, its spread in Japan has been extremely slow: only about 10,000 cases have undergone this procedure annually, and this number accounted for less than 5% of patients receiving enteral alimentation. The reason why PEG has not spread may be the medical insurance system in Japan and the local distaste for operation scarring. However, in consideration of the unprecedented ageing of society that is surely coming in the near future, the role of PEG in Japan must be reexamined. In this report, we presented the methodology of enteral alimentation at home by means of PEG, giving special consideration to: (1) "What points are improved by using enteral alimentation at home by means of PEG in various diseases; (2) dysphagia due to cerebral angiopathy; (3) terminal cancer; (4) otolaryngological diseases; and (5) Crohn disease. We also discussed "Why PEG is important now?" in performing enteral alimentation at home.

  3. Image guided percutaneous splenic interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Mandeep; Kalra, Naveen; Gulati, Madhu; Lal, Anupam; Kochhar, Rohit; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions as diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective review of our interventional records from July 2001 to June 2006. Ninety-five image-guided percutaneous splenic interventions were performed after informed consent in 89 patients: 64 men and 25 women who ranged in age from 5 months to 71 years (mean, 38.4 years) under ultrasound (n = 93) or CT (n = 2) guidance. The procedures performed were fine needle aspiration biopsy of focal splenic lesions (n = 78) and aspiration (n = 10) or percutaneous catheter drainage of a splenic abscess (n = 7). Results: Splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy was successful in 62 (83.78%) of 74 patients with benign lesions diagnosed in 43 (58.1%) and malignancy in 19 (25.67%) patients. The most common pathologies included tuberculosis (26 patients, 35.13%) and lymphoma (14 patients, 18.91%). Therapeutic aspiration or pigtail catheter drainage was successful in all (100%) patients. There were no major complications. Conclusions: Image-guided splenic fine needle aspiration biopsy is a safe and accurate technique that can provide a definitive diagnosis in most patients with focal lesions in the spleen. This study also suggests that image-guided percutaneous aspiration or catheter drainage of splenic abscesses is a safe and effective alternative to surgery

  4. Percutaneous Ablation of a Mesenteric Cyst Using Ethanol: Is It Feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Toshiyuki; Kuramochi, Masashi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kamoshida, Toshirou

    2010-01-01

    A huge mesenteric cyst in a 61-year-old female was treated by percutaneous ablation using ethanol. Marked shrinkage was achieved and regrowth was not seen 16 months after ablation. Resection is the standard therapy for mesenteric cysts, but it may be valuable to discuss the feasibility of percutaneous ablation before resection if the lesion wall is smooth and thin, and if solid nodules are not depicted on imaging.

  5. Obstructive jaundice: a comparative study of forceps and brush biopsy under percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongdong; Han Xinwei; Wu Gang; Ma Bo; Xing Gusheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the sensitivity between forceps biopsy and brushing, and to explore a feasible approach to pathological diagnosis of the obstructive jaundice. Methods: 92 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice underwent transluminal forceps biopsy and brushing during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage. The technique was performed through a preexisting percutaneous transhepatic tract with multiple specimens obtained after passing the forceps biopsy or brush into a 8-French sheath. Finally the specimens were fixed with formalin for pathologic or cytologic diagnosis. Results: The histopathologic diagnosis was acquired in 81 out of 92 patients with forceps biopsy reaching the successful rate of 97.83%. Sensitivity of forceps biopsy in 92 patients was higher than that of brush in 84 patients (88.04% vs 76.19% χ 2 =4.251, P= <0.05). Conclusions: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiobiopsy is a simple technique with minimal invasion, high sensitivity and worthy to be used spread extensively. Percutaneous transluminal brush cytology is also an useful method for establishing a diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. (authors)

  6. Percutaneous pancreatic stent placement for postoperative pancreaticojejunostomy stenosis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Koo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chang Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stenosis of the pancreatico-enteric anastomosis is one of the major complications of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Endoscopic stent placement, has limited success rate as a nonsurgical treatment due to altered gastrointestinal anatomy. Percutaneous treatment is rarely attempted due to the technical difficulty in accessing the pancreatic duct. We reported a case of pancreaticojejunostomy stenosis after PD, in which a pancreatic stent was successfully placed using a rendezvous technique with a dual percutaneous approach.

  7. Percutaneous pancreatic stent placement for postoperative pancreaticojejunostomy stenosis: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Koo; Yoon, Chang Jin

    2016-01-01

    Stenosis of the pancreatico-enteric anastomosis is one of the major complications of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Endoscopic stent placement, has limited success rate as a nonsurgical treatment due to altered gastrointestinal anatomy. Percutaneous treatment is rarely attempted due to the technical difficulty in accessing the pancreatic duct. We reported a case of pancreaticojejunostomy stenosis after PD, in which a pancreatic stent was successfully placed using a rendezvous technique with a dual percutaneous approach

  8. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intrapulmonary fluid collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, E. D.; Kim, H. J.; Choi, P. Y.; Jung, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    With the success of percutaneous abdominal abscess drainage, attention is now being focused on the use of similar techniques in the thorax. We studied to evaluate the effect of percutaneous drainage in parenchymal fluid collections in the lungs. We performed percutaneous drainage of abscesses and other parenchymal fluid collections of the lungs in 15 patients. All of the procedures were performed under the fluoroscopic guidance with an 18-gauge Seldinger needle and coaxial technique with a 8-10F drainage catheter. Among 10 patients with lung abscess, 8 patients improved by percutaneous catheter drainage. In one patient, drainage was failed by the accidental withdrawal of the catheter before complete drainage. One patient died of sepsis 5 hours after the procedure. Among three patients with complicated bulla, successful drainage was done in two patients, but in the remaining patient, the procedure was failed. In one patient with intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst, the drainage was not successful due to the thick internal contents. In one patient with traumatic hematoma, after the drainage of old blood clots, the signs of infection disappeared. Overally, of 14 patients excluding one who died, 11 patients improved with percutaneous catheter drainage and three patients did not. There were no major complications during and after the procedure. We conclude that percutaneous catheter drainage is effective and safe procedure for the treatment of parenchymal fluid collections of the lung in patients unresponsive to the medical treatment

  9. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intrapulmonary fluid collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, E. D.; Kim, H. J.; Choi, P. Y.; Jung, S. H. [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-15

    With the success of percutaneous abdominal abscess drainage, attention is now being focused on the use of similar techniques in the thorax. We studied to evaluate the effect of percutaneous drainage in parenchymal fluid collections in the lungs. We performed percutaneous drainage of abscesses and other parenchymal fluid collections of the lungs in 15 patients. All of the procedures were performed under the fluoroscopic guidance with an 18-gauge Seldinger needle and coaxial technique with a 8-10F drainage catheter. Among 10 patients with lung abscess, 8 patients improved by percutaneous catheter drainage. In one patient, drainage was failed by the accidental withdrawal of the catheter before complete drainage. One patient died of sepsis 5 hours after the procedure. Among three patients with complicated bulla, successful drainage was done in two patients, but in the remaining patient, the procedure was failed. In one patient with intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst, the drainage was not successful due to the thick internal contents. In one patient with traumatic hematoma, after the drainage of old blood clots, the signs of infection disappeared. Overally, of 14 patients excluding one who died, 11 patients improved with percutaneous catheter drainage and three patients did not. There were no major complications during and after the procedure. We conclude that percutaneous catheter drainage is effective and safe procedure for the treatment of parenchymal fluid collections of the lung in patients unresponsive to the medical treatment.

  10. Percutaneous nephrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, In Hoon; Ryu, Kook Hyun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyeon De [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Percutaneous nephrostomy was performed in 82 patients under the fluoroscopic guidance for recent 3 years. The cause of hydronephrosis were as follows: unknown origin of stricture (N=37), stone (N=20), tumor (N=14), tuberculosis (N=8), postoperative ureteral injury (N=1), postoperative anastomotic stricture(N=1)and renal transplantation complication (N=1). Successful nephrostomy was achieved in 79 patients (96%). Causes if failure were minimal dilatation of pelvocaliceal system (N=2) and staghorn calculi (N=1). Follow up laboratory test shows high BUN and creatinine level returned to normal limit within 1 or 3 weeks in 73 patient. Major complication was not found, but temporary hematuria (N=4) or fever (N=1) was noted. In conclusion, percutaneous nephrostomy is the safe and effective method for the temporary and permanent relief of urinary obstruction and maintenance of ureteral patency.

  11. Percutaneous nephrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, In Hoon; Ryu, Kook Hyun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyeon De

    1990-01-01

    Percutaneous nephrostomy was performed in 82 patients under the fluoroscopic guidance for recent 3 years. The cause of hydronephrosis were as follows: unknown origin of stricture (N=37), stone (N=20), tumor (N=14), tuberculosis (N=8), postoperative ureteral injury (N=1), postoperative anastomotic stricture(N=1)and renal transplantation complication (N=1). Successful nephrostomy was achieved in 79 patients (96%). Causes if failure were minimal dilatation of pelvocaliceal system (N=2) and staghorn calculi (N=1). Follow up laboratory test shows high BUN and creatinine level returned to normal limit within 1 or 3 weeks in 73 patient. Major complication was not found, but temporary hematuria (N=4) or fever (N=1) was noted. In conclusion, percutaneous nephrostomy is the safe and effective method for the temporary and permanent relief of urinary obstruction and maintenance of ureteral patency

  12. Advances in percutaneous stone surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Christopher; Gupta, Nikhil; Leavitt, David; Hoenig, David; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of large renal stones has changed considerably in recent years. The increasing prevalence of nephrolithiasis has mandated that urologists perform more surgeries for large renal calculi than before, and this has been met with improvements in percutaneous stone surgery. In this review paper, we examine recent developments in percutaneous stone surgery, including advances in diagnosis and preoperative planning, renal access, patient position, tract dilation, nephroscopes, lithotripsy, ...

  13. Accuracy of percutaneous lung biopsy for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, F.A. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Gow, K.; Davidoff, A. [Dept. of Surgery, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Flynn, P.M. [Dept. of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Background. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is fulminant and often fatal in immunosuppressed patients. Percutaneous biopsy may select patients who could benefit from surgical resection. Objective. We sought to determine the accuracy of percutaneous biopsy for pediatric invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Materials and methods. We retrospectively reviewed 28 imaging-guided percutaneous biopsies of the lungs of 24 children with suspected pulmonary aspergillosis. Twenty-two were being treated for malignancy and two for congenital immunodeficiency; 15 had received bone-marrow transplants. The accuracy of the percutaneous lung biopsy was determined by subsequent surgical resection, autopsy, or clinical course. Results. Histopathological studies showed ten biopsy specimens with septate hyphae, indicating a mold, and seven with Aspergillus flavus colonies in culture. The remaining 18 biopsies revealed no fungi. No patient had progressive aspergillosis after negative biopsy. Invasive pulmonary mold was detected by percutaneous biopsy with 100 % (10/10) sensitivity and 100 % (18/18) specificity. Percutaneous biopsy results influenced the surgical decision in 86 % (24 of 28) of the cases. Bleeding complicated the biopsy in 46 % (13/28) and hastened one death. Conclusion. Percutaneous biopsy of the lung is an accurate technique for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and correctly determines which immunosuppressed pediatric patients would benefit from therapeutic pulmonary resection. (orig.)

  14. Accuracy of percutaneous lung biopsy for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffer, F.A.; Gow, K.; Davidoff, A.; Flynn, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    Background. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is fulminant and often fatal in immunosuppressed patients. Percutaneous biopsy may select patients who could benefit from surgical resection. Objective. We sought to determine the accuracy of percutaneous biopsy for pediatric invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Materials and methods. We retrospectively reviewed 28 imaging-guided percutaneous biopsies of the lungs of 24 children with suspected pulmonary aspergillosis. Twenty-two were being treated for malignancy and two for congenital immunodeficiency; 15 had received bone-marrow transplants. The accuracy of the percutaneous lung biopsy was determined by subsequent surgical resection, autopsy, or clinical course. Results. Histopathological studies showed ten biopsy specimens with septate hyphae, indicating a mold, and seven with Aspergillus flavus colonies in culture. The remaining 18 biopsies revealed no fungi. No patient had progressive aspergillosis after negative biopsy. Invasive pulmonary mold was detected by percutaneous biopsy with 100 % (10/10) sensitivity and 100 % (18/18) specificity. Percutaneous biopsy results influenced the surgical decision in 86 % (24 of 28) of the cases. Bleeding complicated the biopsy in 46 % (13/28) and hastened one death. Conclusion. Percutaneous biopsy of the lung is an accurate technique for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and correctly determines which immunosuppressed pediatric patients would benefit from therapeutic pulmonary resection. (orig.)

  15. [The regional cooperation of medical services and a nutritional support team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Michio

    2006-12-01

    "Community NST" is a new concept, which means a cooperation system with the hospital NST and a regional medical service. "Community NST" provides home nutritional care for the patients with nutritional problems. The function of the hospital NST for inpatients has been established in recent years. Now the patients need a continuous nutritional care not only in the hospital but at home. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) has been performed on the base of cooperation with the hospital and home care. This PEG system is one of the functions of "Community NST". The author showed several measures of "Community NST", which have been tried in the hospital.

  16. Percutaneous cecostomy: Laboratory and clinical experience with a new radiologic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Wittich, G.R.; Stavas, J.; Quinn, S.F.; Gibbs, J.; Macaulay, S.; Schecter, M.S.; Edwards, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    Percutaneous cecostomy or colostomy is a new interventional radiology procedure used for colonic decompression due to mechanical obstruction or pseudoobstruction. This paper describes our laboratory and initial clinical work with percutaneous colostomy. In our initial nine patient, it has served as a temporizing (five patients), definitive (three patients), or inadvertent maneuver (one patient). Methods of guidance were CT (three patients) and fluoroscopy (six patients). Catheters were placed both transperitoneally and retroperitoneally; laboratory work focused on these paths of introduction as well as catheter insertion and catheter type. The authors used catheters with retention devices preferentially, and these permit adherence of the colon to the abdominal wall. Both Seldinger and trocar techniques have been utilized. Leakage has resulted in minor abdominal pain; no patient has required operation due to percutaneous cecostomy. All procedures were successful and accomplished their goal

  17. Open, Arthroscopic, and Percutaneous Surgical Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Matthew B; Mitchell, Ronald J; Liberman, Shari R; Lintner, David M; Harris, Joshua D; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with lateral epicondylitis go on to have surgical treatment; however, multiple surgical treatment options exist. The purpose of this study was to review the literature for the clinical outcomes of open, arthroscopic, and percutaneous treatment of lateral epicondylitis. The authors hypothesized that the clinical outcome of all 3 analyzed surgical treatments would be equivalent. A systematic review was performed using PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar in July 2016 to compare the functional outcome, pain, grip strength, patient satisfaction, and return to work at 1-year follow-up for open, arthroscopic, and percutaneous treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Six studies (2 Level I and 4 Level II) including 179 elbows (83 treated open, 14 arthroscopic, 82 percutaneous) were analyzed. Three outcome measures (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [DASH] score, visual analog scale [VAS], and patient satisfaction) were reported for more than one category of surgical technique. Of these, the authors noted no clinically significant differences between the techniques. This is the first systematic review looking at high-level evidence to compare open, percutaneous, and arthroscopic techniques for treating lateral epicondylitis. There are no clinically significant differences between the 3 surgical techniques (open, arthroscopic, and percutaneous) in terms of functional outcome (DASH), pain intensity (VAS), and patient satisfaction at 1-year follow-up.

  18. Ultrasound guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    )-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (PFNAB)/US-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy (PNCB) of abdominal lesions is efficacious in diagnosis, is helpful in treatment choice, to evaluate whether various other investigations ...

  19. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan; Huang Xianglong; Shen Tianzhen; Hu Zhou; Hong Shuizong; Mei Haiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  20. A new device of CT-targeted percutaneous punctures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdoba, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a device for CT-targeted percutaneous punctures. After extensive phantom studies, punctures of vertebral disk space (diskography/nucleotomy) and orbit retrobulbar anesthesia/biopsy were performed in 15 patients. The new device is easy to mount on the CT scanner and does not require additional devices affixed to the patient. Its design and construction permit exact calculation of needle angle and depth, even when the gantry is tilted. Percutaneous biopsies can be performed in approximately 40 minutes. The device is accurate within ±0.5 mm, thereby allowing puncture of even small lesions deep in the orbital cone. Retrobulbar anesthesia can be performed safely in patients with a long myopic bulbus; in nucleotomy, instant control of the instrument's position within the disk space is possible

  1. Pulmonary Cement Embolism following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümran Toru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimal invasive procedure that is applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. During vertebroplasty, the leakage of bone cement outside the vertebral body leads to pulmonary cement embolism, which is a serious complication of this procedure. Here we report a 48-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea after percutaneous vertebroplasty and diagnosed as pulmonary cement embolism.

  2. Age-related percutaneous penetration part 1: skin factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, S; Meier-Davis, S R; Cayme, B; Shudo, J; Maibach, H I

    2012-05-01

    Changes in the skin that occur in the elderly may put them at increased risk for altered percutaneous penetration from pharmacotherapy along with potential adverse effects. Skin factors that may have a role in age-related percutaneous penetration include blood flow, pH, skin thickness, hair and pore density, and the content and structure of proteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), water, and lipids. Each factor is examined as a function of increasing age along with its potential impact on percutaneous penetration. Additionally, topical drugs that successfully overcome the barrier function of the skin can still fall victim to cutaneous metabolism, thereby producing metabolites that may have increased or decreased activity. This overview discusses the current data and highlights the importance of further studies to evaluate the impact of skin factors in age-related percutaneous penetration.

  3. The role of the interventional radiologist in enteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given, M F; Lyon, S M; Lee, M J

    2004-01-01

    The provision of enteral nutrition through the placement of gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy tubes is a well-established procedure. Traditionally, these catheters have been placed either surgically or endoscopically; however, over the past two decades interventional radiologists have increasingly performed these procedures successfully. The perceived advantages of this route lie in the reported lower morbidity and mortality rates. In addition, percutaneous radiologically guided (PRG) catheters may be placed in certain subgroups of patients in whom it would be technically difficult or impossible by other routes, e.g., patients with head and neck or oesophageal tumours. The aim of this review is to describe the techniques of radiologically placed gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy, discuss its indications and contraindications, describe any associated potential complications and compare PRG results with the more established techniques of open surgical and endoscopic placement. We also describe some recent procedural and catheter modifications.

  4. The role of the interventional radiologist in enteral alimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Given, M.F.; Lyon, S.M.; Lee, M.J. [Department of Academic Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, St. Stephen' s Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2004-01-01

    The provision of enteral nutrition through the placement of gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy tubes is a well-established procedure. Traditionally, these catheters have been placed either surgically or endoscopically; however, over the past two decades interventional radiologists have increasingly performed these procedures successfully. The perceived advantages of this route lie in the reported lower morbidity and mortality rates. In addition, percutaneous radiologically guided (PRG) catheters may be placed in certain subgroups of patients in whom it would be technically difficult or impossible by other routes, e.g., patients with head and neck or oesophageal tumours. The aim of this review is to describe the techniques of radiologically placed gastrostomy/gastrojejunostomy, discuss its indications and contraindications, describe any associated potential complications and compare PRG results with the more established techniques of open surgical and endoscopic placement. We also describe some recent procedural and catheter modifications. (orig.)

  5. Healthcare Professionals’ Views on the Provision of Gastrostomy and Noninvasive Ventilation to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffell, Tamatha; Martin, Naomi; Janssen, Anna; Wijesekera, Lokesh; Knights, Catherine; Burman, Rachel; Oliver, David J.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Goldstein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Gastrostomy and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) are recommended interventions for the management of symptoms associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This study aimed to quantify the views of a range of healthcare professionals (HCPs) on the provision of these interventions in the United Kingdom. A total of 177 HCPs participated in an online survey. Significant differences were found between medical and allied HCPs’ views on: whether HCPs adhere to policy and accept legal constraint...

  6. Postoperative intraabdominal fluid collections : a modified percutaneous drainage method using a surgical drain track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deok Hee; Kim, Gab Choul; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Song, Ho Young; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2000-01-01

    In the management of postoperative fluid collection, the conventional percutaneous drainage method can be employed. Because of abdominal incisions and various types of surgical drains and/or T-tubes, the application of this method is not always easy, however. We inserted a drainage catheter through a pre-existing percutaneous track formed by a surgical drain located adjacent to the site of abnormal fluid collection. There was no need to remove the drain nor make an additional puncture in the abdominal wall. A dilator was inserted along the drain, and a guide wire was used to negotiate its intraperitoneal track and reach the accumulated fluid. The procedure was simple and safe. We briefly describe our experience of this modified percutaneous drainage technique, as used in three cases involving postoperative fluid collection. (author)

  7. Percutaneous aspiration of hydatid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, G.; Serrano, R.

    1996-01-01

    A perspective study was carried out to assess the efficacy of a combination of percutaneous aspiration plus oral albendazole to assess its efficacy as an alternative to surgery in the treatment of hydatid cyst. We performed percutaneous aspiration followed by injection of 20% hypertonic saline solution into 16 hydatid cysts in 13 patients. All the patients received oral albendazole (400 mg/12 hours) starting 2 days before and lasting until there weeks after the procedure. There were no anaphylactic reactions during or after the procedure. Follow-up included monthly ultrasound over a period ranging between 10 and 36 months. Three cysts disappeared completely; in 10 cases, the cysts cavity was replaced by a complex ultrasonographic findings, with strong signals similar to those of a pseudotumor. In another case, the aspirate was sterile and its morphology remained unchanged. In two cases, infection of the cyst ensued, requiring surgical treatment. We consider that percutaneous aspiration in combination with albendazole may prove to be a good alternative to surgery for the management of hepatic hydatid disease. (Author) 15 refs

  8. Percutaneous treatment in patients presenting with malignant cardiac tamponade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcy, P.Y. [Antoine Lacassagne Center, Interventional Radiology Department, Nice (France); Bondiau, P.Y. [Antoine Lacassagne Center, Radiation Therapy Department, Nice (France); Brunner, P. [Centre Hospitalier Princesse, Grace (Monaco). Interventional Radiology Department

    2005-09-01

    The percutaneous treatment of pericardial effusion resulting in cardiac tamponade has undergone an evolution in recent years with the use of less invasive drainage techniques in selected cases. To determine optimal therapy modalities for oncology patients with malignant pericardial tamponade (MPT), the authors review their institutional experience with percutaneous needle puncture routes, means of imaging-guided drainage and percutaneous management of the pericardial fluid effusion (pericardial sclerosis and balloon pericardiotomy). Advantages and limits of the percutaneous techniques will be compared to the surgical treatment. (orig.)

  9. Advances in percutaneous stone surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher; Gupta, Nikhil; Leavitt, David; Hoenig, David; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of large renal stones has changed considerably in recent years. The increasing prevalence of nephrolithiasis has mandated that urologists perform more surgeries for large renal calculi than before, and this has been met with improvements in percutaneous stone surgery. In this review paper, we examine recent developments in percutaneous stone surgery, including advances in diagnosis and preoperative planning, renal access, patient position, tract dilation, nephroscopes, lithotripsy, exit strategies, and post-operative antibiotic prophylaxis.

  10. Percutaneous valved stent repair of a failed homograft: implications for the Ross procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Victor; Jones, Alan; Taylor, Dylan; Coe, Yashu; Ross, David B

    2008-08-01

    A case of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation following a failed homograft in the pulmonary position is reported. A 16-year-old boy developed infective endocarditis of his pulmonary homograft, which was implanted four years earlier during a Ross procedure for congenital aortic stenosis. Following successful medical therapy, the boy was symptomatic due to pulmonary stenosis and regurgitation. A 22 mm Melody valve (Medtronic, USA) was successfully implanted percutaneously. His symptoms resolved and he was discharged home one day after the procedure. Echocardiography at the six-month follow-up demonstrated a normally functioning pulmonary valve. Percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement may make the Ross procedure a more attractive option for patients with aortic stenosis, particularly in the pediatric population.

  11. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Retained Jackson-Pratt Drain Fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namyslowski, Jan; Halin, Neil J.; Greenfield, Alan J.

    1996-01-01

    A retained intraabdominal Jackson-Pratt drain fragment was percutaneously retrieved using an inflated angioplasty balloon that had been maneuvered inside of the drain lumen over a hydrophilic-coated steerable guidewire

  12. Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy: also a simple technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrink, M H; Foster, J; Rosemurgy, A S; Carey, L C

    1992-01-01

    Placement of feeding tubes is a common procedure for general surgeons. While the advent of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy has changed and improved surgical practice, this technique is contraindicated in many circumstances. In some patients placement of feeding tubes in the stomach may be contraindicated due to the risks of aspiration, gastric paresis, or gastric dysmotility. We describe a technique of laparoscopic jejunostomy tube placement which is easy and effective. It is noteworthy that this method may be used in patients who have had previous abdominal operations, and it has the added advantage of a direct peritoneal view of the viscera. We suggest that qualified laparoscopic surgeons learn the technique of laparoscopic jejunostomy.

  13. Surgical treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures: the comparison of open and percutaneous methods in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Güney; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Turhan, Egemen; Dönmez, Gürhan; Atay, Ahmet Özgür; Kaya, Defne

    2014-09-01

    This study was intended to investigate the healing properties of open and percutaneous techniques in a rabbit model and compare histological, electron microscopical, and biomechanical findings of the healed tendon between the groups. Twenty-six rabbits were randomly assigned to two groups of thirteen rabbits each. Percutaneous tenotomy of the Achilles tendon (AT) was applied through a stab incision on the right side 1.5 cm above the calcaneal insertion in all animals. Using the same Bunnell suture, the first group was repaired with the open and the second group was repaired with the percutaneous method. ATs were harvested at the end of eight weeks for biomechanical and histological evaluation. When the sections were evaluated for fibrillar density under electron microscopy, it was noted that fibrils were more abundant in the percutaneous repair group. The tendon scores in the percutaneous group were less than the open group indicating closer histological morphology to normal. The difference was not significant (p=0.065). The mean force to rupture the tendon was 143.7± 9.5 N in percutaneous group and 139.2±8.2 N in the open group. The difference was not significant (p=0.33). Percutaneous techniques provide as good clinical results as the open techniques do. The healing tendon shows better findings in histological and electron microscopical level with percutaneous technique.

  14. Prevention and treatment of complications following percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolarikos, Andreas; de la Rosette, Jean

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this article is to identify classification and grading systems of percutaneous nephrolithotomy-related complications and evidence for the prevention and treatment of these complications. RECENT FINDINGS: A total complication rate of up to 83% following percutaneous

  15. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, Clare L.; Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 ± 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 ± 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  16. Percutaneous bioprosthetic venous valve: a long-term study in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T; Timmermans, Hans A; Corless, Christopher L; O'Hara, Michael; Toyota, Naoyuki; Moneta, Gregory L; Keller, Frederick S; Rösch, Josef

    2002-03-01

    A long-term evaluation of a new percutaneously placed bioprosthetic, bicuspid venous valve (BVV) consisting of a square stent and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) covering was performed in 12 sheep. Of 26 BVVs placed into the jugular veins, 25 exhibited good valve function on immediate venography and 22 on venograms obtained before the sheep were killed. Gross and histologic examination results demonstrated incorporation of remodeled and endothelialized SIS BVVs into the vein wall. Slight to moderate leaflet thickening was found mostly at their bases. Percutaneously placed SIS BVV is a promising one-way, competent valve that resists venous back-pressure while allowing forward flow.

  17. Ultra-mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A minimally-invasive option for percutaneous stone removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu Sudan Agrawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL has witnessed rapid advancements, the latest being ultra-mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (UMP, which makes the use of 11-13F sheaths as compared to 24-30F sizes used in conventional PCNL. This miniaturization aims to reduce morbidity and improve patient outcomes. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of UMP and report our ourtcomes. Patients and Methods: A total of 120 patients underwent UMP from July 2012 to March 2014. These patients had a single unilateral renal stone measuring between 8 and 20 mm. All patients underwent UMP using a 3F nephroscope, 7.5F inner sheath, and 11F or 13F outer metallic cannula, which served as the Amplatz sheath. Stone fragmentation and clearance were achieved with holmium laser. No nephrostomy or stent was used routinely. Results: Complete stone fragmentation was achieved in 114 out of 120 patients (95% using UMP; whereas the remaining 6 were converted into mini-PCNL using a 12.5F nephroscope and 15F Amplatz sheath. The mean operative time was 39.7 ± 15.4 min, and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 22.3 ± 2.2 h. Postoperatively, 6 (5% patients had residual fragments measuring ≤4 mm. At the 2 weeks follow-up, the stone-free status was >99% (119/120. There were no significant postoperative complications. Conclusion: This study shows UMP to be an effective and safe procedure for managing stones up to 20 mm. This procedure offers an attractive alternative to shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde intrarenal surgery for managing small stones.

  18. The effect of volatility on percutaneous absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Nicole C; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Topically applied chemicals may volatilize, or evaporate, from skin leaving behind a chemical residue with new percutaneous absorptive capabilities. Understanding volatilization of topical medications, such as sunscreens, fragrances, insect repellants, cosmetics and other commonly applied topicals may have implications for their safety and efficacy. A systematic review of English language articles from 1979 to 2014 was performed using key search terms. Articles were evaluated to assess the relationship between volatility and percutaneous absorption. A total of 12 articles were selected and reviewed. Key findings were that absorption is enhanced when coupled with a volatile substance, occlusion prevents evaporation and increases absorption, high ventilation increases volatilization and reduces absorption, and pH of skin has an affect on a chemical's volatility. The articles also brought to light that different methods may have an affect on volatility: different body regions; in vivo vs. in vitro; human vs. Data suggest that volatility is crucial for determining safety and efficacy of cutaneous exposures and therapies. Few articles have been documented reporting evaporation in the context of percutaneous absorption, and of those published, great variability exists in methods. Further investigation of volatility is needed to properly evaluate its role in percutaneous absorption.

  19. Percutaneous management of staghorn renal calculi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jay

    1989-01-01

    During a four year period, ending May 1987, 154 cases of symptomatic staghorn calculi have been treated by percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Of these patients,86% were discharged completely stone free with the remainder having fragments less than 5 mm in greatest diameter. More than one operative procedure during the same hospitalizations was required in 24% of patients and multiple percutaneous tracts were established in excess of 73% of them. Significant complications occurred in 16% of patients and there was one death. Most complications can be generally by minimized by careful approach and manageable by interventional radiological means. The management of patients with staghorn calculi requires a comprehensive understanding of the renal anatomy, selection of appropriate percutaneous nephrostomy tract sites, and radiologic-urologic expertise needed to remove the large stone mass. The advent of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy will not abolish the need for nephrolithotomy, particularly complex stones such as staghorn calculi

  20. Percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Chengjiang; Su Huanbin; Xu Sui; He Xiaofeng; Li Yanhao

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To probe the therapeutic effects, indications and safety of the percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLDP). Methods: To ameliorate percutaneous punctured route based on classic PLD and modified jaw structure of pulpiform nacleus forceps, with statistic analysis of the therapeutic results of 352 cases of patient undergone PLDP and follow up ranging from 6 to 38 months retrospectively. Results: The effective ratios were excellent in 45.5%, good for 45.4% and bad in 9.1%. 44 of 352 cases with pulps prolapse were cured. No intervertebral inflammation and paradisc hematoma took place. One case complicated with cauda equina injury and 4 cases with appliances broken inside the disc. Conclusions: PLDP is effective and safe, not only adaptive to the contained disc herniation, but also for noncontained herniation. (authors)

  1. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy for chronic elbow tendinosis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Darryl E; Beckley, James M; Smith, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Elbow tendinopathy is the most common cause of elbow pain affecting active populations. Surgical excision is reserved for patients with refractory symptoms. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy performed under local anesthesia also removes degenerated tissue and therefore provides an alternative treatment option to surgical excision. This investigation prospectively documented the safety and 1-year efficacy of ultrasonic percutaneous tenotomy performed by a single operator. Nineteen patients, aged 38 to 67 years, in whom >6 months of conservative management for medial (7) or lateral (12) elbow tendinopathy had failed were prospectively studied. All patients were treated with percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy of the elbow by a single operator. Visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the 11-item version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick DASH) index, and the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) were assessed by an independent observer before treatment and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after treatment. No procedural complications occurred. Total treatment time was elbow tendinopathy up to 1 year after the procedure. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lung abscess; Percutaneous catheter therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, H.K. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Kang, M.W. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Park, J.M. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Yang, W.J. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Shinn, K.S. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Bahk, Y.W. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    1993-07-01

    Lung abscess was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage in 5 of 6 patients. Complete abscess resolution occurred in 4 patients, partial resolution in one, and no response in one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days (mean 15.5 days) in successful cases. The failure of drainage in one neurologicall impaired patient was attributed to persistent aspiration. In 2 patients, concurrent pleural empyema was also cured. CT provided the anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is a safe and effective method for treating lung abscess. (orig.).

  3. Percutaneous transhepatic recanalization of malignant hilarobstruction: A possible rescue for early failure of endoscopic y-stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hoon; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Dong Uk [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ung Bae; Kang, Dae Hwan [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan Pusan National University Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Endoscopic biliary stenting is well known as an optimal method of management of malignant hilar obstruction, but sometimes the result is not satisfactory, with early stent failure. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) has a distinct advantage over endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatoscopy in that with ultrasound guidance one or more appropriate segments for drainage can be chosen. We evaluated the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic stenting as a rescue of early failure of endoscopic stenting. Ten patients (4 men, 6 women; age range, 52-78 years; mean age, 69 years) with inoperable biliary obstruction (2 patients with gall bladder cancer and hilar invasion, and 8 patients with Klatskin tumor) and with early endoscopic stent failure were included in our study. All of the patients underwent PTBD and percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Metallic stents were placed in all patients for internal drainage. Percutaneous rescue stenting was successful in all the patients technically and clinically. Mean time for the development of biliary obstruction was 13.5 days after endoscopic stenting. The mean patency of the rescue stenting was 122 days. The mean survival time for percutaneous transhepatic rescue stenting was 226.3 days. In early failure of endoscopic biliary stenting, percutaneous transhepatic recanalization can be a possible solution.

  4. Percutaneous transhepatic recanalization of malignant hilarobstruction: A possible rescue for early failure of endoscopic y-stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hoon; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Dong Uk; Jeon, Ung Bae; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic biliary stenting is well known as an optimal method of management of malignant hilar obstruction, but sometimes the result is not satisfactory, with early stent failure. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) has a distinct advantage over endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatoscopy in that with ultrasound guidance one or more appropriate segments for drainage can be chosen. We evaluated the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic stenting as a rescue of early failure of endoscopic stenting. Ten patients (4 men, 6 women; age range, 52-78 years; mean age, 69 years) with inoperable biliary obstruction (2 patients with gall bladder cancer and hilar invasion, and 8 patients with Klatskin tumor) and with early endoscopic stent failure were included in our study. All of the patients underwent PTBD and percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Metallic stents were placed in all patients for internal drainage. Percutaneous rescue stenting was successful in all the patients technically and clinically. Mean time for the development of biliary obstruction was 13.5 days after endoscopic stenting. The mean patency of the rescue stenting was 122 days. The mean survival time for percutaneous transhepatic rescue stenting was 226.3 days. In early failure of endoscopic biliary stenting, percutaneous transhepatic recanalization can be a possible solution.

  5. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  6. Percutaneous brachial artery catheterization for coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions (pci): an encouraging experience of 100 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Z.U.; Maken, G.R.; Saif, M.; Khattak, Z.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the practicability and safety of the percutaneous transbrachial approach (TBA) for diagnostic coronary angiography and therapeutic percutaneous coronary interventions. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology- National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC-NIHD) from March 2009 to May 2011. Patients and Methods: We collected data of 100 consecutive patients who underwent coronary catheterization by the percutaneous transbrachial approach. Transbrachial catheterization was performed only if the radial access failed or radial pulse was feeble. Study endpoints included successful brachial artery catheterization, vascular and neurological complications at access site and procedure success rate. Results: Mean age of the patients was 54 years (range 33-79 yrs) and 65(65%) were males and 35 (35%) were females. The right brachial artery was used in all of the cases. Procedural success was achieved in 100% of the patients. Coronary angiography was performed in 70 patients and percutaneous coronary interventions were done in 30 cases. Out of these 30 cases, PCI to left coronary arteries (LAD and LCX) were performed in 19 patients while 11 patients had PCI to right coronary artery (RCA). No case of vascular complications such as major access site bleeding, vascular perforation, brachial artery occlusion causing forearm ischemia, compartment syndrome, vascular spasm or failure to catheterize coronary arteries requiring alternate vascular access were observed. Conclusion: Brachial artery is a safe and easily accessible approach for coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions. (author)

  7. Percutaneous dilatation of biliary benign strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Choi, Byung Ihn; Sung, Kyu Bo; Han, Man Chung; Park, Yong Hyun; Yoon, Yong Bum [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-06-15

    Percutaneous biliary dilation was done in 3 patients with benign strictures. The first case was 50-year-old male who had multiple intrahepatic stones with biliary stricture. The second 46-year-old female and the third 25-year-old male suffered from recurrent cholangitis with benign stricture of anastomotic site after choledocho-jejunostomy. In the first case, a 6mm diameter Grunzing dilatation balloon catheter was introduced through the T-tube tract. In the second case, the stricture was dilated with two balloons of 5mm and 8mm in each diameter sequentially through the U-loop tract formed by surgically made jejunostomy and percutaneous transhepatic puncture. In the third case, the dilatation catheter was introduced through the percutaneous transhepatic tract. Dilatation was made with a pressure of 5 to 10 atmospheres for 1 to 3 minutes duration for 3 times. In all 3 cases, the strictures were successfully dilated and in second and third cases internal stent was left across the lesion for prevention of restenosis.

  8. Percutaneous catheter drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnel, F.; Gebauer, A.; Jantsch, H.; Prayer, L.; Schurawitzki, H.; Feil, W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of CT/US-guided percutaneous drainage in 35 patients with pancreatic pseudocysts are reported. 27 patients recovered without surgery and no further treatment was required. 8 patients required a subsequent surgery due to recurrence. The role of CT/US-guided percutaneous drainage in pancreatic pseudocysts as well as an analysis of the technical aspects associated with a successful procedure are discussed. Although US may be used, we believe CT is safer and allows more precise localisation and guidance in the treatment of pseudocysts. (orig.) [de

  9. Percutaneous Management of Abscess and Fistula Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AAssar, O. Sami; LaBerge, Jeanne M.; Gordon, Roy L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Mulvihill, Sean J.; Way, Lawrence W.; Kerlan, Robert K.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous drainage of fluid collections following pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure). Methods: We performed a retrospective review of 19 patients referred to our service with fluid collections following pancreaticoduodenectomy. The presence of associated enteric or biliary fistulas, the route(s) of access for image-guided drainage, the incidence of positive bacterial cultures, and the duration and success of percutaneous management were recorded. Results: Fistulous communication to the jejunum in the region of the pancreatico-jejunal anastomosis was demonstrable in all 19 patients by gentle contrast injection into drainage tubes. Three patients had concurrent biliary fistulas. In 18 of 19 patients, fluid samples yielded positive bacterial cultures. Successful percutaneous evacuation of fluid was achieved in 17 of 19 patients (89%). The mean duration of drainage was 31 days. Conclusion: Percutaneous drainage of abscess following pancreaticoduodenectomy is effective in virtually all patients despite the coexistence of enteric and biliary fistulas

  10. Percutaneous Renal Biopsy : A Report of 200 Caces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bahadori

    1966-01-01

    Full Text Available In the diffuse medical diseases of kidney, percutaneous renal biopsy is a valuable, safe and hazardless procedure. With the aid of this nearly new technique renal pathology, the natural history of renal diseases and the response of renal diseases to therapy, as well as the prognosis of renal disorders can be evaluated."nWe have analysed 210 percutaneous biopsies in Tehran. Complications were observed in 13% of cases, there is no mortality and no patient required drastic therapeutic intervention. Anuria, peri-renal colic and peri-renal hematoma were the only serious complications, which were seen in 4 patients, and were. readily controled with simple measures We obtained renal tissue in 95% cases of our patients and in 9 I% of them the tissue was adequate for c'ear diagnosis."nLike other authors, we believe that the procedure, when properly performed, can give a far more valuable informations about the patients without any realy dangerous risk.

  11. Percutaneous Osteoplasty for the Management of a Femoral Head Metastasis: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Wu, Chun Gen; Gu, Yi Feng; Li, Ming Hua

    2009-01-01

    Percutaneous osteoplasty (POP) as a technical extension of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) has been used to treat malignant disease that affects the skeletal system. POP has demonstrated good outcome for pain relief and functional improvement. Few studies have reported on the efficiency of POP to treat malignancies located in the femoral head. We designed a pilot study with the use of POP to treat intractable pain caused by a femoral head metastatic tumor in a 43-year-old man. During the follow-up period, the patient experienced sustained pain relief and improvement of quality of life that persisted for more than three months

  12. Percutaneous Osteoplasty for the Management of a Femoral Head Metastasis: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Wu, Chun Gen; Gu, Yi Feng; Li, Ming Hua [The Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2009-12-15

    Percutaneous osteoplasty (POP) as a technical extension of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) has been used to treat malignant disease that affects the skeletal system. POP has demonstrated good outcome for pain relief and functional improvement. Few studies have reported on the efficiency of POP to treat malignancies located in the femoral head. We designed a pilot study with the use of POP to treat intractable pain caused by a femoral head metastatic tumor in a 43-year-old man. During the follow-up period, the patient experienced sustained pain relief and improvement of quality of life that persisted for more than three months.

  13. Percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totev, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) is an X-ray or US guided procedure that involves the injection of a contrast material directly into the bile ducts inside the liver to produce pictures of them. If a blockage or narrowing is found, additional procedures may be performed: 1. insertion of a catheter to drain excess bile out of the body or both - internal and external; 2. plastic endoprothesis placement; 3. self-expandable metal stents placement to help open bile ducts or to bypass an obstruction and allow fluids to drain. Current percutaneous biliary interventions include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage to manage benign and malignant obstructions. Internal biliary stents are either plastic or metallic, and various types of each kind are available. Internal biliary stents have several advantages. An external tube can be uncomfortable and have a psychological disadvantage. An internal stent prevents the problems related to external catheters, for example, pericatheter leakage of bile and the need for daily flushing. The disadvantages include having to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or new PTC procedures to obtain access in case of stent obstruction. Better patency rates are reported with metallic than with plastic stents in cases of malignant obstruction, though no effect on survival is noted. Plastic internal stents are the cheapest but reportedly prone to migration. Metallic stents are generally not used in the treatment of benign disease because studies have shown poor long-term patency rates. Limited applications may include the treatment of patients who are poor surgical candidates or of those in whom surgical treatment fails. Most postoperative strictures are treated surgically, though endoscopic and (less commonly) percutaneous placement of nonmetallic stents has increasingly been used in the past few years. Now there are some reports about use of biodegradable biliary

  14. Percutaneous injuries among dental professionals in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Syed M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous exposure incidents facilitate transmission of bloodborne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. This study was conducted to identify the circumstances and equipment related to percutaneous injuries among dental professionals. Methods We used workers' compensation claims submitted to the Department of Labor and Industries State Fund during a 7-year period (1995 through 2001 in Washington State for this study. We used the statement submitted by the injured worker on the workers' compensation claim form to determine the circumstances surrounding the injury including the type of activity and device involved. Results Of a total of 4,695 accepted State Fund percutaneous injury claims by health care workers (HCWs, 924 (20% were submitted by dental professionals. Out of 924 percutaneous injuries reported by dental professionals 894 (97% were among dental health care workers in non-hospital settings, including dentists (66, 7%, dental hygienists (61, 18% and dental assistants (667, 75%. The majority of those reporting were females (638, 71%. Most (781, 87% of the injuries involved syringes, dental instruments (77, 9%, and suture needles (23%. A large proportion (90% of injuries occurred in offices and clinics of dentists, while remainder occurred in offices of clinics and of doctors of medicine (9%, and a few in specialty outpatient facilities (1%. Of the 894 dental health care workers with percutaneous injuries, there was evidence of HBV in 6 persons, HCV in 30 persons, HIV in 3 persons and both HBV and HVC (n = 2 exposure. Conclusion Out of hospital percutaneous injuries are a substantial risk to dental health professionals in Washington State. Improved work practices and safer devices are needed to address this risk.

  15. Percutaneous necrosectomy in patients with acute, necrotizing pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruennler, T.; Langgartner, J.; Lang, S.; Salzberger, B.; Schoelmerich, J. [University Hospital of Regensburg, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Regensburg (Germany); Zorger, N.; Herold, T.; Feuerbach, S.; Hamer, O.W. [University Hospital of Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy. By searching the radiological, surgical and internal medicine databases, all patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy between 1992 and 2004 were identified. Demographic, laboratory, and clinical data, and details about invasive procedures were collected by reviewing patient charts, radiological and surgical reports. The computed tomography severity index (CTSI) scores were determined by reviewing CT images. Eighteen patients were identified. Median Ranson score on admission was 2. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was median 22. Median CTSI score was 7. Initially all patients were treated with CT-guided drainage placement. Because passive drainage proved not to be effective, subsequent minimally invasive, percutaneous necrosectomy was performed. Eight out of 18 patients recovered fully without the need for surgery. Ten of 18 patients required additional surgical necrosectomy. For one of ten patients, percutaneous necrosectomy allowed postponing surgery by 39 days. Four of ten surgically treated patients died: three from septic multiorgan failure, one from pulmonary embolism. Percutaneous minimally invasive necrosectomy can be regarded as a safe and effective complementary treatment modality in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. It is suitable for a subset of patients to avoid or delay surgery. (orig.)

  16. Percutaneous necrosectomy in patients with acute, necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruennler, T.; Langgartner, J.; Lang, S.; Salzberger, B.; Schoelmerich, J.; Zorger, N.; Herold, T.; Feuerbach, S.; Hamer, O.W.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy. By searching the radiological, surgical and internal medicine databases, all patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy between 1992 and 2004 were identified. Demographic, laboratory, and clinical data, and details about invasive procedures were collected by reviewing patient charts, radiological and surgical reports. The computed tomography severity index (CTSI) scores were determined by reviewing CT images. Eighteen patients were identified. Median Ranson score on admission was 2. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was median 22. Median CTSI score was 7. Initially all patients were treated with CT-guided drainage placement. Because passive drainage proved not to be effective, subsequent minimally invasive, percutaneous necrosectomy was performed. Eight out of 18 patients recovered fully without the need for surgery. Ten of 18 patients required additional surgical necrosectomy. For one of ten patients, percutaneous necrosectomy allowed postponing surgery by 39 days. Four of ten surgically treated patients died: three from septic multiorgan failure, one from pulmonary embolism. Percutaneous minimally invasive necrosectomy can be regarded as a safe and effective complementary treatment modality in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. It is suitable for a subset of patients to avoid or delay surgery. (orig.)

  17. Percutaneous Revision of a Testicular Prosthesis is Safe, Cost-effective, and Provides Good Patient Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene B. Cone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Office-based percutaneous revision of a testicular prosthesis has never been reported. A patient received a testicular prosthesis but was dissatisfied with the firmness of the implant. In an office setting, the prosthesis was inflated with additional fluid via a percutaneous approach. Evaluated outcomes included patient satisfaction, prosthesis size, recovery time, and cost savings. The patient was satisfied, with no infection, leak, or complication after more than 1 year of follow-up, at significantly less cost than revision surgery. Percutaneous adjustment of testicular prosthesis fill-volume can be safe, inexpensive, and result in good patient satisfaction.

  18. Postoperative complications following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy are common in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvard Hansen, Erik Sören; Qvist, N.; Rasmussen, L.

    2017-01-01

    (range: 0-14.9), and the follow-up period was 36 months. Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: A total of 167 postoperative complications occurred in 118 of the 229 patients (51.5%). Of these, 89 were grade 1 complications, 49 were grade 2 complications, and 29...

  19. MAPLE Fabricated Fe3O4@Cinnamomum verum Antimicrobial Surfaces for Improved Gastrostomy Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Georgiana Anghel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamomum verum-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles of 9.4 nm in size were laser transferred by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE technique onto gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes for antibacterial activity evaluation toward Gram positive and Gram negative microbial colonization. X-ray diffraction analysis of the nanoparticle powder showed a polycrystalline magnetite structure, whereas infrared mapping confirmed the integrity of C. verum (CV functional groups after the laser transfer. The specific topography of the deposited films involved a uniform thin coating together with several aggregates of bio-functionalized magnetite particles covering the G-tubes. Cytotoxicity assays showed an increase of the G-tube surface biocompatibility after Fe3O4@CV treatment, allowing a normal development of endothelial cells up to five days of incubation. Microbiological assays on nanoparticle-modified G-tube surfaces have proved an improvement of anti-adherent properties, significantly reducing both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria colonization.

  20. Percutaneous drainage of lung abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ri, Jong Min; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik [Kyung-Pook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    Medical treatment using antibiotics and postural drainage has been widely adopted as a treatment method of pulmonary abscess, accompanied by surgical methods in cases intractable to drug therapy. However long-term therapy may be required, and the tolerance of organisms to antibiotics or other complications are apt to be encountered, during medical treatment. To shorten the convalescent period or to decrease the risk of invasive procedures, rather simple and relatively easy interventional techniques such as transbronchial or percutaneous catheter drainage have been successfully tried. We have performed 12 cases of percutaneous drainages of lung abscesses under fluoroscope guidance. This report is on the results of this procedure.

  1. Percutaneous drainage of lung abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ri, Jong Min; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik

    1992-01-01

    Medical treatment using antibiotics and postural drainage has been widely adopted as a treatment method of pulmonary abscess, accompanied by surgical methods in cases intractable to drug therapy. However long-term therapy may be required, and the tolerance of organisms to antibiotics or other complications are apt to be encountered, during medical treatment. To shorten the convalescent period or to decrease the risk of invasive procedures, rather simple and relatively easy interventional techniques such as transbronchial or percutaneous catheter drainage have been successfully tried. We have performed 12 cases of percutaneous drainages of lung abscesses under fluoroscope guidance. This report is on the results of this procedure

  2. Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholangiography

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-30

    Mar 30, 1974 ... Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography can play a major role in expediting the early diagnosis of surgically correctable jaundice. The need for this is emphasised by the fact that in a group of 46 patients the delay between the onset of jaundice and diagnosis ranged from 20 to 90 days. Transhepatic ...

  3. Percutaneous closure of a post-traumatic ventricular septal defect with a patent ductus arteriosus occluder

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Er-Ping; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Shui-Bo; Yin, Gui-Lin; Liu, Yong; Dong, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Feng

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ventricular septal defects resulting from post-traumatic cardiac injury are very rare. Percutaneous closure has emerged as a method for treating this disorder. We wish to report our experience in three patients who underwent percutaneous closure of a post-traumatic ventricular septal defect with a patent ductus arteriosus occluder. METHODS: We treated three patients with post-traumatic ventricular septal defects caused by stab wounds with knives. After the heart wound was repaired,...

  4. Nephron-sparing percutaneous ablation of a 5 cm renal cell carcinoma by superselective embolization and percutaneous RF-ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.; Buecker, A.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Rohde, D. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Abt. Urologie

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: To report on the nephron-sparing, percutaneous ablation of a large renal cell carcinoma by combined superselective embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation. Materials and Methods: A 5 cm renal cell carcinoma of a 43-year-old drug abusing male with serologically proven HIV, hepatitis B and C infection, who refused surgery, was superselectively embolized using microspheres (size: 500 - 700 {mu}m) and a platinum coil under local anesthesia. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation using a 7F LeVeen probe (size of expanded probe tip: 40 mm) and a 200 Watt generator was performed one day after transcatheter embolization under general anesthesia. Results: The combined treatment resulted in complete destruction of the tumor without relevant damage of the surrounding healthy renal tissue. The patient was discharged 24 hours after RF ablation. No complications like urinary leaks or fistulas were observed and follow up CT one day and 4 weeks after the radiofrequency intervention revealed no signs of residual tumor growth. Conclusion: The combined transcatheter embolization and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma has proved technically feasible, effective, and safe in this patient. It may be offered as an alternative treatment to partial or radical nephrectomy under certain circumstances. Abbreviations: RF = radiofrequency ablation; CT = computed tomography; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Bericht ueber eine nierenschonende, perkutane Ablation eines 5 cm grossen Nierenzellkarzinoms durch kombinierte Transkatheterembolisation und perkutane Radiofrequenzablation. Material und Methoden: Ein 5 cm grosses Nierenzellkarzinom eines 43 Jahre alten Drogenabhaengigen mit serologisch nachgewiesener HIV, Hepatitis B- und C-Infektion, der eine operative Therapie ablehnte, wurde superselektiv durch Embosphaeren (Partikelgroesse: 500 - 700 {mu}m) und einer Platinspirale unter Lokalanaesthesie embolisiert. Am Folgetag

  5. Painful percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy of Schwannoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Young Joo; Park, Seog Hee; Shin, Kyung Sub; Lee, Eun Jung

    1995-01-01

    Percutaneous aspiration needle biopsy of the intrathoracic disease is a safe, easy, and accurate diagnostic method. It usually causes mild pain or discomfort during the procedure. We had a patient who complained of severe sharp pain, well localized at the biopsy site of the target mass during CT-guided transthoracic aspiration biopsy. It was pathologically confirmed as an intrathoracic schwannoma after special staining. To our knowledge, there has been no published report of such a painful percutaneous needle biopsy in a patient with schwannoma in Korea. Two cases were reported in other radiologic journals. The severe sharp pain developed during the transthoracic aspiration needle biopsy is a reliable sign of neurogenic tumor, therefore the participating radiologist should recommend specific immumochemical stain for neurogenic tumor to pathologist

  6. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybojewski, J.Z.; Weich, H.F.H.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review PTCA, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, which can be considered to be a truly revolutionary and fairly simple invasive form of intervention to atherosclerotic obstruction. The 'epidemic' of IHD, ischaemic heart disease, in the Republic of South Africa calls for the employment of this technique, which has already been carried out in a few teaching hospitals in this country. Very recently, modified balloon dilatation catheters have been used percutaneously in the non-operative transluminal correction of congenital coarctation of the aorta in infants and children, congenital pulmonary value stenosis, and hypoplasia and stenosis of the pulmonary arteries. It has also been employed for PTCA and for the simultaneous occlusion of coronary-bronchial artery anastomosis using a detachable balloon. The isotopes thallium 201 and technetium 99 were also used in scintiscanning

  7. Malfunctioning Plastic Biliary Endoprosthesis: Percutaneous Transhepatic Balloon Pulling Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto G. Rossi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous transhepatic removal techniques for malfunctioning plastic biliary endoprosthesis are considered safe and efficient second-line strategies, when endoscopic procedures are not feasible. We describe the percutaneous transhepatic balloon pulling technique in a patient with an unresectable malignant hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

  8. Microneedle-Assisted Percutaneous Delivery of a Tetramethylpyrazine-Loaded Microemulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the efficacy of the percutaneous delivery of a tetramethylpyrazine-loaded microemulsion (TMP-ME on skin pretreated with microneedles (MN. The TMP-ME formulation was optimized in vitro with skin permeation experiments, using a uniform experimental design, guided by a pseudo-ternary phase diagram, in which the TMP skin permeation level and mean particle size were indices. The effects of MN pretreatment on skin permeation by TMP-ME were assessed using in vitro skin permeation, in vivo skin microdialysis, and pharmacokinetic studies in rats. The influence of MN pretreatment on the skin barrier function was evaluated by measuring the electrical resistance of rat skin before and after MN insertion. In the optimal formulation of TMP-ME, the weight percentages of Maisine® 35-1 (oil phase, Labrasol® (surfactant, and Transcutol® P (co-surfactant were 7%, 30% and 10%, respectively, with 1.5% TMP loading. In the in vitro skin permeation study, MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a two-fold increase in a 24-h cumulative TMP permeation compared with TMP-ME alone (p < 0.05. In the skin microdialysis study, TMP in MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a 1.25-fold increase in Cmax, a 0.93-fold decrease in Tmax, and a 0.88-fold increase in AUC0–t (p < 0.05. Similarly, in the pharmacokinetic study, TMP in MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a 2.11-fold increase in Cmax, a 0.67-fold decrease in Tmax, and a 1.07-fold increase in AUC0–t (p < 0.05. The percutaneous electrical resistance of rat skin before and after MN insertion was 850 ± 50 Ω/cm2 and 283 ± 104 Ω/cm2 respectively, indicating that MN dramatically compromises the skin barrier. These results suggest that MN assistance increases the skin permeation rate and the extent of percutaneous absorption of TMP-ME, and that the mechanism may involve the reversible barrier perturbation effect. The rate and extent of percutaneous absorption of TMP-ME can be significantly enhanced by MN assistance, possibly

  9. Microneedle-Assisted Percutaneous Delivery of a Tetramethylpyrazine-Loaded Microemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Qiang; Yu, Yanyan; Bi, Xiaolin; Zhang, Ren; Di, Liuqing

    2017-11-21

    This study examined the efficacy of the percutaneous delivery of a tetramethylpyrazine-loaded microemulsion (TMP-ME) on skin pretreated with microneedles (MN). The TMP-ME formulation was optimized in vitro with skin permeation experiments, using a uniform experimental design, guided by a pseudo-ternary phase diagram, in which the TMP skin permeation level and mean particle size were indices. The effects of MN pretreatment on skin permeation by TMP-ME were assessed using in vitro skin permeation, in vivo skin microdialysis, and pharmacokinetic studies in rats. The influence of MN pretreatment on the skin barrier function was evaluated by measuring the electrical resistance of rat skin before and after MN insertion. In the optimal formulation of TMP-ME, the weight percentages of Maisine ® 35-1 (oil phase), Labrasol ® (surfactant), and Transcutol ® P (co-surfactant) were 7%, 30% and 10%, respectively, with 1.5% TMP loading. In the in vitro skin permeation study, MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a two-fold increase in a 24-h cumulative TMP permeation compared with TMP-ME alone ( p < 0.05). In the skin microdialysis study, TMP in MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a 1.25-fold increase in C max , a 0.93-fold decrease in T max , and a 0.88-fold increase in AUC 0-t ( p < 0.05). Similarly, in the pharmacokinetic study, TMP in MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a 2.11-fold increase in C max , a 0.67-fold decrease in T max , and a 1.07-fold increase in AUC 0-t ( p < 0.05). The percutaneous electrical resistance of rat skin before and after MN insertion was 850 ± 50 Ω/cm² and 283 ± 104 Ω/cm² respectively, indicating that MN dramatically compromises the skin barrier. These results suggest that MN assistance increases the skin permeation rate and the extent of percutaneous absorption of TMP-ME, and that the mechanism may involve the reversible barrier perturbation effect. The rate and extent of percutaneous absorption of TMP-ME can be significantly enhanced by MN assistance, possibly

  10. [A clinical observation of percutaneous balloon dilation and maintenance percutaneous transhepatic cholangial catheter drainage for treatment of 21 patients with benign biliary strictures and difficult endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Shi, Hai-feng; Li, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Xiao-bo; Liu, Wei; Jin, Zheng-yu; Hong, Tao; Yang, Ai-ming; Yang, Ning

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the value of percutaneous balloon dilation and percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage (PTCD) catheter maintenance in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. The clinical data of 21 patients with benign biliary strictures at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from June 2005 to June 2011 were retrospectively studied, in which 12 patients in severe stricture (stenosis > 70%) were treated with percutaneous balloon dilation and PTCD catheter placed across the stricture, while another 9 patients in median stricture (stenosis stenosis was seen in 2 patients. A severe complication with biliary artery branch rupture and massive hemobilia was seen in 1 patient during balloon dilation. Of the 9 patients only treated with 1 - 12 months (median: 6 months) of PTCD catheter placement, 7 patients had the catheter successfully removed. In the follow-up of 5 - 18 months (median: 8 months), patency of bile duct was preserved in 5 of 7 patients, and recurrent stenosis was seen in 2 patients. No severe complication occurred. When endoscopy therapy is failed or the patient can't undergo endoscopy therapy, the percutaneous balloon dilation and PTCD catheter maintenance method is an effective alternative therapeutic approach in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. The moderate benign biliary stricture may be effectively treated only by the PTCD catheter maintenance method.

  11. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, F., E-mail: francoiscornelis@hotmail.com [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology (France); Neuville, A. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Pathology (France); Labreze, C. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Pediatric Dermatology (France); Kind, M. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology (France); Bui, B. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Oncology (France); Midy, D. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (France); Palussiere, J. [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology (France); Grenier, N. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Radiology (France)

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  12. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labrèze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussière, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-01-01

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  13. Pleural fluid drainage: Percutaneous catheter drainage versus surgical chest tube drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illescas, F.F.; Reinhold, C.; Atri, M.; Bret, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 4 years, 55 cases (one transudate, 28 exudates, and 26 empymas) were drained. Surgical chest tubes alone were used in 35 drainages, percutaneous catheters alone in five drainages, and both types in 15 drainages. Percutaneous catheter drainage was successful in 12 of 20 drainages (60%). Surgical tube drainage was successful in 18 of 50 drainages (36%). The success rate for the nonempyema group was 45% with both types of drainage. For the empyema group, the success rate for percutaneous catheter drainage was 66% vs 23% for surgical tube drainage. Seven major complications occurred with surgical tube drainage, but only one major complication occurred with percutaneous catheter drainage. Radiologically guided percutaneous catheter drainage should be the procedure of choice for pleural fluid drainage. It has a higher success rate for empyemas and is associated with less complications

  14. Challenging the wisdom of puncture at the calyceal fornix in percutaneous nephrolithotripsy: feasibility and safety study with 137 patients operated via a non-calyceal percutaneous track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriazis, Iason; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Vasilas, Marinos; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Kamal, Wissam; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2017-05-01

    To present our experience with a central, non-calyceal puncture protocol for percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) in an attempt to challenge the opinion of worldwide adopted calyceal puncture as the less traumatic site of percutaneous entrance into the collecting system. During 2012, a total of 137 consecutive, unselected patients were subjected to PCNL in our department. Non-calyceal punctures were performed to all cases and followed by subsequent track dilations up to 30 Fr. Perioperative and postoperative data were prospectively collected and analyzed. Mean operative time (from skin puncture to nephrostomy tube placement) was 48 min. Patients with single, multiple and staghorn stones had primary stone-free rates of 89.2, 80.4 and 66.7 % after PCNL, respectively. The overall complication rate was 10.2 %, while bleeding complications were minimal. Only 4 patients (2.9 %) required blood transfusion. Five patients (3.6 %) had Clavien Grade IIIa complications requiring an intervention for their management and none Grade IV or V. Despite the absence of evidence that non-calyceal percutaneous tracts could be a risk factor for complications, the concept of calyceal puncture has been worldwide adopted by PCNL surgeons as the sole safe percutaneous entrance into the collective system. Based on our experience, other pathways than the worldwide recognized rule, calyceal puncture, are possible and probably not as dangerous as has been previously stated.

  15. Image-Guided percutaneous biopsies with a biopsy gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lim, Hyo Keun; Kim, Eun Ah; Yun, Ku Sub; Bae, Sang Hoo; Shin, Hyung Sik [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    We report the results of image-guided percutaneous biopsies with a biopsy gun and evaluate the clinical usefulness. One hundred and five biopsies under ultrasonographic or fluoroscopic guidance were performed. Various anatomic sites were targeted(liver; 50, chest; 22, kidney; 12, pancreas; 8, intraperitoeum; 7, retroperitoneum; ). Obtained tissue was diagnostic in 98 of the 105 biopsies(93%). In each instance, representative core tissue specimens were obtained. Evaluation of the core tissue by pathologist revealed consistent, uniform specimens that contained significant crush artifact in no case. Five biopsies yielded inadequate tissue which were too small for histopathologic interpretation or were composed of necrotic debris. Two biopsies yielded adequate tissues, but tissues were not of the target. The diagnoses were malignancy in 77 biopsies and benign disease in 21 biopsies. No complications other than mild, localized discomfort were encountered except a transient hemoptysis and pneumothorax which was observed in two patients. Cutting biopsy with a biopsy gun provided sufficient amount of target tissue for an accurate diagnosis of malignant and benign disease. It was a safe and useful procedure for percutaneous biopsy.

  16. Percutaneous planter fasciitis release under local anesthesia: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramji Lal Sahu

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Percutaneous planter fasciitis release under local anesthesia is a minimally invasive procedure that can be performed in the outpatient setting. It is easy, quick, effective and moreover with few complications.

  17. Percutaneous dilatation of benign ureteral stricture -a case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Kyu Bo; Ahn, Jung Sook; Ham, So Hie; Woo, Won Hyung [Koryo General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    Percutaneous ureteral dilatation was done with balloon catheter and ureteral stent. A 40 year old woman had a pelvic surgery due to inflammatory cyst and this surgery was complicated by incidental cutting of right ureter and ureteroureteral anastomosis was done. After 1 month, she was suffered from severe right flank pain, nausea and vomiting, and showed delayed visualization of pelvocalyceal system with dilatation in intravenous pyelography. Percutaneous nephrostomy was done and complete obstruction at lower ureter was seen in antegrade pyelography. 4 mm balloon catheter was introduced through the nephrostomy tract and dilatation was done with a pressure of 5 atm for 1 minute duration for 4 times and no. 7 double J ureteral stent was left across the lesion for prevention of restenosis. Ureteral stent was removed after 2 months, and successful dilatation was seen and no evidence of restenosis in 5 weeks follow up.

  18. Pancreatic cancer seeding of percutaneous needle tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhou, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old African-American female presents with biliary ductal dilatation due to an obstructive pancreatic head mass. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram performed and biliary drainage catheter placement for decompression of the biliary system. The patient had a Whipple procedure performed several months later. On follow up CT imaging, there was interval development and enlargement of a subcutaneous lesion by the right oblique muscles. Biopsy of this lesion revealed pancreatic adenocarcinoma from percutaneous seeding of the transhepatic needle tract.

  19. Percutaneous cholecystostomy at the community hospital: value evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Lee, Jin Hee; Ym, Seong Hee; Yoon, Young Gun; Sohn, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Han, Young Min; Choi, Ki Chul

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of percutaneous cholecystostomy as a therapeutic maneuver in patients critically ill with acute cholecystitis in community hospitals. Eighteen patients, 11 with suspected acute calculous cholecystits and seven with acute acalulous cholecystitis underwent emergency percutaneous cholecystostomy. All demonstrated a variety of high risk factors for cholecystectomy:liver cirrhosis(n=3D2), diabetes mellitus(n=3D3), cardiac disease(n=3D3), underlying malignancy(n=3D2), pulmonary dysfunction(n=3D1), septic cholangitis(n=3D5), and old age(n=3D2). All percutaneous cholecystostomies were performed with ultrasound guidance and preferably using the transhepatic route. All procedures but one were successful, and most cholecystostomies were performed within 5-20 minutes. Technical problems were as follows: guide-wire buckling during catheter insertion(n=3D2) and procedure failure(n=3D1). The only major problem was a case of localized bile peritonitis due to procedural failure, but a few minor complications were encountered:catheter dislodgment(n=3D3), and significant abdominal pain during the procedure(2). After successful cholecystostomy, a dramatic improvement in clinical condition was observed in 16 of 17 patients(94%) within 48 hours. Ten of 16 patients who responded to percutaneous cholecystostomy underwent elective cholecystectomy after the improvement of clinical symptoms, and the remaining six patients improved without other gallbladder interventions. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is not only an effective procedure for acute cholecystitis, but also has a definite role in the management of these high-risk patients in community hospitals.=20

  20. Percutaneous cholecystostomy at the community hospital: value evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Lee, Jin Hee; Ym, Seong Hee; Yoon, Young Gun [Namwon Medical Center, Namwon (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Han, Young Min; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-10-01

    To assess the role of percutaneous cholecystostomy as a therapeutic maneuver in patients critically ill with acute cholecystitis in community hospitals. Eighteen patients, 11 with suspected acute calculous cholecystits and seven with acute acalulous cholecystitis underwent emergency percutaneous cholecystostomy. All demonstrated a variety of high risk factors for cholecystectomy:liver cirrhosis(n=3D2), diabetes mellitus(n=3D3), cardiac disease(n=3D3), underlying malignancy(n=3D2), pulmonary dysfunction(n=3D1), septic cholangitis(n=3D5), and old age(n=3D2). All percutaneous cholecystostomies were performed with ultrasound guidance and preferably using the transhepatic route. All procedures but one were successful, and most cholecystostomies were performed within 5-20 minutes. Technical problems were as follows: guide-wire buckling during catheter insertion(n=3D2) and procedure failure(n=3D1). The only major problem was a case of localized bile peritonitis due to procedural failure, but a few minor complications were encountered:catheter dislodgment(n=3D3), and significant abdominal pain during the procedure(2). After successful cholecystostomy, a dramatic improvement in clinical condition was observed in 16 of 17 patients(94%) within 48 hours. Ten of 16 patients who responded to percutaneous cholecystostomy underwent elective cholecystectomy after the improvement of clinical symptoms, and the remaining six patients improved without other gallbladder interventions. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is not only an effective procedure for acute cholecystitis, but also has a definite role in the management of these high-risk patients in community hospitals.=20.

  1. Beyond Prone Position in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Comprehensive Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Tsakiris, Peter; Ferrandino, Michael N.; Elsakka, Ahmed M.; Rioja, Jorge; Preminger, Glenn M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is traditionally performed with the patient in the prone position. Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of the prone and supine positions, particularly in obese patients and in those with staghorn calculi. Evidence acquisition: A Medline search was

  2. The application of percutaneous endoscopic colostomy to the management of obstructed defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heriot, A G; Tilney, H S; Simson, J N L

    2002-05-01

    We describe the case of a 52-year woman with a 17-year history of obstructed defecation in whom all other standard treatments had failed and the patient had refused a colostomy. Her symptoms were controlled by percutaneous endoscopic colostomy with antegrade colonic irrigation. A percutaneous endoscopic colostomy tube was placed in the sigmoid colon endoscopically using a colonoscope and the patient irrigated two liters of water through the percutaneous endoscopic colostomy twice each day and was able to successfully evacuate her rectum without excess straining or discomfort. Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy is an alternative option to colostomy in the management of obstructed defecation.

  3. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numaguchi, Y.; Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA; Puyau, F.A.; Provenza, L.J.; Richardson, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The successful dilatation of postsurgical concentric stenosis of an internal carotid artery using percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) is reported here. Only one such case has been previously documented. Review of the literature disclosed 16 patients who received transluminal angioplasty for stenosis of carotid arteries by percutaneous or open arteriotomy techniques. The authors feel that PTA may be the treatment of choice for postoperative concentric stenosis of a short segment of the carotid artery as opposed to surgical repair. (orig.)

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Arias-Buría

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US- guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n=17 group or exercise (n=19 group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions. Shoulder pain (NPRS and disability (DASH were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P<0.01: individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention.

  5. Laparoscopic-assisted percutaneous internal ring ligation in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery ... Patients and methods Laparoscopic percutaneous ligation of internal inguinal ring has been ... The mean operative time in our series was 15 (± 3) and 20 (± 5) min for bilateral cases, without anesthesia time. ... Conclusion Laparoscopic percutaneous ligation of internal inguinal ring repair of ...

  6. Recurrence of primary aldosteronism after percutaneous ethanol injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Chi Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Adrenalectomy is the definite treatment for aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA. Percutaneous ethanol or acetic acid injection with computed tomography (CT guidance has been described as a safe, noninvasive, and effective alternative treatment modality in patients with high surgical risk. We report on a man who was 49 years of age and presented with treatment-resistant hypertension and was later diagnosed with APA. CT-guided percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI was performed for this high surgical risk patient. He had aldosteronism recurrence 4 years after the ethanol injection, so a second PEI was performed. The tumor size was reduced and his blood pressure was normalized. Therefore, we suggest that clinicians should closely check aldosterone to renin ration and potassium level if percutaneous chemical ablation is considered in functioning adrenal adenomas.

  7. Percutaneous removal of a pacing electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, U.; Schild, H.; Hake, U.

    1989-01-01

    The large number of pace-makers introduced transvenously has resulted in increasing the number of complications, amongst which infections and dislocations are prominent. It is usually necessary to remove the electrode, which can be attempted percutaneously by using a Dormia basket, a loop or forceps. Amongst the complications of this procedure are tears to the myocardium, with the risk of pericardial tamponade, or tears of the tricuspid valve leading to tricuspid insufficiency. Consequently, thoracic surgical intervention should be available if necessary. Four successful procedures are described. (orig.) [de

  8. Percutaneous embolisation of retroperitoneal bleeding from pelvic fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabenwoeger, F.; Dock, W.; Ittner, G.; Vienna Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Pelvic fractures may lead to severe retroperitoneal bleeding. Percutaneous catheter embolisation has become an increasingly important therapeutic alternative to surgical intervention. Most studies dealing with this problem have been small and we have attempted to evaluate the method on the basis of our own experience and a review of the literature. The success rate of percutaneous embolisation appears to be about 94%. The use of blood transfusion dropped from an average of 25.7 units before embolisation to an average of 6.5 units after embolisation. In spite of this, mortality in these patients remains high at 43.3% because of the serious additional injuries. The advantages and disadvantages of various embolising materials are discussed and various techniques of percutaneous embolisation are described. (orig.) [de

  9. Percutaneous management of bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islim, F.; Ors, S.; Salik, A.; Guven, K.; Yanar, F.; Alis, H.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The risk of bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is higher than open cholecystectomy. Objective: To discuss the importance of minimally invasive treatment options in the management of bile duct injuries after laparoscopic cholecystectomy and to present our approach in the management. Materials and methods: Management of 25 patients with symptomatic bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy was retrospectively evaluated. Percutaneous collection drainage, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and percutaneous biliary drainage were performed for the management of the patients. Results: Mean age of the patients (15 women, 10 men) was 55. Either ultrasonography or computed tomography guided percutaneous drainage was performed in 13 patients. 9 of them completely recovered only with percutaneous drainage. In 4 of them ERCP was performed because of high drainage volume. In 9 of the patients with jaundice and high bilirubin levels ERCP was performed as the first option. And 3 patients were reoperated because of acute abdomen signs. ERCP, MRCP and PTC revealed type A in 7, type E2 in 3, type E3 in 3 and type E4 in 1 of the patients according to Strasberg classification. Conclusion: Presenting symptoms of the patients with symptomatic bile duct injury are useful in the determination of the treatment option.

  10. Seven-year follow-up of percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzada, Naqibullah; Ladenvall, Per; Hansson, Per-Olof; Johansson, Magnus Carl; Furenäs, Eva; Eriksson, Peter; Dellborg, Mikael

    2013-12-01

    Observational studies favor percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) over medical treatment to reduce recurrent stroke while randomized trials fail to demonstrate significant superiority of percutaneous PFO closure. Few long-term studies are available post PFO closure. This study reports long-term clinical outcomes after percutaneous PFO closure. Between 1997 and 2006, 86 consecutive eligible patients with cerebrovascular events, presumably related to PFO, underwent percutaneous PFO closure. All 86 patients were invited to a long-term follow-up, which was carried out during 2011 and 2012. Percutaneous PFO closure was successfully performed in 85 of 86 patients. The follow-up rate was 100%. No cardiovascular or cerebrovascular deaths occurred. Two patients (both women) died from lung cancer during follow-up. Follow-up visits were conducted for 64 patients and the remaining 20 patients were followed up by phone. The mean follow-up time was 7.3 years (5 to 12.4 years). Mean age at PFO closure was 49 years. One patient had a minor stroke one month after PFO closure and a transient ischemic attack (TIA) two years afterwards. One other patient suffered from a TIA six years after closure. No long-term device-related complications were observed. Percutaneous PFO closure was associated with very low risk of recurrent stroke and is suitable in most patients. We observed no mortality and no long-term device-related complications related to PFO closure, indicating that percutaneous PFO closure is a safe and efficient treatment even in the long term.

  11. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent removal using a rigid alligator forceps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Given, M F

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent removal using a rigid alligator forceps. Twenty patients were included in our study. Indications for ureteric stent insertion included stone disease (n = 7), malignancy (n = 8) and transplant anastomotic strictures (n = 5). Stent retrieval was carried out for proximal stent placement\\/migration in seven patients and encrustation in the remaining 13. Twenty-two stents were successfully retrieved in 20 patients. There was one technical failure (5%). There were no major complications. We had four minor complications, which included nephrostomy site pain (n = 2), periprocedural sepsis (n = 1) and a small urinoma (n = 1). All patients settled with conservative management. Percutaneous radiologically guided antegrade ureteric stent removal with an alligator forceps is safe and effective, particularly when initial surgical removal has failed.

  12. The CROES percutaneous nephrolithotomy global study: the influence of body mass index on outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuller, Andrew; Razvi, Hassan; Denstedt, John D

    2012-01-01

    In addition to more commonly forming stones, obese patients present a number of challenges when undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy. We evaluated percutaneous nephrolithotomy outcomes in 3,709 patients stratified by body mass index.......In addition to more commonly forming stones, obese patients present a number of challenges when undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy. We evaluated percutaneous nephrolithotomy outcomes in 3,709 patients stratified by body mass index....

  13. Percutaneous drainage in conservative therapy for perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oida, Takatsugu; Kano, Hisao; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kuboi, Youichi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kida, Kazutoshi; Amano, Sadao

    2012-01-01

    The management of peptic ulcers has dramatically changed and the incidence of elective surgery for gastroduodenal peptic ulcers has markedly decreased; hence, the incidence of emergency surgery for perforated peptic ulcers has slightly increased. In select cases, conservative therapy can be used as an alternative for treating perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of percutaneous abdominal drainage for the conservative treatment of perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. We retrospectively studied 51 patients who had undergone conservative therapy for perforated gastroduodenal ulcers. These patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of the initial treatment with conservative therapy with or without percutaneous drainage: group PD included patients who had undergone percutaneous drainage and group NPD, patients who had undergone non-percutaneous drainage. In the PD group, 14.3% (n=3) of the patients did not respond to conservative therapy, while this value was 43.3% (n=13) in the NPD group. The 2 groups differed significantly with respect to conversion from conservative therapy to surgery (pperforated gastroduodenal ulcers should be performed only in the case of patients meeting the required criteria; its combination with percutaneous intraperitoneal drainage is effective as initial conservative therapy.

  14. Ameliorative percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Chengjiang; Su Huanbin; He Xiaofeng; Li Yanhao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To ameliorate the percutaneous lumbar discectomy (APLD) for improving the effectiveness and amplifying the indicative range of PLD. Methods: To ameliorate percutaneous punctured route based on classic PLD and discectomy of extracting pulp out of the herniated disc with special pulpforceps. The statistical analysis of the therapeutic results on 750 disc protrusions of 655 cases undergone APLD following up from 6 to 54 months retrospectively. Results: The effective ratios were excellent in 40.2%, good for 46.6% and bad of 13.3%. No occurrance of intervertebral inflammation and paradiscal hematoma, there were only 1 case complicated with injuried cauda equina, and 4 cases with broken appliance within disc. Conclusions: APLD is effective and safe, not only indicative for inclusion disc herniation, but also for noninclusion herniation. (authors)

  15. A prospective study of percutaneous vertebroplasty in patients with myeloma and spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, C.; Ritchie, M.; O’Dwyer, P.J.; Edwards, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess patient outcome in a consecutive series of patients with myeloma and spinal metastases who underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty. Materials and methods: Data were gathered prospectively on all patients undergoing percutaneous vertebroplasty between June 2001 and June 2010. Outcome measures included visual analogue pain scores (VAS) and Roland–Morris Questionnaire (RMQ) in patients treated since 2005 as well as complications and long-term outcome in all patients. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight patients underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty for myeloma (n = 41) or spinal metastases (n = 87) over a 9 year period. VAS scores fell from 7.75 ± 1.88 pre-vertebroplasty to 4.77 ± 2.69 post-vertebroplasty (p = 0.001). RDQ scores improved from 18.55 ± 4.79 to 13.5 ± 6.96 (p = 0.001). Complications were recorded in three patients: cement extension to vena cava (n = 1), local haematoma (n = 1), and loss of sensation over T1 dermatome (n = 1). The Kaplan–Meier estimate of 5 year survival post-vertebroplasty was 40% for patients with myeloma and 25% for those with metastases. Conclusion: This large prospective study demonstrates percutaneous vertebroplasty reduces pain and improves disability in patients from intractable pain from myeloma or spinal metastases and now forms an important part of the multimodality treatment for these patients.

  16. Percutaneous drainage treatment of primary liver abscesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, H.; Pratschke, E.; Berr, F.; Fink, U.

    1989-02-01

    28 primary liver abscesses, including 9 amoebic abscesses, in 24 patients were drained percutaneously. Indication for drainage in amoebic abscesses was imminent rupture and clinical symptoms as pleural effusion, lung atelectasis and pain. 95% of the primary abscesses were cured by percutaneous drainage and systemic antibiotic treatment. There was one recurrence of abscess, which was managed surgically. Reasons for drainage failure were: tumour necrosis and tumour perforation with secondary liver abscess.

  17. Infective endocarditis following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Gary; Vejlstrup, Niels; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult.......Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult....

  18. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy among patients with renal anomalies: patient characteristics and outcomes; a subgroup analysis of the clinical research office of the endourological society global percutaneous nephrolithotomy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, Palle Jörn; Razvi, Hassan; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the characteristics and outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with and without renal malformations using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database.......This study compared the characteristics and outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in patients with and without renal malformations using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database....

  19. Pleural space infections after image-guided percutaneous drainage of infected intraabdominal fluid collections: a retrospective single institution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avella, Diego M; Toth, Jennifer W; Reed, Michael F; Gusani, Niraj J; Kimchi, Eric T; Mahraj, Rickeshvar P; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Kaifi, Jussuf T

    2015-04-11

    Percutaneous drainage of infected intraabdominal fluid collections is preferred over surgical drainage due to lower morbidity and costs. However, it can be a challenging procedure and catheter insertion carries the potential to contaminate the pleural space from the abdomen. This retrospective analysis demonstrates the clinical and radiographic correlation between percutaneous drainage of infected intraabdominal collections and the development of iatrogenic pleural space infections. A retrospective single institution analysis of 550 consecutive percutaneous drainage procedures for intraabdominal fluid collections was performed over 24 months. Patient charts and imaging were reviewed with regard to pleural space infections that were attributed to percutaneous drain placements. Institutional review board approval was obtained for conduct of the study. 6/550 (1.1%) patients developed iatrogenic pleural space infections after percutaneous drainage of intraabdominal fluid collections. All 6 patients presented with respiratory symptoms and required pleural space drainage (either by needle aspiration or chest tube placement), 2 received intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy and 1 patient had to undergo surgical drainage. Pleural effusion cultures revealed same bacteria in both intraabdominal and pleural fluid in 3 (50%) cases. A video with a dynamic radiographic sequence demonstrating the contamination of the pleural space from percutaneous drainage of an infected intraabdominal collection is included. Iatrogenic pleural space infections after percutaneous drainage of intraabdominal fluid collections occur at a low incidence, but the pleural empyema can be progressive requiring prompt chest tube drainage, intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy or even surgery. Expertise in intraabdominal drain placements, awareness and early recognition of this complication is critical to minimize incidence, morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  20. Percutaneous catheter drainage of lung abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Shin; Chun, Kyung Ah; Choi, Hyo Sun; Ha, Hyun Kown; Shinn, Kyung Sub [Catholic University Medical college, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    From March 1987 to July 1989, six patients (five adults and one child) with lung abscess (size, 5-13 cm in diameter) were treated with percutaneous aspiration and drainage. In each case, the puncture was made where the wall of the abscess was in contact with the pleural surface. An 8 to 10 Fr cartheter was inserted for drainage. Five of 6 had a dynamatic clinical response within 24 hours of the drainage. Percutaneous drainage was successful with complete abscess resolution in four and partial resolution in one patient. No response was seen in the rest one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days(average, 15.5 days) in successful cases. One case of the failure in drainage was due tio persistent aspiration of the neurologically impaired patient. In one patient, the abscess resolved after drainage but recurred after inadvertent removal of the catheter 7 days after insertion. In two patients, concurrent pleural empyema was resolved completely by the drainage. Computed tomography provide anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding a puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is safe and effective method for treating patient with lung abscess.

  1. Percutaneous catheter drainage of lung abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Shin; Chun, Kyung Ah; Choi, Hyo Sun; Ha, Hyun Kown; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1993-01-01

    From March 1987 to July 1989, six patients (five adults and one child) with lung abscess (size, 5-13 cm in diameter) were treated with percutaneous aspiration and drainage. In each case, the puncture was made where the wall of the abscess was in contact with the pleural surface. An 8 to 10 Fr cartheter was inserted for drainage. Five of 6 had a dynamatic clinical response within 24 hours of the drainage. Percutaneous drainage was successful with complete abscess resolution in four and partial resolution in one patient. No response was seen in the rest one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days(average, 15.5 days) in successful cases. One case of the failure in drainage was due tio persistent aspiration of the neurologically impaired patient. In one patient, the abscess resolved after drainage but recurred after inadvertent removal of the catheter 7 days after insertion. In two patients, concurrent pleural empyema was resolved completely by the drainage. Computed tomography provide anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding a puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is safe and effective method for treating patient with lung abscess

  2. Pre- and Postoperative Vomiting in Children Undergoing Video-Assisted Gastrostomy Tube Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjörn Backman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pre- and postoperative vomiting in children undergoing a Video-Assisted Gastrostomy (VAG operation. Patients and Methods. 180 children underwent a VAG operation and were subdivided into groups based on their underlying diagnosis. An anamnesis with respect to vomiting was taken from each of the children’s parents before the operation. After the VAG operation, all patients were followed prospectively at one and six months after surgery. All complications including vomiting were documented according to a standardized protocol. Results. Vomiting occurred preoperatively in 51 children (28%. One month after surgery the incidence was 43 (24% in the same group of children and six months after it was found in 40 (22%. There was a difference in vomiting frequency both pre- and postoperatively between the children in the groups with different diagnoses included in the study. No difference was noted in pre- and postoperative vomiting frequency within each specific diagnosis group. Conclusion. The preoperative vomiting symptoms persisted after the VAG operation. Neurologically impaired children had a higher incidence of vomiting than patients with other diagnoses, a well-known fact, probably due to their underlying diagnosis and not the VAG operation. This information is useful in preoperative counselling.

  3. Oral og verbal dyspraksi hos en i øvrigt rask pige

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikoghosyan-Bossen, Gohar

    2018-01-01

    In the absence of any known neurological condition, dyspraxia is the inability to plan and execute movement. This case report describes a girl with swallowing difficulties, who was diagnosed with oral dyspraxia, as all other possible explanations had been ruled out. A percutaneous endoscopic...... gastrostomy was performed at the age of 6.5 months, and as a five-year-old she was still dependent on supplementary nutrition through the tube, even though she had gradually learned to swallow. Her difficulties to correctly pronounce syllables and words were later diagnosed as childhood apraxia of speech...

  4. Transient megaoesophagus and oesophagitis following diaphragmatic rupture repair in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rotem; Kuzi, Sharon; Lavy, Eran; Aroch, Itamar

    2008-07-01

    A 6-month-old domestic shorthair female cat was presented with suspected diaphragmatic hernia (DH) that was later confirmed by thoracic radiography. The cat underwent exploratory celiotomy with a diaphragmatic rupture (DR) repair and recovered. Six days later, it was represented with vomiting and anorexia. Megaoesophagus (MO) and gastric dilatation were diagnosed by contrast radiography. A second celiotomy revealed no abnormalities and gastropexy was performed. Endoscopy demonstrated MO, oesophagitis and gastro-oesophageal reflux. MO persisted for several weeks and was an unexpected complication as no association between DR (or DH) and MO has never been described in the veterinary literature. The cat was treated medically with aggressive prokinetic and antacid therapy along with prolonged temporary oesophageal diversion (percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube) with an excellent outcome.

  5. History of Retractor Technologies for Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin

    2016-02-01

    Minimally invasive techniques aimed at minimizing surgery-associated risk and morbidity of spinal surgery have increased in popularity in recent years. Their potential advantages include reduced length of hospital stay, blood loss, and requirement for post-operative analgesia and earlier return to work. One such minimally invasive technique is the use of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, which is paramount for promoting rigid and stable constructs and fusion in the context of trauma, tumors, deformity and degenerative disease. Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion can be an intimidating prospect for surgeons who have only been trained in open techniques. One of the ongoing challenges of this percutaneous system is to provide the surgeon with adequate access to the pedicle entry anatomy and adequate tactile or visual feedback concerning the position and anatomy of the rod and set-screw construct. This review article discusses the history and evolution of percutaneous pedicle screw retractor technologies and outlines the advances over the last decade in the rapidly expanding field of minimal access surgery for posterior pedicle screw based spinal stabilization. As indications for percutaneous pedicle screw techniques expand, the nuances of the minimally invasive surgery techniques and associated technologies will also multiply. It is important that experienced surgeons have access to tools that can improve access with a greater degree of ease, simplicity and safety. We here discuss the technical challenges of percutaneous pedicle screw retractor technologies and a variety of systems with a focus on the pros and cons of various retractor systems. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Spinopelvic Dissociation: Comparison of Outcomes of Percutaneous versus Open Fixation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Pearson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spinopelvic dissociation injuries are historically treated with open reduction with or without decompressive laminectomy. Recent technological advances have allowed for percutaneous fixation with indirect reduction. Herein, we evaluate outcomes and complications between patients treated with open reduction versus percutaneous spinopelvic fixation. Methods. Retrospective review of patients undergoing spinopelvic fixation from a single, level one trauma center from 2012 to 2017. Patient information regarding demographics, associated injuries, and treatment outcome measures was recorded and analyzed. All fractures were classified via the AO Spine classification system. Results. Thirty-one spinopelvic dissociations were identified: 15 treated with open and 16 with percutaneous techniques. The two treatment groups had similar preoperative characteristics including spinopelvic parameters (pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis. Compared to open reduction internal fixation, percutaneous fixation of spinopelvic dissociation resulted in statistically significantly lower blood loss (171 cc versus 538 cc; p=0.0013. There were no significant differences in surgical site infections (p=0.48 or operating room time (p=0.66. Conclusion. Percutaneous fixation of spinopelvic dissociation is associated with significantly less blood loss. Treatment outcomes in terms of infection, length of stay, operative cost, and final alignment between the open and percutaneous group were similar.

  7. Gallbladder Cryoablation: Proof of Concept in a Swine Model for a Percutaneous Alternative to Cholecystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Hugh C. J., E-mail: hugh.mcgregor@ucsf.edu; Saeed, Maythem, E-mail: maythem.saeed@ucsf.edu; Surman, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.surman@ucsf.edu; Ehman, Eric C., E-mail: eric.ehman@ucsf.edu; Hetts, Steven W., E-mail: steven.hetts@ucsf.edu; Wilson, Mark W., E-mail: mark.wilson@ucsf.edu; Conrad, Miles B., E-mail: miles.conrad@ucsf.edu [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging (United States)

    2016-07-15

    PurposeTo investigate the feasibility of percutaneous gallbladder cryoablation (GBC) under CT guidance in a swine model with histopathologic correlation.Materials and MethodsInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee approval was obtained for this study protocol. Five pigs underwent GBC. Under CT guidance, 3–4 cryoprobes were positioned percutaneously at the gallbladder margins. Thermocouple probes were placed percutaneously at the gallbladder fundus, neck, free wall, and gallbladder fossa. Two freeze–thaw cycles ranging from 10 to 26 min were performed. The subjects were sacrificed 5 h after cryoablation. The gallbladder and bile ducts were resected, stained, and examined microscopically.ResultsGBC was completed in all subjects. A 10-mm ablation margin was achieved beyond all gallbladder walls. Thermocouple probes reached at least −20 °C. Intra-procedural body temperature decreased to a minimum of 35 °C but recovered after the procedure. Intra- and post-procedural vital signs otherwise remained within physiologic parameters. Non-target ablation occurred in the stomach and colon of the first two subjects. Histology demonstrated complete denudation of the gallbladder epithelium, hemorrhage, and edema within the muscularis layer, and preservation of the microscopic architecture of the common bile duct in all cases.ConclusionPercutaneous gallbladder cryoablation is feasible, with adequate ablation margins obtained and histologic changes demonstrating transmural necrosis. Adjacent structures included in the ablation may require conservative ablation zones, hydrodissection, or continuous saline lavage.

  8. Gallbladder Cryoablation: Proof of Concept in a Swine Model for a Percutaneous Alternative to Cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, Hugh C. J.; Saeed, Maythem; Surman, Andrew; Ehman, Eric C.; Hetts, Steven W.; Wilson, Mark W.; Conrad, Miles B.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate the feasibility of percutaneous gallbladder cryoablation (GBC) under CT guidance in a swine model with histopathologic correlation.Materials and MethodsInstitutional Animal Care and Use Committee approval was obtained for this study protocol. Five pigs underwent GBC. Under CT guidance, 3–4 cryoprobes were positioned percutaneously at the gallbladder margins. Thermocouple probes were placed percutaneously at the gallbladder fundus, neck, free wall, and gallbladder fossa. Two freeze–thaw cycles ranging from 10 to 26 min were performed. The subjects were sacrificed 5 h after cryoablation. The gallbladder and bile ducts were resected, stained, and examined microscopically.ResultsGBC was completed in all subjects. A 10-mm ablation margin was achieved beyond all gallbladder walls. Thermocouple probes reached at least −20 °C. Intra-procedural body temperature decreased to a minimum of 35 °C but recovered after the procedure. Intra- and post-procedural vital signs otherwise remained within physiologic parameters. Non-target ablation occurred in the stomach and colon of the first two subjects. Histology demonstrated complete denudation of the gallbladder epithelium, hemorrhage, and edema within the muscularis layer, and preservation of the microscopic architecture of the common bile duct in all cases.ConclusionPercutaneous gallbladder cryoablation is feasible, with adequate ablation margins obtained and histologic changes demonstrating transmural necrosis. Adjacent structures included in the ablation may require conservative ablation zones, hydrodissection, or continuous saline lavage.

  9. Measurement of bio-impedance with a smart needle to confirm percutaneous kidney access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, D J; Sinkov, V A; Roberts, W W; Allaf, M E; Patriciu, A; Jarrett, T W; Kavoussi, L R; Stoianovici, D

    2001-10-01

    The traditional method of percutaneous renal access requires freehand needle placement guided by C-arm fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, or computerized tomography. This approach provides limited objective means for verifying successful access. We developed an impedance based percutaneous Smart Needle system and successfully used it to confirm collecting system access in ex vivo porcine kidneys. The Smart Needle consists of a modified 18 gauge percutaneous access needle with the inner stylet electrically insulated from the outer sheath. Impedance is measured between the exposed stylet tip and sheath using Model 4275 LCR meter (Hewlett-Packard, Sunnyvale, California). An ex vivo porcine kidney was distended by continuous gravity infusion of 100 cm. water saline from a catheter passed through the parenchyma into the collecting system. The Smart Needle was gradually inserted into the kidney to measure depth precisely using a robotic needle placement system, while impedance was measured continuously. The Smart Needle was inserted 4 times in each of 4 kidneys. When the needle penetrated the distended collecting system in 11 of 16 attempts, a characteristic sharp drop in resistivity was noted from 1.9 to 1.1 ohm m. Entry into the collecting system was confirmed by removing the stylet and observing fluid flow from the sheath. This characteristic impedance change was observed only at successful entry into the collecting system. A characteristic sharp drop in impedance signifies successful entry into the collecting system. The Smart Needle system may prove useful for percutaneous kidney access.

  10. Percutaneous injuries among healthcare workers at a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibak Gönen, Mehmet Faruk Geyik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Percutaneous injuries (PCIs remain a common incident among healthcare workers (HCWs despite the introductionof safety programs. The aim of this study was to assess the PCIs, required precautions, and applications after the injuries among healthcare workers in a small general hospital.Materials and methods: We assessed the occurrence of PCIs at a General Hospital (EGH from January 2007 to November2010. During this period, all injury cases among HCWs were reported to the Infection Control Committee (ICC using percutaneous injury notification form. The injury notification forms were evaluated retrospectively.Results: Totally 275 health personnel were working in our hospital, 36 healthy workers have been exposed to PCIs during this period. The incidence of PCIs was 2,9/10000 in 2007, 3,1/10000 in 2008, 3,8/10000 in 2009 and 3,9/10000 patient-days in 2010. Injured staff were recorded as, 16 nurses (44%, 12 cleaning staffs (34%, and eight (22% doctors. The device leading to damage was most frequently the needle-channel. Ten sources (27% were detected positive for hepatitis B virus (HBV, four (11% for hepatitis C virus (HCV, and two (5% for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV. No case of seroconversion has been recognized for any of the above mentioned infections.Conclusions: Percutaneous injuries remain to occur among HCWs. Since some the sources were infected, the health personnel are endangered for infections due to PCIs. The health personnel should presume that all patients are infected,and thus should work following universal precautions to avoid complications about the PCIs. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2011;1(1:26-30.

  11. Percutaneous Management of Ureteral Injuries that are Diagnosed Late After Cesarean Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ugurel, Sahin; Duru, Namik Kemal; Ozgok, Yasar; Ustunsoz, Ayfer [GATA Medical Faculty, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2008-08-15

    We wanted to present the results of percutaneous management of ureteral injuries that were diagnosed late after cesarean sections (CS). Twenty-two cases with 24 ureteral injuries that were diagnosed late after CS underwent percutaneous nephrostomy (PN), antegrade double J (DJ) catheter placement and balloon dilatation or a combination of these. The time for making the diagnosis was 21 +- 50.1 days. The injury site was the distal ureter in all cases (the left ureter: 13, the right ureter: 7 and bilateral: 2). Fifteen complete ureteral obstructions were detected in 13 cases. Ureteral leakage due to partial (n = 4) or complete (n = 3) rupture was noted in seven cases. Two cases had ureterovaginal fistula. All the cases were initially confirmed with antegrade pyelography and afterwards they underwent percutaneous nephrostomy. Balloon dilatation was needed in three cases. Antegrade DJ stents were placed in 10 cases, including the three cases with balloon dilatation. Repetititon of percutaneous nephrostomy with balloon dilatation and DJ stent placement was needed in one case with complete obstruction. All the cases were followed-up with US in their first week and then monthly thereafter for up to two years. Eighteen ureters (75%) were managed by percutaneous procedures alone. A total of six ureter injuries had to undergo surgery (25%). Percutaneous management is a good alternative for the treatment of post-CS ureteral injuries that are diagnosed late after CS. Percutaneous management is at least preparatory for a quarter of the cases where surgery is unavoidable

  12. Percutaneous drainage treatment of primary liver abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Pratschke, E.; Berr, F.; Fink, U.; Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen; Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen

    1989-01-01

    28 primary liver abscesses, including 9 amoebic abscesses, in 24 patients were drained percutaneously. Indication for drainage in amoebic abscesses was imminent rupture and clinical symptoms as pleural effusion, lung atelectasis and pain. 95% of the primary abscesses were cured by percutaneous drainage and systemic antibiotic treatment. There was one recurrence of abscess, which was managed surgically. Reasons for drainage failure were: tumour necrosis and tumour perforation with secondary liver abscess. (orig.) [de

  13. Percutaneous closure of a post-traumatic ventricular septal defect with a patent ductus arteriosus occluder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er-Ping Xi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Ventricular septal defects resulting from post-traumatic cardiac injury are very rare. Percutaneous closure has emerged as a method for treating this disorder. We wish to report our experience in three patients who underwent percutaneous closure of a post-traumatic ventricular septal defect with a patent ductus arteriosus occluder. METHODS: We treated three patients with post-traumatic ventricular septal defects caused by stab wounds with knives. After the heart wound was repaired, patient examinations revealed ventricular septal defects with pulmonary/systemic flow ratios (Qp/Qs of over 1.7. The post-traumatic ventricular septal defects were closed percutaneously with a patent ductus arteriosus occluder (Lifetech Scientific (Shenzhen Co., LTD, Guangdong, China utilizing standard techniques. RESULTS: Post-operative transthoracic echocardiography revealed no residual left-to-right shunt and indicated normal ventricular function. In addition, 320-slice computerized tomography showed that the occluder was well placed and exhibited normal morphology. CONCLUSION: Our experiences indicate that closure of a post-traumatic ventricular septal defect using a patent ductus arteriosus occluder is feasible, safe, and effective.

  14. Percutaneous closure of a post-traumatic ventricular septal defect with a patent ductus arteriosus occluder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Er-Ping; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Shui-Bo; Yin, Gui-Lin; Liu, Yong; Dong, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Feng

    2012-11-01

    Ventricular septal defects resulting from post-traumatic cardiac injury are very rare. Percutaneous closure has emerged as a method for treating this disorder. We wish to report our experience in three patients who underwent percutaneous closure of a post-traumatic ventricular septal defect with a patent ductus arteriosus occluder. We treated three patients with post-traumatic ventricular septal defects caused by stab wounds with knives. After the heart wound was repaired, patient examinations revealed ventricular septal defects with pulmonary/systemic flow ratios (Qp/Qs) of over 1.7. The post-traumatic ventricular septal defects were closed percutaneously with a patent ductus arteriosus occluder (Lifetech Scientific (Shenzhen) Co., LTD, Guangdong, China) utilizing standard techniques. Post-operative transthoracic echocardiography revealed no residual left-to-right shunt and indicated normal ventricular function. In addition, 320-slice computerized tomography showed that the occluder was well placed and exhibited normal morphology. Our experiences indicate that closure of a post-traumatic ventricular septal defect using a patent ductus arteriosus occluder is feasible, safe, and effective.

  15. Dexmedetomidine as a procedural sedative for percutaneous tracheotomy: case report and systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrott, Jerrold L; Co, Michelle T; Reynolds, Steven C; Gunning, Derek J R

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the successful use of dexmedetomidine as the primary procedural sedative for a percutaneous tracheotomy procedure and to systematically present the supporting literature. Materials and Methods. A Case report of our experience and systematic literature search. PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched without restriction using the key words dexmedetomidine, percutaneous tracheotomy, and tracheotomy procedure. All relevant published references were retrieved irrespective of their methodological quality. Results. In total, only 3 relevant references were found. These include one small placebo controlled randomized trial and 2 case reports. The randomized, placebo controlled trial enrolled patients already sedated on midazolam and included 64 total patients. The 2 other case reports both described the use of dexmedetomidine as the primary procedural sedative. All of the cases reported the successful completion of the percutaneous tracheotomy without any major complication, but none reported the subjective patient experience. Conclusion. Based on the available published literature and our experience, we suggest that dexmedetomidine be considered for use as the primary procedural sedative for percutaneous tracheotomy procedure. Dexmedetomidine's ability to provide adequate sedation and amnesia, without blunting the respiratory drive and protective reflexes of the patient, may make it an optimal agent in specific cases.

  16. Dexmedetomidine as a Procedural Sedative for Percutaneous Tracheotomy: Case Report and Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrold L. Perrott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the successful use of dexmedetomidine as the primary procedural sedative for a percutaneous tracheotomy procedure and to systematically present the supporting literature. Materials and Methods. A Case report of our experience and systematic literature search. PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched without restriction using the key words dexmedetomidine, percutaneous tracheotomy, and tracheotomy procedure. All relevant published references were retrieved irrespective of their methodological quality. Results. In total, only 3 relevant references were found. These include one small placebo controlled randomized trial and 2 case reports. The randomized, placebo controlled trial enrolled patients already sedated on midazolam and included 64 total patients. The 2 other case reports both described the use of dexmedetomidine as the primary procedural sedative. All of the cases reported the successful completion of the percutaneous tracheotomy without any major complication, but none reported the subjective patient experience. Conclusion. Based on the available published literature and our experience, we suggest that dexmedetomidine be considered for use as the primary procedural sedative for percutaneous tracheotomy procedure. Dexmedetomidine’s ability to provide adequate sedation and amnesia, without blunting the respiratory drive and protective reflexes of the patient, may make it an optimal agent in specific cases.

  17. Accuracy of CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for assessment of pediatric musculoskeletal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L.; Strouse, Peter J.; Biermann, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy has been shown in adults to be an effective diagnostic tool for a large number of musculoskeletal malignancies. To characterize our experience with CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of pediatric bone lesions and determine its utility in diagnosing pediatric osseous lesions, in a population where such lesions are commonly benign. From 2000 to 2009, 61 children underwent 63 CT-guided percutaneous biopsies. Radiological, pathological and clinical records were reviewed. Fourteen biopsies (22%) were performed on malignant lesions, while 49 biopsies (78%) were performed on benign lesions. Forty-nine of the 63 biopsies (78%) were adequate; these children underwent no further tissue sampling. Fourteen of the 63 biopsies (22%) were inadequate or non-conclusive. Of these patients, 12 underwent open biopsy. Retrospective analysis of percutaneous biopsies in these patients demonstrates that 9/12 provided clinically relevant information, and 4/12 patients received final diagnoses that confirmed initial core biopsy findings. No malignancies were diagnosed as benign on percutaneous biopsy. Overall, percutaneous core needle biopsy provided accurate diagnostic information in 84% (53/63) of biopsies. Our results demonstrate that CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is safe and beneficial in children. This study supports the use of CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for primary diagnosis of pediatric bone lesions. (orig.)

  18. Autonomic hyper-reflexia modulated by percutaneous epidural neurostimulation: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R R; Cerullo, L J; Meyer, P R

    1979-06-01

    Our clinical experience in the management of five paraplegic or quadriplegic patients with subjective complaints and objective findings of autonomic hyper-reflexia is presented. These five patients had epidural neurostimulation systems implanted percutaneously to regulate intractable spasticity. During a follow-up period varying from 2 months to almost 2 years, four of the five patients experienced no episodes of autonomic dysfunction with the use of a low frequency, low voltage, square wave pulse output. From their responses and from recent neurophysiological evidence, the potential benefit of percutaneous epidural neurostimulation in the modulation of autonomic hyper-reflexia without antihypertensive medication is suggested. Further follow-up of these patients and additional clinical research should be performed to confirm our initial clinical impressions.

  19. Percutaneous CT-guided interventional procedures in musculoskeletal system (our experience)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, Loukas E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, Sophia; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos

    2004-06-01

    Percutaneous interventional procedures include a broad spectrum of minimal invasive techniques, which are a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool. In this study we present our experience in CT-guided percutaneous musculoskeletal biopsies, drainages of musculoskeletal abscesses, facet and sacroiliac joint injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation of painful metastases or osteoid osteomas.

  20. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome - a review of supportive percutaneous treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moszura, Tomasz; Góreczny, Sebastian; Dryżek, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complex anatomical and haemodynamic consequences of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), patients with the condition require multistage surgical and supportive interventional treatment. Percutaneous interventions may be required between each stage of surgical palliation, sometimes simultaneously with surgery as hybrid interventions, or after completion of multistage treatment. Recent advances in the field of interventional cardiology, including new devices and techniques, have significantly contributed to improving results of multistage HLHS palliation. Knowledge of the potential interventional options as well as the limitation of percutaneous interventions will enable the creation of safe and effective treatment protocols in this highly challenging group of patients. In this comprehensive review we discuss the types, goals, and potential complications of transcatheter interventions in patients with HLHS.

  1. Percutaneous vertebroplasty in the therapy of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochmuth, K.; Proschek, D.; Schwarz, W.; Mack, M.; Vogl, T.J.; Kurth, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty has become an efficient technique for the treatment of painful vertebral fractures. Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures are characterized by severe back pain and immobilization causing other complications like thrombosis or pneumonia. Vertebral cement augmentation provides increased strength of the vertebral body and an obvious pain relief. Between 1989 and 2004, 30 studies and a total of 2,086 treated patients have been published in literature. A review of these studies has been performed. The number and age of the patients, number of treated vertebrae, pre- and postoperative outcome of pain and complications of the different studies were assessed and analyzed. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is an efficient technique with low complication rates and a significant reduction in pain. It rapidly improves the mobility and quality of life of patients with vertebral compression fractures. With an increasing number of treated patients, experience with this interventional technique has become excellent. But still there are no randomized controlled trials available, showing that percutaneous vertebroplasty has a significantly better outcome than other treatment options, especially after a long-term follow-up. (orig.)

  2. Percutaneous cholecystostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhan, Okan; Akinci, Devrim; Oezmen, Mustafa N.

    2002-01-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC), a technique that consists of percutaneous catheter placement in the gallbladder lumen under imaging guidance, has become an alternative to surgical cholecystostomy in recent years. Indications of PC include calculous or acalculous cholecystitis, cholangitis, biliary obstruction and opacification of biliary ducts. It also provides a potential route for stone dissolution therapy and stone extraction. Under aseptic conditions and ultrasound guidance, using local anesthesia, the procedure is carried out by using either modified Seldinger technique or trocar technique. Transhepatic or transperitoneal puncture can be performed as an access route. Several days after the procedure transcatheter cholangiography is performed to assess the patency of cystic duct, presence of gallstones and catheter position. The tract is considered mature in the absence of leakage to the peritoneal cavity, subhepatic, subcapsular, or subdiaphragmatic spaces. Response rates to PC in the literature are between the range of 56-100% as the variation of different patient population. Complications associated with PC usually occur immediately or within days and include haemorrhage, vagal reactions, sepsis, bile peritonitis, pneumothorax, perforation of the intestinal loop, secondary infection or colonisation of the gallbladder and catheter dislodgment. Late complications have been reported as catheter dislodgment and recurrent cholecystitis. PC under ultrasonographic guidance is a cost-effective, easy to perform and reliable procedure with low complication and high success rates for critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis. It is generally followed by elective cholecystectomy, if possible. However, it may be definitive treatment, especially in acalculous cholecystitis

  3. Percutaneous cholecystostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan E-mail: akhano@tr.net; Akinci, Devrim; Oezmen, Mustafa N

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC), a technique that consists of percutaneous catheter placement in the gallbladder lumen under imaging guidance, has become an alternative to surgical cholecystostomy in recent years. Indications of PC include calculous or acalculous cholecystitis, cholangitis, biliary obstruction and opacification of biliary ducts. It also provides a potential route for stone dissolution therapy and stone extraction. Under aseptic conditions and ultrasound guidance, using local anesthesia, the procedure is carried out by using either modified Seldinger technique or trocar technique. Transhepatic or transperitoneal puncture can be performed as an access route. Several days after the procedure transcatheter cholangiography is performed to assess the patency of cystic duct, presence of gallstones and catheter position. The tract is considered mature in the absence of leakage to the peritoneal cavity, subhepatic, subcapsular, or subdiaphragmatic spaces. Response rates to PC in the literature are between the range of 56-100% as the variation of different patient population. Complications associated with PC usually occur immediately or within days and include haemorrhage, vagal reactions, sepsis, bile peritonitis, pneumothorax, perforation of the intestinal loop, secondary infection or colonisation of the gallbladder and catheter dislodgment. Late complications have been reported as catheter dislodgment and recurrent cholecystitis. PC under ultrasonographic guidance is a cost-effective, easy to perform and reliable procedure with low complication and high success rates for critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis. It is generally followed by elective cholecystectomy, if possible. However, it may be definitive treatment, especially in acalculous cholecystitis.

  4. Percutaneous Management of Ureteral Injuries that are Diagnosed Late After Cesarean Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ugurel, Sahin; Duru, Namik Kemal; Ozgok, Yasar; Ustunsoz, Ayfer

    2008-01-01

    We wanted to present the results of percutaneous management of ureteral injuries that were diagnosed late after cesarean sections (CS). Twenty-two cases with 24 ureteral injuries that were diagnosed late after CS underwent percutaneous nephrostomy (PN), antegrade double J (DJ) catheter placement and balloon dilatation or a combination of these. The time for making the diagnosis was 21 ± 50.1 days. The injury site was the distal ureter in all cases (the left ureter: 13, the right ureter: 7 and bilateral: 2). Fifteen complete ureteral obstructions were detected in 13 cases. Ureteral leakage due to partial (n = 4) or complete (n = 3) rupture was noted in seven cases. Two cases had ureterovaginal fistula. All the cases were initially confirmed with antegrade pyelography and afterwards they underwent percutaneous nephrostomy. Balloon dilatation was needed in three cases. Antegrade DJ stents were placed in 10 cases, including the three cases with balloon dilatation. Repetititon of percutaneous nephrostomy with balloon dilatation and DJ stent placement was needed in one case with complete obstruction. All the cases were followed-up with US in their first week and then monthly thereafter for up to two years. Eighteen ureters (75%) were managed by percutaneous procedures alone. A total of six ureter injuries had to undergo surgery (25%). Percutaneous management is a good alternative for the treatment of post-CS ureteral injuries that are diagnosed late after CS. Percutaneous management is at least preparatory for a quarter of the cases where surgery is unavoidable

  5. A Single-Institution Experience in Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsy of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, B. T.; Eiken, P. W.; Atwell, T. D.; Peikert, T.; Yi, E. S.; Nichols, F.; Schmit, G. D.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeMesothelioma has been considered a difficult pathologic diagnosis to achieve via image-guided core needle biopsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review was performed to identify patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma and who underwent image-guided needle biopsy between January 1, 2002, and January 1, 2016. Thirty-two patients with pleural mesothelioma were identified and included for analysis in 33 image-guided biopsy procedures. Patient, procedural, and pathologic characteristics were recorded. Complications were characterized via standardized nomenclature [Common Terminology for Clinically Adverse Events (CTCAE)].ResultsPercutaneous image-guided biopsy was associated with an overall sensitivity of 81%. No CTCAE clinically significant complications were observed. No image-guided procedures were complicated by pneumothorax or necessitated chest tube placement. No patients had tumor seeding of the biopsy tract.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided biopsy can achieve high sensitivity for pathologic diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma with a low procedural complication rate, potentially obviating need for surgical biopsy.

  6. A Single-Institution Experience in Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsy of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, B. T., E-mail: Welch.brian@mayo.edu; Eiken, P. W.; Atwell, T. D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Peikert, T. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (United States); Yi, E. S. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Pathology (United States); Nichols, F. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Thoracic Surgery (United States); Schmit, G. D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeMesothelioma has been considered a difficult pathologic diagnosis to achieve via image-guided core needle biopsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic sensitivity of percutaneous image-guided biopsy for diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review was performed to identify patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma and who underwent image-guided needle biopsy between January 1, 2002, and January 1, 2016. Thirty-two patients with pleural mesothelioma were identified and included for analysis in 33 image-guided biopsy procedures. Patient, procedural, and pathologic characteristics were recorded. Complications were characterized via standardized nomenclature [Common Terminology for Clinically Adverse Events (CTCAE)].ResultsPercutaneous image-guided biopsy was associated with an overall sensitivity of 81%. No CTCAE clinically significant complications were observed. No image-guided procedures were complicated by pneumothorax or necessitated chest tube placement. No patients had tumor seeding of the biopsy tract.ConclusionPercutaneous image-guided biopsy can achieve high sensitivity for pathologic diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma with a low procedural complication rate, potentially obviating need for surgical biopsy.

  7. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Gallstone Removal Using a 12-Fr Sheath in High-Risk Surgical Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Yong Joo; Shin, Tae Beom

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic cholecystolithotomy under fluoroscopic guidance in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. Sixty-three consecutive patients of high surgical risk with acute calculous cholecystitis underwent percutaneous transhepatic gallstone removal under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using a Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance on three days after performing a percutaneous cholecystostomy. Large or hard stones were fragmented using either the snare guide wire technique or the metallic cannula technique. Gallstones were successfully removed from 59 of the 63 patients (94%). Reasons for stone removal failure included the inability to grasp a large stone in two patients, and the loss of tract during the procedure in two patients with a contracted gallbladder. The mean hospitalization duration was 7.3 days for acute cholecystitis patients and 9.4 days for gallbladder empyema patients. Bile peritonitis requiring percutaneous drainage developed in two patients. No symptomatic recurrence occurred during follow-up (mean, 608.3 days). Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gallstone removal using a 12-Fr sheath is technically feasible and clinically effective in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis

  8. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Gallstone Removal Using a 12-Fr Sheath in High-Risk Surgical Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hwan [Keimyung University, College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Joo [Andong General Hospital, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Gyeonsang National University, College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic cholecystolithotomy under fluoroscopic guidance in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. Sixty-three consecutive patients of high surgical risk with acute calculous cholecystitis underwent percutaneous transhepatic gallstone removal under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using a Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance on three days after performing a percutaneous cholecystostomy. Large or hard stones were fragmented using either the snare guide wire technique or the metallic cannula technique. Gallstones were successfully removed from 59 of the 63 patients (94%). Reasons for stone removal failure included the inability to grasp a large stone in two patients, and the loss of tract during the procedure in two patients with a contracted gallbladder. The mean hospitalization duration was 7.3 days for acute cholecystitis patients and 9.4 days for gallbladder empyema patients. Bile peritonitis requiring percutaneous drainage developed in two patients. No symptomatic recurrence occurred during follow-up (mean, 608.3 days). Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gallstone removal using a 12-Fr sheath is technically feasible and clinically effective in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis

  9. Percutaneous peritoneovenous shunt positioning: technique and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsi, Franco; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Bonomo, Guido; Marinucci, Irene; Monti, Cinzia; Bellomi, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    Nine peritoneovenous shunts were positioned by percutaneous technique in seven patients with advanced malignancy causing severe refractory ascites, and in two patients with hepatic cirrhosis (one with hepatocarcinoma). In all patients the shunts were percutaneously placed through the subclavian vein in the angiographic suite under digital fluoroscopic guide. No complications directly related to the procedure occurred. The shunt was successfully positioned in all patients in 60 min average time. No patient showed symptoms related to pulmonary overload or to disseminated intravascular coagulation. All patients had a significant improvement of the objective symptoms related to ascites such as respiratory symptoms, dyspepsia, and functional impairment to evacuation describing an improvement of their quality of life. Maximum shunt patency was 273 days. Percutaneous placement of peritoneovenous shunt is a safe, fast, and inexpensive procedure, extremely useful in resolution of refractory ascites, reducing symptoms, and allowing effective palliation, with a great improvement in quality of life. (orig.)

  10. Percutaneous peritoneovenous shunt positioning: technique and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orsi, Franco; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Bonomo, Guido; Marinucci, Irene [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Monti, Cinzia [Institute of Radiology, University of Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Institute of Radiology, University of Milan (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    Nine peritoneovenous shunts were positioned by percutaneous technique in seven patients with advanced malignancy causing severe refractory ascites, and in two patients with hepatic cirrhosis (one with hepatocarcinoma). In all patients the shunts were percutaneously placed through the subclavian vein in the angiographic suite under digital fluoroscopic guide. No complications directly related to the procedure occurred. The shunt was successfully positioned in all patients in 60 min average time. No patient showed symptoms related to pulmonary overload or to disseminated intravascular coagulation. All patients had a significant improvement of the objective symptoms related to ascites such as respiratory symptoms, dyspepsia, and functional impairment to evacuation describing an improvement of their quality of life. Maximum shunt patency was 273 days. Percutaneous placement of peritoneovenous shunt is a safe, fast, and inexpensive procedure, extremely useful in resolution of refractory ascites, reducing symptoms, and allowing effective palliation, with a great improvement in quality of life. (orig.)

  11. Image-guided percutaneous disc sampling: impact of antecedent antibiotics on yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, V.; Wo, S.; Lagemann, G.M.; Tsay, J.; Delfyett, W.T.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of antecedent antimicrobial therapy on diagnostic yield from percutaneous image-guided disc-space sampling. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the electronic health records of all patients who underwent image-guided percutaneous sampling procedures for suspected discitis/osteomyelitis over a 5-year period was performed. One hundred and twenty-four patients were identified. Demographics, medical history, and culture results were recorded as well as duration of presenting symptoms and whether antecedent antibiotic therapy had been administered. Results: Of the 124 patients identified who underwent image-guided percutaneous disc-space sampling, 73 had received antecedent antibiotic treatment compared with 51 who had not. The overall positive culture rate for the present study population was 24% (n=30). The positive culture rate from patients previously on antibiotics was 21% (n=15) compared with 29% (n=15) for patients who had not received prior antibiotic treatment, which is not statistically significant (p=0.26). Eighty-six percent (n=63) of patients who had antecedent antibiotics received treatment for 4 or more days prior to their procedure, whereas 14% (n=10) received treatment for 1–3 days prior to their procedure. The difference in culture positivity rate between these two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.43). Culture results necessitated a change in antibiotic therapy in a third of the patients who had received antecedent antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Antecedent antibiotic therapy, regardless of duration, did not result in significantly diminished diagnostic yield from percutaneous sampling for suspected discitis/osteomyelitis. The present results suggest that percutaneous biopsy may nonetheless yield positive diagnostic information despite prior antimicrobial therapy. If the diagnostic information may impact choice of therapeutic regimen, percutaneous biopsy should still be considered in cases where

  12. CT-guided percutaneous treatment of solitary pyogenic splenic abscesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pombo, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Suarez, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Marini, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Arrojo, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Echaniz, A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain)

    1991-08-01

    Six patients with solitary pyogenic splenic abscesses treated by CT-guided percutaneous drainage (by catheter or needle), are presented. There were 3 unilocular, purely intrasplenic abscesses and 3 complex lesions with loculations and perisplenic involvement. Percutaneous drainage and intravenous antibiotics were curative in 4 patients. In the other 2, who had multiloculated abscesses, despite initially successful drainage, splenectomy was performed because of intractable left upper quadrant pain in one case and persistent fever and drainage of pus after 30 days in the other. These patients also developed large, sterile left pleural effusions. Solitary pyogenic splenic abscesses - particularly if uniloculated - can be effectively treated by CT-guided percutaneous drainage. (orig.)

  13. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of lung abscess through a diaphragmatic fistula caused by a penetrating liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masako; Morita, Satoru; Ueno, Eiko; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Ishikawa, Motonao; Mae, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    Liver abscesses occurring just below the diaphragm can penetrate or perforate the thoracic cavity, resulting in lung abscess or pyothorax. Although surgical or percutaneous transpleural drainage is often required in such cases, the latter approach has some risks, including hemothorax and bronchopleural fistula formation when the cavity is surrounded by normal lung parenchyma. The present report describes a treatment technique of percutaneous transhepatic drainage through the diaphragmatic fistula to avoid the risks of a transpulmonary approach in a case of lung abscess caused by a penetrating liver abscess.

  14. Percutaneous embolization of varicocele: technique, indications, relative contraindications, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Halpern

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several options for the treatment of varicocele, including surgical repair either by open or microsurgical approach, laparoscopy, or through percutaneous embolization of the internal spermatic vein. The ultimate goal of varicocele treatment relies on the occlusion of the dilated veins that drain the testis. Percutaneous embolization offers a rapid recovery and can be successfully accomplished in approximately 90% of attempts. However, the technique demands interventional radiologic expertise and has potential serious complications, including vascular perforation, coil migration, and thrombosis of pampiniform plexus. This review discusses the common indications, relative contraindications, technical details, and risks associated with percutaneous embolization of varicocele.

  15. [Periprocedural and late complications after percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale: a single centre experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węglarz, Przemysław; Konarska Kuszewska, Ewa; Spisak Borowska, Katarzyna; Machowski, Jerzy; Drzewiecka-Gerber, Agnieszka; Kuszewski, Piotr; Jackson, Christopher L; Opala, Grzegorz; Trusz Gluza, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a potential risk factor for ischaemic stroke in young individuals. An interventional method of secondary stroke prevention in PFO patients is its percutaneous closure. To assess safety and effectiveness (i.e. lack of residual shunt) of percutaneous PFO closure in patients with history of cryptogenic cerebrovascular event. 149 patients (56 men/93 women), aged 39 ± 12 years, underwent percutaneous PFO closure. The implantation was performed under local anaesthesia, guided by trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and fluoroscopy. Follow-up trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed at 1 month and follow-up TEE at 6-months. In cases of residual shunt, additional TEE was performed after ensuing 6 months. Effective PFO closure (no residual shunt) was achieved in 91.3% patients at 6 months and 95.3% patients at 12 months. In 2 patients transient atrial fibrillation was observed during the procedure. In 2 patients, a puncture site haematoma developed and in 1 patient superficial thrombophlebitis was noted. In 1 patient a small pericardial effusion was observed, which resolved at day 3 post-procedurally, after administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Percutaneous PFO closure seems to be a safe procedure when performed in a centre with adequate expertise with regard to these procedures.

  16. CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the chest: initial experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this article is to report our first experience of CT guided percutaneous thoracic biopsy and to demonstrate the accuracy and safety of this procedure. This was a retrospective study of 28 CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsies of the Chest performed on 24 patients between November 2014 and April 2015.

  17. Percutaneous Fixation of Anterior Column Acetabular Fracture in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Ceylan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation, performed per million population, ranges from 30 to 60 in developed countries. The transplanted kidney is generally placed in iliac fossa; therefore the treatment procedure of the pelvic trauma in these patients should be selected carefully. The gold standard technique for the treatment of displaced acetabulum fractures is open reduction and internal fixation. Our patient had received a living-related-donor renal transplant due to chronic renal failure. In the second year of transplantation, she had been injured in a motor-vehicle accident, and radiographs showed a right acetabular anterior column fracture and left pubic rami fractures. The patient was treated with percutaneous fixation techniques and at one year of postoperative period there was no evidence of degenerative signs and the clinical outcome was good. Beside having the advantage of avoiding dissection through the iliac fossa by the standard ilioinguinal approach, percutaneous techniques, with shorter surgical time, decreasing soft tissue disruption, and the potential for early discharge from hospital might be ideal for a renal transplant recipient carrying a higher risk of infection. Percutaneous fixation of selected acetabular fractures in a renal transplant recipient would presumably have the potential to decrease the morbidity associated with traditional open surgical procedures.

  18. Percutaneous drainage with ultrasound guidance in the intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Doo Kyung; Won, Je Hwan; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Kim, Ji Hyung

    2004-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of bedside percutaneous drainage procedures with ultrasound guidance in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Sixty five percutaneous drainage procedures performed at the bedside, in 39 ICU patients, were evaluated. All of the procedures were performed with ultrasound guidance alone. The procedures consisted of percutaneous drainage of abdominal (n=35) and pleural (n=27) fluids, percutaneous cholecystostomy (n=2) and percutaneous nephrostomy (n=1). The clinical responses were classified as 'complete response', 'partial response', 'failure' or 'undetermined'. The medical records were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the clinical response. Technical success was achieved in 64 of the 65 procedures (98.5%). The complication rate was 13.8% (9 cases). There was no immediate procedure-related death or worsening of the clinical condition of the patients. The clinical responses after drainage were 'complete response' in 39 cases (60.9%). 'partial response' in 14 (21.9%), 'failure' in 3 (4.7%), and 'undetermined' in 8 (12.5%). Bedside drainage procedures with ultrasound guidance are effective and safe to perform when patients are too critically ill to be moved from the ICU to the angiography room

  19. Use of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in Relation to Percutaneous Interventional Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolsøe, Christian Pállson; Nolsøe, Alexander Bjørneboe; Klubien, Jeanett

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an inventory of the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in relation to percutaneous interventional procedures. The article is structured into a systematic literature review followed by a clinical part relating to percutaneous CEUS-guided procedures...

  20. Comparison of percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty for the management of Kümmell's disease: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Quan; Gao, Yan-Zheng; Chen, Shu-Lian; Ding, Shuai; Gao, Kun; Wang, Hong-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Post traumatic osteonecrosis of a vertebral body occurring in a delayed fashion was first described by the German doctor Kümmell in 1895. Several studies have reported percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), or percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) for Kümmell's disease achieves good outcomes. However, it is unknown whether a technique is superior for the treatment of this disease. The objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of PVP and PKP for the treatment of Kümmell's disease. A retrospective review was conducted for 73 patients with Kümmell's disease. PVP was performed in 38 patients and PKP in 35 patients. Visual analogue score (VAS) was used to evaluate pain. The anterior vertebral height was measured. The operative time, the incidence of cement leakage and the costs were recorded. In both PVP group and PKP group, the VAS and anterior vertebral height significantly improved at 1-day postoperatively (P 0.05). Between the PVP and PKP groups, there were no significant differences in VAS and the anterior vertebral height at 1-day postoperatively and at the final followup (P > 0.05). The operating time and expense in the PKP group were higher than the PVP group (P pain relief and restoration of vertebral height to PKP for the treatment of Kümmell's disease. PKP has a significant advantage over PVP in term of the fewer cement leakages.

  1. Percutaneous drainage of abscesses associated with biliary fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Winter, T.; Pratschke, E.; Sauerbruch, T.; Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen; Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen

    1989-01-01

    33 abdominal abscesses associated with fistulae in 31 patients were treated by percutaneous drainage. 19 of these patients had had surgery immediately preceding the drainage. In 64% the percutaneous drainage led to a diagnosis of an internal fistula. Additional therapeutic measures, because of the fistula, were necessary in 45% (operation, biliary drainage, repositioning of catheter). The average duration of drainage was 29 days. 77% of those abscesses which could be drained were treated successfully. Mortality in the entire series was 19%. (orig.) [de

  2. Percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional microdiscectomy for patients with sciatica: Two-year results of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Patrick A; Brand, Ronald; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Jacobs, Wilco Ch; Schenk, Barry; van den Berg-Huijsmans, Annette A; Koes, Bart W; Arts, Mark A; van Buchem, M A; Peul, Wilco C

    2017-06-01

    Background Percutaneous laser disc decompression is a minimally invasive treatment, for lumbar disc herniation and might serve as an alternative to surgical management of sciatica. In a randomised trial with two-year follow-up we assessed the clinical effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression compared to conventional surgery. Materials and methods This multicentre randomised prospective trial with a non-inferiority design, was carried out according to an intent-to-treat protocol with full institutional review board approval. One hundred and fifteen eligible surgical candidates, with sciatica from a disc herniation smaller than one-third of the spinal canal, were randomly allocated to percutaneous laser disc decompression ( n = 55) or conventional surgery ( n = 57). The main outcome measures for this trial were the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for sciatica, visual analogue scores for back and leg pain and the patient's report of perceived recovery. Results The primary outcome measures showed no significant difference or clinically relevant difference between the two groups at two-year follow-up. The re-operation rate was 21% in the surgery group, which is relatively high, and with an even higher 52% in the percutaneous laser disc decompression group. Conclusion At two-year follow-up, a strategy of percutaneous laser disc decompression, followed by surgery if needed, resulted in non-inferior outcomes compared to a strategy of microdiscectomy. Although the rate of reoperation in the percutaneous laser disc decompression group was higher than expected, surgery could be avoided in 48% of those patients that were originally candidates for surgery. Percutaneous laser disc decompression, as a non-surgical method, could have a place in the treatment arsenal of sciatica caused by contained herniated discs.

  3. Subcutaneous Transitional Cell Cancer After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokman Ižrkilata

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinomas of the upper urinary tract are rare but, highly predisposing to tumoral seeding. Percutaneous lithotripsy (PNL recently has expanded the therapeutic choices for patients with kidney stones and gained popularity by urologic surgeons. Although unusual, renal collecting system tumours may be encountered during PNL. We present and discuss the clinical course of a 48 years old male patient who underwent PNL surgery for kidney stone in whom transitional cell carcinoma in the renal collecting system obscured by stone left undiagnosed. Three months later following PNL he admitted with a bulge on lumbar region. Excisional biopsy revealed carcinoma and therefore, he was directed to chemoradiotherapy and died 21 months later. Renal collecting system tumors undiagnosed during surgery may progress and demonstrate local invasion in a short period of time. Therefore, we recommend to take more caution during any percutaneous access and to exclude the possible existence of tumor.

  4. Successful percutaneous transperineal drainage of a large prostatic abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Barry M; Hakimi, A Ari; Clerkin, Kevin J; Silva, Jose V

    2010-12-01

    We present a case of an 83-year-old man with septic shock secondary to an extremely large prostatic abscess. Antibiotics and transperineal percutaneous drainage with a suprapubic-type Malecot catheter successfully treated the abscess. Follow-up images reveal resolution of the abscess. Broad-spectrum antibiotics and drainage permitted a full recovery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Percutaneous cryoablation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Doo Song

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Local ablation therapy is considered as a conventional treatment option for patients with early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Although radiofrequency (RF ablation is widely used for HCC, the use of cryoablation has been increasing as newer and safer cryoablation systems have developed. The thermodynamic mechanism of freezing and thawing used in cryoablation is the Joule-Thomson effect. Cryoablation destroys tissue via direct tissue destruction and vascular-related injury. A few recent comparative studies have shown that percutaneous cryoablation for HCCs is comparable to percutaneous RF ablation in terms of long term therapeutic outcomes and complications. Cryoablation has several advantages over RF ablation such as well visualization of iceball, no causation of severe pain, and lack of severe damage to great vessels and gallbladder. It is important to know the advantages and disadvantages of cryoablation compared with RF ablation for improvement of therapeutic efficacy and safety.

  6. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in children: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderwy, Ahmad A; Gadelmoula, Mohamed; Elgammal, Mohamed A; Osama, Ehab; Al-Hazmi, Hamdan; Hammouda, H; Osman, Esam; Abdullah, Medhat A; Neel, Khalid Fouda

    2014-07-01

    The recurrence of pediatric nephrolithiasis, the morbidity of repeated open surgical treatment as well as our experience in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) in adult patients, all derived us to shift to PNL for managing renal stones >1.5 cm in pediatric patients. Our aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PNL in pediatric patients. During the period of the month between May 2011 and April 2013, 38 children (47 renal units) underwent PNL for renal stones 1.5-5 cm in length. Patient demographics, stone characteristics, and clinical outcome were prospectively studied. Data of those who underwent conventional and tubeless PNL were compared. Median follow-up period was 12 months (range: 6-24). The median age at presentation was 8-year (range: 3-12). The operative time ranged from 30 to 120 min (median 90). Overall stone clearance rate was 91.5% after single PNL. The median hospital stay was 3 days. Auxiliary procedures were successful for the remaining 4 patients (nephroscopic clearance in one and shockwave lithotripsy in 3). Tubeless PNL was performed in 17 renal units with a comparable outcome to conventional ones. The perioperative complications were noted in 5/47 (10.6%) of all procedures (Clavien Grade II in 4 and Clavien Grade IIIa in 1) and were managed conservatively. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal stones in pediatric patients is safe and feasible if performed by a well-experienced endourologist. Tubeless PNL is a better choice for children.

  7. Antegrade jj stenting after percutaneous renal procedures: The 'pull and push' technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkal, Jaideep M; Sharma, Elias

    2015-06-01

    A JJ stent is inserted antegradely after percutaneous renal procedures like percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal calculus disease, and for endopyelotomy for pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction. We describe a technique for antegrade stent insertion after PCNL.

  8. Subclavian steal syndrome: treatment by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abath, Carlos Gustavo Coutinho; Silva, Marcos Antonio Barbosa da; Brito, Norma Maria Tenorio; Marques, Silvio Romero; Santa Cruz, Rodolfo

    1995-01-01

    The subclavian steal syndrome is a rare vascular disease that can be managed by interventional radiology. It is presented the experience with three cases of this syndrome that underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, and a brief literature review is done. Two patients remained asymptomatic 23 and 30 months, respectively, after the procedure. One patient presented with recurrent symptoms 12 months after the dilatation. Considering the low morbidity and good clinical and technical results, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is the first choice in the subclavian steal syndrome treatment. (author). 9 refs., 3 figs

  9. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy and its legacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolarikos, A.; Alivizatos, G.; de la Rosette, J. J. M. C. H.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: We review the indications of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PNL), its safety and efficacy when applied to various patient groups as well as the different points of technique, giving emphasis on new tips and ongoing debates. Methods: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE database

  10. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimovic, Ruzica [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, GD Rotterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Dill, Thorsten [Kerckhoff-Heart Center, Department of Cardiology, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M. [Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases of the University Medical Center, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia)

    2006-11-15

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  11. Imaging in percutaneous ablation for atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovic, Ruzica; Dill, Thorsten; Ristic, Arsen D.; Seferovic, Petar M.

    2006-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation for electrical disconnection of the arrhythmogenic foci using various forms of energy has become a well-established technique for treating atrial fibrillation (AF). Success rate in preventing recurrence of AF episodes is high although associated with a significant incidence of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis and other rare complications. Clinical workup of AF patients includes imaging before and after ablative treatment using different noninvasive and invasive techniques such as conventional angiography, transoesophageal and intracardiac echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which offer different information with variable diagnostic accuracy. Evaluation before percutaneous ablation involves assessment of PVs (PV pattern, branching pattern, orientation and ostial size) to facilitate position and size of catheters and reduce procedure time as well as examining the left atrium (presence of thrombi, dimensions and volumes). Imaging after the percutaneous ablation is important for assessment of overall success of the procedure and revealing potential complications. Therefore, imaging methods enable depiction of PVs and the anatomy of surrounding structures essential for preprocedural management and early detection of PV stenosis and other ablation-related procedures, as well as long-term follow-up of these patients. (orig.)

  12. Percutaneous endoscopic intra-annular subligamentous herniotomy for large central disc herniation: a technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Baek, Oon Ki; Kim, Ho Jin; Yoo, Seung-Hwa

    2014-04-01

    Technical case report. To describe the novel technique of percutaneous endoscopic herniotomy using a unilateral intra-annular subligamentous approach for the treatment of large centrally herniated discs. Open discectomy for large central disc herniations may have poor long-term prognosis due to heavy loss of intervertebral disc tissue, segmental instability, and recurrence of pain. Six consecutive patients who presented with back and leg pain, and/or weakness due to a large central disc herniation were treated using percutaneous endoscopic herniotomy with a unilateral intra-annular subligamentous approach. The patients experienced relief of symptoms and intervertebral disc spaces were well maintained. The annular defects were noted to be in the process of healing and recovery. Percutaneous endoscopic unilateral intra-annular subligamentous herniotomy was an effective and affordable minimally invasive procedure for patients with large central disc herniations, allowing preservation of nonpathological intradiscal tissue through a concentric outer-layer annular approach.

  13. [The percutaneous absorption of diclofenac].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, W; Schmid, K; Botta, L; Kobayashi, K; Moppert, J; Schneider, W; Sioufi, A; Strusberg, A; Tomasi, M

    1986-07-01

    The percutaneous absorption of diclofenac diethylammonium 1.16% (w/w) in a combination of emulsion cream and gel (Voltaren Emulgel) and of diclofenac sodium 1% (w/w) in a cream formulation (Voltaren cream) was investigated in guinea-pig, rabbit and man. The percutaneous absorption of diclofenac sodium in guinea-pig was 3 to 6% of the dose when the cream formulation in doses of 320, 100 or 40 mg was applied on 10 cm2 of occluded skin and left in place for 6 h. The transdermal delivery of 14C-labelled diclofenac yielded plateau plasma concentrations of radiotracer from 1.5 h after application until removal of the residual cream. Subsequently the steady state drug depots in the skin and muscle tissue were depleted promptly. During daily administration the steady state levels in the muscle tissue in proximity to the application site were about 3 times higher than in distant muscle tissue. By topical application on knee joints of rabbits diclofenac penetrated into the patellar ligament, the adipose corpus and the synovial fluid. In man the percutaneous absorption was 6% of the dose when the Emulgel formulation was spread by 5 mg/cm2 and left for 12 h on non-occluded skin. The pattern of metabolites of diclofenac in human urine was the same after topical and oral administration. In man, upon daily topical administration of 3 times 2.5 g cream formulation (10 mg/cm2) the diclofenac steady state plasma levels were 20 to 40 nmol/l.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Multiple pyogenic liver abscesses formed after appendectomy: The role of percutaneous drainage in a critically ill patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver Zerem

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple pyogenic liver abscesses formed after appendectomy andtheir percutaneous treatment with multiple catheters have been rarelydescribed. We report a case of multiple pyogenic liver abscesses in acritically ill patient, formed after appendectomy and treated successfully by antibiotics and drainage with six catheters that were introduced simultaneously under ultrasound control. Even though this was a case of liver abscess secondary to appendicitis, today very rare in Western countries, but still a serious complication in developing countries, it was successfully resolved by percutaneous drainage, along with antibiotic therapy. Conclusion. We emphasize the advantages of percutaneous treatment compared with surgery regarding the avoidance of perioperative complications and the risks of general anesthesia.

  15. Percutaneous Treatment of Splenic Cystic Echinococcosis: Results of 12 Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net; Akkaya, Selçuk, E-mail: selcuk.akkaya85@gmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Dağoğlu, Merve Gülbiz, E-mail: drmgkartal@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Istanbul School of Medicine (Turkey); Akpınar, Burcu, E-mail: burcu-akpinar@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Erbahçeci, Aysun, E-mail: aysunerbahceci@yahoo.com [Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Çiftçi, Türkmen, E-mail: turkmenciftci@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Köroğlu, Mert, E-mail: mertkoroglu@hotmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Akıncı, Devrim, E-mail: akincid@hotmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeCystic echinococcosis (CE) in the spleen is a rare disease even in endemic regions. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of percutaneous treatment for splenic CE.Materials and MethodsTwelve patients (four men, eight women) with splenic CE were included in this study. For percutaneous treatment, CE1 and CE3A splenic hydatid cysts were treated with either the PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, respiration) technique or the catheterization technique.ResultsEight of the hydatid cysts were treated with the PAIR technique and four were treated with catheterization. The volume of all cysts decreased significantly during the follow-up period. No complication occurred in seven of 12 patients. Abscess developed in four patients. Two patients underwent splenectomy due to cavity infection developed after percutaneous treatment, while the spleen was preserved in 10 of 12 patients. Total hospital stay was between 1 and 18 days. Hospital stay was longer and the rate of infection was higher in the catheterization group. Follow-up period was 5–117 months (mean, 44.8 months), with no recurrence observed.ConclusionThe advantages of the percutaneous treatment are its minimal invasive nature, short hospitalization duration, and its ability to preserve splenic tissue and function. As the catheterization technique is associated with higher abscess risk, we suggest that the PAIR procedure should be the first percutaneous treatment option for splenic CE.

  16. Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy of the left colon: a new technique for management of intractable constipation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, David J; Haddad, Munther; Geoghegan, Niamh; Clarke, Simon; Fell, John M

    2004-07-01

    The antegrade colonic enema is accepted as effective for management of intractable constipation in children when conventional bowel management has failed. This study describes experience with a new, minimally invasive technique, the distal antegrade colonic enema, which involves percutaneous endoscopic colostomy of the left colon. Fifteen children with refractory constipation and soiling who had radiographic evidence of megarectum and/or distal colonic delay were selected for the procedure. The junction of the descending and the sigmoid colon was identified colonoscopically, and the percutaneous endoscopic colostomy tube, through which antegrade distal colonic enema are administered, was inserted. Fourteen children underwent distal percutaneous endoscopic colostomy insertion. The median time required for the procedure was 30 minutes (20-50 minutes). Excluding one child (technical difficulties with percutaneous endoscopic colostomy placement), median post-procedural hospital stay was 4 days (2-27 days). Thirteen children were no longer soiling, and improvement in quality of life was reported at 2 months' follow-up. At 6 months' follow-up, 90% of children were clean during intervals between enemas. All children evaluated at 12 months' follow-up remained clean. Median duration of follow-up was 12.5 months (2-51 months). The distal percutaneous endoscopic colostomy is a simple alternative to established methods for delivery of antegrade enemas. It is less invasive and on reversal leaves only minor scarring.

  17. Placement of percutaneous transhepatic biliary stent using a silicone drain with channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Mineta, Sho; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawano, Yoichi; Sasaki, Junpei; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Aimoto, Takayuki; Tajiri, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a method for percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting with a BLAKE Silicone Drain, and discusses the usefulness of placement of the drain connected to a J-VAC Suction Reservoir for the treatment of stenotic hepaticojejunostomy. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed under ultrasonographic guidance in a patient with stenotic hepaticojejunostomy after hepatectomy for hepatic hilum malignancy. The technique used was as follows. After dilatation of the drainage root, an 11-Fr tube with several side holes was passed through the stenosis of the hepaticojejunostomy. A 10-Fr BLAKE Silicone Drain is flexible, which precludes one-step insertion. One week after insertion of the 11-Fr tube, a 0.035-inch guidewire was inserted into the tube. After removal of the 11-Fr tube, the guidewire was put into the channel of a 10-Fr BLAKE Silicone Drain. The drain was inserted into the jejunal limb through the intrahepatic bile duct and was connected to a J-VAC Suction Reservoir. Low-pressure continued suction was applied. Patients can be discharged after insertion of the 10-Fr BLAKE Silicone Drain connected to the J-VAC Suction Reservoir. Placement of a percutaneous transhepatic biliary stent using a 10-Fr BLAKE Silicone Drain connected to a J-VAC Suction Reservoir is useful for the treatment of stenotic hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:19725159

  18. Survival times with and without tube feeding in patients with dementia or psychiatric diseases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Keiko; Hirayama, Keisuke; Hirao, Akihiko; Kondo, Keiko; Hayashi, Hideki; Kadota, Koichi; Asaba, Hiroyuki; Ishizu, Hideki; Nakata, Kenji; Kurisu, Kairi; Oshima, Etsuko; Yokota, Osamu; Yamada, Norihito; Terada, Seishi

    2017-11-01

    It is widely supposed that there has been no evidence of increased survival in patients with advanced dementia receiving enteral tube feeding. However, more than a few studies have reported no harmful outcome from tube feeding in dementia patients compared to in patients without dementia. This was a retrospective study. Nine psychiatric hospitals in Okayama Prefecture participated in this survey. All inpatients fulfilling the entry criteria were evaluated. All subjects suffered from difficulty with oral intake. Attending physicians thought that the patients could not live without long-term artificial nutrition. The physicians decided whether to make use of long-term artificial nutrition between January 2012 and December 2014. We evaluated 185 patients. Their mean age was 76.6 ± 11.4 years. Of all subjects, patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (n = 78) formed the biggest group, schizophrenia patients (n = 44) the second, and those with vascular dementia (n = 30) the third. The median survival times were 711 days for patients with tube feeding and 61 days for patients without tube feeding. In a comparison different types of tube feeding, median survival times were 611 days for patients with a nasogastric tube and more than 1000 days for those with a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube. Patients with tube feeding survived longer than those without tube feeding, even among dementia patients. This study suggests that enteral nutrition for patients with dementia prolongs survival. Additionally, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube feeding may be safer than nasogastric tube feeding among patients in psychiatric hospitals. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  19. Percutaneous thrombin injection for the treatment of a post-pancreatitis pseudoaneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, S.; Nicholson, A.A.; Breen, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms are often treated surgically or by transcatheter embolisation. We report a case of a pseudoaneurysm in a patient with chronic pancreatitis, which was successfully occluded by percutaneous injection of thrombin into the pseudoaneurysmal sac as a first-line management. (orig.)

  20. CT-guided percutaneous aspiration and drainage of postoperative abdominal fluid collections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marano, I.; Mainenti, P.P.; Selva, G.; Cannavale, M.; Sodano, A.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report the personal techniques and the results of CT-guided percutaneous drainage of postoperative abdominal fluid collections. CT-guided percutaneous drainage offers many advantages over surgery: it is less invasive, can be repeated and requires no anesthesia, there are not surgery-related risks and lower morbidity and mortality rates. Moreover, subsequent hospitalization is shorter and costs are consequently reduced. The authors conclude that CT-guided percutaneous drainage is the method of choice in the treatment of postoperative abdominal fluid collections [it

  1. Emergency percutaneous treatment in surgical bile duct injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Dizonno, Massimiliano; Ianniello, Andrea; Cotta, Elisa; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Dionigi, Renzo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of emergency percutaneous treatment in patients with surgical bile duct injury (SBDI). From May 2004 to May 2007, 11 patients (five men, six women; age range 26-80 years; mean age 58 years) with a critical clinical picture (severe jaundice, bile peritonitis, septic state) due to SBDI secondary to surgical or laparoscopic procedures were treated by percutaneous procedures. We performed four ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainages, four external-internal biliary drainages, one bilioplasty, and two plastic biliary stenting after 2 weeks of external-internal biliary drainage placement. All procedures had 100% technical success with no complications. The clinical emergencies resolved in 3-4 days in 100% of cases. All patients had a benign clinical course, and reoperation was avoided in 100% of cases. Interventional radiological procedures are effective in the emergency management of SBDI since they are minimally invasive and have a high success rate and a low incidence of complications compared to the more complex and dangerous surgical or laparoscopic options.

  2. Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Kienbock’s Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallejo, Eduardo Crespo, E-mail: dreduardocrespo@gmail.com [Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (Spain); Martinez-Galdámez, Mario [Fundación Jimenez Diaz, Neurointerventional Radiology Unit (Spain); Martin, Ernesto Santos [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Center, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (United States); Gregorio, Arturo Perera de [Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Department of Orthopedic Surgery (Spain); Gallego, Miriam Gamo [Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit (Spain); Escobar, Angeles Ramirez [Hospital Príncipe de Asturias, Radiology Unit (Spain)

    2017-05-15

    Kienböck disease typically presents with wrist pain, swelling, restricted range of motion, and difficulty in performing activities of daily living. Because the etiology and evolution of disease remain unclear, broad ranges of treatments have been designed. Percutaneous cementoplasty is expanding its role for managing painful bone metastases outside the spine. We can draw a parallel between lytic tumoral lesions and Kienbock’s disease. Increasing the strength and rigidity of lunate with cementoplasty can prevent it from collapse, relieve the symptoms associated with the process of avascular necrosis, and increase the wrist range of motion. We report the case of 30-year-old man with a painful stage IIIA Kienböck disease who underwent percutaneous cementoplasty and experienced immediate effective pain relief and recovery of wrist mobility.

  3. Percutaneous Cementoplasty for Kienbock’s Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, Eduardo Crespo; Martinez-Galdámez, Mario; Martin, Ernesto Santos; Gregorio, Arturo Perera de; Gallego, Miriam Gamo; Escobar, Angeles Ramirez

    2017-01-01

    Kienböck disease typically presents with wrist pain, swelling, restricted range of motion, and difficulty in performing activities of daily living. Because the etiology and evolution of disease remain unclear, broad ranges of treatments have been designed. Percutaneous cementoplasty is expanding its role for managing painful bone metastases outside the spine. We can draw a parallel between lytic tumoral lesions and Kienbock’s disease. Increasing the strength and rigidity of lunate with cementoplasty can prevent it from collapse, relieve the symptoms associated with the process of avascular necrosis, and increase the wrist range of motion. We report the case of 30-year-old man with a painful stage IIIA Kienböck disease who underwent percutaneous cementoplasty and experienced immediate effective pain relief and recovery of wrist mobility.

  4. Supine Versus Prone Position During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Report from the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Global Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Vadivia, José; M. Scarpa, Roberto; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2011-01-01

    To determine differences in patients' characteristics, operative time and procedures, and perioperative outcomes between prone and supine positioning in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database....

  5. Emergency percutaneous tracheostomy in a severely burned patient with upper airway obstruction and circulatory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossmacher, Pascal; Martinet, Olivier; Testud, Richard; Agesilas, Fabrice; Benhamou, Léon; Gauzëre, Bernard Alex

    2006-02-01

    We report the life-saving use of Griggs percutaneous tracheostomy in an arrested patient with complex upper airway obstruction, as a result of burns, smoke injuries and iterative tracheal intubation attempts. The technique was performed blindly at bedside to treat an acute episode of failed ventilation and intubation and cardiac arrest in a patient with altered neck anatomy. The intervention salvaged the situation, leaving a definitive airway. The feasibility of using an emergency Griggs percutaneous tracheostomy versus cricothyroidotomy is suggested in selected cases.

  6. Percutaneous discal cyst rupture in a professional football player using sublaminar epidural injection for thecal sac displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Michael V; Park, Andrew; Bumpass, David; Jennings, Jack W; Matava, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    A case of percutaneous discal cyst rupture in a 25-year-old professional American football player is reported. The patient presented with a 3-day history of severe left-sided back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a discal cyst effacing the left L4-L5 lateral recess, with interposed thecal sac. A sublaminar epidural injection was performed displacing the thecal sac, exposing the discal cyst, and allowing for percutaneous perforation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after discal cyst rupture and was able to compete in a professional football game 3 days later. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous rupture is a therapeutic modality that may be considered for treatment of a symptomatic discal cyst. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Results of first 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthila Mahesha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of back pain and sciatica. The surgical management of lumbar disc prolapse has evolved from exploratory laminectomy to percutaneous endoscopic discectomy. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy is the least invasive procedure for lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome, quality of life, neurologic function, and complications. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with lumbar disc prolapse who were treated with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy from May 2012 to January 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical followup was done at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and at yearly interval thereafter. The outcome was assessed using modified Macnab′s criteria, visual analog scale, and Oswestry Disability Index. Results: The mean followup period was 2 years (range 18 months - 3 years. Transforaminal approach was used in 84 patients, interlaminar approach in seven patients, and combined approach in nine patients. An excellent outcome was noted in ninety patients, good outcome in six patients, fair result in two patients, and poor result in two patients. Minor complications were seen in three patients, and two patients had recurrent disc prolapse. Mean hospital stay was 1.6 days. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a safe and effective procedure in lumbar disc prolapse. It has the advantage that it can be performed on a day care basis under local anesthesia with shorter length of hospitalization and early return to work thus improving the quality of life earlier. The low complication rate makes it the future of disc surgery. Transforaminal approach alone is sufficient in majority of cases, although 16% of cases required either percutaneous interlaminar approach or combined approach. The procedure definitely has a learning curve, but it is acceptable with adequate preparations.

  8. Percutaneous Dilational Tracheotomy in Solid-Organ Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemirkan, Aycan; Ersoy, Zeynep; Zeyneloglu, Pinar; Gedik, Ender; Pirat, Arash; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Solid-organ transplant recipients may require percutaneous dilational tracheotomy because of prolonged mechanical ventilation or airway issues, but data regarding its safety and effectiveness in solid-organ transplant recipients are scarce. Here, we evaluated the safety, effectiveness, and benefits in terms of lung mechanics, complications, and patient comfort of percutaneous dilational tracheotomy in solid-organ transplant recipients. Medical records from 31 solid-organ transplant recipients (median age of 41.0 years [interquartile range, 18.0-53.0 y]) who underwent percutaneous dilational tracheotomy at our hospital between January 2010 and March 2015 were analyzed, including primary diagnosis, comorbidities, duration of orotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stays, the time interval between transplant to percutaneous dilational tracheotomy, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, tracheotomy-related complications, and pulmonary compliance and ratio of partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen. The median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score on admission was 24.0 (interquartile range, 18.0-29.0). The median interval from transplant to percutaneous dilational tracheotomy was 105.5 days (interquartile range, 13.0-2165.0 d). The only major complication noted was left-sided pneumothorax in 1 patient. There were no significant differences in ratio of partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen before and after procedure (170.0 [interquartile range, 102.2-302.0] vs 210.0 [interquartile range, 178.5-345.5]; P = .052). However, pulmonary compliance results preprocedure and postprocedure were significantly different (0.020 L/cm H2O [interquartile range, 0.015-0.030 L/cm H2O] vs 0.030 L/cm H2O [interquartile range, 0.020-0.041 L/cm H2O); P = .001]). Need for sedation significantly decreased after tracheotomy (from 17 patients [54.8%] to

  9. Percutaneous N-Butyl cyanoacrylate embolization of a pancreatic pseudoaneurysm after failed attempts of transcatheter embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ri Hyeon; Yoo, Roh Eul; Kim, Hyo Cheol [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    One common complication after major pancreatic surgery is bleeding. Herein we describe a case of pancreatic pseudoaneurysm which developed after pylorous preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy for common bile duct cancer. Three attempts of transcatheter embolization failed since feeders to the pseudoaneurysm had unfavorable anatomy. Direct percutaneous N-butyl cyanoacrylate injection was performed under fluoroscopy-guidance and the pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated. Percutaneous fluoroscopy-guided direct N-butyl cyanoacrylate injection may be a useful alternative when selective transcatheter embolization fails or is technically challenging.

  10. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t’am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  11. Percutaneous Direct Puncture Embolization with N-butyl-cyanoacrylate for High-flow Priapism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokue, Hiroyuki, E-mail: tokue@s2.dion.ne.jp; Shibuya, Kei [Gunma University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan); Ueno, Hiroyuki [Isesaki Municipal Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Tokue, Azusa; Tsushima, Yoshito [Gunma University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    There are many treatment options in high-flow priapism. Those mentioned most often are watchful waiting, Doppler-guided compression, endovascular highly selective embolization, and surgery. We present a case of high-flow priapism in a 57-year-old man treated by percutaneous direct puncture embolization of a post-traumatic left cavernosal arteriovenous fistula using N-butyl-cyanoacrylate. Erectile function was preserved during a 12-month follow-up. No patients with percutaneous direct puncture embolization for high-flow priapism have been reported previously. Percutaneous direct puncture embolization is a potentially useful and safe method for management of high-flow priapism.

  12. Percutaneous transgluteal drainage of pelvic abscesses in interventional radiology: A safe alternative to surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, B; Chivot, C; Rebibo, L; Sabbagh, C; Regimbeau, J-M; Yzet, T

    2016-02-01

    Interventional radiology plays an important role in the management of deep pelvic abscesses. Percutaneous drainage is currently considered as the first-line alternative to surgery. A transgluteal computed tomography (CT)-guided approach allows to access to deep infected collections avoiding many anatomical obstacles (vessels, nerves, bowel, bladder). The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of a transgluteal approach by reviewing our clinical experience. We reviewed medical records of patients having undergone percutaneous CT-guided transgluteal drainage for deep pelvic abscesses. We focused on the duration of catheter drainage, the complications related to the procedures and the rate of complete resolution. Between 2005 and 2013, 39patients (27women and 12men; mean age: 52.5) underwent transgluteal approach CT-guided percutaneous drainage of pelvis abscesses in our department. The origins of abscesses were postoperative complications in 34patients (87.2%) and infectious intra-abdominal disease in 5patients (12.8%). The mean duration of drainage was 8.3days (range: 3-33). Laboratory cultures were positive in 35patients (89.7%) and Escherichia coli was present in 71.4% of the positive samples. No major complication was observed. Drainage was successful in 38patients (97.4%). A transpiriformis approach was more significantly associated with intra-procedural pain (P=0.003). Percutaneous CT-guided drainage with a transgluteal approach is a safe, well-tolerated and effective alternative to surgery for deep pelvic abscesses. This approach should be considered as the first-line intention for the treatment of deep pelvic abscesses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Percutaneous drainage of 100 subphrenic abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casola, G.; Sonnenberg, E. van; D'Agostino, H.; Kothari, R.; May, S.; Taggart, S.

    1990-01-01

    PURPOSE: Percutaneous drainage of subphrenic abscesses is technically more difficult because lung and pleura may be transgressed during catheter insertion. The purpose of this paper is to determine the incidence of thoracic complications secondary to subphrenic abscess drainage and to determine factors that may alter this. The authors' series consists of 100 subphrenic abscesses that were drained percutaneously. Patients range in age from 14 to 75 years. Abscesses were secondary to surgery (splenectomy, pancreatectomy, partial hepatectomy, gastrectomy), pancreatitis, and trauma. Catheters ranged in size from 8 to 14 F and were inserted via trocar or Seldinger technique. Thoracic complications of pneumothorax or empyema were determined from follow-up chest radiographs or CT scans

  14. Percutaneous biliary drainage in acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Lyul; Cho, June Sik; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Sang Jin; Rhee, Byung Chull

    1993-01-01

    Acute suppurative cholangitis is a severe inflammatory process of the bile duct occurred as result of partial or complete obstruction of the bile duct, and may manifest clinically severe form of disease, rapidly deteriorating to life-threatening condition. We analyzed emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in 20 patients of acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis to evaluate the therapeutic effect and complication of the procedure. The underlying cause were 12 benign disease(stones) and eight malignant tumors and among eight malignant tumors, bile duct stones(n=4) and clonorchiasis(n=1) were combined. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed successfully in 17 of 20 patients resulting in improvement of general condition and failed in three patients. The procedure were preterminated due to the patient's condition in two and biliary-proto fistula was developed in one. After biliary decompression by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, effective and successful elective surgery was performed in nine cases, which were seven biliary stones and two biliary cancer with stones. Our experience suggest that emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an initial and effective treatment of choice for acute suppurative cholangitis with sepsis and a safe alternative for nonsurgical treatment

  15. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in children: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A. Elderwy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The recurrence of pediatric nephrolithiasis, the morbidity of repeated open surgical treatment as well as our experience in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL in adult patients, all derived us to shift to PNL for managing renal stones >1.5 cm in pediatric patients. Our aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PNL in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: During the period of the month between May 2011 and April 2013, 38 children (47 renal units underwent PNL for renal stones 1.5-5 cm in length. Patient demographics, stone characteristics, and clinical outcome were prospectively studied. Data of those who underwent conventional and tubeless PNL were compared. Median follow-up period was 12 months (range: 6-24. Results: The median age at presentation was 8-year (range: 3-12. The operative time ranged from 30 to 120 min (median 90. Overall stone clearance rate was 91.5% after single PNL. The median hospital stay was 3 days. Auxiliary procedures were successful for the remaining 4 patients (nephroscopic clearance in one and shockwave lithotripsy in 3. Tubeless PNL was performed in 17 renal units with a comparable outcome to conventional ones. The perioperative complications were noted in 5/47 (10.6% of all procedures (Clavien Grade II in 4 and Clavien Grade IIIa in 1 and were managed conservatively. Conclusions: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal stones in pediatric patients is safe and feasible if performed by a well-experienced endourologist. Tubeless PNL is a better choice for children.

  16. Mortality after percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair: a contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortlandt, Friso A; de Beenhouwer, Thomas; Swaans, Martin J; Post, Marco C; van der Heyden, Jan A S; Eefting, Frank D; Rensing, Benno J W M

    2016-04-01

    Percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve (MV) repair is a relatively new treatment option for mitral regurgitation (MR). After the feasibility and safety having been proved in low-surgical-risk patients, the use of this procedure has shifted more to the treatment of high-risk patients. With the absence of randomized controlled trials (RCT) for this particular subgroup, observational studies try to add evidence to the safety aspect of this procedure. These also provide short- and mid-term mortality figures. Several mortality predictors have been identified, which may help the optimal selection of patients who will benefit most from this technique. In this article we provide an overview of the literature about mortality and its predictors in patients treated with the percutaneous edge-to-edge device.

  17. Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy via Griggs Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimpour, Hasan Ali; Vafaii, Kamran; Chalechale, Maryam; Mohammadi, Saeed; Kaviannezhad, Rasool

    2017-01-01

    Tracheostomy is considered the airway management of choice for patients who need prolonged mechanical ventilation support. Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheotomy (PDT) is a technique that can be performed easily and rapidly at bedside and is particularly useful in the intensive care setting. The Griggs percutaneous tracheotomy is unique in its utilization of a guide wire dilator forceps. We aimed to describe the early perioperative and late postoperative complications of PDT using the Griggs technique in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This cross-sectional study was conducted on all patients who underwent tracheostomy in the ICU of the Imam Reza Hospital of Kermanshah, Iran, from June 2011 to June 2015. PDT was performed in 184 patients with the Griggs technique. Demographic variables, as well as perioperative and late postoperative complications were recorded. The mean age of patients was 57.3 ± 15.37 years. The most common primary causes of tracheostomy were hypoxic brain damage disorders (43.2%) and pneumonia (14.8%). Perioperative and early complications occurred in 16.7 % of procedures, of which 9.3% were bleedings (minor, significant and major). Furthermore, the incidence of late complications was 8.6%, including: stomal infection, difficult replace tracheostomy tube, tracheoesophageal fistula, tracheal stenosis, and tracheomalacia. PDT via Griggs technique is a safe, quick, and effective method. The low incidence of complications indicates that bedside percutaneous tracheostomy can be performed safely as a routine procedure for daily care implemented in the ICU.

  18. PERCUTANEOUS DRAINAGE : AN EFFECTIVE AND LESS AGRESSIVE APPROACH FOR COMPLICATED DIVERTICULAR ABSCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMADOU LAMINE GUEYE

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneal abscess is a serious complication of diverticular disease. Its management involves several options, ranging from conservative management to surgery. Elective colectomy is most often thought to be mandatory after a percutaneous drainage given the high rate of recidive. However, in patients with high risk for surgery, percutaneous drainage is often the main therapeutic alternative. We report a case of a 80-year-old woman, who was diagnosed to have a retroperitoneal abscess complicating a sigmoid diverticulitis. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage allowed to drain 1500cc of pus and gas. The cytobacteriological examination was positive for: Streptococcus spp and Alkalescens dispar. The therapeutic outcomes were uneventful and despite we did not realize a colectomy because the patient was at high risk for surgery, there was no recidive after a 2-year-follow-up period. Percutaneous drainage can be a therapeutic alternative in patients with high risk for surgery in diverticular abscess of big size.

  19. Pneumoperitoneum Caused by Air Leakage Through the Percutaneous Puncture Tract as a Complication of Rendezvous Technique: A Case Report

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    Chiao-Hsiung Chuang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The rendezvous technique, combining percutaneous and endoscopic procedures, is a safe and effective method to achieve biliary cannulation if an endoscopic approach fails. The two procedures in this technique can be carried out simultaneously or in stages. A simultaneous approach is reported to be associated with fewer complications, and patients undergoing this approach can recover and be discharged more rapidly. Here, we report a complication of pneumoperitoneum in a patient who underwent percutaneous and endoscopic procedures simultaneously for the removal of a common bile duct stone. It was supposed that prolonged air insufflation during endoscopy forced intestinal air to track into the peritoneal cavity through the bile ducts and the puncture tract. Accordingly, a short wait before removing the percutaneous catheter to deflate the intestinal air will be helpful to avoid such a complication.

  20. Discussion of percutanous nephrostomy technique with prevention and treatment of complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zefu; Liang Huiming; Zheng Chuansheng; Wu Hanpin; Zhou Guofeng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the complications and treatment technique of percutaneous nephrostomy. Methods: 247 hydronephrosis eases treated with percutaneous nephrostomy guided by ultrosound and fluroseopy flora Januray 2007 to April 2008 were evaluated retrospectively and the causes of complications and suitable treatments were analyzed. Results: The successful rate of percutaneous nephrostomy in 247 hydronephrotic cases reached 100%. In all cases, 4 cases occurred with severe complications (1.6%) including 3 massive hemorrhage and 1 septic shock during the operation. The minor complications (25 cases, 10% ) were hematuria, urinary tract infection, local haematoma, perirenal haematoma, detachment of drainage tube with obstruction and exodus, internal double-J catheter displacement and obstruction, etc. Conclusion: The operative safety and treatment efficacy of percutaneous nephrostomy could be achieved through skillful management and comprehensive preoperative evaluation of the risk factors for the complications. (authors)

  1. CT evaluation of local leakage of bone cement after percutaneous kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Jae; Choi, A. Lam; Yie, Mi-Yeon; Yoon, Ji Young; Jeon, Eui Yong; Koh, Sung Hye; Yoon, Dae Young; Lim, Kyung Ja; Im, Hyoung June

    2010-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous injection of bone cement (acrylic cement) during percutaneous kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty can cause symptomatic or asymptomatic complications due to leakage, extravasation or vascular migration of cement. Purpose: To investigate and to compare the incidence and site of local leakage or complications of bone cement after percutaneous kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty using bone cement. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 473 cases of percutaneous kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty performed under fluoroscopic guidance. Of the 473 cases, follow-up CT scans that covered the treated bones were available for 83 cases (59 kyphoplasty and 24 vertebroplasty). Results: The rate of local leakage of bone cement was 87.5% (21/24) for percutaneous vertebroplasty and 49.2% (29/59) for kyphoplasty. The most common site of local leakage was perivertebral soft tissue (n=8, 38.1%) for vertebroplasty. The most common site of local leakage was a perivertebral vein (n=7, 24.1%) for kyphoplasty. Two cases of pulmonary cement embolism developed: one case after kyphoplasty and one case after vertebroplasty. Conclusion: Local leakage of bone cement was more common for percutaneous vertebroplasty compared with kyphoplasty (P<0.005). The most common sites of local leakage were perivertebral soft tissue and perivertebral vein.

  2. Percutaneous absorption of several chemicals, some pesticides included, in the red-winged blackbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J.G.; Cagan, R.H.; Kare, M.R.

    1974-01-01

    Percutaneous absorption in vivo through the skin of the feet of the red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) has been investigated. Absorption after 18-24 hours exposure to 0.01 M solutions of salicylic acid, caffeine, urea, 2,4-D, dieldrin, diethylstilbesterol, and DDT was measured. Of these, only DDT and diethylstilbesterol were not absorbed to a measurable degree. The solvents ethanol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and vegetable oil were compared with water in their effects on the absorption ofcaffeine, urea, and salicylic acid. Ethanol, DMSO,and oil each decreased percutaneous absorption of salicylic acid. DMSO increased absorption of caffeine, and ethanol had no effect on it. Neither DMSO nor ethanol affected penetration of urea. Partition coefficients (K) (epidermis/water) were determined for all seven penetrants. Compounds with higher values of K showed lower percutaneous absorption. These findings suggest that K may be useful to predict percutaneous absorption in vivo. It appears unlikely that percutaneous absorption contributes greatly to the body burden of 2,4-D and dieldrin in A. phoeniceus.

  3. Percutaneous Iliac Screws for Minimally Invasive Spinal Deformity Surgery

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    Michael Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females. Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs.

  4. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of an occluded surgical splenorenal shunt in a 4-year-old child after liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yussim, Ethan; Belenky, Alexander; Atar, Eli [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Rabin Medical Center, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Petah Tikva (Israel); Shapiro, Rivka [Schneider Children' s Medical Center, Institute of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Petah Tikva (Israel); Mor, Eytan [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Organ Transplantation, Petah Tikva (Israel)

    2005-07-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is increasingly used in children. We present a case of successful balloon angioplasty of an occluded surgical splenorenal shunt in a 4-year-old child who underwent liver transplantation because of biliary atresia. Percutaneous reopening of the shunt is a relatively safe procedure that may spare patients of surgical intervention. (orig.)

  5. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of an occluded surgical splenorenal shunt in a 4-year-old child after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussim, Ethan; Belenky, Alexander; Atar, Eli; Shapiro, Rivka; Mor, Eytan

    2005-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is increasingly used in children. We present a case of successful balloon angioplasty of an occluded surgical splenorenal shunt in a 4-year-old child who underwent liver transplantation because of biliary atresia. Percutaneous reopening of the shunt is a relatively safe procedure that may spare patients of surgical intervention. (orig.)

  6. Percutaneous liver biopsy and revised coagulation guidelines: a 9-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchin, Douglas R; Del Rio, Alejandro Munoz; Woods, Michael; Ludeman, Lucas; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2017-09-19

    To retrospectively review revised pre-procedural coagulation guidelines for percutaneous liver biopsy to determine whether their implementation is associated with increased hemorrhagic complications on a departmental scale. Secondary endpoints were to determine the effect of this change on pre-procedural blood product (FFP and platelet) utilization, to evaluate the impact of administered blood products on hemorrhagic complications, and to determine whether bleeding complications were related to INR and platelet levels. This IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant, retrospective study reviewed 1846 percutaneous liver biopsies in 1740 patients, comparing biopsies performed, while SIR consensus pre-procedural coagulation guidelines were in place (INR ≤ 1.5, platelets ≥50,000 µL) to those performed after departmental implementation of revised, less stringent guidelines (INR ≤ 2.0, platelets ≥25,000 µL). On a departmental scale, there were significantly fewer hemorrhagic complications in the population of patients treated after adoption of less stringent guidelines as compared to those treated under the SIR guidelines (1.6% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.0192) despite a significant decrease in pre-procedural FFP (0.8% vs. 3.9%, p guidelines for percutaneous liver biopsy (INR ≤ 2.0, platelets ≥25,000 µL) did not result in an increase in departmental hemorrhagic complication rates but did significantly decrease pre-procedural FFP/platelet administration. An individual patient's bleeding risk does increase as INR increases and platelets decrease, but pre-procedural FFP and/or platelet transfusion did not mitigate that increased risk.

  7. CT-guided percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazoyer, J.F.; Kohler, R.; Bossard, D.

    1990-01-01

    The authors of this paper report seven cases of percutaneous destruction of osteoid osteoma. All patients complained of typical pain lasting for several months. In each case, finding of plain radiography, bone scintigraphy, and CT were strongly suggestive of an osteoid osteoma. All the lesions were located on the lower limb (five femoral and two tibial). Under general anesthesia, the nidus was drilled through a trocar inserted percutaneously with CT guidance. Patients were discharged 1-3 days after the procedure with no residual pain, and they are still asymptomatic 18-33 months later, with normal scintigraphic and CT studies. Histologic confirmation was allowed by technical improvement of the method in the last four cases

  8. Successful percutaneous management of Lutembacher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Goel

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: Percutaneous management of the Lutembacher syndrome (PTMC and ASD device closure is an effective and low risk procedure and avoids considerable morbidity and mental trauma for the patients.

  9. Percutaneous implantation of endoprostheses in the carotid arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Jr. José Ribamar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the in-hospital evolution of patients undergoing percutaneous stent placement in the carotid arteries. METHODS: From August 1996 to April 2001, we studied 86 patients with carotid arterial obliterative lesions > 70% who were treated with percutaneous stent placement in the carotid arteries. We assessed the rate of success of the implantation and of the procedure, the types of stents used, mortality rate, and neurological complications. RESULTS: Successful implantation was obtained in 98.9% of the cases, and the procedure was successful in 91.8%. The Wallstent was the most frequently used stent (73 patients - 77%. Cerebral strokes occurred as follows: 3 (3.2% transient ischemic attacks, 1 (1.1% minor stroke, and 3 (3.1% major strokes. One (1.1% patient died during hospitalization. CONCLUSION: The high rate of success of stent implantation (98.9% in addition to the low rate of cerebral stroke/death (4.2% showed the efficiency and safety of percutaneous stent placement in carotid arteries.

  10. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy following total artificial heart implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliopoulos, Sotirios; Dimitriou, Alexandros Merkourios; Serrano, Maria Rosario; Guersoy, Dilek; Autschbach, Ruediger; Goetzenich, Andreas; Koerfer, Reiner; Tenderich, Gero

    2015-07-01

    Coagulation disorders and an immune-altered state are common among total artificial heart patients. In this context, we sought to evaluate the safety of percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy in cases of prolonged need for mechanical ventilatory support. We retrospectively analysed the charts of 11 total artificial heart patients who received percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy. We focused on early and late complications. We observed no major complications and no procedure-related deaths. Early minor complications included venous oozing (45.4%) and one case of local infection. Late complications, including subglottic stenosis, stomal infection or infections of the lower respiratory tract, were not observed. In conclusion, percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy in total artificial heart patients is safe. Considering the well-known benefits of early tracheotomy over prolonged translaryngeal intubation, we advocate early timing of therapy in cases of prolonged mechanical ventilation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  11. Percutaneous Treatment of a Primary Pancreatic Hydatid Cyst Using a Catheterization Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaman, Bulent; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ugurel, Sahin

    2012-01-01

    Primary pancreatic hydatid cysts are rare and its percutaneous treatment and catheterization technique has, to the best of our knowledge, not been published in literature. A 33-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain was evaluated by ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography examinations. Both examinations revealed a cyst in the neck of the pancreas. After the administration of albendazole chemoprophylaxis, the patient underwent diagnostic puncture showing high pressure spring water which harbored the scoleces and was treated percutaneously by the catheterization technique. In this technique, first the cyst was punctured, the fluid content aspirated, the radiocontrast material injected to see possible fistulisation, and then re-aspirated. The 20% hypertonic saline solution was injected and re-aspiration was performed to the best of our abilities, followed by the insertion of a catheter for drainage of the remaining non-aspiratable fluid content. At follow-up examination, the cyst was not visible on US after 6 months. There was no evidence of cyst recurrence or dissemination after 18 months at serologic and imaging follow-up.

  12. Percutaneous Treatment of a Primary Pancreatic Hydatid Cyst Using a Catheterization Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Bulent; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ugurel, Sahin [Gulhane Military Medical School, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2012-03-15

    Primary pancreatic hydatid cysts are rare and its percutaneous treatment and catheterization technique has, to the best of our knowledge, not been published in literature. A 33-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain was evaluated by ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography examinations. Both examinations revealed a cyst in the neck of the pancreas. After the administration of albendazole chemoprophylaxis, the patient underwent diagnostic puncture showing high pressure spring water which harbored the scoleces and was treated percutaneously by the catheterization technique. In this technique, first the cyst was punctured, the fluid content aspirated, the radiocontrast material injected to see possible fistulisation, and then re-aspirated. The 20% hypertonic saline solution was injected and re-aspiration was performed to the best of our abilities, followed by the insertion of a catheter for drainage of the remaining non-aspiratable fluid content. At follow-up examination, the cyst was not visible on US after 6 months. There was no evidence of cyst recurrence or dissemination after 18 months at serologic and imaging follow-up.

  13. Antegrade jj stenting after percutaneous renal procedures: The ‘pull and push’ technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkal, Jaideep M.; Sharma, Elias

    2014-01-01

    A JJ stent is inserted antegradely after percutaneous renal procedures like percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal calculus disease, and for endopyelotomy for pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction. We describe a technique for antegrade stent insertion after PCNL. PMID:26413327

  14. Percutaneous evacuation for treatment of subdural hematoma and outcome in 28 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofi, Keyvan; Marnet, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is a frequently encountered entity in neurosurgery in particular in elderly patients. There in a high variance in the treatment in literature. We report our experience of percutaneous evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma in 28 patients. From January 2007 to July 2009, 28 patients underwent percutaneous evacuation. 27 of the 28 patients (96.4%) became asymptomatic or improved clinically. Six weeks later, the scan showed the hematoma had completely disappeared in 18 of the cases. We did not have any postoperative infection. Treatment of chronic subdural hematoma using a percutaneous operative technique is a minimally invasive method with sufficient outcome and a therapeutic alternative to the craniotomy.

  15. Stroke from Delayed Embolization of Polymerized Glue Following Percutaneous Direct Injection of a Carotid Body Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, Thamburaj; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Rajan, Jayadevan E; Thomas, Bejoy [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, (India)

    2007-06-15

    Direct percutaneous embolization of hypervascular tumors results in more effective preoperative devascularization. Migration of glue is a well known complication of direct glue injection and it may lead to stroke or cranial nerve deficits. We report here on a case of carotid body tumor in a 52-year-old man; the tumor was mainly embolized by percutaneous injection of 50% glue and this was supported with balloon protection of the internal carotid artery. Thirteen hours later, he developed hemiparesis from delayed migration of glue. The possible mechanisms of this migration are discussed and preventive measures are suggested. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular tumors of the head and neck, including carotid body tumor, is often performed to decrease the amount of blood loss during surgery. Devascularization is mainly performed with particulate agents and by employing the transarterial route. More effective embolization may be achieved by performing percutaneous direct embolization of hypervascular tumors with liquid embolic agents. Even though there are few reports available on direct embolization, complications from glue migration have been reported, and this mainly happens during the procedure when the glue is in a liquid state. We report here on a case of delayed migration of polymerized glue (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate [NBCA]), many hours after the procedure, into the intracranial circulation and the final result was stroke. A 52-year-old male with right carotid body tumor underwent direct percutaneous glue (n-butylcyanoacrylate [NBCA]) embolization. Several hours later, he developed left hemiparesis from embolization of the polymerized glue cast. Migration of glue during percutaneous tumor embolization is presumed to occur only in the liquid state, which may lead to stroke or cranial nerve deficits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of delayed glue embolization from a treated hypervascular tumor of the head and neck.

  16. Percutaneous Facet Screw Fixation in the Treatment of Symptomatic Recurrent Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst: A New Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr; Gallo, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.gallo83@gmail.com; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie, E-mail: asbertrand3@hotmail.com [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice (France); Bard, Robert L., E-mail: rbard@cancerscan.com [New York Medical College (United States); Kelekis, Alexis, E-mail: akelekis@med.uoa.gr [University General Hospital “ATTIKON” (Greece)

    2016-01-15

    We present a case of percutaneous treatment of symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst resistant to all medical treatments including facet joint steroid injection. Percutaneous transfacet fixation was then performed at L4–L5 level with a cannulated screw using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 9.5, preoperatively, to 0 after the procedure. At 6-month follow-up, an asymptomatic cystic recurrence was observed, which further reduced at the 1-year follow-up. Pain remained stable (VAS at 0) during all follow-ups. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous cyst rupture associated with facet screw fixation could be an alternative to surgery in patients suffering from a symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst.

  17. Safety and Effectiveness of Percutaneously Inserted Peritoneal Ports Compared to Surgically Inserted Ports in a Retrospective Study of 87 Patients with Ovarian Carcinoma over a 10-Year Period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodley-Cook, Joel; Tarulli, Emidio; Tan, Kong T.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.; Simons, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    PurposePlacement of peritoneal ports has become a favorable technique for direct chemotherapy infusion in treating peritoneal metastases from ovarian cancer. We aim to outline an approach to the percutaneous insertion of peritoneal ports and to characterize success and complication rates compared to surgically inserted ports.Materials and MethodsRetrospective analysis was collected from 87 patients who had peritoneal port insertion (28 inserted surgically and 59 percutaneously) for treatment of peritoneal metastases from ovarian cancer from July 2004 to July 2014. Complications were classified according to the SIR Clinical Practice Guidelines as major or minor.ResultsTechnical success rates for surgically and percutaneously inserted ports were 100 and 96.7 %, respectively (p = 0.44), with the two percutaneous failures successful at a later date. There were no major complications in either group. Minor complication rates for surgically versus percutaneously inserted ports were 46.4 versus 22.0 %, respectively (p = 0.02). The infection rate for surgically inserted versus percutaneously inserted ports was 14.3 and 0 %, respectively (p = 0.002). The relative risk of developing a complication from percutaneous peritoneal port insertion without ascites was 3.4 (p = 0.04). For percutaneously inserted ports, the mean in-room procedure time was 81 ± 1.3 min and mean fluoroscopy time was 5.0 ± 4.5 min.ConclusionPercutaneously inserted peritoneal ports are a safe alternative to surgically inserted ports, demonstrating similar technical success and lower complication rates.

  18. Safety and Effectiveness of Percutaneously Inserted Peritoneal Ports Compared to Surgically Inserted Ports in a Retrospective Study of 87 Patients with Ovarian Carcinoma over a 10-Year Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodley-Cook, Joel, E-mail: jwoodleycook@gmail.com [The Scarborough Hospital, Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Canada); Tarulli, Emidio; Tan, Kong T.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.; Simons, Martin E. [University of Toronto, Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    PurposePlacement of peritoneal ports has become a favorable technique for direct chemotherapy infusion in treating peritoneal metastases from ovarian cancer. We aim to outline an approach to the percutaneous insertion of peritoneal ports and to characterize success and complication rates compared to surgically inserted ports.Materials and MethodsRetrospective analysis was collected from 87 patients who had peritoneal port insertion (28 inserted surgically and 59 percutaneously) for treatment of peritoneal metastases from ovarian cancer from July 2004 to July 2014. Complications were classified according to the SIR Clinical Practice Guidelines as major or minor.ResultsTechnical success rates for surgically and percutaneously inserted ports were 100 and 96.7 %, respectively (p = 0.44), with the two percutaneous failures successful at a later date. There were no major complications in either group. Minor complication rates for surgically versus percutaneously inserted ports were 46.4 versus 22.0 %, respectively (p = 0.02). The infection rate for surgically inserted versus percutaneously inserted ports was 14.3 and 0 %, respectively (p = 0.002). The relative risk of developing a complication from percutaneous peritoneal port insertion without ascites was 3.4 (p = 0.04). For percutaneously inserted ports, the mean in-room procedure time was 81 ± 1.3 min and mean fluoroscopy time was 5.0 ± 4.5 min.ConclusionPercutaneously inserted peritoneal ports are a safe alternative to surgically inserted ports, demonstrating similar technical success and lower complication rates.

  19. Comparison of percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty for the management of Kümmell's disease: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Quan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post traumatic osteonecrosis of a vertebral body occurring in a delayed fashion was first described by the German doctor Kümmell in 1895. Several studies have reported percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP, or percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP for Kümmell's disease achieves good outcomes. However, it is unknown whether a technique is superior for the treatment of this disease. The objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of PVP and PKP for the treatment of Kümmell's disease. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was conducted for 73 patients with Kümmell's disease. PVP was performed in 38 patients and PKP in 35 patients. Visual analogue score (VAS was used to evaluate pain. The anterior vertebral height was measured. The operative time, the incidence of cement leakage and the costs were recorded. Results: In both PVP group and PKP group, the VAS and anterior vertebral height significantly improved at 1-day postoperatively (P 0.05. Between the PVP and PKP groups, there were no significant differences in VAS and the anterior vertebral height at 1-day postoperatively and at the final followup (P > 0.05. The operating time and expense in the PKP group were higher than the PVP group (P < 0.001. Cement leakages in the PKP group were fewer than PVP group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: PVP is a faster, less expensive option that still provides a comparable pain relief and restoration of vertebral height to PKP for the treatment of Kümmell's disease. PKP has a significant advantage over PVP in term of the fewer cement leakages.

  20. Percutaneous occlusion of vascular malformations in pediatric and adult patients: 20-year experience of a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-da-Silva, Tiago; Martins, José Diogo; de Sousa, Lídia; Fiarresga, António; Trigo Pereira, Conceição; Cruz Ferreira, Rui; Ferreira Pinto, Fátima

    2016-02-01

    A case series on different vascular malformations (VM) treated with percutaneous occlusion in children and adults is presented. Percutaneous occlusion is usually the preferred treatment method for VM. Previous series have mostly focused on single types of devices and/or VM. Retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent percutaneous occlusion of VM in a single center, from 1995 to 2014, excluding patent ductus arteriosus. Clinical and angiographic data, procedural details, implanted devices, and complications were assessed. Procedural success was defined as effective device deployment with none or minimal residual flow. Predictors of procedural failure and complications were determined by multivariate analysis. A total of 123 VM were intervened in 47 patients with median age of 12 years (25 days-76 years). The VM included 55 pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae, 39 aortopulmonary collaterals, 10 systemic venovenous collaterals, 8 peripheral arteriovenous fistulae, 5 Blalock-Taussig shunts, 4 coronary fistulae, and 2 Fontan fenestrations. The 143 devices used included 80 vascular plugs, 38 coils, 22 duct occluders, and 3 foramen ovale or atrial septal defect occluders. Median vessel size was 4.5 (2.0-16.0) mm and device/vessel size ratio was 1.4 (1.1-2.0). Successful occlusion was achieved in 118 (95.9%) VM, including three reinterventions. Four (3.3%) clinically relevant complications occurred, without permanent sequelae. Lower body weight was independently associated with procedural failure and complications. To our knowledge, this is the largest series on different VM occluded percutaneously in children and adults, excluding patent ductus arteriosus. Percutaneous occlusion was effective and safe, using different devices. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous bone drilling for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sang Ho; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Bo Ra

    2018-01-01

    To determine the clinical efficacy of sonographically-guided percutaneous bone drilling of the lateral epicondyle (LE) for the treatment of patients with LE. We included 24 patients with LE who reported pain in this study. All patients underwent sonographically-guided percutaneous bone drilling of the lateral epicondyle. Follow-up sonography and physical examinations were performed 1, 3 and 6 months after the procedure. The outcome measures included sonographic findings, visual analogue scale (VAS) score, maximum voluntary grip strength (MVGS) and patient-related tennis elbow evaluation (PRTEE) score. None of the patients had immediate complications during the procedure. The area of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tears decreased significantly at 1 month and declined gradually over the remaining 5 months of the study (p LE that can be performed in an outpatient setting. • Percutaneous drilling of the lateral condyle is effective for the treatment of LE. • The area of ECRB tears can be measured by US-guided saline injection. • US-guided percutaneous drilling is a quick and safe treatment option for LE.

  2. Percutaneous artherial embolization in the treatment of liver trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, G.S.; Uflacker, R.

    1989-01-01

    Percutaneous arterial embolization in the treatment of liver trauma. Liver trauma requires emergency therapy. Because it is highly vascular and because of its location, the hemostasis is difficult to achieve. The main causes of death associated to liver trauma are due to prolonged hipovolemia. The current forms of surgical treatment of liver wounds are associated with a high morbidity rate. In some hepatic injuries, hemorrage is so massive that operative control of bleeding is necessary, bu t in most cases, particularly in blunt trauma, an angiographic approach with diagnosis and embolotherapy is preferable. Six patients with blunt or perforating hepatic trauma were managed with percutaneous arterial embolization. Hemostasis was achieved immediately in all of them withoyt recurrence. Surgical intervention with additional trauma was thus avoided, decreasing the morbidity rate. The percutaneous arterial embolization presents an efficient alternative in the management of hemorrage due to liver trauma, being particularly useful in the poor risk patient. (author) [pt

  3. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage: Experiences in 146 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jai Keun [Sohwa Children' s Hospital, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ki Whang; Chung, Soo Yoon; Jeong, Mi Gyoung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Deuk Lin; Kwon, Gui Hyang; Lee, Hae Kyung [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    Percutaneous biliary drainage is an important technique for palliative therapy of obstructive biliary disease and diagnostic information. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the experiences of ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed on 146 occasions in 134 patients. The causes of biliary obstruction were: benign diseases (19 cases, 14.2%) such as bile duct stones or stricture, cholangiocarcinoma (37 cases, 27.6%), pancreatic carcinoma (35 cases, 26.1%), metastasis (22 cases, 16.5%), gall bladder cancer (14 cases, 10.4%), ampulla of Vater cancer (4 cases, 3.0%), hepatocellular carcinoma (3 cases, 2.2%). Retrospectively reviewing medical records, we found out frequency of external or external/internal biliary drainages, puncture of left or right hepatic duct, and presence of bileinfection. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was compared with conventional biliary drainage of previous reports on the basis of frequency of complications. External (124 procedures, 84.9%) and external/internal biliary drainage (22 procedures, 15.1%) were carried out by puncture of dilated right (59.6%) or left (40.4%) intrahepatic duct. Sixty-nine complications occurred in 47 patients. Catheter related complications (33/69, 47.8%) were most common: catheter dislodgement (17/69, 24.6%), malfunction (9/69, 13.1%), leakage (7/69, 10.1%). Other minor complications such as simple fever (16/69, 23.2%), cholangitis (7/69, 10.1%), hemobilia (4/69, 5.8%), biloma (2/69, 2.9%) and wound infection (1/69, 1.5%) occurred. Major complications including sepsis (4/69, 5.8%) and bile peritonitis (2/69, 2.9%) were also noted. Puncture-related complications such as hemobilia, biloma and bile peritonitis occurred in 8 cases (5.5%). Comparing with conventional X-ray guided drainage, ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a safe procedure for

  4. Gastrostomy versus nasogastric tube feeding for chemoradiation patients with head and neck cancer: the TUBE pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleri, Vinidh; Patterson, Joanne; Rousseau, Nikki; Moloney, Eoin; Craig, Dawn; Tzelis, Dimitrios; Wilkinson, Nina; Franks, Jeremy; Hynes, Ann Marie; Heaven, Ben; Hamilton, David; Guerrero-Urbano, Teresa; Donnelly, Rachael; Barclay, Stewart; Rapley, Tim; Stocken, Deborah

    2018-04-01

    Approximately 9000 new cases of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs) are treated by the NHS each year. Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is a commonly used treatment for advanced HNSCC. Approximately 90% of patients undergoing CRT require nutritional support via gastrostomy or nasogastric tube feeding. Long-term dysphagia following CRT is a primary concern for patients. The effect of enteral feeding routes on swallowing function is not well understood, and the two feeding methods have, to date (at the time of writing), not been compared. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) was to compare these two options. This was a mixed-methods multicentre study to establish the feasibility of a RCT comparing oral feeding plus pre-treatment gastrostomy with oral feeding plus as-required nasogastric tube feeding in patients with HNSCC. Patients were recruited from four tertiary centres treating cancer and randomised to the two arms of the study (using a 1 : 1 ratio). The eligibility criteria were patients with advanced-staged HNSCC who were suitable for primary CRT with curative intent and who presented with no swallowing problems. The primary outcome was the willingness to be randomised. A qualitative process evaluation was conducted alongside an economic modelling exercise. The criteria for progression to a Phase III trial were based on a hypothesised recruitment rate of at least 50%, collection of outcome measures in at least 80% of those recruited and an economic value-of-information analysis for cost-effectiveness. Of the 75 patients approached about the trial, only 17 consented to be randomised [0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.13 to 0.32]. Among those who were randomised, the compliance rate was high (0.94, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.05). Retention rates were high at completion of treatment (0.94, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.05), at the 3-month follow-up (0.88, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.04) and at the 6-month follow-up (0.88, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.04). No serious adverse

  5. Performance of a New Blunt-Tip Coaxial Needle for Percutaneous Biopsy and Drainage of "Hard-To-Reach" Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Garnon, Julien; Shaygi, Behnam; Caudrelier, Jean; Bauones, Salem; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Koch, Guillaume; Gangi, Afshin

    2017-09-01

    To present a new blunt-tip coaxial needle (SoftGuard) applied to access "hard-to-reach" targets undergoing percutaneous image-guided biopsy or drainage. All consecutive patients presenting between August and December 2016 with "hard-to-reach" (blunt-tip needle is a safe and effective tool when applied as a coaxial working cannula for percutaneous biopsy or drainage of "hard-to-reach" targets.

  6. Ruptured Splenic Abscess following Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in a 40-Year-Old Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rajasekharan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of splenic abscesses is currently 0.14–0.7% with a reported mortality of 0–47%. The diagnosis of splenic abscess which has ruptured into the abdomen is often overlooked because of its rarity and its misleading clinical presentations. Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs and coronary stenting procedures increased from 184,000 to 885,000 (from 335 to 1,550 and from 3,000 to 770,000 (from 5 to 1,350 per one million inhabitants, respectively. A 40-year-old Asian male presented to our emergency department with upper abdominal pain 5 days after a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Clinical examination raised the possibilities of acute pancreatitis and intraabdominal sepsis. An initial ultrasound of the abdomen and blood tests were negative. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a splenic abscess that had ruptured into the abdomen. Pus culture revealed a multidrug-resistant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae that was sensitive to meropenem. The patient recovered quickly after open surgical drainage and antibiotic therapy. As this is the second case of splenic abscess and the first case report of a ruptured splenic abscess following a PCI, it will be rational to administer a short course of antibiotic prophylaxis for high-risk immunocompromised patients who are undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention.

  7. Osteoid osteoma: percutaneous treatment with CT guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velan, Osvaldo; Ayzaguer, Alejandro H.; Endara Bustos, Olinda; Lambertini, Roberto G.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign bone tumor characterized by causing severe and constant pain at night, and for that reason it requires a surgical excision. Although for years the treatment of choice has been surgery, the development of CT-guided percutaneous procedures, such as percutaneous resection with trephine (PR), and more recently the radiofrequency ablation (RF), it is possible to remove the core of the lesion and therefore relieve the symptoms in a considerably less invasive way. Material and methods: Between January 1990 and February 2004, 65 lesions in 60 patients with a presumptive diagnosis of osteoid osteoma were treated. 49 PRs and 16 RFs were performed. Of the 49 PRs, 5 required curettage and one required an ethanol injection. The procedures were guided by CT imaging under general or spinal anesthesia with 24 hr hospitalization. Tumor samples were taken for anatomical pathology analysis (AP). The absence of symptoms and late complications was verified 30 days after the procedure. Results: All lesions were accessed successfully. In 5 of them it was necessary to broaden the resection due to a possible insufficient margin. In 38 of the 65 lesions (58,5%) AP confirmed the OO diagnosis; in 6/65 (9.2%) of them AP found other specific lesions, such as enostoma (n=2), bone cyst (n=1), inclusion cyst (n=1), chondroma (n=1), and chronic osteitis (n=1), and in the rest of the cases the findings were unspecified. All patients (60/60) showed no pain within 24-48 hours of the procedure, and 5/60 (8,3%) received further treatment due to recurring symptoms. Conclusion: The percutaneous procedure has shown to be an effective technique for the treatment of OO. Compared to surgical excision, the percutaneous technique is less invasive, it requires less anesthesia and hospitalization time, and it allows an earlier return to active life. The PR is less expensive than the RF, but it requires a wider bone incision. However, both techniques are equally

  8. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jung Suk; Lee, Hae Giu; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6–20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6–38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5–14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10–58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites

  9. Graft Loss Due to Percutaneous Sclerotherapy of a Lymphocele Using Acetic Acid After Renal Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adani, Gian Luigi; Baccarani, Umberto; Bresadola, Vittorio; Lorenzin, Dario; Montanaro, Domenico; Risaliti, Andrea; Terrosu, Giovanni; Sponza, Massimo; Bresadola, Fabrizio

    2005-01-01

    Development of lymphoceles after renal transplantation is a well-described complication that occurs in up to 40% of recipients. The gold standard approach for the treatment of symptomatic cases is not well defined yet. Management options include simple aspiration, marsupialization by a laparotomy or laparoscopy, and percutaneous sclerotherapy using different chemical agents. Those approaches can be associated, and they depend on type, dimension, and localization of the lymphocele. Percutaneous sclerotherapy is considered to be less invasive than the surgical approach; it can be used safely and effectively, with low morbidity, in huge, rapidly accumulating lymphoceles. Moreover, this approach is highly successful, and the complication rate is acceptable; the major drawback is a recurrence rate close to 20%. We herewith report a renal transplant case in which the patient developed a symptomatic lymphocele that was initially treated by ultrasound-guided percutaneous sclerotherapy with ethanol and thereafter using acetic acid for early recurrence. A few hours after injection of acetic acid in the lymphatic cavity, the patient started to complain of acute pain localized to the renal graft and fever. An ultrasound of the abdomen revealed thrombosis of the renal vein and artery. The patient was immediately taken to the operating room, where the diagnosis of vascular thrombosis was confirmed and the graft was urgently explanted. In conclusion, we strongly suggest avoiding the use of acetic acid as a slerosating agent for the percutaneous treatment of post-renal transplant lymphocele because, based on our experience, it could be complicated by vascular thrombosis of the kidney, ending in graft loss

  10. [Study on pulmonary lesions in which nontuberculous mycobacteria were detected by percutaneous aspiration--a proposal to add "culture positivity of percutaneous aspiration material" to the bacteriological diagnostic criteria of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Yasuharu; Mochizuki, Yoshiro; Kawamura, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Shin; Morimoto, Akie; Mizumori, Yasuyuki; Tsukamoto, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Etsuko; Yokoyama, Toshihide

    2013-03-01

    Culture positivity of percutaneous aspiration material" is not included in the current bacteriological criteria for diagnosis of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) diseases, which were published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)/American Thoracic Society (ATS) in 2007 or those released by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis in 2008. However, percutaneous aspiration is a reliable technique for the detection of causative microorganisms isolated from the focus of infection. We discuss the benefits of including positive culture of percutaneous aspiration material in the bacteriological diagnostic criteria of pulmonary NTM diseases. We reviewed the radiological images and clinical courses of pulmonary diseases in which NTM cultures were obtained from percutaneously aspirated materials at our hospital from 1991 to 2011. Aspiration was carried out under local anesthesia, usually with fluoroscopic guidance. After percutaneous insertion of a 22-gauge needle attached to a 20-mL syringe containing about 3 mL of saline, the lesion specimen was withdrawn together with the saline. After the needle was pulled out, the aspirated material and saline were transferred to test tubes for cytological and microbiological examinations. In patients with thin-walled cavitary lesions, saline was injected into the cavity and then aspirated. Percutaneous aspiration was performed in 2,742 patients and NTM disease was detected in 51 patients. Of these 51 patients, 12 had solitary nodular lesions, and in many of these patients, no NTM bacilli could be detected in the sputa or bronchial washing specimens. Mycobacterium avium was identified in 10 of the 12 cases. Four of these 10 patients were followed up after their diagnosis without any treatment: 3 showed spontaneous reduction in lesion size, while 1 patient's condition remained unchanged. Four of the remaining 6 cases were treated with anti-NTM medications, and lesion size reduced in 2 cases, while no change or

  11. Placement of a Colonic Stent by Percutaneous Colostomy in a Case of Malignant Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Herrero, Helena; Paul Diaz, Laura; Pinto Pabon, Isabel; Lobato Fernandez, Rosa

    2001-01-01

    We present a patient with disseminated stomach cancer who presented with symptoms of acute obstruction of the splenic flexure of the colon caused by tumor spread. During a first attempt to insert a colon stent through the anus under endoscopic guidance as final palliative therapy, it was not possible to reach the region of the stricture, and iatrogenic perforation of the descending colon occurred, which resolved favorably under conservative management. A second attempt to insert a stent was made via percutaneous puncture of the transverse colon, approaching the region of the stricture by a descending route. The procedure was completed without complications and the patient's symptoms improved. Stent placement via percutaneous puncture of the colon has not previously been described in the literature. It may be an alternate route in cases of proximal strictures in which access through the anus has been unsuccessful even with the aid of endoscopic guidance

  12. Arterial Complications of Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Hermine, Claude; Ernst, Olivier; Delemazure, Olivier; Sergent, Geraldine

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the frequency and treatment of arterial complications due to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD).Materials: Lesions of the intrahepatic artery were encountered in 10 of 525 patients treated by PTBD (2%). Hemobilia followed in 9 patients and subcapsular hematoma in 1. Seven patients had a benign biliary stenosis and 3 had a malignant stenosis.Results: The bleeding resolved spontaneously in 3 patients. In 7 it required arterial embolization, which was successfully achieved either through the percutaneous catheter (n= 3) or by arteriography (n= 4).Conclusion: Arterial bleeding is a relatively rare complication of PTBD that can easily be treated by selective arterial embolization when it does not resolve spontaneously. In this series its frequency was much higher (16%) when the stenosis was benign than when it was malignant (0.6%)

  13. Successful treatment of tumor-induced osteomalacia with CT-guided percutaneous ethanol and cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, Sean; Olson, Erik; King, David; Shaker, Joseph L

    2012-10-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia is a rare condition usually caused by benign mesenchymal tumors. When the tumor can be found, patients are usually managed by wide excision of the tumor. We report a 51-yr-old male with clinical and biochemical evidence of tumor-induced osteomalacia caused by a mesenchymal tumor in the right iliac bone. He declined surgery and appears to have been successfully managed by computed tomography-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation and percutaneous cryoablation. Our patient appears to have had an excellent clinical and biochemical response to computed tomography-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation and percutaneous cryoablation. We found one prior case of image-guided ablation using radiofrequency ablation for tumor-induced osteomalacia. Although the standard treatment for tumor-induced osteomalacia is wide excision of the tumor, image-guided ablation may be an option in patients who cannot have appropriate surgery or who decline surgery.

  14. Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomy: Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstructive uropathy is a common problem in urologic practice; temporary relief of obstruction in the upper tract poses a significant challenge. Ultrasound‑guided percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) is an option for upper tract drainage; compared to fluoroscopic guidance, it is readily available, affordable, and not ...

  15. Understanding of percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound in treating peritoneal and perinephritic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Liying; Wang Jiagang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound in treating peritoneal abscess. Methods: To summarize 68 patients with peritoneal abscess underwent percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound to analyse the method of operation and therapeutic effect. Results: effective power of percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound in treating peritoneal abscess was 96.8%. Conclusion: Percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound in treating peritoneal abscess may avoid injury induced by blinded puncture, with characteristic of easier operation, slighter trauma. higher safety, significant therapeutic effect, and can be spreaded to the clinical application. (authors)

  16. Synchronous gastric and duodenal metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a unique presentation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarangelo, Nicholas P; Kistler, C Andrew; Daitch, Zachary; Jiang, Wei; Quirk, Daniel M

    2018-01-01

    Metastatic disease to the stomach or duodenum is an infrequent diagnosis, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the least common primary malignancies that lead to gastric or duodenal metastases. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus infection and previously diagnosed HNSCC who presented with melena. The patient had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placed 3 months prior to his presentation. Laboratory testing was significant for normocytic anemia and a digital rectal examination was positive for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed numerous cratered nodules with contact bleeding in the stomach as well as the duodenum that appeared malignant. Biopsies of the gastric and duodenal nodules were positive for p40 and CK 5/6, consistent with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma.

  17. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation and percutaneous treatment of hepatic and renal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meloni, Maria Franca; Smolock, Amanda; Cantisani, Vito; Bezzi, Mario; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando; Proiti, Maria; Lee, Fred; Aiani, Luca; Calliada, Fabrizio; Ferraioli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Image-guided percutaneous ablation techniques are increasingly being used for the treatment of malignant tumors of the liver and kidney when surgery is not indicated. • Percutaneous ablation relies on imaging at every step of the process in order to detect, guide, and confirm complete tumor coagulation. • CEUS is a real-time dynamic imaging technique that plays an important role in the management of patients treated with ablation for malignant tumors. • This review focuses on the role of CEUS in the evaluation of patients undergoing percutaneous treatments for hepatic and renal tumors. - Abstract: Image-guided percutaneous ablation techniques are increasingly being used for the treatment of malignant tumors of the liver and kidney. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a real-time dynamic imaging technique that plays an important role in the pre-, intra-, and post-procedural management of these patients. This review will focus on the role of CEUS in the evaluation of patients undergoing treatment with percutaneous ablation for hepatic or renal tumors

  18. Standards of Practice: Quality Assurance Guidelines for Percutaneous Treatments of Intervertebral Discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelekis, Alexis D.; Filippiadis, Dimitris K.; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Brountzos, Elias

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous treatments are used in the therapy of small- to medium-sized hernias of intervertebral discs to reduce the intradiscal pressure in the nucleus and theoretically create space for the herniated fragment to implode inward, thus reducing pain and improving mobility and quality of life. These techniques involve the percutaneous removal of the nucleus pulposus by using a variety of chemical, thermal, or mechanical techniques and consist of removal of all or part of nucleus pulposus to induce more rapid healing of the abnormal lumbar disc. These guidelines are written to be used in quality improvement programs for assessing fluoroscopy- and/or computed tomography-guided percutaneous intervertebral disc ablative techniques.

  19. Percutaneous fetoscopic closure of large open spina bifida using a bilaminar skin substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa Pedreira, Denise A; Acacio, Gregório L; Gonçalves, Rodrigo T; Sá, Renato Augusto M; Brandt, Reynaldo A; Chmait, Ramen; Kontopoulos, Eftichia; Quintero, Ruben A

    2018-01-04

    We have previously described our percutaneous fetoscopic technique for the treatment of open spina bifida (OSB). However, approximately 20-30% of OSB defects are too large to allow primary skin closure. We hereby describe a modification of our standard technique using a bilaminar skin substitute to allow closure of such large spinal defects. The aim of this study was to report our clinical experience with the use of a bilaminar skin substitute and a percutaneous fetoscopic technique for the prenatal closure of large spina bifida defects. Surgeries were performed between 24.0 and 28.9 gestational weeks under general anesthesia, using an entirely percutaneous fetoscopic approach with partial CO2 insufflation of the uterine cavity, as previously described. If there was enough skin to be sutured in the midline, only a biocellulose patch was placed over the placode. In cases where skin approximation was not possible, a bilaminar skin substitute (two layers: one silicone and one dermal matrix) was placed over the biocellulose. The surgical site was assessed at birth, and long-term follow-up was performed. Forty-seven consecutive fetuses underwent percutaneous fetoscopic OSB repair. Premature preterm rupture of membranes (PPROM) occurred in 38 (84%), and the mean gestational age at delivery was 32,8 + 2.5 weeks. A bilaminar skin substitute was required in 13 (29%), of which 5 was associated with myeloschisis. In all cases the skin substitute was found at the surgical site, at birth. In 3 (15%) of these cases, postnatal additional repair was needed. In the other 10 cases, the silicone layer detached spontaneously from the dermal matrix (average 25 days after birth), and the lesion healed by secondary-intention. Operating time was significantly longer in cases requiring the bilaminar skin substitute (additional 42 minutes). The subgroup with bilaminar skin substitute had similar PPROM rate and delivery gestational age compared to the one patch group. Complete reversal of

  20. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy of digestive tract lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, S.; Martin, I.; Ballesteros, J. M.; Gomez, C.; Marco, S. F.; Fernandez, P.

    1999-01-01

    To present our experience in ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy of lesions located in the digestive tract. We performed ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy in 14 patients (10 men and 4 women) ranging in age from 7 to 71 years (mean; 519 years). The lesions were located throughout the digestive tract, from the pyriform sinus to the sigmoid colon. The biopsy was carried out with a 5 MHz convex probe equipped with a device to direct the needle. An 18G automatic needle or a 20G Chiba needle was used to obtain specimens for histological study in every case, and additional samples were collected with a 22G needle for cytological examination in 13 of the patients. The ultrasound images corresponded to pseudokidney in 9 cases and extrinsic masses in 5. The diagnosis was obtained from the histological examination in every case (100%) and from cytology in 6 (44.4%), the latter results were less specific. The only complication corresponded to a case of bilioperitoneum. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy is a suitable technique for the histological diagnosis of those lesions of the digestive tract that are visible in ultrasound images, but that for some reason can not be examined by endoscopic biopsy. (Author) 20 refs

  1. Ozone-augmented percutaneous discectomy: A novel treatment option for refractory discogenic sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crockett, M.T.; Moynagh, M.; Long, N.; Kilcoyne, A.; Dicker, P.; Synnott, K.; Eustace, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess the short and medium-term efficacy and safety of a novel, minimally invasive therapeutic option combining automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, intradiscal ozone injection, and caudal epidural: ozone-augmented percutaneous discectomy (OPLD). Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-seven patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of discogenic sciatica who were refractory to initial therapy were included. Fifty patients underwent OPLD whilst 97 underwent a further caudal epidural. Outcomes were evaluated using McNab's score, improvement in visual analogue score (VAS) pain score, and requirement for further intervention. Follow-up occurred at 1 and 6 months, and comparison was made between groups. Results: OPLD achieved successful outcomes in almost three-quarters of patients in the short and medium term. OPLD achieved superior outcomes at 1 and 6 months compared to caudal epidural. There was a reduced requirement for further intervention in the OPLD group. No significant complications occurred in either group. Discussion: OPLD is a safe and effective treatment for patients with refractory discogenic sciatica in the short and medium term. OPLD has the potential to offer an alternative second-line minimally invasive treatment option that could reduce the requirement for surgery in this patient cohort. - Highlights: • Discogenic sciatica is a common condition which causes significant morbidity. • Ozone augmented percutaneous lumbar discectomy (OPLD) is a novel treatment. • Comparison was made to caudal epidural injection. • All outcomes were superior in the OPLD treatment group. • OPLD appears is an effective treatment for refractory discogenic sciatica

  2. Human Thrombin Injection for the Percutaneous Treatment of Iatrogenic Pseudoaneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elford, Julian; Burrell, Christopher; Freeman, Simon; Roobottom, Carl

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Thrombin injection is becoming well established for the percutaneous management of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms. All the published series to date use bovine thrombin,and there have been reports of adverse immunologic effects following its use. Our study aimed to assess the efficacy of human thrombin injection for pseudoaneurysm occlusion. Methods:Fourteen patients with iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms underwent a color Doppler ultrasound examination to assess their suitability for percutaneous human thrombin injection. Human thrombin 1000 IU was then injected into the pseudoaneurysm sac under sterile conditions and with ultrasound guidance. A further color Doppler ultrasound examination was performed 24 hr later to confirm occlusion. Results: All 14 pseudoaneurysms were successfully occluded by human thrombin injection. In two cases a second injection of thrombin was required,but there were no other complications, and all pseudoaneurysms remained occluded at 24 hr. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided human thrombin injection is simple to perform, effective and safe. We recommend that human thrombin becomes the agent of choice for percutaneous injection into iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms

  3. Barriers to Implementation of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laut, Kristina Grønborg; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Lash, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) is the recommended treatment for patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Despite substantial evidence of its effectiveness, only 40–45% of European STEMI patients are currently treated with PPCI and there are large ...... is needed. Keywords Primary percutaneous coronary intervention, acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction, implementation, practice variation, registry data......Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) is the recommended treatment for patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Despite substantial evidence of its effectiveness, only 40–45% of European STEMI patients are currently treated with PPCI and there are large...... the diffusion of PPCI in Europe. The lack of complete implementation and large national and regional differences arise from the interplay between technology, patients, policy makers, culture and resources. Explanations for the variation in treatment access still remain a puzzle and access to valid data...

  4. Feasibility and effectiveness of image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butros, Selim Reha; McCarthy, Colin James; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha S; Arellano, Ronald S

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the indications, technique, results, and complications of image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder. This retrospective study included 15 patients (10 male, 5 female) who underwent image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder between January 1999 and December 2013. The medical records, imaging studies, procedural details, and long-term follow-up of each patient were reviewed in detail to assess the feasibility of percutaneous bladder biopsy. Ten patients had focal bladder masses and 5 patients had asymmetric or diffuse bladder wall thickening. Eleven patients had either negative or unsatisfactory cystoscopies prior to the biopsy. Percutaneous biopsies were performed under computed tomography guidance in 12 patients and ultrasound in 3 patients. All procedures were technically successful and there were no procedural complications. Malignancy was confirmed in 8 patients, among whom 6 had transitional cell carcinoma, 1 cervical cancer, and 1 prostate cancer metastasis. Seven patients had a benign diagnosis, including 3 that were later confirmed by pathology following surgery and 2 patients with a false-negative result. The overall sensitivity was 80% and accuracy was 87%. Image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder is a safe and technically feasible procedure with a high sensitivity and accuracy rate. Although image-guided bladder biopsy is an uncommon procedure, it should be considered in selected cases when more traditional methods of tissue sampling are either not possible or fail to identify abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging.

  5. Prospective analysis of percutaneous endoscopic colostomy at a tertiary referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraza, W; Brown, S; McAlindon, M; Hurlstone, P

    2007-11-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy (PEC) is an alternative to surgery in selected patients with recurrent sigmoid volvulus, recurrent pseudo-obstruction or severe slow-transit constipation. A percutaneous tube acts as an irrigation or decompressant channel, or as a mode of sigmoidopexy. This prospective study evaluated the safety and efficacy of this procedure at a single tertiary referral centre. Nineteen patients with recurrent sigmoid volvulus, ten with idiopathic slow-transit constipation and four with pseudo-obstruction underwent PEC. The tube was left in place indefinitely in those with recurrent sigmoid volvulus or constipation, whereas in patients with pseudo-obstruction it was left in place for a variable period of time, depending on symptoms. Thirty-five procedures were performed in 33 patients. Three patients developed peritonitis, of whom one died, and ten patients had minor complications. Symptoms resolved in 26 patients. This large prospective study has confirmed the value of PEC in the treatment of recurrent sigmoid volvulus and pseudo-obstruction in high-risk surgical patients. Copyright (c) 2007 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd.

  6. Percutaneous Endoscopic Colostomy: A New Technique for the Treatment of Recurrent Sigmoid Volvulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Ibrahim K.

    2010-01-01

    Sigmoid volvulus is a common cause of large bowel obstruction in western countries and Africa. It accounts for 25% of the patients admitted to the hospital for large bowel obstruction. The acute management of sigmoid volvulus is sigmoidoscopic decompression. However, the recurrence rate can be as high as 60% in some series. Recurrent sigmoid volvulus in elderly patients who are not fit for definitive surgery is difficult to manage. The percutaneous endoscopic placement of two percutaneous endoscopic colostomy tube placement is a simple and relatively safe procedure. The two tubes should be left open to act as vents for the colon from over-distending. In our opinion, this aspect is key to its success as it keeps the sigmoid colon deflated until adhesions form between the colon and the abdominal wall. PMID:20339184

  7. A Prospective Randomized Study Comparing Mini-surgical Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy With Surgical and Classical Percutaneous Tracheostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad-Reza; Digaleh, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) is more accessible and less time-demanding compared with surgical tracheostomy (ST), it has its own limitations. We introduced a modified PDT technique and brought some surgical knowledge to the bedside to overcome some standard percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy relative contraindications. PDT uses a blind route of tracheal access that usually requires perioperational imaging guidance to protect accidental injuries. Moreover, there are contraindications in certain cases, limiting widespread PDT application. Different PDT modifications and devices have been represented to address the problem; however, these approaches are not generally popular among professionals due to limited accessibility and/or other reasons. We prospectively analyzed the double-blinded trial, patient and nurse head evaluating the complications, and collected data from 360 patients who underwent PDT, ST, or our modified mini-surgical PDT (msPDT, Hashemian method). These patients were divided into 2 groups—contraindicated to PDT—and randomization was done for msPDT or PDT in PDT-indicated group and msPDT or ST for PDT-contraindicated patients. The cases were compared in terms of pre and postoperational complications. Data analysis demonstrated that the mean value of procedural time was significantly lower in the msPDT group, either compared with the standard PDT or the ST group. Paratracheal insertion, intraprocedural hypoxemia, and bleeding were also significantly lower in the msPDT group compared with the standard PDT group. Other complications were not significantly different between msPDT and ST patients. The introduced msPDT represented a semiopen incision, other than blinded PDT route of tracheal access that allowed proceduralist to withdraw bronchoscopy and reduced the total time of procedure. Interestingly, the most important improvement was performing msPDT on PDT-contraindicated patients with the complication rate

  8. FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS: PERCUTANEOUS SURGERY, CHOICE OF A SURGICAL PROCEDURE, CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Berezhnoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hallux rigidus is observed in approximately 2.5% of the adult population. Until now neither a unified classification of hallux rigidus appears to exist nor any clear principles to choose the surgical method. The variety of clinical and radiological signs explains the difficulties in establishing a comprehensive classification system and in selection of the criteria for surgical procedure. There are few published reports about hallux rigidus percutaneous surgical treatment. Existing papers are dedicated to a limited number of percutaneous techniques.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous techniques for surgical treatment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis; to specify factors determining the choice of procedure; to develop a grading system of the hallux rigidus severity which will help in selection of surgery. Materials and methods. Based on 156 surgeries (107 patients the author demonstrated the possibilities of percutaneous techniques in the surgical treatment of hallux rigidus of different stages as well as provided a brief description of used surgical techniques.Results. The mean age of patients was 48.8 years (ranged from 18 to 73. The mean follow-up was 7 months (ranged from 3 to 54. At the specified time the treatment outcomes of 103 patients (150 feet were analyzed. Mean hospital stay was 0.78 days (ranged from 0 to 1. No infectious or wound-healing problems were observed. Overall, the patients were completely satisfied with the outcomes of 89 surgical treatment, qualified satisfaction was reported with patients in respect of outcomes of 57 surgeries. Four unsatisfactory outcomes were observed. The role of the relatively long first metatarsal in the development of hallux rigidus was confirmed. Conclusion. Percutaneous techniques provide successful treatment for all stages of hallux rigidus. The choice of a specific surgical technique may be challenging and requires

  9. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses using pneumodissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Jeng Tyng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the technique of computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic tumors with pneumodissection. Materials and Methods In the period from June 2011 to May 2012, seven computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic tumors utilizing pneumodissection were performed in the authors' institution. All the procedures were performed with an automatic biopsy gun and coaxial system with Tru-core needles. The biopsy specimens were histologically assessed. Results In all the cases the pancreatic mass could not be directly approached by computed tomography without passing through major organs and structures. The injection of air allowed the displacement of adjacent structures and creation of a safe coaxial needle pathway toward the lesion. Biopsy was successfully performed in all the cases, yielding appropriate specimens for pathological analysis. Conclusion Pneumodissection is a safe, inexpensive and technically easy approach to perform percutaneous biopsy in selected cases where direct access to the pancreatic tumor is not feasible.

  10. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses using pneumodissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Almeida, Maria Fernanda Arruda; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira; Martins, Eduardo Bruno Lobato; Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka Matushita; Chojniak, Rubens; Coimbra, Felipe Jose Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to describe the technique of computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic tumors with pneumodissection. Materials and methods: in the period from June 2011 to May 2012, seven computed tomography guided percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic tumors utilizing pneumodissection were performed in the authors' institution. All the procedures were performed with an automatic biopsy gun and coaxial system with Tru-core needles. The biopsy specimens were histologically assessed. Results: in all the cases the pancreatic mass could not be directly approached by computed tomography without passing through major organs and structures. The injection of air allowed the displacement of adjacent structures and creation of a safe coaxial needle pathway toward the lesion. Biopsy was successfully performed in all the cases, yielding appropriate specimens for pathological analysis. Conclusion: Pneumodissection is a safe, inexpensive and technically easy approach to perform percutaneous biopsy in selected cases where direct access to the pancreatic tumor is not feasible. (author)

  11. Conservative management of colonic injury during percutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M. Elghoneimy

    2016-02-22

    Feb 22, 2016 ... Patients' records were searched for the occurrence of colonic injury. Records were ... tion to opacify the system and the percutaneous renal access was .... identify the presence of a retrorenal colon, yet the rarity of such a.

  12. Percutaneous catheter drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts. Perkutane Katheterdrainage von Pankreaspseudozysten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnel, F.; Gebauer, A.; Jantsch, H.; Prayer, L.; Schurawitzki, H. (Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Vienna (Austria) Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologisch-Physikalische Tumordiagnostik, Vienna (Austria)); Feil, W. (1. Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik, Vienna (Austria))

    1991-09-01

    The results of CT/US-guided percutaneous drainage in 35 patients with pancreatic pseudocysts are reported. 27 patients recovered without surgery and no further treatment was required. 8 patients required a subsequent surgery due to recurrence. The role of CT/US-guided percutaneous drainage in pancreatic pseudocysts as well as an analysis of the technical aspects associated with a successful procedure are discussed. Although US may be used, we believe CT is safer and allows more precise localisation and guidance in the treatment of pseudocysts. (orig.).

  13. Percutaneous penetration studies for risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sartorelli, Vittorio; Andersen, Helle Raun; Angerer, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    experiences, literature data and guidelines already in existence. During the meetings of Percutaneous Penetration Subgroup they presented a number of short papers of up to date information on the key issues. The objective was to focus the existing knowledge and the gaps in the knowledge in the field...

  14. PERCUTANEOUS ELECTROHEMOSTASIS AFTER PERCUTANEOUS NEPHROLITHOTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Trushkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the clinical case in a patient with bilateral nephrolithiasis, chronic kidney disease of the 4th stage, after which bleeding from the left kidney developed after simultaneous bilateral percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL, leading to severe hemic hypoxia. Conservative therapy, blood transfusion did not lead to a persistent effect, the bleeding continued to recur. Given the presence of chronic renal failure (CRF from the embolization of the branches of the renal artery, it was decided to abstain, given the extremely high risk of aggravation of nephropathy after the administration of the contrast drug. Left-sided nephrectomy would inevitably lead to the development of terminal chronic renal failure. Patients performed an electrocoagulation of the fistula wall with a Karl Storz 26C resectoscope in 60W mode. The bleeding was completely stopped. The patient is discharged from the hospital in a satisfactory condition. At the time of discharge in the conduct of replacement renal therapy did not need. When analyzing publications in The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Medline and Web of Science, we did not find a description of such a method of hemostasis.

  15. Comparison of Audiological Results Between a Transcutaneous and a Percutaneous Bone Conduction Instrument in Conductive Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Timo; Salcher, Rolf Benedikt; Schwab, Burkard; Lenarz, Thomas; Maier, Hannes

    2016-07-01

    In conductive, mixed hearing losses and single-sided-deafness bone-anchored hearing aids are a well-established treatment. The transcutaneous transmission across the intact skin avoids the percutaneous abutment of a bone-anchored device with the usual risk of infections and requires less care.In this study, the audiological results of the Bonebridge transcutaneous bone conduction implant (MED-EL) are compared to the generally used percutaneous device BP100 (Cochlear Ltd., Sydney, Australia). Ten patients implanted with the transcutaneous hearing implant were compared to 10 matched patients implanted with a percutaneous device. Tests included pure-tone AC and BC thresholds and unaided and aided sound field thresholds. Speech intelligibility was determined in quiet using the Freiburg monosyllable test and in noise with the Oldenburg sentence test (OLSA) in sound field with speech from the front (S0). The subjective benefit was assessed with the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit. In comparison with the unaided condition there was a significant improvement in aided thresholds, word recognition scores (WRS), and speech reception thresholds (SRT) in noise, measured in sound field, for both devices. The comparison of the two devices revealed a minor but not significant difference in functional gain (Bonebridge: PTA = 27.5 dB [mean]; BAHA: PTA = 26.3 dB [mean]). No significant difference between the two devices was found when comparing the improvement in WRSs and SRTs (Bonebridge: improvement WRS = 80% [median], improvement SRT = 6.5 dB SNR [median]; BAHA: improvement WRS = 77.5% [median], BAHA: improvement SRT = 6.9 dB SNR [median]). Our data show that the transcutaneous bone conduction hearing implant is an audiologically equivalent alternative to percutaneous bone-anchored devices in conductive hearing loss with a minor sensorineural hearing loss component.

  16. Treatment of lung abscess: effectiveness of percutaneous catheter drainage in 14 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Su Hyun; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Ryu, Chun Su; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous catheter drainage in treatment of the lung abscess. We treated the lung abscesses in 14 patients (12 mean, 2 women), who did not respond to medical therapy, by percutaneous catheter drainage under fluoroscopic or ultrasound guidance. One abscess due to infacted bulla was managed by combination treatment with alcohol sclerosing therapy. Patients were followed by serial chest radiographs every three days and the amount of drained or aspirated pus evaluated. The treatment effect and recurrence were followed by chest PA and lateral chest at one week after removal of drainage catheter. Thirteen patients (93%) recovered clinically and radiologically within 3 days. In 10 patients, drainage catheter could be removed within 2 weeks, and three patients, the catheter was kept longer. Most complications were mild; vague to moderate chest pain (n = 14), mild hemoptysis (n = 2), and pneumothorax (n = 1). One man who suffered from far advanced pulmonary tuberculosis died of asphyxia caused by massive hemoptysis 16 days after percutaneous drainage. Percutaneous catheter drainage is a safe and effective method for treating lung abscess.

  17. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation in the Spleen for Treatment of Hypersplenism in Cirrhosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, XiangWu; Gao, Fei; Ma, Yan; Feng, ShuFen; Liu, XueLian; Zhou, HongKe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the feasibility and therapeutic effectiveness of percutaneous microwave ablation in the treatment of hypersplenism in cirrhosis. Forty-one cirrhosis patients with hypersplenism were treated with ultrasonography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation between February 2007 and August 2011. Peripheral blood cell counts, portal vein diameter, splenic vein diameter, and blood flow of splenic vein were evaluated before and after the operation, and complications of the treatment were also investigated. All patients were followed up for 24 months. The levels of platelets and white blood cells were increased, while the splenic vein diameter narrowed gradually after the therapy and 24 months later. Moreover, patients received percutaneous microwave ablation had much lower splenic venous flow velocity. The portal vein diameter did not change significantly 6 months after the treatment, although it narrowed gradually within 3 months after the treatment. Furthermore, no complications such as uncontrollable bleeding, splenic abscess, spleen rupture, and damage in surrounding organ happened after the therapy. Graded percutaneous microwave ablation, as a minimally invasive therapy, could damage the spleen, increase the levels of platelets and white blood cells, and reduce portal hypertension effectively without serious complications. Percutaneous microwave ablation is an effective, safe, and feasible method for cirrhosis patients with hypersplenism.

  18. Treatment for proximal humeral fractures with percutaneous plating: our first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imarisio, D; Trecci, A; Sabatini, L; Scagnelli, R

    2013-06-01

    Proximal humeral fractures are common lesions; there is no generally accepted strategy about the treatment for displaced and unstable two- to four-part fractures. We have nowadays many different surgical solutions, ranging from percutaneous pinning to shoulder arthroplasty. Percutaneous plating can be a good solution to treat some of these fractures using a minimally invasive technique and performing stable fixation that can allow early mobilization. Purpose of this paper is to evaluate the results of our first cases of percutaneous plating in proximal humeral fractures in order to assess the theoretical advantages and the incidence of possible complications. From June 2009 to February 2012, we treated 29 proximal humeral fractures with a percutaneous plating (NCB-PH plate) through an anterolateral deltoid split. For each patient, we evaluated the clinical outcome according to Constant score and the radiographic results, paying attention to fracture healing, loss of reduction, hardware complications, and head necrosis. The clinical evaluation gave a mean Constant score value of 79 points. Comparing each value to the unaffected shoulder, we could find these results: 7 excellent, 10 good, 8 fair, and 4 poor. No axillary nerve lesions were clinically detected. The radiographic evaluation showed a complete bone healing in all cases within the first 3 months. No head necrosis was detected, as well as screws loosening. In two cases, the X-ray at 2 months revealed a little loss of reduction in varus. Two patients had an anterior pain; in one of these two cases, the plate was removed. In our series, we had no cases of head necrosis, screws cutout, fracture collapse, hardware mobilization, and we think this could be the real advantage of the percutaneous technique compared to the open one, thanks to the reduced biological damage. We had some poor results, related more to patient's age than to other factors. The safety of the technique for the axillary nerve is

  19. Percutaneous Selective Embolectomy using a Fogarty Thru-Lumen Catheter for Pancreas Graft Thrombosis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izaki, Kenta; Yamaguchi, Masato; Matsumoto, Ippei; Shinzeki, Makoto; Ku, Yonson; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus underwent simultaneous pancreas–kidney transplantation. The pancreaticoduodenal graft was implanted in the right iliac fossa. The donor’s portal vein was anastomosed to the recipient’s inferior vena cava (IVC). Seven days after the surgery, a thrombus was detected in the graft veins. Percutaneous thrombolysis was immediately performed; however, venous congestion was still present. We therefore attempted selective embolectomy using a Fogarty Thru-Lumen Catheter. Thrombi were directed from the graft veins toward the IVC and captured in the IVC filter with complete elimination of the thrombus without any major complications. We present our technique for the successful treatment of pancreas graft thrombosis within a short time period by percutaneous selective embolectomy using a Fogarty Thru-Lumen Catheter.

  20. Cholecystectomy vs. percutaneous cholecystostomy for the management of critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis: a protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambe, Peter C; Kaptanis, Sarantos; Papadakis, Marios; Weber, Sebastian A; Zirngibl, Hubert

    2015-05-30

    Acute cholecystitis is a common diagnosis. However, the heterogeneity of presentation makes it difficult to standardize management. Although surgery is the mainstay of treatment, critically ill patients have been managed via percutaneous cholecystostomy. However, the role of percutaneous cholecystostomy in the management of such patients has not been clearly established. This systematic review will compare the outcomes of critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis managed with percutaneous cholecystostomy to those of similar patients managed with cholecystectomy. Systematic searches will be conducted across relevant health databases including the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus using the following keywords: (acute cholecystitis OR severe cholecystitis OR cholecystitis) AND (cholecystectomy OR laparoscopic cholecystectomy OR open cholecystectomy) AND (Cholecystostomy OR percutaneous cholecystectomy OR gallbladder drain OR gallbladder tube OR transhepatic gallbladder drain OR transhepatic gallbladder tube OR cholecystostomy tube). The reference lists of eligible articles will be hand searched. Articles from 2000-2014 will be identified using the key terms "acute cholecystitis, cholecystectomy, and percutaneous cholecystostomy". Studies including both interventions will be included. Relevant data will be extracted from eligible studies using a specially designed data extraction sheet. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale will be used to assess the quality of non-randomized studies. Central tendencies will be reported in terms of means and standard deviations where necessary, and risk ratios will be calculated where possible. All calculations will be performed with a 95 % confidence interval. Furthermore, the Fisher's exact test will be used for the calculation of significance, which will be set at p < 0.05. Pooled estimates will be presented after consideration of both clinical and

  1. Persistent post-stroke dysphagia treated with cricopharyngeal myotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthi S Nair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke dysphagia is a common problem after stroke. About 8-13% patients have persistent dysphagia and are unable to return to pre-stroke diet even after 6 months of stroke. Use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG may be required in these patients, which may be psychologically unacceptable and impair the quality of life. In those with cricopharyngeal dysfunction leading on to refractory post-stroke dysphagia, cricopharyngeal myotomy and injection of botulinum toxin are the treatment options. We present a case of vertebrobasilar stroke who had persistent dysphagia due to cricopharyngeal dysfunction with good recovery of swallowing function following cricopharyngeal myotomy 1.5 years after the stroke.

  2. A novel osseointegrated percutaneous prosthetic system for the treatment of patients with transfemoral amputation: A prospective study of 51 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brånemark, R; Berlin, O; Hagberg, K; Bergh, P; Gunterberg, B; Rydevik, B

    2014-01-01

    Patients with transfemoral amputation (TFA) often experience problems related to the use of socket-suspended prostheses. The clinical development of osseointegrated percutaneous prostheses for patients with a TFA started in 1990, based on the long-term successful results of osseointegrated dental implants. Between 1999 and 2007, 51 patients with 55 TFAs were consecutively enrolled in a prospective, single-centre non-randomised study and followed for two years. The indication for amputation was trauma in 33 patients (65%) and tumour in 12 (24%). A two-stage surgical procedure was used to introduce a percutaneous implant to which an external amputation prosthesis was attached. The assessment of outcome included the use of two self-report questionnaires, the Questionnaire for Persons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA) and the Short-Form (SF)-36. The cumulative survival at two years' follow-up was 92%. The Q-TFA showed improved prosthetic use, mobility, global situation and fewer problems (all p reported following treatment with osseointegrated percutaneous prostheses.

  3. Percutaneous drainage of diverticular abscess: Adjunct to resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.R.; Saini, S.; Butch, R.J.; Simeone, J.F.; Rodkey, G.V.; Bousquet, J.C.; Ottinger, L.W.; Wittenberg, J.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Traditional surgical management of acute diverticulitis with abscess may require a one-, two-, or three-stage procedure. Because of recent interest in CT diagnosis of diverticulitis, and novel access routes for interventional drainage of deep pelvic abscesses, the authors investigated the potential for converting complex two- and three-stage surgical procedures to simpler, safer one-stage colon resections by percutaneous drainage of the associated abscess. Of 23 patients with acute perforated diverticulitis who were referred for catheter drainage under radiologic guidance, successful catheter drainage and subsequent single-stage colon resection were carried out in 15. In three patients catheter drainage was unsuccessful and a multistage procedure was required. In three patients only percutaneous drainage was performed and operative intervention was omitted entirely

  4. Percutaneous Closure of 2 Paravalvular Leaks and a Gerbode Defect after Mitral Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalver, Jorge; Shatila, Wassim; Silva, Guilherme V

    2017-04-01

    Surgical valve replacement after infective endocarditis can result in local destructive paravalvular lesions. A 30-year-old woman with infective endocarditis underwent mitral valve replacement that was complicated postoperatively by 2 paravalvular leaks. During percutaneous closure of the leaks, a Gerbode defect was also found and closed. We discuss our patient's case and its relation to others in the relevant medical literature. To our knowledge, we are the first to describe the use of a percutaneous approach to close concomitant paravalvular leaks and a Gerbode defect.

  5. Effects of percutaneous needle liver biopsy on dairy cow behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Lene; Damgaard, Birthe Marie; Bjerre-Harpøth, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    In cattle, percutaneous needle liver biopsy is used for scientific examination of liver metabolism. The impact of the biopsy procedure is, however, poorly investigated. Our aim was to examine the behaviour of dairy cows during and after liver biopsy. Data were collected from 18 dry cows....... Percutaneous needle liver biopsies (after administration of local anaesthesia (2% Procaine)) and blood samples were taken during restraining. During the control treatment, animals were restrained and blood sampled. During the biopsy procedure, cows showed increased restlessness (P = 0.008), frequency of head...... behavioural changes for up to 19 h – and particularly for behaviour previously associated with pain. Even though the exact welfare impact of percutaneous needle liver biopsies in cows is not known, and the magnitude of the behavioural changes was limited, pain always has negative effects on animal welfare...

  6. Percutaneous angioscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.

    1987-01-01

    In dogs and 11 patients a new endoscopic method for arteries has been developed. The approach is transfemoral, and endoscopy is combined with angiography, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), and local lysis. An ultrathin endoscope with a diameter of 2.4 mm is used, which also provides a working channel with a diameter of 0.4 mm. Guide wires, contrast media, and drugs for local lysis can be inserted through this channel. Under fluoroscopic control, the endoscope is placed in the region of interest, followed by a special method for decreasing blood flow. Endoscopy is documented by video or by a high-speed camera. No complications have occurred. In all patients, it was possible to demonstrate the results of dilatation, recanalization, or local lysis before and after the interventional procedure. (orig.) [de

  7. Chewing-induced hypertension in afferent baroreflex failure: a sympathetic response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente Mora, Cristina; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-11-01

    What is the central question of this study? Our goal was to understand the autonomic responses to eating in patients with congenital afferent baroreflex failure, by documenting changes in blood pressure and heart rate with chewing, swallowing and stomach distension. What is the main finding and its importance? Patients born with lesions in the afferent baroreceptor pathways have an exaggerated pressor response to food intake. This appears to be a sympathetically mediated response, triggered by chewing, that occurs independently of swallowing or distension of the stomach. The chewing-induced pressor response may be useful as a counter-manoeuvre to prevent orthostatic hypotension in these patients. Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare genetic disease with extremely labile blood pressure resulting from baroreflex deafferentation. Patients have marked surges in sympathetic activity, frequently surrounding meals. We conducted an observational study to document the autonomic responses to eating in patients with FD and to determine whether sympathetic activation was caused by chewing, swallowing or stomach distension. Blood pressure and R-R intervals were measured continuously while chewing gum (n = 15), eating (n = 20) and distending the stomach by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube feeding (n = 9). Responses were compared with those of normal control subjects (n = 10) and of patients with efferent autonomic failure (n = 10) who have chronically impaired sympathetic outflow. In patients with FD, eating was associated with a marked but transient pressor response (P Chewing gum evoked a similar increase in blood pressure that was higher in patients with FD than in control subjects (P = 0.0001), but was absent in patients with autonomic failure. In patients with FD, distending the stomach by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube feeding failed to elicit a pressor response. The results provide indirect evidence that chewing triggers sympathetic

  8. [Tracheotomy-endoscop for dilatational percutaneous tracheotomy (TED)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Eckart

    2006-09-01

    While surgical tracheotomies are currently performed using state-of-the-art operative techniques, percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) is in a rapidly evolving state with regard to its technology and the number of techniques available. This has resulted in a range of new complications that are difficult to quantify on a scientific basis, given the fact that more than half of the patients who are tracheotomized in intensive care units die from their underlying disease. The new Tracheotomy Endoscope (TED) is designed to help prevent serious complications in dilatational tracheotomies and facilitate their management. The endoscope has been specifically adapted to meet the require-ments of percutaneous dilatational tracheotomies. It is fully compatible with all current techniques of PDT. The method is easy to learn. The percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy with the Tracheotomy Endoscope is a seven-step procedure: Advantages of the Tracheotomy Endoscope: Injuries to the posterior tracheal wall ar impossible (tracheoesophageal fistulas, pneumothorax). Minor bleeding sites on the tracheal mucosa can be controlled with a specially curved suction-coagulation tube introudeced through the Tracheotomy Endoscope. In cases with heavy bleeding and a risk of aspiration, the rigid indwelling Tracheotomy Endoscope provides a secure route for reintubating the patient with a cuffed endotracheal tube. It also allows for rapid conversion to an open surgical procedure if necessary. All the parts are easy to clean and are autoclavable. This type of endoscopically guided PDT creates an optimal link between the specialties of intensive care medicine and otorhinolaryngology. The Tracheotomy Endoscope (TED) increases the standard of safety in PDT.

  9. Percutaneous treatment of cervical and lumbar herniated disc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, A., E-mail: akelekis@med.uoa.gr; Filippiadis, D.K., E-mail: dfilippiadis@yahoo.gr

    2015-05-15

    Therapeutic armamentarium for symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation includes conservative therapy, epidural infiltrations (interlaminar or trans-foraminal), percutaneous therapeutic techniques and surgical options. Percutaneous, therapeutic techniques are imaging-guided, minimally invasive treatments for intervertebral disc herniation which can be performed as outpatient procedures. They can be classified in 4 main categories: mechanical, thermal, chemical decompression and biomaterials implantation. Strict sterility measures are a prerequisite and should include extensive local sterility and antibiotic prophylaxis. Indications include the presence of a symptomatic, small to medium sized contained intervertebral disc herniation non-responding to a 4–6 weeks course of conservative therapy. Contraindications include sequestration, infection, segmental instability (spondylolisthesis), uncorrected coagulopathy or a patient unwilling to provide informed consent. Decompression techniques are feasible and reproducible, efficient (75–94% success rate) and safe (>0.5% mean complications rate) therapies for the treatment of symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation. Percutaneous, imaging guided, intervertebral disc therapeutic techniques can be proposed either as an initial treatment or as an attractive alternative prior to surgery for the therapy of symptomatic herniation in both cervical and lumbar spine. This article will describe the mechanism of action for different therapeutic techniques applied to intervertebral discs of cervical and lumbar spine, summarize the data concerning safety and effectiveness of these treatments, and provide a rational approach for the therapy of symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation in cervical and lumbar spine.

  10. Percutaneous treatment of cervical and lumbar herniated disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelekis, A.; Filippiadis, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic armamentarium for symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation includes conservative therapy, epidural infiltrations (interlaminar or trans-foraminal), percutaneous therapeutic techniques and surgical options. Percutaneous, therapeutic techniques are imaging-guided, minimally invasive treatments for intervertebral disc herniation which can be performed as outpatient procedures. They can be classified in 4 main categories: mechanical, thermal, chemical decompression and biomaterials implantation. Strict sterility measures are a prerequisite and should include extensive local sterility and antibiotic prophylaxis. Indications include the presence of a symptomatic, small to medium sized contained intervertebral disc herniation non-responding to a 4–6 weeks course of conservative therapy. Contraindications include sequestration, infection, segmental instability (spondylolisthesis), uncorrected coagulopathy or a patient unwilling to provide informed consent. Decompression techniques are feasible and reproducible, efficient (75–94% success rate) and safe (>0.5% mean complications rate) therapies for the treatment of symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation. Percutaneous, imaging guided, intervertebral disc therapeutic techniques can be proposed either as an initial treatment or as an attractive alternative prior to surgery for the therapy of symptomatic herniation in both cervical and lumbar spine. This article will describe the mechanism of action for different therapeutic techniques applied to intervertebral discs of cervical and lumbar spine, summarize the data concerning safety and effectiveness of these treatments, and provide a rational approach for the therapy of symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation in cervical and lumbar spine

  11. Sonographically guided percutaneous muscle biopsy in diagnosis of neuromuscular disease: a useful alternative to open surgical biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Paul J; Gorman, Grainne M; Hardiman, Orla M; Farrell, Michael J; Logan, P Mark

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of sonographically guided percutaneous muscle biopsy in the investigation of neuromuscular disorders. Sonographically guided percutaneous needle biopsy of skeletal muscle was performed with a 14-gauge core biopsy system in 40 patients over a 24-month period. Patients were referred from the Department of Neurology under investigation for neuromuscular disorders. Sonography was used to find suitable tissue and to avoid major vascular structures. A local anesthetic was applied below skin only. A 3- to 4-mm incision was made. Three 14-gauge samples were obtained from each patient. All samples were placed on saline-dampened gauze and sent for neuropathologic analysis. As a control, we retrospectively assessed results of the 40 most recent muscle samples acquired via open surgical biopsy. With the use of sonography, 32 (80%) of 40 patients had a histologic diagnosis made via percutaneous needle biopsy. This included 26 (93%) of 28 patients with acute muscular disease and 6 (50%) of 12 patients with chronic disease. In the surgical group (all acute disease), 38 (95%) of 40 patients had diagnostic tissue attained. Sonographically guided percutaneous 14-gauge core skeletal muscle biopsy is a useful procedure, facilitating diagnosis in acute muscular disease. It provides results comparable with those of open surgical biopsy in acute muscular disease. It may also be used in chronic muscular disease but repeated or open biopsy may be needed.

  12. Lymphocele Mimicking a Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Imaging Characteristics and Percutaneous Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.-H.; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Urman, Richard; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2003-01-01

    Lymphocele can be a difficult diagnosis to establish and may be confused for other abdominal fluid collections.Conversely, pancreatic pseudocysts may occur inadvertently from upper abdominal surgery and must be included in the differential diagnosis of virtually all peripancreatic fluid collections. We report the unusual occurrence of an unsuspected postoperative peripancreatic lymphocelethat was thought to be a pancreatic pseudocyst. In retrospect, CT findings were evident and diagnostic. The lymphocele responded well to percutaneous drainage