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Sample records for peptide complexes activate

  1. A functional mimic of natural peroxidases : synthesis and catalytic activity of a non-heme iron peptide hydroperoxide complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choma, CT; Schudde, EP; Kellogg, RM; Robillard, GT; Feringa, BL

    1998-01-01

    Site-selective attachment of unprotected peptides to a non-heme iron complex is achieved by displacing two halides on the catalyst by peptide caesium thiolates, This coupling approach should be compatible with any peptide sequence provided there is only a single reduced cysteine. The oxidation

  2. PSA-alpha-2-macroglobulin complex is enzymatically active in the serum of patients with advanced prostate cancer and can degrade circulating peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, Maya B; Brennen, William Nathaniel; Lopez, David; Anthony, Lizamma; Wang, Hao; Platz, Elizabeth; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2018-08-01

    Prostate cancer cells produce high levels of the serine protease Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA). PSA is enzymatically active in the tumor microenvironment but is presumed to be enzymatically inactive in the blood due to complex formation with serum protease inhibitors α-1-antichymotrypsin and α-2-macroglobulin (A2M). PSA-A2M complexes cannot be measured by standard ELISA assays and are also rapidly cleared from the circulation. Thus the exact magnitude of PSA production by prostate cancer cells is not easily measured. The PSA complexed to A2M is unable to cleave proteins but maintains the ability to cleave small peptide substrates. Thus, in advanced prostate cancer, sufficient PSA-A2M may be in circulation to effect total A2M levels, levels of cytokines bound to A2M and hydrolyze small circulating peptide hormones. Total A2M levels in men with advanced prostate cancer and PSA levels above 1000 ng/mL were measured by ELISA and compared to controls. Additional ELISA assays were used to measure levels of IL-6 and TGF-beta which can bind to A2M. The ability of PSA-A2M complexes to hydrolyze protein and peptide substrates was analyzed ± PSA inhibitor. Enzymatic activity of PSA-A2M in serum of men with high PSA levels was also assayed. Serum A2M levels are inversely correlated with PSA levels in men with advanced prostate cancer. Il-6 Levels are significantly elevated in men with PSA >1000 ng/mL compared to controls with PSA PSA-A2M complex in serum of men with PSA levels >1000 ng/mL can hydrolyze small fluorescently labeled peptide substrates but not large proteins that are PSA substrates. PSA can hydrolyze small peptide hormones like PTHrP and osteocalcin. PSA complexed to A2M retains the ability to degrade PTHrP. In advanced prostate cancer with PSA levels >1000 ng/mL, sufficient PSA-A2M is present in circulation to produce enzymatic activity against circulating small peptide hormones. Sufficient PSA is produced in advanced prostate cancer to alter

  3. Peptides derived from specific interaction sites of the fibroblast growth factor 2 - FGF receptor complexes induce receptor activation and signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfè, Valentina; Kochoyan, Artur; Bock, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    J. Neurochem. (2010) 10.1111/j.1471-4159.2010.06718.x Abstract Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2, bFGF) is the most extensively studied member of the FGF family and is involved in neurogenesis, differentiation, neuroprotection, and synaptic plasticity in the CNS. FGF2 executes its pleiotropic...... biologic actions by binding, dimerizing, and activating FGF receptors (FGFRs). The present study reports the physiologic impact of various FGF2-FGFR1 contact sites employing three different synthetic peptides, termed canofins, designed based on structural analysis of the interactions between FGF2 and FGFR1...

  4. Efficient preparation of {sup 99m}Tc(III) '4+1' mixed-ligand complexes for peptide labeling with high specific activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunstler, Jens-Uwe [Biotectid GmbH, Deutscher Platz 5c, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Seidel, Gesine [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Pietzsch, Hans-Jurgen, E-mail: h.j.pietzsch@fzd.d [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    An improved labeling procedure for peptides attached to organometallic {sup 99m}Tc(III) '4+1' mixed-ligand complexes in which the radiometal is coordinated by a tripodal tetradentate chelator 2,2',2''-nitrilotriethanethiol (NS{sub 3}) and a monodentate isocyanide ligand is presented. The labeling procedure was evaluated by the synthesis of [{sup 99m}Tc(NS{sub 3})(L2-RGD)]. The containing radiopharmaceutically interesting RGD-peptide cyclo[Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Tyr-Lys] was modified with 4-isocyanobutanoic acid (L2) as linker conjugated to N{sup 6}-Lys to get the monodentate ligand L2-RGD. The structural identity of the {sup 99m}Tc-conjugate was confirmed by comparison to a Re reference compound. The Tc- and Re-conjugates had matching retention times under identical HPLC conditions. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeling was performed in a novel one-step procedure using the eluate of a {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generator, NS{sub 3}, the isocyanide modified peptide, SnCl{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}EDTA, mannitol and ascorbic acid in the reaction mixture. Using optimized reagents it is possible to label 50 nmol peptide with {sup 99m}Tc within 60 min at room temperature with a radiochemical yield higher than 95% and a specific activity of {approx}20 GBq/{mu}mol.

  5. Bicyclic peptide inhibitor of urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée; Jensen, Berit Paaske; Jiang, Longguang

    2013-01-01

    The development of protease inhibitors for pharmacological intervention has taken a new turn with the use of peptide-based inhibitors. Here, we report the rational design of bicyclic peptide inhibitors of the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), based on the established...... investigated the solution structures of the bicyclic peptide by NMR spectroscopy to map possible conformations. An X-ray structure of the bicyclic-peptide-uPA complex confirmed an interaction similar to that for the previous upain-1/upain-2-uPA complexes. These physical studies of the peptide...

  6. Molecular characterization of covalent complexes between tissue transglutaminase and gliadin peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2004-01-01

    recognized by intestinal T cells from patients. Incubation of TG2 with gliadin peptides also results in the formation of covalent TG2-peptide complexes. Here we report the characterization of complexes between TG2 and two immunodominant gliadin peptides. Two types of covalent complexes were found......; the peptides are either linked via a thioester bond to the active site cysteine of TG2 or via isopeptide bonds to particular lysine residues of the enzyme. We quantified the number of gliadin peptides bound to TG2 under different conditions. After 30 min of incubation of TG2 at 1 microm with an equimolar ratio...... of peptides to TG2, approximately equal amounts of peptides were bound by thioester and isopeptide linkage. At higher peptide to TG2 ratios, more than one peptide was linked to TG2, and isopeptide bond formation dominated. The lysine residues in TG2 that act as acyl acceptors were identified by matrix...

  7. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide increases mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II activity and protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Dujuan; Wang, Luna; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Lai; Li, Qiming; Li, Jin; Qian, Jian; Gu, Shuangshuang; Han, Ling; Xu, Peng; Xu, Yun

    2014-09-25

    The mechanisms of ischemic stroke, a main cause of disability and death, are complicated. Ischemic stroke results from the interaction of various factors including oxidative stress, a key pathological mechanism that plays an important role during the acute stage of ischemic brain injury. This study demonstrated that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide, specifically CART55-102, increased the survival rate, but decreased the mortality of neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), in a dose-dependent manner. The above-mentioned effects of CART55-102 were most significant at 0.4nM. These results indicated that CART55-102 suppressed neurotoxicity and enhanced neuronal survival after oxygen-glucose deprivation. CART55-102 (0.4nM) significantly diminished reactive oxygen species levels and markedly increased the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II in oxygen-glucose deprived neurons. In summary, CART55-102 suppressed oxidative stress in oxygen-glucose deprived neurons, possibly through elevating the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II. This result provides evidence for the development of CART55-102 as an antioxidant drug. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PeptideNavigator: An interactive tool for exploring large and complex data sets generated during peptide-based drug design projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, Kyle I; Bayden, Alexander S; Audie, Joseph; Diller, David J

    2018-01-01

    There is growing interest in peptide-based drug design and discovery. Due to their relatively large size, polymeric nature, and chemical complexity, the design of peptide-based drugs presents an interesting "big data" challenge. Here, we describe an interactive computational environment, PeptideNavigator, for naturally exploring the tremendous amount of information generated during a peptide drug design project. The purpose of PeptideNavigator is the presentation of large and complex experimental and computational data sets, particularly 3D data, so as to enable multidisciplinary scientists to make optimal decisions during a peptide drug discovery project. PeptideNavigator provides users with numerous viewing options, such as scatter plots, sequence views, and sequence frequency diagrams. These views allow for the collective visualization and exploration of many peptides and their properties, ultimately enabling the user to focus on a small number of peptides of interest. To drill down into the details of individual peptides, PeptideNavigator provides users with a Ramachandran plot viewer and a fully featured 3D visualization tool. Each view is linked, allowing the user to seamlessly navigate from collective views of large peptide data sets to the details of individual peptides with promising property profiles. Two case studies, based on MHC-1A activating peptides and MDM2 scaffold design, are presented to demonstrate the utility of PeptideNavigator in the context of disparate peptide-design projects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. New dendrimer - Peptide host - Guest complexes: Towards dendrimers as peptide carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Sontjens, S.H.M.; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Adamantyl urea and adamantyl thiourea modified poly(propylene imine) dendrimers act as hosts for N-terminal tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-protected peptides and form chloroform-soluble complexes. investigations with NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide is bound to the dendrimer by ionic interactions...... between the dendrimer outer shell tertiary amines and the C-terminal carboxylic acid of the peptide, and also through host-urea to peptide-amide hydrogen bonding. The hydrogen-bonding nature of the peptide dendrimer interactions was further confirmed by using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, for which...... the NH- and CO-stretch signals of the peptide amide moieties shift towards lower wave-numbers upon complexation with the dendrimer. Spatial analysis of the complexes with NOESY spectroscopy generally shows close proximity of the N-terminal Boc group of the peptide to the peripheral adamantyl groups...

  10. Heat shock protein-peptide complex-96 (Vitespen for the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Amato

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are the most abundant and ubiquitous soluble intracellular proteins. Members of the HSP family bind peptides, they include antigenic peptides generated within cells. HSPs also interact with antigen-presenting cells (APCs through CD91 and other receptors, eliciting a cascade of events that includes re-presentation of HSP-chaperoned peptides by major histocompatability complex (MHC, translocation of nuclear factorkappaB (NFkB into the nuclei, and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs. These consequences point to a key role of heat shock proteins in fundamental immunological phenomena such as activation of APCs, indirect presentation (or crosspriming of antigenic peptides, and chaperoning of peptides during antigen presentation. The properties of HSPs also allow them to be used for immunotherapy of cancers and infections in novel ways. This paper reviews the development and clinical trial progress of vitespen, an HSP peptide complex vaccine based on tumor-derived glycoprotein 96.

  11. New dendrimer - peptide host - guest complexes : towards dendrimers as peptide carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boas, U.; Sontjens, S.H.M.; Jensen, K.J.; Christensen, J.B.; Meijer, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    Adamantyl urea and adamantyl thiourea modified poly(propylene imine) dendrimers act as hosts for N-terminal tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-protected peptides and form chloroform-soluble complexes. investigations with NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide is bound to the dendrimer by ionic interactions

  12. A novel chimeric peptide with antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaybeyoglu, Begum; Akbulut, Berna Sariyar; Ozkirimli, Elif

    2015-04-01

    Beta-lactamase-mediated bacterial drug resistance exacerbates the prognosis of infectious diseases, which are sometimes treated with co-administration of beta-lactam type antibiotics and beta-lactamase inhibitors. Antimicrobial peptides are promising broad-spectrum alternatives to conventional antibiotics in this era of evolving bacterial resistance. Peptides based on the Ala46-Tyr51 beta-hairpin loop of beta-lactamase inhibitory protein (BLIP) have been previously shown to inhibit beta-lactamase. Here, our goal was to modify this peptide for improved beta-lactamase inhibition and cellular uptake. Motivated by the cell-penetrating pVEC sequence, which includes a hydrophobic stretch at its N-terminus, our approach involved the addition of LLIIL residues to the inhibitory peptide N-terminus to facilitate uptake. Activity measurements of the peptide based on the 45-53 loop of BLIP for enhanced inhibition verified that the peptide was a competitive beta-lactamase inhibitor with a K(i) value of 58 μM. Incubation of beta-lactam-resistant cells with peptide decreased the number of viable cells, while it had no effect on beta-lactamase-free cells, indicating that this peptide had antimicrobial activity via beta-lactamase inhibition. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which this peptide moves across the membrane, steered molecular dynamics simulations were carried out. We propose that addition of hydrophobic residues to the N-terminus of the peptide affords a promising strategy in the design of novel antimicrobial peptides not only against beta-lactamase but also for other intracellular targets. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  14. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Salas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  15. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting towards intracellular targets, which increases their success comparatively to specific one-target drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials.

  16. Structural organization and spectroscopy of peptide-actinide(IV) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahou, S.

    2010-01-01

    The contamination of living organisms by actinide elements is at the origin of both radiological and chemical toxicity that may lead to severe dysfunction. Most of the data available on the actinide interaction with biological systems are macroscopic physiological measurements and are lacking a molecular description of the systems. Because of the intricacy of these systems, classical biochemical methods are difficult to implement. Our strategy consisted in designing simplified biomimetic peptides, and describing the corresponding intramolecular interactions with actinides. A carboxylic pentapeptide of the form DDPDD has been at the starting point of this work in order to further assess the influence of the peptide sequence on the topology of the complexes.To do so, various linear (Asp/Ala permutations, peptoids) and cyclic analogues have been synthesized. Furthermore, in order to include the hydroxamic function (with a high affinity for Fe(III)) in the peptide, both desferrioxamine and acetohydroxamic acid have been investigated. However because of difficulties in synthesis, we have not been able to test these peptides. Three actinide cations have been considered at oxidation state +IV (Th, Np, Pu) and compared to Fe(III), often considered as a biological surrogate of Pu(IV). The spatial arrangement of the peptide around the cation has been probed by spectrophotometry and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. The spectroscopic data and EXAFS data adjustment lead us to rationalize the topology of the complexes as a function of the peptide sequence: mix hydroxy polynuclear species for linear and cyclic peptides, mononuclear for the desferrioxamine complexes. Furthermore, significant differences have appeared between Fe(III) and actinide(IV), related to differences of reactivity in aqueous medium. (author)

  17. Radiometallating antibodies and biologically active peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer-Smith, J.A.; Roberts, J.C.; Lewis, D.; Newmyer, S.L.; Schulte, L.D.; Burns, T.P.; Mixon, P.L.; Jeffery, A.L.; Schreyer, S.A.; Cole, D.A.; Figard, S.D.; Lennon, V.A.; Hayashi, M.; Lavallee, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    We have developed methods to radiolabel large molecules, using porphyrins as bifunctional chelating agents for radiometals. The porphyrins are substituted with an N-benzyl group to activate them for radiometallation under mild reaction conditions. Porphyrins that have on functional group for covalent attachment to other molecules cannot cause crosslinking. We have examined the labeling chemistry for antibodies, and we have also developed methods to label smaller biologically active molecules, such as autoantigenic peptides. The autoantigenic peptides, fragments of the acetylcholine receptor, are under investigation for myasthenia gravis research. The methods of covalent attachment of these bifunctional chelating agents to large molecules and the radiometallation chemistry will be discussed

  18. Structure of the Ni(II) complex of Escherichia coli peptide deformylase and suggestions on deformylase activities depending on different metal(II) centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ngo Thi Hai; Bogdanović, Xenia; Palm, Gottfried J; Kühl, Olaf; Hinrichs, Winfried

    2010-02-01

    Crystal structures of polypeptide deformylase (PDF) of Escherichia coli with nickel(II) replacing the native iron(II) have been solved with chloride and formate as metal ligands. The chloro complex is a model for the correct protonation state of the hydrolytic hydroxo ligand and the protonated status of the Glu133 side chain as part of the hydrolytic mechanism. The ambiguity that recently some PDFs have been identified with Zn(2+) ion as the active-site centre whereas others are only active with Fe(2+) (or Co(2+), Ni(2+) is discussed with respect to Lewis acid criteria of the metal ion and substrate activation by the CD loop.

  19. Toward the prediction of class I and II mouse major histocompatibility complex-peptide-binding affinity: in silico bioinformatic step-by-step guide using quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis is a cornerstone of modern informatics. Predictive computational models of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding affinity based on QSAR technology have now become important components of modern computational immunovaccinology. Historically, such approaches have been built around semiqualitative, classification methods, but these are now giving way to quantitative regression methods. We review three methods--a 2D-QSAR additive-partial least squares (PLS) and a 3D-QSAR comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) method--which can identify the sequence dependence of peptide-binding specificity for various class I MHC alleles from the reported binding affinities (IC50) of peptide sets. The third method is an iterative self-consistent (ISC) PLS-based additive method, which is a recently developed extension to the additive method for the affinity prediction of class II peptides. The QSAR methods presented here have established themselves as immunoinformatic techniques complementary to existing methodology, useful in the quantitative prediction of binding affinity: current methods for the in silico identification of T-cell epitopes (which form the basis of many vaccines, diagnostics, and reagents) rely on the accurate computational prediction of peptide-MHC affinity. We have reviewed various human and mouse class I and class II allele models. Studied alleles comprise HLA-A*0101, HLA-A*0201, HLA-A*0202, HLA-A*0203, HLA-A*0206, HLA-A*0301, HLA-A*1101, HLA-A*3101, HLA-A*6801, HLA-A*6802, HLA-B*3501, H2-K(k), H2-K(b), H2-D(b) HLA-DRB1*0101, HLA-DRB1*0401, HLA-DRB1*0701, I-A(b), I-A(d), I-A(k), I-A(S), I-E(d), and I-E(k). In this chapter we show a step-by-step guide into predicting the reliability and the resulting models to represent an advance on existing methods. The peptides used in this study are available from the AntiJen database (http://www.jenner.ac.uk/AntiJen). The PLS method

  20. Propensity of a single-walled carbon nanotube-peptide to mimic a KK10 peptide in an HLA-TCR complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Bell, David R.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-12-01

    The application of nanotechnology to improve disease diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and prevention is the goal of nanomedicine. We report here a theoretical study of a functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) mimic binding to a human leukocyte antigen-T cell receptor (HLA-TCR) immune complex as a first attempt of a potential nanomedicine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine development. The carbon nanotube was coated with three arginine residues to imitate the HIV type 1 immunodominant viral peptide KK10 (gag 263-272: KRWIILGLNK), named CNT-peptide hereafter. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the CNT-peptide and KK10 binding to an important HLA-TCR complex. Our results suggest that the CNT-peptide and KK10 bind comparably to the HLA-TCR complex, but the CNT-peptide forms stronger interactions with the TCR. Desorption simulations highlight the innate flexibility of KK10 over the CNT-peptide, resulting in a slightly higher desorption energy required for KK10 over the CNT-peptide. Our findings indicate that the designed CNT-peptide mimic has favorable propensity to activate TCR pathways and should be further explored to understand therapeutic potential.

  1. Activity of synthetic peptides against Chlamydia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Manuela; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Biondi, Roberta; Papa, Valentina; Borel, Nicole; Vecchio Nepita, Edoardo; Magnino, Simone; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Levi, Aurora; Franco, Octavio L

    2017-11-01

    The in vitro activity of six synthetic peptides against 36 strains of Chlamydia from different origins was investigated. Clavanin MO (CMO) proved to be the most active peptide, reducing the inclusion number of all Chlamydia strains from eight different species tested by ≥50% at 10 µg mL -1 . Mastoparan L showed an equal activity against C. trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, and C. muridarum, but did not exert any inhibitory effect against C. psittaci, C. pecorum, C. abortus, and C. avium even at 80 µg mL -1 . These data suggest that CMO could be a promising compound in the prevention and treatment of chlamydial infections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Model of the complex of Parathyroid hormone-2 receptor and Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aim to propose interactions between the parathyroid hormone-2 receptor (PTH2R and its ligand the tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39 by constructing a homology model of their complex. The two related peptides parathyroid hormone (PTH and parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP are compared with the complex to examine their interactions. Findings In the model, the hydrophobic N-terminus of TIP39 is buried in a hydrophobic part of the central cavity between helices 3 and 7. Comparison of the peptide sequences indicates that the main discriminator between the agonistic peptides TIP39 and PTH and the inactive PTHrP is a tryptophan-phenylalanine replacement. The model indicates that the smaller phenylalanine in PTHrP does not completely occupy the binding site of the larger tryptophan residue in the other peptides. As only TIP39 causes internalisation of the receptor and the primary difference being an aspartic acid in position 7 of TIP39 that interacts with histidine 396 in the receptor, versus isoleucine/histidine residues in the related hormones, this might be a trigger interaction for the events that cause internalisation. Conclusions A model is constructed for the complex and a trigger interaction for full agonistic activation between aspartic acid 7 of TIP39 and histidine 396 in the receptor is proposed.

  3. Anticancer Activity of Bacterial Proteins and Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiński, Tomasz M; Adamczak, Artur

    2018-04-30

    Despite much progress in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, tumour diseases constitute one of the main reasons of deaths worldwide. The side effects of chemotherapy and drug resistance of some cancer types belong to the significant current therapeutic problems. Hence, searching for new anticancer substances and medicines are very important. Among them, bacterial proteins and peptides are a promising group of bioactive compounds and potential anticancer drugs. Some of them, including anticancer antibiotics (actinomycin D, bleomycin, doxorubicin, mitomycin C) and diphtheria toxin, are already used in the cancer treatment, while other substances are in clinical trials (e.g., p28, arginine deiminase ADI) or tested in in vitro research. This review shows the current literature data regarding the anticancer activity of proteins and peptides originated from bacteria: antibiotics, bacteriocins, enzymes, nonribosomal peptides (NRPs), toxins and others such as azurin, p28, Entap and Pep27anal2. The special attention was paid to the still poorly understood active substances obtained from the marine sediment bacteria. In total, 37 chemical compounds or groups of compounds with antitumor properties have been described in the present article.

  4. The optimization of peptide cargo bound to MHC class I molecules by the peptide-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Tim; Williams, Anthony

    2005-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I complexes present peptides from both self and foreign intracellular proteins on the surface of most nucleated cells. The assembled heterotrimeric complexes consist of a polymorphic glycosylated heavy chain, non-polymorphic beta(2) microglobulin, and a peptide of typically nine amino acids in length. Assembly of the class I complexes occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and is assisted by a number of chaperone molecules. A multimolecular unit termed the peptide-loading complex (PLC) is integral to this process. The PLC contains a peptide transporter (transporter associated with antigen processing), a thiooxido-reductase (ERp57), a glycoprotein chaperone (calreticulin), and tapasin, a class I-specific chaperone. We suggest that class I assembly involves a process of optimization where the peptide cargo of the complex is edited by the PLC. Furthermore, this selective peptide loading is biased toward peptides that have a longer off-rate from the assembled complex. We suggest that tapasin is the key chaperone that directs this action of the PLC with secondary contributions from calreticulin and possibly ERp57. We provide a framework model for how this may operate at the molecular level and draw parallels with the proposed mechanism of action of human leukocyte antigen-DM for MHC class II complex optimization.

  5. Antimalarial Activity of Ultra-Short Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Yolanda Rios

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-short peptides 1-9 were designed and synthesized with phenylalanine, ornithine and proline amino acid residues and their effect on antimalarial activity was analyzed. On the basis of the IC50 data for these compounds, the effects of nature, polarity, and amino acid sequence on Plasmodium berghei schizont cultures were analyzed too. Tetrapeptides Phe-Orn-Phe-Orn (4 and Lys-Phe-Phe-Orn (5 showed a very important activity with IC50 values of 3.31 and 2.57 μM, respectively. These two tetrapeptides are candidates for subsequent in vivo assays and SARS investigations.

  6. Constructing bioactive peptides with pH-dependent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhigang; Volk, Melanie; Shah, Khushali; Clerkin, Kevin; Liang, Jun F

    2009-08-01

    Many bioactive peptides are featured by their arginine and lysine rich contents. In this study, lysine and arginine residues in lytic peptides were selectively replaced by histidines. Although resulting histidine-containing lytic peptides had decreased activity, they did show pH-dependent cytotoxicity. The activity of the constructed histidine-containing lytic peptides increased 2-8 times as the solution pH changed from 7.4 to 5.5. More importantly, these histidine-containing peptides maintain the same cell killing mechanism as their parent peptides by causing cell lysis. Both the activity and pH-sensitivity of histidine-containing peptides are tunable by adjusting histidine substitution numbers and positions. This study has presented a general strategy to create bioactive peptides with desired pH-sensitivity to meet the needs of various applications such as cancer treatments.

  7. Anticancer activities of bovine and human lactoferricin-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Mauricio; Hilchie, Ashley L; Haney, Evan F; Bolscher, Jan G M; Hyndman, M Eric; Hancock, Robert E W; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a mammalian host defense glycoprotein with diverse biological activities. Peptides derived from the cationic region of LF possess cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Bovine lactoferricin (LFcinB), a peptide derived from bovine LF (bLF), exhibits broad-spectrum anticancer activity, while a similar peptide derived from human LF (hLF) is not as active. In this work, several peptides derived from the N-terminal regions of bLF and hLF were studied for their anticancer activities against leukemia and breast-cancer cells, as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The cyclized LFcinB-CLICK peptide, which possesses a stable triazole linkage, showed improved anticancer activity, while short peptides hLF11 and bLF10 were not cytotoxic to cancer cells. Interestingly, hLF11 can act as a cell-penetrating peptide; when combined with the antimicrobial core sequence of LFcinB (RRWQWR) through either a Pro or Gly-Gly linker, toxicity to Jurkat cells increased. Together, our work extends the library of LF-derived peptides tested for anticancer activity, and identified new chimeric peptides with high cytotoxicity towards cancerous cells. Additionally, these results support the notion that short cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides can be combined to create new adducts with increased potency.

  8. Dynamics of major histocompatibility complex class I association with the human peptide-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, Michaela S; Jain, Ankur; Leonhardt, Ralf M; Ha, Taekjip; Cresswell, Peter

    2012-09-07

    Although the human peptide-loading complex (PLC) is required for optimal major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) antigen presentation, its composition is still incompletely understood. The ratio of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and MHC I to tapasin, which is responsible for MHC I recruitment and peptide binding optimization, is particularly critical for modeling of the PLC. Here, we characterized the stoichiometry of the human PLC using both biophysical and biochemical approaches. By means of single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull), we determined a TAP/tapasin ratio of 1:2, consistent with previous studies of insect-cell microsomes, rat-human chimeric cells, and HeLa cells expressing truncated TAP subunits. We also report that the tapasin/MHC I ratio varies, with the PLC population comprising both 2:1 and 2:2 complexes, based on mutational and co-precipitation studies. The MHC I-saturated PLC may be particularly prevalent among peptide-selective alleles, such as HLA-C4. Additionally, MHC I association with the PLC increases when its peptide supply is reduced by inhibiting the proteasome or by blocking TAP-mediated peptide transport using viral inhibitors. Taken together, our results indicate that the composition of the human PLC varies under normal conditions and dynamically adapts to alterations in peptide supply that may arise during viral infection. These findings improve our understanding of the quality control of MHC I peptide loading and may aid the structural and functional modeling of the human PLC.

  9. Whey Peptide-Iron Complexes Increase the Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Comparison to Iron Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Silva, Maria Elisa; Barros Mariutti, Lilian Regina; Bragagnolo, Neura; Bertoldo-Pacheco, Maria Teresa; Netto, Flavia Maria

    2018-02-28

    Food fortification with iron may favor lipid oxidation in both food matrices and the human body. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of peptide-iron complexation on lipid oxidation catalyzed by iron, using oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions as a model system. The extent of lipid oxidation of emulsions containing iron salts (FeSO 4 or FeCl 2 ) or iron complexes (peptide-iron complexes or ferrous bisglycinate) was evaluated during 7 days, measured as primary (peroxide value) and secondary products (TBARS and volatile compounds). Both salts catalyzed lipid oxidation, leading to peroxide values 2.6- to 4.6-fold higher than the values found for the peptide-iron complexes. The addition of the peptide-iron complexes resulted in the formation of lower amounts of secondary volatiles of lipid oxidation (up to 78-fold) than those of iron salts, possibly due to the antioxidant activity of the peptides and their capacity to keep iron apart from the lipid phase, since the iron atom is coordinated and takes part in a stable structure. The peptide-iron complexes showed potential to reduce the undesirable sensory changes in food products and to decrease the side effects related to free iron and the lipid damage of cell membranes in the organism, due to the lower reactivity of iron in the complexed form.

  10. Antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities of PR-39 derived peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J A Veldhuizen

    Full Text Available The porcine cathelicidin PR-39 is a host defence peptide that plays a pivotal role in the innate immune defence of the pig against infections. Besides direct antimicrobial activity, it is involved in immunomodulation, wound healing and several other biological processes. In this study, the antimicrobial- and immunomodulatory activity of PR-39, and N- and C-terminal derivatives of PR-39 were tested. PR-39 exhibited an unexpected broad antimicrobial spectrum including several Gram positive strains such as Bacillus globigii and Enterococcus faecalis. Of organisms tested, only Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to PR-39. Truncation of PR-39 down to 15 (N-terminal amino acids did not lead to major loss of activity, while peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of PR-39 were hampered in their antimicrobial activity. However, shorter peptides were all much more sensitive to inhibition by salt. Active peptides induced ATP leakage and loss of membrane potential in Bacillus globigii and Escherichia coli, indicating a lytic mechanism of action for these peptides. Finally, only the mature peptide was able to induce IL-8 production in porcine macrophages, but some shorter peptides also had an effect on TNF-α production showing differential regulation of cytokine induction by PR-39 derived peptides. None of the active peptides showed high cytotoxicity highlighting the potential of these peptides for use as an alternative to antibiotics.

  11. Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Activities of PR-39 Derived Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Agustiandari, Herfita; van Dijk, Albert; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Johanna L. M.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2014-01-01

    The porcine cathelicidin PR-39 is a host defence peptide that plays a pivotal role in the innate immune defence of the pig against infections. Besides direct antimicrobial activity, it is involved in immunomodulation, wound healing and several other biological processes. In this study, the antimicrobial- and immunomodulatory activity of PR-39, and N- and C-terminal derivatives of PR-39 were tested. PR-39 exhibited an unexpected broad antimicrobial spectrum including several Gram positive strains such as Bacillus globigii and Enterococcus faecalis. Of organisms tested, only Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to PR-39. Truncation of PR-39 down to 15 (N-terminal) amino acids did not lead to major loss of activity, while peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of PR-39 were hampered in their antimicrobial activity. However, shorter peptides were all much more sensitive to inhibition by salt. Active peptides induced ATP leakage and loss of membrane potential in Bacillus globigii and Escherichia coli, indicating a lytic mechanism of action for these peptides. Finally, only the mature peptide was able to induce IL-8 production in porcine macrophages, but some shorter peptides also had an effect on TNF-α production showing differential regulation of cytokine induction by PR-39 derived peptides. None of the active peptides showed high cytotoxicity highlighting the potential of these peptides for use as an alternative to antibiotics. PMID:24755622

  12. Antitumor activity of novel chimeric peptides derived from cyclinD/CDK4 and the protein transduction domain 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haili; Chen, Xi; Chen, Yanping; Sun, Lei; Li, Guodong; Zhai, Mingxia; Zhai, Wenjie; Kang, Qiaozhen; Gao, Yanfeng; Qi, Yuanming

    2013-02-01

    CyclinD1/CDK4 and cyclinD3/CDK4 complexes are key regulators of the cell progression and therefore constitute promising targets for the design of anticancer agents. In the present study, the key peptide motifs were selected from these two complexes. Chimeric peptides with these peptides conjugated to the protein transduction domain 4 (PTD4) were designed and synthesized. The chimeric peptides, PTD4-D1, PTD4-D3, PTD4-K4 exhibited significant anti-proliferation effects on cancer cell lines. These peptides could compete with the cyclinD/CDK4 complex and induce the G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. In the tumor challenge experiment, these peptides showed potent antitumor effects with no significant side effects. Our results suggested that these peptides could be served as novel leading compounds with potent antitumor activity.

  13. Anticancer activities of bovine and human lactoferricin-derived peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arias, M.; Hilchie, A.L.; Haney, E.F.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Hyndman, M.E.; Hancock, R.E.W.; Vogel, H.J.

    2017-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a mammalian host defense glycoprotein with diverse biological activities. Peptides derived from the cationic region of LF possess cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Bovine lactoferricin (LFcinB), a peptide derived from bovine LF (bLF), exhibits

  14. Photodissociative Cross-Linking of Non-covalent Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Tureček, František

    2018-05-01

    We report a gas-phase UV photodissociation study investigating non-covalent interactions between neutral hydrophobic pentapeptides and peptide ions incorporating a diazirine-tagged photoleucine residue. Phenylalanine (Phe) and proline (Pro) were chosen as the conformation-affecting residues that were incorporated into a small library of neutral pentapeptides. Gas-phase ion-molecule complexes of these peptides with photo-labeled pentapeptides were subjected to photodissociation. Selective photocleavage of the diazirine ring at 355 nm formed short-lived carbene intermediates that underwent cross-linking by insertion into H-X bonds of the target peptide. The cross-link positions were established from collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectra (CID-MS3) providing sequence information on the covalent adducts. Effects of the amino acid residue (Pro or Phe) and its position in the target peptide sequence were evaluated. For proline-containing peptides, interactions resulting in covalent cross-links in these complexes became more prominent as proline was moved towards the C-terminus of the target peptide sequence. The photocross-linking yields of phenylalanine-containing peptides depended on the position of both phenylalanine and photoleucine. Density functional theory calculations were used to assign structures of low-energy conformers of the (GLPMG + GLL*LK + H)+ complex. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectory calculations were used to capture the thermal motion in the complexes within 100 ps and determine close contacts between the incipient carbene and the H-X bonds in the target peptide. This provided atomic-level resolution of potential cross-links that aided spectra interpretation and was in agreement with experimental data. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Folding and activity of hybrid sequence, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.B.; Storrs, R.W.; Wemmer, D.E. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Peptides have been synthesized that have hybrid sequences, partially derived from the bee venom peptide apamin and partially from the S peptide of ribonuclease A. The hybrid peptides were demonstrated by NMR spectroscopy to fold, forming the same disulfides and basic three-dimensional structure as native apamin, containing a {beta}-turn and an {alpha}-helix. These hybrids were active in complementing S protein, reactivating nuclease activity. In addition, the hybrid peptide was effective in inducing antibodies that cross-react with the RNase, without conjugation to a carrier protein. The stability of the folded structure of this peptide suggests that it should be possible to elicit antibodies that will react not only with a specific sequence, but also with a specific secondary structure. Hybrid sequence peptides also provide opportunities to study separately nucleation and propagation steps in formation of secondary structure. The authors show that in S peptide the {alpha}-helix does not end abruptly but rather terminates gradually over four or five residues. In general, these hybrid sequence peptides, which fold predictably because of disulfide bond formation, can provide opportunities for examining structure - function relationships for many biologically active sequences.

  16. Folding and activity of hybrid sequence, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, J.H.B.; Storrs, R.W.; Wemmer, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Peptides have been synthesized that have hybrid sequences, partially derived from the bee venom peptide apamin and partially from the S peptide of ribonuclease A. The hybrid peptides were demonstrated by NMR spectroscopy to fold, forming the same disulfides and basic three-dimensional structure as native apamin, containing a β-turn and an α-helix. These hybrids were active in complementing S protein, reactivating nuclease activity. In addition, the hybrid peptide was effective in inducing antibodies that cross-react with the RNase, without conjugation to a carrier protein. The stability of the folded structure of this peptide suggests that it should be possible to elicit antibodies that will react not only with a specific sequence, but also with a specific secondary structure. Hybrid sequence peptides also provide opportunities to study separately nucleation and propagation steps in formation of secondary structure. The authors show that in S peptide the α-helix does not end abruptly but rather terminates gradually over four or five residues. In general, these hybrid sequence peptides, which fold predictably because of disulfide bond formation, can provide opportunities for examining structure - function relationships for many biologically active sequences

  17. Using metal complex-labeled peptides for charge transfer-based biosensing with semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Trammell, Scott A.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2009-02-01

    Luminescent colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have unique optical and photonic properties and are highly sensitive to charge transfer in their surrounding environment. In this study we used synthetic peptides as physical bridges between CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and some of the most common redox-active metal complexes to understand the charge transfer interactions between the metal complexes and QDs. We found that QD emission underwent quenching that was highly dependent on the choice of metal complex used. We also found that quenching traces the valence or number of metal complexes brought into close proximity of the nanocrystal surface. Monitoring of the QD absorption bleaching in the presence of the metal complex provided insight into the charge transfer mechanism. The data suggest that two distinct charge transfer mechanisms can take place. One directly to the QD core states for neutral capping ligands and a second to surface states for negatively charged capping ligands. A basic understanding of the proximity driven charge-transfer and quenching interactions allowed us to construct proteolytic enzyme sensing assemblies with the QD-peptide-metal complex conjugates.

  18. Design, synthesis and DNA interactions of a chimera between a platinum complex and an IHF mimicking peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harita; Damian, Mariana S; Alshiekh, Alak; Elmroth, Sofi K C; Diederichsen, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    Conjugation of metal complexes with peptide scaffolds possessing high DNA binding affinity has shown to modulate their biological activities and to enhance their interaction with DNA. In this work, a platinum complex/peptide chimera was synthesized based on a model of the Integration Host Factor (IHF), an architectural protein possessing sequence specific DNA binding and bending abilities through its interaction with a minor groove. The model peptide consists of a cyclic unit resembling the minor grove binding subdomain of IHF, a positively charged lysine dendrimer for electrostatic interactions with the DNA phosphate backbone and a flexible glycine linker tethering the two units. A norvaline derived artificial amino acid was designed to contain a dimethylethylenediamine as a bidentate platinum chelating unit, and introduced into the IHF mimicking peptides. The interaction of the chimeric peptides with various DNA sequences was studied by utilizing the following experiments: thermal melting studies, agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA unwinding experiments, and native and denaturing gel electrophoresis to visualize non-covalent and covalent peptide-DNA adducts, respectively. By incorporation of the platinum metal center within the model peptide mimicking IHF we have attempted to improve its specificity and DNA targeting ability, particularly towards those sequences containing adjacent guanine residues.

  19. Ubiquitination regulates MHC class II-peptide complex retention and degradation in dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Walseng, Even; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Bosch, Berta; Weih, Karis A.; Matsuki, Yohei; Bakke, Oddmund; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The expression and turnover of MHC class II-peptide complexes (pMHC-II) on the surface of dendritic cells (DCs) is essential for their ability to activate CD4 T cells efficiently. The half-life of surface pMHC-II is significantly greater in activated (mature) DCs than in resting (immature) DCs, but the molecular mechanism leading to this difference remains unknown. We now show that ubiquitination of pMHC-II by the E3 ubiquitin ligase membrane-associated RING-CH 1 (March-I) regulates surface e...

  20. Natural antimicrobial peptide complexes in the fighting of antibiotic resistant biofilms: Calliphora vicina medicinal maggots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gordya

    Full Text Available Biofilms, sedimented microbial communities embedded in a biopolymer matrix cause vast majority of human bacterial infections and many severe complications such as chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Biofilms' resistance to the host immunity and antibiotics makes this kind of infection particularly intractable. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a ubiquitous facet of innate immunity in animals. However, AMPs activity was studied mainly on planktonic bacteria and little is known about their effects on biofilms. We studied structure and anti-biofilm activity of AMP complex produced by the maggots of blowfly Calliphora vicina living in environments extremely contaminated by biofilm-forming germs. The complex exhibits strong cell killing and matrix destroying activity against human pathogenic antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms as well as non-toxicity to human immune cells. The complex was found to contain AMPs from defensin, cecropin, diptericin and proline-rich peptide families simultaneously expressed in response to bacterial infection and encoded by hundreds mRNA isoforms. All the families combine cell killing and matrix destruction mechanisms, but the ratio of these effects and antibacterial activity spectrum are specific to each family. These molecules dramatically extend the list of known anti-biofilm AMPs. However, pharmacological development of the complex as a whole can provide significant advantages compared with a conventional one-component approach. In particular, a similar level of activity against biofilm and planktonic bacteria (MBEC/MIC ratio provides the complex advantage over conventional antibiotics. Available methods of the complex in situ and in vitro biosynthesis make this idea practicable.

  1. Natural antimicrobial peptide complexes in the fighting of antibiotic resistant biofilms: Calliphora vicina medicinal maggots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordya, Natalia; Yakovlev, Andrey; Kruglikova, Anastasia; Tulin, Dmitry; Potolitsina, Evdokia; Suborova, Tatyana; Bordo, Domenico; Rosano, Camillo; Chernysh, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms, sedimented microbial communities embedded in a biopolymer matrix cause vast majority of human bacterial infections and many severe complications such as chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Biofilms' resistance to the host immunity and antibiotics makes this kind of infection particularly intractable. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a ubiquitous facet of innate immunity in animals. However, AMPs activity was studied mainly on planktonic bacteria and little is known about their effects on biofilms. We studied structure and anti-biofilm activity of AMP complex produced by the maggots of blowfly Calliphora vicina living in environments extremely contaminated by biofilm-forming germs. The complex exhibits strong cell killing and matrix destroying activity against human pathogenic antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms as well as non-toxicity to human immune cells. The complex was found to contain AMPs from defensin, cecropin, diptericin and proline-rich peptide families simultaneously expressed in response to bacterial infection and encoded by hundreds mRNA isoforms. All the families combine cell killing and matrix destruction mechanisms, but the ratio of these effects and antibacterial activity spectrum are specific to each family. These molecules dramatically extend the list of known anti-biofilm AMPs. However, pharmacological development of the complex as a whole can provide significant advantages compared with a conventional one-component approach. In particular, a similar level of activity against biofilm and planktonic bacteria (MBEC/MIC ratio) provides the complex advantage over conventional antibiotics. Available methods of the complex in situ and in vitro biosynthesis make this idea practicable.

  2. Structure-activity relationship of CART peptide fragments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maletínská, Lenka; Maixnerová, Jana; Hlaváček, Jan; Blokešová, Darja; Elbert, Tomáš; Šanda, Miloslav; Slaninová, Jiřina; Železná, Blanka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2007), s. 565 ISSN 0006-3525. [American Peptide Society Symposium /20./. 26.06.2007-30.06.2007, Montreal] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript peptide * structure * activity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  3. Prediction of antibacterial activity from physicochemical properties of antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel N Melo

    Full Text Available Consensus is gathering that antimicrobial peptides that exert their antibacterial action at the membrane level must reach a local concentration threshold to become active. Studies of peptide interaction with model membranes do identify such disruptive thresholds but demonstrations of the possible correlation of these with the in vivo onset of activity have only recently been proposed. In addition, such thresholds observed in model membranes occur at local peptide concentrations close to full membrane coverage. In this work we fully develop an interaction model of antimicrobial peptides with biological membranes; by exploring the consequences of the underlying partition formalism we arrive at a relationship that provides antibacterial activity prediction from two biophysical parameters: the affinity of the peptide to the membrane and the critical bound peptide to lipid ratio. A straightforward and robust method to implement this relationship, with potential application to high-throughput screening approaches, is presented and tested. In addition, disruptive thresholds in model membranes and the onset of antibacterial peptide activity are shown to occur over the same range of locally bound peptide concentrations (10 to 100 mM, which conciliates the two types of observations.

  4. Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal,...

  5. Formation of taste-active amino acids, amino acid derivatives and peptides in food fermentations - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cindy J; Schieber, Andreas; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-11-01

    Fermented foods are valued for their rich and complex odour and taste. The metabolic activity of food-fermenting microorganisms determines food quality and generates odour and taste compounds. This communication reviews the formation of taste-active amino acids, amino acid derivatives and peptides in food fermentations. Pathways of the generation of taste compounds are presented for soy sauce, cheese, fermented meats, and bread. Proteolysis or autolysis during food fermentations generates taste-active amino acids and peptides; peptides derived from proteolysis particularly impart umami taste (e.g. α-glutamyl peptides) or bitter taste (e.g. hydrophobic peptides containing proline). Taste active peptide derivatives include pyroglutamyl peptides, γ-glutamyl peptides, and succinyl- or lactoyl amino acids. The influence of fermentation microbiota on proteolysis, and peptide hydrolysis, and the metabolism of glutamate and arginine is well understood, however, the understanding of microbial metabolic activities related to the formation of taste-active peptide derivatives is incomplete. Improved knowledge of the interactions between taste-active compounds will enable the development of novel fermentation strategies to develop tastier, less bitter, and low-salt food products, and may provide novel and "clean label" ingredients to improve the taste of other food products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Peptides of the Constant Region of Antibodies Display Fungicidal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C.; Pinto, Marcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  7. Peptides of the constant region of antibodies display fungicidal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Polonelli

    Full Text Available Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA of antibodies (Fc-peptides exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents.

  8. Orally active-targeted drug delivery systems for proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Yu, Miaorong; Fan, Weiwei; Gan, Yong; Hovgaard, Lars; Yang, Mingshi

    2014-09-01

    In the past decade, extensive efforts have been devoted to designing 'active targeted' drug delivery systems (ATDDS) to improve oral absorption of proteins and peptides. Such ATDDS enhance cellular internalization and permeability of proteins and peptides via molecular recognition processes such as ligand-receptor or antigen-antibody interaction, and thus enhance drug absorption. This review focuses on recent advances with orally ATDDS, including ligand-protein conjugates, recombinant ligand-protein fusion proteins and ligand-modified carriers. In addition to traditional intestinal active transport systems of substrates and their corresponding receptors, transporters and carriers, new targets such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and β-integrin are also discussed. ATDDS can improve oral absorption of proteins and peptides. However, currently, no clinical studies on ATDDS for proteins and peptides are underway, perhaps due to the complexity and limited knowledge of transport mechanisms. Therefore, more research is warranted to optimize ATDDS efficiency.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of GN peptides and their mode of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Jenssen, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    peptides due to their characteristics as naturally derived compounds with antimicrobial activity. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of a small set of in silico optimized peptides. Following determination of peptide activity against E. coli, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa......Increasing prevalence of bacteria that carries resistance towards conventional antibiotics has prompted the investigation into new compounds for bacterial intervention to ensure efficient infection control in the future. One group of potential lead structures for antibiotics is antimicrobial...

  10. Structure of HLA-A*1101 in complex with a hepatitis B peptide homologue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, Thomas; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    A high-resolution structure of the human MHC-I molecule HLA-A*1101 is presented in which it forms a complex with a sequence homologue of a peptide that occurs naturally in hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase. The sequence of the bound peptide is AIMPARFYPK, while that of the corresponding natural...

  11. Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyoung Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish from 2006 to the present.

  12. Structure of the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B in complex with TCR and peptide-MHC demonstrates absence of TCR-peptide contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödström, Karin E J; Elbing, Karin; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2014-08-15

    Superantigens are immune-stimulatory toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus, which are able to interact with host immune receptors to induce a massive release of cytokines, causing toxic shock syndrome and possibly death. In this article, we present the x-ray structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in complex with its receptors, the TCR and MHC class II, forming a ternary complex. The structure, in combination with functional analyses, clearly shows how SEB adopts a wedge-like position when binding to the β-chain of TCR, allowing for an interaction between the α-chain of TCR and MHC. Furthermore, the binding mode also circumvents contact between TCR and the peptide presented by MHC, which enables SEB to initiate a peptide-independent activation of T cells. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. The role of formyl peptide receptors for immunomodulatory activities of antimicrobial peptides and peptidomimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Holdfeldt, André; Forsman, Huamei

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as immunomodulators has become generally accepted. Nevertheless, only very few AMP-based compounds have progressed into clinical trials. This paradox may be explained by the fact, that some of the intrinsic properties...... displaying analogous immunomodulatory activity profiles. Neutrophils play key roles in host defense as major effector cells in clearance of pathogens by phagocytosis and by regulating other processes of innate immunity as well as promotion of resolution of inflammation. Several aspects of these effects...... are correlated to their expression of formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) that have been shown to be targets of both natural and synthetic antimicrobial peptides. In the present review recent findings highlighting the role of FPRs in mediating immunomodulatory activities of natural and synthetic AMPs as well...

  14. Fungicidal activity of peptides encoded by immunoglobulin genes

    OpenAIRE

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Sperind?, Martina; Giovati, Laura; D?Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; Travassos, Luiz R.; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Evidence from previous works disclosed the antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-tumour and/or immunomodulatory activity exerted, through different mechanisms of action, by peptides expressed in the complementarity-determining regions or even in the constant region of antibodies, independently from their specificity and isotype. Presently, we report the selection, from available databases, of peptide sequences encoded by immunoglobulin genes for the evaluation of their potential biological activitie...

  15. Structure-activity relationship of crustacean peptide hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    In crustaceans, various physiological events, such as molting, vitellogenesis, and sex differentiation, are regulated by peptide hormones. To understanding the functional sites of these hormones, many structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have been published. In this review, the author focuses the SAR of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-family peptides and androgenic gland hormone and describes the detailed results of our and other research groups. The future perspectives will be also discussed.

  16. Peptide-mediated vectorization of metal complexes: conjugation strategies and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Marta; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta; Ribas, Xavi; Costas, Miquel

    2016-08-16

    The rich chemical and structural versatility of transition metal complexes provides numerous novel paths to be pursued in the design of molecules that exert particular chemical or physicochemical effects that could operate over specific biological targets. However, the poor cell permeability of metallodrugs represents an important barrier for their therapeutic use. The conjugation between metal complexes and a functional peptide vector can be regarded as a versatile and potential strategy to improve their bioavailability and accumulation inside cells, and the site selectivity of their effect. This perspective lies in reviewing the recent advances in the design of metallopeptide conjugates for biomedical applications. Additionally, we highlight the studies where this approach has been directed towards the incorporation of redox active metal centers into living organisms for modulating the cellular redox balance, as a tool with application in anticancer therapy.

  17. Improved proteolytic stability and potent activity against Leishmania infantum trypanothione reductase of α/β-peptide foldamers conjugated to cell-penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucio, Héctor; Gamo, Ana María; Ruiz-Santaquiteria, Marta; de Castro, Sonia; Sánchez-Murcia, Pedro A; Toro, Miguel A; Gutiérrez, Kilian Jesús; Gago, Federico; Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2017-11-10

    The objective of the current study was to enhance the proteolytic stability of peptide-based inhibitors that target critical protein-protein interactions at the dimerization interface of Leishmania infantum trypanothione reductase (Li-TryR) using a backbone modification strategy. To achieve this goal we carried out the synthesis, proteolytic stability studies and biological evaluation of a small library of α/β 3 -peptide foldamers of different length (from 9-mers to 13-mers) and different α→β substitution patterns related to prototype linear α-peptides. We show that several 13-residue α/β 3 -peptide foldamers retain inhibitory potency against the enzyme (in both activity and dimerization assays) while they are far less susceptible to proteolytic degradation than an analogous α-peptide. The strong dependence of the binding affinities for Li-TryR on the length of the α,β-peptides is supported by theoretical calculations on conformational ensembles of the resulting complexes. The conjugation of the most proteolytically stable α/β-peptide with oligoarginines results in a molecule with potent activity against L. infantum promastigotes and amastigotes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells by recombinant plate bound MHC/peptide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben G W; Buus, Soren; Thorn, Mette

    2009-01-01

    to in vitro T cell stimulation was investigated. By use of an antigenic peptide derived from the cytomegalovirus (CMVp) we tested the stimulatory efficacy of recombinant plate bound MHC molecules (PB-MHC), being immobilized in culture plates. A single stimulation of non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear...

  19. Structural requirements and biological significance of interactions between peptides and the major histocompatibility complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, H M; Buus, S; Colon, S

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that T cells recognize a complex between the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction-element and peptide-antigen fragments. Two aspects of this complex formation are considered in this paper: (1) what is the nature of the specificity of the interactions that a...... of binding to Ia (i.e. determinant selection was operative), we found that about 40% of Ia-binding peptides were not immunogenic (i.e. there were also 'holes in the T-cell repertoire')....... responsiveness, we present data that suggest both mechanisms operate in concert with one another. Thus only about 30% of a collection of peptides that in sum represent the sequence of a protein molecule were found to bind to Ia. Although immunogenicity was restricted to those peptides that were capable...

  20. Bioorthogonal Diversification of Peptides through Selective Ruthenium(II)-Catalyzed C-H Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schischko, Alexandra; Ren, Hongjun; Kaplaneris, Nikolaos; Ackermann, Lutz

    2017-02-01

    Methods for the chemoselective modification of amino acids and peptides are powerful techniques in biomolecular chemistry. Among other applications, they enable the total synthesis of artificial peptides. In recent years, significant momentum has been gained by exploiting palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling for peptide modification. Despite major advances, the prefunctionalization elements on the coupling partners translate into undesired byproduct formation and lengthy synthetic operations. In sharp contrast, we herein illustrate the unprecedented use of versatile ruthenium(II)carboxylate catalysis for the step-economical late-stage diversification of α- and β-amino acids, as well as peptides, through chemo-selective C-H arylation under racemization-free reaction conditions. The ligand-accelerated C-H activation strategy proved water-tolerant and set the stage for direct fluorescence labelling as well as various modes of peptide ligation with excellent levels of positional selectivity in a bioorthogonal fashion. The synthetic utility of our approach is further demonstrated by twofold C-H arylations for the complexity-increasing assembly of artificial peptides within a multicatalytic C-H activation manifold. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Crystal structure of importin-{alpha} complexed with a classic nuclear localization sequence obtained by oriented peptide library screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, A.A.S.; Fontes, M.R.M. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Yang, S.N.Y. [University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Harris, J.M. [Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Jans, D.A. [Monash University, Clayton (Australia); Kobe, B. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, QU (Australia)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Importin-{alpha} (Imp{alpha}) plays a role in the classical nuclear import pathway, binding to cargo proteins with activities in the nucleus. Different Imp{alpha} paralogs responsible for specific cargos can be found in a single organism. The cargos contain nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), which are characterized by one or two clusters of basic amino acids (monopartite and bipartite NLSs, respectively). In this work we present the crystal structure of Imp{alpha} from M. musculus (residues 70-529, lacking the auto inhibitory domain) bound to a NLS peptide (pepTM). The peptide corresponds to the optimal sequence obtained by an oriented peptide library experiment designed to probe the specificity of the major NLS binding site. The peptide library used five degenerate positions and identified the sequence KKKRR as the optimal sequence for binding to this site for mouse Imp{alpha} (70-529). The protein was obtained using an E. coli expression system and purified by affinity chromatography followed by an ion exchange chromatography. A single crystal of Imp{alpha} -pepTM complex was grown by the hanging drop method. The data were collected using the Synchrotron Radiation Source LNLS, Brazil and processed to 2.3. Molecular replacement techniques were used to determine the crystal structure. Electron density corresponding to the peptide was present in both major and minor binding sites The peptide is bound to Imp{alpha} similar as the simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumour (T)-antigen NLS. Binding assays confirmed that the peptide bound to Imp{alpha} with low nM affinities. This is the first time that structural information has been linked to an oriented peptide library screening approach for importin-{alpha}; the results will contribute to understanding of the sequence determinants of classical NLSs, and may help identify as yet unidentified classical NLSs in novel proteins. (author)

  2. Novel peptide-based platform for the dual presentation of biologically active peptide motifs on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Fraioli, Roberta; Albericio, Fernando; Manero, José María; Gil, F Javier

    2014-05-14

    Biofunctionalization of metallic materials with cell adhesive molecules derived from the extracellular matrix is a feasible approach to improve cell-material interactions and enhance the biointegration of implant materials (e.g., osseointegration of bone implants). However, classical biomimetic strategies may prove insufficient to elicit complex and multiple biological signals required in the processes of tissue regeneration. Thus, newer strategies are focusing on installing multifunctionality on biomaterials. In this work, we introduce a novel peptide-based divalent platform with the capacity to simultaneously present distinct bioactive peptide motifs in a chemically controlled fashion. As a proof of concept, the integrin-binding sequences RGD and PHSRN were selected and introduced in the platform. The biofunctionalization of titanium with this platform showed a positive trend towards increased numbers of cell attachment, and statistically higher values of spreading and proliferation of osteoblast-like cells compared to control noncoated samples. Moreover, it displayed statistically comparable or improved cell responses compared to samples coated with the single peptides or with an equimolar mixture of the two motifs. Osteoblast-like cells produced higher levels of alkaline phosphatase on surfaces functionalized with the platform than on control titanium; however, these values were not statistically significant. This study demonstrates that these peptidic structures are versatile tools to convey multiple biofunctionality to biomaterials in a chemically defined manner.

  3. [BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES FROM CHICKENS THROMBOCYTES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sycheva, M V; Vasilchenko, A S; Rogozhin, E A; Pashkova, T M; Popova, L P; Kartashova, O L

    2016-01-01

    Isolation and study of biological activity of antimicrobial peptides from chickens thrombocytes. Peptides from chickens thrombocytes, obtained by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method with stepped and linear gradients of concentration increase of the organic solvent were used in the study. Their antimicrobial activity was determined by microtitration method in broth; mechanism of biological effect--by using fluorescent spectroscopy method with DNA-tropic dyes. Individual fractions of peptides were isolated from chickens thrombocytes, that possess antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus P209 and Escherichia coli K12. A disruption of integrity of barrier structures of microorganisms under the effect of thrombocyte antimicrobial peptides and predominance of cells with damaged membrane in the population of E. coli was established. The data obtained on antimicrobial activity and mechanism of bactericidal effect of the peptide fractions from chickens thrombocytes isolated for the first time expand the understanding of functional properties of chickens thrombocytes and open a perspective for their further study with the aim of use as antimicrobial means.

  4. Intervention with Serine Protease Activity with Small Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases perform proteolytic reactions in many physiological and metabolic processes and have been certified as targets for therapeutics. Small peptides can be used as potent antagonists to target serine proteases and intervene with their activities. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u......PA) plays an important role in plasminogen activation system, which has many physiological and pathological functions and is closely associated with the metastasis of tumor cells. Based on a mono-cyclic peptidic inhibitor of murine uPA (muPA), mupain-1, which was screened out from a phage-display library...... before, we elucidated the binding and inhibitory mechanism by using multiple techniques, like X-ray crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance analysis. By studying the peptide-enzyme interaction, we discovered an unusual inhibitor...

  5. New horizons in mouse immunoinformatics: reliable in silico prediction of mouse class I histocompatibility major complex peptide binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2004-11-21

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis is a main cornerstone of modern informatic disciplines. Predictive computational models, based on QSAR technology, of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding affinity have now become a vital component of modern day computational immunovaccinology. Historically, such approaches have been built around semi-qualitative, classification methods, but these are now giving way to quantitative regression methods. The additive method, an established immunoinformatics technique for the quantitative prediction of peptide-protein affinity, was used here to identify the sequence dependence of peptide binding specificity for three mouse class I MHC alleles: H2-D(b), H2-K(b) and H2-K(k). As we show, in terms of reliability the resulting models represent a significant advance on existing methods. They can be used for the accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes and are freely available online ( http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred).

  6. Deciphering complex patterns of class-I HLA-peptide cross-reactivity via hierarchical grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sumanta; Warwicker, Jim; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2015-07-01

    T-cell responses in humans are initiated by the binding of a peptide antigen to a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule. The peptide-HLA complex then recruits an appropriate T cell, leading to cell-mediated immunity. More than 2000 HLA class-I alleles are known in humans, and they vary only in their peptide-binding grooves. The polymorphism they exhibit enables them to bind a wide range of peptide antigens from diverse sources. HLA molecules and peptides present a complex molecular recognition pattern, as many peptides bind to a given allele and a given peptide can be recognized by many alleles. A powerful grouping scheme that not only provides an insightful classification, but is also capable of dissecting the physicochemical basis of recognition specificity is necessary to address this complexity. We present a hierarchical classification of 2010 class-I alleles by using a systematic divisive clustering method. All-pair distances of alleles were obtained by comparing binding pockets in the structural models. By varying the similarity thresholds, a multilevel classification was obtained, with 7 supergroups, each further subclassifying to yield 72 groups. An independent clustering performed based only on similarities in their epitope pools correlated highly with pocket-based clustering. Physicochemical feature combinations that best explain the basis of clustering are identified. Mutual information calculated for the set of peptide ligands enables identification of binding site residues contributing to peptide specificity. The grouping of HLA molecules achieved here will be useful for rational vaccine design, understanding disease susceptibilities and predicting risk of organ transplants.

  7. Relationships between Cargo, Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cell Type for Uptake of Non-Covalent Complexes into Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea-Anneliese Keller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Modulating signaling pathways for research and therapy requires either suppression or expression of selected genes or internalization of proteins such as enzymes, antibodies, nucleotide binding proteins or substrates including nucleoside phosphates and enzyme inhibitors. Peptides, proteins and nucleotides are transported by fusing or conjugating them to cell penetrating peptides or by formation of non-covalent complexes. The latter is often preferred because of easy handling, uptake efficiency and auto-release of cargo into the live cell. In our studies complexes are formed with labeled or readily detectable cargoes for qualitative and quantitative estimation of their internalization. Properties and behavior of adhesion and suspension vertebrate cells as well as the protozoa Leishmania tarentolae are investigated with respect to proteolytic activity, uptake efficiency, intracellular localization and cytotoxicity. Our results show that peptide stability to membrane-bound, secreted or intracellular proteases varies between different CPPs and that the suitability of individual CPPs for a particular cargo in complex formation by non-covalent interactions requires detailed studies. Cells vary in their sensitivity to increasing concentrations of CPPs. Thus, most cells can be efficiently transduced with peptides, proteins and nucleotides with intracellular concentrations in the low micromole range. For each cargo, cell type and CPP the optimal conditions must be determined separately.

  8. Antibacterial activity in bovine lactoferrin-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, K S; Milne, J M; Grieve, P A; Dionysius, D A; Smith, R

    1997-01-01

    Several peptides sharing high sequence homology with lactoferricin B (Lf-cin B) were generated from bovine lactoferrin (Lf) with recombinant chymosin. Two peptides were copurified, one identical to Lf-cin B and another differing from Lf-cin B by the inclusion of a C-terminal alanine (lactoferricin). Two other peptides were copurified from chymosin-hydrolyzed Lf, one differing from Lf-cin B by the inclusion of C-terminal alanyl-leucine and the other being a heterodimer linked by a disulfide bond. These peptides were isolated in a single step from chymosin-hydrolyzed Lf by membrane ion-exchange chromatography and were purified by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). They were characterized by N-terminal Edman sequencing, mass spectrometry, and antibacterial activity determination. Pure lactoferricin, prepared from pepsin-hydrolyzed Lf, was purified by standard chromatography techniques. This peptide was analyzed against a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria before and after reduction of its disulfide bond or cleavage after its single methionine residue and was found to inhibit the growth of all the test bacteria at a concentration of 8 microM or less. Subfragments of lactoferricin were isolated from reduced and cleaved peptide by reverse-phase HPLC. Subfragment 1 (residues 1 to 10) was active against most of the test microorganisms at concentrations of 10 to 50 microM. Subfragment 2 (residues 11 to 26) was active against only a few microorganisms at concentrations up to 100 microM. These antibacterial studies indicate that the activity of lactoferricin is mainly, but not wholly, due to its N-terminal region. PMID:8980754

  9. Hepatoma targeting peptide conjugated bio-reducible polymer complexed with oncolytic adenovirus for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joung-Woo; Kim, Hyun Ah; Nam, Kihoon; Na, Youjin; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, SungWan

    2015-12-28

    Despite adenovirus (Ad) vector's numerous advantages for cancer gene therapy, such as high ability of endosomal escape, efficient nuclear entry mechanism, and high transduction, and therapeutic efficacy, tumor specific targeting and antiviral immune response still remain as a critical challenge in clinical setting. To overcome these obstacles and achieve cancer-specific targeting, we constructed tumor targeting bioreducible polymer, an arginine grafted bio-reducible polymer (ABP)-PEG-HCBP1, by conjugating PEGylated ABP with HCBP1 peptides which has high affinity and selectivity towards hepatoma. The ABP-PEG-HCBP1-conjugated replication incompetent GFP-expressing ad, (Ad/GFP)-ABP-PEG-HCBP1, showed a hepatoma cancer specific uptake and transduction compared to either naked Ad/GFP or Ad/GFP-ABP. Competition assays demonstrated that Ad/GFP-ABP-PEG-HCBP1-mediated transduction was specifically inhibited by HCBP1 peptide rather than coxsackie and adenovirus receptor specific antibody. In addition, ABP-PEG-HCBP1 can protect biological activity of Ad against serum, and considerably reduced both innate and adaptive immune response against Ad. shMet-expressing oncolytic Ad (oAd; RdB/shMet) complexed with ABP-PEG-HCBP1 delivered oAd efficiently into hepatoma cancer cells. The oAd/ABP-PEG-HCBP1 demonstrated enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy in comparison to oAd/ABP complex. Furthermore, Huh7 and HT1080 cancer cells treated with oAd/shMet-ABP-PEG-HCBP1 complex had significantly decreased Met and VEGF expression in hepatoma cancer, but not in non-hepatoma cancer. In sum, these results suggest that HCBP1-conjugated bioreducible polymer could be used to deliver oncolytic Ad safely and efficiently to treat hepatoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Designed beta-boomerang antiendotoxic and antimicrobial peptides: structures and activities in lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Anirban; Mohanram, Harini; Domadia, Prerna N; Torres, Jaume; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2009-08-14

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an integral part of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, is involved in a variety of biological processes including inflammation, septic shock, and resistance to host-defense molecules. LPS also provides an environment for folding of outer membrane proteins. In this work, we describe the structure-activity correlation of a series of 12-residue peptides in LPS. NMR structures of the peptides derived in complex with LPS reveal boomerang-like beta-strand conformations that are stabilized by intimate packing between the two aromatic residues located at the 4 and 9 positions. This structural feature renders these peptides with a high ability to neutralize endotoxicity, >80% at 10 nM concentration, of LPS. Replacements of these aromatic residues either with Ala or with Leu destabilizes the boomerang structure with the concomitant loss of antiendotoxic and antimicrobial activities. Furthermore, the aromatic packing stabilizing the beta-boomerang structure in LPS is found to be maintained even in a truncated octapeptide, defining a structured LPS binding motif. The mode of action of the active designed peptides correlates well with their ability to perturb LPS micelle structures. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of the peptides delineate beta-type conformations and immobilization of phosphate head groups of LPS. Trp fluorescence studies demonstrated selective interactions with LPS and the depth of insertion into the LPS bilayer. Our results demonstrate the requirement of LPS-specific structures of peptides for endotoxin neutralizations. In addition, we propose that structures of these peptides may be employed to design proteins for the outer membrane.

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide and feeding activity patterns in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira M.H.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents historical data about atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP from its discovery as an atrial natriuretic factor (ANF to its role as an atrial natriuretic hormone (ANH. As a hormone, ANP can interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-A and is related to feeding activity patterns in the rat. Food restriction proved to be an interesting model to investigate this relationship. The role of ANP must be understood within a context of peripheral and central interactions involving different peptides and pathways

  12. Conformational determinants of phosphotyrosine peptides complexed with the Src SH2 domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Nachman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of specific SH2 domain mediated protein-protein interactions as an effective chemotherapeutic approach in the treatment of diseases remains a challenge. That different conformations of peptide-ligands are preferred by different SH2 domains is an underappreciated observation from the structural analysis of phosphotyrosine peptide binding to SH2 domains that may aid in future drug design. To explore the nature of ligand binding, we use simulated annealing (SA to sample the conformational space of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides complexed with the Src SH2 domain. While in good agreement with the crystallographic and NMR studies of high-affinity phosphopeptide-SH2 domain complexes, the results suggest that the structural basis for phopsphopeptide- Src SH2 interactions is more complex than the "two-pronged plug two-hole socket" model. A systematic study of peptides of type pYEEX, where pY is phosphotyrosine and X is a hydrophobic residue, indicates that these peptides can assume two conformations, one extended and one helical, representing the balance between the interaction of residue X with the hydrophobic hole on the surface of the Src SH2 domain, and its contribution to the inherent tendency of the two glutamic acids to form an alpha-helix. In contrast, a beta-turn conformation, almost identical to that observed in the crystal structure of pYVNV bound to the Grb2 SH2 domain, predominates for pYXNX peptides, even in the presence of isoleucine at the third position. While peptide binding affinities, as measured by fluorescence polarization, correlate with the relative proportion of extended peptide conformation, these results suggest a model where all three residues C-terminal to the phosphotyrosine determine the conformation of the bound phosphopeptide. The information obtained in this work can be used in the design of specific SH2 domain inhibitors.

  13. Intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides upon collisional activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Gårdsvoll, H.; Ploug, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presently different opinions exist as to the degree of scrambling of amide hydrogens in gaseous protonated peptides and proteins upon collisional activation in tandem mass spectrometry experiments. This unsettled controversy is not trivial, since only a very low degree of scrambling is tolerable...... if collision-induced dissociation (CID) should provide reliable site-specific information from (1)H/(2)H exchange experiments. We have explored a series of unique, regioselectively deuterium-labeled peptides as model systems to probe for intramolecular amide hydrogen migration under low-energy collisional...... are protected against exchange with the solvent, while the amide hydrogens of the nonbinding sequences exchange rapidly with the solvent. We have utilized such long-lived complexes to generate peptides labeled with deuterium in either the binding or nonbinding region, and the expected regioselectivity...

  14. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data......In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...

  15. Directing the phase behavior of polyelectrolyte complexes using chiral patterned peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacalin, Naomi M.; Leon, Lorraine; Tirrell, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) have a broad range of promising applications as soft materials due to their self-assembly and diversity of structure and chemical composition. Peptide polymer PECs are highly biocompatible and biodegradable, making them particularly useful for encapsulation of food additives and flavors, micellar drug delivery, medical and underwater adhesives, fetal membrane patches, and scaffolds for cell growth in tissue engineering. While parameters affecting PEC formation and stability in regards to charge effects are well researched, little is known about the effects of van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding, and secondary structure in these materials. Peptide chirality provides a unique opportunity to manipulate PEC phase to modulate the amount of solid-like (precipitate) or liquid-like (coacervate) character by influencing hydrogen bonding interactions among peptide chains. In previous work, we showed that chiral peptides form solid complexes, while complexes with even one racemic peptide were fluid. This raised the interesting question of how long a homochiral sequence must be to result in solid phase formation. In this work, we designed chiral patterned peptides of polyglutamic acid and polylysine ranging from 50 to 90% L-chiral residues with increasing numbers of sequential L-chiral residues before a chirality change. These polymers were mixed together to form PECs. We observed that 8 or more sequential L-chiral residues are necessary to achieve both the appearance of a precipitate phase and sustained beta-sheets in the complex, as determined by optical imaging and FTIR Spectroscopy. Less homochiral content results in formation of a coacervate phase. Thus, we show that chiral sequence can be used to control the phase transition of PECs. Understanding how to manipulate PEC phase using chiral sequence as presented here may enable tuning of the material properties to achieve the desired mechanical strength for coatings and polymer

  16. Directing the phase behavior of polyelectrolyte complexes using chiral patterned peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacalin, Naomi M.; Leon, Lorraine; Tirrell, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) have a broad range of promising applications as soft materials due to their self-assembly and diversity of structure and chemical composition. Peptide polymer PECs are highly biocompatible and biodegradable, making them particularly useful for encapsulation of food additives and flavors, micellar drug delivery, medical and underwater adhesives, fetal membrane patches, and scaffolds for cell growth in tissue engineering. While parameters affecting PEC formation and stability in regards to charge effects are well researched, little is known about the effects of van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding, and secondary structure in these materials. Peptide chirality provides a unique opportunity to manipulate PEC phase to modulate the amount of solid-like (precipitate) or liquid-like (coacervate) character by influencing hydrogen bonding interactions among peptide chains. In previous work, we showed that chiral peptides form solid complexes, while complexes with even one racemic peptide were fluid. This raised the interesting question of how long a homochiral sequence must be to result in solid phase formation. In this work, we designed chiral patterned peptides of polyglutamic acid and polylysine ranging from 50 to 90% L-chiral residues with increasing numbers of sequential L-chiral residues before a chirality change. These polymers were mixed together to form PECs. We observed that 8 or more sequential L-chiral residues are necessary to achieve both the appearance of a precipitate phase and sustained β-sheets in the complex, as determined by optical imaging and FTIR Spectroscopy. Less homochiral content results in formation of a coacervate phase. Thus, we show that chiral sequence can be used to control the phase transition of PECs. Understanding how to manipulate PEC phase using chiral sequence as presented here may enable tuning of the material properties to achieve the desired mechanical strength for coatings and polymer

  17. Simultaneous membrane interaction of amphipathic peptide monomers, self-aggregates and cargo complexes detected by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Luís; Lehto, Tõnis; Madani, Fatemeh; Radoi, Vlad; Hällbrink, Mattias; Vukojević, Vladana; Langel, Ülo

    2018-02-01

    Peptides able to translocate cell membranes while carrying macromolecular cargo, as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), can contribute to the field of drug delivery by enabling the transport of otherwise membrane impermeable molecules. Formation of non-covalent complexes between amphipathic peptides and oligonucleotides is driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Here we investigate and quantify the coexistence of distinct molecular species in multiple equilibria, namely peptide monomer, peptide self-aggregates and peptide/oligonucleotide complexes. As a model for the complexes, we used a stearylated peptide from the PepFect family, PF14 and siRNA. PF14 has a cationic part and a lipid part, resembling some characteristics of cationic lipids. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) were used to detect distinct molecular entities in solution and at the plasma membrane of live cells. For that, we labeled the peptide with carboxyrhodamine 6G and the siRNA with Cyanine 5. We were able to detect fluorescent entities with diffusional properties characteristic of the peptide monomer as well as of peptide aggregates and peptide/oligonucleotide complexes. Strategies to avoid peptide adsorption to solid surfaces and self-aggregation were developed and allowed successful FCS measurements in solution and at the plasma membrane. The ratio between the detected molecular species was found to vary with pH, peptide concentration and the proximity to the plasma membrane. The present results suggest that the diverse cellular uptake mechanisms, often reported for amphipathic CPPs, might result from the synergistic effect of peptide monomers, self-aggregates and cargo complexes, distributed unevenly at the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical activity influence neuronal survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenneman, D.E.; Eiden, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Blockage of electrical activity in dissociated spinal cord cultures results in a significant loss of neurons during a critical period in development. Decreases in neuronal cell numbers and 125 I-labeled tetanus toxin fixation produced by electrical blockage with tetrodotoxin (TTX) were prevented by addition of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the nutrient medium. The most effective concentration of VIP was 0.1 nM. At higher concentrations, the survival-enhancing effect of VIP on TTX-treated cultures was attenuated. Addition of the peptide alone had no significant effect on neuronal cell counts or tetanus toxin fixation. With the same experimental conditions, two closely related peptides, PHI-27 (peptide, histidyl-isoleucine amide) and secretin, were found not to increase the number of neurons in TTX-treated cultures. Interference with VIP action by VIP antiserum resulted in neuronal losses that were not significantly different from those observed after TTX treatment. These data indicate that under conditions of electrical blockade a neurotrophic action of VIP on neuronal survival can be demonstrated

  19. β-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2014-04-21

    Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammations are among some of the most  prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt β-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the β-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, β-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules.

  20. β-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harini Mohanram

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated inflammations are among some of the most  prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt β-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the β-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, β-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules.

  1. Crystal structure of a TAPBPR–MHC I complex reveals the mechanism of peptide editing in antigen presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiansheng; Natarajan, Kannan; Boyd, Lisa F.; Morozov, Giora I.; Mage, Michael G.; Margulies, David H. (NIH); (Hebrew)

    2017-10-12

    Central to CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity is the recognition of peptide–major histocompatibility complex class I (p–MHC I) proteins displayed by antigen-presenting cells. Chaperone-mediated loading of high-affinity peptides onto MHC I is a key step in the MHC I antigen presentation pathway. However, the structure of MHC I with a chaperone that facilitates peptide loading has not been determined. We report the crystal structure of MHC I in complex with the peptide editor TAPBPR (TAP-binding protein–related), a tapasin homolog. TAPBPR remodels the peptide-binding groove of MHC I, resulting in the release of low-affinity peptide. Changes include groove relaxation, modifications of key binding pockets, and domain adjustments. This structure captures a peptide-receptive state of MHC I and provides insights into the mechanism of peptide editing by TAPBPR and, by analogy, tapasin.

  2. Selective Sensing of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Peptides Using Terbium(III Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sumaoka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins, as well as their dephosphorylation, is closely related to various diseases. However, this phosphorylation is usually accompanied by more abundant phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues in the proteins and covers only 0.05% of the total phosphorylation. Accordingly, highly selective detection of phosphorylated tyrosine in proteins is an urgent subject. In this review, recent developments in this field are described. Monomeric and binuclear TbIII complexes, which emit notable luminescence only in the presence of phosphotyrosine (pTyr, have been developed. There, the benzene ring of pTyr functions as an antenna and transfers its photoexcitation energy to the TbIII ion as the emission center. Even in the coexistence of phosphoserine (pSer and phosphothreonine (pThr, pTyr can be efficintly detected with high selectivity. Simply by adding these TbIII complexes to the solutions, phosphorylation of tyrosine in peptides by protein tyrosine kinases and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatases can be successfully visualized in a real-time fashion. Furthermore, the activities of various inhibitors on these enzymes are quantitatively evaluated, indicating a strong potential of the method for efficient screening of eminent inhibitors from a number of candidates.

  3. Epimerization-free C-terminal peptide activation, elongation and cyclization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popović, S.

    2015-01-01

    C-terminal peptide activation and cyclization reactions are generally accompanied with epimerization (partial loss of C‐terminal stereointegrity). Therefore, the focus of this thesis was to develop epimerization-free methods for C-terminal peptide activation to enable C-terminal peptide elongation

  4. Antioxidant Activity of Purified Active Peptide Derived from Spirulina platensis Enzymatic Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Maulida Safitri; Endang Yuli Herawati; Jue Liang Hsu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to isolate the antioxidative peptide from Spirulina platensis. Peptide was obtained by proteolytic digestion, ultrafiltration, fractionation by RP-HPLC, identified by LC-MS/MS—MASCOT Distiller and measured its antioxidant activity by DPPH (2.2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay. Results showed that thermolysin was the most effective enzyme to digest this algae. The active peptide Phe-Ser-Glu-Ser-Ser-Ala-Pro-Glu-Gln-His-Tyr (m/z 1281.51) was identified and synthetized, w...

  5. Anxiolytic-Like Effect of a Salmon Phospholipopeptidic Complex Composed of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Belhaj

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A phospholipopeptidic complex obtained by the enzymatic hydrolysis of salmon heads in green conditions; exert anxiolytic-like effects in a time and dose-dependent manner, with no affection of locomotor activity. This study focused on the physico-chemical properties of the lipidic and peptidic fractions from this natural product. The characterization of mineral composition, amino acid and fatty acids was carried out. Stability of nanoemulsions allowed us to realize a behavioral study conducted with four different tests on 80 mice. This work highlighted the dose dependent effects of the natural complex and its various fractions over a period of 14 days compared to a conventional anxiolytic. The intracellular redox status of neural cells was evaluated in order to determine the free radicals scavenging potential of these products in the central nervous system (CNS, after mice sacrifice. The complex peptidic fraction showed a strong scavenging property and similar results were found for the complex as well as its lipidic fraction. For the first time, the results of this study showed the anxiolytic-like and neuroprotective properties of a phospholipopeptidic complex extracted from salmon head. The applications on anxiety disorders might be relevant, depending on the doses, the fraction used and the chronicity of the supplementation.

  6. Antioxidant activity of yoghurt peptides: Part 2 – Characterisationof peptide fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Baron, Caroline; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2010-01-01

    the peptides identified contained at least one proline residue. Some of the identified peptides included the hydrophobic amino acid residues Val or Leu at the N-terminus and Pro, His or Tyr in the amino acid sequence, which is characteristic of antioxidant peptides. In addition, the yoghurt contained...

  7. Quantification of HLA-DM-Dependent Major Histocompatibility Complex of Class II Immunopeptidomes by the Peptide Landscape Antigenic Epitope Alignment Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Álvaro-Benito

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex of class II (MHCII immunopeptidome represents the repertoire of antigenic peptides with the potential to activate CD4+ T cells. An understanding of how the relative abundance of specific antigenic epitopes affects the outcome of T cell responses is an important aspect of adaptive immunity and offers a venue to more rationally tailor T cell activation in the context of disease. Recent advances in mass spectrometric instrumentation, computational power, labeling strategies, and software analysis have enabled an increasing number of stratified studies on HLA ligandomes, in the context of both basic and translational research. A key challenge in the case of MHCII immunopeptidomes, often determined for different samples at distinct conditions, is to derive quantitative information on consensus epitopes from antigenic peptides of variable lengths. Here, we present the design and benchmarking of a new algorithm [peptide landscape antigenic epitope alignment utility (PLAtEAU] allowing the identification and label-free quantification (LFQ of shared consensus epitopes arising from series of nested peptides. The algorithm simplifies the complexity of the dataset while allowing the identification of nested peptides within relatively short segments of protein sequences. Moreover, we apply this algorithm to the comparison of the ligandomes of cell lines with two different expression levels of the peptide-exchange catalyst HLA-DM. Direct comparison of LFQ intensities determined at the peptide level is inconclusive, as most of the peptides are not significantly enriched due to poor sampling. Applying the PLAtEAU algorithm for grouping of the peptides into consensus epitopes shows that more than half of the total number of epitopes is preferentially and significantly enriched for each condition. This simplification and deconvolution of the complex and ambiguous peptide-level dataset highlights the value of the PLAt

  8. Synthesis and antioxidant activity of peptide-based ebselen analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheeshkumar, Kandhan; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2011-04-18

    A series of di- and tripeptide-based ebselen analogues has been synthesized. The compounds were characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (77)Se NMR spectroscopy and mass spectral techniques. The glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like antioxidant activity has been studied by using H(2)O(2) , tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBuOOH), and cumene hydroperoxide (Cum-OOH) as substrates, and glutathione (GSH) as a cosubstrate. Although all the peptide-based compounds have a selenazole ring similar to that of ebselen, the GPx activity of these compounds highly depends on the nature of the peptide moiety attached to the nitrogen atom of the selenazole ring. It was observed that the introduction of a phenylalanine (Phe) amino acid residue in the N-terminal reduces the activity in all three peroxide systems. On the other hand, the introduction of aliphatic amino acid residues such as valine (Val) significantly enhances the GPx activity of the ebselen analogues. The difference in the catalytic activity of dipeptide-based ebselen derivatives can be ascribed mainly to the change in the reactivity of these compounds toward GSH and peroxide. Although the presence of the Val-Ala-CO(2) Me moiety facilitates the formation of a catalytically active selenol species, the reaction of ebselen analogues that has a Phe-Ile-CO(2) Me residue with GSH does not generate the corresponding selenol. To understand the antioxidant activity of the peptide-based ebselen analogues in the absence of GSH, these compounds were studied for their ability to inhibit peroxynitrite (PN)-mediated nitration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123. In contrast to the GPx activity, the PN-scavenging activity of the Phe-based peptide analogues was found to be comparable to that of the Val-based compounds. However, the introduction of an additional Phe residue to the ebselen analogue that had a Val-Ala dipeptide significantly reduced the potency of the parent compound in PN-mediated nitration. Copyright

  9. Nitriles form mixed-coligand complexes with 99mTc-HYNIC-Peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozheng; Wescott, Charles; Sato, Aaron; Wang Yi; Liu Ning; Zhang Yumin; Rusckowski, Mary; Hnatowich, Donald J.

    2002-01-01

    Using a 12-amino acid peptide conjugated with HYNIC as a model, we investigated nitriles as possible coligands for labeling with 99m Tc. After the preparation of the 99m Tc labeled HYNIC-peptide using tricine as coligand, the addition of acetonitile was found by reverse phase HPLC to block further coligand exchange with ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) at room temperature. The addition of this nitrile changed the pharmacokinetics of the 99m Tc labeled peptide in normal mice towards faster clearance and significant differences in accumulation in most tissues sampled. By replacing acetonitrile with cyanoacetate, a nitrile not present in the HPLC eluant, it was possible to show the existence of a new, more hydrophilic, species by reverse phase HPLC. We conclude that nitriles can act as coligands for HYNIC-conjugated peptides labeled with 99m Tc and tricine. Furthermore, the presence of acetonitrile during Sep-Pak or HPLC purification may inadvertently generate a mixed tricine/acetonitile coligand 99m Tc-HYNIC-peptide complex

  10. Anti-dengue virus serotype 2 activity and mode of action of a novel peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, M-F; Tham, H-W; Rajik, M; Sharifah, S H

    2015-10-01

    To identify a novel antiviral peptide against dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) by screening a phage display peptide library and to evaluate its in vitro antiviral activity and mode of action. A phage display peptide library was biopanned against purified DENV-2 and resulted in the identification and selection of a peptide (peptide gg-ww) for further investigation. ELISA was performed, and peptide gg-ww was shown to possess the highest binding affinity against DENV-2. Thus, peptide gg-ww was synthesized for cytotoxicity and antiviral assays. Virus plaque reduction assay, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assay were used to investigate the inhibitory effect of peptide gg-ww on DENV-2 infection in Vero cells. Three different assays (pre-, simultaneous and post-treatments assays) were performed to investigate the peptide's mode of action. Results indicated that peptide gg-ww possessed strong antiviral activity with a ~96% inhibition rate, which was achieved at 250 μmol l(-1) . Viral replication was inhibited during a simultaneous treatment assay, indicating that the entry of the virus was impeded by this peptide. Peptide gg-ww displayed antiviral action against DENV-2 by targeting an early stage of viral replication (i.e. during viral entry). Peptide gg-ww may represent a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of DENV infections and is a potential candidate to be developed as a peptide drug. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Glycotriazole-peptides derived from the peptide HSP1: synergistic effect of triazole and saccharide rings on the antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior, Eduardo F C; Guimarães, Carlos F R C; Franco, Lucas L; Alves, Ricardo J; Kato, Kelly C; Martins, Helen R; de Souza Filho, José D; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Munhoz, Victor H O; Resende, Jarbas M; Verly, Rodrigo M

    2017-08-01

    This work proposes a strategy that uses solid-phase peptide synthesis associated with copper(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition reaction to promote the glycosylation of an antimicrobial peptide (HSP1) containing a carboxyamidated C-terminus (HSP1-NH 2 ). Two glycotriazole-peptides, namely [p-Glc-trz-G 1 ]HSP1-NH 2 and [p-GlcNAc-trz-G 1 ]HSP1-NH 2 , were prepared using per-O-acetylated azide derivatives of glucose and N-acetylglucosamine in the presence of copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO 4 ·5H 2 O) and sodium ascorbate as a reducing agent. In order to investigate the synergistic action of the carbohydrate motif linked to the triazole-peptide structure, a triazole derivative [trz-G 1 ]HSP1-NH 2 was also prepared. A set of biophysical approaches such as DLS, Zeta Potential, SPR and carboxyfluorescein leakage from phospholipid vesicles confirmed higher membrane disruption and lytic activities as well as stronger peptide-LUVs interactions for the glycotriazole-peptides when compared to HSP1-NH 2 and to its triazole derivative, which is in accordance with the performed biological assays: whereas HSP1-NH 2 presents relatively low and [trz-G 1 ]HSP1-NH 2 just moderate fungicidal activity, the glycotriazole-peptides are significantly more effective antifungal agents. In addition, the glycotriazole-peptides and the triazole derivative present strong inhibition effects on ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida albicans, when compared to HSP1-NH 2 alone. In conclusion, the increased fungicidal activity of the glycotriazole-peptides seems to be the result of (A) more pronounced membrane-disruptive properties, which is related to the presence of a saccharide ring, together with (B) the inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis, which seems to be related to the presence of both the monosaccharide and the triazole rings.

  12. Differential activity of innate defense antimicrobial peptides against Nocardia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Siegbert; Meier, Benjamin; Fähnrich, Eva; Huth, Anja; Wagner, Dirk; Kern, Winfried V; Kalbacher, Hubert

    2010-02-23

    Members of the genus Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes capable to cause human pulmonary, disseminated and cutaneous nocardiosis or bovine mastitis. Innate immunity appears to play an important role in early defense against Nocardia species. To elucidate the contribution of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in innate defense against Nocardia, the activity of human alpha-defensins human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) 1-3, human beta-defensin (hBD)-3 and cathelicidin LL-37 as well as bovine beta-defensins lingual and tracheal antimicrobial peptides (LAP, TAP) and bovine neutrophil-derived indolicidin against four important Nocardia species was investigated. Whereas N. farcinica ATCC 3318 and N. nova ATCC 33726 were found to be susceptible to all investigated human and bovine AMPs, N. asteroides ATCC 19247 was killed exclusively by neutrophil-derived human alpha-defensins HNP 1-3 and bovine indolicidin. N. brasiliensis ATCC 19296 was found to exhibit complete resistance to investigated human AMPs and to be susceptible only to bovine indolicidin. Selected AMPs are capable to contribute to the first line of defense against Nocardia, yet, susceptibility appears to vary across different Nocardia species. Obtained results of neutrophil-derived AMPs to possess the broadest antinocardial spectrum are remarkable, since nocardiosis is characterized by a neutrophil-rich infiltrate in vivo.

  13. Differential activity of innate defense antimicrobial peptides against Nocardia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Dirk

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the genus Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes capable to cause human pulmonary, disseminated and cutaneous nocardiosis or bovine mastitis. Innate immunity appears to play an important role in early defense against Nocardia species. To elucidate the contribution of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in innate defense against Nocardia, the activity of human α-defensins human neutrophil peptides (HNPs 1-3, human β-defensin (hBD-3 and cathelicidin LL-37 as well as bovine β-defensins lingual and tracheal antimicrobial peptides (LAP, TAP and bovine neutrophil-derived indolicidin against four important Nocardia species was investigated. Results Whereas N. farcinica ATCC 3318 and N. nova ATCC 33726 were found to be susceptible to all investigated human and bovine AMPs, N. asteroides ATCC 19247 was killed exclusively by neutrophil-derived human α-defensins HNP 1-3 and bovine indolicidin. N. brasiliensis ATCC 19296 was found to exhibit complete resistance to investigated human AMPs and to be susceptible only to bovine indolicidin. Conclusion Selected AMPs are capable to contribute to the first line of defense against Nocardia, yet, susceptibility appears to vary across different Nocardia species. Obtained results of neutrophil-derived AMPs to possess the broadest antinocardial spectrum are remarkable, since nocardiosis is characterized by a neutrophil-rich infiltrate in vivo.

  14. Investigating the inclusion properties of aromatic amino acids complexing beta-cyclodextrins in model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Jolanda Valentina; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Malgieri, Gaetano; Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Isernia, Carla; Iacovino, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are commonly used as complexing agents in biological, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications since they have an effect on protein thermal and proteolytic stability, refolding yields, solubility, and taste masking. β-cyclodextrins (β-CD), because of their cavity size are a perfectly suited complexing agent for many common guest moieties. In the case of peptide-cyclodextrin and protein-cyclodextrin host-guest complexes the aromatic amino acids are reported to be the principal responsible of the interaction. For these reasons, we have investigated the inclusion properties of nine designed tripeptides, obtained permuting the position of two L-alanines (Ala, A) with that of one L-tryptophan (Trp, W), L-phenylalanine (Phe, F), or L-tyrosine (Tyr, Y), respectively. Interestingly, the position of the aromatic side-chain in the sequence appears to modulate the β-CD:peptide binding constants, determined via UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopy, which in turn assumes values higher than those reported for the single amino acid. The tripeptides containing a tyrosine showed the highest binding constants, with the central position in the Ac-AYA-NH2 peptide becoming the most favorite for the interaction. A combined NMR and Molecular Docking approach permitted to build detailed complex models, highlighting the stabilizing interactions of the neighboring amino acids backbone atoms with the upper rim of the β-CD.

  15. Targeting of gelatinase activity with a radiolabeled cyclic HWGF peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnast, B.; Bodenstein, C.; Haubner, R.; Wester, H.J.; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, R.; Schwaiger, M.; Weber, W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of proteinases that play an important role in cancer as well as in numerous diseases. In this article, we describe the labeling of a phage display selected cyclic decapeptide containing the HWGF (histidine-tryptophane-glycine-phenylalanine) sequence to target MMP-2 and MMP-9. To evaluate the ability of this labeled peptide to monitor non invasively MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity, in vitro studies, biodistribution, competition studies and plasma metabolites analyses in Lewis Lung cancer tumor bearing mice were performed

  16. End-labeling of peptide nucleic acid with osmium complex. Voltammetry at carbon and mercury electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Trefulka, Mojmír; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2009), s. 359-362 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : peptide nucleic acid end-labeling * osmium tetroxide complexes * electroactive labels Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.243, year: 2009

  17. Labeling of Complex III peptides in beef heart mitochondria and submitochondrial particles by diazonium bensene [35S]sulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel-Hartvig, I.; Nelson, B.D.

    1978-01-01

    The labeling of Complex III peptides in DABS-treated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles from beef heart is reported. The results are consistent with the labeling of the two core proteins on the matrix surface of the inner membrane, and of a 29 000 molecular weight peptide on the cytoplasmic surface. (Auth.)

  18. Antiviral activity of the EB peptide against zoonotic poxviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altmann Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The EB peptide is a 20-mer that was previously shown to have broad spectrum in vitro activity against several unrelated viruses, including highly pathogenic avian influenza, herpes simplex virus type I, and vaccinia, the prototypic orthopoxvirus. To expand on this work, we evaluated EB for in vitro activity against the zoonotic orthopoxviruses cowpox and monkeypox and for in vivo activity in mice against vaccinia and cowpox. Findings In yield reduction assays, EB had an EC50 of 26.7 μM against cowpox and 4.4 μM against monkeypox. The EC50 for plaque reduction was 26.3 μM against cowpox and 48.6 μM against monkeypox. A scrambled peptide had no inhibitory activity against either virus. EB inhibited cowpox in vitro by disrupting virus entry, as evidenced by a reduction of the release of virus cores into the cytoplasm. Monkeypox was also inhibited in vitro by EB, but at the attachment stage of infection. EB showed protective activity in mice infected intranasally with vaccinia when co-administered with the virus, but had no effect when administered prophylactically one day prior to infection or therapeutically one day post-infection. EB had no in vivo activity against cowpox in mice. Conclusions While EB did demonstrate some in vivo efficacy against vaccinia in mice, the limited conditions under which it was effective against vaccinia and lack of activity against cowpox suggest EB may be more useful for studying orthopoxvirus entry and attachment in vitro than as a therapeutic against orthopoxviruses in vivo.

  19. Collisional Activation of Peptide Ions in FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade characterization of complex molecules, particularly biomolecules became a focus of both fundamental and applied research in mass spectrometry. Most of these studies utilize tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for obtaining structural information for complex molecules. . Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) typically involves the mass selection of a primary ion, its activation by collision or photon excitation, unimolecular decay into fragment ions characteristic of the ion structure and its internal excitation, and mass analysis of the fragment ions. Although the fundamental principles of tandem mass spectrometry of relatively small molecules are fairly well understood, our understanding of the activation and fragmentation of large molecules is much more primitive. For small ions a single energetic collision is sufficient to dissociate the ion but this is not the case for complex molecules. For large ions two fundamental limits severely constrain fragmentation in tandem mass spectrometry. First the center-of-mass collision energy?the absolute upper limit of energy transfer in a collision process?decreases with increasing mass of the projectile ion for fixed ion kinetic energy and neutral mass. Secondly, the dramatic increase in density of states with increasing internal degrees of freedom of the ion decreases the rate of dissociation by many orders of magnitude at a given internal energy. Consequently most practical MS/MS experiments with complex ions involve multiple collision activation (MCA-CID), multi-photon activation or surface-induced dissociation (SID). This review is focused on what has been learned in recent research studies concerned with fundamental aspects of MCA-CID and SID of model peptides with emphasis on experiments carried out using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS). These studies provide the first quantitative comparison of gas-phase multiple-collision activation and SID of peptide ions

  20. 'Collisional Activation of Peptide Ions in FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, Julia; Futrell, Jean H.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade characterization of complex molecules, particularly biomolecules became a focus of both fundamental and applied research in mass spectrometry. Most of these studies utilize tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for obtaining structural information for complex molecules. . Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) typically involves the mass selection of a primary ion, its activation by collision or photon excitation, unimolecular decay into fragment ions characteristic of the ion structure and its internal excitation, and mass analysis of the fragment ions. Although the fundamental principles of tandem mass spectrometry of relatively small molecules are fairly well understood, our understanding of the activation and fragmentation of large molecules is much more primitive. For small ions a single energetic collision is sufficient to dissociate the ion but this is not the case for complex molecules. For large ions two fundamental limits severely constrain fragmentation in tandem mass spectrometry. First the center-of-mass collision energy?the absolute upper limit of energy transfer in a collision process?decreases with increasing mass of the projectile ion for fixed ion kinetic energy and neutral mass. Secondly, the dramatic increase in density of states with increasing internal degrees of freedom of the ion decreases the rate of dissociation by many orders of magnitude at a given internal energy. Consequently most practical MS/MS experiments with complex ions involve multiple collision activation (MCA-CID), multi-photon activation or surface-induced dissociation (SID). This review is focused on what has been learned in recent research studies concerned with fundamental aspects of MCA-CID and SID of model peptides with emphasis on experiments carried out using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS). These studies provide the first quantitative comparison of gas-phase multiple-collision activation and SID of peptide ions

  1. Structure-activity relationships of an antimicrobial peptide plantaricin s from two-peptide class IIb bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Wael; Wang, Liru; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2011-04-14

    Class IIb bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides comprising two different peptides synergistically acting in equal amounts for optimal potency. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time potent (nanomolar) antimicrobial activity of a representative class IIb bacteriocin, plantaricin S (Pls), against four pathogenic gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes. The structure-activity relationships for Pls were studied using activity assays, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The two Pls peptides and five Pls derived fragments were synthesized. The CD spectra of the Pls and selected fragments revealed helical conformations in aqueous 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The MD simulations showed that when the two Pls peptides are in antiparallel orientation, the helical regions interact and align, mediated by strong attraction between conserved GxxxG/AxxxA motifs. The results strongly correlate with the antimicrobial activity suggesting that helix-helix alignment of the two Pls peptides and interaction between the conserved motifs are crucial for interaction with the target cell membrane.

  2. A general strategy to endow natural fusion-protein-derived peptides with potent antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Pessi

    Full Text Available Fusion between the viral and target cell membranes is an obligatory step for the infectivity of all enveloped virus, and blocking this process is a clinically validated therapeutic strategy.Viral fusion is driven by specialized proteins which, although specific to each virus, act through a common mechanism, the formation of a complex between two heptad repeat (HR regions. The HR regions are initially separated in an intermediate termed "prehairpin", which bridges the viral and cell membranes, and then fold onto each other to form a 6-helical bundle (6HB, driving the two membranes to fuse. HR-derived peptides can inhibit viral infectivity by binding to the prehairpin intermediate and preventing its transition to the 6HB.The antiviral activity of HR-derived peptides differs considerably among enveloped viruses. For weak inhibitors, potency can be increased by peptide engineering strategies, but sequence-specific optimization is time-consuming. In seeking ways to increase potency without changing the native sequence, we previously reported that attachment to the HR peptide of a cholesterol group ("cholesterol-tagging" dramatically increases its antiviral potency, and simultaneously increases its half-life in vivo. We show here that antiviral potency may be increased by combining cholesterol-tagging with dimerization of the HR-derived sequence, using as examples human parainfluenza virus, Nipah virus, and HIV-1. Together, cholesterol-tagging and dimerization may represent strategies to boost HR peptide potency to levels that in some cases may be compatible with in vivo use, possibly contributing to emergency responses to outbreaks of existing or novel viruses.

  3. Identification of constrained peptides that bind to and preferentially inhibit the activity of the hepatitis C viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Anthony; Zaccardi, Joe; Mullen, Stanley; Olland, Stephane; Orlowski, Mark; Feld, Boris; Labonte, Patrick; Mak, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A class of disulfide constrained peptides containing a core motif FPWG was identified from a screen of phage displayed library using the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) as a bait. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that three highly purified synthetic constrained peptides bound to immobilized NS5B with estimated K d values ranging from 30 to 60 μM. In addition, these peptides inhibited the NS5B activity in vitro with IC 50 ranging from 6 to 48 μM, whereas in contrast they had no inhibitory effect on the enzymatic activities of calf thymus polymerase α, human polymerase β, RSV polymerase, and HIV reverse transcriptase in vitro. Two peptides demonstrated conformation-dependent inhibition since their synthetic linear versions were not inhibitory in the NS5B assay. A constrained peptide with the minimum core motif FPWG retained selective inhibition of NS5B activity with an IC 50 of 50 μM. Alanine scan analyses of a representative constrained peptide, FPWGNTW, indicated that residues F1 and W7 were critical for the inhibitory effect of this peptide, although residues P2 and N5 had some measurable inhibitory effect as well. Further analyses of the mechanism of inhibition indicated that these peptides inhibited the formation of preelongation complexes required for the elongation reaction. However, once the preelongation complex was formed, its activity was refractory to peptide inhibition. Furthermore, the constrained peptide FPWGNTW inhibited de novo initiated RNA synthesis by NS5B from a poly(rC) template. These data indicate that the peptides confer selective inhibition of NS5B activity by binding to the enzyme and perturbing an early step preceding the processive elongation step of RNA synthesis

  4. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide...... each other showing that peptide residues 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were exposed on the MHC surface and recognized by the T cells. Thus, the majority, and perhaps all, of the side chains of the non-primary anchor residues may be available for T-cell recognition, and contribute to the stringent specificity of T...... cells. A striking similarity between the specificity of the T cells and that of the pSAN antibody was found and most of the peptide residues, which could be recognized by the T cells, could also be recognized by the antibody....

  5. Hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of peptide from sea cucumber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enzyme complex, sea cucumber protein hydrolysis was carried out to obtain hydrolysates that have hydroxyl-radical-scavenging activity (HRSA). The hydrolytic process was monitored by HRSA and conditions for this process were optimized as follows: pH 6.5, temperature 35°C, 12 mg enzyme complex in a reaction solution ...

  6. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  7. Sex peptides and MIPs can activate the same G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Nachman, Ronald J; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2013-07-01

    In many animal species, copulation elicits a number of physiological and behavioral changes in the female partner. In Drosophila melanogaster, the main molecular effector of these physiological responses has been identified as sex peptide (SP). The sex peptide receptor (SPR) has been characterized and recently, its activation by Drosophila myoinhibiting peptides (MIPs)-in addition to SP-has been demonstrated. The myoinhibiting peptides are members of a conserved peptide family, also known as B-type allatostatins, which generally feature the C-terminal motif -WX6Wamide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxicity of Biologically Active Peptides and Future Safety Aspects: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2018-02-18

    Peptides are fragments of proteins with significant biological activities. These peptides are encoded in the protein sequence. Initially, such peptides are inactive in their parental form, unless proteolytic enzymes are released. These peptides then exhibit various functions and play a therapeutic role in the body. Besides the therapeutic and physiological activities of peptides, the main purpose of this study was to highlight the safety aspects of peptides. We performed an organized search of available literature using PubMed, Google Scholar, Medline, EMBASE, Reaxys and Scopus databases. All the relevant citations including research and review articles about the toxicity of biologically active peptides were evaluated and gathered in this study. Biological peptides are widely used in the daily routine ranging from food production to the cosmetics industry and also they have a beneficial role in the treatment and prevention of different diseases. These peptides are manufactured by both chemical and biotechnological techniques, which show negligible toxicity, however, some naturally occurring peptides and enzymes may induce high toxicity. Depending upon the demand and expected use in the food or pharmaceutical industry, we need different approaches to acertain the safety of these peptides preferentially through in silico methods. Intestinal wall disruption, erythrocytes and lymphocytes toxicity, free radical production, enzymopathic and immunopathic tissue damage and cytotoxicity due to the consumption of peptides are the main problems in the biological system that lead to various complicated disorders. Therefore, before considering biologically active peptides for food production and for therapeutic purpose, it is first necessary to evaluate the immunogenicity and toxicities of peptides. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Advances in lanthanide-based luminescent peptide probes for monitoring the activity of kinase and phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Vázquez, M Eugenio

    2014-02-01

    Signaling pathways based on protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play critical roles in the orchestration of complex biochemical events and form the core of most signaling pathways in cells (i.e. cell cycle regulation, cell motility, apoptosis, etc.). The understanding of these complex signaling networks is based largely on the biochemical study of their components, i.e. kinases and phosphatases. The development of luminescent sensors for monitoring kinase and phosphatase activity is therefore an active field of research. Examples in the literature usually rely on the modulation of the fluorescence emission of organic fluorophores. However, given the exceptional photophysical properties of lanthanide ions, there is an increased interest in their application as emissive species for monitoring kinase and phosphatase activity. This review summarizes the advances in the development of lanthanide-based luminescent peptide sensors as tools for the study of kinases and phosphatases and provides a critical description of current examples and synthetic approaches to understand these lanthanide-based luminescent peptide sensors. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Membrane interactions and biological activity of antimicrobial peptides from Australian scorpion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ramírez, Karen; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Jiménez-Vargas, Juana María; Reyna-Flores, Fernando; Winkel, Kenneth D; Wright, Christine E; Possani, Lourival D; Separovic, Frances

    2014-09-01

    UyCT peptides are antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of the Australian scorpion. The activity of the UyCT peptides against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and red blood cells was determined. The membrane interactions of these peptides were evaluated by dye release (DR) of the fluorophore calcein from liposomes and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC); and their secondary structure was determined by circular dichroism (CD). Three different lipid systems were used to mimic red blood cells, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus membranes. UyCT peptides exhibited broad spectrum antimicrobial activity with low MIC for S. aureus and multi-drug resistant Gram negative strains. Peptide combinations showed some synergy enhancing their potency but not hemolytic activity. The UyCT peptides adopted a helical structure in lipid environments and DR results confirmed that the mechanism of action is by disrupting the membrane. ITC data indicated that UyCT peptides preferred prokaryotic rather than eukaryotic membranes. The overall results suggest that UyCT peptides could be pharmaceutical leads for the treatment of Gram negative multiresistant bacterial infections, especially against Acinetobacter baumanni, and candidates for peptidomimetics to enhance their potency and minimize hemolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. © 2013.

  11. Cell number and transfection volume dependent peptide nucleic acid antisense activity by cationic delivery methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llovera Nadal, Laia; Berthold, Peter; Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    have now quantitatively compared the cellular activity (in the pLuc705 HeLa cell splice correction system) of PNA antisense oligomers using lipoplex delivery of cholesterol- and bisphosphonate-PNA conjugates, polyplex delivery via a PNA-polyethyleneimine conjugate and CPP delivery via a PNA......Efficient intracellular delivery is essential for high activity of nucleic acids based therapeutics, including antisense agents. Several strategies have been developed and practically all rely on auxiliary transfection reagents such as cationic lipids, cationic polymers and cell penetrating...... peptides as complexing agents and carriers of the nucleic acids. However, uptake mechanisms remain rather poorly understood, and protocols always require optimization of transfection parameters. Considering that cationic transfection complexes bind to and thus may up-concentrate on the cell surface, we...

  12. Spermicidal Activity of the Safe Natural Antimicrobial Peptide Subtilosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Chikindas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, a condition affecting millions of women each year, is primarily caused by the gram-variable organism Gardnerella vaginalis. A number of organisms associated with BV cases have been reported to develop multidrug resistance, leading to the need for alternative therapies. Previously, we reported the antimicrobial peptide subtilosin has proven antimicrobial activity against G. vaginalis, but not against the tested healthy vaginal microbiota of lactobacilli. After conducting tissue sensitivity assays using an ectocervical tissue model, we determined that human cells remained viable after prolonged exposures to partially-purified subtilosin, indicating the compound is safe for human use. Subtilosin was shown to eliminate the motility and forward progression of human spermatozoa in a dose-dependent manner, and can therefore be considered a general spermicidal agent. These results suggest subtilosin would be a valuable component in topical personal care products aimed at contraception and BV prophylaxis and treatment.

  13. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between cell penetrating peptides and plasmid DNA are important for stable non-covalent complexation and intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Archana; Sangave, Preeti C

    2016-10-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful tools for intracellular delivery of nucleic acids. Delivery of plasmid DNA, a large nucleic acid, poses a challenge for peptide mediated transport. The paper investigates and compares efficacy of five novel peptide designs for complexation of plasmid DNA and subsequent delivery into cells. The peptides were designed to contain reported DNA condensing agents and basic cell penetrating sequences, octa-arginine (R 8 ) and CHK 6 HC coupled to cell penetration accelerating peptides such as Bax inhibitory mutant peptide (KLPVM) and a peptide derived from the Kaposi fibroblast growth factor (kFGF) membrane translocating sequence. A tryptophan rich peptide, an analogue of Pep-3, flanked with CH 3 on either ends was also a part of the study. The peptides were analysed for plasmid DNA complexation, protection of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes against DNase I, serum components and competitive ligands by simple agarose gel electrophoresis techniques. Hemolysis of rat red blood corpuscles (RBCs) in the presence of the peptides was used as a measure of peptide cytotoxicity. Plasmid DNA delivery through the designed peptides was evaluated in two cell lines, human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and (NIH/3 T3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts via expression of the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene. The importance of hydrophobic sequences in addition to cationic sequences in peptides for non-covalent plasmid DNA complexation and delivery has been illustrated. An alternative to the employment of fatty acid moieties for enhanced gene transfer has been proposed. Comparison of peptides for plasmid DNA complexation and delivery of peptide-plasmid DNA complexes to cells estimated by expression of a reporter gene, SEAP. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Antioxidant Activity of Purified Active Peptide Derived from Spirulina platensis Enzymatic Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Maulida Safitri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to isolate the antioxidative peptide from Spirulina platensis. Peptide was obtained by proteolytic digestion, ultrafiltration, fractionation by RP-HPLC, identified by LC-MS/MS—MASCOT Distiller and measured its antioxidant activity by DPPH (2.2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay. Results showed that thermolysin was the most effective enzyme to digest this algae. The active peptide Phe-Ser-Glu-Ser-Ser-Ala-Pro-Glu-Gln-His-Tyr (m/z 1281.51 was identified and synthetized, which exhibited 45.98 ± 1.7% at concentration 128.15 µg/mL. Therefore, S. platensis is indicated as a potential therapeutic source for combating oxidative stress.

  15. Structure-activity studies and therapeutic potential of host defense peptides of human thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasetty, Gopinath; Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Rydengård, Victoria; Mörgelin, Matthias; Albiger, Barbara; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2011-06-01

    Peptides of the C-terminal region of human thrombin are released upon proteolysis and identified in human wounds. In this study, we wanted to investigate minimal determinants, as well as structural features, governing the antimicrobial and immunomodulating activity of this peptide region. Sequential amino acid deletions of the peptide GKYGFYTHVFRLKKWIQKVIDQFGE (GKY25), as well as substitutions at strategic and structurally relevant positions, were followed by analyses of antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, and the fungus Candida albicans. Furthermore, peptide effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-, lipoteichoic acid-, or zymosan-induced macrophage activation were studied. The thrombin-derived peptides displayed length- and sequence-dependent antimicrobial as well as immunomodulating effects. A peptide length of at least 20 amino acids was required for effective anti-inflammatory effects in macrophage models, as well as optimal antimicrobial activity as judged by MIC assays. However, shorter (>12 amino acids) variants also displayed significant antimicrobial effects. A central K14 residue was important for optimal antimicrobial activity. Finally, one peptide variant, GKYGFYTHVFRLKKWIQKVI (GKY20) exhibiting improved selectivity, i.e., low toxicity and a preserved antimicrobial as well as anti-inflammatory effect, showed efficiency in mouse models of LPS shock and P. aeruginosa sepsis. The work defines structure-activity relationships of C-terminal host defense peptides of thrombin and delineates a strategy for selecting peptide epitopes of therapeutic interest.

  16. Steric effects in peptide and protein exchange with activated disulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jason; Schlosser, Jessica L; Griffin, Donald R; Wong, Darice Y; Kasko, Andrea M

    2013-08-12

    Disulfide exchange is an important bioconjugation tool, enabling chemical modification of peptides and proteins containing free cysteines. We previously reported the synthesis of a macromer bearing an activated disulfide and its incorporation into hydrogels. Despite their ability to diffuse freely into hydrogels, larger proteins were unable to undergo in-gel disulfide exchange. In order to understand this phenomenon, we synthesized four different activated disulfide-bearing model compounds (Mn = 300 Da to 10 kDa) and quantified their rate of disulfide exchange with a small peptide (glutathione), a moderate-sized protein (β-lactoglobulin), and a large protein (bovine serum albumin) in four different pH solutions (6.0, 7.0, 7.4, and 8.0) to mimic biological systems. Rate constants of exchange depend significantly on the size and accessibility of the thiolate. pH also significantly affects the rate of reaction, with the faster reactions occurring at higher pH. Surprisingly, little difference in exchange rates is seen between macromolecular disulfides of varying size (Mn = 2 kDa - 10 kDa), although all undergo exchange more slowly than their small molecule analogue (MW = 300 g/mol). The maximum exchange efficiencies (% disulfides exchanged after 24 h) are not siginificantly affected by thiol size or pH, but somewhat affected by disulfide size. Therefore, while all three factors investigated (pH, disulfide size, and thiolate size) can influence the exchange kinetics and extent of reaction, the size of the thiolate and its accessibility plays the most significant role.

  17. Characterization of the interaction forces in a drug carrier complex of doxorubicin with a drug-binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocheva, Gergana; Ilieva, Nina; Peneva, Kalina; Ivanova, Anela

    2018-04-01

    Polypeptide-based materials are used as building blocks for drug delivery systems aimed at toxicity decrease in chemotherapeutics. A molecular-level approach is adopted for investigating the non-covalent interactions between doxorubicin and a recently synthesized drug-binging peptide as a key part of a system for delivery to neoplastic cells. Molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution at room and body temperature are applied to investigate the structure and the binding modes within the drug-peptide complex. The tryptophans are outlined as the main chemotherapeutic adsorption sites, and the importance of their placement in the peptide sequence is highlighted. The drug-peptide binging energy is evaluated by density functional theory calculations. Principal component analysis reveals comparable importance of several types of interaction for the binding strength. π-Stacking is dominant, but other factors are also significant: intercalation, peptide backbone stacking, electrostatics, dispersion, and solvation. Intra- and intermolecular H-bonding also stabilizes the complexes. The influence of solvent molecules on the binding energy is mild. The obtained data characterize the drug-to-peptide attachment as a mainly attractive collective process with interactions spanning a broad range of values. These results explain with atomistic detail the experimentally registered doxorubicin-binging ability of the peptide and outline the complex as a prospective carrying unit that can be employed in design of drug delivery systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Rapid phenolic O-glycosylation of small molecules and complex unprotected peptides in aqueous solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadzinski, Tyler J.; Steinauer, Angela; Hie, Liana; Pelletier, Guillaume; Schepartz, Alanna; Miller, Scott J.

    2018-06-01

    Glycosylated natural products and synthetic glycopeptides represent a significant and growing source of biochemical probes and therapeutic agents. However, methods that enable the aqueous glycosylation of endogenous amino acid functionality in peptides without the use of protecting groups are scarce. Here, we report a transformation that facilitates the efficient aqueous O-glycosylation of phenolic functionality in a wide range of small molecules, unprotected tyrosine, and tyrosine residues embedded within a range of complex, fully unprotected peptides. The transformation, which uses glycosyl fluoride donors and is promoted by Ca(OH)2, proceeds rapidly at room temperature in water, with good yields and selective formation of unique anomeric products depending on the stereochemistry of the glycosyl donor. High functional group tolerance is observed, and the phenol glycosylation occurs selectively in the presence of virtually all side chains of the proteinogenic amino acids with the singular exception of Cys. This method offers a highly selective, efficient, and operationally simple approach for the protecting-group-free synthesis of O-aryl glycosides and Tyr-O-glycosylated peptides in water.

  19. Anti-Biofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Peptides That Inhibit Biofilms Formed by Pathogens Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César de la Fuente-Núñez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF patients often acquire chronic respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc species. In the CF lung, these bacteria grow as multicellular aggregates termed biofilms. Biofilms demonstrate increased (adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotics, and there are currently no available biofilm-specific therapies. Using plastic adherent, hydroxyapatite and flow cell biofilm models coupled with confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that an anti-biofilm peptide 1018 prevented biofilm formation, eradicated mature biofilms and killed biofilms formed by a wide range of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia clinical isolates. New peptide derivatives were designed that, compared to their parent peptide 1018, showed similar or decreased anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased activity against biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, some of these new peptide derivatives retained the immunomodulatory activity of 1018 since they induced the production of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and were non-toxic towards these cells. Peptide 1018 and its derivatives provide promising leads for the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and hyperinflammatory lung disease in CF patients.

  20. Marine-Derived Bioactive Peptides with Pharmacological Activities- A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Rabiei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Some nutritional factors are related to chronic disease. In response to increased concern regarding nutrition and health, the functional and nutraceuticals food markets have been developed. During food digestion, proteins are hydrolyzed and a wide range of peptides are formed. Some of these peptides have special structures which permit them to confer particular biological functions. Marine animals which involve more than half of the world biological varieties are a wide source of bioactive proteins and peptides. Marine derived peptides show various physiologic functions such as anti-oxidant, antimicrobial, anti-cancer, Angiotensin1-Converting Enzyme (ACE glucosidase and a-amylase inhibitory effects in vitro. Before application of marine bioactive peptides as nutraceuticals or functional food ingredients, their efficacy should be approved through pre-clinical animal and then clinical studies. The aim of this study was to review the studies conducted on the pharmacological effect of marine bioactive peptides in animal models and humans.

  1. Blocking the RecA activity and SOS-response in bacteria with a short α-helical peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimov, Alexander; Pobegalov, Georgii; Bakhlanova, Irina; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Petukhov, Michael; Baitin, Dmitry

    2017-09-19

    The RecX protein, a very active natural RecA protein inhibitor, can completely disassemble RecA filaments at nanomolar concentrations that are two to three orders of magnitude lower than that of RecA protein. Based on the structure of RecX protein complex with the presynaptic RecA filament, we designed a short first in class α-helical peptide that both inhibits RecA protein activities in vitro and blocks the bacterial SOS-response in vivo. The peptide was designed using SEQOPT, a novel method for global sequence optimization of protein α-helices. SEQOPT produces artificial peptide sequences containing only 20 natural amino acids with the maximum possible conformational stability at a given pH, ionic strength, temperature, peptide solubility. It also accounts for restrictions due to known amino acid residues involved in stabilization of protein complexes under consideration. The results indicate that a few key intermolecular interactions inside the RecA protein presynaptic complex are enough to reproduce the main features of the RecX protein mechanism of action. Since the SOS-response provides a major mechanism of bacterial adaptation to antibiotics, these results open new ways for the development of antibiotic co-therapy that would not cause bacterial resistance. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Amphiphilic Peptide Interactions with Complex Biological Membranes : Effect of peptide properties on antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    With increasing problem of resistance development in bacteria against conventional antibiotics, as well as problems associated with diseases either triggered or enhanced by infection, there is an urgent need to identify new types of effective therapeutics for the treatment of infectious diseases and its consequences. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides have attracted considerable interest as potential new antibiotics in this context. While antimicrobial function of such peptides is b...

  3. Evaluation of dermal wound healing activity of synthetic peptide SVVYGLR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchinaka, Ayako; Kawaguchi, Naomasa; Ban, Tsuyoshi; Hamada, Yoshinosuke; Mori, Seiji; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Sawa, Yoshiki; Nagata, Kohzo; Yamamoto, Hirofumi

    2017-09-23

    SVVYGLR peptide (SV peptide) is a 7-amino-acid sequence with angiogenic properties that is derived from osteopontin in the extracellular matrix and promotes differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblast-like cells and the production of collagen type Ⅲ by cardiac fibroblasts. However, the effects of SV peptide on dermal cells and tissue are unknown. In this study, we evaluated the effects of this peptide in a rat model of dermal wound healing. The synthetic SV peptide was added to dermal fibroblasts or keratinocytes, and their cellular motility was evaluated. In an in vivo wound healing exeriment, male rats aged 8 weeks were randomly assigned to the SV peptide treatment, non-treated control, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) groups. Wound healing was assessed by its repair rate and histological features. Scratch assay and cell migration assays using the Chemotaxicell method showed that SV peptide significantly promoted the cell migration in both fibroblasts and keratinocytes. In contrast the proliferation potency of these cells was not affected by SV peptide. In the rat model, wound healing progressed faster in the SV peptide-treated group than in the control and PBS groups. The histopathological analyses showed that the SV peptide treatment stimulated the migration of fibroblasts to the wound area and increased the number of myofibroblasts. Immunohistochemical staining showed a marked increase of von Willebland factor-positive neomicrovessels in the SV peptide-treated group. In conclusion, SV peptide has a beneficial function to promote wound healing by stimulating granulation via stimulating angiogenesis, cell migration, and the myofibroblastic differentiation of fibroblasts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aqueous Extract of Chrysanthemum morifolium Enhances the Antimelanogenic and Antioxidative Activities of the Mixture of Soy Peptide and Collagen Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Gui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The possible synergistic effect between the aqueous extract of Chrysanthemum morifolium (菊花 Jú Huā (AECM and the peptide mixture (PM containing soy peptide and collagen peptide was investigated in an ultraviolet (UV irradiation–induced skin damage mouse model. The irradiated mice were treated with the PM or PM+AECM (containing PM and AECM, respectively. Both PM and PM+AECM groups displayed an apparent photoprotective effect on the UV-irradiated skin damage of mice. Histological evaluation demonstrated that the epidermal hyperplasia and melanocytes in the basal epidermal layer of the UV-irradiated skin in mice decreased when treated with either PM or PM+AECM. Further study showed that soy peptide, collagen peptide, and AECM also inhibited the activities of mushroom tyrosinase with IC50 values of 82.3, 28.2, and 1.6 μg/ml, respectively. Additionally, PM+AECM reduced melanogenesis by 46.2% at the concentration of 10 mg/ml in B16 mouse melanoma cells. Meanwhile, the UV-induced increase of antioxidative indicators, including glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and malondialdehyde (MDA, was reduced significantly after treatment with 1.83 g/kg/dbw of PM+AECM. This evidence supported the synergistic antioxidative effect of AECM with PM. These results demonstrated that oral intake of PM and AECM had synergistic antimelanogenic and antioxidative effects in UV-irradiated mice.

  5. Conformation of an Shc-derived phosphotyrosine-containing peptide complexed with the Grb2 SH2 domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kenji; Tsuchiya, Shigeo; Terasawa, Hiroaki; Yuzawa, Satoru; Hatanaka, Hideki; Mandiyan, Valsan; Schlessinger, Joseph; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    1997-01-01

    We have determined the structure of an Shc-derived phosphotyrosine-containing peptide complexed with Grb2 SH2 based on intra-and intermolecular NOE correlations observed by a series of isotope-filtered NMR experiments using a PFG z-filter. In contrast to an extended conformation of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides bound to Src, Syp and PLC γ SH2s, the Shc-derived peptide formed a turn at the +1 and +2 positions next to the phosphotyrosine residue. Trp 121 , located at the EF1 site of Grb2 SH2, blocked the peptide binding in an extended conformation. The present study confirms that each phosphotyrosine-containing peptide binds to the cognate SH2 with a specific conformation, which gives the structural basis for the binding specificity between SH2s and target proteins

  6. Protocols to test the activity of antimicrobial peptides against the honey bee pathogen Paenibacillus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilnani, Jasmin C; Wing, Helen J

    2015-10-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causal agent of the honey bee disease American Foulbrood. Two enhanced protocols that allow the activity of antimicrobial peptides to be tested against P. larvae are presented. Proof of principle experiments demonstrate that the honey bee antimicrobial peptide defensin 1 is active in both assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bodipy-VAD-Fmk, a useful tool to study yeast peptide N-glycanase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Martin D.; Descals, Carlos V.; Lavoir, Sebastiaan V.P. de; Florea, Bogdan I.; Marel, Gijsbert A. van der; Overkleeft, Herman S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the development of a fluorescent activity based probe, Bodipy-VAD-Fmk, for visualization of yeast peptide N-glycanase is described. The activity based probe is used to assess the efficacy of known and new chitobiose-based electrophilic traps to bind yeast peptide N-glycanase.

  8. Machine learning-enabled discovery and design of membrane-active peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ernest Y; Wong, Gerard C L; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2017-07-08

    Antimicrobial peptides are a class of membrane-active peptides that form a critical component of innate host immunity and possess a diversity of sequence and structure. Machine learning approaches have been profitably employed to efficiently screen sequence space and guide experiment towards promising candidates with high putative activity. In this mini-review, we provide an introduction to antimicrobial peptides and summarize recent advances in machine learning-enabled antimicrobial peptide discovery and design with a focus on a recent work Lee et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2016;113(48):13588-13593. This study reports the development of a support vector machine classifier to aid in the design of membrane active peptides. We use this model to discover membrane activity as a multiplexed function in diverse peptide families and provide interpretable understanding of the physicochemical properties and mechanisms governing membrane activity. Experimental validation of the classifier reveals it to have learned membrane activity as a unifying signature of antimicrobial peptides with diverse modes of action. Some of the discriminating rules by which it performs classification are in line with existing "human learned" understanding, but it also unveils new previously unknown determinants and multidimensional couplings governing membrane activity. Integrating machine learning with targeted experimentation can guide both antimicrobial peptide discovery and design and new understanding of the properties and mechanisms underpinning their modes of action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dissociation of Calmodulin-Target Peptide Complexes by the Lipid Mediator Sphingosylphosphorylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Erika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Liliom, Károly

    2010-01-01

    Previously we have identified the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) as the first potentially endogenous inhibitor of the ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM) (Kovacs, E., and Liliom, K. (2008) Biochem. J. 410, 427–437). Here we give mechanistic insight into CaM inhibition by SPC, based on fluorescence stopped-flow studies with the model CaM-binding domain melittin. We demonstrate that both the peptide and SPC micelles bind to CaM in a rapid and reversible manner with comparable affinities. Furthermore, we present kinetic evidence that both species compete for the same target site on CaM, and thus SPC can be considered as a competitive inhibitor of CaM-target peptide interactions. We also show that SPC disrupts the complex of CaM and the CaM-binding domain of ryanodine receptor type 1, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1, and the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump. By interfering with these interactions, thus inhibiting the negative feedback that CaM has on Ca2+ signaling, we hypothesize that SPC could lead to Ca2+ mobilization in vivo. Hence, we suggest that the action of the sphingolipid on CaM might explain the previously recognized phenomenon that SPC liberates Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Moreover, we demonstrate that unlike traditional synthetic CaM inhibitors, SPC disrupts the complex between not only the Ca2+-saturated but also the apo form of the protein and the target peptide, suggesting a completely novel regulation for target proteins that constitutively bind CaM, such as ryanodine receptors. PMID:19910470

  10. Isolation of biologically active peptides from the venom of Japanese carpenter bee, Xylocopa appendiculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hiroko; Goto, Shin G; Murata, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hideaki; Shigeri, Yasushi; Imura, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Hidetoshi; Shinada, Tetsuro

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-guided venom peptide profiling is a powerful tool to explore novel substances from venomous animals in a highly sensitive manner. In this study, this peptide profiling approach is successfully applied to explore the venom peptides of a Japanese solitary carpenter bee, Xylocopa appendiculata (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Apidae: Anthophila: Xylocopinae: Xylocopini). Although interesting biological effects of the crude venom of carpenter bees have been reported, the structure and biological function of the venom peptides have not been elucidated yet. The venom peptide profiling of the crude venom of X. appendiculata was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectroscopy. The venom was purified by a reverse-phase HPLC. The purified peptides were subjected to the Edman degradation, MS/MS analysis, and/or molecular cloning methods for peptide sequencing. Biological and functional characterization was performed by circular dichroism analysis, liposome leakage assay, and antimicrobial, histamine releasing and hemolytic activity tests. Three novel peptides with m / z 16508, 1939.3, and 1900.3 were isolated from the venom of X. appendiculata . The peptide with m / z 16508 was characterized as a secretory phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2 ) homolog in which the characteristic cysteine residues as well as the active site residues found in bee PLA 2 s are highly conserved. Two novel peptides with m/z 1939.3 and m/z 1900.3 were named as Xac-1 and Xac-2, respectively. These peptides are found to be amphiphilic and displayed antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. The potency was almost the same as that of mastoparan isolated from the wasp venom. We found three novel biologically active peptides in the venom of X. appendiculata and analyzed their molecular functions, and compared their sequential homology to discuss their molecular diversity. Highly sensitive mass analysis plays an important role in this study.

  11. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa Kurabi

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM and into the middle ear (ME. Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE; and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy

  12. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated l-Alanine Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2017-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of l-alanine peptides ( l-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala n ) and homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the l-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+( l-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of d-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+( d-Trp). l-Ala peptides recognize d-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+( d-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+( d-Trp)( l-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas l-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of l-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  13. Versatile polyion complex micelles for peptide and siRNA vectorization to engineer tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebarek, Naila; Vicente, Rita; Aubert-Pouëssel, Anne; Quentin, Julie; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Jorgensen, Christian; Bégu, Sylvie; Louis-Plence, Pascale

    2015-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that play a critical role in maintaining the balance between immunity and tolerance and, as such are a promising immunotherapy tool to induce immunity or to restore tolerance. The main challenge to harness the tolerogenic properties of DCs is to preserve their immature phenotype. We recently developed polyion complex micelles, formulated with double hydrophilic block copolymers of poly(methacrylic acid) and poly(ethylene oxide) blocks and able to entrap therapeutic molecules, which did not induce DC maturation. In the current study, the intrinsic destabilizing membrane properties of the polymers were used to optimize endosomal escape property of the micelles in order to propose various strategies to restore tolerance. On the first hand, we showed that high molecular weight (Mw) copolymer-based micelles were efficient to favor the release of the micelle-entrapped peptide into the endosomes, and thus to improve peptide presentation by immature (i) DCs. On the second hand, we put in evidence that low Mw copolymer-based micelles were able to favor the cytosolic release of micelle-entrapped small interfering RNAs, dampening the DCs immunogenicity. Therefore, we demonstrate the versatile use of polyionic complex micelles to preserve tolerogenic properties of DCs. Altogether, our results underscored the potential of such micelle-loaded iDCs as a therapeutic tool to restore tolerance in autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Preliminary crystallographic characterization of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with a FAK-derived phosphotyrosyl peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsiao-Hsin; Chen, Cuei-Wen; Chang, Yu-Yung; Shen, Tang-Long; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Crystals of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with a phosphotyrosyl peptide corresponding to residues 921–930 of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) have been obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Data have been collected to 2.49 Å resolution. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) is an adaptor protein with a single SH2 domain that specifically binds to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) when residue Tyr925 of FAK is phosphorylated. The Grb2–FAK interaction is associated with cellular integrin-activated signal transduction events leading to the activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway. Crystals of the Grb2 SH2 domain in complex with a phosphopeptide corresponding to residues 921–930 of FAK have been obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belonged to space group P3 1 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 102.7, c = 127.6 Å, α = β = 90.0, γ = 120.0°. A diffraction data set was collected from a flash-cooled crystal at 100 K to 2.49 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination by molecular replacement and analysis of the detailed structure of the complex are currently in progress

  15. Structural basis for the enhanced activity of cyclic antimicrobial peptides : The case of BPC194

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek T.; Moiset, Gemma; Cirac, Anna D.; Feliu, Lidia; Bardaji, Eduard; Planas, Marta; Sengupta, Durba; Marrink, Siewert J.; Poolman, Bert

    We report the molecular basis for the differences in activity of cyclic and linear antimicrobial peptides. We iteratively performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical measurements to probe the interaction of a cyclic antimicrobial peptide and its inactive linear analogue with

  16. Chicken cathelicidin-2-derived peptides with enhanced immunomodulatory and antibacterial activities against biological warfare agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molhoek, E.M.; Dijk, A. van; Veldhuizen, E.J.A.; Dijk-Knijnenburg, H.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Boele, L.C.L.; Kaman-van Zanten, W.E.; Haagsman, H.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are considered to be excellent candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Recently, it was demonstrated that the peptide C1-15, an N-terminal segment of chicken HDP cathelicidin-2, exhibits potent antibacterial activity while lacking cytotoxicity towards

  17. Natriuretic peptides stimulate the cardiac sodium pump via NPR-C-coupled NOS activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    William, M.; Hamilton, E.J.; Garcia, A.

    2008-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) and their receptors (NPRs) are expressed in the heart, but their effects on myocyte function are poorly understood. Because NPRs are coupled to synthesis of cGMP, an activator of the sarcolemmal Na(+)-K(+) pump, we examined whether atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) regul...

  18. Antifungal Activity of 14-Helical β-Peptides against Planktonic Cells and Biofilms of Candida Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Raman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of fungal infections and treatment is further complicated by the formation of drug resistant biofilms, often on the surfaces of implanted medical devices. In recent years, the incidence of fungal infections by other pathogenic Candida species such as C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis has increased. Amphiphilic, helical β-peptide structural mimetics of natural antimicrobial α-peptides have been shown to exhibit specific planktonic antifungal and anti-biofilm formation activity against C. albicans in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that β-peptides are also active against clinically isolated and drug resistant strains of C. albicans and against other opportunistic Candida spp. Different Candida species were susceptible to β-peptides to varying degrees, with C. tropicalis being the most and C. glabrata being the least susceptible. β-peptide hydrophobicity directly correlated with antifungal activity against all the Candida clinical strains and species tested. While β-peptides were largely ineffective at disrupting existing Candida biofilms, hydrophobic β-peptides were able to prevent the formation of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis biofilms. The broad-spectrum antifungal activity of β-peptides against planktonic cells and in preventing biofilm formation suggests the promise of this class of molecules as therapeutics.

  19. Antiaging activity of low molecular weight peptide from Paphia undulate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Pan, Jianyu; Chen, Deke; Sun, Huili

    2013-05-01

    Low molecular weight peptide (LMWP) was prepared from clam Paphia undulate and its antiaging effect on D-galactose-induced acute aging in rats, aged Kunming mice, ultraviolet-exposed rats, and thermally injured rats was investigated. P. undulate flesh was homogenized and digested using papain under optimal conditions, then subjected to Sephadex G-25 chromatography to isolate the LMWP. Administration of LMWP significantly reversed D-galactose-induced oxidative stress by increasing the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT), and by decreasing the level of malondialdehyde (MDA). This process was accompanied by increased collagen synthesis. The LMWP prevented photoaging and promoted dermis recovery and remission of elastic fiber hyperplasia. Furthermore, treatment with the LMWP helped to regenerate elastic fibers and the collagen network, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the serum and significantly decreased MDA. Thermal scald-induced inflammation and edema were also relieved by the LWMP, while wound healing in skin was promoted. These results suggest that the LMWP from P. undulate could serve as a new antiaging substance in cosmetics.

  20. Chemical Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Active against Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Nicolás; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny; Marshall, Sergio H

    2016-04-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the etiological agent of the disease by the same name and causes major losses in the salmon industry worldwide. Epizootic ISAV outbreaks have occurred in Norway and, to a lesser degree, in Canada. In 2007, an ISAV outbreak in Chile destroyed most of the seasonal production and endangered the entire Chilean salmon industry. None of the existing prophylactic approaches have demonstrated efficacy in providing absolute protection from or even a palliative effect on ISAV proliferation. Sanitary control measures for ISAV, based on molecular epidemiology data, have proven insufficient, mainly due to high salmon culture densities and a constant presence of a nonpathogenic strain of the virus. This report describes an alternative treatment approach based on interfering peptides selected from a phage display library. The screening of a phage display heptapeptide library resulted in the selection of a novel peptide with significant in vitro antiviral activity against ISAV. This peptide specifically interacted with the viral hemagglutinin-esterase protein, thereby impairing virus binding, with plaque reduction assays showing a significant reduction in viral yields. The identified peptide acts at micromolar concentrations against at least two different pathogenic strains of the virus, without detectable cytotoxic effects on the tested fish cells. Therefore, antiviral peptides represent a novel alternative for controlling ISAV and, potentially, other fish pathogens. Identifying novel methods for the efficient control of infectious diseases is imperative for the future of global aquaculture. The present study used a phage display heptapeptide library to identify a peptide with interfering activity against a key protein of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). A piscine orthomyxovirus, ISAV is a continuous threat to the commercial sustainability of cultured salmon production worldwide. The complex epidemiological strategy of this

  1. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  2. New Milk Protein-Derived Peptides with Potential Antimicrobial Activity: An Approach Based on Bioinformatic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Dziuba

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available New peptides with potential antimicrobial activity, encrypted in milk protein sequences, were searched for with the use of bioinformatic tools. The major milk proteins were hydrolyzed in silico by 28 enzymes. The obtained peptides were characterized by the following parameters: molecular weight, isoelectric point, composition and number of amino acid residues, net charge at pH 7.0, aliphatic index, instability index, Boman index, and GRAVY index, and compared with those calculated for known 416 antimicrobial peptides including 59 antimicrobial peptides (AMPs from milk proteins listed in the BIOPEP database. A simple analysis of physico-chemical properties and the values of biological activity indicators were insufficient to select potentially antimicrobial peptides released in silico from milk proteins by proteolytic enzymes. The final selection was made based on the results of multidimensional statistical analysis such as support vector machines (SVM, random forest (RF, artificial neural networks (ANN and discriminant analysis (DA available in the Collection of Anti-Microbial Peptides (CAMP database. Eleven new peptides with potential antimicrobial activity were selected from all peptides released during in silico proteolysis of milk proteins.

  3. Expression, refolding and crystallizations of the Grb2-like (GADS) C-terminal SH3 domain complexed with a SLP-76 motif peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faravelli, Alessandro; Dimasi, Nazzareno

    2005-01-01

    Several crystals of the Grb2-like C-terminal SH3 domain in complex with a motif peptide from the SLP-76 protein were obtained and characterized. The Grb2-like adaptor protein GADS is composed of an N-terminal SH3 domain, an SH2 domain, a proline-rich region and a C-terminal SH3 domain. GADS interacts through its C-terminal SH3 domain with the adaptor protein SLP-76, thus recruiting this protein and other associated molecules to the linker for activation of T-cell (LAT) protein. The DNA encoding the C-terminal SH3 domain of GADS (GADS-cSH3) was assembled synthetically using a recursive PCR technique and the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, refolded and purified. Several crystals of this domain in complex with the SLP-76 peptide were obtained and characterized

  4. Crystal Structure of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Complex with the Extracellular Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Garibay, Patrick; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Hastrup, Sven; Peters, Günther H.; Rudolph, Rainer; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) is an incretin released from intestinal L-cells in response to food intake. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor potentiates the synthesis and release of insulin from pancreatic β-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor belongs to class B of the G-protein-coupled receptors, a subfamily characterized by a large N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. Exendin-4 and GLP-1 are 50% identical, and exendin-4 is a full agonist with similar affinity and potency for the GLP-1 receptor. We recently solved the crystal structure of the GLP-1 receptor extracellular domain in complex with the competitive antagonist exendin-4(9–39). Interestingly, the isolated extracellular domain binds exendin-4 with much higher affinity than the endogenous agonist GLP-1. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of the extracellular domain in complex with GLP-1 to 2.1 Åresolution. The structure shows that important hydrophobic ligand-receptor interactions are conserved in agonist- and antagonist-bound forms of the extracellular domain, but certain residues in the ligand-binding site adopt a GLP-1-specific conformation. GLP-1 is a kinked but continuous α-helix from Thr13 to Val33 when bound to the extracellular domain. We supplemented the crystal structure with site-directed mutagenesis to link the structural information of the isolated extracellular domain with the binding properties of the full-length receptor. The data support the existence of differences in the binding modes of GLP-1 and exendin-4 on the full-length GLP-1 receptor. PMID:19861722

  5. Crystal structure of glucagon-like peptide-1 in complex with the extracellular domain of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Garibay, Patrick; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Hastrup, Sven; Peters, Günther H; Rudolph, Rainer; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) is an incretin released from intestinal L-cells in response to food intake. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor potentiates the synthesis and release of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor belongs to class B of the G-protein-coupled receptors, a subfamily characterized by a large N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. Exendin-4 and GLP-1 are 50% identical, and exendin-4 is a full agonist with similar affinity and potency for the GLP-1 receptor. We recently solved the crystal structure of the GLP-1 receptor extracellular domain in complex with the competitive antagonist exendin-4(9-39). Interestingly, the isolated extracellular domain binds exendin-4 with much higher affinity than the endogenous agonist GLP-1. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of the extracellular domain in complex with GLP-1 to 2.1 Aresolution. The structure shows that important hydrophobic ligand-receptor interactions are conserved in agonist- and antagonist-bound forms of the extracellular domain, but certain residues in the ligand-binding site adopt a GLP-1-specific conformation. GLP-1 is a kinked but continuous alpha-helix from Thr(13) to Val(33) when bound to the extracellular domain. We supplemented the crystal structure with site-directed mutagenesis to link the structural information of the isolated extracellular domain with the binding properties of the full-length receptor. The data support the existence of differences in the binding modes of GLP-1 and exendin-4 on the full-length GLP-1 receptor.

  6. Antibody constant region peptides can display immunomodulatory activity through activation of the Dectin-1 signalling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gabrielli

    Full Text Available We previously reported that a synthetic peptide with sequence identical to a CDR of a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for difucosyl human blood group A exerted an immunomodulatory activity on murine macrophages. It was therapeutic against systemic candidiasis without possessing direct candidacidal properties. Here we demonstrate that a selected peptide, N10K, putatively deriving from the enzymatic cleavage of the constant region (Fc of human IgG(1, is able to induce IL-6 secretion and pIkB-α activation. More importantly, it causes an up-regulation of Dectin-1 expression. This leads to an increased activation of β-glucan-induced pSyk, CARD9 and pIkB-α, and an increase in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-12, IL-1β and TNF-α. The increased activation of this pathway coincides with an augmented phagocytosis of non opsonized Candida albicans cells by monocytes. The findings suggest that some Fc-peptides, potentially deriving from the proteolysis of immunoglobulins, may cause an unexpected immunoregulation in a way reminiscent of innate immunity molecules.

  7. Structure of the Paramyxovirus Parainfluenza Virus 5 Nucleoprotein in Complex with an Amino-Terminal Peptide of the Phosphoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Megha; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A.; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2017-12-13

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) belongs to the familyParamyxoviridae, which consists of enveloped viruses with a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (N). Paramyxovirus replication is regulated by the phosphoprotein (P) through protein-protein interactions with N and the RNA polymerase (L). The chaperone activity of P is essential to maintain the unassembled RNA-free form of N in order to prevent nonspecific RNA binding and premature N oligomerization. Here, we determined the crystal structure of unassembled PIV5 N in complex with a P peptide (N0P) derived from the N terminus of P (P50) at 2.65 Å. The PIV5 N0P consists of two domains: an N-terminal domain (NTD) and a C-terminal domain (CTD) separated by a hinge region. The cleft at the hinge region of RNA-bound PIV5 N was previously shown to be an RNA binding site. The N0P structure shows that the P peptide binds to the CTD of N and extends toward the RNA binding site to inhibit N oligomerization and, hence, RNA binding. Binding of P peptide also keeps the PIV5 N in the open form. A molecular dynamics (MD) analysis of both the open and closed forms of N shows the flexibility of the CTD and the preference of the N protein to be in an open conformation. The gradual opening of the hinge region, to release the RNA, was also observed. Together, these results advance our knowledge of the conformational swapping of N required for the highly regulated paramyxovirus replication.

    IMPORTANCEParamyxovirus replication is regulated by the interaction of P with N and L proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of unassembled parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) N chaperoned with P peptide. Our results provide a detailed understanding of the binding of P to N. The conformational switching of N between closed and open forms during its initial interaction with P, as well as

  8. Membrane-Active Epithelial Keratin 6A Fragments (KAMPs) Are Unique Human Antimicrobial Peptides with a Non-αβ Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Judy T. Y.; Wang, Guangshun; Tam, Yu Tong; Tam, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a pressing global health problem that threatens millions of lives each year. Natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic derivatives, including peptoids and peptidomimetics, are promising candidates as novel antibiotics. Recently, the C-terminal glycine-rich fragments of human epithelial keratin 6A were found to have bactericidal and cytoprotective activities. Here, we used an improved 2-dimensional NMR method coupled with a new protocol for structural refinement by low temperature simulated annealing to characterize the solution structure of these kerain-derived antimicrobial peptides (KAMPs). Two specific KAMPs in complex with membrane mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles displayed amphipathic conformations with only local bends and turns, and a central 10-residue glycine-rich hydrophobic strip that is central to bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of non-αβ structure for human antimicrobial peptides. Direct observation of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that KAMPs deformed bacterial cell envelopes and induced pore formation. Notably, in competitive binding experiments, KAMPs demonstrated binding affinities to LPS and LTA that did not correlate with their bactericidal activities, suggesting peptide-LPS and peptide-LTA interactions are less important in their mechanisms of action. Moreover, immunoprecipitation of KAMPs-bacterial factor complexes indicated that membrane surface lipoprotein SlyB and intracellular machineries NQR sodium pump and ribosomes are potential molecular targets for the peptides. Results of this study improve our understanding of the bactericidal function of epithelial cytokeratin fragments, and highlight an unexplored class of human antimicrobial peptides, which may serve as non-αβ peptide scaffolds for the design of novel peptide-based antibiotics. PMID:27891122

  9. Membrane-Active Epithelial Keratin 6A Fragments (KAMPs Are Unique Human Antimicrobial Peptides with a Non-αβ Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Tsz Ying Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is a pressing global health problem that threatens millions of lives each year. Natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic derivatives, including peptoids and peptidomimetics, are promising candidates as novel antibiotics. Recently, the C-terminal glycine-rich fragments of human epithelial keratin 6A were found to have bactericidal and cytoprotective activities. Here, we used an improved 2-dimensional NMR method coupled with a new protocol for structural refinement by low temperature simulated annealing to characterize the solution structure of these kerain-derived antimicrobial peptides (KAMPs. Two specific KAMPs in complex with membrane mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS micelles displayed amphipathic conformations with only local bends and turns, and a central 10-residue glycine-rich hydrophobic strip that is central to bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of non-αβ structure for human antimicrobial peptides. Direct observation of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that KAMPs deformed bacterial cell envelopes and induced pore formation. Notably, in competitive binding experiments, KAMPs demonstrated binding affinities to LPS and LTA that did not correlate with their bactericidal activities, suggesting peptide-LPS and peptide-LTA interactions are less important in their mechanisms of action. Moreover, immunoprecipitation of KAMPs-bacterial factor complexes indicated that membrane surface lipoprotein SlyB and intracellular machineries NQR sodium pump and ribosomes are potential molecular targets for the peptides. Results of this study improve our understanding of the bactericidal function of epithelial cytokeratin fragments, and highlight an unexplored class of human antimicrobial peptides, which may serve as non-αβ peptide scaffolds for the design of novel peptide-based antibiotics.

  10. Studies on lactoferricin-derived Escherichia coli membrane-active peptides reveal differences in the mechanism of N-acylated versus nonacylated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweytick, Dagmar; Deutsch, Günter; Andrä, Jörg; Blondelle, Sylvie E; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Jerala, Roman; Lohner, Karl

    2011-06-17

    To improve the low antimicrobial activity of LF11, an 11-mer peptide derived from human lactoferricin, mutant sequences were designed based on the defined structure of LF11 in the lipidic environment. Thus, deletion of noncharged polar residues and strengthening of the hydrophobic N-terminal part upon adding a bulky hydrophobic amino acid or N-acylation resulted in enhanced antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, which correlated with the peptides' degree of perturbation of bacterial membrane mimics. Nonacylated and N-acylated peptides exhibited different effects at a molecular level. Nonacylated peptides induced segregation of peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains in negatively charged bilayers, although N-acylated peptides formed small heterogeneous domains resulting in a higher degree of packing defects. Additionally, only N-acylated peptides perturbed the lateral packing of neutral lipids and exhibited increased permeability of E. coli lipid vesicles. The latter did not correlate with the extent of improvement of the antimicrobial activity, which could be explained by the fact that elevated binding of N-acylated peptides to lipopolysaccharides of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria seems to counteract the elevated membrane permeabilization, reflected in the respective minimal inhibitory concentration for E. coli. The antimicrobial activity of the peptides correlated with an increase of membrane curvature stress and hence bilayer instability. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that only the N-acylated peptides induced tubular protrusions from the outer membrane, whereas all peptides caused detachment of the outer and inner membrane of E. coli bacteria. Viability tests demonstrated that these bacteria were dead before onset of visible cell lysis.

  11. Studies on Lactoferricin-derived Escherichia coli Membrane-active Peptides Reveal Differences in the Mechanism of N-Acylated Versus Nonacylated Peptides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweytick, Dagmar; Deutsch, Günter; Andrä, Jörg; Blondelle, Sylvie E.; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Jerala, Roman; Lohner, Karl

    2011-01-01

    To improve the low antimicrobial activity of LF11, an 11-mer peptide derived from human lactoferricin, mutant sequences were designed based on the defined structure of LF11 in the lipidic environment. Thus, deletion of noncharged polar residues and strengthening of the hydrophobic N-terminal part upon adding a bulky hydrophobic amino acid or N-acylation resulted in enhanced antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, which correlated with the peptides' degree of perturbation of bacterial membrane mimics. Nonacylated and N-acylated peptides exhibited different effects at a molecular level. Nonacylated peptides induced segregation of peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains in negatively charged bilayers, although N-acylated peptides formed small heterogeneous domains resulting in a higher degree of packing defects. Additionally, only N-acylated peptides perturbed the lateral packing of neutral lipids and exhibited increased permeability of E. coli lipid vesicles. The latter did not correlate with the extent of improvement of the antimicrobial activity, which could be explained by the fact that elevated binding of N-acylated peptides to lipopolysaccharides of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria seems to counteract the elevated membrane permeabilization, reflected in the respective minimal inhibitory concentration for E. coli. The antimicrobial activity of the peptides correlated with an increase of membrane curvature stress and hence bilayer instability. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that only the N-acylated peptides induced tubular protrusions from the outer membrane, whereas all peptides caused detachment of the outer and inner membrane of E. coli bacteria. Viability tests demonstrated that these bacteria were dead before onset of visible cell lysis. PMID:21515687

  12. Integrin Targeting and Toxicological Assessment of Peptide-Conjugated Liposome Delivery Systems to Activated Endothelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Villadsen, Klaus; Østrem, Ragnhild Garborg

    2017-01-01

    constructed with the aim of targeting integrins (i.e. vitronectin and/or fibronectin receptors) on activated endothelial cells. The peptide-conjugated liposomes induced only cytotoxicity at the highest concentration in non-activated or activated endothelial cells, as well as in co-culture of endothelial cells...... and macrophages. There was unaltered secretion of cytokines following exposure of peptide-conjugated liposomes to endothelial cells, indicating that the materials were not inflammogenic. Liposomes with a peptide targeting the fibronectin receptor (integrin α5β1) were more effective in targeting of activated....... Therefore, this study demonstrates the feasibility of constructing a peptide-conjugated cationic liposome, which displays targeting to activated endothelial cells at concentrations that are not cytotoxic or inflammogenic to the cells....

  13. Peptide-Based Selective Inhibitors of Matrix Metalloproteinase-Mediated Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret W. Ndinguri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs exhibit a broad array of activities, some catalytic and some non-catalytic in nature. An overall lack of selectivity has rendered small molecule, active site targeted MMP inhibitors problematic in execution. Inhibitors that favor few or individual members of the MMP family often take advantage of interactions outside the enzyme active site. We presently focus on peptide-based MMP inhibitors and probes that do not incorporate conventional Zn2+ binding groups. In some cases, these inhibitors and probes function by binding only secondary binding sites (exosites, while others bind both exosites and the active site. A myriad of MMP mediated-activities beyond selective catalysis can be inhibited by peptides, particularly cell adhesion, proliferation, motility, and invasion. Selective MMP binding peptides comprise highly customizable, unique imaging agents. Areas of needed improvement for MMP targeting peptides include binding affinity and stability.

  14. Predicting Antitumor Activity of Peptides by Consensus of Regression Models Trained on a Small Data Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Jerić

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Predicting antitumor activity of compounds using regression models trained on a small number of compounds with measured biological activity is an ill-posed inverse problem. Yet, it occurs very often within the academic community. To counteract, up to some extent, overfitting problems caused by a small training data, we propose to use consensus of six regression models for prediction of biological activity of virtual library of compounds. The QSAR descriptors of 22 compounds related to the opioid growth factor (OGF, Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met with known antitumor activity were used to train regression models: the feed-forward artificial neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, sparseness constrained linear regression, the linear and nonlinear (with polynomial and Gaussian kernel support vector machine. Regression models were applied on a virtual library of 429 compounds that resulted in six lists with candidate compounds ranked by predicted antitumor activity. The highly ranked candidate compounds were synthesized, characterized and tested for an antiproliferative activity. Some of prepared peptides showed more pronounced activity compared with the native OGF; however, they were less active than highly ranked compounds selected previously by the radial basis function support vector machine (RBF SVM regression model. The ill-posedness of the related inverse problem causes unstable behavior of trained regression models on test data. These results point to high complexity of prediction based on the regression models trained on a small data sample.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and inhibitory activities of (4-N3[3,5-3H]Phe10)PKI(6-22)amide and its precursors: photoaffinity labeling peptides for the active site of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B M; Lundquist, L J; Walsh, D A; Glass, D B

    1989-06-01

    PKI(6-22)amide is a 17 residue peptide corresponding to the active portion of the heat-stable inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The peptide is a potent (Ki = 1.6 nM), competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The photoreactive peptide analog (4-azidophenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide was synthesized in both its non-radiolabeled and tritiated forms by chemical modification of precursor peptides that were prepared by stepwise solid-phase synthesis. (4-Amino[3,5-3H]phenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide, the precursor for the radiolabeled arylazide peptide, was obtained by catalytic reduction of the corresponding peptide containing the 3,5-diiodo-4-aminophenylalanine residue at position 10. The purified PKI peptides were analyzed by HPLC, amino acid analysis, and u.v. spectra. In the dark, (4-azidophenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide inhibited the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase with a Ki value of 2.8 nM. The photoreactivity of the arylazide peptide was demonstrated by time-dependent u.v. spectral changes on exposure to light. Photolysis of the catalytic subunit (4-azido[3,5-3H]phenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide complex resulted in specific covalent labeling of the enzyme. The data indicate that this peptide is a useful photoaffinity labeling reagent for the active site of the protein kinase.

  16. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Seok, Heon; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Ho

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 11-mer peptide Lumbricusin, a defensin like peptide, is isolated from earthworm. • We here demonstrated that Lumbricusin has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. • p27 degradation by Lumbricusin mediates effects of Lumbricusin on neuronal cells. - Abstract: We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH 2 -RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson’s disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27 Kip1 protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27 Kip1 significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27 Kip1 degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin

  17. Neurotropic and neuroprotective activities of the earthworm peptide Lumbricusin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ik Hwan; Nam, Seung Taek; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Sam [Department of Agricultural Biology, National Academy of Agricultural Science, RDA, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Heon [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Jungwon University, Goesan, Chungcheongbukdo 367-700 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun [School of Life Sciences, KNU Creative Bioresearch Group (BK21 Plus Program), College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daehak-ro 80, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Il [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho, E-mail: hokim@daejin.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-06

    Highlights: • 11-mer peptide Lumbricusin, a defensin like peptide, is isolated from earthworm. • We here demonstrated that Lumbricusin has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. • p27 degradation by Lumbricusin mediates effects of Lumbricusin on neuronal cells. - Abstract: We recently isolated a polypeptide from the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris that is structurally similar to defensin, a well-known antibacterial peptide. An 11-mer antibacterial peptide (NH{sub 2}-RNRRWCIDQQA), designated Lumbricusin, was synthesized based on the amino acid sequence of the isolated polypeptide. Since we previously reported that CopA3, a dung beetle peptide, enhanced neuronal cell proliferation, we here examined whether Lumbricusin exerted neurotropic and/or neuroprotective effects. Lumbricusin treatment induced a time-dependent increase (∼51%) in the proliferation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Lumbricusin also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and decreased viability induced by treatment with 6-hydroxy dopamine, a Parkinson’s disease-mimicking agent. Immunoblot analyses revealed that Lumbricusin treatment increased ubiquitination of p27{sup Kip1} protein, a negative regulator of cell-cycle progression, in SH-SY5Y cells, and markedly promoted its degradation. Notably, adenoviral-mediated over-expression of p27{sup Kip1} significantly blocked the antiapoptotic effect of Lumbricusin in 6-hydroxy dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that promotion of p27{sup Kip1} degradation may be the main mechanism underlying the neuroprotective and neurotropic effects of Lumbricusin.

  18. Crystallization and Preliminary Diffraction Analysis of the CAL PDZ Domain in Complex with a Selective Peptide Inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Amacher; P Cushing; J Weiner; D Madden

    2011-12-31

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which regulates epithelial fluid and ion homeostasis. The CFTR cytoplasmic C-terminus interacts with a number of PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) proteins that modulate its intracellular trafficking and chloride-channel activity. Among these, the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL) has a negative effect on apical-membrane expression levels of the most common disease-associated mutant {Delta}F508-CFTR, making CAL a candidate target for the treatment of CF. A selective peptide inhibitor of the CAL PDZ domain (iCAL36) has recently been developed and shown to stabilize apical expression of {Delta}F508-CFTR, enhancing net chloride-channel activity, both alone and in combination with the folding corrector corr-4a. As a basis for structural studies of the CAL-iCAL36 interaction, a purification protocol has been developed that increases the oligomeric homogeneity of the protein. Here, the cocrystallization of the complex in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 35.9, b = 47.7, c = 97.3 {angstrom}, is reported. The crystals diffracted to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (1.96 {angstrom}{sup 3} Da{sup -1}), it appears that the asymmetric unit contains two complexes.

  19. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins

  20. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships and Docking Studies of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Kyani, Anahita

    2012-01-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range...... of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression....... The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model...

  1. Antihypertensive activity of peptides identified in the in vitro gastrointestinal digest of pork meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Elizabeth; Toldrá, Fidel; Sentandreu, Miguel Angel; Nishimura, Hitoshi; Arihara, Keizo

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the in vivo antihypertensive activity of three novel peptides identified in the in vitro digest of pork meat. These peptides were RPR, KAPVA and PTPVP and all of them showed significant antihypertensive activity after oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats, RPR being the peptide with the greatest in vivo activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing the in vivo antihypertensive action of the three peptides from nebulin (RPR) and titin (KAPVA and PTPVP), thus confirming their reported in vitro angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. These findings suggest that pork meat could constitute a source of bioactive constituents that could be utilized in functional foods or nutraceuticals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (At

  3. New cyclic peptides with osteoblastic proliferative activity from Dianthus superbus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yun; Luo, Jian-Guang; Wang, Rui; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2012-03-01

    Two new cyclic peptides, dianthins G-H (1 and 2), together with the known dianthin E (3), were isolated from the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Dianthus superbus. The sequences of cyclic peptides 1 and 2 were elucidated as cyclo (-Gly(1)-Pro(2)-Leu(3)-Thr(4)-Leu(5)-Phe(6)-) and cyclo (-Gly(1)-Pro(2)-Val(3)-Thr(4)-Ile(5)-Phe(6)-), on the basis of ESI tandem mass fragmentation analysis, extensive 2D NMR methods and X-ray diffraction. The isolated three compounds all increase proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro using MTT method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of Peptides in Flowers of Sambucus nigra with Antimicrobial Activity against Aquaculture Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Claudio Andrés; Barriga, Andrés; Albericio, Fernando; Romero, María Soledad; Guzmán, Fanny

    2018-04-27

    The elder ( Sambucus spp.) tree has a number of uses in traditional medicine. Previous studies have demonstrated the antimicrobial properties of elderberry liquid extract against human pathogenic bacteria and also influenza viruses. These properties have been mainly attributed to phenolic compounds. However, other plant defense molecules, such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), may be present. Here, we studied peptide extracts from flowers of Sambucus nigra L. The mass spectrometry analyses determined peptides of 3 to 3.6 kDa, among them, cysteine-rich peptides were identified with antimicrobial activity against various Gram-negative bacteria, including recurrent pathogens of Chilean aquaculture. In addition, membrane blebbing on the bacterial surface after exposure to the cyclotide was visualized by SEM microscopy and SYTOX Green permeabilization assay showed the ability to disrupt the bacterial membrane. We postulate that these peptides exert their action by destroying the bacterial membrane.

  5. Antimicrobial activity and mechanism of PDC213, an endogenous peptide from human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yazhou; Zhou, Yahui; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Yan, Linping; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xing; Ruan, Hongjie; Ji, Chenbo; Cui, Xianwei; Wang, Jiaqin

    2017-01-01

    Human milk has always been considered an ideal source of elemental nutrients to both preterm and full term infants in order to optimally develop the infant's tissues and organs. Recently, hundreds of endogenous milk peptides were identified in human milk. These peptides exhibited angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, immunomodulation, or antimicrobial activity. Here, we report the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of a novel type of human antimicrobial peptide (AMP), termed PDC213 (peptide derived from β-Casein 213-226 aa). PDC213 is an endogenous peptide and is present at higher levels in preterm milk than in full term milk. The inhibitory concentration curve and disk diffusion tests showed that PDC213 had obvious antimicrobial against S. aureus and Y. enterocolitica, the common nosocomial pathogens in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Fluorescent dye methods, electron microscopy experiments and DNA-binding activity assays further indicated that PDC213 can permeabilize bacterial membranes and cell walls rather than bind intracellular DNA to kill bacteria. Together, our results suggest that PDC213 is a novel type of AMP that warrants further investigation. - Highlights: • PDC213 is an endogenous peptide presenting higher levels in preterm milk. • PDC213 showed obvious antimicrobial against S. aereus and Y. enterocolitica. • PDC213 can permeabilize bacterial membranes and cell walls to kill bacterias. • PDC213 is a novel type of antimicrobial peptides worthy further investigation.

  6. The self-assembly of redox active peptides: Synthesis and electrochemical capacitive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Julia P; Santos, Adriano; Santos-Filho, Norival A; Lorenzón, Esteban N; Cilli, Eduardo M; Bueno, Paulo R

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports on the synthesis of a redox-tagged peptide with self-assembling capability aiming applications in electrochemically active capacitive surfaces (associated with the presence of the redox centers) generally useful in electroanalytical applications. Peptide containing ferrocene (fc) molecular (redox) group (Ac-Cys-Ile-Ile-Lys(fc)-Ile-Ile-COOH) was thus synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). To obtain the electrochemically active capacitive interface, the side chain of the cysteine was covalently bound to the gold electrode (sulfur group) and the side chain of Lys was used to attach the ferrocene in the peptide chain. After obtaining the purified redox-tagged peptide, the self-assembly and redox capability was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance-based capacitance spectroscopy techniques. The obtained results confirmed that the redox-tagged peptide was successfully attached by forming an electroactive self-assembled monolayer onto gold electrode. The design of redox active self-assembly ferrocene-tagged peptide is predictably useful in the development of biosensor devices precisely to detect, in a label-free platform, those biomarkers of clinical relevance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 357-367, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. T cell responses affected by aminopeptidase N (CD13)-mediated trimming of major histocompatibility complex class II-bound peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S L; Pedersen, L O; Buus, S

    1996-01-01

    Endocytosed protein antigens are believed to be fragmented in what appears to be a balance between proteolysis and MHC-mediated epitope protection, and the resulting peptide-MHC complexes are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cells (APC) and presented to T cells. The events tha...

  8. Availability of endogenous peptides limits expression of an M3a-Ld major histocompatibility complex class I chimera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Taking advantage of our understanding of the peptide specificity of the major histocompatibility complex class I-b molecule M3a, we sought to determine why these molecules are poorly represented on the cell surface. To this end we constructed a chimeric molecule with the alpha 1 and alpha 2 domains of M3a and alpha 3 of Ld thereby allowing use of available monoclonal antibodies to quantify surface expression. Transfected, but not control, B10.CAS2 (H-2M3b) cells were lysed readily by M3a-restricted monoclonal cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, the chimera bound, trafficked, and presented endogenous mitochondrial peptides. However, despite high levels of M3a-Ld mRNA, transfectants were negative by surface staining. This finding was consistent with inefficient trafficking to the cell surface. Incubation at 26 degrees C, thought to permit trafficking of unoccupied heavy (H) chains, resulted in detectable cell surface expression of chimeric molecules. Incubation with exogenous peptide at 26 degrees C (but not at 37 degrees C) greatly enhanced expression of M3a-Ld molecules in a dose- dependent manner, suggesting stabilization of unoccupied molecules. Stable association of beta 2-microglobulin with the chimeric H chain was observed in labeled cell lysates only in the presence of exogenous specific peptide, indicating that peptide is required for the formation of a ternary complex. These results indicate that surface expression of M3a-Ld is limited largely by the steady-state availability of endogenous peptides. Since most known M3a-binding peptides are N- formylated, native M3a may normally be expressed at high levels only during infection by intracellular bacteria. PMID:8270862

  9. Control In Cellular Activity By Interaction Of Peptides | Umar Dikko ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiments was conducted in the previous years using EGF, PTH-rP and PTH(1-34) to investigate the interaction between these peptides on the proliferation of JAR human chariocarcinoma cells. Here the interaction between some of the fragments of hypercalcaemic factor PTH-rP and PTH(1-34) were considered with ...

  10. Delivering Transmembrane Peptide Complexes to the Gas Phase Using Nanodiscs and Electrospray Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2017-10-01

    The gas-phase conformations of dimers of the channel-forming membrane peptide gramicidin A (GA), produced from isobutanol or aqueous solutions of GA-containing nanodiscs (NDs), are investigated using electrospray ionization-ion mobility separation-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The IMS arrival times measured for (2GA + 2Na)2+ ions from isobutanol reveal three different conformations, with collision cross-sections (Ω) of 683 Å2 (conformation 1, C1), 708 Å2 (C2), and 737 Å2 (C3). The addition of NH4CH3CO2 produced (2GA + 2Na)2+ and (2GA + H + Na)2+ ions, with Ω similar to those of C1, C2, and C3, as well as (2GA + 2H)2+, (2GA + 2NH4)2+, and (2GA + H + NH4)2+ ions, which adopt a single conformation with a Ω similar to that of C2. These results suggest that the nature of the charging agents, imparted by the ESI process, can influence dimer conformation in the gas phase. Notably, the POPC NDs produced exclusively (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions; the DMPC NDs produced both (2GA + 2H)2+ and (2GA + 2NH4)2+ dimer ions. While the Ω of (2GA + 2H)2+ is similar to that of C2, the (2GA + 2NH4)2+ ions from NDs adopt a more compact structure, with a Ω of 656 Å2. It is proposed that this compact structure corresponds to the ion conducting single stranded head-to-head helical GA dimer. These findings highlight the potential of NDs, combined with ESI, for transferring transmembrane peptide complexes directly from lipid bilayers to the gas phase. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  12. Antioxidant activity of cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysates: Fractionation and characterisation of peptide fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin Habebullah, Sabeena; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Otte, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise peptide fractions (>5 kDa, 3–5 kDa and fractions were dominated by Ala, Gly, Glu and Ser. The total amino acid composition had high proportions of Lys, Ala...... and Glu. The 3–5 kDa and fractions were further fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. All sub-fractions showed high Fe2+ chelating activity. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the 3–5 kDa fraction was exerted mainly by one sub-fraction dominated by peptides with masses below 600 Da....... The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the fraction was exerted by sub-fractions with low molecular weight. The highest reducing power was found in a sub-fraction containing peptides rich in Arg, Tyr and Phe. Both free amino acids and low molecular weight peptides thus seemed to contribute...

  13. In vitro production and antifungal activity of peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxin; Movahedi, Ali; Xu, Junjie; Wang, Mengyang; Wu, Xiaolong; Xu, Chen; Yin, Tongming; Zhuge, Qiang

    2015-04-10

    The antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A is a small cationic peptide with potent activity against a wide range of bacterial species. Evidence of antifungal activity has also been suggested; however, testing of this peptide has been limited due to the low expression of cecropin proteins in Escherichia coli. To improve expression of this peptide in E. coli, ABP-dHC-cecropin A was cloned into a pSUMO vector and transformed into E. coli, resulting in the production of a pSUMO-ABP-dHC-cecropin A fusion protein. The soluble form of this protein was then purified by Ni-IDA chromatography, yielding a total of 496-mg protein per liter of fermentation culture. The SUMO-ABP-dHC-cecropin A fusion protein was then cleaved using a SUMO protease and re-purified by Ni-IDA chromatography, yielding a total of 158-mg recombinant ABP-dHC-cecropin A per liter of fermentation culture at a purity of ≥94%, the highest yield reported to date. Antifungal activity assays performed using this purified recombinant peptide revealed strong antifungal activity against both Candida albicans and Neurospora crassa, as well as Rhizopus, Fusarium, Alternaria, and Mucor species. Combined with previous analyses demonstrating strong antibacterial activity against a number of important bacterial pathogens, these results confirm the use of ABP-dHC-cecropin A as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide, with significant therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancement of anti-tumor activity of hybrid peptide in conjugation with carboxymethyl dextran via disulfide linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaowa, Arong; Horibe, Tomohisa; Kohno, Masayuki; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-05-01

    To improve the anti-tumor activity of EGFR2R-lytic hybrid peptide, we prepared peptide-modified dextran conjugates with the disulfide bonds between thiolated carboxymethyl dextran (CMD-Cys) and cysteine-conjugated peptide (EGFR2R-lytic-Cys). In vitro release studies showed that the peptide was released from the CMD-s-s-peptide conjugate in a concentration-dependent manner in the presence of glutathione (GSH, 2μM-2mM). The CMD-s-s-peptide conjugate exhibited a similar cytotoxic activity with free peptide alone against human pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells in vitro. Furthermore, it was shown that the CMD-s-s-peptide conjugates were highly accumulated in tumor tissue in a mouse xenograft model using BxPC-3 cells, and the anti-tumor activity of the conjugate was more effective than that of the free peptide. In addition, the plasma concentrations of peptide were moderately increased and the elimination half-life of the peptide was prolonged after intravenous injection of CMD-s-s-peptide conjugates. These results demonstrated that the conjugate based on thiolated CMD polymer would be potentially useful carriers for the sustained release of the hybrid peptide in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Self-assembled peptides for coating of active sulfur nanoparticles in lithium–sulfur battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jewel, Yead; Yoo, Kisoo; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2016-01-01

    Development of lithium–sulfur (Li–S) battery is hindered by poor cyclability due to the loss of sulfur, although Li–S battery can provide high energy density. Coating of sulfur nanoparticles can help maintain active sulfur in the cathode of Li–S battery, and hence increase the cyclability. Among myriad of coating materials, synthetic peptides are very attractive because of their spontaneous self-assembly as well as electrical conductive characteristics. In this study, we explored the use of various synthetic peptides as a coating material for sulfur nanoparticles. Atomistic simulations were carried out to identify optimal peptide structure and density for coating sulfur nanoparticles. Three different peptide models, poly-proline, poly(leucine–lysine) and poly-histidine, are selected for this study based on their peptide–peptide and peptide-sulfur interactions. Simulation results show that both poly-proline and poly(leucine–lysine) can form self-assembled coating on sulfur nanoparticles (2–20 nm) in pyrrolidinone, a commonly used solvent for cathode slurry. We also studied the structural integrity of these synthetic peptides in organic [dioxolane (DOL) and dimethoxyethane (DME)] electrolyte used in Li–S battery. Both peptides show stable structures in organic electrolyte (DOL/DME) used in Li–S battery. Furthermore, the dissolution of sulfur molecules in organic electrolyte is investigated in the absence and presence of these peptide coatings. It was found that only poly(leucine–lysine)-based peptide can most effectively suppress the sulfur loss in electrolyte, suggesting its potential applications in Li–S battery as a coating material.Graphical abstract

  16. Fluorescent turn-on determination of the activity of peptidases using peptide templated gold nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Junjun; Wang, Liqiang; Zeng, Ke; Shen, Congcong; Qian, Pin; Yang, Minghui; Rasooly, Avraham; Qu, Fengli

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) is inversely related to the length of a peptide immobilized on its surface. This finding has been exploited to design a turn-on fluorescent method for the determination of the activity of peptidase. The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) was chosen as a model peptidase. BACE1 cleaves the peptide substrates on AuNCs, and the fluorescence intensity of the AuNCs (at exCitation/emission wavelengths of 320/405 nm) carrying the rest of the cleaved peptide is significantly higher than that of the AuNCs with uncleaved peptide. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a decrease in the size of the AuNCs which is assumed cause fluorescence enhancement. The assay was applied to the determination of BACE1 activity in spiked cell lysates, and recoveries were between 96.9 and 104.0 %. (author)

  17. Hydrogen atom scrambling in selectively labeled anionic peptides upon collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Roepstorff, Peter

    2008-01-01

    have now measured the level of hydrogen scrambling in a deprotonated, selectively labeled peptide using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results conclusively show that hydrogen scrambling is prevalent in the deprotonated peptide upon collisional activation. The amide hydrogens ((1)H....../(2)H) have migrated extensively in the anionic peptide, thereby erasing the original regioselective deuteration pattern obtained in solution....

  18. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP participates in adipogenesis by activating ERK signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Arsenijevic

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP belongs to the secretin/glucagon/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP family. Its action can be mediated by three different receptor subtypes: PAC1, which has exclusive affinity for PACAP, and VPAC1 and VPAC2 which have equal affinity for PACAP and VIP. We showed that all three receptors are expressed in 3T3-L1 cells throughout their differentiation into adipocytes. We established the activity of these receptors by cAMP accumulation upon induction by PACAP. Together with insulin and dexamethasone, PACAP induced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cell line. PACAP increased cAMP production within 15 min upon stimulation and targeted the expression and phosphorylation of MAPK (ERK1/2, strengthened by the ERK1/2 phosphorylation being partially or completely abolished by different combinations of PACAP receptors antagonists. We therefore speculate that ERK1/2 activation is crucial for the activation of CCAAT/enhancer- binding protein β (C/EBPβ.

  19. [BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES OF ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, A S; Rogozhin, E A; Valyshev, A V

    2015-01-01

    Isolate bacteriocins from Enterococcus faecium metabolites and characterize their effect on cells of Gram positive (Listeria monocytogenes) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Methods of solid-phase extraction, ion-exchange and reversed phase chromatography were applied for isolation of bacteriocins from cultural medium of bacteria MALDI time-of-flight mass-spectrometry was used for characterization of the obtained preparations. The mechanism of biological effect of peptides was evaluated using DNA-tropic dyes (SYTO 9 and PI) with subsequent registration of fluorescence spectra: Atomic-force microscopy (AFM) was used for characterization of morpho-functional reaction of target cells. Peptide fractions with mass of 1.0 - 3.0 kDa were isolated from enterococci metabolites, that inhibit the growth of indicator microorganisms. E. faecium strain exoproducts were shown to increase membrane permeability during interaction with L. monocytogenes, that results in subsequent detectable disturbance of normal cell morphology of listeria. Alterations of E. coli surface during the effect of purified peptide fraction was detected using AFM. The studies carried out have revealed the effect of bacteriocins of enterococci on microorganisms with various types of cell wall composition and have confirmed the importance of bacterial barrier structure permeability disturbance in the mechanism of antimicrobial effect of enterocins.

  20. Syntheses and structures of technetium(V) and rhenium(V) oxo complexes of peptide having KYC-sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, T.; Suzuki, K.; Sekine, T.; Kudo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Technetium(V) and rhenium(V) oxo complexes of a peptide having a KYC-sequence such as KYCAR (H 3 L 5 ) and KYCAREPPTRTNAYQGQG-NH 2 (H 3 L 18 ) were synthesized, and structures of the complexes were characterized by spectroscopic techniques. All of the complexes were synthesized by the ligand exchange reaction of [(n-C 4 H 9 ) 4 N][MOCl 4 ] (M = 99 Tc, Re) with peptide in methanol or dimethylformamide solution. These complexes have a square pyramidal structure with an oxo ligand at the apical position. The peptide is coordinated to a metal atom through N amine of lysine. S thiol of cysteine, and N amide of tyrosine and cysteine in the equatorial plane. A lysine (CH 2 ) 4 NH 2 group of the L 5 ligand has the syn conformation with respect to metal-oxo bonding in the complex. The syn isomer was selectively formed in the ligand exchange reaction. The conversion of the syn isomer to the anti isomer was observed only for syn-[ReO(L 5 )], in which the coordination of water to the trans position of the oxo ligand was involved. (orig.)

  1. Syntheses and structures of technetium(V) and rhenium(V) oxo complexes of peptide having KYC-sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, T.; Suzuki, K.; Sekine, T.; Kudo, H. [Dept. of Chemistry, Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Technetium(V) and rhenium(V) oxo complexes of a peptide having a KYC-sequence such as KYCAR (H{sub 3}L{sup 5}) and KYCAREPPTRTNAYQGQG-NH{sub 2} (H{sub 3}L{sup 18}) were synthesized, and structures of the complexes were characterized by spectroscopic techniques. All of the complexes were synthesized by the ligand exchange reaction of [(n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N][MOCl{sub 4}] (M = {sup 99}Tc, Re) with peptide in methanol or dimethylformamide solution. These complexes have a square pyramidal structure with an oxo ligand at the apical position. The peptide is coordinated to a metal atom through N{sub amine} of lysine. S{sub thiol} of cysteine, and N{sub amide} of tyrosine and cysteine in the equatorial plane. A lysine (CH{sub 2}){sub 4}NH{sub 2} group of the L{sup 5} ligand has the syn conformation with respect to metal-oxo bonding in the complex. The syn isomer was selectively formed in the ligand exchange reaction. The conversion of the syn isomer to the anti isomer was observed only for syn-[ReO(L{sup 5})], in which the coordination of water to the trans position of the oxo ligand was involved. (orig.)

  2. Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Chicken Cathelicidin-2 Derived Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Albert; van Eldik, Mandy; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Hanne L. M.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2016-01-01

    Host Defence Peptides and derived peptides are promising classes of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory lead compounds. For this purpose we examined whether chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2)-derived peptides modulate the function and inflammatory response of avian immune cells. Using a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11) we found that full-length CATH-2 dose-dependently induced transcription of chemokines CXCLi2/IL-8, MCP-3 and CCLi4/RANTES, but not of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. In addition, CATH-2 efficiently inhibited IL-1β and nitric oxide production by HD11 cells induced by different sources of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). N-terminal truncated CATH-2 derived peptides maintained the capacity to selectively induce chemokine transcription, but despite their high LPS affinity several analogs lacked LPS-neutralizing capacity. Substitution of phenylalanine residues by tryptophan introduced endotoxin neutralization capacity in inactive truncated CATH-2 derived peptides. In contrast, amino acid substitution of phenylalanine by tyrosine abrogated endotoxin neutralization activity of CATH-2 analogs. These findings support a pivotal role for aromatic residues in peptide-mediated endotoxin neutralization by CATH-2 analogs and were shown to be independent of LPS affinity. The capacity to modulate chemokine production and dampen endotoxin-induced pro-inflammatory responses in chicken immune cells implicates that small CATH-2 based peptides could serve as leads for the design of CATH-2 based immunomodulatory anti-infectives. PMID:26848845

  3. Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Chicken Cathelicidin-2 Derived Peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert van Dijk

    Full Text Available Host Defence Peptides and derived peptides are promising classes of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory lead compounds. For this purpose we examined whether chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2-derived peptides modulate the function and inflammatory response of avian immune cells. Using a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11 we found that full-length CATH-2 dose-dependently induced transcription of chemokines CXCLi2/IL-8, MCP-3 and CCLi4/RANTES, but not of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. In addition, CATH-2 efficiently inhibited IL-1β and nitric oxide production by HD11 cells induced by different sources of lipopolysaccharides (LPS. N-terminal truncated CATH-2 derived peptides maintained the capacity to selectively induce chemokine transcription, but despite their high LPS affinity several analogs lacked LPS-neutralizing capacity. Substitution of phenylalanine residues by tryptophan introduced endotoxin neutralization capacity in inactive truncated CATH-2 derived peptides. In contrast, amino acid substitution of phenylalanine by tyrosine abrogated endotoxin neutralization activity of CATH-2 analogs. These findings support a pivotal role for aromatic residues in peptide-mediated endotoxin neutralization by CATH-2 analogs and were shown to be independent of LPS affinity. The capacity to modulate chemokine production and dampen endotoxin-induced pro-inflammatory responses in chicken immune cells implicates that small CATH-2 based peptides could serve as leads for the design of CATH-2 based immunomodulatory anti-infectives.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of the indolicidin-derived novel synthetic peptide In-58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, A S; Vasilchenko, A V; Pashkova, T M; Smirnova, M P; Kolodkin, N I; Manukhov, I V; Zavilgelsky, G B; Sizova, E A; Kartashova, O L; Simbirtsev, A S; Rogozhin, E A; Duskaev, G K; Sycheva, M V

    2017-12-01

    Natural peptides with antimicrobial activity are extremely diverse, and peptide synthesis technologies make it possible to significantly improve their properties for specific tasks. Here, we investigate the biological properties of the natural peptide indolicidin and the indolicidin-derived novel synthetic peptide In-58. In-58 was generated by replacing all tryptophan residues on phenylalanine in D-configuration; the α-amino group in the main chain also was modified by unsaturated fatty acid. Compared with indolicidin, In-58 is more bactericidal, more resistant to proteinase K, and less toxic to mammalian cells. Using molecular physics approaches, we characterized the action of In-58 on bacterial cells at the cellular level. Also, we have found that studied peptides damage bacterial membranes. Using the Escherichia coli luminescent biosensor strain MG1655 (pcolD'::lux), we investigated the action of indolicidin and In-58 at the subcellular level. At subinhibitory concentrations, indolicidin and In-58 induced an SOS response. Our data suggest that indolicidin damages the DNA, but bacterial membrane perturbation is its principal mode of action. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Chimerization of lactoferricin and lactoferrampin peptides strongly potentiates the killing activity against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolscher, Jan; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; van 't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno

    2012-06-01

    Bovine lactoferrin harbors 2 antimicrobial sequences (LFcin and LFampin), situated in close proximity in the N1-domain. To mimic their semi parallel configuration we have synthesized a chimeric peptide (LFchimera) in which these sequences are linked in a head-to-head fashion to the α- and ε-amino group, respectively, of a single lysine. In line with previously described bactericidal effects, this peptide was also a stronger candidacidal agent than the antimicrobial peptides LFcin17-30 and LFampin265-284, or a combination of these 2. Conditions that strongly reduced the candidacidal activities of LFcin17-30 and LFampin265-284, such as high ionic strength and energy depletion, had little influence on the activity of LFchimera. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy showed that LFchimera severely affected the membrane morphology, resulting in disintegration of the membrane bilayer and in an efflux of small and high molecular weight molecules such as ATP and proteins. The differential effects displayed by the chimeric peptide and a mixture of its constituent peptides clearly demonstrate the synergistic effect of linking these peptides in a fashion that allows a similar spatial arrangement as in the parent protein, suggesting that in bovine lactoferrrin the corresponding fragments act in concert in its candidacidal activity.

  6. Effect of probiotics on antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of crude peptide extract from yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, B N P; Vasiljevic, T; McKechnie, S; Donkor, O N

    2014-08-01

    Search for bioactive peptides is intensifying because of the risks associated with the use of synthetic therapeutics, thus peptide liberation by lactic acid bacteria and probiotics has received a great focus. However, proteolytic capacity of these bacteria is strain specific. The study was conducted to establish proteolytic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC® 4356™), Lactobacillus casei (ATCC® 393™) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (ATCC® BAA52™) in yogurt. Crude peptides were separated by high-speed centrifugation and tested for antioxidant and antimutagenic activities. The degree of proteolysis highly correlated with these bioactivities, and its value (11.91%) for samples containing all the cultures was double that of the control. Liberated peptides showed high radical scavenging activities with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), IC50 1.51 and 1.63mg/ml, respectively and strong antimutagenicity (26.35%). These probiotics enhanced the generation of bioactive peptides and could possibly be commercially applied in new products, or production of novel anticancer peptides. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semashko, Tatiana A; Vorotnikova, Elena A; Sharikova, Valeriya F; Vinokurov, Konstantin S; Smirnova, Yulia A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Oppert, Brenda; Elpidina, Elena N; Filippova, Irina Y

    2014-03-15

    This study describes the design, synthesis, and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family, important in many biological processes. The structure of the newly synthesized substrates is Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y (where Glp=pyroglutamyl; Xaa=Phe or Val; and Y=pNA [p-nitroanilide], AMC [4-amino-7-methylcoumaride], or AFC [4-amino-7-trifluoromethyl-coumaride]). Substrates were synthesized enzymatically to guarantee selectivity of the reaction and optical purity of the target compounds, simplifying the scheme of synthesis and isolation of products. The hydrolysis of the synthesized substrates was evaluated by C1 cysteine peptidases from different organisms and with different functions, including plant enzymes papain, bromelain, ficin, and mammalian lysosomal cathepsins B and L. The new substrates were selective for C1 cysteine peptidases and were not hydrolyzed by serine, aspartic, or metallo peptidases. We demonstrated an application of the selectivity of the synthesized substrates during the chromatographic separation of a multicomponent set of digestive peptidases from a beetle, Tenebrio molitor. Used in combination with the cysteine peptidase inhibitor E-64, these substrates were able to differentiate cysteine peptidases from peptidases of other classes in midgut extracts from T. molitor larvae and larvae of the genus Tribolium; thus, they are useful in the analysis of complex mixtures containing peptidases from different classes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Preparation and bioavailability of calcium-chelating peptide complex from tilapia skin hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Qiu, Xujian; Hao, Gengxin; Zhang, Meng; Weng, Wuyin

    2017-11-01

    With the continuous improvement in material life, the generation of fish by-products and the market demand for calcium supplements have been increasing in China. Therefore a calcium-chelating peptide complex (CPC) from tilapia skins was prepared and its effect on calcium (Ca)-deficient mice was investigated. The molecular weight distribution of CPC mainly ranged from 2000 to 180 Da, and its contents of complete amino acids and free amino acids were 85.30 and 8.67% (w/w) respectively. Scanning electron microscopy images and Fourier transform infrared data revealed that Ca crystals were bound with gelatin hydrolysates via interaction between Ca ions and NH/CN groups. When Ca-deficient mice were fed CPC and CaCO 3 respectively for 4 weeks, no significant differences in serum biochemistry or bone mineral density were found. However, the length, weight, Ca content and hydroxyproline content of the femur, Ca absorption and body weight gain of mice fed CPC were significantly higher than those of mice fed CaCO 3 . It is concluded that the prepared CPC could promote bone formation via better bioavailability of Ca and an increase in bone collagen. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J.; Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance

  10. Lactoferrin-derived Peptides Active towards Influenza: Identification of Three Potent Tetrapeptide Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Maria Carmina; Sala, Marina; Pietrantoni, Agostina; Spensiero, Antonia; Di Micco, Simone; Agamennone, Mariangela; Bertamino, Alessia; Novellino, Ettore; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel M; Superti, Fabiana; Campiglia, Pietro

    2017-09-06

    Bovine lactoferrin is a biglobular multifunctional iron binding glycoprotein that plays an important role in innate immunity against infections. We have previously demonstrated that selected peptides from bovine lactoferrin C-lobe are able to prevent both Influenza virus hemagglutination and cell infection. To deeper investigate the ability of lactoferrin derived peptides to inhibit Influenza virus infection, in this study we identified new bovine lactoferrin C-lobe derived sequences and corresponding synthetic peptides were synthesized and assayed to check their ability to prevent viral hemagglutination and infection. We identified three tetrapeptides endowed with broad anti-Influenza activity and able to inhibit viral infection in a concentration range femto- to picomolar. Our data indicate that these peptides may constitute a non-toxic tool for potential applications as anti-Influenza therapeutics.

  11. Novel chimeric peptide with enhanced cell specificity and anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Nam-Hong; Lee, Jong-Wan; Jang, Jin-Sun; Park, Yung-Hoon; Park, Seong-Cheol; Jang, Mi-Kyeong

    2015-07-31

    An antimicrobial peptide (AMP), Hn-Mc, was designed by combining the N-terminus of HPA3NT3 and the C-terminus of melittin. This chimeric AMP exhibited potent antibacterial activity with low minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), ranging from 1 to 2 μM against four drug-susceptible bacteria and ten drug-resistant bacteria. Moreover, the hemolysis and cytotoxicity was reduced significantly compared to those of the parent peptides, highlighting its high cell selectivity. The morphological changes in the giant unilamellar vesicles and bacterial cell surfaces caused by the Hn-Mc peptide suggested that it killed the microbial cells by damaging the membrane envelope. An in vivo study also demonstrated the antibacterial activity of the Hn-Mc peptide in a mouse model infected with drug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the chimeric peptide inhibited the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines in RAW 264.7 cells by preventing the interaction between LPS and Toll-like receptors. These results suggest that this chimeric peptide is an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory candidate as a pharmaceutic agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Laminin active peptide/agarose matrices as multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuji; Hozumi, Kentaro; Aso, Akihiro; Hotta, Atsushi; Toma, Kazunori; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Cell adhesive peptides derived from extracellular matrix components are potential candidates to afford bio-adhesiveness to cell culture scaffolds for tissue engineering. Previously, we covalently conjugated bioactive laminin peptides to polysaccharides, such as chitosan and alginate, and demonstrated their advantages as biomaterials. Here, we prepared functional polysaccharide matrices by mixing laminin active peptides and agarose gel. Several laminin peptide/agarose matrices showed cell attachment activity. In particular, peptide AG73 (RKRLQVQLSIRT)/agarose matrices promoted strong cell attachment and the cell behavior depended on the stiffness of agarose matrices. Fibroblasts formed spheroid structures on the soft AG73/agarose matrices while the cells formed a monolayer with elongated morphologies on the stiff matrices. On the stiff AG73/agarose matrices, neuronal cells extended neuritic processes and endothelial cells formed capillary-like networks. In addition, salivary gland cells formed acini-like structures on the soft matrices. These results suggest that the peptide/agarose matrices are useful for both two- and three-dimensional cell culture systems as a multifunctional biomaterial for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of the antimicrobial activities of a chemokine-derived peptide (CDAP-4) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Becerra, Francisco; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Dominguez-Ramirez, Lenin; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Soldevila, Gloria; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are key molecules involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking. Recently, a novel function as antimicrobial proteins has been described. CCL13 is the only member of the MCP chemokine subfamily displaying antimicrobial activity. To determine Key residues involved in its antimicrobial activity, CCL13 derived peptides were synthesized and tested against several bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these peptides, corresponding to the C-terminal region of CCL13 (CDAP-4) displayed good antimicrobial activity. Electron microscopy studies revealed remarkable morphological changes after CDAP-4 treatment. By computer modeling, CDAP-4 in α helical configuration generated a positive electrostatic potential that extended beyond the surface of the molecule. This feature is similar to other antimicrobial peptides. Altogether, these findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity was displayed by CCL13 resides to some extent at the C-terminal region. Furthermore, CDAP-4 could be considered a good antimicrobial candidate with a potential use against pathogens including P. aeruginosa

  14. Binding stability of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I proteins: role of entropy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Ahmet; Erman, Burak

    2018-03-01

    Prediction of peptide binding on specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) has long been studied with successful results. We herein describe the effects of entropy and dynamics by investigating the binding stabilities of 10 nanopeptides on various HLA Class I alleles using a theoretical model based on molecular dynamics simulations. The fluctuational entropies of the peptides are estimated over a temperature range of 310-460 K. The estimated entropies correlate well with experimental binding affinities of the peptides: peptides that have higher binding affinities have lower entropies compared to non-binders, which have significantly larger entropies. The computation of the entropies is based on a simple model that requires short molecular dynamics trajectories and allows for approximate but rapid determination. The paper draws attention to the long neglected dynamic aspects of peptide binding, and provides a fast computation scheme that allows for rapid scanning of large numbers of peptides on selected HLA antigens, which may be useful in defining the right peptides for personal immunotherapy.

  15. Determination of antioxidant activity of bioactive peptide fractions obtained from yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloğlu, H Sanlıdere; Oner, Z

    2011-11-01

    In this study, physicochemical and microbiological properties of traditional and commercial yogurt samples were determined during 4 wk of storage. Proteolytic activity, which occurs during the storage period of yogurt samples, was also determined. Peptide fractions obtained from yogurts were investigated and the effect of proteolysis on peptide release during storage was determined. The antioxidant activities of peptides released from yogurt water-soluble extracts (WSE) and from HPLC fractions were determined by 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) methods. The antioxidant activity of WSE from traditional yogurt was greater than that of WSE from commercial yogurts. In analysis by the ABTS method, mean values increased from 7.697 to 8.739 mM Trolox/g in commercial yogurts, and from 10.115 to 13.182 mM Trolox/g in traditional yogurts during storage. Antioxidant activities of peptides released from HPLC fractions of selected yogurt samples increased 10 to 200 times. In all yogurt samples, the greatest antioxidant activity was shown in the F2 fraction. After further fractionation of yogurt samples, the fractions coded as F2.2, F2.3, F4.3, and F4.4 had the highest antioxidant activity values. Total antioxidant activity of yogurts was low but after purification of peptides by fractionation in HPLC, peptide fractions with high antioxidant activity were obtained. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-assembly of cationic multidomain peptide hydrogels: supramolecular nanostructure and rheological properties dictate antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Sellati, Timothy J.; Dong, He

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would also protect the hydrogel itself from being adversely affected by microbial attachment to its surface. We have previously demonstrated the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of supramolecular assemblies of cationic multi-domain peptides (MDPs) in solution. Here, we extend the 1-D soluble supramolecular assembly to 3-D hydrogels to investigate the effect of the supramolecular nanostructure and its rheological properties on the antimicrobial activity of self-assembled hydrogels. Among designed MDPs, the bactericidal activity of peptide hydrogels was found to follow an opposite trend to that in solution. Improved antimicrobial activity of self-assembled peptide hydrogels is dictated by the combined effect of supramolecular surface chemistry and storage modulus of the bulk materials, rather than the ability of individual peptides/peptide assemblies to penetrate bacterial cell membrane as observed in solution. The structure-property-activity relationship developed through this study will provide important guidelines for designing biocompatible peptide hydrogels with built-in antimicrobial activity for various biomedical applications.Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would

  17. Formation of active inclusion bodies induced by hydrophobic self-assembling peptide GFIL8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhou, Bihong; Hu, Weike; Zhao, Qing; Lin, Zhanglin

    2015-06-16

    In the last few decades, several groups have observed that proteins expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs) in bacteria could still be biologically active when terminally fused to an appropriate aggregation-prone partner such as pyruvate oxidase from Paenibacillus polymyxa (PoxB). More recently, we have demonstrated that three amphipathic self-assembling peptides, an alpha helical peptide 18A, a beta-strand peptide ELK16, and a surfactant-like peptide L6KD, have properties that induce target proteins into active IBs. We have developed an efficient protein expression and purification approach for these active IBs by introducing a self-cleavable intein molecule. In this study, the self-assembling peptide GFIL8 (GFILGFIL) with only hydrophobic residues was analyzed, and this peptide effectively induced the formation of cytoplasmic IBs in Escherichia coli when terminally attached to lipase A and amadoriase II. The protein aggregates in cells were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis and retained ~50% of their specific activities relative to the native counterparts. We constructed an expression and separation coupled tag (ESCT) by incorporating an intein molecule, the Mxe GyrA intein. Soluble target proteins were successfully released from active IBs upon cleavage of the intein between the GFIL8 tag and the target protein, which was mediated by dithiothreitol. A variant of GFIL8, GFIL16 (GFILGFILGFILGFIL), improved the ESCT scheme by efficiently eliminating interference from the soluble intein-GFIL8 molecule. The yields of target proteins at the laboratory scale were 3.0-7.5 μg/mg wet cell pellet, which is comparable to the yields from similar ESCT constructs using 18A, ELK16, or the elastin-like peptide tag scheme. The all-hydrophobic self-assembling peptide GFIL8 induced the formation of active IBs in E. coli when terminally attached to target proteins. GFIL8 and its variant GFIL16 can act as a "pull-down" tag to produce purified soluble proteins with

  18. Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seng Koon; Sandén, Camilla; Selegård, Robert; Liedberg, Bo; Aili, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Membrane active peptides are of large interest for development of drug delivery vehicles and therapeutics for treatment of multiple drug resistant infections. Lack of specificity can be detrimental and finding routes to tune specificity and activity of membrane active peptides is vital for improving their therapeutic efficacy and minimize harmful side effects. We describe a de novo designed membrane active peptide that partition into lipid membranes only when specifically and covalently anchored to the membrane, resulting in pore-formation. Dimerization with a complementary peptide efficiently inhibits formation of pores. The effect can be regulated by proteolytic digestion of the inhibitory peptide by the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-7, an enzyme upregulated in many malignant tumors. This system thus provides a precise and specific route for tuning the permeability of lipid membranes and a novel strategy for development of recognition based membrane active peptides and indirect enzymatically controlled release of liposomal cargo.

  19. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: II. Activity against periopathogenic biofilms and anti-inflammatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, J; Scott, R.W.; Diamond, G

    2011-01-01

    Whereas periodontal disease is ultimately of bacterial etiology, from multispecies biofilms of gram-negative anaerobic microorganisms, much of the deleterious effects are caused by the resultant epithelial inflammatory response. Hence, development of a treatment that combines anti-biofilm antibiotic activity with anti-inflammatory activity would be of great utility. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) such as defensins are naturally occurring peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum activity as well as a variety of immunomodulatory activities. Furthermore, bacteria do not readily develop resistance to these agents. However, clinical studies have suggested that they do not represent optimal candidates for exogenous therapeutic agents. Small-molecule mimetics of these AMPs exhibit similar activities to the parent peptides, in addition to having low toxicity, high stability and low cost. To determine whether AMP mimetics have the potential for treatment of periodontal disease, we examined the activity of one mimetic, mPE, against biofilm cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Metabolic assays as well as culture and biomass measurement assays demonstrated that mPE exhibits potent activity against biofilm cultures of both species. Furthermore, as little as 2 µg ml−1 mPE was sufficient to inhibit interleukin-1β-induced secretion of interleukin-8 in both gingival epithelial cells and THP-1 cells. This anti-inflammatory activity is associated with a reduction in activation of nuclear factor-κB, suggesting that mPE can act both as an anti-biofilm agent in an anaerobic environment and as an anti-inflammatory agent in infected tissues. PMID:21040516

  20. Iodinated derivatives of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), PHI and PHM: purification, chemical characterization and biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, D.; Suzuki, Y.; Rorstad, O.; Lederis, K.

    1987-01-01

    The iodination of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was studied, using a variety of enzymatic and chemical iodination methods. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to purify the reaction products. The lactoperoxidase-glucose oxidase method gave excellent results in terms of reproducibility, iodine incorporation, and yield of the non-oxidized products [Tyr(I)10]VIP and [Tyr(I)22]VIP, and was used to prepare both 125 I and 127 I labelled derivatives. In both cases, direct application to HPLC and a single column system were used. Although the oxidized peptides [Tyr(I)10,Met(O)17]VIP and [Tyr(I)22,Met(O)17]VIP could be generated to varying degrees directly by iodination of VIP, these were most conveniently prepared by iodination of [Met(O)17]VIP. Iodinated derivatives of the homologous peptides PHI and PHM were likewise prepared by rapid, one-step HPLC procedures. The site and degree of iodination were determined by HPLC peptide mapping of tryptic digests and amino acid analyses, and in the case of [Tyr(I)10]VIP also by sequencing. The vasorelaxant activities of the iodinated peptides in bovine cerebral artery preparations did not differ significantly from those of the corresponding noniodinated peptides, with the exception of [Tyr(I)10,Met(O)17]VIP and [Tyr(I)22,Met(O)17]VIP which, unlike [Met(O)17]VIP itself, had slightly lower potency than VIP

  1. Antiviral activity of α-helical stapled peptides designed from the HIV-1 capsid dimerization domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowburn David

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C-terminal domain (CTD of HIV-1 capsid (CA, like full-length CA, forms dimers in solution and CTD dimerization is a major driving force in Gag assembly and maturation. Mutations of the residues at the CTD dimer interface impair virus assembly and render the virus non-infectious. Therefore, the CTD represents a potential target for designing anti-HIV-1 drugs. Results Due to the pivotal role of the dimer interface, we reasoned that peptides from the α-helical region of the dimer interface might be effective as decoys to prevent CTD dimer formation. However, these small peptides do not have any structure in solution and they do not penetrate cells. Therefore, we used the hydrocarbon stapling technique to stabilize the α-helical structure and confirmed by confocal microscopy that this modification also made these peptides cell-penetrating. We also confirmed by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, sedimentation equilibrium and NMR that these peptides indeed disrupt dimer formation. In in vitro assembly assays, the peptides inhibited mature-like virus particle formation and specifically inhibited HIV-1 production in cell-based assays. These peptides also showed potent antiviral activity against a large panel of laboratory-adapted and primary isolates, including viral strains resistant to inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease. Conclusions These preliminary data serve as the foundation for designing small, stable, α-helical peptides and small-molecule inhibitors targeted against the CTD dimer interface. The observation that relatively weak CA binders, such as NYAD-201 and NYAD-202, showed specificity and are able to disrupt the CTD dimer is encouraging for further exploration of a much broader class of antiviral compounds targeting CA. We cannot exclude the possibility that the CA-based peptides described here could elicit additional effects on virus replication not directly linked to their ability to bind

  2. Structure of a SARS coronavirus-derived peptide bound to the human major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B*1501

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav; Kristensen, Ole; Kastrup, Jette S

    2008-01-01

    , the crystal structure of HLA-B*1501 in complex with a SARS coronavirus-derived nonapeptide (VQQESSFVM) has been determined at high resolution (1.87 A). The peptide is deeply anchored in the B and F pockets, but with the Glu4 residue pointing away from the floor in the peptide-binding groove, making...

  3. Recommended administered activities for {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides in paediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, J.S.; Beykan, S.; Lassmann, M. [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Herrmann, K. [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for determining administered activities for {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides. Dose calculations were based on the weight-independent effective dose model proposed by the EANM paediatric dosage card for use in paediatric nuclear medicine. Previously published time-integrated activity coefficients for {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC and {sup 68}Ga-pentixafor were used to calculate age-independent effective doses. Consequently, the corresponding weight-dependent effective dose coefficients were rescaled according to the formalism of the EANM dosage card to determine the radiopharmaceutical class of {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides (''multiples'') and to calculate the baseline activities based on an upper limit for administered activity (185 MBq) in an adult. All calculated normalization factors suggest that the {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides are class ''B'' radiopharmaceuticals. The baseline activity for all compounds is 12.8 MBq. In analogy to {sup 18}F-fluoride, we recommend a minimum activity of 14 MBq. For paediatric nuclear medicine applications involving {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides, we suggest determining administered activities based on the formalism proposed in this work. The corresponding effective doses from these procedures will remain age-independent. (orig.)

  4. Antibacterial activity of a newly developed peptide-modified lysin against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang eYang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The global emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria is a growing threat to public health worldwide. Natural bacteriophage lysins are promising alternatives in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens, but not Gram-negative ones, like Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, due to the barriers posed by their outer membranes. Recently, modifying a natural lysin with an antimicrobial peptide was found able to break the barriers, and to kill Gram-negative pathogens. Herein, a new peptide-modified lysin (PlyA was constructed by fusing the cecropin A peptide residues 1–8 (KWKLFKKI with the OBPgp279 lysin and its antibacterial activity was studied. PlyA showed good and broad antibacterial activities against logarithmic phase A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, but much reduced activities against the cells in stationary phase. Addition of outer membrane permeabilizers (EDTA and citric acid could enhance the antibacterial activity of PlyA against stationary phase cells. Finally, no antibacterial activity of PlyA could be observed in some bio-matrices, such as culture media, milk, and sera. In conclusion, we reported here a novel peptide-modified lysin with significant antibacterial activity against both logarithmic (without OMPs and stationary phase (with OMPs A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa cells in buffer, but further optimization is needed to achieve broad activity in diverse bio-matrices.

  5. Staphylokinase has distinct modes of interaction with antimicrobial peptides, modulating its plasminogen-activation properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylokinase (Sak) is a plasminogen activator protein that is secreted by many Staphylococcus aureus strains. Sak also offers protection by binding and inhibiting specific antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here, we evaluate Sak as a more general interaction partner for AMPs. Studies with melittin, mCRAMP, tritrpticin and bovine lactoferricin indicate that the truncation of the first ten residues of Sak (SakΔN10), which occurs in vivo and uncovers important residues in a bulge region, improves its affinity for AMPs. Melittin and mCRAMP have a lower affinity for SakΔN10, and in docking studies, they bind to the N-terminal segment and bulge region of SakΔN10. By comparison, lactoferricin and tritrpticin form moderately high affinity 1:1 complexes with SakΔN10 and their cationic residues form several electrostatic interactions with the protein’s α-helix. Overall, our work identifies two distinct AMP binding surfaces on SakΔN10 whose occupation would lead to either inhibition or promotion of its plasminogen activating properties. PMID:27554435

  6. Epoxyethylglycyl peptides as inhibitors of oligosaccharyltransferase: double-labelling of the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bause, E; Wesemann, M; Bartoschek, A; Breuer, W

    1997-02-15

    Pig liver oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) is inactivated irreversibly by a hexapeptide in which threonine has been substituted by epoxyethylglycine in the Asn-Xaa-Thr glycosylation triplet. Incubation of the enzyme in the presence of Dol-PP-linked [14C]oligosaccharides and the N-3,5-dinitrobenzoylated epoxy derivative leads to the double-labelling of two subunits (48 and 66 kDa) of the oligomeric OST complex, both of which are involved in the catalytic activity. Labelling of both subunits was blocked competitively by the acceptor peptide N-benzoyl-Asu-Gly-Thr-NHCH3 and by the OST inhibitor N-benzoyl-alpha,gamma-diaminobutyric acid-Gly-Thr-NHCH3, but not by an analogue derived from the epoxy-inhibitor by replacing asparagine with glutamine. Our data clearly show that double-labelling is an active-site-directed modification, involving inhibitor glycosylation at asparagine and covalent attachment of the glycosylated inhibitor, via the epoxy group, to the enzyme. Double-labelling of OST can occur as the result of either a consecutive or a syn-catalytic reaction sequence. The latter mechanism, during the course of which OST catalyses its own 'suicide' inactivation, is more likely, as suggested by indirect experimental evidence. The syn-catalytic mechanism corresponds with our current view of the functional role of the acceptor site Thr/Ser acting as a hydrogen-bond acceptor, not a donor, during transglycosylation.

  7. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatability complex class 2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahram, S.; Arnold, D.; Bresnahan, M.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T.

    1991-01-01

    The class 2 region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class 1 molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class 1 molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class 2 DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by γ interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class 1 molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out

  8. Molecular Design, Structures, and Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide-Mimetic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruko; Palermo, Edmund F.; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics which are effective against drug-resistant bacteria without contributing to resistance development. We have designed and developed antimicrobial copolymers with cationic amphiphilic structures based on the mimicry of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. These copolymers exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no adverse hemolytic activity. Notably, these polymers also did not result in any measurable resistance development in E. coli. The peptide-mimetic design principle offers significant flexibility and diversity in the creation of new antimicrobial materials and their potential biomedical applications. PMID:23832766

  9. Active immunizations with peptide-DC vaccines and passive transfer with antibodies protect neutropenic mice against disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong

    2016-01-04

    We previously report that peptide-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination, which targeting two peptides (Fba and Met6) expressed on the cell surface of Candida albicans, can induce high degree of protection against disseminated candidiasis in immunocompetent mice. Passive transfer of immune sera from the peptide immunized mice or peptide-related monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that protection was medicated by peptide-specific antibodies. In this study the efficacy of active and passive immunization against disseminated candidiasis was tested in mice with cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia. Peptide-DC vaccines were given to mice prior to induction of neutropenia. We show active immunization with either Fba or Met6 peptide-DC vaccine significantly improved the survival and reduced the fungal burden of disseminated candidiasis in those immunocompromised mice. Importantly, we show that administration of two protective monoclonal antibodies also protect neutropenic mice against the disease, implying possibility of developing a successful passive immunotherapy strategy to treat the disease and protect against disseminated candidiasis. The results of this study are crucial as they address the fundamental questions as to whether the synthetic peptide vaccine induced immunity protects the host during a neutropenic episode. We anticipate that this peptide-vaccine study will serve as the foundation of future investigations into new peptide vaccines comprised of cell surface peptides from other medically important Candida species, as well as other fungi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Active Immunizations with Peptide-DC Vaccines and Passive Transfer with Antibodies Protect Neutropenic Mice against Disseminated Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We previously report that peptide-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination, which targeting two peptides (Fba and Met6) expressed on the cell surface of Candida albicans, can induce high degree of protection against disseminated candidiasis in immunocompetent mice. Passive transfer of immune sera from the peptide immunized mice or peptide-related monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that protection was medicated by peptide-specific antibodies. In this study the efficacy of active and passive immunization against disseminated candidiasis was tested in mice with cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia. Peptide-DC vaccines were given to mice prior to induction of neutropenia. We show active immunization with either Fba or Met6 peptide-DC vaccine significantly improved the survival and reduced the fungal burden of disseminated candidiasis in those immunocompromised mice. Importantly, we show that administration of two protective monoclonal antibodies also protect neutropenic mice against the disease, implying possibility of developing a successful passive immunotherapy strategy to treat the disease and protect against disseminated candidiasis. The results of this study are crucial as they address the fundamental questions as to whether the synthetic peptide vaccine induced immunity protects the host during a neutropenic episode. We anticipate that this peptide-vaccine study will serve as the foundation of future investigations into new peptide vaccines comprised of cell surface peptides from other medically important Candida species, as well as other fungi. PMID:26620842

  11. Stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles for cancerous cells intracellular drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing, E-mail: zhangjing@zjut.edu.cn; Li, Mengfei [Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Yuan, Zhefan [Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (China); Wu, Dan; Chen, Jia-da; Feng, Jie, E-mail: fengjie@zjut.edu.cn [Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-10-15

    A novel type of stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles (MPPM) was fabricated for cancerous cells intracellular drug release. Deca-lysine sequence (K{sub 10}), a type of cell-penetrating peptide, was synthesized and terminated with azido-glycine. Then a new kind of molecule, alkyne modified doxorubicin (DOX) connecting through disulfide bond (DOX-SS-alkyne), was synthesized. After coupling via Cu-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry reaction, reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug was obtained. Due to the amphiphilic property of the prodrug, it can assemble to form micelles. To prevent the nanocarriers from unspecific cellular uptake, the prodrug micelles were subsequently modified with 2,3-dimethyl maleic anhydride to obtain MPPM with a negatively charged outer shell. In vitro studies showed that MPPM could be shielded from cells under psychological environment. However, when arriving at mild acidic tumor site, the cell-penetrating capacity of MPPM would be activated by charge reversal of the micelles via hydrolysis of acid-labile β-carboxylic amides and regeneration of K{sub 10}, which enabled efficient internalization of MPPM by tumor cells as well as following glutathione- and protease-induced drug release inside the cancerous cells. Furthermore, since the guide peptide sequences can be accurately designed and synthesized, it can be easily changed for various functions, such as targeting peptide, apoptotic peptide, even aptamers, only need to be terminated with azido-glycine. This method can be used as a template for reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug for cancer therapy.Graphical abstractA novel type of stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles (MPPM) was fabricated for selective drug delivery in cancerous cells. MPPM could be shielded from cells under psychological environment. However, when arriving at mild acidic tumor site, the cell-penetrating capacity of MPPM would

  12. Designing complex systems - a structured activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Gerrit C.; van Vliet, Johannes C.; Lenting, Bert; Olson, Gary M.; Schuon, Sue

    1995-01-01

    This paper concerns the development of complex systems from the point of view of design as a structure of activities, related both to the clients and the users. Several modeling approaches will be adopted for different aspects of design, and several views on design will be integrated. The proposed

  13. Production of Biologically Active Cecropin A Peptide in Rice Seed Oil Bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Montesinos

    Full Text Available Cecropin A is a natural antimicrobial peptide that exhibits fast and potent activity against a broad spectrum of pathogens and neoplastic cells, and that has important biotechnological applications. However, cecropin A exploitation, as for other antimicrobial peptides, is limited by their production and purification costs. Here, we report the efficient production of this bioactive peptide in rice bran using the rice oleosin 18 as a carrier protein. High cecropin A levels were reached in rice seeds driving the expression of the chimeric gene by the strong embryo-specific oleosin 18 own promoter, and targeting the peptide to the oil body organelle as an oleosin 18-cecropin A fusion protein. The accumulation of cecropin A in oil bodies had no deleterious effects on seed viability and seedling growth, as well as on seed yield. We also show that biologically active cecropin A can be easily purified from the transgenic rice seeds by homogenization and simple flotation centrifugation methods. Our results demonstrate that the oleosin fusion technology is suitable for the production of cecropin A in rice seeds, which can potentially be extended to other antimicrobial peptides to assist their exploitation.

  14. Antioxidant activity of a novel synthetic hexa-peptide derived from an enzymatic hydrolysate of duck skin by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Cheong, Sun Hee; Kim, Yon-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Kwon, Hyuck-Ju; Kang, Seo-Hee; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2013-12-01

    A peptide was synthesized on the basis of our previous study from solid phase peptide synthesis using ASP48S (Peptron Inc.) and identified by the reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a Vydac Everest C18 column. The molecular mass of the peptide found to be 693.90 Da, and the amino acid sequences of the peptide was Trp-Tyr-Pro-Ala-Ala-Pro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antioxidant effects of the peptide by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer, and on t-BHP-induced liver cells damage in Chang cells. The antioxidative activity of the peptide was evaluated by measuring 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl, alkyl and superoxide radical scavenging activity using an ESR spectrometer. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of the peptide for hydroxyl, DPPH, alkyl, and superoxide radical scavenging activity were 45.2, 18.5, 31.5, and 33.4 μM, respectively. In addition, the peptide inhibited productions of cell death against t-BHP-induced liver cell damage in Chang cells. It was presumed to be peptide involved in regulating the apoptosis-related gene expression in the cell environment. The present results indicate that the peptide substantially contributes to antioxidative properties in liver cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative analysis of internalisation, haemolytic, cytotoxic and antibacterial effect of membrane-active cationic peptides: aspects of experimental setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváti, Kata; Bacsa, Bernadett; Mlinkó, Tamás; Szabó, Nóra; Hudecz, Ferenc; Zsila, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2017-06-01

    Cationic peptides proved fundamental importance as pharmaceutical agents and/or drug carrier moieties functioning in cellular processes. The comparison of the in vitro activity of these peptides is an experimental challenge and a combination of different methods, such as cytotoxicity, internalisation rate, haemolytic and antibacterial effect, is necessary. At the same time, several issues need to be addressed as the assay conditions have a great influence on the measured biological effects and the experimental setup needs to be optimised. Therefore, critical comparison of results from different assays using representative examples of cell penetrating and antimicrobial peptides was performed and optimal test conditions were suggested. Our main goal was to identify carrier peptides for drug delivery systems of antimicrobial drug candidates. Based on the results of internalisation, haemolytic, cytotoxic and antibacterial activity assays, a classification of cationic peptides is advocated. We found eight promising carrier peptides with good penetration ability of which Penetratin, Tat, Buforin and Dhvar4 peptides showed low adverse haemolytic effect. Penetratin, Transportan, Dhvar4 and the hybrid CM15 peptide had the most potent antibacterial activity on Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC lower than 1.2 μM) and Transportan was effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis as well. The most selective peptide was the Penetratin, where the effective antimicrobial concentration on pneumococcus was more than 250 times lower than the HC 50 value. Therefore, these peptides and their analogues will be further investigated as drug delivery systems for antimicrobial agents.

  16. An Exploration of the Calcium-Binding Mode of Egg White Peptide, Asp-His-Thr-Lys-Glu, and In Vitro Calcium Absorption Studies of Peptide-Calcium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Jin, Ziqi; Li, Dongmei; Yin, Hongjie; Lin, Songyi

    2017-11-08

    The binding mode between the pentapeptide (DHTKE) from egg white hydrolysates and calcium ions was elucidated upon its structural and thermodynamics characteristics. The present study demonstrated that the DHTKE peptide could spontaneously bind calcium with a 1:1 stoichiometry, and that the calcium-binding site corresponded to the carboxyl oxygen, amino nitrogen, and imidazole nitrogen atoms of the DHTKE peptide. Moreover, the effect of the DHTKE-calcium complex on improving the calcium absorption was investigated in vitro using Caco-2 cells. Results showed that the DHTKE-calcium complex could facilitate the calcium influx into the cytosol and further improve calcium absorption across Caco-2 cell monolayers by more than 7 times when compared to calcium-free control. This study facilitates the understanding about the binding mechanism between peptides and calcium ions as well as suggests a potential application of egg white peptides as nutraceuticals to improve calcium absorption.

  17. Antioxidant, ACE-Inhibitory and antibacterial activities of Kluyveromyces marxianus protein hydrolysates and their peptide fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahta Mirzaeia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been evidence that proteins are potentially excellent source of antioxidants, antihypertensive and antimicrobial peptides, and that enzymatic hydrolysis is an effective method to release these peptides from protein molecules. The functional properties of protein hydrolysates depends on the protein substrate, the specificity of the enzymes, the conditions used during proteolysis, degree of hydrolysis, and the nature of peptides released including molecular weight, amino acid composition, and hydrophobicity. Context and purpose of this study: The biomass of Kluyveromyces marxianus was considered as a source of ACE inhibitory, antioxidant and antimicrobial peptides. Results: Autolysis and enzymatic hydrolysis were completed respectively, after 96 h and 5 h. Overall, trypsin (18.52% DH and chymotrypsin (21.59% DH treatments were successful in releasing antioxidant and ACE inhibitory peptides. Autolysate sample (39.51% DH demonstrated poor antioxidant and ACE inhibitory activity compared to trypsin and chymotrypsin hydrolysates. The chymotrypsin 3-5 kDa (301.6±22.81 μM TE/mg protein and trypsin < 3 kDa (280.16±39.16 μM TE/mg protein permeate peptide fractions showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity. The trypsin <3 kDa permeate peptide fraction showed the highest ABTS radical scavenging (1691.1±48.68 μM TE/mg protein and ACE inhibitory (IC50=0.03±0.001 mg/mL activities. The fraction (MW=5-10 kD obtained after autolysis treatment showed antibacterial activity against St. aureus and Lis. monocytogenes in well diffusion screening. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value was 13.3 mg/mLagainst St. aureus and Lis. monocytogenes calculated by turbidimetric assay and it showed bactericidal activity against St. aureus at 21.3 mg/mL protein concentration. Conclusions: Altogether, the results of this study reveal that K. marxianus proteins contain specific peptides in their sequences which can be released by

  18. Peptide aptamer-assisted immobilization of green fluorescent protein for creating biomolecule-complexed carbon nanotube device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Daisuke; Nozawa, Yosuke; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shimada, Yuichiro

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a novel material for next-generation applications. In this study, we generated carbon nanotube and green fluorescent protein (GFP) conjugates using affinity binding peptides. The carbon nanotube-binding motif was introduced into the N-terminus of the GFP through molecular biology methods. Multiple GFPs were successfully aligned on a single-walled carbon nanotube via the molecular recognition function of the peptide aptamer, which was confirmed through transmission electron microscopy and optical analysis. Fluorescence spectral analysis results also suggested that the carbon nanotube-GFP complex was autonomously formed with orientation and without causing protein denaturation during immobilization. This simple process has a widespread potential for fabricating carbon nanotube-biomolecule hybrid devices.

  19. Selective Gene Delivery for Integrating Exogenous DNA into Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes Using Peptide-DNA Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Oikawa, Kazusato; Chuah, Jo-Ann; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2018-05-14

    Selective gene delivery into organellar genomes (mitochondrial and plastid genomes) has been limited because of a lack of appropriate platform technology, even though these organelles are essential for metabolite and energy production. Techniques for selective organellar modification are needed to functionally improve organelles and produce transplastomic/transmitochondrial plants. However, no method for mitochondrial genome modification has yet been established for multicellular organisms including plants. Likewise, modification of plastid genomes has been limited to a few plant species and algae. In the present study, we developed ionic complexes of fusion peptides containing organellar targeting signal and plasmid DNA for selective delivery of exogenous DNA into the plastid and mitochondrial genomes of intact plants. This is the first report of exogenous DNA being integrated into the mitochondrial genomes of not only plants, but also multicellular organisms in general. This fusion peptide-mediated gene delivery system is a breakthrough platform for both plant organellar biotechnology and gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases in animals.

  20. Complex mixture analysis of peptides using LC/LC-MS/MS and data-dependent protein identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasinger, V.; Corthals, G.

    2001-01-01

    The comprehensive identification of proteins within complex solutions by mass-spectrometry largely depends on the sensitivity, resolving power and sampling efficiency of the technology. An integrated orthogonal approach using Strong Cation Exchange-Reverse Phase-MS/MS (SCX-RP-MS/MS) was used to evaluate the data-dependent Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) of yeast peptides. Reverse phase gradient times of 4, 10. 30, 90, and 180 minutes allowed the identification of hundreds of proteins in a nearly automated fashion from nuclear, membrane, and cytosolic distributions. Many proteins from typically difficult to resolve regions of two-dimensional gels, such as >100kDa, > pI 9.0 and Codon Adaptation Index < 0.2, were also identified using this multi-dimensional separation technology. Few low mass proteins (<10kDa) were identified. The impact of scan-range and duty-cycle on CID of peptides will be discussed

  1. Structure-activity relationship of Trp-containing analogs of the antimicrobial peptide gomesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Tatiana M; Buri, Marcus V; Daffre, Sirlei; Campana, Patricia T; Riske, Karin A; Miranda, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Gomesin (Gm) has a broad antimicrobial activity making it of great interest for development of drugs. In this study, we analyzed three Gm analogs, [Trp(1) ]-Gm, [Trp(7) ]-Gm, and [Trp(9) ]-Gm, in an attempt to gain insight into the contributions of different regions of the peptide sequence to its activity. The incorporation of the tryptophan residue in different positions has no effect on the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of the Gm analogs in relation to Gm. Spectroscopic studies (circular dichroism, fluorescence and absorbance) of Gm and its analogs were performed in the presence of SDS, below and above its critical micelle concentration (CMC) (~8 mM), in order to monitor structural changes induced by the interaction with this anionic surfactant (0-15 mM). Interestingly, we found that the analogs interact more strongly with SDS at low concentrations (0.3-6.0 mM) than close to or above its CMC. This suggests that SDS monomers are able to cover the whole peptide, forming large detergent-peptide aggregates. On the other hand, the peptides interact differently with SDS micelles, inserting partially into the micelle core. Among the peptides, Trp in position 1 becomes more motionally-restricted in the presence of SDS, probably because this residue is located at the N-terminal region, which presents higher conformational freedom to interact stronger with SDS molecules. Trp residues in positions 7 and 9, close to and in the region of the turn of the molecule, respectively, induced a more constrained structure and the compounds cannot insert deeper into the micelle core or be completely buried by SDS monomers. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Proteolytic activity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA towards protein substrates and effect of peptides stimulating PSA activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Mattsson

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3 exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA.

  3. Proteolytic Activity of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) towards Protein Substrates and Effect of Peptides Stimulating PSA Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Johanna M.; Ravela, Suvi; Hekim, Can; Jonsson, Magnus; Malm, Johan; Närvänen, Ale; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3) exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA. PMID:25237904

  4. Deinococcus Mn2+-peptide complex: A novel approach to alphavirus vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Manoshi; Gupta, Paridhi; Morazzani, Elaine M; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara; Daly, Michael J; Glass, Pamela J; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2017-06-22

    Over the last ten years, Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an Old World alphavirus has caused numerous outbreaks in Asian and European countries and the Americas, making it an emerging pathogen of great global health importance. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a New World alphavirus, on the other hand, has been developed as a bioweapon in the past due to its ease of preparation, aerosol dispersion and high lethality in aerosolized form. Currently, there are no FDA approved vaccines against these viruses. In this study, we used a novel approach to develop inactivated vaccines for VEEV and CHIKV by applying gamma-radiation together with a synthetic Mn-decapeptide-phosphate complex (MnDpPi), based on manganous-peptide-orthophosphate antioxidants accumulated in the extremely radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Classical gamma-irradiated vaccine development approaches are limited by immunogenicity-loss due to oxidative damage to the surface proteins at the high doses of radiation required for complete virus-inactivation. However, addition of MnDpPi during irradiation process selectively protects proteins, but not the nucleic acids, from the radiation-induced oxidative damage, as required for safe and efficacious vaccine development. Previously, this approach was used to develop a bacterial vaccine. In the present study, we show that this approach can successfully be applied to protecting mice against viral infections. Irradiation of VEEV and CHIKV in the presence of MnDpPi resulted in substantial epitope preservation even at supra-lethal doses of gamma-rays (50,000Gy). Irradiated viruses were found to be completely inactivated and safe in vivo (neonatal mice). Upon immunization, VEEV inactivated in the presence of MnDpPi resulted in drastically improved protective efficacy. Thus, the MnDpPi-based gamma-inactivation approach described here can readily be applied to developing vaccines against any pathogen of interest in a fast and cost

  5. Synthesis of Reusable Silica Nanosphere-Supported Pt(IV Complex for Formation of Disulfide Bonds in Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Hou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Some peptide-based drugs, including oxytocin, vasopressin, ziconotide, pramlintide, nesiritide, and octreotide, contain one intramolecular disulfide bond. A novel and reusable monodispersed silica nanosphere-supported Pt(IV complex (SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV; TPEA: N-[3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl]ethylenediamine was synthesized via a four-step procedure and was used for the formation of intramolecular disulfide bonds in peptides. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and chemical mapping results for the Pt(II intermediates and for SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV show that the silica nanospheres possess a monodisperse spherical structure and contain uniformly-distributed Si, O, C, N, Cl, and Pt. The valence state of Pt on the silica nanospheres was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The Pt(IV loaded on SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV was 0.15 mmol/g, as determined by UV-VIS spectrometry. The formation of intramolecular disulfides in six dithiol-containing peptides of variable lengths by the use of SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV was investigated, and the relative oxidation yields were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In addition, peptide 1 (Ac-CPFC-NH2 was utilized to study the reusability of SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV. No significant decrease in the relative oxidation yield was observed after ten reaction cycles. Moreover, the structure of SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV after being used for ten cycles was determined to be similar to its initial one, demonstrating the cycling stability of the complex.

  6. Antiviral activity of a Bacillus sp: P34 peptide against pathogenic viruses of domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Scopel e Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available P34 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by a Bacillus sp. strain isolated from the intestinal contents of a fish in the Brazilian Amazon basin with reported antibacterial activity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the peptide P34 for its in vitro antiviral properties against canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2, canine coronavirus (CCoV, canine distemper virus (CDV, canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2, equine arteritis virus (EAV, equine influenza virus (EIV, feline calicivirus (FCV and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1. The results showed that the peptide P34 exhibited antiviral activity against EAV and FHV-1. The peptide P34 inhibited the replication of EAV by 99.9% and FHV-1 by 94.4%. Virucidal activity was detected only against EAV. When P34 and EAV were incubated for 6 h at 37 °C the viral titer reduced from 10(4.5 TCID50 to 10(2.75 TCID50, showing a percent of inhibition of 98.6%. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that P34 inhibited EAV and FHV-1 replication in infected cell cultures and it showed virucidal activity against EAV. Since there is documented resistance to the current drugs used against herpesviruses and there is no treatment for equine viral arteritis, it is advisable to search for new antiviral compounds to overcome these infections.

  7. The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore-forming proteins sticholysin I and II is modulated by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions ... Center for Protein Studies, Biology Faculty, University of Havana, Havana, Cuba; Department of Applied Physics, Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São ...

  8. Collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry induces intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Bache, Nicolai; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    of doubly protonated peptides that the original regioselective deuterium pattern of these peptides is completely erased (Jørgensen, T. J. D., Gårdsvoll, H., Ploug, M., and Roepstorff, P. (2005) Intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides upon collisional activation. J. Am. Chem. Soc...... randomization among all exchangeable sites (i.e. all N- and O-linked hydrogens) also occurs upon high energy collisional activation of singly protonated peptides. This intense proton/deuteron traffic precludes the use of MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry to obtain reliable information...

  9. Antiviral cationic peptides as a strategy for innovation in global health therapeutics for dengue virus: high yield production of the biologically active recombinant plectasin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothan, Hussin A; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Suhaeb, Abdulrazzaq M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2013-11-01

    Dengue virus infects millions of people worldwide, and there is no vaccine or anti-dengue therapeutic available. Antimicrobial peptides have been shown to possess effective antiviral activity against various viruses. One of the main limitations of developing these peptides as potent antiviral drugs is the high cost of production. In this study, high yield production of biologically active plectasin peptide was inexpensively achieved by producing tandem plectasin peptides as inclusion bodies in E. coli. Antiviral activity of the recombinant peptide towards dengue serotype-2 NS2B-NS3 protease (DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro) was assessed as a target to inhibit dengue virus replication in Vero cells. Single units of recombinant plectasin were collected after applying consecutive steps of refolding, cleaving by Factor Xa, and nickel column purification to obtain recombinant proteins of high purity. The maximal nontoxic dose (MNTD) of the recombinant peptide against Vero cells was 20 μM (100 μg/mL). The reaction velocity of DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro decreased significantly after increasing concentrations of recombinant plectasin were applied to the reaction mixture. Plectasin peptide noncompetitively inhibited DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro at Ki value of 5.03 ± 0.98 μM. The percentage of viral inhibition was more than 80% at the MNTD value of plectasin. In this study, biologically active recombinant plectasin which was able to inhibit dengue protease and viral replication in Vero cells was successfully produced in E. coli in a time- and cost- effective method. These findings are potentially important in the development of potent therapeutics against dengue infection.

  10. Active protein aggregates induced by terminally attached self-assembling peptide ELK16 in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bihong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, it has been gradually realized that bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs could be biologically active. In particular, several proteins including green fluorescent protein, β-galactosidase, β-lactamase, alkaline phosphatase, D-amino acid oxidase, polyphosphate kinase 3, maltodextrin phosphorylase, and sialic acid aldolase have been successfully produced as active IBs when fused to an appropriate partner such as the foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protein VP1, or the human β-amyloid peptide Aβ42(F19D. As active IBs may have many attractive advantages in enzyme production and industrial applications, it is of considerable interest to explore them further. Results In this paper, we report that an ionic self-assembling peptide ELK16 (LELELKLK2 was able to effectively induce the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli (E. coli when attached to the carboxyl termini of four model proteins including lipase A, amadoriase II, β-xylosidase, and green fluorescent protein. These aggregates had a general appearance similar to the usually reported cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs under transmission electron microscopy or fluorescence confocal microscopy. Except for lipase A-ELK16 fusion, the three other fusion protein aggregates retained comparable specific activities with the native counterparts. Conformational analyses by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the existence of newly formed antiparallel beta-sheet structures in these ELK16 peptide-induced inclusion bodies, which is consistent with the reported assembly of the ELK16 peptide. Conclusions This has been the first report where a terminally attached self-assembling β peptide ELK16 can promote the formation of active inclusion bodies or active protein aggregates in E. coli. It has the potential to render E. coli and other recombinant hosts more efficient as microbial cell factories for protein production. Our observation might

  11. Gliadin peptides induce tissue transglutaminase activation and ER-stress through Ca2+ mobilization in Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Caputo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease (CD is an intestinal inflammatory condition that develops in genetically susceptible individuals after exposure to dietary wheat gliadin. The role of post-translational modifications of gliadin catalyzed by tissue transglutaminase (tTG seems to play a crucial role in CD. However, it remains to be established how and where tTG is activated in vivo. We have investigated whether gliadin peptides modulate intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis and tTG activity. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied Ca(2+ homeostasis in Caco-2 cells by single cell microfluorimetry. Under our conditions, A-gliadin peptides 31-43 and 57-68 rapidly mobilized Ca(2+ from intracellular stores. Specifically, peptide 31-43 mobilized Ca(2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria, whereas peptide 57-68 mobilized Ca(2+ only from mitochondria. We also found that gliadin peptide-induced Ca(2+ mobilization activates the enzymatic function of intracellular tTG as revealed by in situ tTG activity using the tTG substrate pentylamine-biotin. Moreover, we demonstrate that peptide 31-43, but not peptide 57-68, induces an increase of tTG expression. Finally, we monitored the expression of glucose-regulated protein-78 and of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-homologous protein, which are two biochemical markers of ER-stress, by real-time RT-PCR and western blot. We found that chronic administration of peptide 31-43, but not of peptide 57-68, induces the expression of both genes. CONCLUSIONS: By inducing Ca(2+ mobilization from the ER, peptide 31-43 could promote an ER-stress pathway that may be relevant in CD pathogenesis. Furthermore, peptides 31-43 and 57-68, by activating intracellular tTG, could alter inflammatory key regulators, and induce deamidation of immunogenic peptides and gliadin-tTG crosslinking in enterocytes and specialized antigen-presenting cells.

  12. Impact of microencapsulated peptidase (Aspergillus oryzae) on cheddar cheese proteolysis and its biologically active peptide profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneweera, Saman; Kailasapathy, Kaila

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the delivery of calcium-alginate encapsulated peptidase (Flavourzyme(®), Aspergillus oryzae) on proteolysis of Cheddar cheese. Physical and chemical characteristics such as moisture, pH and fat content were measured, and no differences were found between control and experimental cheese at day 0. SDS-PAGE analysis clearly showed that proteolysis of α and k casein was significantly accelerated after three months of maturity in the experimental cheese. A large number of low molecular weight peptides were found in the water soluble fraction of the experimental cheeses and some of these peptides were new. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis identified these as P(1), Leu-Thu-Glu; P(3), Asp-Val-Pro-Ser-Glu) and relatively abundant stable peptides P(2), P(4), Arg-Pro-Lys-His-Pro-Ile; P(5), Arg-Pro-Lys-His-Pro-Ile-Lys and P(6). These peptides were mainly originated from αs1-CN and β-CN. Three of the identified peptides (P(1), P(2), P(3) and P(4)) are known to biologically active and P(1) and P(3) were only present in experimental cheese suggesting that experimental cheese has improved health benefits.

  13. Influence of structural and surface properties of whey-derived peptides on zinc-chelating capacity, and in vitro gastric stability and bioaccessibility of the zinc-peptide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udechukwu, M Chinonye; Downey, Brianna; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2018-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stability of zinc-peptide complexes is essential for zinc delivery. As peptide surface charge can influence their metal complex stability, we evaluated the zinc-chelating capacity and stability of zinc complexes of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH), produced with Everlase (WPH-Ever; ζ-potential, -39mV) and papain (WPH-Pap; ζ-potential, -7mV), during simulated digestion. WPH-Ever had lower amount of zinc-binding amino acids but showed higher zinc-chelating capacity than WPH-Pap. This is attributable to the highly anionic surface charge of WPH-Ever for electrostatic interaction with zinc. Release of zinc during peptic digestion was lower for WPH-Ever-zinc, and over 50% of zinc remained bound in both peptide complexes after peptic-pancreatic digestion. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggests the involvement of carboxylate ion, and sidechain carbon-oxygen of aspartate/glutamate and serine/threonine in zinc-peptide complexation. The findings indicate that strong zinc chelation can promote gastric stability and impede intestinal release, for peptides intended for use as dietary zinc carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A biomimetic collagen derived peptide exhibits anti-angiogenic activity in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Rosca

    Full Text Available We investigated the application of a mimetic 20 amino acid peptide derived from type IV collagen for treatment of breast cancer. We showed that the peptide induced a decrease of proliferation, adhesion, and migration of endothelial and tumor cells in vitro. We also observed an inhibition of triple negative MDA-MB-231 xenograft growth by 75% relative to control when administered intraperitoneally for 27 days at 10 mg/kg. We monitored in vivo the changes in vascular properties throughout the treatment using MRI and found that the vascular volume and permeability surface area product decreased significantly. The treatment also resulted in an increase of caspase-3 activity and in a reduction of microvascular density. The multiple mode of action of this peptide, i.e., anti-angiogenic, and anti-tumorigenic, makes it a viable candidate as a therapeutic agent as a monotherapy or in combination with other compounds.

  15. Co-immobilization of active antibiotics and cell adhesion peptides on calcium based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchesko, Rachelle N; Buckholtz, Gavin A; Romeo, Jared D; Gawalt, Ellen S

    2014-07-01

    Two bioactive molecules with unrelated functions, vancomycin and a cell adhesion peptide, were immobilized on the surface of a potential bone scaffold material, calcium aluminum oxide. In order to accomplish immobilization and retain bioactivity three sequential surface functionalization strategies were compared: 1.) vancomycin was chemically immobilized before a cell adhesion peptide (KRSR), 2.) vancomycin was chemically immobilized after KRSR and 3.) vancomycin was adsorbed after binding the cell adhesion peptide. Both molecules remained on the surface and active using all three reaction sequences and after autoclave sterilization based on osteoblast attachment, bacterial turbidity and bacterial zone inhibition test results. However, the second strategy was superior at enhancing osteoblast attachment and significantly decreasing bacterial growth when compared to the other sequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent Interleukin-6 Binding Peptide with Neutralizing Activity In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Ranganath

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is an important member of the cytokine superfamily, exerting pleiotropic actions on many physiological processes. Over-production of IL-6 is a hallmark of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as Castleman's Disease (CD and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Antagonism of the interleukin IL-6/IL-6 receptor (IL-6R/gp130 signaling complex continues to show promise as a therapeutic target. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against components of this complex have been approved as therapeutics for both CD and RA. To potentially provide an additional modality to antagonize IL-6 induced pathophysiology, a peptide-based antagonist approach was undertaken. Using a combination of molecular design, phage-display, and medicinal chemistry, disulfide-rich peptides (DRPs directed against IL-6 were developed with low nanomolar potency in inhibiting IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 monocytic cells. Targeted PEGylation of IL-6 binding peptides resulted in molecules that retained their potency against IL-6 and had a prolongation of their pharmacokinetic (PK profiles in rodents and monkeys. One such peptide, PN-2921, contained a 40 kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG moiety and inhibited IL-6-induced pSTAT3 in U937 cells with sub-nM potency and possessed 23, 36, and 59 h PK half-life values in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. Parenteral administration of PN-2921 to mice and cynomolgus monkeys potently inhibited IL-6-induced biomarker responses, with significant reductions in the acute inflammatory phase proteins, serum amyloid A (SAA and C-reactive protein (CRP. This potent, PEGylated IL-6 binding peptide offers a new approach to antagonize IL-6-induced signaling and associated pathophysiology.

  17. Tetraspan microdomains distinct from lipid rafts enrich select peptide-MHC class II complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kropshofer, H.; Spindeldreher, S.; Rohn, T. A.; Platania, N.; Grygar, C.; Daniel, N.; Wolpl, A.; Langen, H.; Hořejší, Václav; Vogt, A. B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2002), s. 61-68 ISSN 1529-2908 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : MHC II * tetraspan microdomains * peptide presentation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 27.868, year: 2002

  18. Peptide-Functionalized Luminescent Iridium Complexes for Lifetime Imaging of CXCR4 Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuil, J.; Steunenberg, P.; Chin, P.T.K.; Oldenburg, J.; Jalink, K.; Velders, A.H.; Leeuwen, F.W.B. van

    2011-01-01

    The chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is over-expressed in 23 types of cancer in which it plays a role in, among others, the metastatic spread. For this reason it is a potential biomarker for the field of diagnostic oncology. The antagonistic Ac-TZ14011 peptide, which binds to CXCR4, has been conjugated

  19. Enhancement of glucose uptake in muscular cell by soybean charged peptides isolated by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes (EDUF): activation of the AMPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblet, Cyril; Doyen, Alain; Amiot, Jean; Pilon, Geneviève; Marette, André; Bazinet, Laurent

    2014-03-15

    Soy peptides consumption has been associated with beneficial effects in type 2 diabetes patients. However, the peptide fractions responsible for these effects, and their mechanisms of action, have not been identified yet. In this study, we have isolated soybean peptides by electrodialysis with an ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) at 50 V/100 kDa, and tested them for their capacity to improve glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells. We observed that these fractions were able to significantly enhance glucose uptake in the presence of insulin. The reported bioactivity would be due to the low molecular weight peptides (300-500 Da) recovered. Moreover, we observed that an enhancement of glucose uptake was correlated to the activation of the AMPK enzyme, well known for its capacity to increase glucose uptake in muscle cells. To our knowledge, this is the first time that bioactive peptides with glucose uptake activity have been isolated from a complex soy matrix, and that the implication of AMPK in it is demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Melanocortin peptides inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide by activated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, R; Carlin, A; Airaghi, L; Demitri, M T; Meda, L; Galimberti, D; Baron, P; Lipton, J M; Catania, A

    1998-06-01

    Inflammatory processes contribute to neurodegenerative disease, stroke, encephalitis, and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Activated microglia are a source of cytokines and other inflammatory agents within the CNS and it is therefore important to control glial function in order to preserve neural cells. Melanocortin peptides are pro-opiomelanocortin-derived amino acid sequences that include alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). These peptides have potent and broad anti-inflammatory effects. We tested effects of alpha-MSH (1-13), alpha-MSH (11-13), and ACTH (1-24) on production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and nitric oxide (NO) in a cultured murine microglial cell line (N9) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). Melanocortin peptides inhibited production of these cytokines and NO in a concentration-related fashion, probably by increasing intracellular cAMP. When stimulated with LPS + IFN-gamma, microglia increased release of alpha-MSH. Production of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and NO was greater in activated microglia after innmunoneutralization of endogenous alpha-MSH. The results suggest that alpha-MSH is an autocrine factor in microglia. Because melanocortin peptides inhibit production of pro-inflammatory mediators by activated microglia they might be useful in treatment of inflammatory/degenerative brain disorders.

  1. A heterodimer comprised of two bovine lactoferrin antimicrobial peptides exhibits powerful bactericidal activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puknun, Aekkalak; Bolscher, Jan G M; Nazmi, Kamran; Veerman, Enno C I; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Kanthawong, Sakawrat; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol

    2013-07-01

    Melioidosis is a severe infectious disease that is endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of this disease, has developed resistance to an increasing list of antibiotics, demanding a search for novel agents. Lactoferricin and lactoferrampin are two antimicrobial domains of lactoferrin with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. A hybrid peptide (LFchimera) containing lactoferrampin (LFampin265-284) and a part of lactoferricin (LFcin17-30) has strikingly higher antimicrobial activities compared to the individual peptides. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of this chimeric construct (LFchimera1), as well as of another one containing LFcin17-30 and LFampin268-284, a shorter fragment of LFampin265-284 (LFchimera2), and the constituent peptides were tested against 7 isolates of B. pseudomallei and compared to the preferential antibiotic ceftazidime (CAZ). All isolates including B. pseudomallei 979b shown to be resistant to CAZ, at a density of 10(5) CFU/ml, could be killed by 5-10 μM of LFchimera1 within 2 h, while the other peptides as well as the antibiotic CAZ only inhibited the B. pseudomallei strains resulting in an overgrowth in 24 h. These data indicate that LFchimera1 could be considered for development of therapeutic agents against B. pseudomallei.

  2. A novel BLyS antagonist peptide designed based on the 3-D complex structure of BCMA and BLyS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jian; Feng Jiannan; Li Yan; Shen Beifen

    2006-01-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is a member of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family. Because of its roles in autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and Sjogren syndrome (SS), BLyS antagonists have been tested to treat SLE- and RA-like symptoms in mice and obtained optimistic results. So far, reported BLyS antagonists were mostly decoyed BLyS receptors or anti-BLyS antibodies. In this study, a novel BLyS antagonist peptide, PT, was designed based on the modeling 3-D complex structure of BCMA and BLyS. The interaction mode of PT with BLyS was analyzed theoretically. The results of competitive ELISA demonstrated that PT could inhibit the binding of BCMA-Fc and anti-BLyS antibody to BLyS in vitro. In addition, PT could partly block the proliferating activity of BLyS on mice splenocytes. The BLyS antagonizing activity of PT was significant (p < 0.05). This study highlights the possibility of using BLyS antagonist peptide to neutralize BLyS activity. Further optimization of PT with computer-guided molecular design method to enhance its biopotency may be useful in developing new BLyS antagonists to treat BLyS-related autoimmune diseases

  3. Selectivity in the potentiation of antibacterial activity of α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics and antimicrobial peptides by human blood plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M.; Franzyk, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising leads for novel antibiotics; however, their activity is often compromised under physiological conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the activity of alpha-peptide/beta-peptoid peptidomimetics and AMPs against Escherichia coli and Staphyl......Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising leads for novel antibiotics; however, their activity is often compromised under physiological conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the activity of alpha-peptide/beta-peptoid peptidomimetics and AMPs against Escherichia coli...... and Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of human blood-derived matrices and immune effectors. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of two peptidomimetics against E. coli decreased by up to one order of magnitude when determined in 50% blood plasma as compared to MHB media. The MIC of a membrane-active AMP......, LL-I/3, also decreased, whereas two intracellularly acting AMPs were not potentiated by plasma. Blood serum had no effect on activity against E. coli and neither matrix had an effect on activity against S. aureus. Unexpectedly, physiological concentrations of human serum albumin did not influence...

  4. The minimum activation peptide from ilvH can activate the catalytic subunit of AHAS from different species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuefang; Niu, Congwei; Wen, Xin; Xi, Zhen

    2013-04-15

    Acetohydroxyacid synthases (AHASs), which catalyze the first step in the biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids, are composed of a catalytic subunit (CSU) and a regulatory subunit (RSU). The CSU harbors the catalytic site, and the RSU is responsible for the activation and feedback regulation of the CSU. Previous results from Chipman and co-workers and our lab have shown that heterologous activation can be achieved among isozymes of Escherichia coli AHAS. It would be interesting to find the minimum peptide of ilvH (the RSU of E. coli AHAS III) that could activate other E. coli CSUs, or even those of ## species. In this paper, C-terminal, N-terminal, and C- and N-terminal truncation mutants of ilvH were constructed. The minimum peptide to activate ilvI (the CSU of E. coli AHAS III) was found to be ΔN 14-ΔC 89. Moreover, this peptide could not only activate its homologous ilvI and heterologous ilvB (CSU of E. coli AHAS I), but also heterologously activate the CSUs of AHAS from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. However, this peptide totally lost its ability for feedback regulation by valine, thus suggesting different elements for enzymatic activation and feedback regulation. Additionally, the apparent dissociation constant (Kd ) of ΔN 14-ΔC 89 when binding CSUs of different species was found to be 9.3-66.5 μM by using microscale thermophoresis. The ability of this peptide to activate different CSUs does not correlate well with its binding ability (Kd ) to these CSUs, thus implying that key interactions by specific residues is more important than binding ability in promoting enzymatic reactions. The high sequence similarity of the peptide ΔN 14-ΔC 89 to RSUs across species hints that this peptide represents the minimum activation motif in RSU and that it regulates all AHASs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Design and biological activity of β-sheet breaker peptide conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Sandra; Cardoso, Isabel; Boerner, Hans; Pereira, Maria Carmo; Saraiva, Maria Joao; Coelho, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The sequence LPFFD (iAβ 5 ) prevents amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as previously demonstrated. In this study iAβ 5 was covalently linked to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and the activity of conjugates was assessed and compared to the activity of the peptide alone by in vitro studies. The conjugates were characterized by MALDI-TOF. Competition binding assays established that conjugates retained the ability to bind Aβ with similar strength as iAβ 5 . Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that iAβ 5 conjugates inhibited amyloid fibril formation, which is in agreement with binding properties observed for the conjugates towards Aβ. The conjugates were also able to prevent amyloid-induced cell death, as evaluated by activation of caspase 3. These results demonstrated that the biological activity of iAβ 5 is not affected by the pegylation process.

  6. NMR assignments of SPOC domain of the human transcriptional corepressor SHARP in complex with a C-terminal SMRT peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Suzuka; Kanaba, Teppei; Ito, Yutaka; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-10-01

    The transcriptional corepressor SMRT/HDAC1-associated repressor protein (SHARP) recruits histone deacetylases. Human SHARP protein is thought to function in processes involving steroid hormone responses and the Notch signaling pathway. SHARP consists of RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region and the spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain in the C-terminal region. It is known that the SPOC domain binds the LSD motif in the C-terminal tail of corepressors silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptor (SMRT)/nuclear receptor corepressor (NcoR). We are interested in delineating the mechanism by which the SPOC domain recognizes the LSD motif of the C-terminal tail of SMRT/NcoR. To this end, we are investigating the tertiary structure of the SPOC/SMRT peptide using NMR. Herein, we report on the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the SPOC domain in complex with a SMRT peptide, which contributes towards a structural understanding of the SPOC/SMRT peptide and its molecular recognition.

  7. Complex formation and vectorization of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide with an amphipathic leucine- and lysine-rich peptide: study at molecular and cellular levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhalfa-Heniche, Fatima-Zohra; Hernández, Belén; Gaillard, Stéphane; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Huynh-Dinh, Tam; Lecouvey, Marc; Seksek, Olivier; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2004-04-15

    Optical spectroscopic techniques such as CD, Raman scattering, and fluorescence imaging allowed us to analyze the complex formation and vectorization of a single-stranded 20-mer phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide with a 15-mer amphipathic peptide at molecular and cellular levels. Different solvent mixtures (methanol and water) and molecular ratios of peptide/oligodeoxynucleotide complexes were tested in order to overcome the problems related to solubility. Optimal conditions for both spectroscopic and cellular experiments were obtained with the molecular ratio peptide/oligodeoxynucleotide equal to 21:4, corresponding to a 7:5 ratio for their respective +/- charge ratio. At the molecular level, CD and Raman spectra were consistent with a alpha-helix conformation of the peptide in water or in a methanol-water mixture. The presence of methanol increased considerably the solubility of the peptide without altering its alpha-helix conformation, as evidenced by CD and Raman spectroscopies. UV absorption melting profile of the oligodeoxynucleotide gave rise to a flat melting profile, corresponding to its random structure in solution. Raman spectra of oligodeoxynucleotide/peptide complexes could only be studied in methanol/water mixture solutions. Drastic changes observed in Raman spectra have undoubtedly shown: (a) the perturbation occurred in the peptide secondary structure, and (b) possible interaction between the lysine residues of the peptide and the oligodeoxynucleotide. At the cellular level, the complex was prepared in a mixture of 10% methanol and 90% cell medium. Cellular uptake in optimal conditions for the oligodeoxynucleotide delivery with low cytotoxicity was controlled by fluorescence imaging allowing to specifically locate the compacted oligonucleotide labeled with fluorescein at its 5'-terminus with the peptide into human glioma cells after 1 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Antibacterial activity of lactoferrin and a pepsin-derived lactoferrin peptide fragment.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamauchi, K; Tomita, M; Giehl, T J; Ellison, R T

    1993-01-01

    Although the antimicrobial activity of lactoferrin has been well described, its mechanism of action has been poorly characterized. Recent work has indicated that in addition to binding iron, human lactoferrin damages the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we determined whether bovine lactoferrin and a pepsin-derived bovine lactoferrin peptide (lactoferricin) fragment have similar activities. We found that both 20 microM bovine lactoferrin and 20 microM lactoferricin rele...

  9. Small surfactant-like peptides can drive soluble proteins into active aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bihong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inactive protein inclusion bodies occur commonly in Escherichia coli (E. coli cells expressing heterologous proteins. Previously several independent groups have found that active protein aggregates or pseudo inclusion bodies can be induced by a fusion partner such as a cellulose binding domain from Clostridium cellulovorans (CBDclos when expressed in E. coli. More recently we further showed that a short amphipathic helical octadecapeptide 18A (EWLKAFYEKVLEKLKELF and a short beta structure peptide ELK16 (LELELKLKLELELKLK have a similar property. Results In this work, we explored a third type of peptides, surfactant-like peptides, for performing such a "pulling-down" function. One or more of three such peptides (L6KD, L6K2, DKL6 were fused to the carboxyl termini of model proteins including Aspergillus fumigatus amadoriase II (AMA, all three peptides were used, Bacillus subtilis lipase A (LipA, only L6KD was used, hereinafter the same, Bacillus pumilus xylosidase (XynB, and green fluorescent protein (GFP, and expressed in E. coli. All fusions were found to predominantly accumulate in the insoluble fractions, with specific activities ranging from 25% to 92% of the native counterparts. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM and confocal fluorescence microscopic analyses confirmed the formation of protein aggregates in the cell. Furthermore, binding assays with amyloid-specific dyes (thioflavin T and Cong red to the AMA-L6KD aggregate and the TEM analysis of the aggregate following digestion with protease K suggested that the AMA-L6KD aggregate may contain structures reminiscent of amyloids, including a fibril-like structure core. Conclusions This study shows that the surfactant-like peptides L6KD and it derivatives can act as a pull-down handler for converting soluble proteins into active aggregates, much like 18A and ELK16. These peptide-mediated protein aggregations might have important implications for protein aggregation in

  10. Mapping membrane activity in undiscovered peptide sequence space using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ernest Y; Fulan, Benjamin M; Wong, Gerard C L; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-11-29

    There are some ∼1,100 known antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which permeabilize microbial membranes but have diverse sequences. Here, we develop a support vector machine (SVM)-based classifier to investigate ⍺-helical AMPs and the interrelated nature of their functional commonality and sequence homology. SVM is used to search the undiscovered peptide sequence space and identify Pareto-optimal candidates that simultaneously maximize the distance σ from the SVM hyperplane (thus maximize its "antimicrobialness") and its ⍺-helicity, but minimize mutational distance to known AMPs. By calibrating SVM machine learning results with killing assays and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that the SVM metric σ correlates not with a peptide's minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), but rather its ability to generate negative Gaussian membrane curvature. This surprising result provides a topological basis for membrane activity common to AMPs. Moreover, we highlight an important distinction between the maximal recognizability of a sequence to a trained AMP classifier (its ability to generate membrane curvature) and its maximal antimicrobial efficacy. As mutational distances are increased from known AMPs, we find AMP-like sequences that are increasingly difficult for nature to discover via simple mutation. Using the sequence map as a discovery tool, we find a unexpectedly diverse taxonomy of sequences that are just as membrane-active as known AMPs, but with a broad range of primary functions distinct from AMP functions, including endogenous neuropeptides, viral fusion proteins, topogenic peptides, and amyloids. The SVM classifier is useful as a general detector of membrane activity in peptide sequences.

  11. Application of Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia) serine proteinase for production of biologically active peptides from casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Pokora, Marta; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine potential application of a serine proteinase derived from Asian pumpkin for obtaining biologically active peptides from casein. The course of casein hydrolysis by three doses of the enzyme (50, 150, 300 U/mg of protein) was monitored for 24 hours by the determinations of: hydrolysis degree DH (%), free amino group content (μmole Gly/g), RP HPLC peptide profiles and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all hydrolyzates analyzed antioxidant activities were determined using three tests: the ability to reduce iron ions in FRAP test, the ability to scavenge free radicals in DPPH test, and Fe(2+) chelating activity. The antimicrobial activity of obtained peptide fractions was determined as the ability to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in a diffusion plate test. The deepest degradation, expressed as the DH [%] and the free amino group content (67% and 7528 µmole Gly/mg, respectively), was noted in samples hydrolyzed with 300 U/ml of enzyme for 24 hours, while in other samples the determined values were about three and two times lower. The results were in agreement with the peptide profiles obtained by RP HPLC. The highest antioxidative activities determined in all tests were seen for the casein hydrolysate obtained with 300 U/mg protein of serine proteinase after 24 h of reaction (2.15 µM Trolox/mg, 96.15 µg Fe(3+)/mg, 814.97 µg Fe(2+)/mg). Antimicrobial activity was presented in three preparations. In other samples no antimicrobial activity was detected.

  12. Connective tissue-activating peptide III: a novel blood biomarker for early lung cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, John; Sadar, Marianne D; Sin, Don D; Kuzyk, Michael; Xing, Li; Kondra, Jennifer; McWilliams, Annette; Man, S F Paul; Lam, Stephen

    2009-06-10

    There are no reliable blood biomarkers to detect early lung cancer. We used a novel strategy that allows discovery of differentially present proteins against a complex and variable background. Mass spectrometry analyses of paired pulmonary venous-radial arterial blood from 16 lung cancer patients were applied to identify plasma proteins potentially derived from the tumor microenvironment. Two differentially expressed proteins were confirmed in 64 paired venous-arterial blood samples using an immunoassay. Twenty-eight pre- and postsurgical resection peripheral blood samples and two independent, blinded sets of plasma from 149 participants in a lung cancer screening study (49 lung cancers and 100 controls) and 266 participants from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Lung Health Study (45 lung cancer and 221 matched controls) determined the accuracy of the two protein markers to detect subclinical lung cancer. Connective tissue-activating peptide III (CTAP III)/ neutrophil activating protein-2 (NAP-2) and haptoglobin were identified to be significantly higher in venous than in arterial blood. CTAP III/NAP-2 levels decreased after tumor resection (P = .01). In two independent population cohorts, CTAP III/NAP-2 was significantly associated with lung cancer and improved the accuracy of a lung cancer risk prediction model that included age, smoking, lung function (FEV(1)), and an interaction term between FEV(1) and CTAP III/NAP-2 (area under the curve, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91) compared to CAPIII/NAP-2 alone. We identified CTAP III/NAP-2 as a novel biomarker to detect preclinical lung cancer. The study underscores the importance of applying blood biomarkers as part of a multimodal lung cancer risk prediction model instead of as stand-alone tests.

  13. Deinococcus Mn2+ -Peptide Complex: A Novel Approach to Alphavirus Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-05

    vaccines, ionizing radiation (IR)-induced destruction of a virus’ genome is desired, while radiation - induced damage to epitopes is...development of irradiation-based approaches to vaccine production [1-3]. During ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, the energy of the photons induces direct...specifically protect proteins from the far more damaging indirect effects of gamma (γ)-rays in aqueous preparations. Mn2+-peptide antioxidants that

  14. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Semashko, T. A.; Vorotnikova, E. A.; Sharikova, V. F.; Vinokurov, Konstantin; Smirnova, Y. A.; Dunaevsky, Y. E.; Belozersky, M. A.; Oppert, B.; Elpidina, E. N.; Filippova, I. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 449, č. 1 (2014), s. 179-187 ISSN 0003-2697 Grant - others:Russian Foundation for Basic Research(RU) 12-04-01562-a; Russian Foundation for Basic Research(RU) 12-03-01057-a; ISTC (RU) 3455 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cysteine peptidases * substrates of peptidases * selective peptide substrates Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.219, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003269713006180#

  15. An SH2 domain model of STAT5 in complex with phospho-peptides define ``STAT5 Binding Signatures''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianti, Eleonora; Zauhar, Randy J.

    2015-05-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) is a member of the STAT family of proteins, implicated in cell growth and differentiation. STAT activation is regulated by phosphorylation of protein monomers at conserved tyrosine residues, followed by binding to phospho-peptide pockets and subsequent dimerization. STAT5 is implicated in the development of severe pathological conditions, including many cancer forms. However, nowadays a few STAT5 inhibitors are known, and only one crystal structure of the inactive STAT5 dimer is publicly available. With a view to enabling structure-based drug design, we have: (1) analyzed phospho-peptide binding pockets on SH2 domains of STAT5, STAT1 and STAT3; (2) generated a model of STAT5 bound to phospho-peptides; (3) assessed our model by docking against a class of known STAT5 inhibitors (Müller et al. in ChemBioChem 9:723-727, 2008); (4) used molecular dynamics simulations to optimize the molecular determinants responsible for binding and (5) proposed unique "Binding Signatures" of STAT5. Our results put in place the foundations to address STAT5 as a target for rational drug design, from sequence, structural and functional perspectives.

  16. An SH2 domain model of STAT5 in complex with phospho-peptides define "STAT5 Binding Signatures".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianti, Eleonora; Zauhar, Randy J

    2015-05-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) is a member of the STAT family of proteins, implicated in cell growth and differentiation. STAT activation is regulated by phosphorylation of protein monomers at conserved tyrosine residues, followed by binding to phospho-peptide pockets and subsequent dimerization. STAT5 is implicated in the development of severe pathological conditions, including many cancer forms. However, nowadays a few STAT5 inhibitors are known, and only one crystal structure of the inactive STAT5 dimer is publicly available. With a view to enabling structure-based drug design, we have: (1) analyzed phospho-peptide binding pockets on SH2 domains of STAT5, STAT1 and STAT3; (2) generated a model of STAT5 bound to phospho-peptides; (3) assessed our model by docking against a class of known STAT5 inhibitors (Müller et al. in ChemBioChem 9:723-727, 2008); (4) used molecular dynamics simulations to optimize the molecular determinants responsible for binding and (5) proposed unique "Binding Signatures" of STAT5. Our results put in place the foundations to address STAT5 as a target for rational drug design, from sequence, structural and functional perspectives.

  17. Improved cellular activity of antisense peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cationic peptide-lipid (CatLip) domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Zachar, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Conjugation to cationic cell penetrating peptides (such as Tat, Penetratin, or oligo arginines) efficiently improves the cellular uptake of large hydrophilic molecules such as oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids, but the cellular uptake is predominantly via an unproductive endosomal pathway...... for future in vivo applications. We find that simply conjugating a lipid domain (fatty acid) to the cationic peptide (a CatLip conjugate) increases the biological effect of the corresponding PNA (CatLip) conjugates in a luciferase cellular antisense assay up to 2 orders of magnitude. The effect increases...... with increasing length of the fatty acid (C8-C16) but in parallel also results in increased cellular toxicity, with decanoic acid being optimal. Furthermore, the relative enhancement is significantly higher for Tat peptide compared to oligoarginine. Confocal microscopy and chloroquine enhancement indicates...

  18. Biosynthesis of 2-aminooctanoic acid and its use to terminally modify a lactoferricin B peptide derivative for improved antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahboub, Sarah A; Narancic, Tanja; Devocelle, Marc; Kenny, Shane T; Palmer-Brown, William; Murphy, Cormac; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2018-01-01

    Terminal modification of peptides is frequently used to improve their hydrophobicity. While N-terminal modification with fatty acids (lipidation) has been reported previously, C-terminal lipidation is limited as it requires the use of linkers. Here we report the use of a biocatalyst for the production of an unnatural fatty amino acid, (S)-2-aminooctanoic acid (2-AOA) with enantiomeric excess > 98% ee and the subsequent use of 2-AOA to modify and improve the activity of an antimicrobial peptide. A transaminase originating from Chromobacterium violaceum was employed with a conversion efficiency 52-80% depending on the ratio of amino group donor to acceptor. 2-AOA is a fatty acid with amino functionality, which allowed direct C- and N-terminal conjugation respectively to an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) derived from lactoferricin B. The antibacterial activity of the modified peptides was improved by up to 16-fold. Furthermore, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of C-terminally modified peptide were always lower than N-terminally conjugated peptides. The C-terminally modified peptide exhibited MIC values of 25 μg/ml for Escherichia coli, 50 μg/ml for Bacillus subtilis, 100 μg/ml for Salmonella typhimurium, 200 μg/ml for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 400 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. The C-terminally modified peptide was the only peptide tested that showed complete inhibition of growth of S. aureus.

  19. Origin of anti-tumor activity of the cysteine-containing GO peptides and further optimization of their cytotoxic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuryaeva, Irina I.; Lyublinskaya, Olga G.; Podkorytov, Ivan S.; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R.

    2017-01-01

    Antitumor GO peptides have been designed as dimerization inhibitors of prominent oncoprotein mucin 1. In this study we demonstrate that activity of GO peptides is independent of the level of cellular expression of mucin 1. Furthermore, these peptides prove to be broadly cytotoxic, causing cell death also in normal cells such as dermal fibroblasts and endometrial mesenchymal stem cells. To explore molecular mechanism of their cytotoxicity, we have designed and tested a number of new peptide sequences containing the key CxC or CxxC motifs. Of note, these sequences bear no similarity to mucin 1 except that they also contain a pair of proximal cysteines. Several of the new peptides turned out to be significantly more potent than their GO prototypes. The results suggest that cytotoxicity of these peptides stems from their (moderate) activity as disulfide oxidoreductases. It is expected that such peptides, which we have termed DO peptides, are involved in disulfide-dithiol exchange reaction, resulting in formation of adventitious disulfide bridges in cell proteins. In turn, this leads to a partial loss of protein function and rapid onset of apoptosis. We anticipate that coupling DO sequences with tumor-homing transduction domains can create a potentially valuable new class of tumoricidal peptides.

  20. Structure of a retro-binding peptide inhibitor complexed with human alpha-thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, L; Chang, C Y; Ohringer, S L; Lau, W F; Iwanowicz, E J; Han, W C; Wang, T C; Seiler, S M; Roberts, D G; Sack, J S

    1995-02-10

    The crystallographic structure of the ternary complex between human alpha-thrombin, hirugen and the peptidyl inhibitor Phe-alloThr-Phe-O-CH3, which is acylated at its N terminus with 4-guanidino butanoic acid (BMS-183507), has been determined at 2.6 A resolution. The structure reveals a unique "retro-binding" mode for this tripeptide active site inhibitor. The inhibitor binds with its alkyl-guanidine moiety in the primary specificity pocket and its two phenyl rings occupying the hydrophobic proximal and distal pockets of the thrombin active site. In this arrangement the backbone of the tripeptide forms a parallel beta-strand to the thrombin main-chain at the binding site. This is opposite to the orientation of the natural substrate, fibrinogen, and all the small active site-directed thrombin inhibitors whose bound structures have been previously reported. BMS-183507 is the first synthetic inhibitor proved to bind in a retro-binding fashion to thrombin, in a fashion similar to that of the N-terminal residues of the natural inhibitor hirudin. Furthermore, this new potent thrombin inhibitor (Ki = 17.2 nM) is selective for thrombin over other serine proteases tested and may be a template to be considered in designing hirudin-based thrombin inhibitors with interactions at the specificity pocket.

  1. Antimicrobial activity and safety evaluation of peptides isolated from the hemoglobin of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fengjiao; Wu, Qiaoxing; Song, Shuang; She, Ruiping; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Yifei; Zhang, Meikun; Du, Fang; Soomro, Majid Hussain; Shi, Ruihan

    2016-12-05

    Hemoglobin is a rich source of biological peptides. As a byproduct and even wastewater of poultry-slaughtering facilities, chicken blood is one of the most abundant source of hemoglobin. In this study, the chicken hemoglobin antimicrobial peptides (CHAP) were isolated and the antimicrobial and bactericidal activities were tested by the agarose diffusion assay, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) analysis, minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) analysis, and time-dependent inhibitory and bactericidal assays. The results demonstrated that CHAP had potent and rapid antimicrobial activity against 19 bacterial strains, including 9 multidrug-resistant bacterial strains. Bacterial biofilm and NaCl permeability assays, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were further performed to detect the mechanism of its antimicrobial effect. Additionally, CHAP showed low hemolytic activity, embryo toxicity, and high stability in different temperatures and animal plasma. CHAP may have great potential for expanding production and development value in animal medication, the breeding industry and environment protection.

  2. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  3. N-Acylated and d Enantiomer Derivatives of a Nonamer Core Peptide of Lactoferricin B Showing Improved Antimicrobial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Koichi; Teraguchi, Susumu; Takase, Mitsunori; Hayasawa, Hirotoshi

    1999-01-01

    N-acylated or d enantiomer peptide derivatives based on the sequence RRWQWRMKK in lactoferricin B demonstrated antimicrobial activities greater than those of lactoferricin B against bacteria and fungi. The most potent peptide, conjugated with an 11-carbon-chain acyl group, showed two to eight times lower MIC than lactoferricin B.

  4. N-Acylated and D enantiomer derivatives of a nonamer core peptide of lactoferricin B showing improved antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Hashimoto, K; Teraguchi, S; Takase, M; Hayasawa, H

    1999-05-01

    N-acylated or D enantiomer peptide derivatives based on the sequence RRWQWRMKK in lactoferricin B demonstrated antimicrobial activities greater than those of lactoferricin B against bacteria and fungi. The most potent peptide, conjugated with an 11-carbon-chain acyl group, showed two to eight times lower MIC than lactoferricin B.

  5. Antagonistic Activities of Novel Peptides from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens PT14 against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Gwon; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Kwon, Kee-Deok; Seo, Chang Ho; Lee, Hyang Burm; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-12-09

    Bacillus species have recently drawn attention due to their potential use in the biological control of fungal diseases. This paper reports on the antifungal activity of novel peptides isolated from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens PT14. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that B. amyloliquefaciens PT14 produces five peptides (PT14-1, -2, -3, -4a, and -4b) that exhibit antifungal activity but are inactive against bacterial strains. In particular, PT14-3 and PT14-4a showed broad-spectrum antifungal activity against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum. The PT14-4a N-terminal amino acid sequence was identified through Edman degradation, and a BLAST homology analysis showed it not to be identical to any other protein or peptide. PT14-4a displayed strong fungicidal activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 3.12 mg/L (F. solani) and 6.25 mg/L (F. oxysporum), inducing severe morphological deformation in the conidia and hyphae. On the other hand, PT14-4a had no detectable hemolytic activity. This suggests PT14-4a has the potential to serve as an antifungal agent in clinical therapeutic and crop-protection applications.

  6. Mammalian protein secretion without signal peptide removal. Biosynthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 in U-937 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, R.D.; Wun, T.C.; Sadler, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) is a serine protease inhibitor that regulates plasmin generation by inhibiting urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. The primary structure of PAI-2 suggests that it may be secreted without cleavage of a single peptide. To confirm this hypothesis we have studied the glycosylation and secretion of PAI-2 in human monocytic U-937 cells by metabolic labeling, immunoprecipitation, glycosidase digestion, and protein sequencing. PAI-2 is variably glycosylated on asparagine residues to yield intracellular intermediates with zero, one, two, or three high mannose-type oligosaccharide units. Secretion of the N-glycosylated species began by 1 h of chase and the secreted molecules contained both complex-type N-linked and O-linked oligosaccharides. Enzymatically deglycosylated PAI-2 had an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of the nonglycosylated precursor and also to that of PAI-2 synthesized in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate from synthetic mRNA derived from full length PAI-2 cDNA. The amino-terminal protein sequence of secreted PAI-2 began with the initiator methionine residue. These results indicate that PAI-2 is glycosylated and secreted efficiently without the cleavage of a signal peptide. PAI-2 shares this property with its nearest homologue in the serine protease inhibitor family, chicken ovalbumin, and appears to be the first well characterized example of this phenomenon among natural mammalian proteins

  7. Enhanced efficacy (intrinsic activity) of cyclic opioid peptide analogs at the μ-receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, P.W.; Lemieux, C.; Nguyen, T.M.D.; Maziak, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Side-chain to end group cyclized enkephalin analogs (e.g. H-Tyr-cyclo[-D-Lys-Gly-Phe-Leu-] and cyclic opioid peptide analogs obtained through covalent linkage of two side-chains (e.g. H-Tyr-D-Cys-Gly-Phe-Cys-NH 2 or H-Tyr-D-Lys-Gly-Phe-Glu-NH 3 ) were tested in the μ-receptor-representative guinea pig ileum (GPI) bioassay and in a binding assay based on displacement of the μ-ligand [ 3 H]DAGO from rat brain membranes. The cyclic analogs were 5 to 70 times more potent in the GPI assay than in the binding assay, whereas linear analogs showed equal potency in the two assays. These results suggest that the efficacy (intrinsic activity) of cyclic opioid peptide analogs at the μ-receptor is increased as a consequence of the conformation constraint imposed through ring closure. This effect was most pronounced in analogs containing a long hydrophobic sidechain as part of the ring structure in the 2-position of the peptide sequence. Further experimental evidence ruled out the possibilities that these potency discrepancies may be due to differences in enzymatic degradation, dissimilar exposure of the receptors in their lipid environment or interaction with different receptor types in the two assay systems. It can be hypothesized that the semi-rigid cyclic analogs may induce a more productive conformational change in the receptor protein than the linear peptides

  8. Novel Naja atra cardiotoxin 1 (CTX-1 derived antimicrobial peptides with broad spectrum activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sala

    Full Text Available Naja atra subsp. atra cardiotoxin 1 (CTX-1, produced by Chinese cobra snakes, belonging to Elapidae family, is included in the three-finger toxin family and exerts high cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity too. Using as template mainly the tip and the subsequent β-strand of the first "finger" of this toxin, different sequences of 20 amino acids linear peptides have been designed in order to avoid toxic effects but to maintain or even strengthen the partial antimicrobial activity already seen for the complete toxin. As a result, the sequence NCP-0 (Naja Cardiotoxin Peptide-0 was designed as ancestor and subsequently 4 other variant sequences of NCP-0 were developed. These synthesized variant sequences have shown microbicidal activity towards a panel of reference and field strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The sequence named NCP-3, and its variants NCP-3a and NCP-3b, have shown the best antimicrobial activity, together with low cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells and low hemolytic activity. Bactericidal activity has been demonstrated by minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC assay at values below 10 μg/ml for most of the tested bacterial strains. This potent antimicrobial activity was confirmed even for unicellular fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Malassezia pachydermatis (MBC 50-6.3 μg/ml, and against the fast-growing mycobacteria Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Moreover, NCP-3 has shown virucidal activity on Bovine Herpesvirus 1 (BoHV1 belonging to Herpesviridae family. The bactericidal activity is maintained even in a high salt concentration medium (125 and 250 mM NaCl and phosphate buffer with 20% Mueller Hinton (MH medium against E. coli, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference strains. Considering these in vitro obtained data, the search for active sequences within proteins presenting an intrinsic microbicidal activity could provide a

  9. Analogues of the Frog-skin Antimicrobial Peptide Temporin 1Tb Exhibit a Wider Spectrum of Activity and a Stronger Antibiofilm Potential as Compared to the Parental Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Lucia; Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Maccari, Giuseppe; Esin, Semih; Batoni, Giovanna

    2017-04-01

    The frog skin-derived peptide Temporin 1Tb (TB) has gained increasing attention as novel antimicrobial agent for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant and/or biofilm-mediated infections. Nevertheless, such a peptide possesses a preferential spectrum of action against Gram-positive bacteria. In order to improve the therapeutic potential of TB, the present study evaluated the antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of two TB analogues against medically relevant bacterial species. Of the two analogues, TB_KKG6A has been previously described in the literature, while TB_L1FK is a new analogue designed by us through statistical-based computational strategies. Both TB analogues displayed a faster and stronger bactericidal activity than the parental peptide, especially against Gram-negative bacteria in planktonic form. Differently from the parental peptide, TB_KKG6A and TB_L1FK were able to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms by more than 50% at 12 μM, while only TB_KKG6A prevented the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms at 24 μM. A marked antibiofilm activity against preformed biofilms of both bacterial species was observed for the two TB analogues when used in combination with EDTA. Analysis of synergism at the cellular level suggested that the antibiofilm activity exerted by the peptide-EDTA combinations against mature biofilms might be due mainly to a disaggregating effect on the extracellular matrix in the case of S. aureus, and to a direct activity on biofilm-embedded cells in the case of P. aeruginosa. Both analogues displayed a low hemolytic effect at the active concentrations and, overall, TB_L1FK resulted less cytotoxic towards mammalian cells. Collectively, the results obtained demonstrated that subtle changes in the primary sequence of TB may provide TB analogues that, used alone or in combination with adjuvant molecules such as EDTA, exhibit promising features against both planktonic and biofilm cells of medically relevant

  10. Biologic activity of porphyromonas endodontalis complex lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirucki, Christopher S; Abedi, Mehran; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Safavi, Kamran E; Clark, Robert B; Nichols, Frank C

    2014-09-01

    Periapical infections secondary to pulpal necrosis are associated with bacterial contamination of the pulp. Porphyromonas endodontalis, a gram-negative organism, is considered to be a pulpal pathogen. P. gingivalis is phylogenetically related to P. endodontalis and synthesizes several classes of novel complex lipids that possess biological activity, including the capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation. The purpose of this study was to extract and characterize constituent lipids of P. endodontalis and evaluate their capacity to promote proinflammatory secretory responses in the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, as well as their capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and inhibit osteoblast activity. Constituent lipids of both organisms were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and were structurally characterized using electrospray mass spectrometry or electrospray-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The virulence potential of P. endodontalis lipids was then compared with known biologically active lipids isolated from P. gingivalis. P. endodontalis total lipids were shown to promote tumor necrosis factor alpha secretion from RAW 264.7 cells, and the serine lipid fraction appeared to account for the majority of this effect. P. endodontalis lipid preparations also increased osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 cells, but osteoblast differentiation in culture was inhibited and appeared to be dependent on Toll-like receptor 2 expression. These effects underscore the importance of P. endodontalis lipids in promoting inflammatory and bone cell activation processes that could lead to periapical pathology. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhanced EGFR Targeting Activity of Plasmonic Nanostructures with Engineered GE11 Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscaglia, Francesca; Rajendran, Senthilkumar; Conflitti, Paolo; Benna, Clara; Sommaggio, Roberta; Litti, Lucio; Mocellin, Simone; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Rosato, Antonio; Palleschi, Antonio; Nitti, Donato; Gobbo, Marina; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2017-12-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures show important properties for biotechnological applications, but they have to be guided on the target for exploiting their potentialities. Antibodies are the natural molecules for targeting. However, their possible adverse immunogenic activity and their cost have suggested finding other valid substitutes. Small molecules like peptides can be an alternative source of targeting agents, even if, as single molecules, their binding affinity is usually not very good. GE11 is a small dodecapeptide with specific binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and low immunogenicity. The present work shows that thousands of polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains modified with lysines and functionalized with GE11 on clusters of naked gold nanoparticles, obtained by laser ablation in water, achieves a better targeting activity than that recorded with nanoparticles decorated with the specific anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab (C225). The insertion of the cationic spacer between the polymeric part of the ligand and the targeting peptide allows for a proper presentation of GE11 on the surface of the nanosystems. Surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering signals of the plasmonic gold nanoparticles are used for quantifying the targeting activity. Molecular dynamic calculations suggest that subtle differences in the exposition of the peptide on the PEG sea are important for the targeting activity. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Dependency of {gamma}-secretase complex activity on the structural integrity of the bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hua, E-mail: hzhou2@lbl.gov [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zhou, Shuxia; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K. [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Partial solubilization of membranes with CHAPSO can increase {gamma}-secretase activity. {yields} Completely solubilized {gamma}-secretase is inactive. {yields} Purified {gamma}-secretase regains activity after reconstitution into lipid bilayers. {yields} A broad range of detergents can be used to successfully reconstitute {gamma}-secretase. -- Abstract: {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex associated with the production of A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease. We have characterized the activity of {gamma}-secretase complexes under a variety of detergent solubilization and reconstitution conditions, and the structural state of proteoliposomes by electron microscopy. We found that {gamma}-secretase activity is highly dependent on the physical state or integrity of the membrane bilayer - partial solubilization may increase activity while complete solubilization will abolish it. The activity of well-solubilized {gamma}-secretase can be restored to near native levels when properly reconstituted into a lipid bilayer environment.

  13. Effect of Jatropha curcas Peptide Fractions on the Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Campos, Maira R.; Peralta-González, Fanny; Castellanos-Ruelas, Arturo; Chel-Guerrero, Luis A.; Betancur-Ancona, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common worldwide diseases in humans. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and hypertension. An evaluation was done on the effect of Alcalase hydrolysis of defatted Jatropha curcas kernel meal on ACE inhibitory activity in the resulting hydrolysate and its purified fractions. Alcalase exhibited broad specificity and produced a protein hydrolysate with a 21.35% degree of hydrolysis and 34.87% ACE inhibition. Ultrafiltration of the hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with increased biological activity (24.46–61.41%). Hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to the peptides' inhibitory potency. The 5–10 and Jatropha kernel have potential applications in alternative hypertension therapies, adding a new application for the Jatropha plant protein fraction and improving the financial viability and sustainability of a Jatropha-based biodiesel industry. PMID:24224169

  14. Structural Analysis of Der p 1–Antibody Complexes and Comparison with Complexes of Proteins or Peptides with Monoclonal Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinski, Tomasz; Pomés, Anna; Majorek, Karolina A.; Glesner, Jill; Offermann, Lesa R.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Chapman, Martin D.; Minor, Wladek; Chruszcz, Maksymilian (INDOOR); (UV); (SC)

    2015-05-29

    Der p 1 is a major allergen from the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, that belongs to the papain-like cysteine protease family. To investigate the antigenic determinants of Der p 1, we determined two crystal structures of Der p 1 in complex with the Fab fragments of mAbs 5H8 or 10B9. Epitopes for these two Der p 1–specific Abs are located in different, nonoverlapping parts of the Der p 1 molecule. Nevertheless, surface area and identity of the amino acid residues involved in hydrogen bonds between allergen and Ab are similar. The epitope for mAb 10B9 only showed a partial overlap with the previously reported epitope for mAb 4C1, a cross-reactive mAb that binds Der p 1 and its homolog Der f 1 from Dermatophagoides farinae. Upon binding to Der p 1, the Fab fragment of mAb 10B9 was found to form a very rare α helix in its third CDR of the H chain. To provide an overview of the surface properties of the interfaces formed by the complexes of Der p 1–10B9 and Der p 1–5H8, along with the complexes of 4C1 with Der p 1 and Der f 1, a broad analysis of the surfaces and hydrogen bonds of all complexes of Fab–protein or Fab–peptide was performed. This work provides detailed insight into the cross-reactive and specific allergen–Ab interactions in group 1 mite allergens. The surface data of Fab–protein and Fab–peptide interfaces can be used in the design of conformational epitopes with reduced Ab binding for immunotherapy.

  15. Bilayer lipid composition modulates the activity of dermaseptins, polycationic antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclohier, Hervé

    2006-05-01

    The primary targets of defense peptides are plasma membranes, and the induced irreversible depolarization is sufficient to exert antimicrobial activity although secondary modes of action might be at work. Channels or pores underlying membrane permeabilization are usually quite large with single-channel conductances two orders of magnitude higher than those exhibited by physiological channels involved, e.g., in excitability. Accordingly, the ion specificity and selectivity are quite low. Whereas, e.g., peptaibols favor cation transport, polycationic or basic peptides tend to form anion-specific pores. With dermaseptin B2, a 33 residue long and mostly alpha-helical peptide isolated from the skin of the South American frog Phyllomedusa bicolor, we found that the ion specificity of its pores induced in bilayers is modulated by phospholipid-charged headgroups. This suggests mixed lipid-peptide pore lining instead of the more classical barrel-stave model. Macroscopic conductance is nearly voltage independent, and concentration dependence suggests that the pores are mainly formed by dermaseptin tetramers. The two most probable single-channel events are well resolved at 200 and 500 pS (in 150 mM NaCl) with occasional other equally spaced higher or lower levels. In contrast to previous molecular dynamics previsions, this study demonstrates that dermaseptins are able to form pores, although a related analog (B6) failed to induce any significant conductance. Finally, the model of the pore we present accounts for phospholipid headgroups intercalated between peptide helices lining the pore and for one of the most probable single-channel conductance.

  16. Helical 1:1 α/Sulfono-γ-AA Heterogeneous Peptides with Antibacterial Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    She, Fengyu; Nimmagadda, Alekhya; Teng, Peng; Su, Ma; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cai, Jianfeng

    2016-05-09

    As one of the greatest threats facing in 21st century, antibiotic resistance is now a major public health concern. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer an alternative approach to combat emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria. It is known that helical HDPs such as magainin 2 and its analogs adopt cationic amphipathic conformations upon interaction with bacterial membranes, leading to membrane disruption and subsequent bacterial cell death. We have previously shown that amphipathic sulfono-γ-AApeptides could mimic magainin 2 and exhibit bactericidal activity. In this article, we demonstrate for the first time that amphipathic helical 1:1 α/sulfono-γ-AA heterogeneous peptides, in which regular amino acids and sulfono-γ-AApeptide building blocks are alternatively present in a 1:1 pattern, display potent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) suggests that the lead sequences adopt defined helical structures. The subsequent studies including 2 fluorescence microscopy and time-kill experiments indicate that these hybrid peptides exert antimicrobial activity by mimicking the mechanism of HDPs. Our findings may lead to the development of HDP-mimicking antimicrobial peptidomimetics that combat drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. In addition, our results also demonstrate the effective design of a new class of helical foldamer, which could be employed to interrogate other important biological targets such as protein-protein interactions in the future.

  17. Increased Staphylococcus-killing activity of an antimicrobial peptide, lactoferricin B, with minocycline and monoacylglycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Teraguchi, Susumu; Tamura, Yoshitaka

    2002-10-01

    This study aimed to find antibiotics or other compounds that could increase the antimicrobial activity of an antimicrobial peptide, lactoferricin B (LFcin B), against Staphylococcus aureus, including antibiotic-resistant strains. Among conventional antibiotics, minocycline increased the bactericidal activity of LFcin B against S. aureus, but methicillin, ceftizoxime, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim did not have such an effect. The combination of minocycline and LFcin B had synergistic effects against three antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus, according to result of checkerboard analysis. Screening of 33 compounds, including acids and salts, alcohols, amino acids, proteins and peptides, sugar, and lipids, showed that medium-chain monoacylglycerols increased the bactericidal activity of LFcin B against three S. aureus strains. The short-term killing test in water and the killing curve test in growing cultures showed that a combination of LFcin B and monolaurin (a monoacylglycerol with a 12-carbon acyl chain) killed S. aureus more rapidly than either agent alone. These findings may be helpful in the application of antimicrobial peptides in medical or other situations.

  18. The effects of sex and neonatal stress on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, E V; Rousseau, J P; Gulemetova, R; Kinkead, R; Wilson, R J A

    2015-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Does sex or neonatal stress affect the expression of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide or its receptors? What is the main finding and its importance? Neonatal-maternal separation stress has little long-lasting effect on the expression of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide or its receptors, but sex differences exist in these genes between males and females at baseline. Sex differences in classic stress hormones have been studied in depth, but pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), recently identified as playing a critical role in the stress axes, has not. Here we studied whether baseline levels of PACAP differ between sexes in various stress-related tissues and whether neonatal-maternal separation stress has a sex-dependent effect on PACAP gene expression in stress pathways. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we found sex differences in PACAP and PACAP receptor gene expression in several respiratory and/or stress-related tissues, while neonatal-maternal separation stress did little to affect PACAP signalling in adult animals. We propose that sex differences in PACAP expression are likely to contribute to differences between males and females in responses to stress. © 2015 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  19. A 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase mediates non-ribosomal peptide synthetase activation in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Claire; Murphy, Alan; Kavanagh, Kevin; Doyle, Sean

    2005-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a significant human pathogen. Non-ribosomal peptide (NRP) synthesis is thought to be responsible for a significant proportion of toxin and siderophore production in the organism. Furthermore, it has been shown that 4'-phosphopantetheinylation is required for the activation of key enzymes involved in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis in other species. Here we report the cloning, recombinant expression and functional characterisation of a 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase from A. fumigatus and the identification of an atypical NRP synthetase (Afpes1), spanning 14.3 kb. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that the NRP synthetase exhibits greatest identity to NRP synthetases from Metarhizium anisolpiae (PesA) and Alternaria brassicae (AbrePsy1). Northern hybridisation and RT-PCR analysis have confirmed that both genes are expressed in A. fumigatus. A 120 kDa fragment of the A. fumigatus NRP synthetase, containing a putative thiolation domain, was cloned and expressed in the baculovirus expression system. Detection of a 4'-phosphopantetheinylated peptide (SFSAMK) from this protein, by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis after coincubation of the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase with the recombinant NRP synthetase fragment and acetyl CoA, confirms that it is competent to play a role in NRP synthetase activation in A. fumigatus. The 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase also activates, by 4'-phosphopantetheinylation, recombinant alpha-aminoadipate reductase (Lys2p) from Candida albicans, a key enzyme involved in lysine biosynthesis.

  20. The preferred substrates for transglutaminase 2 in a complex wheat gluten digest are Peptide fragments harboring celiac disease T-cell epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri Dørum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut that is induced by dietary exposure to gluten proteins. CD4+ T cells of the intestinal lesion recognize gluten peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2.5 or HLA-DQ8 and the gluten derived peptides become better T-cell antigens after deamidation catalyzed by the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2. In this study we aimed to identify the preferred peptide substrates of TG2 in a heterogeneous proteolytic digest of whole wheat gluten. METHODS: A method was established to enrich for preferred TG2 substrates in a complex gluten peptide mixture by tagging with 5-biotinamido-pentylamine. Tagged peptides were isolated and then identified by nano-liquid chromatography online-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, database searching and final manual data validation. RESULTS: We identified 31 different peptides as preferred substrates of TG2. Strikingly, the majority of these peptides were harboring known gluten T-cell epitopes. Five TG2 peptide substrates that were predicted to bind to HLA-DQ2.5 did not contain previously characterized sequences of T-cell epitopes. Two of these peptides elicited T-cell responses when tested for recognition by intestinal T-cell lines of celiac disease patients, and thus they contain novel candidate T-cell epitopes. We also found that the intact 9mer core sequences of the respective epitopes were not present in all peptide substrates. Interestingly, those epitopes that were represented by intact forms were frequently recognized by T cells in celiac disease patients, whereas those that were present in truncated versions were infrequently recognized. CONCLUSION: TG2 as well as gastrointestinal proteolysis play important roles in the selection of gluten T-cell epitopes in celiac disease.

  1. The Preferred Substrates for Transglutaminase 2 in a Complex Wheat Gluten Digest Are Peptide Fragments Harboring Celiac Disease T-Cell Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørum, Siri; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Holm, Anders; Koehler, Christian J.; Thiede, Bernd; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Fleckenstein, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut that is induced by dietary exposure to gluten proteins. CD4+ T cells of the intestinal lesion recognize gluten peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2.5 or HLA-DQ8 and the gluten derived peptides become better T-cell antigens after deamidation catalyzed by the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2). In this study we aimed to identify the preferred peptide substrates of TG2 in a heterogeneous proteolytic digest of whole wheat gluten. Methods A method was established to enrich for preferred TG2 substrates in a complex gluten peptide mixture by tagging with 5-biotinamido-pentylamine. Tagged peptides were isolated and then identified by nano-liquid chromatography online-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, database searching and final manual data validation. Results We identified 31 different peptides as preferred substrates of TG2. Strikingly, the majority of these peptides were harboring known gluten T-cell epitopes. Five TG2 peptide substrates that were predicted to bind to HLA-DQ2.5 did not contain previously characterized sequences of T-cell epitopes. Two of these peptides elicited T-cell responses when tested for recognition by intestinal T-cell lines of celiac disease patients, and thus they contain novel candidate T-cell epitopes. We also found that the intact 9mer core sequences of the respective epitopes were not present in all peptide substrates. Interestingly, those epitopes that were represented by intact forms were frequently recognized by T cells in celiac disease patients, whereas those that were present in truncated versions were infrequently recognized. Conclusion TG2 as well as gastrointestinal proteolysis play important roles in the selection of gluten T-cell epitopes in celiac disease. PMID:21124911

  2. Antibacterial activity of novel cationic peptides against clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from infected dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F Mohamed

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections in companion animals and has zoonotic potential. Additionally, methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP has emerged with resistance to virtually all classes of antimicrobials. Thus, novel treatment options with new modes of action are required. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of six synthetic short peptides against clinical isolates of methicillin-susceptible and MRSP isolated from infected dogs. All six peptides demonstrated potent anti-staphylococcal activity regardless of existing resistance phenotype. The most effective peptides were RRIKA (with modified C terminus to increase amphipathicity and hydrophobicity and WR-12 (α-helical peptide consisting exclusively of arginine and tryptophan with minimum inhibitory concentration50 (MIC50 of 1 µM and MIC90 of 2 µM. RR (short anti-inflammatory peptide and IK8 "D isoform" demonstrated good antimicrobial activity with MIC50 of 4 µM and MIC90 of 8 µM. Penetratin and (KFF3K (two cell penetrating peptides were the least effective with MIC50 of 8 µM and MIC90 of 16 µM. Killing kinetics revealed a major advantage of peptides over conventional antibiotics, demonstrating potent bactericidal activity within minutes. Studies with propidium iodide and transmission electron microscopy revealed that peptides damaged the bacterial membrane leading to leakage of cytoplasmic contents and consequently, cell death. A potent synergistic increase in the antibacterial effect of the cell penetrating peptide (KFF3K was noticed when combined with other peptides and with antibiotics. In addition, all peptides displayed synergistic interactions when combined together. Furthermore, peptides demonstrated good therapeutic indices with minimal toxicity toward mammalian cells. Resistance to peptides did not evolve after 10 passages of S. pseudintermedius at sub-inhibitory concentration. However, the MICs of amikacin

  3. Protein-only, antimicrobial peptide-containing recombinant nanoparticles with inherent built-in antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Naroa; Sánchez-García, Laura; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Unzueta, Ugutz; Roldán, Mónica; Mangues, Ramón; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-09-15

    The emergence of bacterial antibiotic resistances is a serious concern in human and animal health. In this context, naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) might play a main role in a next generation of drugs against bacterial infections. Taking an innovative approach to design self-organizing functional proteins, we have generated here protein-only nanoparticles with intrinsic AMP microbicide activity. Using a recombinant version of the GWH1 antimicrobial peptide as building block, these materials show a wide antibacterial activity spectrum in absence of detectable toxicity on mammalian cells. The GWH1-based nanoparticles combine clinically appealing properties of nanoscale materials with full biocompatibility, structural and functional plasticity and biological efficacy exhibited by proteins. Because of the largely implemented biological fabrication of recombinant protein drugs, the protein-based platform presented here represents a novel and scalable strategy in antimicrobial drug design, that by solving some of the limitations of AMPs offers a promising alternative to conventional antibiotics. The low molecular weight antimicrobial peptide GWH1 has been engineered to oligomerize as self-assembling protein-only nanoparticles of around 50nm. In this form, the peptide exhibits potent and broad antibacterial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, without any harmful effect over mammalian cells. As a solid proof-of-concept, this finding strongly supports the design and biofabrication of nanoscale antimicrobial materials with in-built functionalities. The protein-based homogeneous composition offer advantages over alternative materials explored as antimicrobial agents, regarding biocompatibility, biodegradability and environmental suitability. Beyond the described prototype, this transversal engineering concept has wide applicability in the design of novel nanomedicines for advanced treatments of bacterial infections

  4. Prokaryotic Selectivity, Anti-endotoxic Activity and Protease Stability of Diastereomeric and Enantiomeric Analogs of Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Lee, Bongju; Shin, Song Yub

    2012-01-01

    LL-37 is the only antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the human cathelicidin family. In addition to potent antimicrobial activity, LL-37 is known to have the potential to inhibit lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic effects. To provide the stability to proteolytic digestion and increase prokaryotic selectivity and/or anti-endotoxic activity of two Lys/Trp-substituted 19-meric anti-microbial peptides (a4-W1 and a4-W2) designed from IG-19 (residues 13-31 of LL-37), we synthesized the diastereomeric peptides (a4-W1-D and a4-W2-D) with D-amino acid substitution at positions 3, 7, 10, 13 and 17 of a4-W1 and a4-W2, respectively and the enantiomeric peptides (a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E) composed D-amino acids. The diastereomeric peptides exhibited the best prokaryotic selectivity and effective protease stability, but no or less anti-endotoxic activity. In contrast, the enantiomeric peptides had not only prokaryotic selectivity and anti-endotoxic activity but also protease stability. Our results suggest that the hydrophobicity and α-helicity of the peptide is important for anti-endotoxic activity. In particular, the enantiomeric peptides showed potent anti-endotoxic and LPS-neutralizing activities comparable to that of LL-37. Taken together, both a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E holds promise as a template for the development of peptide antibiotics for the treatment of endotoxic shock and sepsis

  5. Prokaryotic Selectivity, Anti-endotoxic Activity and Protease Stability of Diastereomeric and Enantiomeric Analogs of Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Lee, Bongju; Shin, Song Yub [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    LL-37 is the only antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the human cathelicidin family. In addition to potent antimicrobial activity, LL-37 is known to have the potential to inhibit lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic effects. To provide the stability to proteolytic digestion and increase prokaryotic selectivity and/or anti-endotoxic activity of two Lys/Trp-substituted 19-meric anti-microbial peptides (a4-W1 and a4-W2) designed from IG-19 (residues 13-31 of LL-37), we synthesized the diastereomeric peptides (a4-W1-D and a4-W2-D) with D-amino acid substitution at positions 3, 7, 10, 13 and 17 of a4-W1 and a4-W2, respectively and the enantiomeric peptides (a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E) composed D-amino acids. The diastereomeric peptides exhibited the best prokaryotic selectivity and effective protease stability, but no or less anti-endotoxic activity. In contrast, the enantiomeric peptides had not only prokaryotic selectivity and anti-endotoxic activity but also protease stability. Our results suggest that the hydrophobicity and α-helicity of the peptide is important for anti-endotoxic activity. In particular, the enantiomeric peptides showed potent anti-endotoxic and LPS-neutralizing activities comparable to that of LL-37. Taken together, both a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E holds promise as a template for the development of peptide antibiotics for the treatment of endotoxic shock and sepsis.

  6. Spatio-temporal regulation of Hsp90-ligand complex leads to immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki eTamura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is the most abundant cytosolic HSP and is known to act as a molecular chaperone. We found that an Hsp90-cancer antigen peptide complex was efficiently cross-presented by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and induced peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we observed that the internalized Hsp90-peptide complex was strictly sorted to the Rab5+, EEA1+ static early endosome and the Hsp90-chaperoned peptide was processed and bound to MHC class I molecules through a endosome-recycling pathway. We also found that extracellular Hsp90 complexed with CpG-A or self-DNA stimulates production of a large amount of IFN-α from pDCs via static early endosome targeting. Thus, extracellular Hsp90 can target the antigen or nucleic acid to a static early endosome by spatio-temporal regulation. Moreover, we showed that Hsp90 associates with and delivers TLR7/9 from the ER to early endosomes for ligand recognition. Hsp90 inhibitor, geldanamycin derivative inhibited the Hsp90 association with TLR7/9, resulting in inhibition IFN-α production, leading to improvement of SLE symptoms. Interstingly, we observed that serum Hsp90 is clearly increased in patients with active SLE compared with that in patients with inactive disease. Serum Hsp90 detected in SLE patients binds to self-DNA and/or anti-DNA Ab, thus leading to stimulation of pDCs to produce IFN-α. Thus, Hsp90 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of SLE and that an Hsp90 inhibitor will therefore provide a new therapeutic approach to SLE and other nucleic acid-related autoimmune diseases. We will discuss how spatio-temporal regulation of Hsp90-ligand complexes within antigen-presenting cells affects the innate immunity and adaptive immunity.

  7. A complicated complex: Ion channels, voltage sensing, cell membranes and peptide inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Alan H; Sharma, Gagan; Undheim, Eivind A B; Jia, Xinying; Mobli, Mehdi

    2018-04-21

    Voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) are specialised ion channels that have a voltage dependent mode of action, where ion conduction, or gating, is controlled by a voltage-sensing mechanism. VGICs are critical for electrical signalling and are therefore important pharmacological targets. Among these, voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V s) have attracted particular attention as potential analgesic targets. Na V s, however, comprise several structurally similar subtypes with unique localisations and distinct functions, ranging from amplification of action potentials in nociception (e.g. Na V 1.7) to controlling electrical signalling in cardiac function (Na V 1.5). Understanding the structural basis of Na V function is therefore of great significance, both to our knowledge of electrical signalling and in development of subtype and state selective drugs. An important tool in this pursuit has been the use of peptides from animal venoms as selective Na V modulators. In this review, we look at peptides, particularly from spider venoms, that inhibit Na V s by binding to the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of this channel, known as gating modifier toxins (GMT). In the first part of the review, we look at the structural determinants of voltage sensing in VGICs, the gating cycle and the conformational changes that accompany VSD movement. Next, the modulation of the analgesic target Na V 1.7 by GMTs is reviewed to develop bioinformatic tools that, based on sequence information alone, can identify toxins that are likely to inhibit this channel. The same approach is also used to define VSD sequences, other than that from Na V 1.7, which are likely to be sensitive to this class of toxins. The final section of the review focuses on the important role of the cellular membrane in channel modulation and also how the lipid composition affects measurements of peptide-channel interactions both in binding kinetics measurements in solution and in cell-based functional assays. Copyright © 2018

  8. Dissociation Behavior of a TEMPO-Active Ester Cross-Linker for Peptide Structure Analysis by Free Radical Initiated Peptide Sequencing (FRIPS) in Negative ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Christoph; Ihling, Christian H; Götze, Michael; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linking reagent, containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) and a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker, to derive three-dimensional structural information of proteins. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate the mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). In an initial study, we had investigated the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-derivatized peptides upon collision activation in (+)-electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) experiments. In addition to the homolytic NO-C bond cleavage FRIPS pathway delivering the desired odd-electron product ions, an alternative heterolytic NO-C bond cleavage, resulting in even-electron product ions mechanism was found to be relevant. The latter fragmentation route clearly depends on the protonation of the TEMPO-Bz-moiety itself, which motivated us to conduct (-)-ESI-MS, CID-MS/MS, and MS 3 experiments of TEMPO-Bz-cross-linked peptides to further clarify the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-peptide molecular ions. We show that the TEMPO-Bz-linker is highly beneficial for conducting FRIPS in negative ionization mode as the desired homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond is the major fragmentation pathway. Based on characteristic fragments, the isomeric amino acids leucine and isoleucine could be discriminated. Interestingly, we observed pronounced amino acid side chain losses in cross-linked peptides if the cross-linked peptides contain a high number of acidic amino acids. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Structure of genes for dermaseptins B, antimicrobial peptides from frog skin. Exon 1-encoded prepropeptide is conserved in genes for peptides of highly different structures and activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouille, V; Amiche, M; Nicolas, P

    1997-09-01

    We cloned the genes of two members of the dermaseptin family, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides isolated from the skin of the arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. The dermaseptin gene Drg2 has a 2-exon coding structure interrupted by a small 137-bp intron, wherein exon 1 encoded a 22-residue hydrophobic signal peptide and the first three amino acids of the acidic propiece; exon 2 contained the 18 additional acidic residues of the propiece plus a typical prohormone processing signal Lys-Arg and a 32-residue dermaseptin progenitor sequence. The dermaseptin genes Drg2 and Drg1g2 have conserved sequences at both untranslated ends and in the first and second coding exons. In contrast, Drg1g2 comprises a third coding exon for a short version of the acidic propiece and a second dermaseptin progenitor sequence. Structural conservation between the two genes suggests that Drg1g2 arose recently from an ancestral Drg2-like gene through amplification of part of the second coding exon and 3'-untranslated region. Analysis of the cDNAs coding precursors for several frog skin peptides of highly different structures and activities demonstrates that the signal peptides and part of the acidic propieces are encoded by conserved nucleotides encompassed by the first coding exon of the dermaseptin genes. The organization of the genes that belong to this family, with the signal peptide and the progenitor sequence on separate exons, permits strikingly different peptides to be directed into the secretory pathway. The recruitment of such a homologous 'secretory' exon by otherwise non-homologous genes may have been an early event in the evolution of amphibian.

  10. A Redox-Active, Compact Molecule for Cross-Linking Amyloidogenic Peptides into Nontoxic, Off-Pathway Aggregates: In Vitro and In Vivo Efficacy and Molecular Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kerr, Richard A.; Nam, Younwoo; Oh, Shin Bi; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Earnest, Kaylin G.; Suh, Nayoung; Peck, Kristy L.; Ozbil, Mehmet; Korshavn, Kyle J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Merino, Edward J.; Shearer, Jason; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2015-11-25

    Chemical reagents targeting and controlling amyloidogenic peptides have received much attention for helping identify their roles in the pathogenesis of protein-misfolding disorders. Herein, we report a novel strategy for redirecting amyloidogenic peptides into nontoxic, off-pathway aggregates, which utilizes redox properties of a small molecule (DMPD, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine) to trigger covalent adduct formation with the peptide. In addition, for the first time, biochemical, biophysical, and molecular dynamics simulation studies have been performed to demonstrate a mechanistic understanding for such an interaction between a small molecule (DMPD) and amyloid-β (Aβ) and its subsequent anti-amyloidogenic activity, which, upon its transformation, generates ligand–peptide adducts via primary amine-dependent intramolecular cross-linking correlated with structural compaction. Furthermore, in vivo efficacy of DMPD toward amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment was evaluated employing 5xFAD mice of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Such a small molecule (DMPD) is indicated to noticeably reduce the overall cerebral amyloid load of soluble Aβ forms and amyloid deposits as well as significantly improve cognitive defects in the AD mouse model. Overall, our in vitro and in vivo studies of DMPD toward Aβ with the first molecular-level mechanistic investigations present the feasibility of developing new, innovative approaches that employ redox-active compounds without the structural complexity as next-generation chemical tools for amyloid management.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain and its complex with a phosphotyrosine peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huculeci, Radu; Buts, Lieven; Lenaerts, Tom; Nuland, Nico A. J. van; Garcia-Pino, Abel

    2012-01-01

    The SH2 domain of the human protein tyrosine kinase Fyn has been expressed, purified and crystallized in the unbound state and in complex with a high-affinity phosphotyrosine peptide. SH2 domains are widespread protein-binding modules that recognize phosphotyrosines and play central roles in intracellular signalling pathways. The SH2 domain of the human protein tyrosine kinase Fyn has been expressed, purified and crystallized in the unbound state and in complex with a high-affinity phosphotyrosine peptide. X-ray data were collected to a resolution of 2.00 Å for the unbound form and 1.40 Å for the protein in complex with the phosphotyrosine peptide

  12. Fusion peptide of influenza hemagglutinin requires a fixed angle boomerang structure for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alex L; Park, Heather; White, Judith M; Tamm, Lukas K

    2006-03-03

    The fusion peptide of influenza hemagglutinin is crucial for cell entry of this virus. Previous studies showed that this peptide adopts a boomerang-shaped structure in lipid model membranes at the pH of membrane fusion. To examine the role of the boomerang in fusion, we changed several residues proposed to stabilize the kink in this structure and measured fusion. Among these, mutants E11A and W14A expressed hemagglutinins with hemifusion and no fusion activities, and F9A and N12A had no effect on fusion, respectively. Binding enthalpies and free energies of mutant peptides to model membranes and their ability to perturb lipid bilayer structures correlated well with the fusion activities of the parent full-length molecules. The structure of W14A determined by NMR and site-directed spin labeling features a flexible kink that points out of the membrane, in sharp contrast to the more ordered boomerang of the wild-type, which points into the membrane. A specific fixed angle boomerang structure is thus required to support membrane fusion.

  13. Bioactive Peptides from Angelica sinensis Protein Hydrolyzate Delay Senescence in Caenorhabditis elegans through Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangqiang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS is known to be associated with aging and age-related diseases, strategies modulating ROS level and antioxidant defense systems may contribute to the delay of senescence. Here we show that the protein hydrolyzate from Angelica sinensis was capable of increasing oxidative survival of the model animal Caenorhabditis elegans intoxicated by paraquat. The hydrolyzate was then fractionated by ultrafiltration, and the antioxidant fraction (<3 kDa was purified by gel filtration to obtain the antioxidant A. sinensis peptides (AsiPeps, which were mostly composed of peptides with <20 amino acid residues. Further studies demonstrate that AsiPeps were able to reduce the endogenous ROS level, increase the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase, and decrease the content of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde in nematodes treated with paraquat or undergoing senescence. AsiPeps were also shown to reduce age pigments accumulation and extend lifespan but did not affect the food-intake behavior of the nematodes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that A. sinensis peptides (AsiPeps are able to delay aging process in C. elegans through antioxidant activities independent of dietary restriction.

  14. Antimicrobial activity predictors benchmarking analysis using shuffled and designed synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, William F; Pires, Állan S; Franco, Octavio L

    2017-08-07

    The antimicrobial activity prediction tools aim to help the novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP) sequences discovery, utilizing machine learning methods. Such approaches have gained increasing importance in the generation of novel synthetic peptides by means of rational design techniques. This study focused on predictive ability of such approaches to determine the antimicrobial sequence activities, which were previously characterized at the protein level by in vitro studies. Using four web servers and one standalone software, we evaluated 78 sequences generated by the so-called linguistic model, being 40 designed and 38 shuffled sequences, with ∼60 and ∼25% of identity to AMPs, respectively. The ab initio molecular modelling of such sequences indicated that the structure does not affect the predictions, as both sets present similar structures. Overall, the systems failed on predicting shuffled versions of designed peptides, as they are identical in AMPs composition, which implies in accuracies below 30%. The prediction accuracy is negatively affected by the low specificity of all systems here evaluated, as they, on the other hand, reached 100% of sensitivity. Our results suggest that complementary approaches with high specificity, not necessarily high accuracy, should be developed to be used together with the current systems, overcoming their limitations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Akihiro, E-mail: a-wada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Wong, Pooi-Fong [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hojo, Hironobu [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Glycoscience, Tokai University, Kanagawa 2591292 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shiga 5260829 (Japan); Ichinose, Akitoyo [Electron Microscopy Shop Central Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Llanes, Rafael [Institute Pedro Kouri, Havana (Cuba); Kubo, Yoshinao [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Senba, Masachika [Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Ichinose, Yoshio [Kenya Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

  16. Activity of Genital Tract Secretions and Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides against Group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nidhi; Buckley, Niall; Nakra, Natasha; Gialanella, Philip; Yuan, Weirong; Ghartey, Jeny P

    2015-12-01

    Genital tract secretions inhibit Escherichia coli (E. coli) through antimicrobial peptides (AMP) secreted by the host and vaginal microbiota. However, there are limited data against group B Streptococcus (GBS). Group B Streptococcus were incubated with cervico-vaginal lavage (CVL) samples from healthy non-pregnant women (n = 12) or synthetic AMP and monitored for bacterial growth using a turbidimetric approach. E. coli inhibitory activity was determined by a colony-forming unit assay. None of the CVL samples inhibited GBS. The human neutrophil peptide-1 and human defensin 5 inhibited GBS growth by ≥80% at concentrations ≥20 μg/mL and ≥50 μg/mL, respectively, while human beta-defensin 2 and LL-37 did not inhibit at highest concentration tested (100 μg/mL). In contrast, all AMP inhibited E. coli. Antimicrobial peptides may protect against E. coli colonization but have more limited activity against GBS. Future studies will focus on augmenting host defense with specific AMP to prevent genitourinary infection with these pathogenic organisms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Lactoferrin-Related Peptides and Applications in Human and Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascia Bruni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs represent a vast array of molecules produced by virtually all living organisms as natural barriers against infection. Among AMP sources, an interesting class regards the food-derived bioactive agents. The whey protein lactoferrin (Lf is an iron-binding glycoprotein that plays a significant role in the innate immune system, and is considered as an important host defense molecule. In search for novel antimicrobial agents, Lf offers a new source with potential pharmaceutical applications. The Lf-derived peptides Lf(1–11, lactoferricin (Lfcin and lactoferrampin exhibit interesting and more potent antimicrobial actions than intact protein. Particularly, Lfcin has demonstrated strong antibacterial, anti-fungal and antiparasitic activity with promising applications both in human and veterinary diseases (from ocular infections to osteo-articular, gastrointestinal and dermatological diseases.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of synthetic cationic peptides and lipopeptides derived from human lactoferricin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa planktonic cultures and biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Susana; Ferrer-Espada, Raquel; Stewart, Philip S; Pitts, Betsey; Lohner, Karl; Martínez de Tejada, Guillermo

    2015-07-07

    Infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa constitute a serious health threat because this pathogen -particularly when it forms biofilms - can acquire resistance to the majority of conventional antibiotics. This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides based on LF11, an 11-mer peptide derived from human lactoferricin against P. aeruginosa planktonic and biofilm-forming cells. We included in this analysis selected N-acylated derivatives of the peptides to analyze the effect of acylation in antimicrobial activity. To assess the efficacy of compounds against planktonic bacteria, microdilution assays to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill studies were conducted. The anti-biofilm activity of the agents was assessed on biofilms grown under static (on microplates) and dynamic (in a CDC-reactor) flow regimes. The antimicrobial activity of lipopeptides differed from that of non-acylated peptides in their killing mechanisms on planktonic and biofilm-forming cells. Thus, acylation enhanced the bactericidal activity of the parental peptides and resulted in lipopeptides that were uniformly bactericidal at their MIC. In contrast, acylation of the most potent anti-biofilm peptides resulted in compounds with lower anti-biofilm activity. Both peptides and lipopeptides displayed very rapid killing kinetics and all of them required less than 21 min to reduce 1,000 times the viability of planktonic cells when tested at 2 times their MBC. The peptides, LF11-215 (FWRIRIRR) and LF11-227 (FWRRFWRR), displayed the most potent anti-biofilm activity causing a 10,000 fold reduction in cell viability after 1 h of treatment at 10 times their MIC. At that concentration, these two compounds exhibited low citotoxicity on human cells. In addition to its bactericidal activity, LF11-227 removed more that 50 % of the biofilm mass in independent assays. Peptide LF11-215 and two of the shortest and least

  19. Prediction of Antimicrobial Peptides Based on Sequence Alignment and Support Vector Machine-Pairwise Algorithm Utilizing LZ-Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yi Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns an attempt to establish a new method for predicting antimicrobial peptides (AMPs which are important to the immune system. Recently, researchers are interested in designing alternative drugs based on AMPs because they have found that a large number of bacterial strains have become resistant to available antibiotics. However, researchers have encountered obstacles in the AMPs designing process as experiments to extract AMPs from protein sequences are costly and require a long set-up time. Therefore, a computational tool for AMPs prediction is needed to resolve this problem. In this study, an integrated algorithm is newly introduced to predict AMPs by integrating sequence alignment and support vector machine- (SVM- LZ complexity pairwise algorithm. It was observed that, when all sequences in the training set are used, the sensitivity of the proposed algorithm is 95.28% in jackknife test and 87.59% in independent test, while the sensitivity obtained for jackknife test and independent test is 88.74% and 78.70%, respectively, when only the sequences that has less than 70% similarity are used. Applying the proposed algorithm may allow researchers to effectively predict AMPs from unknown protein peptide sequences with higher sensitivity.

  20. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the circulation after sumatriptan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Petersen, Jesper Troensegaard

    2013-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain is still elusive, but increasingly researchers focus on the neuropeptides in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. The parasympathetic neurotransmitters, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating...... peptide-38 (PACAP38) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may be released from parasympathetic fibres and activate sensory nerve fibres during migraine attacks. Triptans are effective and well tolerated in acute migraine management but the exact mechanism of action is still debated. Triptans might...

  1. Antibacterial activity of synthetic peptides derived from lactoferricin against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Calvijo, María A; Leal-Castro, Aura L; Almanzar-Reina, Giovanni A; Rosas-Pérez, Jaiver E; García-Castañeda, Javier E; Rivera-Monroy, Zuly J

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from human and bovine lactoferricin were designed, synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Specific changes in the sequences were designed as (i) the incorporation of unnatural amino acids in the sequence, the (ii) reduction or (iii) elongation of the peptide chain length, and (iv) synthesis of molecules with different number of branches containing the same sequence. For each peptide, the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was evaluated. Our results showed that Peptides I.2 (RWQWRWQWR) and I.4 ((RRWQWR)4K2Ahx2C2) exhibit bigger or similar activity against E. coli (MIC 4-33 μM) and E. faecalis (MIC 10-33 μM) when they were compared with lactoferricin protein (LF) and some of its derivate peptides as II.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGA) and IV.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGAPSITCVRRAE). It should be pointed out that Peptides I.2 and I.4, containing the RWQWR motif, are short and easy to synthesize; our results demonstrate that it is possible to design and obtain synthetic peptides that exhibit enhanced antibacterial activity using a methodology that is fast and low-cost and that allows obtaining products with a high degree of purity and high yield.

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Synthetic Peptides Derived from Lactoferricin against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. León-Calvijo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides derived from human and bovine lactoferricin were designed, synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. Specific changes in the sequences were designed as (i the incorporation of unnatural amino acids in the sequence, the (ii reduction or (iii elongation of the peptide chain length, and (iv synthesis of molecules with different number of branches containing the same sequence. For each peptide, the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was evaluated. Our results showed that Peptides I.2 (RWQWRWQWR and I.4 ((RRWQWR4K2Ahx2C2 exhibit bigger or similar activity against E. coli (MIC 4–33 μM and E. faecalis (MIC 10–33 μM when they were compared with lactoferricin protein (LF and some of its derivate peptides as II.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGA and IV.1 (FKCRRWQWRMKKLGAPSITCVRRAE. It should be pointed out that Peptides I.2 and I.4, containing the RWQWR motif, are short and easy to synthesize; our results demonstrate that it is possible to design and obtain synthetic peptides that exhibit enhanced antibacterial activity using a methodology that is fast and low-cost and that allows obtaining products with a high degree of purity and high yield.

  3. Structure-activity studies of RFamide peptides reveal subtype-selective activation of neuropeptide FF1 and FF2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Maria; Rathmann, Daniel; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2011-06-06

    Selectivity is a major issue in closely related multiligand/multireceptor systems. In this study we investigated the RFamide systems of hNPFF₁R and hNPFF₂R that bind the endogenous peptide hormones NPFF, NPAF, NPVF, and NPSF. By use of a systematic approach, we characterized the role of the C-terminal dipeptide with respect to agonistic properties using synthesized [Xaa 7]NPFF and [Xaa 8]NPFF analogues. We were able to identify only slight differences in potency upon changing the position of Arg 7, as all modifications resulted in identical behavior at the NPFF₁R and NPFF₂R. However, the C-terminal Phe 8 was able to be replaced by Trp or His with only a minor loss in potency at the NPFF₂R relative to the NPFF₁R. Analogues with shorter side chains, such as α-amino-4-guanidino butyric acid ([Agb 7]NPFF) or phenylglycine ([Phg 8]NPFF), decreased efficacy for the NPFF₁ R to 25-31 % of the maximal response, suggesting that these agonist-receptor complexes are more susceptible to structural modifications. In contrast, mutations to the conserved Asp 6.59 residue in the third extracellular loop of both receptors revealed a higher sensitivity toward the hNPFF₂R receptor than toward hNPFF₁R. These data provide new insight into the subtype-specific agonistic activation of the NPFF₁ and NPFF(2) receptors that are necessary for the development of selective agonists. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. [Cardiotropic activity of synthetic peptide CH3CO-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-NH2 (protectin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazhin, A I; Zaĭtseva, M A; Melikhova, M E; Ezhov, N F; Sadovnikov, V B; Navolotskaia, E V

    2011-01-01

    Peptide CH3CO-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-NH2 (protectin) was synthesized and its activity was studied on the model of experimental myocardial infarction in rats in comparison to the reference antihypoxant drug riboxin. Intranasal injections ofprotectin at doses within 2-20 microg/kg once a day by course of 7 days produced a pronounced anti-ischemic action, improved coronary circulation of the blood, increases contractile activity of myocardium, reduced intensity of lipid peroxidation, and improved antioxidant protection. In some respects (improved coronary circulation of the blood, increased antioxidant protection), protectin was more effective than riboxin.

  5. Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity of a temporin B peptide analogue on an in vitro model of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzerri, Valentino; Avitabile, Concetta; Dechecchi, Maria Cristina; Lampronti, Ilaria; Borgatti, Monica; Montagner, Giulia; Cabrini, Giulio; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2014-10-01

    Natural peptides with antimicrobial properties are deeply investigated as tools to fight bacteria resistant to common antibiotics. Small peptides, as those belonging to the temporin family, are very attractive because their activity can easily be tuned after small modification to their primary sequence. Structure-activity studies previously reported by us allowed the identification of one peptide, analogue of temporin B, TB_KKG6A, showing, unlike temporin B, antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this paper, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity of the peptide TB_KKG6A against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, we found that the peptide exhibits antimicrobial activity at low concentrations, being able to downregulate the pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α produced downstream infected human bronchial epithelial cells. Experiments were carried out also with temporin B, which was found to show pro-inflammatory activity. Details on the interaction between TB_KKG6A and the P. aeruginosa LPS were obtained by circular dichroism and fluorescence studies. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Bactericidal activity of LFchimera is stronger and less sensitive to ionic strength than its constituent lactoferricin and lactoferrampin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolscher, Jan G M; Adão, Regina; Nazmi, Kamran; van den Keybus, Petra A M; van 't Hof, Wim; Nieuw Amerongen, Arie V; Bastos, Margarida; Veerman, Enno C I

    2009-01-01

    The innate immunity factor lactoferrin harbours two antimicrobial moieties, lactoferricin and lactoferrampin, situated in close proximity in the N1 domain of the molecule. Most likely they cooperate in many of the beneficial activities of lactoferrin. To investigate whether chimerization of both peptides forms a functional unit we designed a chimerical structure containing lactoferricin amino acids 17-30 and lactoferrampin amino acids 265-284. The bactericidal activity of this LFchimera was found to be drastically stronger than that of the constituent peptides, as was demonstrated by the need for lower dose, shorter incubation time and less ionic strength dependency. Likewise, strongly enhanced interaction with negatively charged model membranes was found for the LFchimera relative to the constituent peptides. Thus, chimerization of the two antimicrobial peptides resembling their structural orientation in the native molecule strikingly improves their biological activity.

  7. The relation between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction and the capacity of Ia to bind immunogenic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M

    1987-01-01

    The capacity of purified I-Ad, I-Ed, I-Ak, and I-Ek to bind to protein derived peptides that have been previously reported to be T cell immunogens has been examined. For each of the 12 peptides studied strong binding to the relevant Ia restriction element was observed. All the peptides bound more...... than one Ia molecule; however, for 11 of 12 peptides, the dominant binding was to the restriction element, whereas in one instance the dominant binding was to a nonrestriction element. When the peptides were used to inhibit the presentation of antigen by prefixed accessory cells to T cells......, an excellent correlation was found between the capacity of a peptide to inhibit the binding of an antigen to purified Ia and the capacity of the peptide to inhibit accessory cell presentation of the antigen. Thus, the binding of peptide to purified Ia is immunologically relevant, and Ia seems to be the only...

  8. Crystal structure of a polyhistidine-tagged recombinant catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase complexed with the peptide inhibitor PKI(5-24) and adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, N; Cox, S; Shaltiel, S; Taylor, S S; Xuong, N

    1997-04-15

    The crystal structure of the hexahistidine-tagged mouse recombinant catalytic subunit (H6-rC) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK), complexed with a 20-residue peptide inhibitor from the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor PKI(5-24) and adenosine, was determined at 2.2 A resolution. Novel crystallization conditions were required to grow the ternary complex crystals. The structure was refined to a final crystallographic R-factor of 18.2% with good stereochemical parameters. The "active" enzyme adopts a "closed" conformation as found in rC:PKI(5-24) [Knighton et al. (1991a,b) Science 253, 407-414, 414-420] and packs in a similar manner with the peptide providing a major contact surface. This structure clearly defines the subsites of the unique nucleotide binding site found in the protein kinase family. The adenosine occupies a mostly hydrophobic pocket at the base of the cleft between the two lobes and is completely buried. The missing triphosphate moiety of ATP is filled with a water molecule (Wtr 415) which replaces the gamma-phosphate of ATP. The glycine-rich loop between beta1 and beta2 helps to anchor the phosphates while the ribose ring is buried beneath beta-strand 2. Another ordered water molecule (Wtr 375) is pentacoordinated with polar atoms from adenosine, Leu 49 in beta-strand 1, Glu 127 in the linker strand between the two lobes, Tyr 330, and a third water molecule, Wtr 359. The conserved nucleotide fold can be defined as a lid comprised of beta-strand 1, the glycine-rich loop, and beta-strand 2. The adenine ring is buried beneath beta-strand 1 and the linker strand (120-127) that joins the small and large lobes. The C-terminal tail containing Tyr 330, a segment that lies outside the conserved core, covers this fold and anchors it in a closed conformation. The main-chain atoms of the flexible glycine-rich loop (residues 50-55) in the ATP binding domain have a mean B-factor of 41.4 A2. This loop is quite mobile, in striking contrast to the other

  9. AN INFLUENCE OF SPONTANEOUS MICROFLORA OF FERMENTED HORSEMEAT PRODUCTS ON THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PEPTIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Chernukha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, different methods are used to accumulate functional peptides in meat raw materials, including the use of spontaneous microflora during autolysis, the use of the microbial enzymes (the application of starter cultures and the use of the non-microbial enzymes (enzymes of animals and plant origin. Each method has its own specific characteristics of an impact on raw materials, which requires their detail study. This paper examines an effect of spontaneous microflora of fermented meat products from horsemeat on formation of biologically active peptides. Using the T-RFLP analysis, it was established that in air dried and uncooked smoked sausages produced with the use of the muscle tissue of horsemeat as a raw material, a significant proportion of microflora was presented by lactic acid microorganisms. The highest content of lactic acid microflora was observed in sample 1 (52.45 %, and the least in sample 3 (29.62 %. Sample 2 had the medium percent content of microflora compared to samples 1 and 3 — 38.82 %. It is necessary to note that about 25 % of microflora was unculturable; i.e., it had metabolic processes but did not grow on culture media. In the samples, the representatives of Actinobacteria and Pseudomonadales were found. Pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic microflora was not detected. Not only quantitative but also qualitative changes were observed in the studied samples. For example, in samples 1 and 2, the fractions of amilo-1,6-glucosidase, fast-type muscle myosin-binding-protein C; glucose-6-phosphate isomerase; fast skeletal muscle troponin I, phosphoglycerate kinase, pyruvate kinase and skeletal muscle actin were found, which were absent or reduced in sample 3. Therefore, in the studied product, good preservation of the main spectra of muscle proteins was observed, and the identified fractions, apparently, can be sources of new functional peptides. Not only quantitative but also qualitative changes were observed in the

  10. Membrane-tethered peptides patterned after the TRP domain (TRPducins) selectively inhibit TRPV1 channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pierluigi; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; Camprubí-Robles, María; Gomis, Ana; Quirce, Susana; Viana, Félix; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; González-Ros, José M; Belmonte, Carlos; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is a thermosensory receptor implicated in diverse physiological and pathological processes. The TRP domain, a highly conserved region in the C terminus adjacent to the internal channel gate, is critical for subunit tetramerization and channel gating. Here, we show that cell-penetrating, membrane-anchored peptides patterned after this protein domain are moderate and selective TRPV1 antagonists both in vitro and in vivo, blocking receptor activity in intact rat primary sensory neurons and their peripheral axons with mean decline time of 30 min. The most potent lipopeptide, TRP-p5, blocked all modes of TRPV1 gating with micromolar efficacy (IC(50)100 μM). TRP-p5 did not affect the capsaicin sensitivity of the vanilloid receptor. Our data suggest that TRP-p5 interferes with protein-protein interactions at the level of the TRP domain that are essential for the "conformational" change that leads to gate opening. Therefore, these palmitoylated peptides, which we termed TRPducins, are noncompetitive, voltage-independent, sequence-specific TRPV1 blockers. Our findings indicate that TRPducin-like peptides may embody a novel molecular strategy that can be exploited to generate a selective pharmacological arsenal for the TRP superfamily of ion channels.

  11. Model of a ternary complex between activated factor VII, tissue factor and factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Schved, Jean-François; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel

    2002-07-01

    Upon binding to tissue factor, FVIIa triggers coagulation by activating vitamin K-dependent zymogens, factor IX (FIX) and factor X (FX). To understand recognition mechanisms in the initiation step of the coagulation cascade, we present a three-dimensional model of the ternary complex between FVIIa:TF:FIX. This model was built using a full-space search algorithm in combination with computational graphics. With the known crystallographic complex FVIIa:TF kept fixed, the FIX docking was performed first with FIX Gla-EGF1 domains, followed by the FIX protease/EGF2 domains. Because the FIXa crystal structure lacks electron density for the Gla domain, we constructed a chimeric FIX molecule that contains the Gla-EGF1 domains of FVIIa and the EGF2-protease domains of FIXa. The FVIIa:TF:FIX complex has been extensively challenged against experimental data including site-directed mutagenesis, inhibitory peptide data, haemophilia B database mutations, inhibitor antibodies and a novel exosite binding inhibitor peptide. This FVIIa:TF:FIX complex provides a powerful tool to study the regulation of FVIIa production and presents new avenues for developing therapeutic inhibitory compounds of FVIIa:TF:substrate complex.

  12. Pepsin Digested Oat Bran Proteins: Separation, Antioxidant Activity, and Identification of New Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Vanvi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine pepsin hydrolysis conditions to produce digested oat bran proteins with higher radical scavenging activities and separate and identify peptides. Isolated proteins were then digested with different concentrations of pepsin and incubation times. Hydrolysates produced with 1 : 30 enzyme substrate (E/S ratio and 2 h possessed the highest peroxyl radical scavenging activity, 608 ± 17 µM TE/g (compared to 456–474 µM TE/g for other digests, and was therefore subsequently fractionated into eight fractions (F1–F8 by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. F1 and F2 had little activity because of their low protein contents. Activities of F3–F8 were 447–874 µM TE/g, 20–36%, and 10–14% in the peroxyl, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radical tests, respectively. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS was used to identify a total of fifty peptides that may have contributed to the activity of F3, a fraction that better scavenged radicals.

  13. Cysteine Cathepsins in the secretory vesicle produce active peptides: Cathepsin L generates peptide neurotransmitters and cathepsin B produces beta-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Wegrzyn, Jill; Bark, Steven; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Recent new findings indicate significant biological roles of cysteine cathepsin proteases in secretory vesicles for production of biologically active peptides. Notably, cathepsin L in secretory vesicles functions as a key protease for proteolytic processing of proneuropeptides (and prohormones) into active neuropeptides that are released to mediate cell-cell communication in the nervous system for neurotransmission. Moreover, cathepsin B in secretory vesicles has been recently identified as a β-secretase for production of neurotoxic β- amyloid (Aβ) peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD), participating as a notable factor in the severe memory loss in AD. These secretory vesicle functions of cathepsins L and B for production of biologically active peptides contrast with the well-known role of cathepsin proteases in lysosomes for the degradation of proteins to result in their inactivation. The unique secretory vesicle proteome indicates proteins of distinct functional categories that provide the intravesicular environment for support of cysteine cathepsin functions. Features of the secretory vesicle protein systems insure optimized intravesicular conditions that support the proteolytic activity of cathepsins. These new findings of recently discovered biological roles of cathepsins L and B indicate their significance in human health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis 50 years after the discovery of lysosome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC Class I complex stability, a correlate of T cell immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Fenoy, Emilio; Harndahl, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Binding of peptides to MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules is the most selective event in the processing and presentation of Ags to CTL, and insights into the mechanisms that govern peptide-MHC-I binding should facilitate our understanding of CTL biology. Peptide-MHC-I interactions have traditionally b...

  15. Factors affecting antimicrobial activity of MUC7 12-mer, a human salivary mucin-derived peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobek Libuse A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MUC7 12-mer (RKSYKCLHKRCR, a cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from the human low-molecular-weight salivary mucin MUC7, possesses potent antimicrobial activity in vitro. In order to evaluate the potential therapeutic application of the MUC7 12-mer, we examined the effects of mono- and divalent cations, EDTA, pH, and temperature on its antimicrobial activity. Methods Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs were determined using a liquid growth inhibition assay in 96-well microtiter plates. MUC7 12-mer was added at concentrations of 1.56–50 μM. MICs were determined at three endpoints: MIC-0, MIC-1, and MIC-2 (the lowest drug concentration showing 10%, 25% and 50% of growth, respectively. To examine the effect of salts or EDTA, a checkerboard microdilution technique was used. Fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICi was calculated on the basis of MIC-0. The viability of microbial cells treated with MUC7 12-mer in the presence of sodium or potassium was also determined by killing assay or flow cytometry. Results The MICs of MUC7 12-mer against organisms tested ranged from 6.25–50 μM. For C. albicans, antagonism (FICi 4.5 was observed for the combination of MUC7 12-mer and calcium; however, there was synergism (FICi 0.22 between MUC7 12-mer and EDTA, and the synergism was retained in the presence of calcium at its physiological concentration (1–2 mM. No antagonism but additivity or indifference (FICi 0.55–2.5 was observed for the combination of MUC7 12-mer and each K+, Na+, Mg2+, or Zn2+. MUC7 12-mer peptide (at 25 μM also exerted killing activity in the presence of NaCl, (up to 25 mM for C. albicans and up to 150 mM for E. coli, a physiological concentration of sodium in the oral cavity and serum, respectively and retained candidacidal activity in the presence of KCl (up to 40 mM. The peptide exhibited higher inhibitory activity against C. albicans at pH 7, 8, and 9 than at pH 5 and 6, and temperature up to

  16. Peptide biomarkers used for the selective breeding of a complex polygenic trait in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarna, M Marta; Hoover, Shelley E; Huxter, Elizabeth; Higo, Heather; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Domanski, Dominik; Bixby, Miriam E F; Melathopoulos, Andony P; Ibrahim, Abdullah; Peirson, Michael; Desai, Suresh; Micholson, Derek; White, Rick; Borchers, Christoph H; Currie, Robert W; Pernal, Stephen F; Foster, Leonard J

    2017-08-21

    We present a novel way to select for highly polygenic traits. For millennia, humans have used observable phenotypes to selectively breed stronger or more productive livestock and crops. Selection on genotype, using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome profiling, is also now applied broadly in livestock breeding programs; however, selection on protein/peptide or mRNA expression markers has not yet been proven useful. Here we demonstrate the utility of protein markers to select for disease-resistant hygienic behavior in the European honey bee (Apis mellifera L.). Robust, mechanistically-linked protein expression markers, by integrating cis- and trans- effects from many genomic loci, may overcome limitations of genomic markers to allow for selection. After three generations of selection, the resulting marker-selected stock outperformed an unselected benchmark stock in terms of hygienic behavior, and had improved survival when challenged with a bacterial disease or a parasitic mite, similar to bees selected using a phenotype-based assessment for this trait. This is the first demonstration of the efficacy of protein markers for industrial selective breeding in any agricultural species, plant or animal.

  17. Sample displacement chromatography as a method for purification of proteins and peptides from complex mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Clifton, James; Josic, Djuro

    2012-01-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately twenty years ago. This method takes advantage of relative binding affinities of components in a sample mixture. During loading, there is a competition among different sample components for the sorption on the surface of the stationary phase. SDC was first used for the preparative purification of proteins. Later, it was demonstrated that this kind of chromatography can also be performed in ion-exchange, affinity and hydrophobic-interaction mode. It has also been shown that SDC can be performed on monoliths and membrane-based supports in both analytical and preparative scale. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction mode was also employed successfully for the removal of trace proteins from monoclonal antibody preparations and for the enrichment of low abundance proteins from human plasma. In this review, the principals of SDC are introduced, and the potential for separation of proteins and peptides in micro-analytical, analytical and preparative scale is discussed. PMID:22520159

  18. Novel haemoglobin-derived antimicrobial peptides from chicken (Gallus gallus) blood: purification, structural aspects and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, A S; Rogozhin, E A; Vasilchenko, A V; Kartashova, O L; Sycheva, M V

    2016-12-01

    To purify and characterize antimicrobial peptides derived from the acid extract of Gallus gallus blood cells. Two polypeptides (i.e. CHb-1 and CHb-2) with antibacterial activity were detected in the acidic extract of blood cells from chicken (G. gallus). The isolated peptides that possessed a potent antibacterial activity were purified using a two-step chromatography procedure that involved solid-phase extraction of a total protein/peptide extract followed by thin fractionation by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The molecular masses of the purified peptides were similar and were 4824·4 and 4825·2 Da, which have been measured by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS). Their amino acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation and showed that the peptides were fully identical to the two fragments of G. gallus α-haemoglobin localized into different subunits (A and D respectively). The peptides were active in micromolar concentrations against Gram-negative Escherichia coli K12 TG1. Using the 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine, the FITC-dextran labelled probes and the live/dead staining allowed to show the hemocidin mode of action and estimate the pore size. In this study, for the first time, α-haemoglobin from chicken (G. gallus) has been investigated as a donor of the two high homologous native peptide fragments that possess potent antibacterial activity in vitro. These are membrane-active peptides and their mechanism of action against E. coli involves a toroidal pore formation. The obtained results expand the perception of the role of haemoglobin in a living system, describing it as a source of multifunction substances. Additionally, the data presented in this paper may contribute to the development of new, cost-effective, antimicrobial agents. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Directed evolution of an LBP/CD14 inhibitory peptide and its anti-endotoxin activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: LPS-binding protein (LBP and its ligand CD14 are located upstream of the signaling pathway for LPS-induced inflammation. Blocking LBP and CD14 binding might prevent LPS-induced inflammation. In previous studies, we obtained a peptide analog (MP12 for the LBP/CD14 binding site and showed that this peptide analog had anti-endotoxin activity. In this study, we used in vitro directed evolution for this peptide analog to improve its in vivo and in vitro anti-endotoxin activity. METHODS: We used error-prone PCR (ep-PCR and induced mutations in the C-terminus of LBP and attached the PCR products to T7 phages to establish a mutant phage display library. The positive clones that competed with LBP for CD14 binding was obtained by screening. We used both in vivo and in vitro experiments to compare the anti-endotoxin activities of a polypeptide designated P1 contained in a positive clone and MP12. RESULTS: 11 positive clones were obtained from among target phages. Sequencing showed that 9 positive clones had a threonine (T to methionine (M mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. Compared to polypeptide MP12, polypeptide P1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α expression and NF-κB activity in U937 cells (P<0.05. Compared to MP12, P1 significantly improved arterial oxygen pressure, an oxygenation index, and lung pathology scores in LPS-induced ARDS rats (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: By in vitro directed evolution of peptide analogs for the LBP/CD14 binding site, we established a new polypeptide (P1 with a threonine (T-to-methionine (M mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. This polypeptide had high anti-endotoxin activity in vitro and in vivo, which suggested that amino acid 287 in the C-terminus of LBP may play an important role in LBP binding with CD14.

  20. Comparison of Cytotoxic Activity in Leukemic Lineages Reveals Important Features of β-Hairpin Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Marcus V; Torquato, Heron F Vieira; Barros, Carlos Castilho; Ide, Jaime S; Miranda, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J

    2017-07-01

    Several reports described different modes of cell death triggered by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) due to direct effects on membrane disruption, and more recently by apoptosis and necrosis-like patterns. Cytotoxic curves of four β-hairpin AMPs (gomesin, protegrin, tachyplesin, and polyphemusin) were obtained from several human leukemic lineages and normal monocytes and Two cell lines were then selected based on their cytotoxic sensitivity. One was sensitive to AMPs (K562) and the other resistant (KG-1) and their effect compared between these lineages. Thus, these lineages were chosen to further investigate biological features related with their cytotoxicities to AMPs. Stimulation with AMPs produced cell death, with activation of caspase-3, in K562 lineage. Increase on the fluidity of plasmatic membrane by reducing cholesterol potentiated cytotoxicity of AMPs in both lineages. Quantification of internal and external gomesin binding to the cellular membrane of both K562 and KG-1 cells showed that more peptide is accumulated inside of K562 cells. Additionally, evaluation of multi-drug resistant pumps activity showed that KG-1 has more activity than K562 lineage. A comparison of intrinsic gene patterns showed great differences between K562 and KG-1, but stimulation with gomesin promoted few changes in gene expression patterns. Differences in internalization process through the plasma membrane, multidrug resistance pumps activity, and gene expression pattern are important features to AMPs regulated cell death. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1764-1773, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Catalytic water co-existing with a product peptide in the active site of HIV-1 protease revealed by X-ray structure analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Prashar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not been found so far in the crystal structures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the first observation of the coexistence in the active site, of a water molecule WAT1, along with the carboxyl terminal product (Q product peptide. The product peptide has been generated in situ through cleavage of the full-length substrate. The N-terminal product (P product has diffused out and is replaced by a set of water molecules while the Q product is still held in the active site through hydrogen bonds. The position of WAT1, which hydrogen bonds to both the catalytic aspartates, is different from when there is no substrate bound in the active site. We propose WAT1 to be the position from where catalytic water attacks the scissile peptide bond. Comparison of structures of HIV-1 protease complexed with the same oligopeptide substrate, but at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.0 shows interesting changes in the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions from the catalytic aspartates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The structure is suggestive of the repositioning, during substrate binding, of the catalytic water for activation and subsequent nucleophilic attack. The structure could be a snap shot of the enzyme active site primed for the next round of catalysis. This structure further suggests that to achieve the goal of designing inhibitors mimicking the transition-state, the hydrogen-bonding pattern between WAT1 and the enzyme should be replicated.

  2. Catalytic water co-existing with a product peptide in the active site of HIV-1 protease revealed by X-ray structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash; Das, Amit; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Hosur, Madhusoodan

    2009-11-17

    It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not been found so far in the crystal structures. We report here the first observation of the coexistence in the active site, of a water molecule WAT1, along with the carboxyl terminal product (Q product) peptide. The product peptide has been generated in situ through cleavage of the full-length substrate. The N-terminal product (P product) has diffused out and is replaced by a set of water molecules while the Q product is still held in the active site through hydrogen bonds. The position of WAT1, which hydrogen bonds to both the catalytic aspartates, is different from when there is no substrate bound in the active site. We propose WAT1 to be the position from where catalytic water attacks the scissile peptide bond. Comparison of structures of HIV-1 protease complexed with the same oligopeptide substrate, but at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.0 shows interesting changes in the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions from the catalytic aspartates. The structure is suggestive of the repositioning, during substrate binding, of the catalytic water for activation and subsequent nucleophilic attack. The structure could be a snap shot of the enzyme active site primed for the next round of catalysis. This structure further suggests that to achieve the goal of designing inhibitors mimicking the transition-state, the hydrogen-bonding pattern between WAT1 and the enzyme should be replicated.

  3. Comparative antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action of bovine lactoferricin-derived synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifan; Han, Feifei; Xie, Yonggang; Wang, Yizhen

    2011-12-01

    Lactoferricin B (LfcinB), a 25 residue peptide derived from the N-terminal of bovine lactoferrin (bLF), causes depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane in susceptible bacteria. Its mechanism of action, however, still needs to be elucidated. In the present study, synthetic LfcinB (without a disulfide bridge) and LfcinB (C-C; with a disulfide bridge) as well as three derivatives with 15-, 11- and 9-residue peptides were prepared to investigate their antimicrobial nature and mechanisms. The antimicrobial properties were measured via minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations, killing kinetics assays and synergy testing, and hemolytic activities were assessed by hemoglobin release. Finally, the morphology of peptide-treated bacteria was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found that there was no difference in MICs between LfcinB and LfcinB (C-C). Among the derivatives, only LfcinB15 maintained nearly the same level as LfcinB, in the MIC range of 16-128 μg/ml, and the MICs of LfcinB11 (64-256 μg/ml) were 4 times more than LfcinB, while LfcinB9 exhibited the lowest antimicrobial activity. When treated at MIC for 1 h, many blebs were formed and holes of various sizes appeared on the cell surface, but the cell still maintained its integrity. This suggested that LfcinB had a major permeability effect on the cytoplasmic membrane of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which also indicated it may be a possible intracellular target. Among the tested antibiotics, aureomycin increased the bactericidal activity of LfcinB against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, but neomycin did not have such an effect. We also found that the combination of cecropin A and LfcinB had synergistic effects against E. coli.

  4. A synthetic peptide blocking TRPV1 activation inhibits UV-induced skin responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, So Min; Han, Sangbum; Oh, Jang-Hee; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2017-10-01

    Transient receptor potential type 1 (TRPV1) can be activated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and mediates UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and proinflammatory cytokines in keratinocytes. Various chemicals and compounds targeting TRPV1 activation have been developed, but are not in clinical use mostly due to their safety issues. We aimed to develop a novel TRPV1-targeting peptide to inhibit UV-induced responses in human skin. We designed and generated a novel TRPV1 inhibitory peptide (TIP) which mimics the specific site in TRPV1 (aa 701-709: Gln-Arg-Ala-Ile-Thr-Ile-Leu-Asp-Thr, QRAITILDT), Thr 705 , and tested its efficacy of blocking UV-induced responses in HaCaT, mouse, and human skin. TIP effectively inhibited capsaicin-induced calcium influx and TRPV1 activation. Treatment of HaCaT with TIP prevented UV-induced increases of MMP-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In mouse skin in vivo, TIP inhibited UV-induced skin thickening and prevented UV-induced expression of MMP-13 and MMP-9. Moreover, TIP attenuated UV-induced erythema and the expression of MMP-1, MMP-2, IL-6, and IL-8 in human skin in vivo. The novel synthetic peptide targeting TRPV1 can ameliorate UV-induced skin responses in vitro and in vivo, providing a promising therapeutic approach against UV-induced inflammation and photoaging. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Single-chain Peptide-MHC Molecule that Modulates both Naive and Activated CD8plus T Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Samanta; G Mukherjee; U Ramagopal; R Chaparro; S Nathenson; T DiLorenzo; S Almo

    2011-12-31

    Peptide-MHC (pMHC) multimers, in addition to being tools for tracking and quantifying antigen-specific T cells, can mediate downstream signaling after T-cell receptor engagement. In the absence of costimulation, this can lead to anergy or apoptosis of cognate T cells, a property that could be exploited in the setting of autoimmune disease. Most studies with class I pMHC multimers used noncovalently linked peptides, which can allow unwanted CD8{sup +} T-cell activation as a result of peptide transfer to cellular MHC molecules. To circumvent this problem, and given the role of self-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells in the development of type 1 diabetes, we designed a single-chain pMHC complex (scK{sup d}.IGRP) by using the class I MHC molecule H-2K{sup d} and a covalently linked peptide derived from islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP{sub 206-214}), a well established autoantigen in NOD mice. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the peptide is presented in the groove of the MHC molecule in canonical fashion, and it was also demonstrated that scK{sup d}.IGRP tetramers bound specifically to cognate CD8{sup +} T cells. Tetramer binding induced death of naive T cells and in vitro- and in vivo-differentiated cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and tetramer-treated cytotoxic T lymphocytes showed a diminished IFN-{gamma} response to antigen stimulation. Tetramer accessibility to disease-relevant T cells in vivo was also demonstrated. Our study suggests the potential of single-chain pMHC tetramers as possible therapeutic agents in autoimmune disease. Their ability to affect the fate of naive and activated CD8{sup +} T cells makes them a potential intervention strategy in early and late stages of disease.

  6. Vasorelaxing and antihypertensive activities of synthesized peptides derived from computer-aided simulation of pepsin hydrolysis of yam dioscorin

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yin-Shiou; Lu, Yeh-Lin; Wang, Guei-Jane; Liang, Hong-Jen; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Background We reported that yam dioscorin and its peptic hydrolysates exhibited ACE inhibition and antihypertensive effects on SHRs, however, the active peptides are not really isolated until now. Using ACE inhibitory screenings, two penta-peptides, KTCGY and KRIHF, were selected for ex vivo and in vivo experiments. Results KTCGY, KRIHF, and captopril were shown to have similar vasodilating effects against phenylephrine (PE)-induced tensions in rat endothelium-dependent thoracic aortic rings,...

  7. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Different Antimicrobial Peptides against a Range of Pathogenic Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbensgaard, Anna Elisabeth; Mordhorst, Hanne; Overgaard, Michael Toft

    2015-01-01

    The rapid emergence of resistance to classical antibiotics has increased the interest in novel antimicrobial compounds. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent an attractive alternative to classical antibiotics and a number of different studies have reported antimicrobial activity data of various...... AMPs, but there is only limited comparative data available. The mode of action for many AMPs is largely unknown even though several models have suggested that the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) play a crucial role in the attraction and attachment of the AMP to the bacterial membrane in Gram...

  8. Antioxidant activities and functional properties of protein and peptide fractions isolated from salted herring brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taheri, Ali; Farvin, Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    In the present study proteins isolated from herring brine, which is a by-product of marinated herring production were evaluated for their functional properties and antioxidant activity. Herring brine was collected from the local herring industry and proteins were precipitated by adjusting the p...... to delay iron catalyzed lipid oxidation in 5% fish oil in water emulsions and the 10–50kDa fraction was the best. These results show the potential of proteins and peptide fractions recovered from waste water from the herring industry as source of natural antioxidants for use in food products....

  9. Lipidated alpha-Peptide/beta-Peptoid Hybrids with Potent Antiinflammatory Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbakke, Sarah L.; Larsen, Camilla J.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2015-01-01

    is dependent on the length and position of the lipid element(s). The resulting lead compound, Pam-(Lys-beta NSpe)(6)-NH2, blocks LPS-induced cytokine secretion with a potency comparable to that of polymyxin B. The mode of action of this HDP mimic appears not to involve direct LPS interaction since it......, in contrast to polymyxin B, displayed only minor activity in the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Flow cytometry data showed specific interaction of a fluorophore-labeled lipidated a-peptide/beta-peptoid hybrid with monocytes and granulocytes indicating a cellular target expressed by these leukocyte subsets....

  10. Cellular localization of peptide hydrolases in chicken embryo tissues and influence of gamma irradiation on their activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khristov, D; Marinopolski, G

    1975-01-01

    Studied was the influence of chicken embryo irradiation at 600 R and 1000 R gamma rays on the activity of tissue peptide hydrolases in mitochondrial-lysosomal, microsomal and supernatant (cell hyaloplasm) cell fractions. The investigation was performed 50 to 168 hours post irradiation. The wole tissue (of the whole embryo) was examined following irradiation of 4-day-old embryos whose liver, muscle and brain tissues were post irradiation examined on day 12 and 16 of incubation. Prior to treatment, the tissues were threfold rinsed with sucrose solution to eliminate proeinase inhibitors. Lysosome membranes were destroyed by adding 0.5 % desoxycholate. It was found that: Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal cell fractions of tissues of whole 6-day chicken embryos is 4-5 times as high as that of cell hyaloplasm. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fractions of liver tissues decreases on day 18 and 19 post incubation, while the same fraction of muscle and brain tissues shows high activity. Peptide hydrolase activity of microsomal fraction and of cell hyaloplasm rises during embryonal development and exceeds the activity of liver tissue mitochondrial fraction. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of tissue of whole 6-day-old embryos 50 hours post irradiation is higher than the activity of non-irradiated embryos. Later the activity of this fraction diminishes and on the 168 hr post irradiation it drops below the normal. Microsomal fraction and cell hyaloplasm activity likewise show deviation from the norm. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of liver, muscle and brain tissue of 14 and 18-day-old embryos is higher than the control 50 hours post irradiation and then declines. The activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of embryo brain tissue changes most strikingly on irradiation, while other brain cell fractions change less compared with liver and muscle fractions.

  11. Cellular localization of peptide hydrolases in chicken embryo tissues and influence of gamma irradiation on their activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristov, D.; Marinopolski, G.

    1975-01-01

    Studied was the influence of chicken embryo irradiation at 600 R and 1000 R gamma rays on the activity of tissue peptide hydrolases in mitochondrial-lysosomal, microsomal and supernatant (cell hyaloplasm) cell fractions. The investigation was performed 50 to 168 hours post irradiation. The wole tissue (of the whole embryo) was examined following irradiation of 4-day-old embryos whose liver, muscle and brain tissues were post irradiation examined on day 12 and 16 of incubation. Prior to treatment, the tissues were threfold rinsed with sucrose solution to eliminate proeinase inhibitors. Lysosome membranes were destroyed by adding 0.5 % desoxycholate. It was found that: Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal cell fractions of tissues of whole 6-day chicken embryos is 4-5 times as high as that of cell hyaloplasm. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fractions of liver tissues decreases on day 18 and 19 post incubation, while the same fraction of muscle and brain tissues shows high activity. Peptide hydrolase activity of microsomal fraction and of cell hyaloplasm rises during embryonal development and exceeds the activity of liver tissue mitochondrial fraction. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of tissue of whole 6-day-old embryos 50 hours post irradiation is higher than the activity of non-irradiated embryos. Later the activity of this fraction diminishes and on the 168 hr post irradiation it drops below the normal. Microsomal fraction and cell hyaloplasm activity likewise show deviation from the norm. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of liver, muscle and brain tissue of 14 and 18-day-old embryos is higher than the control 50 hours post irradiation and then declines. The activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of embryo brain tissue changes most strikingly on irradiation, while other brain cell fractions change less compared with liver and muscle fractions

  12. Activation of the DnaK-ClpB Complex is Regulated by the Properties of the Bound Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Higuero, Jose Angel; Aguado, Alejandra; Perales-Calvo, Judit; Moro, Fernando; Muga, Arturo

    2018-04-11

    The chaperone ClpB in bacteria is responsible for the reactivation of aggregated proteins in collaboration with the DnaK system. Association of these chaperones at the aggregate surface stimulates ATP hydrolysis, which mediates substrate remodeling. However, a question that remains unanswered is whether the bichaperone complex can be selectively activated by substrates that require remodeling. We find that large aggregates or bulky, native-like substrates activates the complex, whereas a smaller, permanently unfolded protein or extended, short peptides fail to stimulate it. Our data also indicate that ClpB interacts differently with DnaK in the presence of aggregates or small peptides, displaying a higher affinity for aggregate-bound DnaK, and that DnaK-ClpB collaboration requires the coupled ATPase-dependent remodeling activities of both chaperones. Complex stimulation is mediated by residues at the β subdomain of DnaK substrate binding domain, which become accessible to the disaggregase when the lid is allosterically detached from the β subdomain. Complex activation also requires an active NBD2 and the integrity of the M domain-ring of ClpB. Disruption of the M-domain ring allows the unproductive stimulation of the DnaK-ClpB complex in solution. The ability of the DnaK-ClpB complex to discrimínate different substrate proteins might allow its activation when client proteins require remodeling.

  13. Diminished Antimicrobial Peptide and Antifungal Antibiotic Activities against Candida albicans in Denture Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber M. Bates

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show this, nine antimicrobial peptides and five antifungal antibiotics with and without 1.0% denture adhesive were incubated with Candida albicans strains ATCC 64124 and HMV4C in radial diffusion assays. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, HNP-1, HBD2, HBD3, IP-10, LL37 (only one strain, histatin 5 (only one strain, lactoferricin B, and SMAP28 showed diminished activity against C. albicans. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, amphotericin B and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were active against both strains of C. albicans. These results suggest that denture adhesive may inactivate innate immune mediators in the oral cavity increasing the risk of C. albicans infections, but inclusion of antifungal antibiotics to denture adhesive may aid in prevention or treatment of Candida infections and denture stomatitis.

  14. GE11 Peptide as an Active Targeting Agent in Antitumor Therapy: A Minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Genta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A lot of solid tumors are characterized by uncontrolled signal transduction triggered by receptors related to cellular growth. The targeting of these cell receptors with antitumor drugs is essential to improve chemotherapy efficacy. This can be achieved by conjugation of an active targeting agent to the polymer portion of a colloidal drug delivery system loaded with an antitumor drug. The goal of this minireview is to report and discuss some recent results in epidermal growth factor receptor targeting by the GE11 peptide combined with colloidal drug delivery systems as smart carriers for antitumor drugs. The minireview chapters will focus on explaining and discussing: (i Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR structures and functions; (ii GE11 structure and biologic activity; (iii examples of GE11 conjugation and GE11-conjugated drug delivery systems. The rationale is to contribute in gathering information on the topic of active targeting to tumors. A case study is introduced, involving research on tumor cell targeting by the GE11 peptide combined with polymer nanoparticles.

  15. Solution structure of the human Grb7-SH2 domain/erbB2 peptide complex and structural basis for Grb7 binding to ErbB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivancic, Monika; Daly, Roger J.; Lyons, Barbara A.

    2003-01-01

    The solution structure of the hGrb7-SH2 domain in complex with a ten amino acid phosphorylated peptide ligand representative of the erbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase (pY1139) is presented as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The hGrb7-SH2 domain structure reveals the Src homology 2 domain topology consisting of a central β-sheet capped at each end by an α-helix. The presence of a four residue insertion in the region between β-strand E and the EF loop and resulting influences on the SH2 domain/peptide complex structure are discussed. The binding conformation of the erbB2 peptide is in a β-turn similar to that found in phosphorylated tyrosine peptides bound to the Grb2-SH2 domain. To our knowledge this is only the second example of an SH2 domain binding its naturally occurring ligands in a turn, instead of extended, conformation. Close contacts between residues responsible for binding specificity in hGrb7-SH2 and the erbB2 peptide are characterized and the potential effect of mutation of these residues on the hGrb7-SH2 domain structure is discussed

  16. Computational Modeling of Complex Protein Activity Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schivo, Stefano; Leijten, Jeroen; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.; Prignet, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Because of the numerous entities interacting, the complexity of the networks that regulate cell fate makes it impossible to analyze and understand them using the human brain alone. Computational modeling is a powerful method to unravel complex systems. We recently described the development of a

  17. Comparative in vitro activities of investigational peptide deformylase inhibitor NVP LBM-415 and other agents against human mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waites, Ken B; Reddy, Nipun B; Crabb, Donna M; Duffy, Lynn B

    2005-06-01

    Peptide deformylase inhibitor LBM-415 and seven other drugs were tested against Mycoplasma pneumoniae (100 isolates), Mycoplasma hominis (20 isolates), Mycoplasma fermentans (10 isolates), and Ureaplasma species (50 isolates). LBM-415 was active against M. pneumoniae (MICs, activity against M. hominis and M. fermentans and modest activity against Ureaplasma spp.

  18. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vincent Edwards

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2–50 nm and an internal surface of 163 m2·g−1. A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin was tethered to NA by (1 esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC, (2 deprotection and (3 coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory

  19. ER stress stimulates production of the key antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin, by forming a previously unidentified intracellular S1P signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyungho; Ikushiro, Hiroko; Seo, Ho Seong; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yano, Takato; Holleran, Walter M; Elias, Peter; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2016-03-08

    We recently identified a previously unidentified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling mechanism that stimulates production of a key innate immune element, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP), in mammalian cells exposed to external perturbations, such as UVB irradiation and other oxidative stressors that provoke subapoptotic levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, independent of the well-known vitamin D receptor-dependent mechanism. ER stress increases cellular ceramide and one of its distal metabolites, S1P, which activates NF-κB followed by C/EBPα activation, leading to CAMP production, but in a S1P receptor-independent fashion. We now show that S1P activates NF-κB through formation of a previously unidentified signaling complex, consisting of S1P, TRAF2, and RIP1 that further associates with three stress-responsive proteins; i.e., heat shock proteins (GRP94 and HSP90α) and IRE1α. S1P specifically interacts with the N-terminal domain of heat shock proteins. Because this ER stress-initiated mechanism is operative in both epithelial cells and macrophages, it appears to be a universal, highly conserved response, broadly protective against diverse external perturbations that lead to increased ER stress. Finally, these studies further illuminate how ER stress and S1P orchestrate critical stress-specific signals that regulate production of one protective response by stimulating production of the key innate immune element, CAMP.

  20. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of bacterial peptide deformylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, D J; Gordon Green, B; O'Connell, J F; Grant, S K

    1999-07-15

    Bacterial peptide deformylases (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) are metalloenzymes that cleave the N-formyl groups from N-blocked methionine polypeptides. Peptide aldehydes containing a methional or norleucinal inhibited recombinant peptide deformylase from gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The most potent inhibitor was calpeptin, N-CBZ-Leu-norleucinal, which was a competitive inhibitor of the zinc-containing metalloenzymes, E. coli and B. subtilis PDF with Ki values of 26.0 and 55.6 microM, respectively. Cobalt-substituted E. coli and B. subtilis deformylases were also inhibited by these aldehydes with Ki values for calpeptin of 9.5 and 12.4 microM, respectively. Distinct spectral changes were observed upon binding of calpeptin to the Co(II)-deformylases, consistent with the noncovalent binding of the inhibitor rather than the formation of a covalent complex. In contrast, the chelator 1,10-phenanthroline caused the time-dependent inhibition of B. subtilis Co(II)-PDF activity with the loss of the active site metal. The fact that calpeptin was nearly equipotent against deformylases from both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial sources lends further support to the idea that a single deformylase inhibitor might have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Lipid raft-like liposomes used for targeted delivery of a chimeric entry-inhibitor peptide with anti-HIV-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómara, María José; Pérez-Pomeda, Ignacio; Gatell, José María; Sánchez-Merino, Victor; Yuste, Eloisa; Haro, Isabel

    2017-02-01

    The work reports the design and synthesis of a chimeric peptide that is composed of the peptide sequences of two entry inhibitors which target different sites of HIV-1 gp41. The chimeric peptide offers the advantage of targeting two gp41 regions simultaneously: the fusion peptide and the loop both of which are membrane active and participate in the membrane fusion process. We therefore use lipid raft-like liposomes as a tool to specifically direct the chimeric inhibitor peptide to the membrane domains where the HIV-1 envelope protein is located. Moreover, the liposomes that mimic the viral membrane composition protect the chimeric peptide against proteolytic digestion thereby increasing the stability of the peptide. The described liposome preparations are suitable nanosystems for managing hydrophobic entry-inhibitor peptides as putative therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the antimicrobial activities of Snakin-Z, a new cationic peptide derived from Zizyphus jujuba fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Fatemeh; Zare-Zardini, Hadi; Ebrahimi, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Snakin-Z is a novel antimicrobial peptide (AMP) that is identified from the fruit of Zizyphus jujuba. This peptide is composed of 31 amino acids which is determined with the sequence of CARLNCVPKGTSGNTETCPCYASLHSCRKYG and molecular weight of 3318.82 Da. Snakin-Z is not identical to any AMP in the peptide database. According to this study, Snakin-Z potentially has antimicrobial property against bacteria and fungi. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of this peptide is suitable for antimicrobial activity. We assessed that Snakin-Z could affect Phomopsis azadirachtae with the MIC value of 7.65 μg/mL and vice versa Staphylococcus aureus with the MIC value of 28.8 μg/mL. Interestingly, human red blood cells also showed good tolerance to the Snakin-Z. On the basis of this study, Snakin-Z can be an appropriate candidate for therapeutic applications in the future due to its antimicrobial property.

  3. Antibiotic activity and synergistic effect of antimicrobial peptide against pathogens from a patient with gallstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yoonkyung; Park, Soon Nang; Park, Seong-Cheol; Park, Joon Yong; Park, Yong Ha; Hahm, Joon Soo; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2004-01-01

    HP (2-20) is a peptide derived from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1 that has been shown to have antimicrobial activity against various species of bacteria. When we tested the effects of HP (2-20), we found that this peptide displayed strong activity against pathogens from a patient with gallstones, but it did not have hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. We also found that HP (2-20) had potent activity against cefazolin sodium-resistant bacterial cell lines, and that HP (2-20) and cefazolin sodium had synergistic effects against cell lines resistant to the latter. To investigate the mechanism of action of HP (2-20), we performed fluorescence activated flow cytometry using pathogens from the patient with gallstones. As determined by propidium iodide (PI) staining, pathogenic bacteria treated with HP (2-20) showed higher fluorescence intensity than untreated cells, similar to melittin-treated cells, and that HP (2-20) acted in an energy- and salt-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy showed that HP (2-20) caused significant morphological alterations in the cell surface of pathogens from the patient with gallstones. By determining their 16S rDNA sequences, we found that both the pathogens from the patient with gallstones and the cefazolin sodium-resistant cell lines showed 100% homology with sequences from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taken together, these results suggest that HP (2-20) has antibiotic activity and that it may be used as a lead drug for the treatment of acquired pathogens from patients with gallstones and antibiotic-resistant cell lines

  4. Structure, synthesis, and activity of dermaseptin b, a novel vertebrate defensive peptide from frog skin: relationship with adenoregulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, A; Amiche, M; Nicolas, P

    1994-05-31

    A novel antimicrobial peptide, designated dermaseptin b, was isolated from the skin of the arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. This 27-residue peptide amide is basic, containing 3 lysine residues that punctuate an alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic sequence. In helix-inducing solvent, dermaseptin b adopts an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation that most closely resembles class L amphipathic helixes, with all lysine residues on the polar face of the helix. The peptide exhibits growth inhibition activity in vitro against a broad spectrum of pathogenic microorganisms including yeast and bacteria as well as various filamentous fungi that are responsible for severe opportunistic infections accompanying acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the use of immunosuppressive agents. Maximized pairwise sequence alignment of dermaseptin b and dermaseptin s, a 34-residue antimicrobial peptide previously isolated from Phyllomedusa sauvagii, reveals 81% amino acid identity. No other significant similarity was found between dermaseptin b and any prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein, but similarity was found with adenoregulin (38% amino acid postional identity), a 33-residue peptide that enhances binding of agonists to the A1 adenosine receptor. The synthetic replicates of dermaseptin b and adenoregulin displayed similar but nonidentical spectra of antimicrobial activity, and both peptides were devoid of lytic effect on mammalian cells. Accordingly, the observation that adenoregulin enhances binding of agonists to the adenosine receptor may in fact be a consequence of its ability to alter the structure of biological membranes and to produce signal transduction via interactions with the lipid bilayer, bypassing cell surface receptor interactions.

  5. Antiproliferative Activity of Egg Yolk Peptides in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousr, Marwa N; Aloqbi, Akram A; Omar, Ulfat M; Howell, Nazlin K

    2017-01-01

    Egg yolk peptides were successfully prepared from egg yolk protein by-products after lecithin extraction. Defatted egg yolk protein was hydrolyzed with pepsin and pancreatin and purified by gel filtration to produce egg yolk gel filtration fraction (EYGF-33) with antiproliferative activity. The highlight of this study was that the peptide EYGF-33 (1.0 mg/ml) significantly inhibits cell viability of colon cancer cells (Caco-2) with no inhibitory effects on the viability of human colon epithelial normal cells (HCEC) after 48 h. Reduced cell viability can be explained by cell cycle arrest in the S-phase in which DNA replication normally takes place. EYGF-33 significantly enhanced the production of superoxide anions in the mitochondria of Caco-2 cells; this could activate a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to typical Poly Adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage as observed in the Western blot result. The induction of apoptotic cell death by EYGF-33 was supported by the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS). However, further elucidation of the mechanism of EYGF-33-mediated apoptosis would provide further support for its use as a potential therapeutic and chemopreventive agent.

  6. Two novel cyclic peptides are key components of the antimicrobial activity of the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas sp. In5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian F.

    suppressive soil, Pseudomonas sp. In5 is therefore a promising potential biocontrol agent with potent activity against plant pathogens. Studies to date have shown nunamycin and nunapeptin as key components underpinning this antimicrobial activity. Current research is focussed on unravelling the regulation...... and antimicrobial mode of action of both peptides. Functional characterisation of the LuxR-type regulatory gene nunF by targeted knock-out and complementation resulted in the loss and gain of both antimicrobial activity and peptide synthesis respectively. Located downstream of the nunamycin biosynthetic genes, nun......F shows homology to syrF from P. syringae pv. syringae involved in the regulation of the antifungal peptide syringomycin. These results show that nunF is a key component of antimicrobial activity and synthesis of nunamycin and nunapeptin....

  7. Unraveling the Molecular Complexity of O-Glycosylated Endogenous (N-Terminal) pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Forms in Blood Plasma of Patients with Severe Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfinger, Bernhard; Hammerer-Lercher, Angelika; Amplatz, Benno; Sarg, Bettina; Kremser, Leopold; Lindner, Herbert H

    2017-01-01

    Currently, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its physiologically active counterpart, BNP, are most frequently used as biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, and disease monitoring of heart failure (HF). Commercial NT-proBNP and BNP immunoassays cross-react to varying degrees with unprocessed proBNP, which is also found in the circulation. ProBNP processing and immunoassay response are related to O-linked glycosylation of NT-proBNP and proBNP. There is a clear and urgent need to identify the glycosylation sites in the endogenously circulating peptides requested by the community to gain further insights into the different naturally occurring forms. The glycosylation sites of (NT-) proBNP (NT-proBNP and/or proBNP) were characterized in leftovers of heparinized plasma samples of severe HF patients (NT-proBNP: >10000 ng/L) by using tandem immunoaffinity purification, sequential exoglycosidase treatment for glycan trimming, β-elimination and Michael addition chemistry, as well as high-resolution nano-flow liquid chromatography electrospray multistage mass spectrometry. We describe 9 distinct glycosylation sites on circulating (NT-) proBNP in HF patients. Differentially glycosylated variants were detected based on highly accurate mass determination and multistage mass spectrometry. Remarkably, for each of the identified proteolytic glycopeptides, a nonglycosylated form also was detectable. Our results directly demonstrate for the first time a rather complex distribution of the endogenously circulating glycoforms by mass spectrometric analysis in HF patients, and show 9 glycosites in human (NT-) proBNP. This information may also have an impact on commercial immunoassays applying antibodies specific for the central region of (NT-) proBNP, which detect mostly nonglycosylated forms. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  8. Analysis of whey protein hydrolysates: peptide profile and ACE inhibitory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialice Pinto Coelho Silvestre

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to prepare enzymatic hydrolysates from whey protein concentrate with a nutritionally adequate peptide profile and the ability to inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE activity. The effects of the type of enzyme used (pancreatin or papain, the enzyme:substrate ratio (E:S ratio=0.5:100, 1:100, 2:100 and 3:100 and the use of ultrafiltration (UF were investigated. The fractionation of peptides was performed by size-exclusion-HPLC, and the quantification of the components of the chromatographic fractions was carried out by a rapid Corrected Fraction Area method. The ACE inhibitory activity (ACE-IA was determined by Reverse Phase-HPLC. All parameters tested affected both the peptide profile and the ACE-IA. The best peptide profile was achieved for the hydrolysates obtained with papain, whereas pancreatin was more advantageous in terms of ACE-IA. The beneficial effect of using a lower E:S ratio on the peptide profile and ACE-IA was observed for both enzymes depending on the conditions used to prepare the hydrolysates. The beneficial effect of not using UF on the peptide profile was observed in some cases for pancreatin and papain. However, the absence of UF yielded greater ACE-IA only when using papain.O objetivo deste estudo foi preparar hidrolisados enzimáticos do concentrado proteico do soro de leite com perfil peptídico nutricionalmente adequado e com capacidade para inibir a atividade da enzima conversora da angiotensina (ECA. Os efeitos do tipo de enzima usado (pancreatina ou papaína, da relação enzima:substrato (E:S=0,5:100, 1:100, 2:100 e 3:100 e do uso da ultrafiltração (UF foram investigados. O fracionamento dos peptídeos foi feito por CLAE de exclusão molecular e a quantificação dos componentes das frações cromatográficas foi realizada pelo método da Área Corrigida da Fração. A atividade inibitória da ECA (AI-ECA foi determinada por CLAE de fase reversa. Todos os parâmetros testados afetaram

  9. Active peptides from skate (Okamejei kenojei) skin gelatin diminish angiotensin-I converting enzyme activity and intracellular free radical-mediated oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Ryu, BoMi; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-01-15

    Skin gelatin of skate (Okamejei kenojei) was hydrolyzed using Alcalase, flavourzyme, Neutrase and protamex. It was found that the Alcalase hydrolysate exhibited the highest angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. Then, Alcalase hydrolysate was further hydrolyzed with protease and separated by an ultrafiltration membrane system. Finally, two peptides responsible for ACE inhibitory activity were identified to be MVGSAPGVL (829Da) and LGPLGHQ (720Da), with IC50 values of 3.09 and 4.22μM, respectively. Moreover, the free radical-scavenging activity of the purified peptides was determined in human endothelial cells. In addition, the antioxidative mechanism of the purified peptides was evaluated by protein and gene expression levels of antioxidant enzymes. The current study demonstrated that the peptides derived from skate skin gelatin could be used in the food industry as functional ingredients with potent antihypertensive and antioxidant benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced ability of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) to activate natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) causes dwarfism in lbab−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Andrea R.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Earhart, Cathleen A.; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2015-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) stimulates endochondrial ossification by activating the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase, natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B). Recently, a spontaneous autosomal recessive mutation that causes severe dwarfism in mice was identified. The mutant, called long bone abnormality (lbab), contains a single point mutation that converts an arginine to a glycine in a conserved coding region of the CNP gene, but how this mutation affects CNP activity has not been reported. Here, we determined that thirty to greater than one hundred-fold more CNPlbab was required to activate NPR-B as compared to wild-type CNP in whole cell cGMP elevation and membrane guanylyl cyclase assays. The reduced ability of CNPlbab to activate NPR-B was explained, at least in part, by decreased binding since ten-fold more CNPlbab than wild-type CNP was required to compete with [125I][Tyr0]CNP for receptor binding. Molecular modeling suggested that the conserved arginine is critical for binding to an equally conserved acidic pocket in NPR-B. These results indicate that reduced binding to and activation of NPR-B causes dwarfism in lbab−/− mice. PMID:18554750

  11. Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacillus plantarum C11: Two New Two-Peptide Bacteriocins, Plantaricins EF and JK, and the Induction Factor Plantaricin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderssen, Erlend L.; Diep, Dzung Bao; Nes, Ingolf F.; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Nissen-Meyer, Jon

    1998-01-01

    Six bacteriocinlike peptides (plantaricin A [PlnA], PlnE, PlnF, PlnJ, PlnK, and PlnN) produced by Lactobacillus plantarum C11 were detected by amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry. Since purification to homogeneity was problematic, all six peptides were obtained by solid-phase peptide synthesis and were tested for bacteriocin activity. It was found that L. plantarum C11 produces two two-peptide bacteriocins (PlnEF and PlnJK); a strain-specific antagonistic activity was detected at nanomolar concentrations when PlnE and PlnF were combined and when PlnJ and PlnK were combined. Complementary peptides were at least 103 times more active when they were combined than when they were present individually, and optimal activity was obtained when the complementary peptides were present in approximately equal amounts. The interaction between complementary peptides was specific, since neither PlnE nor PlnF could complement PlnJ or PlnK, and none of these peptides could complement the peptides constituting the two-peptide bacteriocin lactococcin G. Interestingly, PlnA, which acts as an extracellular signal (pheromone) that triggers bacteriocin production, also possessed a strain-specific antagonistic activity. No bacteriocin activity could be detected for PlnN. PMID:9603847

  12. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with [ 3 H]-NaBH 4 , and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P

  13. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs

  14. The order of expression is a key factor in the production of active transglutaminase in Escherichia coli by co-expression with its pro-peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Song

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptomyces transglutaminase (TGase is naturally synthesized as zymogen (pro-TGase, which is then processed to produce active enzyme by the removal of its N-terminal pro-peptide. This pro-peptide is found to be essential for overexpression of soluble TGase in E. coli. However, expression of pro-TGase by E. coli requires protease-mediated activation in vitro. In this study, we developed a novel co- expression method for the direct production of active TGase in E. coli. Results A TGase from S. hygroscopicus was expressed in E. coli only after fusing with the pelB signal peptide, but fusion with the signal peptide induced insoluble enzyme. Therefore, alternative protocol was designed by co-expressing the TGase and its pro-peptide as independent polypeptides under a single T7 promoter using vector pET-22b(+. Although the pro-peptide was co-expressed, the TGase fused without the signal peptide was undetectable in both soluble and insoluble fractions of the recombinant cells. Similarly, when both genes were expressed in the order of the TGase and the pro-peptide, the solubility of TGase fused with the signal peptide was not improved by the co-expression with its pro-peptide. Interestingly, active TGase was only produced by the cells in which the pro-peptide and the TGase were fused with the signal peptide and sequentially expressed. The purified recombinant and native TGase shared the similar catalytic properties. Conclusions Our results indicated that the pro-peptide can assist correct folding of the TGase inter-molecularly in E. coli, and expression of pro-peptide prior to that of TGase was essential for the production of active TGase. The co-expression strategy based on optimizing the order of gene expression could be useful for the expression of other functional proteins that are synthesized as a precursor.

  15. Adamantoylated biologically active small peptides and glycopeptides structurally related to the bacterial peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frkanec, Ruža; Vranešić, Branka; Tomić, Srdjanka

    2013-01-01

    A large number of novel synthetic compounds representing smaller parts of original peptidoglycan molecules have been synthesized and found to possess versatile biological activity, particularly immunomodulating properties. A series of compounds containing the adamantyl residues coupled to peptides and glycopeptides characteristic for bacterial peptidoglycan was described. The new adamantylpeptides and adamantylglycopeptides were prepared starting from N-protected racemic adamantylglycine and dipeptide L-Ala-D-isoglutamine. The adamantyl glycopeptides were obtained by coupling the adamantyltripeptides with alpha-D-mannose moiety through spacer molecule of fixed chirality. Since the starting material was D,L-(adamantyl-glycine) the condensation products with the dipeptide were mixtures of diastereoisomers. The obtained diastereoisomers were separated, characterized, and tested for immunostimulating activity. An HPLC method for purity testing was developed and adapted for the particular compounds.

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Sandra C. [Translational Sciences - Translational Medicine, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., 220 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing [Cardiovascular and Metabolism Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., 100 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gauthier, Marie-Soleil [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02140 (United States); Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper [Cardiovascular and Metabolism Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., 100 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Dole, William P., E-mail: bill.dole@novartis.com [Translational Sciences - Translational Medicine, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., 220 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  17. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). → ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. → ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. → Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNFα) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and peroxisome proliferator-activated

  18. Structure of HLA-A*0301 in complex with a peptide of proteolipid protein: insights into the role of HLA-A alleles in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Róisín M.; Friis, Lone; Siebold, Christian; Friese, Manuel A.; Fugger, Lars; Jones, E. Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. HLA-A3 is a predisposing allele for multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The KLIETYFSK peptide is a naturally processed epitope of proteolipid protein, a myelin protein and candidate target for immune-mediated myelin destruction in MS. Comparison of the structure of HLA-A3 with that of HLA-A2, an MHC class I molecule which is protective against MS, indicates that both MHC class I molecules present very similar faces for T-cell receptor recognition whilst differing in the specificity of their peptide-binding grooves. These characteristics may underlie the opposing (predisposing versus protective) associations that they exhibit both in humans and in mouse models of MS-like disease. Furthermore, subtle alterations within the peptide-binding groove of HLA-A3 and other A3-like MHC class I molecules, members of the so-called A3 superfamily, may be sufficient to alter their presentation of autoantigen peptides such as KLIETYFSK. This in turn may modulate their contribution to the associated risk of autoimmune disease

  19. Database searching and accounting of multiplexed precursor and product ion spectra from the data independent analysis of simple and complex peptide mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Zhong; Vissers, Johannes P C; Silva, Jeffrey C; Golick, Dan; Gorenstein, Marc V; Geromanos, Scott J

    2009-03-01

    A novel database search algorithm is presented for the qualitative identification of proteins over a wide dynamic range, both in simple and complex biological samples. The algorithm has been designed for the analysis of data originating from data independent acquisitions, whereby multiple precursor ions are fragmented simultaneously. Measurements used by the algorithm include retention time, ion intensities, charge state, and accurate masses on both precursor and product ions from LC-MS data. The search algorithm uses an iterative process whereby each iteration incrementally increases the selectivity, specificity, and sensitivity of the overall strategy. Increased specificity is obtained by utilizing a subset database search approach, whereby for each subsequent stage of the search, only those peptides from securely identified proteins are queried. Tentative peptide and protein identifications are ranked and scored by their relative correlation to a number of models of known and empirically derived physicochemical attributes of proteins and peptides. In addition, the algorithm utilizes decoy database techniques for automatically determining the false positive identification rates. The search algorithm has been tested by comparing the search results from a four-protein mixture, the same four-protein mixture spiked into a complex biological background, and a variety of other "system" type protein digest mixtures. The method was validated independently by data dependent methods, while concurrently relying on replication and selectivity. Comparisons were also performed with other commercially and publicly available peptide fragmentation search algorithms. The presented results demonstrate the ability to correctly identify peptides and proteins from data independent acquisition strategies with high sensitivity and specificity. They also illustrate a more comprehensive analysis of the samples studied; providing approximately 20% more protein identifications, compared to

  20. Identification of antihyperuricemic peptides in the proteolytic digest of shark cartilage water extract using in vivo activity-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murota, Itsuki; Taguchi, Satoko; Sato, Nobuyuki; Park, Eun Young; Nakamura, Yasushi; Sato, Kenji

    2014-03-19

    A peptide that exerts antihyperuricemic activity after oral administration was identified from a microbial protease (alcalase) digest of the water extract of shark cartilage by in vivo activity-guided fractionation, using oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. Water extract of shark cartilage was first fractionated by preparative ampholine-free isoelectric focusing, followed by preparative reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The antihyperuricemic activity of the alcalse digests of the obtained fractions was evaluated using an animal model. Alcalase digests of the basic and hydrophobic fractions exerted antihyperuricemic activity. A total of 18 peptides were identified in the alcalase digest of the final active fraction. These peptides were chemically synthesized and evaluated for antihyperuricemic activity. Tyr-Leu-Asp-Asn-Tyr and Ser-Pro-Pro-Tyr-Trp-Pro-Tyr lowered the serum uric acid level via intravenous injection at 5 mg/kg of body weight. Furthermore, orally administered Tyr-Leu-Asp-Asn-Tyr showed antihyperuricemic activity. Therefore, these peptides are at least partially responsible for the antihyperuricemic activity of the alcalase digest of shark cartilage.

  1. Orally Delivered Scorpion Antimicrobial Peptides Exhibit Activity against Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) and Its Bacterial Symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ramirez, Karen; Skaljac, Marisa; Grotmann, Jens; Kirfel, Phillipp; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2017-08-24

    Aphids are severe agricultural pests that damage crops by feeding on phloem sap and vectoring plant pathogens. Chemical insecticides provide an important aphid control strategy, but alternative and sustainable control measures are required to avoid rapidly emerging resistance, environmental contamination, and the risk to humans and beneficial organisms. Aphids are dependent on bacterial symbionts, which enable them to survive on phloem sap lacking essential nutrients, as well as conferring environmental stress tolerance and resistance to parasites. The evolution of aphids has been accompanied by the loss of many immunity-related genes, such as those encoding antibacterial peptides, which are prevalent in other insects, probably because any harm to the bacterial symbionts would inevitably affect the aphids themselves. This suggests that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could replace or at least complement conventional insecticides for aphid control. We fed the pea aphids ( Acyrthosiphon pisum ) with AMPs from the venom glands of scorpions. The AMPs reduced aphid survival, delayed their reproduction, displayed in vitro activity against aphid bacterial symbionts, and reduced the number of symbionts in vivo. Remarkably, we found that some of the scorpion AMPs compromised the aphid bacteriome, a specialized organ that harbours bacterial symbionts. Our data suggest that scorpion AMPs holds the potential to be developed as bio-insecticides, and are promising candidates for the engineering of aphid-resistant crops.

  2. Orally Delivered Scorpion Antimicrobial Peptides Exhibit Activity against Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Its Bacterial Symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Luna-Ramirez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are severe agricultural pests that damage crops by feeding on phloem sap and vectoring plant pathogens. Chemical insecticides provide an important aphid control strategy, but alternative and sustainable control measures are required to avoid rapidly emerging resistance, environmental contamination, and the risk to humans and beneficial organisms. Aphids are dependent on bacterial symbionts, which enable them to survive on phloem sap lacking essential nutrients, as well as conferring environmental stress tolerance and resistance to parasites. The evolution of aphids has been accompanied by the loss of many immunity-related genes, such as those encoding antibacterial peptides, which are prevalent in other insects, probably because any harm to the bacterial symbionts would inevitably affect the aphids themselves. This suggests that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs could replace or at least complement conventional insecticides for aphid control. We fed the pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum with AMPs from the venom glands of scorpions. The AMPs reduced aphid survival, delayed their reproduction, displayed in vitro activity against aphid bacterial symbionts, and reduced the number of symbionts in vivo. Remarkably, we found that some of the scorpion AMPs compromised the aphid bacteriome, a specialized organ that harbours bacterial symbionts. Our data suggest that scorpion AMPs holds the potential to be developed as bio-insecticides, and are promising candidates for the engineering of aphid-resistant crops.

  3. N-Formylated humanin activates both formyl peptide receptor-like 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Masataka; Habata, Yugo; Hosoya, Masaki; Nishi, Kazunori; Fujii, Ryo; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hinuma, Shuji

    2004-01-01

    We have discovered that humanin (HN) acts as a ligand for formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) and 2 (FPRL2). This discovery was based on our finding that HN suppressed forskolin-induced cAMP production in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing human FPRL1 (CHO-hFPRL1) or human FPRL2 (CHO-hFPRL2). In addition, we found that N-formylated HN (fHN) performed more potently as a ligand for FPRL1 than HN: in CHO-hFPRL1 cells, the effective concentration for the half-maximal response (EC 50 ) value of HN was 3.5 nM, while that of fHN was 0.012 nM. We demonstrated by binding experiments using [ 125 I]-W peptide that HN and fHN directly interacted with hFPRL1 on the membrane. In addition, we found that HN and fHN showed strong chemotactic activity for CHO-hFPRL1 and CHO-hFPRL2 cells. HN is known to have a protective effect against neuronal cell death. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanism behind HN's function

  4. Elevated levels of CXC chemokine connective tissue activating peptide (CTAP)-III in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gina; Gardner, Brian K; Elashoff, David A; Purcell, Colleen M; Sandha, Harpavan S; Mao, Jenny T; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Lee, Jay M; Dubinett, Steven M

    2011-05-15

    Despite advances in treatments, lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States for the past several decades. Recent findings from the National Lung Screening Trial reveal that low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scan screening of high-risk individuals reduces lung cancer mortality. This suggests that early detection is of key importance to improving patient outcome. However, of those screened with CT scans, 25% had positive scans that require further follow-up studies which often involve more radiation exposure and invasive tests to reduce false positive results. The purpose of this study was to identify candidate plasma biomarkers to aid in diagnosis of lung cancer in at-risk individuals. We found increased expression of the CXC chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III from plasma specimens of lung cancer patients compared to at-risk control subjects. Identification of the peptide was confirmed by the addition of an anti-NAP-2 antibody that recognizes CTAP-III and NAP-2. We also quantified and verified the increased levels of plasma CTAP-III with ELISA in patients with lung cancer (mean ± SD, 1859 ± 1219 ng/mL) compared to controls (698 ± 434 ng/mL; Pcancer patients. Further studies are required to determine if this chemokine could be utilized in a blood-based biomarker panel for the diagnosis of lung cancer.

  5. Nematode Peptides with host-directed anti-inflammatory activity rescue Caenorhabditis elegans from a Burkholderia pseudomallei infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Perng Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is among a growing number of bacterial pathogens that are increasingly antibiotic resistant. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been investigated as an alternative approach to treat microbial infections, as generally, there is a lower likelihood that a pathogen will develop resistance to AMPs. In this study, 36 candidate Caenorhabditis elegans genes that encode secreted peptides of <150 amino acids and previously shown to be overexpressed during infection by B. pseudomallei were identified from the expression profile of infected nematodes. RNA interference (RNAi-based knockdown of 12/34 peptide-encoding genes resulted in enhanced nematode susceptibility to B. pseudomallei without affecting worm fitness. A microdilution test demonstrated that two peptides, NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3, exhibited anti-B. pseudomallei activity in a dose dependent manner on different pathogens. Time kill analysis proposed that these peptides were bacteriostatic against B. pseudomallei at concentrations up to 8× MIC90. The SYTOX green assay demonstrated that NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 did not disrupt the B. pseudomallei membrane. Instead, gel retardation assays revealed that both peptides were able to bind to DNA and interfere with bacterial viability. In parallel, microscopic examination showed induction of cellular filamentation, a hallmark of DNA synthesis inhibition, of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 treated cells. In addition, the peptides also regulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines in B. pseudomallei infected macrophage cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the potential of NLP-31 and Y43C5A.3 as anti-B. pseudomallei peptides based on their function as immune modulators.

  6. Influence of Dimerization of Lipopeptide Laur-Orn-Orn-Cys-NH2 and an N-terminal Peptide of Human Lactoferricin on Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamysz, Elżbieta; Sikorska, Emilia; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Tyszkowski, Rafał; Kamysz, Wojciech

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide that is cleaved by pepsin to lactoferricin (LFcin). LFcin has an enhanced antimicrobial activity as compared to that of LF. Recently several hetero- and homodimeric antimicrobial peptides stabilized by a single disulfide bond linking linear polypeptide chains have been discovered. We have demonstrated that the S-S bond heterodimerization of lipopeptide Laur-Orn-Orn-Cys-NH 2 (peptide III) and the synthetic N -terminal peptide of human lactoferricin (peptide I) yields a dimer (peptide V), which is almost as microbiologically active as the more active monomer and at the same time it is much less toxic. Furthermore, it has been found that the S-S bond homodimerization of both peptide I and peptide III did not affect antimicrobial and haemolytic activity of the compounds. The homo- and heterodimerization of peptides I and III resulted in either reduction or loss of antifungal activity. This work suggests that heterodimerization of antimicrobial lipopeptides via intermolecular disulfide bond might be a powerful modification deserving consideration in the design of antimicrobial peptides.

  7. Chemical probing of the human sirtuin 5 active site reveals its substrate acyl specificity and peptide-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Claudia; Nowak, Theresa; Pannek, Martin; Gertz, Melanie; Nguyen, Giang T T; Scharfe, Michael; Born, Ilona; Sippl, Wolfgang; Steegborn, Clemens; Schutkowski, Mike

    2014-09-26

    Sirtuins are NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases acting as sensors in metabolic pathways and stress response. In mammals there are seven isoforms. The mitochondrial sirtuin 5 is a weak deacetylase but a very efficient demalonylase and desuccinylase; however, its substrate acyl specificity has not been systematically analyzed. Herein, we investigated a carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 derived peptide substrate and modified the lysine side chain systematically to determine the acyl specificity of Sirt5. From that point we designed six potent peptide-based inhibitors that interact with the NAD(+) binding pocket. To characterize the interaction details causing the different substrate and inhibition properties we report several X-ray crystal structures of Sirt5 complexed with these peptides. Our results reveal the Sirt5 acyl selectivity and its molecular basis and enable the design of inhibitors for Sirt5. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Human Vitronectin-Derived Peptide Covalently Grafted onto Titanium Surface Improves Osteogenic Activity: A Pilot In Vivo Study on Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacchioli, Antonio; Ravanetti, Francesca; Bagno, Andrea; Dettin, Monica; Gabbi, Carlo

    2009-10-01

    Peptide and protein exploitation for the biochemical functionalization of biomaterial surfaces allowed fabricating biomimetic devices able to evoke and promote specific and advantageous cell functions in vitro and in vivo. In particular, cell adhesion improvement to support the osseointegration of implantable devices has been thoroughly investigated. This study was aimed at checking the biological activity of the (351-359) human vitronectin precursor (HVP) sequence, mapped on the human vitronectin protein; the peptide was covalently linked to the surface of titanium cylinders, surgically inserted in the femurs of New Zealand white rabbits and analyzed at short experimental time points (4, 9, and 16 days after surgery). To assess the osteogenic activity of the peptide, three vital fluorochromic bone markers were used (calcein green, xylenol orange, and calcein blue) to stain the areas of newly grown bone. Static and dynamic histomorphometric parameters were measured at the bone-implant interface and at different distances from the surface. The biological role of the (351-359)HVP sequence was checked by comparing peptide-grafted samples and controls, analyzing how and how much its effects change with time across the bone regions surrounding the implant surface. The results obtained reveal a major activity of the investigated peptide 4 days after surgery, within the bone region closest to the implant surface, and larger bone to implant contact 9 and 16 days after surgery. Thus, improved primary fixation of endosseous devices can be foreseen, resulting in an increased osteointegration.

  9. Structure-activity study of macropin, a novel antimicrobial peptide from the venom of solitary bee Macropis fulvipes (Hymenoptera: Melittidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monincová, Lenka; Veverka, Václav; Slaninová, Jiřina; Buděšínský, Miloš; Fučík, Vladimír; Bednárová, Lucie; Straka, Jakub; Ceřovský, Václav

    2014-06-01

    A novel antimicrobial peptide, designated macropin (MAC-1) with sequence Gly-Phe-Gly-Met-Ala-Leu-Lys-Leu-Leu-Lys-Lys-Val-Leu-NH2 , was isolated from the venom of the solitary bee Macropis fulvipes. MAC-1 exhibited antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, antifungal activity, and moderate hemolytic activity against human red blood cells. A series of macropin analogs were prepared to further evaluate the effect of structural alterations on antimicrobial and hemolytic activities and stability in human serum. The antimicrobial activities of several analogs against pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa were significantly increased while their toxicity against human red blood cells was decreased. The activity enhancement is related to the introduction of either l- or d-lysine in selected positions. Furthermore, all-d analog and analogs with d-amino acid residues introduced at the N-terminal part of the peptide chain exhibited better serum stability than did natural macropin. Data obtained by CD spectroscopy suggest a propensity of the peptide to adopt an amphipathic α-helical secondary structure in the presence of trifluoroethanol or membrane-mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate. In addition, the study elucidates the structure-activity relationship for the effect of d-amino acid substitutions in MAC-1 using NMR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. N-terminal amphipathic helix as a trigger of hemolytic activity in antimicrobial peptides: a case study in latarcins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyansky, Anton A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Volynsky, Pavel E; Vorontsova, Olga V; Samsonova, Olga V; Egorova, Natalya S; Krylov, Nicolay A; Feofanov, Alexei V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Efremov, Roman G

    2009-07-21

    In silico structural analyses of sets of alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are performed. Differences between hemolytic and non-hemolytic AMPs are revealed in organization of their N-terminal region. A parameter related to hydrophobicity of the N-terminal part is proposed as a measure of the peptide propensity to exhibit hemolytic and other unwanted cytotoxic activities. Based on the information acquired, a rational approach for selective removal of these properties in AMPs is suggested. A proof of concept is gained through engineering specific mutations that resulted in elimination of the hemolytic activity of AMPs (latarcins) while leaving the beneficial antimicrobial effect intact.

  11. Mathematical analysis of complex cellular activity

    CERN Document Server

    Bertram, Richard; Teka, Wondimu; Vo, Theodore; Wechselberger, Martin; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on mathematical physiology that deal with closely related topics but were written and can be read independently. The first article reviews the basic theory of calcium oscillations (common to almost all cell types), including spatio-temporal behaviors such as waves. The second article uses, and expands on, much of this basic theory to show how the interaction of cytosolic calcium oscillators with membrane ion channels can result in highly complex patterns of electrical spiking. Through these examples one can see clearly how multiple oscillatory processes interact within a cell, and how mathematical methods can be used to understand such interactions better. The two reviews provide excellent examples of how mathematics and physiology can learn from each other, and work jointly towards a better understanding of complex cellular processes. Review 1: Richard Bertram, Joel Tabak, Wondimu Teka, Theodore Vo, Martin Wechselberger: Geometric Singular Perturbation Analysis of Burst...

  12. Computational design of a PDZ domain peptide inhibitor that rescues CFTR activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle E Roberts

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR is an epithelial chloride channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. The most prevalent CFTR mutation, ΔF508, blocks folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Recent work has shown that some ΔF508-CFTR channel activity can be recovered by pharmaceutical modulators ("potentiators" and "correctors", but ΔF508-CFTR can still be rapidly degraded via a lysosomal pathway involving the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL, which binds CFTR via a PDZ interaction domain. We present a study that goes from theory, to new structure-based computational design algorithms, to computational predictions, to biochemical testing and ultimately to epithelial-cell validation of novel, effective CAL PDZ inhibitors (called "stabilizers" that rescue ΔF508-CFTR activity. To design the "stabilizers", we extended our structural ensemble-based computational protein redesign algorithm K* to encompass protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions. The computational predictions achieved high accuracy: all of the top-predicted peptide inhibitors bound well to CAL. Furthermore, when compared to state-of-the-art CAL inhibitors, our design methodology achieved higher affinity and increased binding efficiency. The designed inhibitor with the highest affinity for CAL (kCAL01 binds six-fold more tightly than the previous best hexamer (iCAL35, and 170-fold more tightly than the CFTR C-terminus. We show that kCAL01 has physiological activity and can rescue chloride efflux in CF patient-derived airway epithelial cells. Since stabilizers address a different cellular CF defect from potentiators and correctors, our inhibitors provide an additional therapeutic pathway that can be used in conjunction with current methods.

  13. Novel α-MSH peptide analogues with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Grieco

    Full Text Available Previous investigations indicate that α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH and certain synthetic analogues of it exert antimicrobial effects against bacteria and yeasts. However, these molecules have weak activity in standard microbiology conditions and this hampers a realistic clinical use. The aim in the present study was to identify novel peptides with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in growth medium. To this purpose, the Gly10 residue in the [DNal(2'-7, Phe-12]-MSH(6-13 sequence was replaced with conventional and unconventional amino acids with different degrees of conformational rigidity. Two derivatives in which Gly10 was replaced by the residues Aic and Cha, respectively, had substantial activity against Candida strains, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. krusei and against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Conformational analysis indicated that the helical structure along residues 8-13 is a key factor in antimicrobial activity. Synthetic analogues of α-MSH can be valuable agents to treat infections in humans. The structural preferences associated with antimicrobial activity identified in this research can help further development of synthetic melanocortins with enhanced biological activity.

  14. Structure–activity relationships of the human prothrombin kringle-2 peptide derivative NSA9: anti-proliferative activity and cellular internalization

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Soung Soo

    2006-01-01

    The human prothrombin kringle-2 protein inhibits angiogenesis and LLC (Lewis lung carcinoma) growth and metastasis in mice. Additionally, the NSA9 peptide (NSAVQLVEN) derived from human prothrombin kringle-2 has been reported to inhibit the proliferation of BCE (bovine capillary endothelial) cells and CAM (chorioallantoic membrane) angiogenesis. In the present study, we examined the structure–activity relationships of the NSA9 peptide in inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells lines...

  15. Preparation and crystallization of the Grb7 SH2 domain in complex with the G7-18NATE nonphosphorylated cyclic inhibitor peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Min Y.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Clayton, Daniel J.; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Wilce, Jacqueline A.

    2010-01-01

    The preparation and successful crystallization of the Grb7 SH2 domain in complex with the specific cyclic peptide inhibitor G7-18NATE are reported. This structure is anticipated to reveal the basis of the binding affinity and specificity and to assist with the development of second-generation inhibitors of Grb7, which is involved in cancer progression. Grb7 is an adapter protein that is involved in signalling pathways that mediate eukaryotic cell proliferation and migration. Its overexpression in several cancer types has implicated it in cancer progression and led to the development of the G7-18NATE cyclic peptide inhibitor. Here, the preparation of crystals of G7-18NATE in complex with its Grb7 SH2 domain target is reported. Crystals of the complex were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant at room temperature. X-ray diffraction data were collected from crystals to 2.4 Å resolution using synchrotron X-ray radiation at 100 K. The diffraction was consistent with space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 52.7, b = 79.1, c = 54.7 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 104.4°. The structure of the G7-18NATE peptide in complex with its target will facilitate the rational development of Grb7-targeted cancer therapeutics

  16. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta I.; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials.

  17. Structure Elucidation and Activity of Kolossin A, the D-/L-Pentadecapeptide Product of a Giant Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Helge B; Brachmann, Alexander O; Jadhav, Kirtikumar B; Seyfarth, Lydia; Dauth, Christina; Fuchs, Sebastian W; Kaiser, Marcel; Waterfield, Nick R; Sack, Holger; Heinemann, Stefan H; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2015-08-24

    The largest continuous bacterial nonribosomal peptide synthetase discovered so far is described. It consists of 15 consecutive modules arising from an uninterrupted, fully functional gene in the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. The identification of its cryptic biosynthesis product was achieved by using a combination of genome analysis, promoter exchange, isotopic labeling experiments, and total synthesis of a focused collection of peptide candidates. Although it belongs to the growing class of D-/ L-peptide natural products, the encoded metabolite kolossin A was found to be largely devoid of antibiotic activity and is likely involved in interspecies communication. A stereoisomer of this peculiar natural product displayed high activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, a recalcitrant parasite that causes the deadly disease African sleeping sickness. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Activity of innate antimicrobial peptides and ivacaftor against clinical cystic fibrosis respiratory pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Joanna E; Dubois, Alice V; Ingram, Rebecca J; Weldon, Sinead; Taggart, Clifford C; Elborn, J Stuart; Tunney, Michael M

    2017-09-01

    There is a clear need for new antimicrobials to improve current treatment of chronic lung infection in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study determined the activities of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and ivacaftor, a novel CF transmembrane conductance regulator potentiator, for CF treatment. Antimicrobial activities of AMPs [LL37, human β-defensins (HβD) 1-4 and SLPI] and ivacaftor against clinical respiratory isolates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Achromobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) were determined using radial diffusion and time-kill assays, respectively. Synergy of LL37 and ivacaftor with tobramycin was determined by time-kill, with in vivo activity of ivacaftor and tobramycin compared using a murine infection model. LL37 and HβD3 were the most active AMPs tested, with MICs ranging from 3.2- ≥ 200 mg/L and 4.8- ≥ 200 mg/L, respectively, except for Achromobacter that was resistant. HβD1 and SLPI demonstrated no antimicrobial activity. LL37 demonstrated synergy with tobramycin against 4/5 S. aureus and 2/5 Streptococcus spp. isolates. Ivacaftor demonstrated bactericidal activity against Streptococcus spp. (mean log 10 decrease 3.31 CFU/mL) and bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus (mean log 10 change 0.13 CFU/mL), but no activity against other genera. Moreover, ivacaftor demonstrated synergy with tobramycin, with mean log 10 decreases of 5.72 CFU/mL and 5.53 CFU/mL at 24 h for S. aureus and Streptococcus spp., respectively. Ivacaftor demonstrated immunomodulatory but no antimicrobial activity in a P. aeruginosa in vivo murine infection model. Following further modulation to enhance activity, AMPs and ivacaftor offer real potential as therapeutics to augment antibiotic therapy of respiratory infection in CF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Bioactive Peptides from Cartilage Protein Hydrolysate of Spotless Smoothhound and Their Antioxidant Activity In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment, crude proteins from spotless smoothhound (Mustelus griseus, cartilages were isolated by HCl-Guanidine buffer, and its hydrolysate was prepared using trypsin at pH 8.0, 40 °C with a total enzyme dose of 2.5%. Subsequently, three antioxidant peptides were purified from the hydrolysate using membrane ultrafiltration, anion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration chromatography, and reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The amino acid sequences of isolated peptides were identified as Gly-Ala-Glu-Arg-Pro (MCPE-A; Gly-Glu-Arg-Glu-Ala-Asn-Val-Met (MCPE-B; and Ala-Glu-Val-Gly (MCPE-C with molecular weights of 528.57, 905.00, and 374.40 Da, respectively, using protein amino acid sequence analyzer and mass spectrum. MCPE-A, MCPE-B and MCPE-C exhibited good scavenging activities on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH• (EC50 3.73, 1.87, and 2.30 mg/mL, respectively, hydroxyl radicals (HO• (EC50 0.25, 0.34, and 0.06 mg/mL, respectively, 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radicals (ABTS+• (EC50 0.10, 0.05, and 0.07 mg/mL, respectively and superoxide anion radicals ( O 2 − • (EC50 0.09, 0.33, and 0.18 mg/mL, respectively. MCPE-B showed similar inhibiting ability on lipid peroxidation with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT in a linoleic acid model system. Furthermore, MCPE-A, MCPE-B, and MCPE-C could protect H2O2-induced HepG2 cells from oxidative stress by decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA and increasing the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and glutathione reductase (GSH-Rx. Glu, Gly, Met, and Pro in their sequences and low molecular weight could be attributed to the antioxidant activities of three isolated peptides. These results suggested that GAERP (MCPE-A, GEREANVM (MCPE-B, and AEVG (MCPE-C from cartilage protein hydrolysate of spotless smoothhound might serve as potential antioxidants and be used in the pharmaceutical and

  20. Quorum Sensing Extracellular Death Peptides Enhance the Endoribonucleolytic Activities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MazF Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Akanksha; Kumar, Sathish

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT mazEF is a toxin-antitoxin module located on chromosomes of most bacteria. MazF toxins are endoribonucleases antagonized by MazE antitoxins. Previously, we characterized several quorum sensing peptides called "extracellular death factors" (EDFs). When secreted from bacterial cultures, EDFs induce interspecies cell death. EDFs also enhance the endoribonucleolytic activity of Escherichia coli MazF. Mycobacterium tuberculosis carries several mazEF modules. Among them, the endoribonucleolytic activities of MazF proteins mt-1, mt-3, and mt-6 were identified. MazF-mt6 and MazF-mt-3 cleave M. tuberculosis rRNAs. Here we report the in vitro effects of EDFs on the endoribonucleolytic activities of M. tuberculosis MazFs. Escherichia coli EDF (EcEDF) and the three Pseudomonas aeruginosa EDFs (PaEDFs) individually enhance the endoribonucleolytic activities of MazF-mt6 and MazF-mt3 and overcome the inhibitory effect of MazE-mt3 or MazE-mt6 on the endoribonucleolytic activities of the respective toxins. We propose that these EDFs can serve as a basis for a novel class of antibiotics against M. tuberculosis. PMID:29717013

  1. Activity of Potent and Selective Host Defense Peptide Mimetics in Mouse Models of Oral Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lisa K.; Freeman, Katie B.; Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G.; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:24752272

  2. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  3. Measurement of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Adenylation Domain Activity Using a Continuous Hydroxylamine Release Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Benjamin P; Wilson, Daniel J; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2016-01-01

    Adenylation is a crucial enzymatic process in the biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) derived natural products. Adenylation domains are considered the gatekeepers of NRPSs since they select, activate, and load the carboxylic acid substrate onto a downstream peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domain of the NRPS. We describe a coupled continuous kinetic assay for NRPS adenylation domains that substitutes the PCP domain with hydroxylamine as the acceptor molecule. The pyrophosphate released from the first-half reaction is then measured using a two-enzyme coupling system, which detects conversion of the chromogenic substrate 7-methylthioguanosine (MesG) to 7-methylthioguanine. From profiling substrate specificity of unknown or engineered adenylation domains to studying chemical inhibition of adenylating enzymes, this robust assay will be of widespread utility in the broad field NRPS enzymology.

  4. A Novel Non-Peptidic Agonist of the Ghrelin Receptor with Orexigenic Activity In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Cavada, Elena; Pardo, Leticia M.; Kandil, Dalia; Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Clarke, Sarah L.; Shaban, Hamdy; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Schellekens, Harriet

    2016-11-01

    Loss of appetite in the medically ill and ageing populations is a major health problem and a significant symptom in cachexia syndromes, which is the loss of muscle and fat mass. Ghrelin is a gut-derived hormone which can stimulate appetite. Herein we describe a novel, simple, non-peptidic, 2-pyridone which acts as a selective agonist for the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a). The small 2-pyridone demonstrated clear agonistic activity in both transfected human cells and mouse hypothalamic cells with endogenous GHS-R1a receptor expression. In vivo tests with the hit compound showed significant increased food intake following peripheral administration, which highlights the potent orexigenic effect of this novel GHS-R1a receptor ligand.

  5. Secapin, a bee venom peptide, exhibits anti-fibrinolytic, anti-elastolytic, and anti-microbial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Choi, Yong Soo; Jin, Byung Rae

    2016-10-01

    Bee venom contains a variety of peptide constituents that have various biological, toxicological, and pharmacological actions. However, the biological actions of secapin, a venom peptide in bee venom, remain largely unknown. Here, we provide the evidence that Asiatic honeybee (Apis cerana) secapin (AcSecapin-1) exhibits anti-fibrinolytic, anti-elastolytic, and anti-microbial activities. The recombinant mature AcSecapin-1 peptide was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells. AcSecapin-1 functions as a serine protease inhibitor-like peptide that has inhibitory effects against plasmin, elastases, microbial serine proteases, trypsin, and chymotrypsin. Consistent with these functions, AcSecapin-1 inhibited the plasmin-mediated degradation of fibrin to fibrin degradation products, thus indicating the role of AcSecapin-1 as an anti-fibrinolytic agent. AcSecapin-1 also inhibited both human neutrophil and porcine pancreatic elastases. Furthermore, AcSecapin-1 bound to bacterial and fungal surfaces and exhibited anti-microbial activity against fungi and gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the bee venom peptide secapin has multifunctional roles as an anti-fibrinolytic agent during fibrinolysis and an anti-microbial agent in the innate immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Proteinase-Activated Receptor-1 and Immunomodulatory Effects of a PAR1-Activating Peptide in a Mouse Model of Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M. Mark; Nelson, Lisa K.; Benediktsson, Hallgrimur; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Buret, Andre G.; Ceri, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Background. Nonbacterial prostatitis has no established etiology. We hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) can play a role in prostatitis. We therefore investigated the effects of PAR1 stimulation in the context of a new model of murine nonbacterial prostatitis. Methods. Using a hapten (ethanol-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (DNBS-)) induced prostatitis model with both wild-type and PAR1-null mice, we examined (1) the location of PAR1 in the mouse prostate and (2) the impact of a PAR1-activating peptide (TFLLR-NH2: PAR1-TF) on ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation. Results. Ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation was maximal at 2 days. In the tissue, PAR1 was expressed predominantly along the apical acini of prostatic epithelium. Although PAR1-TF on its own did not cause inflammation, its coadministration with ethanol-DNBS reduced all indices of acute prostatitis. Further, PAR1-TF administration doubled the prostatic production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared with ethanol-DNBS treatment alone. This enhanced IL-10 was not observed in PAR1-null mice and was not caused by the reverse-sequence receptor-inactive peptide, RLLFT-NH2. Surprisingly, PAR1-TF, also diminished ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation in PAR1-null mice. Conclusions. PAR1 is expressed in the mouse prostate and its activation by PAR1-TF elicits immunomodulatory effects during ethanol-DNBS-induced prostatitis. However, PAR1-TF also diminishes ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation via a non-PAR1 mechanism by activating an as-yet unknown receptor. PMID:24459330

  7. Connective tissue activation. XXXII. Structural and biologic characteristics of mesenchymal cell-derived connective tissue activating peptide-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, A R; Cole, L A; Walz, D A; Castor, C W

    1987-12-01

    Connective tissue activating peptide-V (CTAP-V) is a single-chain, mesenchymal cell-derived anionic protein with large and small molecular forms (Mr of 28,000 and 16,000, respectively), as defined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The proteins have similar specific activities with respect to stimulation of hyaluronic acid and DNA formation in human synovial fibroblast cultures. S-carboxymethylation or removal of sialic acid residues did not modify CTAP-V biologic activity. Rabbit antibodies raised separately against each of the purified CTAP-V proteins reacted, on immunodiffusion and on Western blot, with each antigen and neutralized mitogenic activity. The amino-terminal amino acid sequence of the CTAP-V proteins, determined by 2 laboratories, confirmed their structural similarities. The amino-terminal sequence through 37 residues was demonstrated for the smaller protein. The first 10 residues of CTAP-V (28 kd) were identical to the N-terminal decapeptide of CTAP-V (16 kd). The C-terminal sequence, determined by carboxypeptidase Y digestion, was the same for both CTAP-V molecular species. The 2 CTAP-V peptides had similar amino acid compositions, whether residues were expressed as a percent of the total or were normalized to mannose. Reduction of native CTAP-V protein released sulfhydryl groups in a protein:disulfide ratio of 1:2; this suggests that CTAP-V contains 2 intramolecular disulfide bonds. Clearly, CTAP-V is a glycoprotein. The carbohydrate content of CTAP-V (16 kd) and CTAP-V (28 kd) is 27% and 25%, respectively. CTAP-V may have significance in relation to autocrine mechanisms for growth regulation of connective tissue cells and other cell types.

  8. Inhibition of peptide bond formation by pleuromutilins: the structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with tiamulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlünzen, Frank; Pyetan, Erez; Fucini, Paola; Yonath, Ada; Harms, Jörg M

    2004-12-01

    Tiamulin, a prominent member of the pleuromutilin class of antibiotics, is a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis in bacteria. Up to now the effect of pleuromutilins on the ribosome has not been determined on a molecular level. The 3.5 A structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with tiamulin provides for the first time a detailed picture of its interactions with the 23S rRNA, thus explaining the molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of the pleuromutilin class of antibiotics. Our results show that tiamulin is located within the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of the 50S ribosomal subunit with its tricyclic mutilin core positioned in a tight pocket at the A-tRNA binding site. Also, the extension, which protrudes from its mutilin core, partially overlaps with the P-tRNA binding site. Thereby, tiamulin directly inhibits peptide bond formation. Comparison of the tiamulin binding site with other PTC targeting drugs, like chloramphenicol, clindamycin and streptogramins, may facilitate the design of modified or hybridized drugs that extend the applicability of this class of antibiotics.

  9. Isolation of biologically active peptides from the venom of Japanese carpenter bee, Xylocopa appendiculata

    OpenAIRE

    Kawakami, Hiroko; Goto, Shin G.; Murata, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hideaki; Shigeri, Yasushi; Imura, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Hidetoshi; Shinada, Tetsuro

    2017-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry-guided venom peptide profiling is a powerful tool to explore novel substances from venomous animals in a highly sensitive manner. In this study, this peptide profiling approach is successfully applied to explore the venom peptides of a Japanese solitary carpenter bee, Xylocopa appendiculata (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Apidae: Anthophila: Xylocopinae: Xylocopini). Although interesting biological effects of the crude venom of carpenter bees have been reported, the struct...

  10. Effect of Jatropha curcas Peptide Fractions on the Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira R. Segura-Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common worldwide diseases in humans. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and hypertension. An evaluation was done on the effect of Alcalase hydrolysis of defatted Jatropha curcas kernel meal on ACE inhibitory activity in the resulting hydrolysate and its purified fractions. Alcalase exhibited broad specificity and produced a protein hydrolysate with a 21.35% degree of hydrolysis and 34.87% ACE inhibition. Ultrafiltration of the hydrolysate produced peptide fractions with increased biological activity (24.46–61.41%. Hydrophobic residues contributed substantially to the peptides’ inhibitory potency. The 5–10 and <1 kDa fractions were selected for further fractionation by gel filtration chromatography. ACE inhibitory activity (% ranged from 22.66 to 45.96% with the 5–10 kDa ultrafiltered fraction and from 36.91 to 55.83% with the <1 kDa ultrafiltered fraction. The highest ACE inhibitory activity was observed in F2 ( μg/mL from the 5–10 kDa fraction and F1 ( μg/mL from the <1 kDa fraction. ACE inhibitory fractions from Jatropha kernel have potential applications in alternative hypertension therapies, adding a new application for the Jatropha plant protein fraction and improving the financial viability and sustainability of a Jatropha-based biodiesel industry.

  11. Antimicrobial activity and mechanism of the human milk-sourced peptide Casein201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fan; Cui, Xianwei; Fu, Yanrong; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Yahui; Sun, Yazhou; Wang, Xing; Li, Yun; Liu, Qianqi; Chen, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Casein201 is one of the human milk sourced peptides that differed significantly in preterm and full-term mothers. This study is designed to demonstrate the biological characteristics, antibacterial activity and mechanisms of Casein201 against common pathogens in neonatal infection. Methodology: The analysis of biological characteristics was done by bioinformatics. Disk diffusion method and flow cytometry were used to detect the antimicrobial activity of Casein201. Killing kinetics of Casein201 was measured using microplate reader. The antimicrobial mechanism of Casein201 was studied by electron microscopy and electrophoresis. Results: Bioinformatics analysis indicates that Casein201 derived from β-casein and showed significant sequence overlap. Antibacterial assays showed Casein201 inhibited the growth of S taphylococcus aureus and Y ersinia enterocolitica. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that the antibacterial activity of Casein201 is through cytoplasmic structures disintegration and bacterial cell envelope alterations but not combination with DNA. Conclusion: We conclude the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of Casein201. Our data demonstrate that Casein201 has potential therapeutic value for the prevention and treatment of pathogens in neonatal infection.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Enzyme from Proteus Mirabilis Bound Non-covalently to an Active Site Peptide Ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  13. Enzyme active site mimics based on TriAzaCyclophane (TAC)-scaffolded peptides and amino acid residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, H.B.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the scope and limitations of the application of TriAzaCyclophane (TAC)-scaffolded peptides or amino acid residues as enzyme active site mimics, as ligands in asymmetric catalysis and as hydrolysis catalysts attached to vancomycin. For the mimicry of functional group enzymes, of

  14. Activation of phospholipase A2 by temporin B: Formation of antimicrobial peptide-enzyme amyloid-type cofibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Code, Christian; Domanov, Y.A.; Killian, J.A.; Kinnunen, P.K.J.

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 have been shown to be activated in a concentration dependent manner by a number of antimicrobial peptides, including melittin, magainin 2, indolicidin, and temporins B and L. Here we used fluorescently labelled bee venom PLA2 (PLA2D) and the saturated phospholipid substrate

  15. Enhancement of the Enterocin CRL35 Activity by a Synthetic Peptide Derived from the NH2-Terminal Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Lucila; Minahk, Carlos; de Ruiz Holgado, Aída P.; Sesma, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The enterocin CRL35 biosynthetic gene cluster was cloned and sequenced. The sequence was revealed to be highly identical to that of the mundticin KS gene cluster (S. Kawamoto, J. Shima, R. Sato, T. Eguchi, S. Ohmomo, J. Shibato, N. Horikoshi, K. Takeshita, and T. Sameshima, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68:3830-3840, 2002). Short synthetic peptides were designed based on the bacteriocin sequence and were evaluated in antimicrobial competitive assays. The peptide KYYGNGVSCNKKGCS produced an enhancement of enterocin CRL35 antimicrobial activity in a buffer system. PMID:15215149

  16. Oostatic peptides containing d-amino acids: synthesis, oostatic activity, degradation, accumulation in ovaries and NMR study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Jan; Tykva, Richard; Holík, Josef; Bennettová, Blanka; Buděšínský, Miloš; Vlasáková, Věra; Černý, Bohuslav; Slaninová, Jiřina

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2012), s. 1715-1725 ISSN 0939-4451 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/1272 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : D-amino acids * oostatic peptide synthesis * H-3 labeling * oostatic activity in Neobellieria bullata * H-3 incorporation * Peptide degradation * NMR study Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2012

  17. A novel bioassay for the activity determination of therapeutic human brain natriuretic peptide (BNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP is an important peptide-based therapeutic drug indicated for the treatment of acute heart failure. Accurate determination of the potency of therapeutic rhBNP is crucial for the safety and efficacy of the drug. The current bioassay involves use of rabbit aortic strips, with experiments being complicated and time-consuming and markedly variable in results. Animal-less methods with better precision and accuracy should be explored. We have therefore developed an alternative cell-based assay, which relies on the ability of BNP to induce cGMP production in HEK293 cells expressing BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An alternative assay based on the measurement of BNP-induced cGMP production was developed. Specifically, the bioassay employs cells engineered to express BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GCA. Upon rhBNP stimulation, the levels of the second messager cGMP in these cells drastically increased and subsequently secreted into culture supernatants. The quantity of cGMP, which corresponds to the rhBNP activity, was determined using a competitive ELISA developed by us. Compared with the traditional assay, the novel cell-based assay demonstrated better reproducibility and precision. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The optimized cell-based assay is much simpler, more rapid and precise compared with the traditional assay using animal tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a novel and viable alternative assay for rhBNP potency analysis.

  18. Inhibition of [gamma]-endorphin generating endopeptidase activity of rat brain by peptides: Structure activity relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebouille, J.L.M.; Visser, W.H.; Hendriks, R.W.; Nispen, J.W. van; Greven, H.M.; Burbach, J.P.H.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma-Endorphin generating endopeptidase (gammaEGE) activity is an enzyme activity which converts beta-endorphin into gamma-endorphin and beta-endorphin-(18–31). The inhibitory potency on gammaEGE activity of neuropeptides and analogues or fragments of neuropeptides was tested. Dynorphin-(1–13)

  19. Antioxidant activity and sensory characteristics of Maillard reaction products derived from different peptide fractions of soybean meal hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; He, Shudong; Tang, Mingming; Zhang, Zuoyong; Zhu, Yongsheng; Sun, Hanju

    2018-03-15

    Four peptide fractions PF1 (>5;kDa), PF2 (3-5;kDa), PF3 (1-3;kDa), PF4 (Maillard reaction products (MRPF1, MRPF2, MRPF3 and MRPF4) were evaluated, respectively. Peptides with low molecular weight showed higher contribution to the changes of pH, colour and browning intensity during Maillard reaction. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of PF4 was significantly improved after Maillard reaction. Aroma volatiles and PLSR analysis suggested MRPF3 had the best sensory characteristics with higher contents of umami amino acids and lower of bitter amino acids, therefore it could be deduced that the umami and meaty characteristics were correlated with the peptides of 1-3;kDa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antitumor and angiostatic activities of the antimicrobial peptide dermaseptin B2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zoggel, Hanneke; Carpentier, Gilles; Dos Santos, Célia; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina; Courty, José; Amiche, Mohamed; Delbé, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have found that the skin secretions of the Amazonian tree frog Phyllomedusa bicolor contains molecules with antitumor and angiostatic activities and identified one of them as the antimicrobial peptide dermaseptin (Drs) B2. In the present study we further explored the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of this molecule and investigated its mechanism of action. We showed that Drs B2 inhibits the proliferation and colony formation of various human tumor cell types, and the proliferation and capillary formation of endothelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, Drs B2 inhibited tumor growth of the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell line PC3 in a xenograft model in vivo. Research on the mechanism of action of Drs B2 on tumor PC3 cells demonstrated a rapid increasing amount of cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase, no activation of caspase-3, and no changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that Drs B2 can interact with the tumor cell surface, aggregate and penetrate the cells. These data together indicate that Drs B2 does not act by apoptosis but possibly by necrosis. In conclusion, Drs B2 could be considered as an interesting and promising pharmacological and therapeutic leader molecule for the treatment of cancer.

  1. Antitumor and angiostatic activities of the antimicrobial peptide dermaseptin B2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke van Zoggel

    Full Text Available Recently, we have found that the skin secretions of the Amazonian tree frog Phyllomedusa bicolor contains molecules with antitumor and angiostatic activities and identified one of them as the antimicrobial peptide dermaseptin (Drs B2. In the present study we further explored the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of this molecule and investigated its mechanism of action. We showed that Drs B2 inhibits the proliferation and colony formation of various human tumor cell types, and the proliferation and capillary formation of endothelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, Drs B2 inhibited tumor growth of the human prostate adenocarcinoma cell line PC3 in a xenograft model in vivo. Research on the mechanism of action of Drs B2 on tumor PC3 cells demonstrated a rapid increasing amount of cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase, no activation of caspase-3, and no changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that Drs B2 can interact with the tumor cell surface, aggregate and penetrate the cells. These data together indicate that Drs B2 does not act by apoptosis but possibly by necrosis. In conclusion, Drs B2 could be considered as an interesting and promising pharmacological and therapeutic leader molecule for the treatment of cancer.

  2. Assembling high activity phosphotriesterase composites using hybrid nanoparticle peptide-DNA scaffolded architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Joyce C.; Buckhout-White, Susan; Walper, Scott A.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) display potentially offers a new way to both stabilize and, in many cases, enhance enzyme activity over that seen for native protein in solution. However, the large, globular and sometimes multimeric nature of many enzymes limits their ability to attach directly to the surface of NPs, especially when the latter are colloidally stabilized with bulky PEGylated ligands. Engineering extended protein linkers into the enzymes to achieve direct attachment through the PEG surface often detrimentally alters the enzymes catalytic ability. Here, we demonstrate an alternate, hybrid biomaterials-based approach to achieving directed enzyme assembly on PEGylated NPs. We self-assemble a unique architecture consisting of a central semiconductor quantum dot (QD) scaffold displaying controlled ratios of extended peptide-DNA linkers which penetrate through the PEG surface to directly couple enzymes to the QD surface. As a test case, we utilize phosphotriesterase (PTE), an enzyme of bio-defense interest due to its ability to hydrolyze organophosphate nerve agents. Moreover, this unique approach still allows PTE to maintain enhanced activity while also suggesting the ability of DNA to enhance enzyme activity in and of itself.

  3. Peptide-activated gold nanoparticles for selective visual sensing of virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajjanar, Basavaraj; Kakodia, Bhuvna; Bisht, Deepika; Saxena, Shikha; Singh, Arvind Kumar [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Division of Veterinary Biotechnology (India); Joshi, Vinay [Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Department of Animal Biotechnology (India); Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Satish, E-mail: drsatishkumar-ivri@yahoo.co.in [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Division of Veterinary Biotechnology (India)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we report peptide–gold nanoparticles (AuNP)-based visual sensor for viruses. Citrate-stabilized AuNP (20 ± 1.9 nm) were functionalized with strong sulfur–gold interface using cysteinylated virus-specific peptide. Peptide–Cys–AuNP formed complexes with the viruses which made them to aggregate. The aggregation can be observed with naked eye and also with UV–Vis spectrophotometer as a color change from bright red to purple. The test allows for fast and selective detection of specific viruses. Spectroscopic measurements showed high linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.995) between the changes in optical density ratio (OD{sub 610}/OD{sub 520}) with the different concentrations of virus. The new method was compared with the hemagglutinating (HA) test for Newcastle disease virus (NDV). The results indicated that peptide–Cys–AuNP was more sensitive and can visually detect minimum number of virus particles present in the biological samples. The limit of detection for the NDV was 0.125 HA units of the virus. The method allows for selective detection and quantification of the NDV, and requires no isolation of viral RNA and PCR experiments. This strategy may be utilized for detection of other important human and animal viral pathogens.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin-derived peptides on Mycoplasma bovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a diverse group of molecules which play an important role in the innate immune response. Bovine NK-lysins, a type of AMP, have been predominantly found in the granules of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and NK-cells. Bovine NK-lysin-derived peptides demonstrate antimicrobia...

  5. Side Chain Hydrophobicity Modulates Therapeutic Activity and Membrane Selectivity of Antimicrobial Peptide Mastoparan-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Etzerodt, Thomas Povl; Gjetting, Torben

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new anti-infective compounds is stagnating and multi-resistant bacteria continue to emerge, threatening to end the "antibiotic era''. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lipo-peptides such as daptomycin offer themselves as a new potential class of antibiotics; however, further opti...

  6. Sensibilidad in vitro de micobacterias a dos péptidos sintéticos híbridos con actividad antimicrobiana In-vitro activity of two hybrid synthetic peptides having antimicrobial activity against mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zerbini

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El aumento de aislamientos clínicos de Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistentes a las drogas esenciales y de casos de micobacteriosis diseminadas debidas al complejo Mycobacterium avium hacen necesario investigar nuevos agentes antimicobacterianos. Los péptidos antimicrobianos son un nuevo grupo de antibióticos que poseen un mecanismo de acción particular. Algunos de ellos, como la cecropina y la melitina, han sido aislados de insectos y han demostrado buena actividad in vitro contra bacterias gram positivas y gram negativas. Híbridos sintéticos de esos péptidos han presentado mayor actividad que los péptidos individuales. En este trabajo se evaluó la actividad in vitro de dos péptidos híbridos sintéticos de melitina y cecropina contra M. tuberculosis, complejo M. avium, Mycobacterium fortuitum y Mycobacterium smegmatis. Se determinó la concentración inhibitoria mínima empleando la técnica de macrodilución en caldo. Luego se estableció la concentración bactericida mínima en medio Lowenstein Jensen. Los péptidos evaluados mostraron ser activos in vitro contra M. smegmatis, mientras que no presentaron ninguna actividad contra las otras micobacterias estudiadas.The increase in both Mycobacterium tuberculosis human clinical isolates resistant to the essential drugs and cases of disseminated micobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium avium Complex, underlines the need to investigate new antimicobacterial agents. The antimicrobial peptides are a new group of active antibiotics with a particular mechanism of action. Some of them, like cecropin and melittin, isolated from insects, have demonstrated good in vitro activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Synthetic hybrids of those peptides have been more active than individual peptides. In this study, the in vitro activity of two hybrid synthetic peptides from melittin and cecropin against M. tuberculosis, M. avium Complex, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium smegmatis

  7. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; ten Kulve, J. S.; Groot, P. F. C.; Ruhe, H. G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J. H.; Diamant, M.; Ijzerman, R. G.

    AimTo test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. MethodsAs part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain

  8. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; ten Kulve, J. S.; Groot, P. F. C.; Ruhé, H. G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J. H.; Diamant, M.; Ijzerman, R. G.

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. As part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain responses to

  9. Brain reward-system activation in response to anticipation and consumption of palatable food is altered by glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor activation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloemendaal, L.; Veltman, D.J.; ten Kulve, J.S.; Groot, P.F.C.; Ruhe, H.G.; Barkhof, F.; Sloan, J.H.; Diamant, M.; IJzerman, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To test the hypothesis that food intake reduction after glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation is mediated through brain areas regulating anticipatory and consummatory food reward. Methods: As part of a larger study, we determined the effects of GLP-1 receptor activation on brain

  10. Killing of Mycobacterium avium by lactoferricin peptides: improved activity of arginine- and D-amino-acid-containing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tânia; Magalhães, Bárbara; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G M; Rodrigues, Pedro N; Bastos, Margarida; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2014-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium causes respiratory disease in susceptible individuals, as well as disseminated infections in immunocompromised hosts, being an important cause of morbidity and mortality among these populations. Current therapies consist of a combination of antibiotics taken for at least 6 months, with no more than 60% overall clinical success. Furthermore, mycobacterial antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, urging the need to develop novel classes of antimicrobial drugs. One potential and interesting alternative strategy is the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMP). These are present in almost all living organisms as part of their immune system, acting as a first barrier against invading pathogens. In this context, we investigated the effect of several lactoferrin-derived AMP against M. avium. Short peptide sequences from both human and bovine lactoferricins, namely, hLFcin1-11 and LFcin17-30, as well as variants obtained by specific amino acid substitutions, were evaluated. All tested peptides significantly inhibited the axenic growth of M. avium, the bovine peptides being more active than the human. Arginine residues were found to be crucial for the display of antimycobacterial activity, whereas the all-d-amino-acid analogue of the bovine sequence displayed the highest mycobactericidal activity. These findings reveal the promising potential of lactoferricins against mycobacteria, thus opening the way for further research on their development and use as a new weapon against mycobacterial infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Endogenous collagen peptide activation of CD1d-restricted NKT cells ameliorates tissue-specific inflammation in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Anna; Mondoc, Emma

    2011-01-01

    NKT cells in the mouse recognize antigen in the context of the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d and play an important role in peripheral tolerance and protection against autoimmune and other diseases. NKT cells are usually activated by CD1d-presented lipid antigens. However, peptide recognition...... in the context of CD1 has also been documented, although no self-peptide ligands have been reported to date. Here, we have identified an endogenous peptide that is presented by CD1d to activate mouse NKT cells. This peptide, the immunodominant epitope from mouse collagen type II (mCII707-721), was not associated...... with either MHC class I or II. Activation of CD1d-restricted mCII707-721-specific NKT cells was induced via TCR signaling and classical costimulation. In addition, mCII707-721-specific NKT cells induced T cell death through Fas/FasL, in an IL-17A-independent fashion. Moreover, mCII707-721-specific NKT cells...

  12. Two Novel Bioactive Peptides from Antarctic Krill with Dual Angiotensin Converting Enzyme and Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibitory Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Zhang, Chaohua; Ji, Hongwu

    2017-07-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) are considered useful in managing 2 often associated conditions: diabetes and hypertension. In this study, corolase PP was used to hydrolyze Antarctic krill protein. The hydrolysate (AKH) was isolated by ultrafiltration and purified by size-exclusion chromatography, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) sequentially. The in vitro inhibitory activities of all AKHs and several fractions obtained against ACE and DPP-IV were assessed. Two peptides, purified with dual-strength inhibitory activity against ACE and DPP-IV, were identified by TOF-MS/MS. Results indicated that not all fractions exhibited dual inhibitory activities of ACE and DPP-IV. The purified peptide Lys-Val-Glu-Pro-Leu-Pro had half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) of 0.93±0.05 and 0.73±0.04 mg/mL against ACE and DPP-IV, respectively. The other peptide Pro-Ala-Leu had IC 50 values of 0.64±0.05 and 0.88±0.03 mg/mL against ACE and DPP-IV, respectively. This study firstly reported the sequences of dual bioactive peptides from Antarctic krill proteins, further provided new insights into the bioactive peptides responsible for the ACE and DPP-IV inhibitory activities from the Antarctic krill protein hydrolysate to manage hypertension and diabetes. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  13. The anticancer activity of lytic peptides is inhibited by heparan sulfate on the surface of the tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) with antitumor activity constitute a promising group of novel anticancer agents. These peptides induce lysis of cancer cells through interactions with the plasma membrane. It is not known which cancer cell membrane components influence their susceptibility to CAPs. We have previously shown that CAPs interact with the two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), which are present on the surface of most cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the two GAGs in the cytotoxic activity of CAPs. Methods Various cell lines, expressing different levels of cell surface GAGs, were exposed to bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) and the designer peptide, KW5. The cytotoxic effect of the peptides was investigated by use of the colorimetric MTT viability assay. The cytotoxic effect on wild type CHO cells, expressing normal amounts of GAGs on the cell surface, and the mutant pgsA-745, that has no expression of GAGs on the cell surface, was also investigated. Results We show that cells not expressing HS were more susceptible to CAPs than cells expressing HS at the cell surface. Further, exogenously added heparin inhibited the cytotoxic effect of the peptides. Chondroitin sulfate had no effect on the cytotoxic activity of KW5 and only minor effects on LfcinB cytotoxicity. Conclusion Our results show for the first time that negatively charged molecules at the surface of cancer cells inhibit the cytotoxic activity of CAPs. Our results indicate that HS at the surface of cancer cells sequesters CAPs away from the phospholipid bilayer and thereby impede their ability to induce cytolysis. PMID:19527490

  14. Endogenous collagen peptide activation of CD1d-restricted NKT cells ameliorates tissue-specific inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Anna; Mondoc, Emma; Ibrahim, Saleh; Holmdahl, Rikard; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2011-01-01

    NKT cells in the mouse recognize antigen in the context of the MHC class I-like molecule CD1d and play an important role in peripheral tolerance and protection against autoimmune and other diseases. NKT cells are usually activated by CD1d-presented lipid antigens. However, peptide recognition in the context of CD1 has also been documented, although no self-peptide ligands have been reported to date. Here, we have identified an endogenous peptide that is presented by CD1d to activate mouse NKT cells. This peptide, the immunodominant epitope from mouse collagen type II (mCII707-721), was not associated with either MHC class I or II. Activation of CD1d-restricted mCII707-721-specific NKT cells was induced via TCR signaling and classical costimulation. In addition, mCII707-721-specific NKT cells induced T cell death through Fas/FasL, in an IL-17A-independent fashion. Moreover, mCII707-721-specific NKT cells suppressed a range of in vivo inflammatory conditions, including delayed-type hypersensitivity, antigen-induced airway inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis, and EAE, which were all ameliorated by mCII707-721 vaccination. The findings presented here offer new insight into the intrinsic roles of NKT cells in health and disease. Given the results, endogenous collagen peptide activators of NKT cells may offer promise as novel therapeutics in tissue-specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  15. The anticancer activity of lytic peptides is inhibited by heparan sulfate on the surface of the tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekdal Øystein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs with antitumor activity constitute a promising group of novel anticancer agents. These peptides induce lysis of cancer cells through interactions with the plasma membrane. It is not known which cancer cell membrane components influence their susceptibility to CAPs. We have previously shown that CAPs interact with the two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, heparan sulfate (HS and chondroitin sulfate (CS, which are present on the surface of most cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the two GAGs in the cytotoxic activity of CAPs. Methods Various cell lines, expressing different levels of cell surface GAGs, were exposed to bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB and the designer peptide, KW5. The cytotoxic effect of the peptides was investigated by use of the colorimetric MTT viability assay. The cytotoxic effect on wild type CHO cells, expressing normal amounts of GAGs on the cell surface, and the mutant pgsA-745, that has no expression of GAGs on the cell surface, was also investigated. Results We show that cells not expressing HS were more susceptible to CAPs than cells expressing HS at the cell surface. Further, exogenously added heparin inhibited the cytotoxic effect of the peptides. Chondroitin sulfate had no effect on the cytotoxic activity of KW5 and only minor effects on LfcinB cytotoxicity. Conclusion Our results show for the first time that negatively charged molecules at the surface of cancer cells inhibit the cytotoxic activity of CAPs. Our results indicate that HS at the surface of cancer cells sequesters CAPs away from the phospholipid bilayer and thereby impede their ability to induce cytolysis.

  16. Immunomodulating and Revascularizing Activity of Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Fungicide Activity of Biogenic Peptide Cecropin P1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Zakharchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata plants producing an antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (CecP1 have been reported. Now we report biological testing K. pinnata extracts containing CecP1 as a candidate drug for treatment of wounds infected with Candida albicans. The drug constitutes the whole juice from K. pinnata leaves (not ethanol extract sterilized with nanofiltration. A microbicide activity of CecP1 against an animal fungal pathogen in vivo was demonstrated for the first time. However, a favorable therapeutic effect of the transgenic K. pinnata extract was attributed to a synergism between the fungicide activity of CecP1 and wound healing (antiscar, revascularizing, and immunomodulating effect of natural biologically active components of K. pinnata. A commercial fungicide preparation clotrimazole eliminated C. albicans cells within infected wounds in rats with efficiency comparable to CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extract. But in contrast to K. pinnata extract, clotrimazole did not exhibit neither wound healing activity nor remodeling of the scar matrix. Taken together, our results allow assumption that CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extracts should be considered as a candidate drug for treatment of dermatomycoses, wounds infected with fungi, and bedsores.

  17. Immunomodulating and Revascularizing Activity of Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Fungicide Activity of Biogenic Peptide Cecropin P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, N S; Belous, A S; Biryukova, Y K; Medvedeva, O A; Belyakova, A V; Masgutova, G A; Trubnikova, E V; Buryanov, Y I; Lebedeva, A A

    2017-01-01

    Previously transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata plants producing an antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (CecP1) have been reported. Now we report biological testing K. pinnata extracts containing CecP1 as a candidate drug for treatment of wounds infected with Candida albicans. The drug constitutes the whole juice from K. pinnata leaves (not ethanol extract) sterilized with nanofiltration. A microbicide activity of CecP1 against an animal fungal pathogen in vivo was demonstrated for the first time. However, a favorable therapeutic effect of the transgenic K. pinnata extract was attributed to a synergism between the fungicide activity of CecP1 and wound healing (antiscar), revascularizing, and immunomodulating effect of natural biologically active components of K. pinnata . A commercial fungicide preparation clotrimazole eliminated C. albicans cells within infected wounds in rats with efficiency comparable to CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extract. But in contrast to K. pinnata extract, clotrimazole did not exhibit neither wound healing activity nor remodeling of the scar matrix. Taken together, our results allow assumption that CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extracts should be considered as a candidate drug for treatment of dermatomycoses, wounds infected with fungi, and bedsores.

  18. Synthetic Peptides Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibit Antimicrobial Activity against E. coli ATCC 11775, S. maltophilia ATCC 13636 and S. enteritidis ATCC 13076

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly De Jesús Huertas Méndez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear, dimeric, tetrameric, and cyclic peptides derived from lactoferricin B–containing non-natural amino acids and the RWQWR motif were synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism. The antibacterial activity of peptides against Escherichia coli ATCC 11775, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13636, and Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076 was evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined. The synthetic bovine lactoferricin exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli ATCC 11775 and S. enteritidis ATCC 13076. The dimeric peptide (RRWQWR2K-Ahx exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strain. The monomeric, cyclic, tetrameric, and palindromic peptides containing the RWQWR motif exhibited high and specific activity against E. coli ATCC 11775. The results suggest that short peptides derived from lactoferricin B could be considered as potential candidates for the development of antibacterial agents against infections caused by E. coli.

  19. Synthetic Peptides Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibit Antimicrobial Activity against E. coli ATCC 11775, S. maltophilia ATCC 13636 and S. enteritidis ATCC 13076.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas Méndez, Nataly De Jesús; Vargas Casanova, Yerly; Gómez Chimbi, Anyelith Katherine; Hernández, Edith; Leal Castro, Aura Lucia; Melo Diaz, Javier Mauricio; Rivera Monroy, Zuly Jenny; García Castañeda, Javier Eduardo

    2017-03-12

    Linear, dimeric, tetrameric, and cyclic peptides derived from lactoferricin B-containing non-natural amino acids and the RWQWR motif were synthesized, purified, and characterized using RP-HPLC, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism. The antibacterial activity of peptides against Escherichia coli ATCC 11775, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13636, and Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076 was evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined. The synthetic bovine lactoferricin exhibited antibacterial activity against E. coli ATCC 11775 and S. enteritidis ATCC 13076. The dimeric peptide (RRWQWR)₂K-Ahx exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial strain. The monomeric, cyclic, tetrameric, and palindromic peptides containing the RWQWR motif exhibited high and specific activity against E. coli ATCC 11775. The results suggest that short peptides derived from lactoferricin B could be considered as potential candidates for the development of antibacterial agents against infections caused by E. coli .

  20. Structure-activity studies of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP): cyclic disulfide analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, D R; Cottrell, J; Garippa, R; O'Neill, N; Simko, B; O'Donnell, M

    1993-02-01

    Analogs of vasoactive intestinal peptide with cysteine residues incorporated at selected sites within the sequence were prepared by solid phase methods, oxidized to the corresponding cyclic disulfides and purified to homogeneity by preparative HPLC. The cyclic compounds were assayed as smooth muscle relaxants on isolated guinea pig trachea, as bronchodilators in vivo in guinea pigs, and for binding to VIP receptors in guinea pig lung membranes. Of the analogs prepared at the N-terminus, one compound, Ac-[D-Cys6,D-Cys11,Lys12,Nle17,Val26,Th r28]-VIP, was found to be a full agonist with slightly more than one tenth the potency of native VIP. Most other cyclic analogs in the N-terminal region were found to be inactive. A second analog, Ac-[Lys12,Cys17,Val26,Cys28]-VIP, was also found to be a full agonist with potency about one third that of native VIP. Furthermore, this compound was active as a bronchodilator in vivo in guinea pig, but with somewhat diminished potency as compared to native VIP. Strikingly, this cyclic compound was found to have significantly longer duration of action (> 40 min) when compared to an analogous acyclic compound (5 min). The conformational restrictions imposed by formation of the cyclic ring structures may have stabilized the molecule to degradation, thus enhancing the effective duration of action. Analysis of this series of cyclic analogs has also yielded information about the requirements for the receptor-active conformation of VIP.

  1. Proliferative activity of elastin-like-peptides depends on charge and phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Koria, Piyush

    2016-03-01

    Elastin-like-peptides (ELPs) are stimulus-responsive protein-based polymers and are attractive biomaterials due to their biocompatibility and unique properties. This study shows that in addition to their physical properties, ELPs have biological activities that are conducive to tissue regeneration. Specifically, we found that ELPs induce fibroblast proliferation via cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). Furthermore, our data suggests that ELP based materials with differential proliferative potential can be designed by controlling the interaction of ELPs with HSPGs by incorporating either hydrophobic or positively charged residues within the ELP sequence. Fibroblast proliferation is important for granulation tissue formation which is important in chronic wounds as well as in healing of other tissues. The customizable biological activity of ELPs coupled with their unique physical properties will enable us to design novel, sustainable and cost effective therapies for different tissue regeneration applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 697-706, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Expression, Purification and Bioactivities Analysis of Recombinant Active Peptide from Shark Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boping Ye

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Active Peptide from Shark Liver (APSL was expressed in E. coli BL21 cells. The cDNA encoding APSL protein was obtained from shark regenerated hepatic tissue by RT-PCR, then it was cloned in the pET-28a expression vector. The expressed fusion protein was purified by Ni-IDA affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE and HPLC analysis showed the purity of the purified fusion protein was more than 98%. The recombinant APSL (rAPSL was tested for its biological activity both in vitro, by its ability to improve the proliferation of SMMC7721 cells, and in vivo, by its significant protective effects against acute hepatic injury induced by CCl4 and AAP (acetaminophen in mice. In addition, the rAPSL could decrease the blood glucose concentration of mice with diabetes mellitus induced by alloxan. Paraffin sections of mouse pancreas tissues showed that rAPSL (3 mg/kg could effectively protect mouse islets from lesions induced by alloxan, which indicated its potential application in theoretical research and industry.

  3. Mitochondria related peptide MOTS-c suppresses ovariectomy-induced bone loss via AMPK activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Wei, E-mail: weiming@xiyi.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Xi’an Medical University, Xi’an 710021 (China); Lu, Gan, E-mail: leonming99@163.com [Department of Gynecology of Shaanxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Xi’an, 710068 (China); Xin, Sha, E-mail: 248967979@qq.com [Institute of Orthopedic Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Huanyu, Lu, E-mail: 2366927258@qq.com [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Yinghao, Jiang, E-mail: jiangyh@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Xiaoying, Lei, E-mail: leixiaoy@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Chengming, Xu, E-mail: chengmingxu@yeah.net [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Banjun, Ruan, E-mail: running@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Li, Wang, E-mail: wanglifw@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Pharmacogenomics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032 (China); and others

    2016-08-05

    Therapeutic targeting bone loss has been the focus of the study in osteoporosis. The present study is intended to evaluate whether MOTS-c, a novel mitochondria related 16 aa peptide, can protect mice from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. After ovary removal, the mice were injected with MOTS-c at a dose of 5 mg/kg once a day for 12 weeks. Our results showed that MOTS-c treatment significantly alleviated bone loss, as determined by micro-CT examination. Mechanistically, we found that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclast differentiation was remarkably inhibited by MOTS-c. Moreover, MOTS-c increased phosphorylated AMPK levels, and compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, could partially abrogate the effects of the MOTS-c on osteoclastogenesis. Thus, our findings provide evidence that MOTS-c may exert as an inhibitor of osteoporosis via AMPK dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. -- Highlights: •MOTS-c decreases OVX-induced bone loss in vivo. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast-specific gene expression. •MOTS-c represses osteoclast differentiation via the activation of AMPK.

  4. Mitochondria related peptide MOTS-c suppresses ovariectomy-induced bone loss via AMPK activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Wei; Lu, Gan; Xin, Sha; Huanyu, Lu; Yinghao, Jiang; Xiaoying, Lei; Chengming, Xu; Banjun, Ruan; Li, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting bone loss has been the focus of the study in osteoporosis. The present study is intended to evaluate whether MOTS-c, a novel mitochondria related 16 aa peptide, can protect mice from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. After ovary removal, the mice were injected with MOTS-c at a dose of 5 mg/kg once a day for 12 weeks. Our results showed that MOTS-c treatment significantly alleviated bone loss, as determined by micro-CT examination. Mechanistically, we found that the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclast differentiation was remarkably inhibited by MOTS-c. Moreover, MOTS-c increased phosphorylated AMPK levels, and compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, could partially abrogate the effects of the MOTS-c on osteoclastogenesis. Thus, our findings provide evidence that MOTS-c may exert as an inhibitor of osteoporosis via AMPK dependent inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. -- Highlights: •MOTS-c decreases OVX-induced bone loss in vivo. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. •MOTS-c inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast-specific gene expression. •MOTS-c represses osteoclast differentiation via the activation of AMPK.

  5. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  6. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  7. bond activation and catalysis by Ru -pac complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and their reactivity towards oxidation of a few organic compounds. Keywords. Kinetics; catalysis; -O–O- bond activation; Ru-pac complex; oxidation. 1. Introduction. Ru-pac complexes exhibit catalytic properties,1 in homogeneous conditions in the presence of oxygen atom donors, that mimic the biological enzymatic oxi-.

  8. Effects of the substitution of amino acid residues, through chemical synthesis, on the conformation and activity of antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina C. Adão

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides make up an assorted group of molecules which contain from 12 to 50 amino acid residues and which may be produced by microorganisms, plants and animals. From the discovery that these biomolecules are lethal to bacteria, inhibiting the pathogenic organism’s growth, and are also related to innate and adapted defense mechanisms, the investigation of such molecules came to be an emergent research field, in which more than 1800 antimicrobial peptides have so far been discovered throughout the last three decades. These molecules are potential representatives of a new generation of antibiotic agents and the main motivation for such use is their activity against a wide variety of pathogens, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi and viruses. An important class of comprising some of these peptides may be found in anurans, from which it has been isolated, a considerable number of antimicrobial peptides with diverse sequences and structures, including linear and dimeric ones. In this work monomeric chains (CH1 e CH2 of the heterodimeric antimicrobial peptide distinctin (isolated in 1999 from Phyllomedusa distincta anurans, as well as its mutated monomers (CH1-S and CH2-S and the heterodimer itself were synthesized. The distinctin is the peptide with two chains of different sequences (Table 1 bound each other by disulfide bond from the cystein residues constituting the heterodimer. To investigate the effects on the biological activity by amino acids substitution at normal distinctin CH1 and CH2 chains, both were synthesized as well as their similar chains (CH1-S and CH2-S in which the cystein (Fig.1 a residues of each chain were changed by serin residues (Fig. 1 b. The new chains were named mutants. The synthesis was carried out in solid phase, using Fmoc strategy. The heterodimer distinctin was obtained from CH1 and CH2 chains coupling through cystein residues air oxidation. The results from HPLC

  9. Small-angle scattering studies show distinct conformations of calmodulin in its complexes with two peptides based on the regulatory domain of the catalytic subunit of phosphorylase kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trewhella, J.; Blumenthal, D.K.; Rokop, S.E.; Seeger, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to study the solution structures of calmodulin complexed with synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 342-366 and 301-326, designated PhK5 and PhK13, respectively, in the regulatory domain of the catalytic subunit of skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase. The scattering data show that binding of PhK5 to calmodulin induces a dramatic contraction of calmodulin, similar to that previously observed when calmodulin is complexed with the calmodulin-binding domain peptide from rabbit skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase. In contrast, calmodulin remains extended upon binding PhK13. In the presence of both peptides, calmodulin also remains extended. Apparently, the presence of PhK13 inhibits calmodulin from undergoing the PhK5-induced contraction. These data indicate that there is a fundamentally different type of calmodulin-target enzyme interaction in the case of the catalytic subunit of phosphorylase kinase compared with that for myosin light chain kinase

  10. Humidity control as a strategy for lattice optimization applied to crystals of HLA-A*1101 complexed with variant peptides from dengue virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B.; Tarry, Michael J.; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Siebold, Christian; Koch, Michael; Stuart, David I.; Harlos, Karl; Malasit, Prida; Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Jones, E. Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of an MHC class I molecule bound to naturally occurring peptide variants from the dengue virus NS3 protein contained high levels of solvent and required optimization of cryoprotectant and dehydration protocols for each complex to yield well ordered diffraction, a process facilitated by the use of a free-mounting system. T-cell recognition of the antigenic peptides presented by MHC class I molecules normally triggers protective immune responses, but can result in immune enhancement of disease. Cross-reactive T-cell responses may underlie immunopathology in dengue haemorrhagic fever. To analyze these effects at the molecular level, the functional MHC class I molecule HLA-A*1101 was crystallized bound to six naturally occurring peptide variants from the dengue virus NS3 protein. The crystals contained high levels of solvent and required optimization of the cryoprotectant and dehydration protocols for each complex to yield well ordered diffraction, a process that was facilitated by the use of a free-mounting system

  11. 3D analysis of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation in monkeys vaccinated with the first peptide inducing sterilizing immunity against human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A Patarroyo

    Full Text Available T-cell receptor gene rearrangements were studied in Aotus monkeys developing high antibody titers and sterilizing immunity against the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite upon vaccination with the modified synthetic peptide 24112, which was identified in the Merozoite Surface Protein 2 (MSP-2 and is known to bind to HLA-DRbeta1*0403 molecules with high capacity. Spectratyping analysis showed a preferential usage of Vbeta12 and Vbeta6 TCR gene families in 67% of HLA-DRbeta1*0403-like genotyped monkeys. Docking of peptide 24112 into the HLA-DRbeta1*0401-HA peptide-HA1.7TCR complex containing the VDJ rearrangements identified in fully protected monkeys showed a different structural signature compared to nonprotected monkeys. These striking results show the exquisite specificity of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation needed for inducing sterilizing immunity and provide important hints for a logical and rational methodology to develop multiepitopic, minimal subunit-based synthetic vaccines against infectious diseases, among them malaria.

  12. Humidity control as a strategy for lattice optimization applied to crystals of HLA-A*1101 complexed with variant peptides from dengue virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong [Department of Immunology, Division of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B.; Tarry, Michael J. [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility (OPPF), The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa [Department of Immunology, Division of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Siebold, Christian; Koch, Michael; Stuart, David I.; Harlos, Karl [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility (OPPF), The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Malasit, Prida [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani, Bangkok (Thailand); Screaton, Gavin [Department of Immunology, Division of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip, E-mail: j.mongkolsapaya@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Immunology, Division of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University (Thailand); Jones, E. Yvonne, E-mail: j.mongkolsapaya@imperial.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility (OPPF), The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Department of Immunology, Division of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-01

    Crystals of an MHC class I molecule bound to naturally occurring peptide variants from the dengue virus NS3 protein contained high levels of solvent and required optimization of cryoprotectant and dehydration protocols for each complex to yield well ordered diffraction, a process facilitated by the use of a free-mounting system. T-cell recognition of the antigenic peptides presented by MHC class I molecules normally triggers protective immune responses, but can result in immune enhancement of disease. Cross-reactive T-cell responses may underlie immunopathology in dengue haemorrhagic fever. To analyze these effects at the molecular level, the functional MHC class I molecule HLA-A*1101 was crystallized bound to six naturally occurring peptide variants from the dengue virus NS3 protein. The crystals contained high levels of solvent and required optimization of the cryoprotectant and dehydration protocols for each complex to yield well ordered diffraction, a process that was facilitated by the use of a free-mounting system.

  13. Mechanism of action and in vitro activity of short hybrid antimicrobial peptide PV3 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memariani, Hamed; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Memariani, Mojtaba; Karbalaeimahdi, Ali; Bagheri, Kamran Pooshang

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are attractive candidates for developing novel therapeutic agents, since they are lethal to a broad spectrum of pathogens and have a unique low tendency for resistance development. In this study, mechanism of action and in vitro anti-pseudomonal activity of previously designed short hybrid antimicrobial peptide PV3 were investigated. Compared to ceftazidime, PV3 had not only higher antibacterial activity but also faster bactericidal activity. PV3 reduced biofilm biomass and viability of biofilm embedded bacteria in a concentration-dependent manner. Although the antimicrobial activity of PV3 was reduced in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) containing human serum, it was still active enough to eradication of bacteria at low concentrations. Compared with standard condition (MHB only), there was no significant decrease in antibacterial activity of PV3 against P. aeruginosa strains under 150 mM NaCl (p = 0.615) and 1 mM MgCl 2 (p = 0.3466). Fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy further indicated that PV3 killed bacteria by disrupting the cell membrane. Since PV3 has potent anti-pseudomonal activity and has little cytotoxicity in vitro, it seems plausible that the peptide should be further investigated with animal studies to support future pharmacological formulations and potential topical applications. - Highlights: • PV3 killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa by membrane-disrupting mechanism. • PV3 reduced biofilm biomass and viability of biofilm embedded bacteria in a concentration-dependent manner. • Short hybrid antimicrobial peptide PV3 exhibited higher and faster bactericidal activity comparing to ceftazidime.

  14. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPNP-A) has been assigned a role in abiotic and biotic stress responses, and the recombinant protein has been demonstrated to elicit cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent stomatal guard cell opening, regulate ion movements, and induce osmoticum-dependent water uptake. Although the importance of the hormone in maintaining ion and fluid homeostasis has been established, key components of the AtPNP-A-dependent signal transduction pathway remain unknown. Since identification of the binding partners of AtPNP-A, including its receptor(s), is fundamental to understanding the mode of its action at the molecular level, comprehensive protein-protein interaction studies, involving yeast two-hybrid screening, affinity-based assays, protein cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric (MS) analyses have been performed. Several candidate binding partners of AtPNP-A identified with at least two independent methods were subsequently expressed as recombinant proteins, purified, and the specificity of their interactions with the recombinant AtPNP-A was verified using surface plasmon resonance. Several specific binary interactants of AtPNP-A were subjected to functional assays aimed at unraveling the consequences of the interactions in planta. These experiments have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are novel secondary messengers involved in the transduction of AtPNP-A signal in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana (Col-0). Further insight into the AtPNP-A dependent signalling events occurring in suspension-cultured cells in ROS-dependent or ROS-independent manner have been obtained from the large-scale proteomics study employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labelling followed by MS analysis to

  15. Structural changes of the ligand and of the receptor alters the receptor preference for neutrophil activating peptides starting with a 3 formylmethionyl group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsman, Huamei; Winther, Malene; Gabl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus strains produce N-formylmethionyl containing peptides, of which the tetrapeptide fMIFL is a potent activator of the neutrophil formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and the PSMα2 peptide is a potent activator of the closely related FPR2. Variants derived from these two...... peptide activators were used to disclose the structural determinants for receptor interaction. Removal of five amino acids from the C-terminus of PSMα2 gave rise to a peptide that had lost the receptor-independent neutrophil permeabilizing effect, whereas neutrophil activation capacity as well as its...... preference for FPR2 was retained. Shorter peptides, PSMα21–10 and PSMα21–5, activate neutrophils, but the receptor preference for these peptides was switched to FPR1. The fMIFL-PSM5–16 peptide, in which the N-terminus of PSMα21–16 was replaced by the sequence fMIFL, was a dual agonist for FPR1/FPR2, whereas...

  16. Identification of a preferred substrate peptide for transglutaminase 3 and detection of in situ activity in skin and hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Asaka; Fukui, Mina; Sugimura, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Miho; Alea, Mileidys Perez; Thomas, Vincent; El Alaoui, Said; Akiyama, Masashi; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2010-09-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) are a family of enzymes that catalyze cross-linking reactions between proteins. During epidermal differentiation, these enzymatic reactions are essential for formation of the cornified envelope, which consists of cross-linked structural proteins. Two main transglutaminases isoforms, epidermal-type (TGase 3) and keratinocyte-type (TGase 1), are cooperatively involved in this process of differentiating keratinocytes. Information regarding their substrate preference is of great importance to determine the functional role of these isozymes and clarify their possible co-operative action. Thus far, we have identified highly reactive peptide sequences specifically recognized by TGases isozymes such as TGase 1, TGase 2 (tissue-type isozyme) and the blood coagulation isozyme, Factor XIII. In this study, several substrate peptide sequences for human TGase 3 were screened from a phage-displayed peptide library. The preferred substrate sequences for TGase 3 were selected and evaluated as fusion proteins with mutated glutathione S-transferase. From these studies, a highly reactive and isozyme-specific sequence (E51) was identified. Furthermore, this sequence was found to be a prominent substrate in the peptide form and was suitable for detection of in situ TGase 3 activity in the mouse epidermis. TGase 3 enzymatic activity was detected in the layers of differentiating keratinocytes and hair follicles with patterns distinct from those of TGase 1. Our findings provide new information on the specific distribution of TGase 3 and constitute a useful tool to clarify its functional role in the epidermis.

  17. Developing a capillary electrophoresis based method for dynamically monitoring enzyme cleavage activity using quantum dots-peptide assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhao; Fan, Jie; Liu, Li; Ding, Shumin; Liu, Xiaoqian; Wang, Jianpeng; Gao, Liqian; Chattopadhaya, Souvik; Miao, Peng; Xia, Jiang; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2017-10-01

    Herein, a novel assay has been developed for monitoring PreScission protease (His-PSP) mediated enzyme cleavage of ATTO 590 labeled peptide substrate (ATTO-LEV). This novel method is based on combining the use of capillary electrophoresis and fluorescence detection (CE-FL) to dynamically monitor the enzyme cleavage activity. A multivalent peptide substrate was first constructed by immobilizing His-tagged ATTO 590 labeled peptide substrate (ATTO-LEVH6) onto the surface of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). Once successfully immobilized, the novel multivalent peptide substrate resulted in the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from QDs to ATTO 590. The ATTO-LEVH6-QD assembly was then incubated with His-PSP to study the proteolytic cleavage of surface bound ATTO-LEVH6 by CE-FL. Our data suggests that PreScission-mediated proteolytic cleavage is enzyme concentration- and incubation time-dependent. By combining capillary electrophoresis, QDs and FRET, our study herein not only provides a new method for the detection and dynamically monitoring of PSP enzyme cleavage activity, but also can be extended to the detection of many other enzymes and proteases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Label-Free Fluorescent Detection of Trypsin Activity Based on DNA-Stabilized Silver Nanocluster-Peptide Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Xia Zhuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypsin is important during the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. The detection of trypsin activity is currently limited because of the need for the substrate to be labeled with a fluorescent tag. A label-free fluorescent method has been developed to monitor trypsin activity. The designed peptide probe consists of six arginine molecules and a cysteine terminus and can be conjugated to DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs by Ag-S bonding to enhance fluorescence. The peptide probe can also be adsorbed to the surface of graphene oxide (GO, thus resulting in the fluorescence quenching of DNA-AgNCs-peptide conjugate because of Förster resonance energy transfer. Once trypsin had degraded the peptide probe into amino acid residues, the DNA-AgNCs were released from the surface of GO, and the enhanced fluorescence of DNA-AgNCs was restored. Trypsin can be determined with a linear range of 0.0–50.0 ng/mL with a concentration as low as 1 ng/mL. This label-free method is simple and sensitive and has been successfully used for the determination of trypsin in serum. The method can also be modified to detect other proteases.

  19. The NALP3 inflammasome is involved in neurotoxic prion peptide-induced microglial activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Fushan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal disease-associated prion protein, PrPSc. In prion-infected brains, activated microglia are often present in the vicinity of PrPSc aggregates, and microglial activation is thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Although interleukin (IL-1β release by prion-induced microglia has been widely reported, the mechanism by which primed microglia become activated and secrete IL-1β in prion diseases has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NALP3 inflammasome in IL-1β release from lipopolysaccharide (LPS-primed microglia after exposure to a synthetic neurotoxic prion fragment (PrP106-126. Methods The inflammasome components NALP3 and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC were knocked down by gene silencing. IL-1β production was assessed using ELISA. The mRNA expression of NALP3, ASC, and pro-inflammatory factors was measured by quantitative PCR. Western blot analysis was used to detect the protein level of NALP3, ASC, caspase-1 and nuclear factor-κB. Results We found that that PrP106-126-induced IL-1β release depends on NALP3 inflammasome activation, that inflammasome activation is required for the synthesis of pro-inflammatory and chemotactic factors by PrP106-126-activated microglia, that inhibition of NF-κB activation abrogated PrP106-126-induced NALP3 upregulation, and that potassium efflux and production of reactive oxygen species were implicated in PrP106-126-induced NALP3 inflammasome activation in microglia. Conclusions We conclude that the NALP3 inflammasome is involved in neurotoxic prion peptide-induced microglial activation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that strong evidence for the involvement of NALP3 inflammasome in prion-associated inflammation has been found.

  20. B7H6-derived peptides trigger TNF-α-dependent immunostimulatory activity of lymphocytic NK92-MI cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mariana; Romeo, Francesca; Bitsaktsis, Constantine; Sabatino, David

    2016-09-01

    The rise of biologics that can stimulate immune responses towards the eradication of tumors has led to the evolution of cancer-based immunotherapy. Representatively, B7H6 has been recently identified as a protein ligand on tumor cells that binds specifically to the NKp30 receptor and triggers NK cell-derived cytokine production, which ultimately leads to tumor cell lysis and death. In an effort to develop effective immunotherapy approaches, the rational design of a novel class of immunostimulatory peptides (IPs) derived from the binding interface of B7H6:NKp30 is described in this study. The IPs comprised the B7H6 active site sequence for NKp30 binding and immunostimulatory activity. An aminohexanoic acid linker was also introduced at the N-terminus of the peptides for FITC-labeling by Fmoc-solid phase peptide synthesis. The peptides were characterized by LCMS to confirm identities and purities >95%. The secondary structures of the peptides were examined by CD spectroscopy in H2 O, PBS and a H2 O:TFE mixture which demonstrated versatile peptide structures which transitioned from random coil (H2 O) to α-helical (PBS) and turn-type (H2 O:TFE) conformations. Their biological properties were then evaluated by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and cell death assays. The occupancy of the synthetic peptides to a human NK cell line demonstrated comparable binding relative to the natural NKp30 ligand, B7H6, and the human anti-NKp30 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in a concentration dependent manner. A competitive binding assay between the human anti-NKp30 mAb or B7H6, and the synthetic peptides, demonstrated partial displacement of the ligands upon anti-NKp30 mAb treatment, suggesting NKp30 receptor specificities by the synthetic peptides. Moreover, the immunostimulatory activity of B7H6 was demonstrated by the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the human NK cell line. The

  1. Nanoparticle Delivered Human Biliverdin Reductase-Based Peptide Increases Glucose Uptake by Activating IRK/Akt/GSK3 Axis: The Peptide Is Effective in the Cell and Wild-Type and Diabetic Ob/Ob Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. M. Gibbs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin’s stimulation of glucose uptake by binding to the IRK extracellular domain is compromised in diabetes. We have recently described an unprecedented approach to stimulating glucose uptake. KYCCSRK (P2 peptide, corresponding to the C-terminal segment of hBVR, was effective in binding to and inducing conformational change in the IRK intracellular kinase domain. Although myristoylated P2, made of L-amino acids, was effective in cell culture, its use for animal studies was unsuitable. We developed a peptidase-resistant formulation of the peptide that was efficient in both mice and cell culture systems. The peptide was constructed of D-amino acids, in reverse order, and blocked at both termini. Delivery of the encapsulated peptide to HepG2 and HSKM cells was confirmed by its prolonged effect on stimulation of glucose uptake (>6 h. The peptide improved glucose clearance in both wild-type and Ob/Ob mice; it lowered blood glucose levels and suppressed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. IRK activity was stimulated in the liver of treated mice and in cultured cells. The peptide potentiated function of IRK’s downstream effector, Akt-GSK3-(α,β axis. Thus, P2-based approach can be used for improving glucose uptake by cells. Also, it allows for screening peptides in vitro and in animal models for treatment of diabetes.

  2. Inhibitory mechanism of peptides and antibodies targeting murine urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    drugs, a detailed mechanistic understanding must be obtained. One peptide and two antibodies were studied in this thesis. First, an engineered cyclic peptide, mupain-1-16 with an unnatural amino acid in the P1 position and the sequence CPAYS[L-3-(N-Amidino-4-piperidyl)alanine]YLDC was investigated...... different conformational and inhibitory mechanisms both in vivo and in vitro. Their similar epitopes, but different functions revealed two different allosteric regulation mechanisms for antibodies binding to serine proteases. Both the peptidic inhibitors and the allosteric mechanisms of uPA are believed...

  3. Reconstitution of a physical complex between the N-formyl chemotactic peptide receptor and G protein. Inhibition by pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP ribosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommakanti, R K; Bokoch, G M; Tolley, J O; Schreiber, R E; Siemsen, D W; Klotz, K N; Jesaitis, A J

    1992-04-15

    Photoaffinity-labeled N-formyl chemotactic peptide receptors from human neutrophils solubilized in octyl glucoside exhibit two forms upon sucrose density gradient sedimentation, with apparent sedimentation coefficients of approximately 4 and 7 S. The 7 S form can be converted to the 4 S form by guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) with an EC50 of approximately 20 nM, suggesting that the 7 S form may represent a physical complex of the receptor with endogenous G protein (Jesaitis, A. J., Tolley, J. O., Bokoch, G. M., and Allen, R. A. (1989) J. Cell Biol. 109, 2783-2790). To probe the nature of the 7 S form, we reconstituted the 7 S form from the 4 S form by adding purified G protein. The 4 S form, obtained by solubilizing GTP gamma S-treated neutrophil plasma membranes, was incubated with purified (greater than 95%) Gi protein from bovine brain (containing both Gi alpha 1 and Gi alpha 2) or with neutrophil G protein (Gn), and formation of the 7 S complex was analyzed on sucrose density gradients. The EC50 of 7 S complex formation induced by the two G proteins was 70 +/- 25 and 170 +/- 40 nM for Gn and Gi, respectively. No complexation was measurable when bovine transducin (Gt) was used up to 30 times the EC50 for Gn. The EC50 for Gi was the same for receptors, obtained from formyl peptide-stimulated or unstimulated cells. The addition of 10 microM GTP gamma S to the reconstituted 7 S complex caused a complete revision of the receptor to the 4 S form, and anti-Gi peptide antisera immunosedimented the 7 S form. ADP-ribosylation of Gi prevented formation of the 7 S form even at 20 times the concentration of unribosylated Gi normally used to attain 50% conversion to the 7 S form. These observations suggest that the 7 S species is a physical complex containing N-formyl chemotactic peptide receptor and G protein.

  4. Evaluation of single amino acid chelate derivatives and regioselective radiolabelling of a cyclic peptide for the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Andrea F.; Lemon, Jennifer A. [McMaster Institute for Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Czorny, Shannon K. [McMaster Institute for Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, ON, L8V 5C2 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, ON, L8V 5C2 (Canada); Valliant, John F. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada)], E-mail: valliant@mcmaster.ca

    2009-11-15

    Introduction: The aim of this work was to investigate the relative radiolabelling kinetics and affinity of a series of ligands for the [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} core, both in the absence and in the presence of competing donors. This information was used to select a suitable ligand for radiolabelling complex peptide-based targeting vectors in high yield under mild conditions. Methods: A series of {alpha}-N-Fmoc-protected lysine derivatives bearing two heterocyclic donor groups at the {epsilon}-amine (, 2-pyridyl; , quinolyl; , 6-methoxy-2-pyridyl; 1d, 2-thiazolyl; 1e, N-methylimidazolyl; , 3-pyridyl) were synthesized and labelled with {sup 99m}Tc. A resin-capture purification strategy for the separation of residual ligand from the radiolabelled product was also developed. The binding affinities of targeted peptides 4, 5a and 5b for uPAR were determined using flow cytometry. Results: Variable temperature radiolabelling reactions using - and [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} revealed optimal kinetics and good selectivity for compounds and 1d; in the case of , 1d, and 1e, the labelling can be conducted at ambient temperature. The utility of this class of ligands was further demonstrated by the radiolabelling of a cyclic peptide that is known to target the serine protease receptor uPAR; essentially quantitative incorporation of {sup 99m}Tc occurred exclusively at the SAAC site, despite the presence of a His residue, and without disruption of the disulfide bond. Conclusion: A series of single amino acid chelate (SAAC) ligands have been evaluated for their ability to incorporate {sup 99m}Tc into peptides. The lead agent to emerge from this work is the thiazole SAAC derivative 1d which has demonstrated the ability to regioselectively label the widest range of peptides.

  5. Superoxide scavenging activity of pirfenidone-iron complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitani, Yoshihiro; Sato, Keizo; Muramoto, Yosuke; Karakawa, Tomohiro; Kitamado, Masataka; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Nabeshima, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Sasamoto, Kazumi

    2008-01-01

    Pirfenidone (PFD) is focused on a new anti-fibrotic drug, which can minimize lung fibrosis etc. We evaluated the superoxide (O 2 ·- ) scavenging activities of PFD and the PFD-iron complex by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay, and cytochrome c reduction assay. Firstly, we confirmed that the PFD-iron complex was formed by mixing iron chloride with threefold molar PFD, and the complex was stable in distillated water and ethanol. Secondary, the PFD-iron complex reduced the amount of O 2 ·- produced by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine without inhibiting the enzyme activity. Thirdly, it also reduced the amount of O 2 ·- released from phorbor ester-stimulated human neutrophils. PFD alone showed few such effects. These results suggest the possibility that the O 2 ·- scavenging effect of the PFD-iron complex contributes to the anti-fibrotic action of PFD used for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

  6. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how activity theory can be used in (cross-)cultural medical education research. We discuss activity theory's theoretical background and principles, and we show how these can be applied to the cultural research practice by discussing the steps involved in a cross-cultural study that we conducted, from formulating research questions to drawing conclusions. We describe how the activity system, the unit of analysis in activity theory, can serve as an organizing principle to grasp cultural complexity. We end with reflections on the theoretical and practical use of activity theory for cultural research and note that it is not a shortcut to capture cultural complexity: it is a challenge for researchers to determine the boundaries of their study and to analyze and interpret the dynamics of the activity system.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  8. A single mutation in the hepta-peptide active site of Aspergillus niger PhyA phytase leads to myriad of biochemical changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The active site motif of proteins belonging to ‘Histidine Acid Phosphatase’ (HAP) contains a hepta-peptide region, RHGXRXP. A close comparison among fungal and yeast HAPs has revealed the fourth residue of the hepta-peptide to be E instead of A, which is the case with A. niger phyA phytase. However,...

  9. Antimicrobial activity of analogues of a peptide isolated from venom glands of social wasps Polistes major major inhabiting the Dominican Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Rudolf; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Šafařík, Martin; Borovičková, Lenka; Fučík, Vladimír; Čeřovský, Václav; Slaninová, Jiřina

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 8 (2008), s. 99-99 ISSN 1075-2617. [European Peptide Symposium /30./. 31.08.2008-05.09.2008, Helsinki] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : peptides from venom glands * Polistes major * synthesis and antimicrobial activity * analogues Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  10. The antibacterial activity of peptides derived from human beta-2 glycoprotein I is inhibited by protein H and M1 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, Maria; Wasylik, Sylwia; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Derksen, Ronald H. W. M.; de Groot, Philip G.; Herwald, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    During the last years, the importance of antibacterial peptides has attracted considerable attention. We report here that peptides derived from the fifth domain of beta-2 glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI), a human heparin binding plasma protein, have antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and

  11. Designing and Producing Modified, New-to-Nature Peptides with Antimicrobial Activity by Use of a Combination of Various Lantibiotic Modification Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heel, Auke J.; Mu, Dongdong; Montalban-Lopez, Manuel; Hendriks, Djoke; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    Lanthipeptides are peptides that contain several post-translationally modified amino acid residues and commonly show considerable antimicrobial activity. After translation, the amino acid residues of these peptides are modified by a distinct set of modification enzymes. This process results in

  12. Alanine scan of the peptide antibiotic feglymycin: assessment of amino acid side chains contributing to antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänchen, Anne; Rausch, Saskia; Landmann, Benjamin; Toti, Luigi; Nusser, Antje; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2013-03-18

    The antibiotic feglymycin is a linear 13-mer peptide synthesized by the bacterium Streptomyces sp. DSM 11171. It mainly consists of the nonproteinogenic amino acids 4-hydroxyphenylglycine and 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. An alanine scan of feglymycin was performed by solution-phase peptide synthesis in order to assess the significance of individual amino acid side chains for biological activity. Hence, 13 peptides were synthesized from di- and tripeptide building blocks, and subsequently tested for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strains. Furthermore we tested the inhibition of peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzymes MurA and MurC, which are inhibited by feglymycin. Whereas the antibacterial activity is significantly based on the three amino acids D-Hpg1, L-Hpg5, and L-Phe12, the inhibitory activity against MurA and MurC depends mainly on L-Asp13. The difference in the position dependence for antibacterial activity and enzyme inhibition suggests multiple molecular targets in the modes of action of feglymycin. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Expression, purification, and activity assay of peptide deformylase from Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xuchun; Hu, Jinwei; Wang, Lijuan; Zhu, Zhifeng; Xu, Qiong; Lv, Junqiang; Fu, Zheng; Sun, Yajun; Sun, Jia; Lin, Gang; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2011-11-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is considered an attractive target for screening novel antibiotics. The PDF from Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are representative of the gram-negative species type of PDF (type I PDF) and the gram-positive species type of PDF (type II PDF), respectively. They could be used for screening broad-spectrum antibiotics. Herein, we cloned the def gene by PCR, inserted it into plasmid pET-22b-def, and transformed the plasmid into E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells, then the cells were induced by IPTG to express PDF. E. coli Ni(2+)-PDF was extracted and purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. S. aureus PDFs were extracted and purified using the MagExtractor kit. The nickel form of S. aureus PDF was obtained by adding NiCl(2) to all reagents used for purification. Iron-enriched S. aureus PDF was obtained by adding FeCl(3) to the growth medium for E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells and adding FeCl(3) and catalase to all reagents used for purification. The activities of PDFs were analyzed, compared, and grouped according to the experimental conditions that produced optimal activity, and we used actinonin as an inhibitor of PDF and calculated the IC(50) value. We obtained high expression of E. coli and S. aureus PDF with high activity and stability. The function of PDFs was inhibited by actinonin in a dose-dependent manner. Results may be helpful for future mechanistic investigations of PDF as well as high-throughput screening for other PDF inhibitors.

  14. High Level Expression and Purification of the Clinically Active Antimicrobial Peptide P-113 in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Ting Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available P-113, which was originally derived from the human saliva protein histatin 5, is a histidine-rich antimicrobial peptide with the sequence AKRHHGYKRKFH. P-113 is currently undergoing phase II clinical trial as a pharmaceutical agent to fight against fungal infections in HIV patients with oral candidiasis. Previously, we developed a new procedure for the high-yield expression and purification of hG31P, an analogue and antagonist of human CXCL8. Moreover, we have successfully removed lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin associated with hG31P in the expression with Escherichia coli. In this paper, we have used hG31P as a novel fusion protein for the expression and purification of P-113. The purity of the expressed P-113 is more than 95% and the yield is 4 mg P-113 per liter of E. coli cell culture in Luria-Bertani (LB medium. The antimicrobial activity of the purified P-113 was tested. Furthermore, we used circular dichroism (CD and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy to study the structural properties of P-113. Our results indicate that using hG31P as a fusion protein to obtain large quantities of P-113 is feasible and is easy to scale up for commercial production. An effective way of producing enough P-113 for future clinical studies is evident in this study.

  15. [Advances of tumor targeting peptides drug delivery system with pH-sensitive activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yin-yun; Li, Li; Huang, Hai-feng; Gou, San-hu; Ni, Jing-man

    2016-05-01

    The pH-sensitive peptides drug delivery systems, which target to acidic extracellular environment of tumor tissue, have many advantages in drug delivery. They exhibit a high specificity to tumor and low cytotoxicity, which significantly increase the efficacy of traditional anti-cancer drugs. In recent years the systems have received a great attention. The pH-sensitive peptides drug delivery systems can be divided into five types according to the difference in pH-responsive mechanism,type of peptides and carrier materials. This paper summarizes the recent progresses in the field with a focus on the five types of pH-sensitive peptides in drug delivery systems. This may provide a guideline to design and application of tumor targeting drugs.

  16. The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    how these water-soluble proteins bind, oligomerize and eventually disrupt target .... Creek, CA, USA), using UV detection at 220 nm. The identity of the peptides ... leakage of dye was negligible under these conditions. Maximum release was ...

  17. Simulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Structure and Peptide Loading into an MHC Binding Pocket with Teachers’Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Sankian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular understanding of three-dimensional (3D peptide: MHC models require both basic knowledge of computational modeling and skilled visual perception, which are not possessed by all students. The present model aims to simulate MHC molecular structure with the hands and make a profound impression on the students.

  18. Crystal structures of two peptide-HLA-B*1501 complexes; structural characterization of the HLA-B62 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roder, G; Blicher, Thomas; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl

    2006-01-01

    MHC class I molecules govern human cytotoxic T cell responses. Their specificity determines which peptides they sample from the intracellular protein environment and then present to human cytotoxic T cells. More than 1100 different MHC class I proteins have been found in human populations...

  19. Receptor Activity-modifying Protein-directed G Protein Signaling Specificity for the Calcitonin Gene-related Peptide Family of Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Cathryn; Winfield, Ian; Harris, Matthew; Hodgson, Rose; Shah, Archna; Dowell, Simon J; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Woodlock, David A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R; Watkins, Harriet A; Ladds, Graham

    2016-10-14

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is formed through the association of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). Binding of one of the three peptide ligands, CGRP, adrenomedullin (AM), and intermedin/adrenomedullin 2 (AM2), is well known to result in a Gα s -mediated increase in cAMP. Here we used modified yeast strains that couple receptor activation to cell growth, via chimeric yeast/Gα subunits, and HEK-293 cells to characterize the effect of different RAMP and ligand combinations on this pathway. We not only demonstrate functional couplings to both Gα s and Gα q but also identify a Gα i component to CLR signaling in both yeast and HEK-293 cells, which is absent in HEK-293S cells. We show that the CGRP family of receptors displays both ligand- and RAMP-dependen