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Sample records for penetrating chest trauma

  1. Penetrating cardiac injuries in blunt chest wall trauma.

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    Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Sirohi, Parmendra

    2012-08-01

    The present photocase illustrates the possible mechanism of direct cardiac injuries from broken sharp jagged fractured ends of ribs in blunt force trauma to the chest in run over traffic mishaps. We propose that the projecting fractured ends of the ribs penetrate the underlying thoracic organs due to the transient phenomenon of deformation of chest cavity under pressure in run over traffic mishaps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. Impacted thoracic foreign bodies after penetrating chest trauma.

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    Sersar, Sameh I; Albohiri, Khalid A; Abdelmohty, Hysam

    2016-10-01

    Retained foreign bodies in the chest may include shell fragments, bullets, shrapnel, pieces of clothing, bones, and rib fragments. The risks of removal of foreign bodies must be weighed against the complications of leaving them inside the chest. We treated 90 cases of retained intrathoracic foreign bodies in patients admitted to 3 tertiary centers in Saudi Arabia between March 2015 and March 2016. Sixty patients were injured by shrapnel, 26 had one or more bullets, 3 had broken rib fragments, and one had a metal screw. The chest wall was site of impaction in 48 cases, the lungs in 24, pleura in 14, and mediastinum in 4. Removal of the retained foreign body was carried out in 12 patients only: bullets in 9 cases, bone fragments in 2, and a metal screw in one. The predictors for removal were bullets, female sex, and mediastinal position with bilateral chest injury, especially with fracture ribs. Retained intrathoracic foreign bodies due to penetrating chest trauma are treated mainly conservatively unless there is another indication for chest exploration. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Urgent thoracotomy for penetrating chest trauma: analysis of 158 patients of a single center.

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    Onat, Serdar; Ulku, Refik; Avci, Alper; Ates, Gungor; Ozcelik, Cemal

    2011-09-01

    Penetrating injuries to the chest present a frequent and challenging problem, but the majority of these injuries can be managed non-\\operatively. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of penetrating chest trauma and the ultimate techniques used for operative management, as well as the diagnosis, complications, morbidity and mortality. A retrospective 9-year review of patients who underwent an operative procedure following penetrating chest trauma was performed. The mechanism of injury, gender, age, physiological and outcome parameters, including injury severity score (ISS), chest abbreviated injury scale (AIS) score, lung injury scale score, concomitant injuries, time from admission to operating room, transfusion requirement, indications for thoracotomy, intra-operative findings, operative procedures, length of hospital stay (LOS) and rate of mortality were recorded. A total of 1123 patients who were admitted with penetrating thoracic trauma were investigated. Of these, 158 patients (93 stabbings, 65 gunshots) underwent a thoracotomy within 24 h after the penetrating trauma. There were 146 (92.4%) male and 12 (7.6%) female patients, and their mean age was 25.72 9.33 (range, 15–54) years. The mean LOS was 10.65 8.30 (range, 5–65) days. Patients admitted after a gunshot had a significantly longer LOS than those admitted with a stab wound (gunshot, 13.53 9.92 days; stab wound, 8.76 6.42 days, p chest AIS score (p chest requiring a thoracotomy are uncommon, and lung-sparing techniques have become the most frequently used procedures for lung injuries. The presence of associated abdominal injuries increased the mortality five-fold. Factors that affected mortality were ISS, chest AIS score, SBP, ongoing chest output, blood transfusion volume, diaphragmatic injury and associated abdominal injury.

  4. Tube thorocostomy: management and outcome in patients with penetrating chest trauma.

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    Muslim, Muhammad; Bilal, Amer; Salim, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Abid; Baseer, Abdul; Ahmed, Manzoor

    2008-01-01

    Penetrating chest trauma is common in this part of the world due to present situation in tribal areas. The first line of management after resuscitation in these patients is tube thoracostomy combined with analgesia and incentive spirometry. After tube thoracostomy following surgery or trauma there are two schools of thought one favours application of continuous low pressure suction to the chest tubes beyond the water seal while other are against it. We studied the application of continuous low pressure suction in patients with penetrating chest trauma. This Randomized clinical controlled trial was conducted in the department of thoracic surgery Post Graduate Medical Institute Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar from July 2007 to March 2008. The objectives of study were to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous low pressure suction in patients with penetrating chest trauma for evacuation of blood, expansion of lung and prevention of clotted Haemothorax. One hundred patients who underwent tube thoracostomy after penetrating chest trauma from fire arm injury or stab wounds were included in the study. Patients with multiple trauma, blunt chest trauma and those intubated for any pulmonary or pleural disease were excluded from the study. After resuscitation, detailed examination and necessary investigations patients were randomized to two groups. Group I included patients who had continuous low pressure suction applied to their chest drains. Group II included those patients whose chest drains were placed on water seal only. Lung expansion development of pneumothorax or clotted Haemothorax, time to removal of chest drain and hospital stay was noted in each group. There were fifty patients in each group. The two groups were not significantly different from each other regarding age, sex, pre-intubation haemoglobin and pre intubation nutritional status. Full lung expansion was achieved in forty six (92%) patients in group I and thirty seven (74%) in group II. Partial lung

  5. Outcome of penetrating chest injuries in an urban level I trauma center in the Netherlands.

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    Heus, C; Mellema, J J; Giannakopoulos, G F; Zuidema, W P

    2015-04-25

    Most patients with penetrating chest injuries benefit from early treatment with chest tube drainage or surgery. Although penetrating chest injury is not uncommon, few descriptive studies are published, especially in Europe. The aim of this study was to review our experience and further improve our management of penetrating chest injuries in a level I trauma center in the Netherlands. All patients with penetrating chest injury between August 2004 and December 2012 were included. Demographics, mechanism of injury, physiological parameters, Injury Severity Scores (ISS), surgical and non-surgical treatment, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, length of hospital stay (LOS), complications and rate of mortality were collected. A total of 159 patients were analyzed. Patients included 116 (73 %) stab wounds and 34 (21 %) gunshot wounds. In 27 patients (17 %), cardiac injury was seen. The mean ISS was 12. Almost half of all patients (49 %) were treated with only chest tube drainage. Alternatively, surgical treatment was performed in 24 % of all cases. Anterolateral incision was most frequently used to gain access to the thoracic cavity. The mean LOS was 9 days. Among all patients, 17 % were admitted to the ICU with a mean stay of 3 days. In 18 (11 %) patients, one or more complications occurred. The 30-day mortality was 7.5 %. Patients presenting with penetrating chest injury are not uncommon in the Netherlands and can mostly be treated conservatively. In one-fourth of the patients, surgical treatment is performed. A structural and vigorous approach is needed for good clinical outcome.

  6. Complications following blunt and penetrating injuries in 216 victims of chest trauma requiring tube thoracostomy.

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    Helling, T S; Gyles, N R; Eisenstein, C L; Soracco, C A

    1989-10-01

    Tube thoracostomy (TT) is required in the treatment of many blunt and penetrating injuries of the chest. In addition to complications from the injuries, TT may contribute to morbidity by introducing microorganisms into the pleural space or by incomplete lung expansion and evacuation of pleural blood. We have attempted to assess the impact of TT following penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma by examining a consecutive series of 216 patients seen at two urban trauma centers with such injuries who required TT over a 30-month period. Ninety-four patients suffered blunt chest trauma; 122 patients were victims of penetrating wounds. Patients with blunt injuries had longer ventilator requirements (12.6 +/- 14 days vs. 3.7 +/- 7.1 days, p = 0.003), longer intensive care stays (12.2 +/- 12.5 days vs. 4.1 +/- 7.5 days, p = 0.001), and longer periods of TT, (6.5 +/- 4.9 days vs. 5.2 +/- 4.5 days, p = 0.018). Empyema occurred in six patients (3%). Residual hemothorax was found in 39 patients (18%), seven of whom required decortication. Recurrent pneumothorax developed in 51 patients (24%) and ten required repeat TT. Complications occurred in 78 patients (36%). Patients with blunt trauma experienced more complications (44%) than those with penetrating wounds (30%) (p = 0.04). However, only seven of 13 patients developing empyema or requiring decortication had blunt trauma. Despite longer requirements for mechanical ventilation, intensive care, and intubation, victims of blunt trauma seemed to have effective drainage of their pleural space by TT without increased risk of infectious complications.

  7. [Chest trauma].

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    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography in the Initial Evaluation of Patients with Penetrating Chest Trauma

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    Farhad Heydari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic chest injuries (TCI are one of the most common causes of referring to the emergency departments, with high mortality and disability. This study was designed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography versus chest X ray (CXR in detection of hemo-pneumothorax for patients suffering penetrating TCI. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in penetrating TCI victims referred to the emergency department of Shahid Kashani and Alzahra hospitals of Isfahan, Iran, from July 2012 to June 2013. Bedside ultrasonography and plain CXR was done on arrival and three hours after admission. The results of ultrasonography and radiography were separately evaluated by an emergency medicine specialist and a radiologist, who were blind to the aims of the study. Then, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, and kappa coefficient was considered to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonography. Results: In this research 64 patients with penetrating chest trauma were assessed (98.4% male. The mean age of them was 25.6±8.5 years (rang: 13-65. The plain radiography revealed the eight (12.5 % cases of pneumothorax and one (1.6% hemothorax. The findings of primary ultrasonography also showed the same number of hemo-pneumothorax. Sensitivity and specificity of primary ultrasound in diagnosis of pneumothorax were 100% (95% Cl: 60.7- 100 and 100.0% (95% Cl, 92.0% to 100.0% and in detection of hemothorax were 100% (95% Cl: 50.5-100 and 100% (95% Cl: 92.8-100, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in the third hour were 100% (95% Cl: 31.3-100 and 100% (95% Cl: 91.4-100, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of the present study have shown that ultrasonography has an acceptable diagnostic accuracy in the initial assessment of patients with penetrating chest trauma. However, because of its dependency on operator

  9. Measurement of hemothorax amount in patients with non-penetrating chest trauma by supine chest AP radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Heon; Yang, Joo Hyun; Na, Myung Hoon; Baik, Hee Jong

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the predictability of amount of hemothorax in the patients with blunt chest trauma, supine chest AP radiographs of 66 patients were reviewed and statistically analyzed. In 66 patients, rib fractures were present in 53 patients, hemothorax in 46 patients, pneumothorax in 25 patients, and pulmonary contusions in 18 patients. Width and length of hemothorax were measured on supine chest AP radiograph, and were correlated with known drained amount of hemothorax. The presence and number of rib fracture, pulmonary contusion, subcutaneous emphysema, fracture of scapula and clavicle, and total opacification of hemithorax were also correlated with the drained amount of hemothorax. In multiple logistic regression analysis, width of hemothorax had the highest correlation with drained amount of hemothorax(regression coeffcient 0.718, p value 0.00005). The presence and number of rib fracture, scapular fracture, subcutaneous emphysema were also correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. But length of hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, clavicular fracture, total opacification of hemithorax were not correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. Measured width of hemothorax in supine chest AP radiograph is the most reliable predictor for estimation of the amount of hemothorax, and may also be used as an indication for the application of closed thoracostomy in the treatment of hemothorax

  10. Measurement of hemothorax amount in patients with non-penetrating chest trauma by supine chest AP radiograph

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    Han, Heon; Yang, Joo Hyun; Na, Myung Hoon; Baik, Hee Jong [Chung-Ang Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate the predictability of amount of hemothorax in the patients with blunt chest trauma, supine chest AP radiographs of 66 patients were reviewed and statistically analyzed. In 66 patients, rib fractures were present in 53 patients, hemothorax in 46 patients, pneumothorax in 25 patients, and pulmonary contusions in 18 patients. Width and length of hemothorax were measured on supine chest AP radiograph, and were correlated with known drained amount of hemothorax. The presence and number of rib fracture, pulmonary contusion, subcutaneous emphysema, fracture of scapula and clavicle, and total opacification of hemithorax were also correlated with the drained amount of hemothorax. In multiple logistic regression analysis, width of hemothorax had the highest correlation with drained amount of hemothorax(regression coeffcient 0.718, p value 0.00005). The presence and number of rib fracture, scapular fracture, subcutaneous emphysema were also correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. But length of hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, clavicular fracture, total opacification of hemithorax were not correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. Measured width of hemothorax in supine chest AP radiograph is the most reliable predictor for estimation of the amount of hemothorax, and may also be used as an indication for the application of closed thoracostomy in the treatment of hemothorax.

  11. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  12. Blunt chest trauma.

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    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  13. Radiology in chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Kloehn, I.; Wolfart, W.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In chest trauma, a routine chest film, preferably in the lateral as well as the frontal projection, is the basic part of the work-up. Occasionally valuable additional methods are fluoroscopy, tomography, bronchography, contrast studies of the GI Tract and angiography and angiocardiography. In 679 chest trauma patients, traffic accidents and falls were the main reason for the trauma. There were 248 fractures; then - in order of frequency - hemopneumothorax (76), lung contusion (58), subcutaneous emphysema (33) cardiac (16) and vascular trauma (12) and damage to other organs. While 20-30% mistakes are made in diagnosing rib fractures in acute trauma, there is high accuracy in the diagnosis of the other injuries. Many cases are shown to demonstrate the value of diagnostic radiology. (orig.) [de

  14. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

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    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma.

  15. Computed tomography of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-01-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient. (orig.) [de

  16. Computed tomography of chest trauma

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    Dinkel, E.; Uhl, H.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wimmer, B.; Wenz, W.

    1987-09-01

    Chest CT scans were obtained in 86 patients suffering from serious blunt or penetrating chest trauma. The finding of mediastinal widening was by far the most common CT indication. CT proved to be a more sensitive method for detection of parenchymal lung lesions and occult pneumothorax than bedside radiographs. CT contributed substantially in differentiation of lung abscess and empyema, exclusion of mediastinal pathology and spinal injuries. Aortography is still indicated, even when CT findings are normal, if aortic laceration is clinically suspected. Despite all technical problems combined with CT examinations in the critically ill patient, we consider CT a valuable diagnostic tool for selected problems in the traumatized patient.

  17. Penetrating chest injury: A miraculous life salvage

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    Santosh B Dalavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An unusual penetrating chest injury was caused by high velocity road traffic accident. An 18-year-old had a four wheeler accident and was brought in emergency department with a ′bamboo′ stick on the left side chest exiting through back. After the stabilization of vital parameters, an inter-costal tube drainage was done on the left side. Except the minor brochopleural fistula which healed by 10 th day, his recovery was uneventful. The outcome was consistent with current aggressive management of penetrating chest injuries. Management of penetrating chest injury involving pulmonary trauma is based on three principles. One is stabilization of hemodynamics of patient with proper clinical evaluation. Second, a mere intercostal tube drainage sufficient for majority of the cases. Third, post-operative active as well as passive physiotherapy is necessary for speedy recovery.

  18. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    1987-01-01

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma. (orig.)

  19. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

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    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  20. Trauma of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the typical radiologic findings in chest trauma, and the value of conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and aortography is discussed. Conventional radiography rather than cross-sectional imaging is the mainstay in diagnosing thoracic trauma. During the critical phase with often concomitant shock, pelvic and spinal injuries tailored raiographic views or even upright chest radiographs are impractical. The severely traumatized patient is usually radiographed in the supine position and suboptimal roentgenograms may have to be accepted for several reasons. It is well documented that many abnormalities detected on CT were not apparent on conventional radiographs, but CT is reserved for hemodynamical stable patients. Nevertheless certain situations like aortic rupture require further evaluation by CT and aortography. (orig./MG)

  1. Classification and management of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, U.; Raza, W.; Zia, N.; Hanif, M.; Khan, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To classify the predominant pattern of injuries following blunt and penetrating chest trauma and to assess the adequacy of treatment strategies, complications and mortality associated with such injuries. Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit I, Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi, from December 2000 to December 2003. Patients and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with thoracic trauma either blunt or penetrating, admitted in the ward were evaluated. Their injuries were classified, treatment strategies outlined and complications and mortality were documented on a specially-designed proforma. Results: Out of the 100 patients presenting in emergency, 44% presented with blunt and 56% with penetrating trauma. Pneumothorax was detected in 39% of the patients, hemopneumothorax in 29%, hemothorax in 12%, flail chest in 9%. Two had involvement of the heart and major vessels, 4% had injury to the diaphragm and 5% had multiple trauma. During treatment, 3% of all the patients were managed conservatively, 83% of patients required chest intubations, 6% needed ventilatory support and 8 % required thoracotomy. Complications were experienced in 28% of the patients of which 9% had pneumonias, 14% empyema and 5% suffered from wound infections. The overall mortality was 7%. Conclusion: This series showed the pattern of injuries following blunt and penetrating chest trauma. Furthermore, it was found that chest incubation and simple resuscitation was adequate for majority of the cases. (author)

  2. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosch, H.; Negrin, L.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [de

  3. Penetrating ureteral trauma

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    Gustavo P. Fraga

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this series is to report our experience in managing ureteral trauma, focusing on the importance of early diagnosis, correct treatment, and the impact of associated injuries on the management and morbid-mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 1994 to December 2002, 1487 laparotomies for abdominal trauma were performed and 20 patients with ureteral lesions were identified, all of them secondary to penetrating injury. Medical charts were analyzed as well as information about trauma mechanisms, diagnostic routine, treatment and outcome. RESULTS: All patients were men. Mean age was 27 years. The mechanisms of injury were gunshot wounds in 18 cases (90% and stab wounds in two (10%. All penetrating abdominal injuries had primary indication of laparotomy, and neither excretory urography nor computed tomography were used in any case before surgery. The diagnosis of ureteric injury was made intra-operatively in 17 cases (85%. Two ureteral injuries (10% were initially missed. All patients had associated injuries. The treatment was dictated by the location, extension and time necessary to identify the injury. The overall incidence of complications was 55%. The presence of shock on admission, delayed diagnosis, Abdominal Trauma Index > 25, Injury Severity Score > 25 and colon injuries were associated to a high complication rate, however, there was no statistically significant difference. There were no mortalities in this group. CONCLUSIONS: A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis of ureteral injuries. A thorough exploration of all retroperitoneal hematoma after penetrating trauma should be an accurate method of diagnosis; even though it failed in 10% of our cases.

  4. CT findings of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim Young Il

    1998-01-01

    Trauma is the third leading cause of death, irrespective of age, and the leading cause of death in persons under 40 persons under 40 years of age. Most pleural, pulmonary, mediastinal, and diaphragmatic injuries are not seen on conventional chest radiographs, or are underestimated. In patients with chest trauma, CT scanning is an effective and sensitive method of detecting thoracic injuries and provides accurate information regarding their pattern and extent. (author). 5 refs., 17 figs

  5. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A.

    2000-01-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  6. Does hemopericardium after chest trauma mandate sternotomy?

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    Thorson, Chad M; Namias, Nicholas; Van Haren, Robert M; Guarch, Gerardo A; Ginzburg, Enrique; Salerno, Tomas A; Schulman, Carl I; Livingstone, Alan S; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-06-01

    Recently, three patients with hemopericardium after severe chest trauma were successfully managed nonoperatively at our institution. This prompted the question whether these were rare or common events. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with similar injuries to test the hypothesis that trauma-induced hemopericardium mandates sternotomy. Records were retrospectively reviewed for all patients at a Level I trauma center (December 1996 to November 2011) who sustained chest trauma with pericardial window (PCW, n = 377) and/or median sternotomy (n = 110). Fifty-five (15%) patients with positive PCW proceeded to sternotomy. Penetrating injury was the dominant mechanism (n = 49, 89%). Nineteen (35%) were hypotensive on arrival or during initial resuscitation. Most received surgeon-performed focused cardiac ultrasound examinations (n = 43, 78%) with positive results (n = 25, 58%). Ventricular injuries were most common, with equivalent numbers occurring on the right (n = 16, 29%) and left (n = 15, 27%). Six (11%) with positive PCW had isolated pericardial lacerations, but 21 (38%) had no repairable cardiac or great vessel injury. Those with therapeutic versus nontherapeutic sternotomies were similar with respect to age, mechanisms of injury, injury severity scores, presenting laboratory values, resuscitation fluids, and vital signs. Multiple logistic regression revealed that penetrating trauma (odds ratio: 13.3) and hemodynamic instability (odds ratio: 7.8) were independent predictors of therapeutic sternotomy. Hemopericardium per se may be overly sensitive for diagnosing cardiac or great vessel injuries after chest trauma. Some stable blunt or penetrating trauma patients without continuing intrapericardial bleeding had nontherapeutic sternotomies, suggesting that this intervention could be avoided in selected cases. Therapeutic study, level III. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  7. Penetrating chest trauma caused by a blank cartridge actuated rubber ball projectile: case presentation and ballistic investigation of an uncommon weapon type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias; Peters, Dieter; Klemm, Wolfram; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Bockholdt, Britta; Seifert, Julia

    2017-09-01

    Recently, an increasing number of an uncommon weapon type based on a caliber 6-mm Flobert blank cartridge actuated revolver which discharges 10-mm-diameter rubber ball projectiles has been confiscated by police authorities following criminal offenses. A recent trauma case presenting with a penetrating chest injury occasioned an investigation into the basic ballistic parameters of this type of weapon. Kinetic energy E of the test projectiles was calculated between 5.8 and 12.5 J. Energy density ED of the test projectiles was close to or higher than the threshold energy density of human skin. It can be concluded that penetrating skin injuries due to free-flying rubber ball projectiles discharged at close range cannot be ruled out. However, in case of a contact shot, the main injury potential of this weapon type must be attributed to the high energy density of the muzzle gas jet which may, similar to well-known gas or alarm weapons, cause life-threatening or even lethal injuries.

  8. Chest trauma in children, single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohamed Fouad; al-Refaie, Reda Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of mortality in children over one year of age in industrialized countries. In this retrospective study we reviewed all chest trauma in pediatric patients admitted to Mansoura University Emergency Hospital from January 1997 to January 2007. Our hospital received 472 patients under the age of 18. Male patients were 374 with a mean age of 9.2±4.9 years. Causes were penetrating trauma (2.1%) and blunt trauma (97.9%). The trauma was pedestrian injuries (38.3%), motor vehicle (28.1%), motorcycle crash (19.9%), falling from height (6.7%), animal trauma (2.9%), and sports injury (1.2%). Type of injury was pulmonary contusions (27.1%) and lacerations (6.9%), rib fractures (23.9%), flail chest (2.5%), hemothorax (18%), hemopneumothorax (11.8%), pneumothorax (23.7%), surgical emphysema (6.1%), tracheobronchial injury (5.3%), and diaphragm injury (2.1%). Associated lesions were head injuries (38.9%), bone fractures (33.5%), and abdominal injuries (16.7%). Management was conservative (29.9%), tube thoracostomy (58.1%), and thoracotomy (12.1%). Mortality rate was 7.2% and multiple trauma was the main cause of death (82.3%) (Ptrauma is the most common cause of pediatric chest trauma and often due to pedestrian injuries. Rib fractures and pulmonary contusions are the most frequent injuries. Delay in diagnosis and multiple trauma are associated with high incidence of mortality. Copyright © 2011 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiology of blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, H.S.; Samuels, T.H. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    Chest injuries and related complications prove fatal in over half of the victims of multiple trauma. The radiologist's responsibility is twofold: a) to recognize key radiographic signs and b) to guide the clinician in the radiologic investigation and management of the patient. The important diagnoses to be recognized from radiographs are pneumothorax, aortic rupture, bronhcial rupture and diaphragmatic rupture.

  10. Penetrating chest wound of the foetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Wandaogo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumas of the foetus caused by stabbings are rare but actually life-threatening for both the foetus and the mother. We report a case of penetrating chest wound on a baby taken from the obstetrics unit to the paediatric surgical department. His mother was assaulted by his father, a mentally sick person with no appropriate follow-up. The foetus did not show any sign of vital distress. Surgical exploration of the wound has revealed a section of the 10 th rib, a laceration of the pleura and a tearing of the diaphragm. A phrenorraphy and a pleural drainage were performed. The new-born and its mother were released from hospital after 5 days and the clinical control and X-ray checks 6 months later showed nothing abnormal. We insisted a medical, psychiatric follow-up be initiated for the father. As regards pregnant women with penetrating wounds, the mortality rate of the foetus is 80%. The odds are good for our newborn due to the mild injuries and good professional collaboration of the medical staff. Penetrating transuterine wounds of the foetus can be very serious. The health care needed should include many fields due to the mother and the foetus′ lesions extreme polymorphism. In our case, it could have prevented by a good psychiatric followed up of the offender.

  11. Chest Seal Placement for Penetrating Chest Wounds by Prehospital Ground Forces in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; April, Michael D; Naylor, Jason F; Simon, Erica M; Fisher, Andrew D; Cunningham, Cord W; Morissette, Daniel M; Fernandez, Jessie Renee D; Ryan, Kathy L

    Thoracic trauma represents 5% of all battlefield injuries. Communicating pneumothoraces resulting in tension physiology remain an important etiology of prehospital mortality. In addressing penetrating chest trauma, current Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines advocate the immediate placement of a vented chest seal device. Although the Committee on TCCC (CoTCCC) has approved numerous chest seal devices for battlefield use, few data exist regarding their use in a combat zone setting. To evaluate adherence to TCCC guidelines for chest seal placement among personnel deployed to Afghanistan. We obtained data from the Prehospital Trauma Registry (PHTR). Joint Trauma System personnel linked patients to the Department of Defense Trauma Registry, when available, for outcome data upon reaching a fixed facility. In the PHTR, we identified 62 patients with documented gunshot wound (GSW) or puncture wound trauma to the chest. The majority (74.2%; n = 46) of these were due to GSW, with the remainder either explosive-based puncture wounds (22.6%; n = 14) or a combination of GSW and explosive (3.2%; n = 2). Of the 62 casualties with documented GSW or puncture wounds, 46 (74.2%) underwent chest seal placement. Higher proportions of patients with medical officers in their chain of care underwent chest seal placement than those that did not (63.0% versus 37.0%). The majority of chest seals placed were not vented. Of patients with a GSW or puncture wound to the chest, 74.2% underwent chest seal placement. Most of the chest seals placed were not vented in accordance with guidelines, despite the guideline update midway through the study period. These data suggest the need to improve predeployment training on TCCC guidelines and matching of the Army logistical supply chain to the devices recommended by the CoTCCC. 2017.

  12. Delayed cardiac tamponade in a patient with previous minor blunt chest trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, Jeannine A.J.M.; Wajon, Elly M.C.J.; Grandjean, Jan G; Grandjean, Jan G.; Haalebos, Max M.P.; von Birgelen, Clemens

    2009-01-01

    Hemopericardium with cardiac tamponade after non-penetrating chest trauma is a very rare but life-threatening condition. If this complication develops after an interval of several weeks following the non-penetrating chest trauma, the causal relation with the traumatic event is less evident, which

  13. penetrating abdominal trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gender, mechanism of injury, injury severity scores (ISS), penetrating ... ileus, reduced pulmonary function and loss of muscle mass and function, all of .... pathophysiology and rehabilitation. ... quality of life after surgery for colorectal cancer.

  14. Lesão da valva tricúspide por trauma torácico penetrante Lesión de la válvula tricúspide por trauma torácico penetrante Tricuspid valve lesion due to penetrating chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Carvalho Bicalho Carneiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As lesões da valva tricúspide decorrentes de trauma torácico penetrante são raras e frequentemente subdiagnosticadas. O objetivo deste relato é descrever um caso de insuficiência tricúspide grave secundária a acidente por arma branca com evolução insidiosa, diagnosticada 19 anos após o ocorrido. O caso enfatiza a importância do acompanhamento adequado dos pacientes vítimas de trauma torácico penetrante por longo período após a injúria, para detecção de possíveis complicações tardias do trauma.Las lesiones de la válvula tricúspide resultantes de trauma torácico penetrante son raras y frecuentemente subdiagnosticadas. El objetivo de este relato es describir un caso de insuficiencia tricúspide severa secundaria a accidente por arma blanca con evolución insidiosa, diagnosticada 19 años tras lo sucedido. El caso enfatiza la importancia del seguimiento adecuado de los pacientes víctimas de trauma torácico penetrante por largo período tras la injuria, para detección de posibles complicaciones tardías del trauma.Tricuspid valve lesions caused by penetrating chest trauma are rare and often underdiagnosed. The objective of this report is to describe a case of severe tricuspid insufficiency secondary to a knifing incident with an insidious evolution, diagnosed 19 years after the incident. The case emphasizes the importance of adequate follow-up of patients that are victims of penetrating chest trauma for a long period after the injury, to detect possible late complications of the trauma.

  15. Coronary artery dissection following chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Agarwala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest trauma has a high rate of mortality. Coronary dissection causing myocardial infarction (MI following blunt chest trauma is rare. We describe the case of an anterior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 39-year-old male was received in our hospital following a motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient underwent craniotomy for evacuation of hematoma. He developed severe chest pain and an electrocardiogram (ECG revealed anterior ST segment elevation following surgery. Acute coronary event was medically managed; subsequently, coronary angiogram was performed that showed dissection in the left anterior coronary artery, which was stented.

  16. THE DEADLY DOZEN OF CHEST TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    specialised surgical intervention; probably the most common presentation is related .... failure. Operation is another treatment option for flail chest, after having been discarded in the ... physiologically unstable due to trauma in other anatomical ...

  17. Determinants of Mortality in Chest Trauma Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10% of trauma admissions.[1,2] In the United States it is estimated at 12 out of 1 million population per day.[3] Furthermore chest injury is still directly responsible for about 25% of trauma‑related deaths and contribute to death in another 25% of trauma‑related deaths.[1,2,4] Therefore, chest injury directly and indirectly ...

  18. Chest trauma in children: A local experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saigh, A.; Fazili, Fiaz M.; Allam, Abdulla R.

    1999-01-01

    Chest trauma in childhood is relatively uncommon in clinical practice andhas been the subject of few reports in literature. This study was undertakento examine our experience in dealing with chest trauma in children. This wasa retrospective study of 74 children who sustained chest trauma and werereferred to King Fahd Hospital in Medina over a two-year period. The age,cause of injury, severity of injury, associated extrathoracic injuries,treatment and outcome were analyzed. The median age of patients was nineyears. Fifty-nine of them (80%) sustained blunt trauma in 62% of thechildren, gun shot wounds were seen in five and stab wounds in 10 children.Head injury was the most common injury associated with thoracic trauma andwas seen in 14 patients (19%) and associated intra-abdominal injuries wereseen in nine patients. Chest x-ray of the blunt trauma patients revealedfractured ribs in 24 children, pneumothorax in six, hemothorax in four,hemoneumothorax in three, and pulmonary contusions in 22 patients. Fifty onepercent of children were managed conservatively, 37% required tubethoracostomy, 8% were mechanically ventilated and 4% underwent thoractomy.The prevalence of chest trauma in children due to road traffic accidents ishigh in Saudi Arabia. Head injury is thought to be the most common associatedextrathoracic injuries, however, most of these patients can be managedconservatively. (author)

  19. The application of MDCT in the diagnosis of chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błasińska-Przerwa, Katarzyna; Pacho, Ryszard; Bestry, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Traumas are the third most common cause of death worldwide, after cardiovascular diseases and neoplasms, and the main cause of death of patients under 40 years of age. Contemporary image diagnosis of chest trauma uses chest X-ray (CXR), multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), transthoracic and transoesophageal ultrasound (USG), X-ray angiography and magnetic resonance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate MDCT results in the examination of posttraumatic chest injuries and to compare the results of CXR and MDCT in chosen chest traumatic injuries. The sixty patients with chest trauma included in the study were diagnosed at the Department of Radiology of the Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases between May 2004 and October 2007. MDCT was performed in all patients. Two groups with different types of injury (blunt or penetrating chest trauma) were distinguished. The analysis of injuries in both groups was conducted depending on the mechanism of trauma. The detection of 20 selected injuries at CXR and MDCT was compared. Moreover, the compatibility of MDCT with the results of intraoperative assessment and bronchoscopy was analysed. The influence of MDCT on the treatment modality was also assessed. History of blunt chest trauma was found in 51 patients (group 1) and of penetrating trauma in 9 patients (group 2). The most frequent injuries among group 1 were lung contusion and rib fractures, and among group 2 it was pericardial hematoma. Compared to MDCT, the sensitivity and specificity of CXR were 66.7 and 58%, respectively. Change of treatment modality was observed after MDCT in 83% of patients. The sensitivity and specificity of MDCT in diagnosing tracheobronchial injury, compared to bronchoscopy, were 72.7% and 100%, respectively. Compatibility of MDCT results and intraoperative assessment was observed in 43% of patients, and the main reason for discrepancy was underdiagnosis of diaphragm injury in MDCT. MDCT was a valuable diagnostic method in

  20. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, D.; Babyn, P.S.; Palder, S.; Bergmann, K.

    1993-01-01

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  1. Possibilities of CT examinations by chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ftacnikova, B.

    1994-01-01

    Chest trauma represents the most frequent associated injury in multiply injured patients. The success of treatment depends also on prompt and effective diagnosis and extent of the injuries, on quality interdisciplinary approach. Author presents contributions of computed tomography (CT) in the management of 77 critically injured patients. Attention is focused on the efficacy of CT examination routinely employed in the setting of thoracic trauma and its relationship to following rationalization of treatment. CT scans of thorax is modality of choice for evaluating patients with occult pneumothorax, chest wall deformity of rib fractures, early diagnosis of lung contusion and laceration. (author). 13 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  2. Chest Trauma in Athletic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicholas R; Kunz, Derek E

    2018-03-01

    While overall sports participation continues at high rates, chest injuries occur relatively infrequently. Many conditions of chest injury are benign, related to simple contusions and strains, but the more rare, severe injuries carry a much higher risk of morbidity and mortality than the typical issues encountered in athletic medicine. Missed or delayed diagnosis can prove to be catastrophic. Sports medicine providers must be prepared to encounter a wide range of traumatic conditions relating to the torso, varying from the benign chest wall contusion to the life-threatening tension pneumothorax. Basic field-side management should be rapid and focused, using the standardized approach of Advanced Traumatic Life Support protocol. Early and appropriate diagnosis and management can help allow safe and enjoyable sports participation.

  3. ACR appropriateness criteria blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jonathan H; Cox, Christian W; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Kirsch, Jacobo; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The radiology of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, H.S.; Samuels, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    Chest injuries and related complications prove fatal in over half of the victims of multiple trauma. The radiologist's responsibility is twofold: a) to recognize key radiographic signs and b) to guide the clinician in the radiologic investigation and management of the patient. The important diagnoses to be recognized from radiographs are pneumothorax, aortic rupture, bronhcial rupture and diaphragmatic rupture

  5. Spiral CT for evaluation of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehnert, W.; Weise, R.

    1997-01-01

    After implementation of spiral CT in our department, we carried out an analysis for determining anew the value of CT as a modality of chest trauma diagnosis in the emergency department. The retrospective study covers a period of 10 months and all emergency patients with chest trauma exmined by spiral CT. The major lesions of varying seriousness covered by this study are: pneumothorax, hematothorax, pulmonary contusion or laceration, mediastinal hematoma, rupture of a vessel, injury of the heart and pericardium. The various fractures are not included in this study. In many cases, spiral CT within relatively short time yields significant diagnostic findings, frequently saving additional angiography. A rigid diagnostic procedure cannot be formulated. Plain-film chest radiography still remains a diagnostic modality of high value. (Orig.) [de

  6. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  7. Ventricular septal necrosis after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ahmadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD after blunt chest trauma is a very rare traumatic affection.We report here a case of blunt chest injury-related VSD and pseudoaneurysm.A 30-year old male truck driver was referred from a trauma center to our hospital seven days after a blunt chest trauma and rib fracture. The patient had severe pulmonary edemaand echocardiography showed large VSD. Several mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of this affection including an acute compression of the heart muscle between the sternum and the spine, leading to excessive changes in the intrathoracic and most likely theintracardiac pressure after blunt chest injury. Traumatical patients with the same symptoms may be at risk of sudden death. Therefore, a high grade of suspicion is mandatory even without solid evidence of myocardial damage on the initial evaluation. In continue somehidden angles of this case was discussed. Given the prognostic implications of traumatic VSD with associated pseudoaneurysm, its detection has critical value for preventing its clinicalsequelae.

  8. Thyroid Emphysema Following Penetrating Neck Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Karadağ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although traumatic thyroid gland rupture or hemorrhage is usually seen in goitrous glands, injuries of the normal thyroid gland after neck trauma have rarely been described in the literature. We describe a 44-year-old man who presented with thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema (SCE that occurred after penetrating neck trauma. CT images showed complete resolution of thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema at follow-up examination. Neck injuries can be life threatening. After penetrating neck traumas, physicians should consider subtle esophageal or tracheal laceration. Thyroid emphysema can occur as the result of penetrating neck trauma. The mechanism of emphysema of the thyroid parenchyma can be explained by the thyroid gland’s presence in a single visceral compartment that encompasses the larynx, trachea and thyroid gland. We describe an unusual case of thyroid emphysema of a normal thyroid gland following a penetrating neck injury.

  9. Experience With The Management Of unusual Penetrating Chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presentation shows how a victim of fall from height in the bush can sustain a penetrating chest injury on a dry stick of a shrub. Applications on the principles of management of penetrating chest injury is needed despite the grotesque clinical appearance. [Jnl College of Medicine Vol.7(1) 2002: 40-42] ...

  10. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-01-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma

  11. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  12. Hepatic hydrothorax after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Chiung Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a successful treatment result in a rare case of hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis, who had sustained hydrothorax after blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. This was a female patient with liver cirrhosis, Child–Turcotte–Pugh class A, without ascites before injury. She sustained blunt thoracoabdominal trauma with a left clavicle fracture dislocation and right rib fractures. There was no hemopneumothorax at initial presentation. However, dyspnea and right pleural effusion developed gradually. We inserted a chest tube to relieve the patient's symptoms, and the daily drainage amount remained consistent. Hepatic hydrothorax was confirmed by the intraperitoneal injection of radioisotope 99mTc-sulfur colloid that demonstrated one-way transdiaphragmatic flow of fluid from the peritoneal cavity to pleural cavities. Finally, the hydrothorax was treated successfully by minocycline-induced pleural symphysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hepatic hydrothorax developed after thoracoabdominal trauma.

  13. Chest tube placement in thorax trauma - comparison chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, P.; Maas, R.; Buecheler, E.; Tesch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of chest tube placement in patients with thoracic trauma with regard to chest tube malposition in chest radiography in the supine position compared to additional computed tomography of the thorax. Material and methods: Apart from compulsory chest radiography after one or multiple chest tube insertions, 31 severely injured patients with thoracic trauma underwent a CT scan of the thorax. These 31 patients with 40 chest tubes constituted the basis for the present analysis. Results: In chest radiography in the supine position there were no chest tube malpositions (n=40); In the CT scans 25 correct positions, 7 pseudo-malpositions, 6 intrafissural and 2 intrapulmonary malpositions were identified. Moreover 16 sufficient, 18 insufficient and 6 indifferent functions of the chest tubes were seen. Conclusion: In case of lasting clinical problems and questionable function of the chest tube, chest radiography should be supplemented by a CT scan of the thorax in order to estimate the position of the chest tube. (orig.) [de

  14. Thyroid Emphysema Following Penetrating Neck Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Karadağ, Demet; Doner, Egemen; Adapınar, Baki

    2014-01-01

    Although traumatic thyroid gland rupture or hemorrhage is usually seen in goitrous glands, injuries of the normal thyroid gland after neck trauma have rarely been described in the literature. We describe a 44-year-old man who presented with thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema (SCE) that occurred after penetrating neck trauma. CT images showed complete resolution of thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema at follow-up examination. Neck injuries can be life threatening. After pene...

  15. Atrioventricular Dissociation following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Surani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt chest trauma (BCT is a common clinical presentation seen in emergency departments. Few cases of cardiac conduction abnormalities due to BCT have been reported in the medical literature. This dysrhythmias may present as permanent conduction defects requiring permanent pacemaker or may have temporary conduction abnormalities requiring temporary pacemaker or supportive care. We present the case of a young woman who suffered from BCT after being kicked by a horse with the development of a significant substernal hematoma. She developed temporary atrioventricular block, which was completely resolved with the decrease in the size of the substernal hematoma suffered.

  16. Determinants of Mortality in Chest Trauma Patients | Ekpe | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chest trauma is an important trauma globally accounting for about 10% of trauma admission and 25‑50% of trauma death. Different types and severity of ... Data were collected and were analyzed using WINPEPI Stone Mountain, Georgia: USD Inc; 1995 statistical software. Results: A total 149 patients with ...

  17. Cardiac and great vessel injuries after chest trauma: our 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onan, Burak; Demirhan, Recep; Öz, Kürşad; Onan, Ismihan Selen

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular injuries after trauma present with high mortality. The aim of the study was to present our experience in cardiac and great vessel injuries after chest trauma. During the 10-year period, 104 patients with cardiac (n=94) and great vessel (n=10) injuries presented to our hospital. The demographic data, mechanism of injury, location of injury, other associated injuries, timing of surgical intervention, surgical approach, and clinical outcome were reviewed. Eighty-eight (84.6%) males presented after chest trauma. The mean age of the patients was 32.5±8.2 years (range: 12-76). Penetrating injuries (62.5%) were the most common cause of trauma. Computed tomography was performed in most cases and echocardiography was used in some stable cases. Cardiac injuries mostly included the right ventricle (58.5%). Great vessel injuries involved the subclavian vein in 6, innominate vein in 1, vena cava in 1, and descending aorta in 2 patients. Early operations after admission to the emergency were performed in 75.9% of the patients. Thoracotomy was performed in 89.5% of the patients. Operative mortality was significantly high in penetrating injuries (p=0.01). Clinicians should suspect cardiac and great vessel trauma in every patient presenting to the emergency unit after chest trauma. Computed tomography and echocardiography are beneficial in the management of chest trauma. Operative timing depends on hemodynamic status, and a multidisciplinary team approach improves the patient's prognosis.

  18. Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child\\'s clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.

  19. Cutaneous mucormycosis secondary to penetrative trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Bilal; Kent, Stephen; Wall, Daryl

    2016-07-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare but serious sequelae of penetrating trauma [1-5]. In spite of aggressive management, mortality remains high due to dissemination of infection. We completed a review of literature to determine the most optimal treatment of cutaneous mucormycosis which occurs secondary to penetrating trauma. We completed a review regarding the management of mucormycosis in trauma patients. We selected a total of 36 reports, of which 18 were case-based, for review. Surgical debridement is a primary predictor of improved outcomes in the treatment of mucormycosis [3,6,7]. Anti-fungal therapy, especially lipid soluble formulation of Amphotericin B, is helpful as an adjunct or when surgical debridement has been maximally achieved. Further research is needed to fully evaluate the impact of topical dressings; negative pressure wound therapy is helpful. An aggressive and early surgical approach, even at the expense of disfigurement, is necessary to reduce mortality in the setting of cutaneous mucormycosis that results from penetrating trauma [4,8,9]. Anti-fungal therapy and negative pressure wound therapy are formidable adjuncts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Penetrating ocular trauma from trampoline spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokes, David; Siddiqui, Salina; Vize, Colin

    2010-02-01

    The case is presented of a 12-year old boy who sustained severe penetrating ocular trauma while playing on a domestic trampoline. A main spring broke under tension and the hook had struck the eye at high velocity and penetrated the sclera. Primary repair was undertaken but on review it became apparent the eye could not be salvaged. Evisceration was carried out and an orbital implant was placed. Post-operative cosmesis is acceptable. This type of injury has not been reported before. Adult supervision of children on trampolines is recommended to minimise the chance of serious injury.

  1. Multi-detector row computed tomography and blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, Mariano; Pinto, Antonio; Pedrosa, Ivan; Sparano, Amelia; Romano, Luigia

    2008-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. The clinical presentation of trauma patients varies widely from one individual to another and ranges from minor reports of pain to shock. Knowledge of the mechanism of injury, the time of injury, estimates of motor vehicle accident velocity and deceleration, and evidence of associated injury to other systems are all salient features to provide for an adequate assessment of chest trauma. Multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanning and MDCT-angiography are being used more frequently in the diagnosis of patients with chest trauma. The high sensitivity of MDCT has increased the recognized spectrum of injuries. This new technology can be regarded as an extremely valuable adjunct to physical examination to recognize suspected and unsuspected blunt chest trauma

  2. Prophylactic antibiotics for penetrating abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Martin; Grieve, Andrew

    2013-11-18

    Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs when the peritoneal cavity is breached. Routine laparotomy for penetrating abdominal injuries began in the 1800s, with antibiotics first being used in World War II to combat septic complications associated with these injuries. This practice was marked with a reduction in sepsis-related mortality and morbidity. Whether prophylactic antibiotics are required in the prevention of infective complications following penetrating abdominal trauma is controversial, however, as no randomised placebo controlled trials have been published to date. There has also been debate about the timing of antibiotic prophylaxis. In 1972 Fullen noted a 7% to 11% post-surgical infection rate with pre-operative antibiotics, a 33% to 57% infection rate with intra-operative antibiotic administration and 30% to 70% infection rate with only post-operative antibiotic administration. Current guidelines state there is sufficient class I evidence to support the use of a single pre-operative broad spectrum antibiotic dose, with aerobic and anaerobic cover, and continuation (up to 24 hours) only in the event of a hollow viscus perforation found at exploratory laparotomy. To assess the benefits and harms of prophylactic antibiotics administered for penetrating abdominal injuries for the reduction of the incidence of septic complications, such as septicaemia, intra-abdominal abscesses and wound infections. Searches were not restricted by date, language or publication status. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, issue 12 of 12), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S) and PubMed. Searches were last conducted in January 2013. All randomised controlled trials of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma versus no

  3. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palas, J.; Matos, A.P.; Ramalho, M.; Mascarenhas, V.; Heredia, V.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  4. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  5. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a tru...

  6. Accuracy of conventional imaging of penetrating torso injuries in the trauma resuscitation room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.S.E. Varin (Dorien); A.N. Ringburg (Akkie); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); P. Patka (Peter); I.B. Schipper (Inger)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractChest X-ray (CXR), abdominal ultrasound, cardiac ultrasound, and abdominal X-ray are the most frequently used imaging modalities to radiologically evaluate patients with penetrating torso trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of these imaging modalities. From January

  7. Blunt chest trauma: bony injury in the thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreik, Nasri H; Francis, Irene; Ray, Arun; Rogers, Benedict A; Ricketts, David M

    2016-02-01

    The management of blunt chest trauma is an evolving concept with no clear current guidelines. This article explores the bony injuries associated with this, focusing on rib fractures and flail segments and the themes around investigation and best management.

  8. Roentgenologic findings of non-penetrating extracardiac chest injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Duck; Ra, Woo Youn [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1975-06-15

    Of the conventional P-A and A-P chest films which have been studied, many roentgenologic signs suggested for chest trauma. In the present study, an effort was designated to further clarify the x-ray findings of the nonpenetrating extracardiac chest injuries and to observe the x-ray findings being a leading maneuver of surgical procedure. Fat embolism and shock lung must be kept in mind on follow up films. The results thus obtained are summarized as follows; 1. Most of cases are visualized between the age of 10 and 50 and more common in male. 2. The denoting rib fracture, hemopneumothorax, and lung contusion are direct roentgenologic signs. 3. In case of serious result which showed pulmonary edema pattern on conventional chest films, we thought fat embolism or shock lung to be the cause of death.

  9. Role of computed tomography in blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Chan Wha; Kim, Hae Kyoon

    1994-01-01

    In patient with blunt trauma of chest, supine AP x-ray cannot differentiate the lung contusion, laceration, atelectasis, and hemothorax definitely. Therefore, computed tomographic evaluation is needed for accurate evaluation of the injuries. In our knowledge, there are few reports about CT findings of blunt chest trauma, in our country, therefore we tried to fluid the characteristic CT findings in patients with blunt trauma. We analyzed the plain x-ray and CT image of 4 patients with blunt chest trauma. Location and morphology of lung parenchymal contusion and laceration, hemopneumothorax, chest wall injuries and location of chest tube. Lung parenchymal contusion was noted in 53 segments., of 16 patients infiltration(n=27 segment), and multiple nodular pattern was noted in 15 segment, pattern of consolidation along the lung periphery was seen in 11 segment. Laceration was noted in 18 lesion and most commonly located in paravertebral area(b=8). CT scan of chest in patient with blunt chest trauma, provides accurate information of the pattern of injuries, and localization, therefore, should be performed as possible

  10. Penetrating trauma; experience from Southwest Finland between 1997 and 2011, a retrospective descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkinen, J; Kirjasuo, K; Gunn, J; Kuttila, K

    2015-08-01

    (1) There is lack of epidemiological data on penetrating trauma in European countries. (2) In Finland most acts of violence are performed under the influence of alcohol. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and types of injury, treatment and survival of patients with penetrating injuries to the thorax and abdomen. This study includes two trauma centers with combined catchment area of approximately 720,000 patients. Patients were identified from patient records using ICD-10 codes. Patients were predominantly young males and they were stab victims. The average yearly incidence for penetrating trauma was 0.9/100,000 inhabitants. Thirteen percent of patients admitted gave a negative toxicology screen or breathalyzer test for alcohol. Twenty two percent of wounds were self-inflicted. Fifty five percent of patients received a chest tube and 30 patients (23%) underwent emergent thoracotomy after sustaining critical injury to the thorax. A considerable proportion (12%) of the study group also later died due to alcohol and/or violence, highlighting the psychosocial co-morbidity among penetrating trauma victims. Chest tube insertion is a skill to be mastered by any on-call physician. This simple procedure can be potentially life-saving. There is also a call for assessment of psychosocial well-being among penetrating trauma victims.

  11. Radiodiagnosis of pulmonary lesions in a severe closed chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishkovskij, A.N.; Tyutin, L.A.; Savchenko, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    The results of X-ray examination of 548 persons with a severe closed chest trauma were summed up. Urgent chest X-ray examination included panoramic roentgenography or electroroentgenography of the chest in two projections performed mostly in a special wheelchair without resetting and turning the patients. Dynamic X-ray control was used afterwards. Pulmonary lesions developed most frequently in a closed chest trauma. Roentgenosemiotics of lung contusion was characterized by a variety of symptoms and determined by the nature of a contusion syndrome. Infiltrate like, cavitary, miliary and peribronchial forms of lung contusion should be distinguished by an X-ray picture. In lung rupture, pneumothorax was detected in 33%, pneumohemothorax in 56%, emphysema of the chest soft tissues in 28%, mediastinal emphysema in 4% of the cases

  12. Profile of chest trauma in Zaria Nigeria: A prelminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Edaigbini

    2011-01-01

    Materials and Methods A prospective study of trauma patients admitted to Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital through the Accident and Emergency units was commenced in January 2008.This preliminary report is for the period of 27months.The clinical history, physical examination and outcome of management recorded in a predesigned proforma, were analysed with SPSS 15 and the patients were followed up in the surgical outpatient department. Results A total of 4784 patients (3143 men and 1641 women were admitted during this period for trauma. There were a total of 628(13.13% deaths. Of the 42 consecutive patients identified with chest trauma35 (83.3% were males and 7(16.7% were females. The age range was from 5-75years and the mean age was 35.4years, while the most affected ages were in the range of 20 to 49years. Blunt injury constituted 71.4% and penetrating injury constituted 28.6%. Road traffic accident was responsible for 61.9%, stab injury 21.4%, falls 7.1%, gunshot injury 4.8%, impalement 2.4% and animal attack also 2.4%. The average time taken between accident and admission was 31hours,40minutes and 12seconds while the average duration of hospital stay was 16.10 days. The injury pattern included rib fracture(s (23.8%, hemopneumothorax (14.3%, hemothorax (7.1%, pneumothorax (4.8%, combinations of chest injuries (7.1%, chest laceration 7.1%, bruises 11.9%, lung contusion 4.8%, subcutaneous empyema 2.4%, flail chest 4.8% and no specific injury (11.9%. Associated injuries included head injury (63.6%, orthopaedic injury (27.3% and combinations (abdominal, head, orthopaedic (9.1%. The fatality of road traffic accident was 36.8%. No patient was attended to by paramedics at the scene of accident while 21.9% of the patients had pre-hospital resuscitation in peripheral clinics before admission. The transfusion requirement was 14.3%. One patient (2.4% required a median sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass, 54.8% required tube thoracostomy while 42.9% had general

  13. Factors Associated with ICU Admission following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bellone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blunt chest wall trauma accounts for over 10% of all trauma patients presenting to emergency departments worldwide. When the injury is not as severe, deciding which blunt chest wall trauma patients require a higher level of clinical input can be difficult. We hypothesized that patient factors, injury patterns, analgesia, postural condition, and positive airway pressure influence outcomes. Methods. The study population consisted of patients hospitalized with at least 3 rib fractures (RF and at least one pulmonary contusion and/or at least one pneumothorax lower than 2 cm. Results. A total of 140 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Ten patients (7.1% were admitted to intensive care unit (ICU within the first 72 hours, because of deterioration of the clinical conditions and gas exchange with worsening of chest X-ray/thoracic ultrasound/chest computed tomography. On univariable analysis and multivariable analysis, obliged orthopnea (p=0.0018 and the severity of trauma score (p<0.0002 were associated with admission to ICU. Conclusions. Obliged orthopnea was an independent predictor of ICU admission among patients incurring non-life-threatening blunt chest wall trauma. The main therapeutic approach associated with improved outcome is the prevention of pulmonary infections due to reduced tidal volume, namely, upright postural condition and positive airway pressure.

  14. Challenges in management of pediatric life-threatening neck and chest trauma

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    Shilpa Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neck and thoracic trauma in children pose unforeseen challenges requiring variable management strategies. Here, we describe some unusual cases. Patients and Methods: Pediatric cases of unusual neck and thoracic trauma prospectively managed from April 2012 to March 2014 at a Level 1 trauma center were studied for management strategies, outcome, and follow-up. Results: Six children with a median age of 5.5 (range 2–10 years were managed. Mechanism of injury was road traffic accident, fall from height and other accidental injury in 2, 3 and 1 patient respectively. The presentation was respiratory distress and quadriplegia, exposed heart, penetrating injury in neck, dysphagia and dyspnea, and swelling over the chest wall in 1, 1, 1, 2 and 1 cases respectively. Injuries included lung laceration, open chest wall, vascular injury of the neck, tracheoesophageal fistula (2, and chest wall posttraumatic pyomyositis. One patient had a flare of miliary tuberculosis. Immediate management included chest wall repair; neck exploration and repair, esophagostomy, gastroesophageal stapling, and feeding jejunostomy (followed by gastric pull-up 8 months later. Chest tube insertion and total parenteral nutrition was required in one each. 2 and 4 patients required tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. The patient with gastric pull-up developed a stricture of the esophagogastric anastomosis that was revised at 26-month follow-up. At follow-up of 40–61 months, five patients are well. One patient with penetrating neck injury suffered from blindness due to massive hemorrhage from the vascular injury in the neck and brain ischemia with only peripheral vision recovery. Conclusion: Successful management of neck and chest wall trauma requires timely appropriate decisions with a team effort.

  15. Failure rate of prehospital chest decompression after severe thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaserer, Alexander; Stein, Philipp; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Spahn, Donat R; Neuhaus, Valentin

    2017-03-01

    Chest decompression can be performed by different techniques, like needle thoracocentesis (NT), lateral thoracostomy (LT), or tube thoracostomy (TT). The aim of this study was to report the incidence of prehospital chest decompression and to analyse the effectiveness of these techniques. In this retrospective case series study, all medical records of adult trauma patients undergoing prehospital chest decompression and admitted to the resuscitation area of a level-1 trauma center between 2009 and 2015 were reviewed and analysed. Only descriptive statistics were applied. In a 6-year period 24 of 2261 (1.1%) trauma patients had prehospital chest decompression. Seventeen patients had NT, six patients TT, one patient NT as well as TT, and no patients had LT. Prehospital successful release of a tension pneumothorax was reported by the paramedics in 83% (5/6) with TT, whereas NT was effective in 18% only (3/17). In five CT scans all thoracocentesis needles were either removed or extrapleural, one patient had a tension pneumothorax, and two patients had no pneumothorax. No NT or TT related complications were reported during hospitalization. Prehospital NT or TT is infrequently attempted in trauma patients. Especially NT is associated with a high failure rate of more than 80%, potentially due to an inadequate ratio between chest wall thickness and catheter length as previously published as well as a possible different pathophysiological cause of respiratory distress. Therefore, TT may be considered already in the prehospital setting to retain sufficient pleural decompression upon admission. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Occult pneumomediastinum in blunt chest trauma: clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende-Neto, J B; Hoffmann, J; Al Mahroos, M; Tien, H; Hsee, L C; Spencer Netto, F; Speers, V; Rizoli, S B

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic injuries are potentially responsible for 25% of all trauma deaths. Chest X-ray is commonly used to screen patients with chest injury. However, the use of computed tomography (CT) scan for primary screening is increasing, particularly for blunt trauma. CT scans are more sensitive than chest X-ray in detecting intra-thoracic abnormalities such as pneumothoraces and pneumomediastinums. Pneumomediastinum detected by chest X-ray or "overt pneumomediastinum", raises the concern of possible aerodigestive tract injuries. In contrast, there is scarce information on the clinical significance of pneumomediastinum diagnosed by CT scan only or "occult pneumomediastinum". Therefore we investigated the clinical consequences of occult pneumomediastinum in our blunt trauma population. A 2-year retrospective chart review of all blunt chest trauma patients with initial chest CT scan admitted to a level I trauma centre. Data extracted from the medical records include; demographics, occult, overt, or no pneumomediastinum, the presence of intra-thoracic aerodigestive tract injuries (trachea, bronchus, and/or esophagus), mechanism and severity of injury, endotracheal intubation, chest thoracostomy, operations and radiological reports by an attending radiologist. All patients with intra-thoracic aerodigestive tract injuries from 1994 to 2004 were also investigated. Of 897 patients who met the inclusion criteria 839 (93.5%) had no pneumomediastinum. Five patients (0.6%) had overt pneumomediastinum and 53 patients (5.9%) had occult pneumomediastinum. Patients with occult pneumomediastinum had significantly higher ISS and AIS chest (pchest thoracostomy tube was more common (ppneumothorax. None of the patients with occult pneumomediastinum had aerodigestive tract injuries (95%CI 0-0.06). Follow up CT scan of patients with occult pneumomediastinum showed complete resolution in all cases, in average 3 h after the initial exam. Occult pneumomediastinum occurred in approximately 6% of

  17. Pectus excavatum in blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liodakis Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blunt cardiac rupture is an exceedingly rare injury. Case presentation We report a case of blunt cardiac trauma in a 43-year-old Caucasian German mother with pectus excavatum who presented after a car accident in which she had been sitting in the front seat holding her two-year-old boy in her arms. The mother was awake and alert during the initial two hours after the accident but then proceeded to hemodynamically collapse. The child did not sustain any severe injuries. Intraoperatively, a combined one-cm laceration of the left atrium and right ventricle was found. Conclusion Patients with pectus excavatum have an increased risk for cardiac rupture after blunt chest trauma because of compression between the sternum and spine. Therefore, patients with pectus excavatum and blunt chest trauma should be admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a high degree of suspicion.

  18. Predictors of chest drainage complications in trauma patients

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    CECÍLIA ARAÚJO MENDES

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify predictors of chest drainage complications in trauma patients attended at a University Hospital. Methods: we conducted a retrospective study of 68 patients submitted to thoracic drainage after trauma, in a one-year period. We analyzed gender, age, trauma mechanism, trauma indices, thoracic and associated lesions, environment in which the procedure was performed, drainage time, experience of the performer, complications and evolution. Results: the mean age of the patients was 35 years and the male gender was the most prevalent (89%. Blunt trauma was the most frequent, with 67% of cases, and of these, 50% were due to traffic accidents. The mean TRISS (Trauma and Injury Severity Score was 98, with a mortality rate of 1.4%. The most frequent thoracic and associated lesions were, respectively, rib fractures (51% and abdominal trauma (32%. The mean drainage time was 6.93 days, being higher in patients under mechanical ventilation (p=0.0163. The complication rate was 26.5%, mainly poor drain positioning (11.77%. Hospital drainage was performed in 89% of cases by doctors in the first year of specialization. Thoracic drainage performed in prehospital care presented nine times more chances of complications (p=0.0015. Conclusion: the predictors of post-trauma complications for chest drainage were a procedure performed in an adverse site and mechanical ventilation. The high rate of complications demonstrates the importance of protocols of care with the thoracic drainage.

  19. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  20. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-27

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  1. Non-operative management of right side thoracoabdominal penetrating injuries--the value of testing chest tube effluent for bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rezende Neto, João Baptista; Guimarães, Tiago Nunes; Madureira, João Lopo; Drumond, Domingos André Fernandes; Leal, Juliana Campos; Rocha, Aroldo; Oliveira, Rodrigo Guimarães; Rizoli, Sandro B

    2009-05-01

    While mandatory surgery for all thoracoabdominal penetrating injuries is advocated by some, the high rate of unnecessary operations challenges this approach. However, the consequences of intrathoracic bile remains poorly investigated. We sought to evaluate the outcome of patients who underwent non-operative management of right side thoracoabdominal (RST) penetrating trauma, and the levels of bilirubin obtained from those patients' chest tube effluent. We managed non-operatively all stable patients with a single RST penetrating injury. Chest tube effluent samples were obtained six times within (4-8 h; 12-16 h; 20-24 h; 28-32 h; 36-40 h; 48 h and 72 h) of admission for bilirubin measurement and blood for complete blood count, bilirubin, alanine (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferases (AST) assays. For comparison we studied patients with single left thoracic penetrating injury. Forty-two patients with RST injuries were included. All had liver and lung injuries confirmed by CT scans. Only one patient failed non-operative management. Chest tube bilirubin peaked at 48 h post-trauma (mean 3.3+/-4.1 mg/dL) and was always higher than both serum bilirubin (pchest tube effluent from control group (27 patients with left side thoracic trauma). Serum ALT and AST were higher in RST injury patients (ptrauma appears to be safe. Bile originating from the liver injury reaches the right thoracic cavity but does not reflect the severity of that injury. The highest concentration was found in the patient failing non-operative management. The presence of intrathoracic bile in selected patients who sustain RST penetrating trauma, with liver injury, does not preclude non-operative management. Our study suggests that monitoring chest tube effluent bilirubin may provide helpful information when managing a patient non-operatively.

  2. Pitfalls in penetrating thoracic trauma (lessons we learned the hard way...).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiannis, Elias; Zinn, Richard Joseph

    2008-10-01

    The majority of patients with penetrating thoracic trauma are managed non-operatively. Those requiring surgery usually go to theater with physiological instability. The critical condition of these patients coupled with the rarity of penetrating thoracic trauma in most European countries makes their surgical management challenging for the occasional trauma surgeon, who is usually trained as a general surgeon. Most general surgeons have a general knowledge of basic cardiothoracic operative surgery, knowledge originating from their training years and possibly enhanced by reading operative surgery textbooks. Unfortunately, the details included in most of these books are not extensive enough to provide him with enough armamentaria to tackle the difficult case. In this anatomical region, their operative dexterity and knowledge cannot be compared to that of their cardiothoracic colleagues, something that is taken for granted in their cardiothoracic trauma textbooks. Techniques that are considered basic and easy by the cardiothoracic surgeons can be unfamiliar and difficult to general surgeons. Knowing the danger points and the pitfalls that will be encountered in cardiothoracic trauma surgery will help them to avoid intraoperative errors and improve patient outcome. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight the commonly encountered pitfalls by trauma surgeons operating on penetrating trauma to the chest.

  3. Transient electrocardiographic abnormalities following blunt chest trauma in a child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udink ten Cate, Floris; Heerde, van Marc; Rammeloo, Lukas; Hruda, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Blunt cardiac injury may occur in patients after suffering nonpenetrating trauma of the chest. It encompasses a wide spectrum of cardiac injury with varied severity and clinical presentation. Electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently encountered. This article presents a case of a child

  4. Imaging of blunt chest trauma; Bildgebung des stumpfen Thoraxtraumas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Negrin, L. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [German] Stumpfe Thoraxtraumen gehen mit einer hohen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet einher. Daher sollten Patienten mit Verdacht auf ein stumpfes Thoraxtrauma rasch radiologisch untersucht werden, damit die entsprechenden therapeutischen Schritte zeitgerecht eingeleitet werden koennen. Zur Abklaerung von Patienten nach einem stumpfen Thoraxtrauma sind seit Jahren das konventionelle Lungenroentgen und die Computertomographie bewaehrte Verfahren. In den letzten Jahren hat die fokussierte Ultraschalluntersuchung (eFAST, Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma) von schwerverletzten Patienten vermehrt an Bedeutung gewonnen. Durch eine eFAST-Untersuchung kann in der Akutphase rasch geklaert werden, ob bei dem Patienten ein therapiebeduerftiger Pneumothorax, Haematoperikard oder Haematothorax vorliegen. Auch das Lungenroentgen wird zur Diagnose eines Pneumothorax oder Haematothorax eingesetzt, wenngleich seine Sensitivitaet deutlich eingeschraenkt ist. Die CT ist das diagnostische Verfahren der Wahl, um v. a. Patienten mit einem schweren Thoraxtrauma abzuklaeren. (orig.)

  5. Mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, H; Hamanaka, Y; Hirai, S; Mitsui, N; Kobayashi, T

    2001-06-01

    A 21 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of chest and back pain after blunt chest trauma. On admission, consciousness was clear and a physical examination showed labored breathing. Her vital signs were stable, but her breathing gradually worsened, and artificial respiration was started. The chest roentgenogram and a subsequent chest computed tomographic scans revealed contusions, hemothorax of the left lung and multiple rib fractures. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and mild mitral regurgitation (MR). TTE was carried out repeatedly, and revealed gradually progressive MR and prolapse of the posterior medial leaflet, although there was no congestive heart failure. After her general condition had recovered, surgery was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed torn chordae at the posterior medial leaflet. The leaflet where the chorda was torn was cut and plicated, and posterior mitral annuloplasty was performed using a prosthetic ring. One month later following discharge, the MR had disappeared on TTE.

  6. Thoracic Trauma: Which Chest Tube When and Where?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Tamas F

    2017-02-01

    Clinical suspicion of hemo/pneumothorax: when in doubt, drain the chest. Stable chest trauma with hemo/pneumothorax: drain and wait. Unstable patient with dislocated trachea must be approached with drain in hand and scalpel ready. Massive hemo/pneumothorax may be controlled by drainage alone. The surgeon should not hesitate to open the chest if too much blood drains over a short period. The chest drainage procedure does not end with the last stitch; the second half of the match is still ahead. The drained patient is in need of physiotherapy and proper pain relief with an extended pleural space: control the suction system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tracheobronchial injuries in blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid Montazeri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tracheobronchial injuries are uncommon but potentially fatal complication of blunt thoracic trauma harboring a high morbidity and mortality if not diagnosed early . A recent series gleaning cases from four major Trauma Center in Los Angeles nine cases in a seven- year period , but the incidence of these injuries has been increasing recently. This has been attributed to improvement in hospital care and advanced Trauma Centers and earlier diagnosis of such injuries. Disruption of tight main bronchus is more common, such injuries are often associated with rib or clavicular fractures. Findings: Clinical and paraclinical data gathered from records of three patients referred with tracheobronchial injuries during the recent ten years have been reviewed .These include clinical manifestations, diagnostic findings, treatment modality and clinical course. The outcome has been satisfactory in all three patients who have undergone operation 2-5 hours after sustaining the injury. We have not had any mortality. Conclusion: These results are similar to those of other series emphasizing over early diagnosis and treatment of such injuries .

  8. Can routine trauma bay chest x-ray be bypassed with an extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soult, Michael C; Weireter, Leonard J; Britt, Rebecca C; Collins, Jay N; Novosel, Timothy J; Reed, Scott F; Britt, L D

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound (US) in place of portable chest x-ray (CXR) for the rapid detection of a traumatic pneumothorax (PTX) requiring urgent decompression in the trauma bay. All patients who presented as a trauma alert to a single institution from August 2011 to May 2012 underwent an extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST). The thoracic cavity was examined using four-view US imaging and were interpreted by a chief resident (Postgraduate Year 4) or attending staff. US results were compared with CXR and chest computed tomography (CT) scans, when obtained. The average age was 37.8 years and 68 per cent of the patients were male. Blunt injury occurred in 87 per cent and penetrating injury in 12 per cent of activations. US was able to predict the absence of PTX on CXR with a sensitivity of 93.8 per cent, specificity of 98 per cent, and a negative predictive value of 99.9 per cent compared with CXR. The only missed PTX seen on CXR was a small, low anterior, loculated PTX that was stable for transport to CT. The use of thoracic US during the FAST can rapidly and safely detect the absence of a clinically significant PTX. US can replace routine CXR obtained in the trauma bay and allow more rapid initiation of definitive imaging studies.

  9. Paediatric chest wall trauma causing delayed presentation of ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegethoff, Angela M; Raney, Emerald; Mendelson, Jenny; Minckler, Michael R

    2017-07-24

    This report describes a paediatric patient presenting with haemodynamically stable non-sustained ventricular tachycardia 1 day after minor blunt chest trauma. Initial laboratory studies, chest X-ray and echocardiography were normal; however, cardiac MRI revealed precordial haematoma, myocardial contusion and small pericardial effusion. Throughout her hospital course, she remained asymptomatic aside from frequent couplets and triplets of premature ventricular contractions. Ectopy was controlled with oral verapamil. This case highlights how significant cardiac injury may be missed with standard diagnostic algorithms. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Non-Invasive Mechanic Ventilation Using in Flail Chest, Caused By Blunt Chest Trauma

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    Serdar Onat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman admitted our faculty emergency room with shortness of breath, and chest pain after traffic accident’s second hour. She was diagnosed as bilateral multipl rib fractures, left clavicula fracture, and left flail chest by phsical and radiological examinations. She was transfered to Chest Surgery Depatment’s intensive care unit. The patient was undergone non-invasive mask mechanic ventilation support, because of the decreasing of blood oxygen saturation and increasing of arteriel blood partial carbondioxide pressure. The treatment of non-invasive mechanic ventilation was succesfull for ventilation support. With this report, we would like to attentioned that non-invasive mechanic ventilation for blunt chest trauma patients could be used succesfully and could be used instead of endotracheal invasive mechanic ventilation.

  11. Prior blunt chest trauma may be a cause of single vessel coronary disease; hypothesis and review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Nielsen, PE; Sleight, P

    2006-01-01

    Prompted by a case where a patient (with no risk factors, and single vessel disease) developed angina pectoris after previous blunt chest trauma, we searched Medline for blunt chest trauma and myocardial ischaemia. We found 77 cases describing AMI after blunt chest trauma, but only one reporting...... angina pectoris. We focused on the age and sex distribution, type of trauma, the angiography findings and the time interval between the trauma and the angiography. The age distribution was atypical, compared to AMI in general; 82% of the patients with AMI after blunt chest trauma were less than 45 years......, which strongly suggested a causal relation between the trauma and subsequent occlusion. AMI should therefore be considered in patients suffering from chest pain after blunt chest trauma. Because traumatic AMI might often be the result of an intimal tear or dissection, thrombolytic therapy might worsen...

  12. Delayed pneumothorax complicating minor rib fracture after chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Shian; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Liu, Hui-Ping; Kao, Chiung-Lun

    2008-06-01

    Pneumothorax (PTX) after trauma is a preventable cause of death. Drainage procedures such as chest tube insertion have been traditionally advocated to prevent fatal tension PTX. We evaluated the safety of close observation in patients with delayed PTX complicating rib fracture after minor chest trauma. Adult patients (>18 years) with a diagnosis of chest trauma and 3 or fewer fractured ribs were reviewed. Case patients were divided according to age, location and number of fractured ribs, mechanism of trauma, and initial pulmonary complication after thoracic trauma for comparative analysis. There were 207 male (70.2%) and 88 female (29.8%) patients whose ages ranged from 18 to 93 years (median, 55 years). The mechanisms of trauma were a motor vehicle accident in 207 patients, falls in 66, pedestrian injury in 10, and assaults in 14. Ninety-five patients sustained 1 rib fracture, 95 had 2 rib fractures, and 105 suffered 3 rib fractures. Right-sided injury occurred in 164 cases, left-sided injury did in 127, and bilateral injury did in 4. The most frequent location of rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib. The initial pulmonary complications after trauma were PTX in 16 patients, hemothorax in 43, pneumohemothorax in 14, lung contusion in 75, and isolated subcutaneous emphysema (SubcEmph) in 33. Thirty percent of the patients (n = 5/16) who presented with traumatic PTX were observed safely without drainage. Delayed PTX was recorded in 16 patients, occurring mostly during the first 2 days of their admission. Associated extrathoracic injury was recorded in 189 patients. The mean hospital stay of the patients was 7.66 days. Longer hospital stay was related to increasing number of fractured ribs, need for thoracic drainage, and the presence of associated extrathoracic injury. The mortality rate for the entire group was 2%. The presence of SubcEmph was the only risk factor associated with the development of delayed PTX. Patients sustaining blunt chest

  13. Emergency operation for penetrating thoracic trauma in a metropolitan surgical service in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Damian Luiz; Quazi, Muhammed A; Reddy, Kriban; Thomson, Sandie Rutherford

    2011-09-01

    This audit examines our total experience with penetrating thoracic trauma. It reviews all the patients who were brought alive to our surgical service and all who were taken directly to the mortuary. The group of patients who underwent emergency operation for penetrating thoracic trauma is examined in detail. A prospective trauma registry is maintained by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Complex. This database was retrospectively interrogated for all patients requiring an emergency thoracic operation for penetrating injury from July 2006 till July 2009. A retrospective review of mortuary data for the same period was undertaken to identify patients with penetrating thoracic trauma who had been taken to the forensic mortuary. Over the 3-year period July 2006 to July 2009, a total of 1186 patients, 77 of whom were female, were admitted to the surgical services in Pietermaritzburg with penetrating thoracic trauma. There were 124 gunshot wounds and 1062 stab wounds. A total of 108 (9%) patients required emergency operation during the period under review. The mechanism of trauma in the operative group was stab wounds (n = 102), gunshot wound (n = 4), stab with compass (n = 1), and impalement by falling on an arrow (n = 1). Over the same period 676 persons with penetrating thoracic trauma were taken to the mortuary. There were 135 (20%) gunshot wounds of the chest in the mortuary cohort. The overall mortality for penetrating thoracic trauma was 541 (33%) of 1603 for stab wounds and 135 (52%) of 259 for gunshot wounds of the chest. Among the 541 subjects with stab wounds from the mortuary cohort, there were 206 (38%) with cardiac injuries. In the emergency operation group there were 11 (10%) deaths. In 76 patients a cardiac injury was identified. The other injuries identified were lung parenchyma bleeding (n = 12) intercostal vessels (n = 10), great vessels of the chest (n = 6), internal thoracic vessel (n = 2), and pericardial injury with no myocardial injury (n = 2

  14. Rib fractures in blunt chest trauma - associated thoracic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Dimitrov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The aim of our retrospective study was to analyze the patterns of associated thoracic injuries in patients underwent blunt chest trauma and rib fractures. METHODS. The study included 212 patients with rib fractures due to blunt thoracic trauma. The mechanism of trauma, the type of rib fracture and the type of associated injuries were analyzed. RESULTS. The patients were divided in two groups according to the number of fractured ribs-group I included the patients with up to two fractured ribs (72 patients-33,9%, and group II – with ≥3 fractured ribs (140 patients-66,1%. Associated chest injuries were present in 36 of the patients from group I (50%, and in 133 patients from group II (95%. Pulmonary contusion was the most common intrathoracicinjurie-65,6% of the cases. The mean hospital stay was 8, 7 days. The lethality rate was 16,9% -all of them due to the associated chest injuries. CONCLUSIONS. The mortality related to rib fractures is affected by the associated thoracic injuries, the advanced age, and the number of fractured ribs.

  15. Prevalence of chest trauma, associated injuries and mortality: a level I trauma centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysi, Veysi T; Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Paliobeis, Christos; Efstathopoulos, Nicolas; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2009-10-01

    A review of prospectively collected data in our trauma unit for the years 1998-2003 was undertaken. Adult patients who suffered multiple trauma with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of >/=16, admitted to hospital for more than 72 hours and with sustained blunt chest injuries were included in the study. Demographic details including pre-hospital care, trauma history, admission vital signs, blood transfusions, details of injuries and their abbreviated injury scores (AIS), operations, length of intensive care unit and hospital stays, Injury Severity Score (ISS) and mortality were analysed. Fulfilling the inclusion criteria with at least one chest injury were 1,164 patients. The overall mortality reached 18.7%. As expected, patients in the higher AIS groups had both a higher overall ISS and mortality rate with one significant exception; patients with minor chest injuries (AIS(chest) = 1) were associated with mortality comparable to injuries involving an AIS(chest) = 3. Additionally, the vast majority of polytraumatised patients with an AIS(chest) = 1 died in ICU sooner than patients of groups 2-5.

  16. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Pessoa, Fernanda Miraldi Clement; Saint-Martin, Nara; Ancilotti Filho, Roger [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. Material and Methods: We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8%) were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2%) were caused by another type of weapon. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%), manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%), atelectasis in 8 (20%), lacerations in 1 (2.5%) and hematomas in 1 (2.5%). Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%), and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%). Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%), including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%), hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%), and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%). Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%). Conclusion: In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach. (author)

  17. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Severo Alves de Melo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. Material and Methods: We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8% were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2% were caused by another type of weapon. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%, manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%, atelectasis in 8 (20%, lacerations in 1 (2.5% and hematomas in 1 (2.5%. Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%, and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%. Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%, including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%, hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%, and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%. Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%. Conclusion: In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach.

  18. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves; Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Pessoa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente; Saint-Martin, Nara; Ancilotti Filho, Roger; Souza, Arthur Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8%) were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2%) were caused by another type of weapon. Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%), manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%), atelectasis in 8 (20%), lacerations in 1 (2.5%) and hematomas in 1 (2.5%). Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%), and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%). Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%), including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%), hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%), and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%). Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%). In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach.

  19. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Pessoa, Fernanda Miraldi Clement; Saint-Martin, Nara; Ancilotti Filho, Roger; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. Material and Methods: We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8%) were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2%) were caused by another type of weapon. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%), manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%), atelectasis in 8 (20%), lacerations in 1 (2.5%) and hematomas in 1 (2.5%). Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%), and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%). Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%), including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%), hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%), and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%). Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%). Conclusion: In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach. (author)

  20. Chest Traumas due to Bicycle accident in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim:Childhood injuries are the leading cause of death in children and result in significant healthcare utilization. Trauma is the second most common cause of mortality in children aged 1-4 years and leading cause of death in children older than 4 years. Thoracic injury is the second most leading cause of death in traumatized children. Multisystemic injury is found in more than 50% of children with thoracic injuries most of which are secondary to blunt traumas. We planned this study to evaluate thorax trauma cases secondary to bicycle driving in childhood and to draw attention to the importance of the regulation of traffic rules, the education of bicycle drivers.Material and Methods:  A retrospective evaluation was performed in 17 pediatric patients admitted to the Department of Thoracic Surgery during 2006-2010 with a diagnosis of chest trauma due to bicycle driving. For every patient, a pediatric trauma score (PTS was calculated. Descriptive statistics were performed for PTS. Results; Eleven (64.70% cases were injured due to the tricycle accidents and six cases 6 (35.29% were injured due to the two-wheeled bicycle accidents. The most frequent thoracic pathologies included pulmonary contusion (41.2% and chest wall contusion (29.41%. Extrathoracic injuries were seen in 35.29%, the extremities (17.64% and abdomino pelvic (11.76% being the most commonly involved. Treatment consisted of symptomatic treatment in 12 patients (70.58%, tube thoracostomy in 2 patients (11.76%, and thoracotomy in 1 patient (5.9%. The morbidity was seen in 3 patients (17.64%. The mortality rate was 5.9% (n:1. The mean PTS of the cases who had additional system injuries were significantly worse than the cases who had isolated chest traumas Conclusions: The pediatric thorax has a greater cartilage content and incomplete ossification of the ribs. Due to the pliability of the pediatric rib cage and mediastinal mobility, significant intrathoracic injury may exist in the

  1. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, Baig M.; Hefny, Ashraf F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. Presentation of case: A 63- year- old man presented...

  2. Sternotomy or drainage for a hemopericardium after penetrating trauma: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Andrew J; Navsaria, Pradeep H; Hommes, Martijn; Ball, Chad G; Edu, Sorin; Kahn, Delawir

    2014-03-01

    To determine if stable patients with a hemopericardium detected after penetrating chest trauma can be safely managed with pericardial drainage alone. The current international practice is to perform a sternotomy and cardiac repair if a hemopericardium is detected after penetrating chest trauma. The experience in Cape Town, South Africa, on performing a mandatory sternotomy in hemodynamically stable patients was that a sternotomy was unnecessary and the cardiac injury, if present, had sealed. A single-center parallel-group randomized controlled study was completed. All hemodynamically stable patients with a hemopericardium confirmed at subxiphoid pericardial window (SPW), and no active bleeding, were randomized. The primary outcome measure was survival to discharge from hospital. Secondary outcomes were complications and postoperative hospital stay. Fifty-five patients were randomized to sternotomy and 56 to pericardial drainage and wash-out only. Fifty-one of the 55 patients (93%) randomized to sternotomy had either no cardiac injury or a tangential injury. There were only 4 patients with penetrating wounds to the endocardium and all had sealed. There was 1 death postoperatively among the 111 patients (0.9%) and this was in the sternotomy group. The mean intensive care unit (ICU) stay for a sternotomy was 2.04 days (range, 0-25 days) compared with 0.25 days (range, 0-2) for the drainage (P drainage group (95% CI: 0.8-2.7). Total hospital stay was significantly shorter in the SPW group (P drainage is effective and safe in the stable patient with a hemopericardium after penetrating chest trauma, with no increase in mortality and a shorter ICU and hospital stay. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00823160).

  3. [Liver trauma due to penetrating lesions: miscellanea, personal case series, clinical and CT findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, A; Nocera, V; De Rosa, A; Rossi, E; Carbone, M; Gatta, G; Vitale, L; Vigliotti, A

    2000-12-01

    Penetrating liver wounds are related to many causes and rank second after blunt abdominal and liver trauma. We will report the clinical and radiological findings of our personal series of patients with penetrating trauma, especially by firearms and stab and cut wounds. We will also try to define the diagnostic workup of these traumas, which is especially based on CT signs of liver damage and associated changes and which is of basic importance for following treatment, both surgical or conservative. In the last seven years we retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of penetrating liver trauma. The patients were 19 men and 12 women, ranging in age 18 to 73 (mean 42), with penetrating liver injuries from firearms (16 patients) and stab (9 cases) wounds; 6 patients had injuries from different causes. Abdominal CT was carried out in emergency with the CT Angiography (CTA) technique in all patients. In the patients with suspected chest and abdomen involvement CT was performed from the mid-chest for accurate assessment of diaphragm and lung bases and to exclude associated pleuropulmonary damage. Penetrating liver wounds were caused by firearms in 70% of cases, by stabbing in 12% and, in the extant 18%, by other causes such as home accidents, road and work traumas, and liver biopsy. In our series, the liver was most frequently involved, especially by firearms wounds; in our 16 cases the most frequent injuries were hemorrhagic tears. We found bullets in the liver in 6 cases. In one case of home accident the patient wounded himself while slicing bread with a long knife, which cut into the anterior abdominal wall and tore the anterior liver capsule, as seen at CTA. Penetrating wounds to liver and abdomen are less frequent than those to the chest. In the past decade the use of CT has changed the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to such injuries completely, decreasing the resort to explorative laparotomy and hepatorrhaphy. Indeed, CT provides a clear picture of the extent and

  4. Liver trauma from penetrating injuries. Miscellanea, personal series, clinical and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzano, A.; Nocera, V.; De Rosa, A.; Vigliotti, A.; Rossi, E.; Carbone, M.; Gatta, G.

    2000-01-01

    Penetrating liver wounds are related to many causes and rank second after blunt abdominal and liver trauma. In this report are examined the clinical and radiological findings of personal series of patients with penetrating trauma, especially by firearms and stab and cut wounds. It will also tried to define the diagnostic workup of these traumas, which is especially based on CT signs of liver damage and associated changes and which is of basic importance for following treatment, both surgical or conservative. In the last seven years it was retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of penetrating liver trauma. The patients were 19 men and 12 women, ranging in age 18 to 73 (mean 42), with penetrating liver injuries from firearms (16 patients) and stab (9 cases) wounds; 6 patients had injuries from different cases. Abdominal CT was carried out in emergency with the CT Angiography (CTA) technique in all patients. In the patients with suspected chest and abdomen involvement CT was performed from the mid-chest for accurate assessment of diaphragm and lung bases and to exclude associated pleuropulmonary damage. Penetrating liver wounds were caused by firearms in 70% of cases, by stabbing in 12% and, in the extant 18%, by other cases such as home accidents, road and work traumas, and liver biopsy. In this series, the liver was most frequently involved, especially by firearms wounds; in the 16 cases the most frequent injuries were hemorrhagic tears. It was found bullets in the liver in 6 cases. In one case of home accident the patient wounded himself while slicing bread with a long knife, which cut into the anterior abdominal wall and tore the anterior liver capsule, as seen at CTA. Penetrating wounds to liver and abdomen are less frequent than those to the chest. In the past decade the use of CT has changed the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to such injuries completely, decreasing the resort to explorative laparotomy and hepatorrhaphy. Indeed, CT provides a clear picture of

  5. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Norikazu; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Makiko; Nakamori, Shoji; Kanazawa, Toru; Kuriyama, Keiko; Mano, Masayuki; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient's chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery. PMID:24660001

  6. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient’s chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery.

  7. CT analysis of pulmonary injuries from blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Shoko

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the CT findings of pulmonary parenchymal injuries due to blunt chest trauma and to categorize CT findings on the basis of their outcome. The materials of this study consist of 62 patients who had pulmonary injuries on CT obtained within 6 hours after blunt chest trauma. CT findings were analysed with regards to the shape, size, and distribution of the lesions. Follow-up CT scans were obtained in 35 patients at intervals from 1 day to 1 month after the initial CT study. CT showed ill-defined opacities in 59 patients (64 lesions in the peripheral area and 95 in the non-peripheral area) and pulmonary nodules with or without cavitary lesions in 30 patients (7 lesions in the peripheral area and 31 in the non-peripheral area). Follow-up CT allowed the classification of these pulmonary injuries into 3 types; the non-peripheral, ill-defined opacities showing immediate clearing, nodules with or without cavitary lesions over 1 cm in diameter showing prolongation, and the peripheral ill-defined opacities adjacent to the thoracic cage, and small nodules with or without cavitary lesions within 1 cm in diameter, showing various courses. CT has marked advantage over plain chest radiographs not only in the detection rate but in accurate estimation of the prognosis of the lesions. (author)

  8. Abdominal penetrating trauma and organ damage and its prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Abri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abdominal penetrating trauma is still a serious problem in the world, due to its high prevalence in young people that impose a heavy economic burden on our country, we decided to evaluate the epidemiologic and demographic status and patient’s prognosis. Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study; all patients with abdominal penetrating trauma referred to the emergency department of Imam Reza Hospital between March 2012 and March 2014 were enrolled to study. Age, sex, injured organs, mechanism of trauma and the prognosis was documented in the checklist. Data was analyzed by SPSS 15.0, and descriptive analysis was run. Results: In this study, 137 patients were enrolled; 103 patients (75.20% did not have visceral damage. In visceral injury, the spleen was most commonly injured abdominal organs (8.03%. the damage to small intestine seen in 8 patients (5.84%, kidney and liver damage seen in 6 patients (4.38% and 5 patients, respectively, and finally diaphragm and colon injury was seen in 2 patients (1.46%. Conclusion: According to a recent study, abdominal penetrating trauma mostly occurred in men. The most common cause of abdominal penetrating trauma was related to knife damage; spleen was commonly damaged organ caused by knives and other sharp objects.

  9. Evaluation of chest and abdominal injuries in trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of poursina teaching hospital, guilan, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hossein; Kazemnezhad-Leili, Ehsan; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Darzi, Ali Asghar; Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, Ali; Dehnadi-Moghaddam, Anoush; Kouchakinejad-Eramsadati, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Trauma, especially chest and abdominal trauma are increasing due to the growing number of vehicles on the roads, which leads to an increased incidence of road accidents. Urbanization, industrialization and additional problems are the other associated factors which accelerate this phenomenon. A better understanding of the etiology and pattern of such injuries can help to improve the management and ultimate the outcomes of these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the patients with chest and abdominal trauma hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital, Guilan, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the data of all chest and abdominal trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital were collected from March 2011 to March 2012. Information about age, gender, injured areas, type of injury (penetrating or blunt), etiology of the injury, accident location (urban or rural) and patients' discharge outcomes were collected by a questionnaire. In total, 211 patients with a mean age of 34.1 ± 1.68 years was entered into the study. The most common cause of trauma was traffic accidents (51.7%). Among patients with chest trauma, 45 cases (35.4%) had penetrating injuries and 82 cases (64.6%) blunt lesions. The prevalence of chest injuries was 35.5% and rib fractures 26.5%. In chest injuries, the prevalence of hemothorax was 65.3%, pneumothorax 2.7%, lung contusion 4% and emphysema 1.3%, respectively. There were 24 cases (27.9%) with abdominal trauma which had penetrating lesions and 62 cases (72.1%) with blunt lesions. The most common lesions in patients with penetrating abdominal injuries were spleen (24.2%) and liver (12.1%) lesions. The outcomes of the patients were as follow: 95.7% recovery and 4.3% death. The majority of deaths were observed among road traffic victims (77.7%). Considering the fact that road-related accidents are quite predictable and controllable; therefore, the quality promotion of traumatic patients' care

  10. Chest wall stabilization in trauma patients: why, when, and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas W.

    2018-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest wall and rib fractures are remarkably frequent and are the basis of considerable morbidity and possible mortality. Surgical remedies for highly displaced rib fractures, especially in cases of flail chest, have been undertaken intermittently for more than 50 years. Rib-specific plating systems have started to be used in the last 10 years. These have ushered in the modern era of rib repair with chest wall stabilization (CWS) techniques that are safer, easier to perform, and more efficient. Recent consensus statements have sought to define the indications and contraindications, as well as the when, the how, and the technical details of CWS. Repair should be considered for patients who have three or more displaced rib fractures or a flail chest, whether or not mechanical ventilation is required. Additional candidates include patients who fail non-operative management irrespective of fracture pattern and those with rib fractures who need thoracic procedures for other reasons. Traditionally, unstable spine fracture and severe traumatic brain injury are definite contraindications. Pulmonary contusion’s role in the decision to perform CWS remains controversial. A range of rib-specific plating systems are now commercially available. PMID:29744222

  11. Isolated right atrial appendage rupture following blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Rakesh; Lafayette, Nathan; Sywak, Michael; Ricketts, Gregory; Otero, Jorge; Kurtzman, Scott; Zhang, Zhongqiu

    2018-02-01

    Right sided tears or rupture are the most common injury to the heart after blunt chest trauma. The majority of these injuries are to the thin walled atrium. Reports of localized right atrial appendage rupture are rare. The classical features of Beck's triad are unreliable in the trauma bay. With the advent of EFAST (Focused assessment with sonography for trauma extended to thorax), Beck's triad should be considered but not used as the primary clinical tool for diagnosis of cardiac tamponade [1]. EFAST aids in rapid diagnosis and definitive care [3]. Our patient was a 17 year old male who presented with hypotension after a rollover motor vehicle accident. He presented with a grossly negative physical exam and positive EFAST for pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology. We performed an emergency pericardiocentesis and expedited transportation for operative exploration. A Right atrial appendage injury was identified and repaired and patient recovered uneventfully. EFAST examination aids in rapid diagnosis of cardiac tamponade in the trauma setting. Pericardiocentesis facilitates temporizing the hemodynamics in preparation for operative exploration.

  12. Profile of thoracic trauma victims submitted to chest drainage

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    CESAR AUGUSTO BROSKA JÚNIOR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to describe and compare the variables involved in trauma victims undergoing thoracic drainage. Methods: we conducted a retrospective, analytical, descriptive, cross-sectional study, with medical records of patients attended at the Trauma Service of the Curitiba Evangelical University Hospital between February 2011 and January 2014. Results: there were 488 patients undergoing chest drainage, 84.7% men and 15.3% women, with an average age of 38.2 years. Attendances usually occurred at night, without predominance between open or closed mechanism, gender or age group. The majority of patients with thoracic trauma requiring drainage were diagnosed by anamnesis and physical examination (41.1% and drained in the emergency room (80.8%. Most of the patients (66.2% had another associated lesion, mostly some abdominal viscera. Complications were present in 16.6% (81 patients, most of them due to drainage positioning error (9.2%. The mean hospital stay was 15 days and drainage lasted for an average of 8.1 days, with no statistical difference between open and closed trauma. The clinical outcome was discharge in most cases. Conclusion: the profile of patients with thoracic trauma is that of young men, attended at night, with some other associated lesion. Although diagnosis and treatment were rapid and most often without the need for complex examinations, the time of drainage, hospitalization and complications were higher than in the literature, which can be explained by the drainage being made at the Emergency Room and the presence of associated injuries.

  13. Lessons from a large trauma center: impact of blunt chest trauma in polytrauma patients-still a relevant problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysou, Konstantina; Halat, Gabriel; Hoksch, Beatrix; Schmid, Ralph A; Kocher, Gregor J

    2017-04-20

    Thoracic trauma is the third most common cause of death after abdominal injury and head trauma in polytrauma patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate epidemiological data, treatment and outcome of polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma in order to help improve management, prevent complications and decrease polytrauma patients' mortality. In this retrospective study we included all polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma admitted to our tertiary care center emergency department for a 2-year period, from June 2012 until May 2014. Data collection included details of treatment and outcome. Patients with chest trauma and Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥18 and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) >2 in more than one body region were included. A total of 110 polytrauma patients with blunt chest injury were evaluated. 82 of them were males and median age was 48.5 years. Car accidents, falls from a height and motorbike accidents were the most common causes (>75%) for blunt chest trauma. Rib fractures, pneumothorax and pulmonary contusion were the most common chest injuries. Most patients (64.5%) sustained a serious chest injury (AIS thorax 3), 19.1% a severe chest injury (AIS thorax 4) and 15.5% a moderate chest injury (AIS thorax 2). 90% of patients with blunt chest trauma were treated conservatively. Chest tube insertion was indicated in 54.5% of patients. The need for chest tube was significantly higher among the AIS thorax 4 group in comparison to the AIS groups 3 and 2 (p < 0.001). Also, admission to the ICU was directly related to the severity of the AIS thorax (p < 0.001). The severity of chest trauma did not correlate with ICU length of stay, intubation days, complications or mortality. Although 84.5% of patients suffered from serious or even severe chest injury, neither in the conservative nor in the surgically treated group a significant impact of injury severity on ICU stay, intubation days, complications or mortality was observed. AIS

  14. Analytical review of 664 cases of penetrating buttock trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive review of data has not yet been provided as penetrating injury to the buttock is not a common condition accounting for 2-3% of all penetrating injuries. The aim of the study is to provide the as yet lacking analytical review of the literature on penetrating trauma to the buttock, with appraisal of characteristics, features, outcomes, and patterns of major injuries. Based on these results we will provide an algorithm. Using a set of terms we searched the databases Pub Med, EMBASE, Cochran, and CINAHL for articles published in English between 1970 and 2010. We analysed cumulative data from prospective and retrospective studies, and case reports. The literature search revealed 36 relevant articles containing data on 664 patients. There was no grade A evidence found. The injury population mostly consists of young males (95.4%) with a high proportion missile injury (75.9%). Bleeding was found to be the key problem which mostly occurs from internal injury and results in shock in 10%. Overall mortality is 2.9% with significant adverse impact of visceral or vascular injury and shock (P colon, or rectum injuries leading in shot wounds, whilst vascular injury leads in stab wounds (P trauma. In conclusion, penetrating buttock trauma should be regarded as a life-threatening injury with impact beyond the pelvis until proven otherwise. PMID:21995834

  15. Scapular Fractures in Blunt Chest Trauma – Self-Experience Study

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    Tabet A. Al-Sadek

    2016-11-01

    CONCLUSIONS:The study confirms the role of scapular fractures as a marker for the severity of the chest trauma (based on the number of associated thoracic injuries, but doesn’t present scapular fractures as an indicator for high mortality in blunt chest trauma patients.

  16. Initial assessment of chest X-ray in thoracic trauma patients: Awareness of specific injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aukema, Tjeerd S.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Hietbrink, Falco; Leenen, Luke Ph

    2012-01-01

    To compare the reported injuries on initial assessment of the chest X-ray (CXR) in thoracic trauma patients to a second read performed by a dedicated trauma radiologist. By retrospective analysis of a prospective database, 712 patients with an injury to the chest admitted to the University Medical

  17. Postmortem ventilation in cases of penetrating gunshot and stab wounds to the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germerott, Tanja; Preiss, Ulrich S; Ross, Steffen G; Thali, Michael J; Flach, Patricia M

    2013-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of postmortem ventilation in combination with a suction pump in cases showing penetrating trauma to the chest with haemo- and/or pneumothorax, for better evaluation of the lungs in postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). The study included 6 subjects (1 female, 5 male; age 32-67years) with a penetrating gunshot or stab wound to the chest and consecutive pneumo- and/or haemothorax. The pneumo- and haemothorax were evacuated by a suction pump, and postmortem ventilation was applied using a home care ventilator. PMCT images with and without postmortem ventilation were compared, as well as the autopsy results. In three cases haemo- and pneumothorax was clearly reduced. Postmortem ventilation led to distinct re-expansion of the lungs in two cases, and to re-expansion of single lung lobes in two cases with shotgun injuries. No visible effect was seen in the remaining two cases, because of extensive destruction of lung tissue and blood aspiration. In two cases the injuries sustained in the individual lung lobes were successfully located during postmortem ventilation. The bullet channel was apparent in one case; in another case, injury of the pericardium became visible by generating pneumopericardium. The present method is capable of improving evaluation of the postmortem lung in the presence of single stab or gunshot wounds and if there is no severe destruction of the respiratory system and aspiration. Forensic autopsy should still be considered as the gold standard, although in some cases the present method might be helpful, especially where no autopsy is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Imaging assessment of penetrating craniocerebral and spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offiah, C.; Twigg, S.

    2009-01-01

    Craniocerebral and spinal penetrating trauma, which may be either missile (most typically gun-related) or non-missile (most typically knife-related), is becoming an increasingly common presentation to the urban general and specialized radiology service in the UK. These injuries carry significant morbidity and mortality with a number of criteria for prognosis identifiable on cross-sectional imaging. Potential complications can also be pre-empted by awareness of certain neuroradiological features. Not all of these injuries are criminal in origin, however, a significant proportion will be, requiring, on occasion, provision of both ante-mortem and post-mortem radiological opinion to the criminal investigative procedure. This review aims to highlight certain imaging features of penetrating craniocerebral and spinal trauma including important prognostic, therapeutic, and forensic considerations.

  19. Profile of thoracic trauma victims submitted to chest drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broska, Cesar Augusto; Botelho, Adriane Barbosa; Linhares, André DE Castro; DE-Oliveria, Mariana Santos; Veronese, Gabriela; Naufel, Carlos Roberto; Batista, Lislaine Cruz; Diogo, Maria Angélica Kurpel

    2017-01-01

    to describe and compare the variables involved in trauma victims undergoing thoracic drainage. we conducted a retrospective, analytical, descriptive, cross-sectional study, with medical records of patients attended at the Trauma Service of the Curitiba Evangelical University Hospital between February 2011 and January 2014. there were 488 patients undergoing chest drainage, 84.7% men and 15.3% women, with an average age of 38.2 years. Attendances usually occurred at night, without predominance between open or closed mechanism, gender or age group. The majority of patients with thoracic trauma requiring drainage were diagnosed by anamnesis and physical examination (41.1%) and drained in the emergency room (80.8%). Most of the patients (66.2%) had another associated lesion, mostly some abdominal viscera. Complications were present in 16.6% (81 patients), most of them due to drainage positioning error (9.2%). The mean hospital stay was 15 days and drainage lasted for an average of 8.1 days, with no statistical difference between open and closed trauma. The clinical outcome was discharge in most cases. the profile of patients with thoracic trauma is that of young men, attended at night, with some other associated lesion. Although diagnosis and treatment were rapid and most often without the need for complex examinations, the time of drainage, hospitalization and complications were higher than in the literature, which can be explained by the drainage being made at the Emergency Room and the presence of associated injuries. descrever e comparar as variáveis envolvidas nos pacientes vítimas de trauma torácico submetidos à drenagem de tórax. estudo transversal descritivo analítico retrospectivo realizado com prontuários de pacientes atendidos no Serviço de Trauma do Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba entre fevereiro de 2011 e janeiro de 2014. neste período foram atendidos 488 pacientes, 84,7% homens e 15,3% mulheres, com média de idade de 38,2 anos

  20. Usefulness of routine computed tomography in the evaluation of penetrating war injuries to the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Bassam; Mahfouz, Mohammad Z; Izzat, Mohammad Bashar

    2018-05-02

    This review was conducted to compare the contributions of chest X-ray (CXR) and computed tomography (CT) towards detecting intrathoracic damage in patients with penetrating war injuries to the chest and to determine whether identification of additional injuries by chest CT will have an impact on the choice of therapeutic interventions and clinical outcomes. We reviewed records of 449 patients (374 men, mean age 29.3 ± 14.8 years) who were admitted to our hospital with penetrating war injuries to the chest over a 7-year period. Collected data included mechanisms of injury, associated injuries, results of CXRs and chest CTs, methods of management, in-hospital stays, complications and mortalities. Immediate screening CXRs were obtained in all patients not requiring emergent thoracotomies, of which 91.4% showed positive signs of injury. Chest CTs were performed at the discretion of the physicians in 49.4% of patients, and CXR-positive findings were confirmed in all cases, while revealing additional injuries in 11% of patients. Chest CT findings led to additional closed chest drainage in 5.6% of patients but had no impact on treatment strategy in 94.4% of scanned patients. Follow-up CXRs showed new positive findings in 22 patients, leading to additional closed chest drainage in 3 patients and delayed open thoracotomies in 7 other patients. CXRs continue as the primary diagnostic modality in the assessment of patients with penetrating war injuries to the chest. Chest CTs can be omitted in most patients, thus reducing CT imaging case-load substantially, while most clinically significant chest injuries remain sufficiently recognized.

  1. Sensitivity of bedside ultrasound and supine anteroposterior chest radiographs for the identification of pneumothorax after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, R Gentry; Stone, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Supine anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs in patients with blunt trauma have poor sensitivity for the identification of pneumothorax. Ultrasound (US) has been proposed as an alternative screening test for pneumothorax in this population. The authors conducted an evidence-based review of the medical literature to compare sensitivity of bedside US and AP chest radiographs in identifying pneumothorax after blunt trauma. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for trials from 1965 through June 2009 using a search strategy derived from the following PICO formulation of our clinical question: patients included adult (18 + years) emergency department (ED) patients in whom pneumothorax was suspected after blunt trauma. The intervention was thoracic ultrasonography for the detection of pneumothorax. The comparator was the supine AP chest radiograph during the initial evaluation of the patient. The outcome was the diagnostic performance of US in identifying the presence of pneumothorax in the study population. The criterion standard for the presence or absence of pneumothorax was computed tomography (CT) of the chest or a rush of air during thoracostomy tube placement (in unstable patients). Prospective, observational trials of emergency physician (EP)-performed thoracic US were included. Trials in which the exams were performed by radiologists or surgeons, or trials that investigated patients suffering penetrating trauma or with spontaneous or iatrogenic pneumothoraces, were excluded. The methodologic quality of the studies was assessed. Qualitative methods were used to summarize the study results. Data analysis consisted of test performance (sensitivity and specificity, with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of thoracic US and supine AP chest radiography. Four prospective observational studies were identified, with a total of 606 subjects who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of US for the detection of pneumothorax ranged from

  2. Traumatic Pulmonary Herniation at the Diaphragmatic Junction in a Pediatric Patient: A Rare Complication of Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlik, Kseniya; Simon, Erin Leslie; Hemmer, Carrie; Ramundo, Maria

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of traumatic intercostal pulmonary herniation in an 11-year-old boy after blunt trauma to the chest, without associated chest wall disruption or pneumothorax. This condition is especially uncommon in children, with only 5 previously reported cases and most occurring after penetrating chest trauma. To date, there are no reports in literature describing traumatic intercostal lung herniation at the diaphragmatic junction with a closed chest cavity in a child. The number of traumatic lung herniation diagnoses may be expanded by a more liberal use of computed tomography when serious injury is suspected. Computed tomography and advanced imaging should be considered in pediatric trauma patients presenting with concern for intrathoracic injury that may not be seen on plain film. Traumatic blunt intrathoracic and intra-abdominal injuries in the pediatric population that are within proximity of diaphragmatic insertion should be thoroughly evaluated to rule out diaphragmatic injury. As in our case, invasive surgical intervention such as thoracoscopy may be necessary.

  3. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T. [Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Horev, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2001-06-01

    A 3{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  4. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T.; Horev, G.

    2001-01-01

    A 3 1 / 2 -year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  5. The Role of Heart Team Approach in Penetrating Cardiac Trauma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Cottini

    Full Text Available Abstract Penetrating cardiac trauma has been increasing in clinical experience and is joined to important morbidity and mortality. A case of a 38-year-old female with history of postpartum depression was reported, admitted to our department for cardiac tamponade due to penetrating self-inflicted multiple stab wound of the chest complicated by rupture of anterior left ventricular wall and traumatic ventricular septal defect. Following the unstable hemodynamic instability, a combined therapeutic strategy was chosen: surgery and transcatheter implantation to correct free wall ventricle damage and traumatic ventricular septal defect, respectively.

  6. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 3: In a penetrating chest wound is a three-sided dressing or a one-way chest seal better at preventing respiratory complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthall, Kirsten

    2012-04-01

    A short-cut review was carried out to establish whether the traditional three-sided dressing is better than a one-way chest seal at preventing the respiratory complications from penetrating chest trauma. Only one animal study, two guidelines and two case reports provided published evidence relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that there is very little evidence, but that the one-way seals may have practical advantages, particularly in the out-of-hospital setting.

  7. Sharp incision of the anterior mitral leaflet due to penetrating trauma - Report of a case and long-term follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, HD; Hamer, HPM; Ebels, T

    A case is described of sharp incision of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve, due to penetrating trauma to the chest with a knife. The lesion of the mitral leaflet was diagnosed with echocardiography and successfully repaired with autologous pericardial tissue. Follow up after 15 years showed

  8. Selective chest imaging for blunt trauma patients: The national emergency X-ray utilization studies (NEXUS-chest algorithm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Robert M; Hendey, Gregory W; Mower, William R

    2017-01-01

    Chest imaging plays a prominent role in blunt trauma patient evaluation, but indiscriminate imaging is expensive, may delay care, and unnecessarily exposes patients to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. To improve diagnostic chest imaging utilization, we conducted 3 prospective multicenter studies over 12years to derive and validate decision instruments (DIs) to guide the use of chest x-ray (CXR) and chest computed tomography (CT). The first DI, NEXUS Chest x-ray, consists of seven criteria (Age >60years; rapid deceleration mechanism; chest pain; intoxication; altered mental status; distracting painful injury; and chest wall tenderness) and exhibits a sensitivity of 99.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 98.2-99.4%) and a specificity of 13.3% (95% CI, 12.6%-14.0%) for detecting clinically significant injuries. We developed two NEXUS Chest CT DIs, which are both highly reliable in detecting clinically major injuries (sensitivity of 99.2%; 95% CI 95.4-100%). Designed primarily to focus on detecting major injuries, the NEXUS Chest CT-Major DI consists of six criteria (abnormal CXR; distracting injury; chest wall tenderness; sternal tenderness; thoracic spine tenderness; and scapular tenderness) and exhibits higher specificity (37.9%; 95% CI 35.8-40.1%). Designed to reliability detect both major and minor injuries (sensitivity 95.4%; 95% CI 93.6-96.9%) with resulting lower specificity (25.5%; 95% CI 23.5-27.5%), the NEXUS CT-All rule consists of seven elements (the six NEXUS CT-Major criteria plus rapid deceleration mechanism). The purpose of this review is to synthesize the three DIs into a novel, cohesive summary algorithm with practical implementation recommendations to guide selective chest imaging in adult blunt trauma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Rina P.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H.; Yu, Chang; Ray, Jackie

    2010-01-01

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  10. Pediatric chest CT after trauma: impact on surgical and clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rina P. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Ray, Jackie [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Chest CT after pediatric trauma is frequently performed but its clinical impact, particularly with respect to surgical intervention, has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the impact of chest CT compared with chest radiography on pediatric trauma management. Two hundred thirty-five consecutive pediatric trauma patients who had both chest CT and radiography were identified. Images were reviewed and findings were categorized and correlated with subsequent chest interventions, blinded to final outcome and management. Of the 235 children, 38.3% (90/235) had an abnormal chest radiograph and 63.8% (150/235) had an abnormal chest CT (P < 0.0001). Chest interventions followed in 4.7% (11/235); of these, the findings could be made 1 cm above the dome of the liver in 91% (10/11). Findings requiring chest intervention included pneumothorax (PTX) and vertebral fractures. PTX was found on 2.1% (5/235) of chest radiographs and 20.0% (47/235) of chest CTs (P < 0.0001); 1.7% (4/235) of the children received a chest tube for PTX, 0.85% (2/235) seen on chest CT only. Vertebral fractures were present in 3.8% of the children (9/235) and 66.7% (6/9) of those cases were treated with spinal fusion or brace. There were no instances of mediastinal vascular injury. Most intrathoracic findings requiring surgical management in our population were identified in the lower chest and would be included in routine abdominopelvic CT exams; this information needs to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic algorithm of pediatric trauma patients. (orig.)

  11. Management of blunt and penetrating biliary tract trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Benjamin N J; Nardino, Benson; Gumm, Kellie; Robertson, Amanda J; Knowles, Brett P; Collier, Neil A; Judson, Rodney

    2012-06-01

    Penetrating or blunt injury to the biliary tree remains a rare complication of trauma occurring in 0.1% of trauma admissions. Because of the different presentations, sites of biliary tract injury, and associated organ injury, there are many possible management pathways to be considered. A retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered data was performed for all gallbladder and biliary tract injuries presenting to the trauma service or hepatobiliary unit of the Royal Melbourne Hospital between January 1, 1999, and March 30, 2011. There were 33 biliary injuries in 30 patients (0.1%) among 26,014 trauma admissions. Three of the 30 patients (10%) died. Of 10 gallbladder injuries, 8 were managed with cholecystectomy. There were 23 injuries to the biliary tree. Fourteen patients had injuries to the intrahepatic biliary tree of which seven involved segmental ducts. Of these, four segmental duct injuries required hepatic resection or debridement. Nine patients had injury to the extrahepatic biliary tree of which five required T-tube placement ± bilioenteric anastomosis and one a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Biliary injury is a rare but important consequence of abdominal trauma, and good outcomes are possible when a major trauma center and hepatopancreaticobiliary service coexist. Cholecystectomy remains the gold standard for gallbladder injury. Drainage with or without endoscopic stenting will resolve the majority of intrahepatic and partial biliary injuries. Hepaticojejunostomy remains the gold standard for complete extrahepatic biliary disruption. Hepatic and pancreatic resection are only required in the circumstances of unreconstructable biliary injury. Therapeutic study, level V. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  12. Evaluation of the use of tomography in penetrating neck trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADONIS NASR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective:the study has the intention of evaluate the accuracy of computed tomography for the diagnosis of cervical lesions on penetrating neck trauma and also identify the most frequent mechanisms of trauma. Most injured structures, determine the age range and the most prevalent sex.Methods: observational descriptive retrospective study executed by the systematic retrospective review of medical records of all patients victims of penetrating neck trauma that went through surgery and CT scans, admitted into Hospital do Trabalhador, between January 2009 and December 2013.Results:the final sample was of 30 patients, 96.7% of the male sex, the median age was of 28 years old. Most patients suffered injuries by gun (56.7% and 33,3% suffered stab wounds. The most stricken area of the neck was Zone II (77.8% and the left side (55.2%. Regarding the structures injured, the CT showed 6.7% lesions on airways but the surgery showed 40% of damaged, with a value of p=0.002. As to damages of the esophagus and pharynx the CT detected 10% of lesions, while surgery found 30% of lesions, therefore with a significant value of p=0.013. As for the analysis the CT showed reliable. As for the analysis of vascular damage, the CT showed to be, in most cases, reliable to the findings during the surgical act.Conclusion:besides the great use of CT for the diagnosis of penetrating neck injuries we can say that this is an exam with low accuracy for the diagnosis of lesions of aerodigestive tract, therefore it is important a clinical correlation for a good diagnosis.as for the vascular lesions and of other structures, the CT had high sensibility and specificity, thus a good exam to be used in overall.

  13. The selective conservative management of penetrating thoracic trauma is still appropriate in the current era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Victor Y; Sartorius, Benn; Clarke, Damian L

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic pleural collections secondary to penetrating chest trauma are generally managed by intercostal chest drainage (ICD), but these protocols were developed a few decades ago when stabs (SWs) predominated over gunshot wounds (GSWs). This study reviews the outcome of a selective conservative approach to penetrating thoracic trauma to establish if it is still appropriate in the current era. We reviewed 827 patients over a four-year period with penetrating unilateral non-cardiac wounds of the chest in order to review the efficacy of our policy and to define the differences in the spectrum of injury between SWs and GSWs. Ninety-two per cent (764/827) were males, and the median age was 24 years. Seventy-six per cent (625/827) sustained SWs and twenty-four per cent (202/827) GSWs. Chest pathologies were: pneumothorax (PTX): 362 (44%), haemothorax (HTX): 150 (18%) and haemopneumothorax (HPTX): 315 (38%). Ninety-six per cent of patients were managed non-operatively. Four per cent (36/827) were subjected to a thoracotomy [31 SWs and 5 GSWs]. No difference was observed in terms of the need for operative intervention: 5% vs. 3% [p=0.202]. PTX was seen exclusively in SWs: 58% vs. 0% and there were significantly more HPTXs seen in the GSWs: HPTX: 24% vs. 81% [p<0.001]. The median days of ICD in situ were significantly longer in GSWs compared to SWs for all pathologies. For HTX: 4.5 (interquartile range [IQR]: 3-6) vs. 3.5 (IQR: 0-5) days, p=0.001 and HPTX: 4 (IQR: 3-5) vs. 3.0 (IQR: 3-4) days, p<0.001. There were seven (15%) complications. A total of five (13%) patients died and all deaths were confined to the operative group. SWs continue to predominate over GSWs. PTXs were more commonly associated with SWs, whilst HPTX are more commonly associated with GSWs. A policy of selective conservatism is still applicable to the management of traumatic pleural collections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Endovascular treatment of penetrating arterial trauma with stent grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Rodrigo Bruno; Burihan, Marcelo Calil; Nasser, Felipe; Biagioni, Luisa Ciucci; Ingrund, José Carlos

    2018-02-01

    The endovascular management of arterial injuries has resulted in reduced operating time, blood loss, hospital mortality, lower incidence of sepsis, and decrease in mortality rates. For penetrating trauma, however, the benefits of endovascular therapy are questionable. Data were obtained by retrospective analysis of electronic medical records. All patients with vascular trauma seeking care at our institution from January 2010 to December 2015 were reviewed. A total of 223 vascular trauma patients were enrolled. Of these, 18 patients (8 %) were treated with endovascular techniques. The data related to clinical presentation, patient characteristics, technical aspects of the treatment, and follow-up were analysed. The mean patient age was 35.4 ± 17.8 years, 94 % were male. The mean injury severity score was 10.4 ± 2.5. The most commonly observed trauma mechanism was a gunshot in 10 cases (55 %), followed by lesions provoked by arterial catheter misplacement in five cases (27 %), and stab wounds in three cases (16.6 %). The main injury site was the subclavian artery, accounting for eight cases (44 %), followed by the superficial femoral artery and the tibiofibular trunk in two cases, respectively (18 %). The anterior tibial, fibular artery, axillary, common carotid, superior mesenteric, and profunda femoris were each affected once. Arteriovenous fistula was detected in nine cases (50 %), pseudoaneurysms in nine cases (50 %), and short occlusion in two cases (11 %). The mean follow-up duration was 753 days. The primary patency rate was 92.3 and 61.5 % after one and two years, respectively. The survival rate was 94.4 % after one and two years. Infection of the stents or limb amputations were not identified at follow-up. The endovascular treatment of penetrating arterial injuries with covered stents is feasible. However, the criteria used to choose the best method must be individualized.

  15. Limiting chest computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Jamie; Isani, Mubina; Bowling, Jordan; Zagory, Jessica; Goodhue, Catherine J; Burke, Rita V; Upperman, Jeffrey S; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the chest (chest CT) is overused in blunt pediatric thoracic trauma. Chest CT adds to the diagnosis of thoracic injury but rarely changes patient management. We sought to identify a subset of blunt pediatric trauma patients who would benefit from a screening chest CT based on their admission chest x-ray (CXR) findings. We hypothesize that limiting chest CT to patients with an abnormal mediastinal silhouette identifies intrathoracic vascular injuries not otherwise seen on CXR. All blunt trauma activations that underwent an admission CXR at our Level 1 pediatric trauma center from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had a chest CT were evaluated for added diagnoses and change in management after CT. An admission CXR was performed in 1,035 patients. One hundred thirty-nine patients had a CT, and the diagnosis of intra-thoracic injury was added in 42% of patients. Chest CT significantly increased the diagnosis of contusion or atelectasis (30.3% vs 60.4%; p pneumothorax (7.2% vs 18.7%; p chest CT. Chest CT changed the management of only 4 patients (2.9%). Two patients underwent further radiologic evaluation that was negative for injury, one had a chest tube placed for an occult pneumothorax before exploratory laparotomy, and one patient had a thoracotomy for repair of aortic injury. Chest CT for select patients with an abnormal mediastinal silhouette on CXR would have decreased CT scans by 80% yet still identified patients with an intrathoracic vascular injury. The use of chest CT should be limited to the identification of intrathoracic vascular injuries in the setting of an abnormal mediastinal silhouette on CXR. Therapeutic study, level IV; diagnostic study, level III.

  16. Analysis the findings of chest radiograph and CT scan in 217 acute thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaoying

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate chest radiograph and CT scan in assessing acute thoracic trauma. Methods: Retrospectively analyzed the findings of chest radiograph and CT scan in 217 cases of acute thoracic trauma and positive rate of each modality was compared. Results: The positive rate of rib and clavicle fracture was higher in chest radiograph than these in CT scan. But the positive rate of chest wall hematoma, mediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, damage of lung parenchyma and traumatic pulmonary atelectasis was higher in CT scan than those in chest radiograph. Conclusion: The application of the combined imaging modalities improves assessing of acute thoracic trauma, because the imaging manifestation of the lesion is various. (authors)

  17. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Baig M; Hefny, Ashraf F

    2016-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. A 63- year- old man presented to the Emergency Department complaining of left lateral chest pain due to a fall on his chest at home. On examination, he was hemodynamically stable. An urgent chest X-ray showed evidence of left sided pneumothorax. CT scan of the chest showed pneumothorax of more than 30% of the left hemithorax (around 600ml of air) with multiple left ribs fracture. Patient refused tube thoracostomy and was admitted to surgical department for close observation. The patient was managed conservatively without chest tube insertion. A repeat CT scan of the chest has shown complete resolution of the pneumothorax. The clinical spectrum of pneumothorax varies from asymptomatic to life threatening tension pneumothorax. In stable patients, conservative management can be safe and effective for small pneumothorax. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case in the English literature with large pneumothorax which resolved spontaneously without chest drain. Blunt traumatic large pneumothorax in a clinically stable patient can be managed conservatively. Current recommendations for tube placement may need to be reevaluated. This may reduce morbidity associated with chest tube thoracostomy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of alveolar epithelial injury by 99mTc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scan following blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudan, B.; Han, S.; Baldemir, M.; Yildiz, M.

    2004-01-01

    DTPA clearance rate is a reliable index of alveolar epithelial permeability, and is a highly sensitive marker of pulmonary epithelial damage, even of mild degree. In this study, 99m Tc-DTPA aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was used to assess the pulmonary epithelial membrane permeability and to investigate the possible application of this permeability value as an indicator of early alveolar or interstitial changes in patients with blunt chest trauma. A total of 26 patients was chest trauma (4 female, 22 male, 31-80 yrs, mean age; 53±13 yrs) who were referred to the emergency department in our hospital participated in this study. Technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was performed on the first and thirtieth days after trauma. Clearance half times (T 1/2 ) were calculated by placing a mono-exponential fit on the curves. Penetration index (PI) was calculated on the first-minute image. On the first day, mean T 1/2 value of the whole lung was 63±19 minutes (min), and thirtieth day mean T 1/2 value was 67±21 min. On the first day, mean PI values of the lung and 30th day mean PI value were 0.60±0.05, and 0.63 ±0.05, respectively. Significant changes were observed in radioaerosol clearance and penetration indices. Following chest trauma, clearance of 99m Tc-DTPA increased owing to breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier. This increase in the epithelial permeability of the lung appears to be an early manifestation of lung disease that may lead to efficient therapy in the early phase. (author)

  19. Chest trauma experience over eleven-year period at al-mouassat university teaching hospital-Damascus: a retrospective review of 888 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Koudmani Ibrahim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thoracic trauma is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this study, we present our 11-year experience in the management and clinical outcome of 888 chest trauma cases as a result of blunt and penetrating injuries in our university hospital in Damascus, Syria. Methods We reviewed files of 888 consequent cases of chest trauma between January 2000 and January 2011. The mean age of our patients was 31 ± 17 years mostly males with blunt injuries. Patients were evaluated and compared according to age, gender, etiology of trauma, thoracic and extra-thoracic injuries, complications, and mortality. Results The leading cause of the trauma was violence (41% followed by traffic accidents (33%. Pneumothorax (51%, Hemothorax (38%, rib fractures (34%, and lung contusion (15% were the most common types of injury. Associated injuries were documented in 36% of patients (extremities 19%, abdomen 13%, head 8%. A minority of the patients required thoracotomy (5.7%, and tube thoracostomy (56% was sufficient to manage the majority of cases. Mean hospital LOS was 4.5 ± 4.6 days. The overall mortoality rate was 1.8%, and morbidity (n = 78, 8.7%. Conclusions New traffic laws (including seat belt enforcement reduced incidence and severity of chest trauma in Syria. Violence was the most common cause of chest trauma rather than road traffic accidents in this series, this necessitates epidemiologic or multi-institutional studies to know to which degree violence contributes to chest trauma in Syria. The number of fractured ribs can be used as simple indicator of the severity of trauma. And we believe that significant neurotrauma, traffic accidents, hemodynamic status and GCS upon arrival, ICU admission, ventilator use, and complication of therapy are predictors of dismal prognosis.

  20. Chest trauma experience over eleven-year period at al-mouassat university teaching hospital-Damascus: a retrospective review of 888 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Koudmani, Ibrahim; Darwish, Bassam; Al-Kateb, Kamal; Taifour, Yahia

    2012-04-19

    Thoracic trauma is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this study, we present our 11-year experience in the management and clinical outcome of 888 chest trauma cases as a result of blunt and penetrating injuries in our university hospital in Damascus, Syria. We reviewed files of 888 consequent cases of chest trauma between January 2000 and January 2011. The mean age of our patients was 31 ± 17 years mostly males with blunt injuries. Patients were evaluated and compared according to age, gender, etiology of trauma, thoracic and extra-thoracic injuries, complications, and mortality. The leading cause of the trauma was violence (41%) followed by traffic accidents (33%). Pneumothorax (51%), Hemothorax (38%), rib fractures (34%), and lung contusion (15%) were the most common types of injury. Associated injuries were documented in 36% of patients (extremities 19%, abdomen 13%, head 8%). A minority of the patients required thoracotomy (5.7%), and tube thoracostomy (56%) was sufficient to manage the majority of cases. Mean hospital LOS was 4.5 ± 4.6 days. The overall mortoality rate was 1.8%, and morbidity (n = 78, 8.7%). New traffic laws (including seat belt enforcement) reduced incidence and severity of chest trauma in Syria. Violence was the most common cause of chest trauma rather than road traffic accidents in this series, this necessitates epidemiologic or multi-institutional studies to know to which degree violence contributes to chest trauma in Syria. The number of fractured ribs can be used as simple indicator of the severity of trauma. And we believe that significant neurotrauma, traffic accidents, hemodynamic status and GCS upon arrival, ICU admission, ventilator use, and complication of therapy are predictors of dismal prognosis.

  1. Predictors of abnormal chest CT after blunt trauma: a critical appraisal of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Kool, D.R.; Dekker, H.M.; Deunk, J.; Jager, G.J.; Kuijk, C. van; Edwards, M.J.R.; Blickman, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify and to evaluate predictors that determine whether chest computed tomography (CT) is likely to reveal relevant injuries in adult blunt trauma patients. METHODS: After a comprehensive literature search for original studies on blunt chest injury diagnosis, two independent observers

  2. Computed tomography of the chest in blunt thoracic trauma: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blostein, P.; Hodgman, C.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt thoracic injuries detected by computed tomography of the chest infrequently require immediate therapy. If immediate therapy is needed, findings will be visible on plain roentgenograms or on clinical exam. Routine Computed Tomography of the chest in blunt trauma is not recommended but may be helpful in selected cases. (N.C.)

  3. Analytical review of 664 cases of penetrating buttock trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulte Klaus-Martin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A comprehensive review of data has not yet been provided as penetrating injury to the buttock is not a common condition accounting for 2-3% of all penetrating injuries. The aim of the study is to provide the as yet lacking analytical review of the literature on penetrating trauma to the buttock, with appraisal of characteristics, features, outcomes, and patterns of major injuries. Based on these results we will provide an algorithm. Using a set of terms we searched the databases Pub Med, EMBASE, Cochran, and CINAHL for articles published in English between 1970 and 2010. We analysed cumulative data from prospective and retrospective studies, and case reports. The literature search revealed 36 relevant articles containing data on 664 patients. There was no grade A evidence found. The injury population mostly consists of young males (95.4% with a high proportion missile injury (75.9%. Bleeding was found to be the key problem which mostly occurs from internal injury and results in shock in 10%. Overall mortality is 2.9% with significant adverse impact of visceral or vascular injury and shock (P P

  4. Are routine repeat chest x-rays before leaving the trauma room useful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmers, M.; Saltzherr, T. P.; Beenen, L. F. M.; Ponsen, K. J.; Goslings, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Several guidelines advocate multiple chest x-rays during primary resuscitation of trauma patients. Some local hospital protocols include a repeat x-ray before leaving the trauma resuscitation room (TR). The purpose of this study was to determine the value of routine repeat x-rays. One-year data of

  5. Concomitant aortic valve and internal mammary artery injuries in blunt chest trauma: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Wang, Yu-Chun; Chung, Ping-Kuei; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of concomitant injury to the aortic valve and internal mammary artery (IMA) from nonpenetrating chest trauma. To our knowledge, this is the first such case to be reported. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) following diagnostic angiography offers an effective and minimally invasive treatment for traumatic IMA injuries. Because there might be an asymptomatic interval after traumatic aortic valve injuries, serial physical examinations and repeated echocardiography should be mandatory for patients with de novo heart failure after blunt chest trauma. Transesophageal echocardiography can provide a clearer image of cardiac injuries than transthoracic echocardiography, particularly if there is extensive anterior mediastinal hematoma resulting from IMA trauma.

  6. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An unusual case of foreign body pulmonary embolus: case report and review of penetrating trauma at a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomer, Laura A; Watkins, Daniel J; O'Donovan, Julie; Kenney, Brian D; Yates, Andrew R; Besner, Gail E

    2015-03-01

    Penetrating thoracic trauma is relatively rare in the pediatric population. Embolization of foreign bodies from penetrating trauma is very uncommon. We present a case of a 6-year-old boy with a penetrating foreign body from a projectile dislodged from a lawn mower. Imaging demonstrated a foreign body that embolized to the left pulmonary artery, which was successfully treated non-operatively. We reviewed the penetrating thoracic trauma patients in the trauma registry at our institution between 1/1/03 and 12/31/12. Data collected included demographic data, procedures performed, complications and outcome. Sixty-five patients were identified with a diagnosis of penetrating thoracic trauma. Fourteen of the patients had low velocity penetrating trauma and 51 had high velocity injuries. Patients with high velocity injuries were more likely to be older and less likely to be Caucasian. There were no statistically significant differences between patients with low vs. high velocity injuries regarding severity scores or length of stay. There were no statistically significant differences in procedures required between patients with low and high velocity injuries. Penetrating thoracic trauma is rare in children. The case presented here represents the only report of cardiac foreign body embolus we could identify in a pediatric patient.

  8. Spontaneous Recanalization of the Obstructed Right Coronary Artery Caused by Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yumiko; Sakakura, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Kei; Taniguchi, Yousuke; Nakashima, Ikue; Wada, Hiroshi; Sanui, Masamitsu; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Fujita, Hideo

    2018-03-30

    Blunt chest trauma can cause a wide variety of injuries including acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Although AMI due to coronary artery dissection caused by blunt chest trauma is very rare, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In the vast majority of patients with AMI, primary percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) are performed to recanalize obstructed arteries, but PCI carries a substantial risk of hemorrhagic complications in the acute phase of trauma. We report a case of AMI due to right coronary artery (RCA) dissection caused by blunt chest trauma. The totally obstructed RCA was spontaneously recanalized with medical therapy. We could avoid primary PCI in the acute phase of blunt chest trauma because electrocardiogram showed early reperfusion signs. We performed an elective PCI in the subacute phase when the risk of bleeding subsided. Since the risk of severe hemorrhagic complications is greater in the acute phase of blunt chest trauma as compared with the late phase, deferring emergency PCI is reasonable if signs of recanalization are observed.

  9. Criteria for the selective use of chest computed tomography in blunt trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M.; Kool, Digna R.; Blickman, Johan G. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Deunk, Jaap; Edwards, Michael J.R. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vugt, Arie B. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Emergency Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kuijk, Cornelis van [VU (Vrije Universiteit) University, Medical Center Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to derive parameters that predict which high-energy blunt trauma patients should undergo computed tomography (CT) for detection of chest injury. This observational study prospectively included consecutive patients ({>=}16 years old) who underwent multidetector CT of the chest after a high-energy mechanism of blunt trauma in one trauma centre. We included 1,047 patients (median age, 37; 70% male), of whom 508 had chest injuries identified by CT. Using logistic regression, we identified nine predictors of chest injury presence on CT (age {>=}55 years, abnormal chest physical examination, altered sensorium, abnormal thoracic spine physical examination, abnormal chest conventional radiography (CR), abnormal thoracic spine CR, abnormal pelvic CR or abdominal ultrasound, base excess <-3 mmol/l and haemoglobin <6 mmol/l). Of 855 patients with {>=}1 positive predictors, 484 had injury on CT (95% of all 508 patients with injury). Of all 192 patients with no positive predictor, 24 (13%) had chest injury, of whom 4 (2%) had injuries that were considered clinically relevant. Omission of CT in patients without any positive predictor could reduce imaging frequency by 18%, while most clinically relevant chest injuries remain adequately detected. (orig.)

  10. Criteria for the selective use of chest computed tomography in blunt trauma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, Monique; Dekker, Helena M.; Kool, Digna R.; Blickman, Johan G.; Deunk, Jaap; Edwards, Michael J.R.; Vugt, Arie B. van; Kuijk, Cornelis van

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive parameters that predict which high-energy blunt trauma patients should undergo computed tomography (CT) for detection of chest injury. This observational study prospectively included consecutive patients (≥16 years old) who underwent multidetector CT of the chest after a high-energy mechanism of blunt trauma in one trauma centre. We included 1,047 patients (median age, 37; 70% male), of whom 508 had chest injuries identified by CT. Using logistic regression, we identified nine predictors of chest injury presence on CT (age ≥55 years, abnormal chest physical examination, altered sensorium, abnormal thoracic spine physical examination, abnormal chest conventional radiography (CR), abnormal thoracic spine CR, abnormal pelvic CR or abdominal ultrasound, base excess <-3 mmol/l and haemoglobin <6 mmol/l). Of 855 patients with ≥1 positive predictors, 484 had injury on CT (95% of all 508 patients with injury). Of all 192 patients with no positive predictor, 24 (13%) had chest injury, of whom 4 (2%) had injuries that were considered clinically relevant. Omission of CT in patients without any positive predictor could reduce imaging frequency by 18%, while most clinically relevant chest injuries remain adequately detected. (orig.)

  11. Early detection of myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma by computed tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thung-Lip; Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Shih, Chen-Hsiang; Liang, Huai-Wen; Tsai, Hsing-Shan; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Hsu, Kwan-Lih

    2017-02-10

    Blunt cardiac trauma encompasses a wide range of clinical entities, including myocardial contusion, cardiac rupture, valve avulsion, pericardial injuries, arrhythmia, and even myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma is rare and may be life threatening. Differential diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction from cardiac contusion at this setting is not easy. Here we demonstrated a case of blunt chest trauma, with computed tomography detected myocardium enhancement defect early at emergency department. Under the impression of acute myocardial infarction, emergent coronary angiography revealed left anterior descending artery occlusion. Revascularization was performed and coronary artery dissection was found after thrombus aspiration. Finally, the patient survived after coronary stenting. Perfusion defects of myocardium enhancement on CT after blunt chest trauma can be very helpful to suggest myocardial infarction and facilitate the decision making of emergent procedure. This valuable sign should not be missed during the initial interpretation.

  12. Imaging of chest trauma: radiological patterns of injury and diagnostic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomoschitz, Fritz M.; Eisenhuber, Edith; Linnau, Ken F.; Peloschek, Philipp; Schoder, Maria; Bankier, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    In patients after chest trauma, imaging plays a key role for both, the primary diagnostic work-up, and the secondary assessment of potential treatment. Despite its well-known limitations, the anteroposterior chest radiograph remains the starting point of the imaging work-up. Adjunctive imaging with computed tomography, that recently is increasingly often performed on multidetector computed tomography units, adds essential information not readily available on the conventional radiograph. This allows better definition of trauma-associated thoracic injuries not only in acute traumatic aortic injury, but also in pulmonary, tracheobronchial, cardiac, diaphragmal, and thoracic skeletal injuries. This article reviews common radiographic findings in patients after chest trauma, shows typical imaging features resulting from thoracic injury, presents imaging algorithms, and recalls to the reader less common but clinically relevant entities encountered in patients after thoracic trauma

  13. Emergency management of blunt chest trauma in children: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzé, Denis R; Pauzé, Daniel K

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department, and trauma to the head, chest, and abdomen may be a source of significant morbidity and mortality. As children have unique thoracic anatomical and physiological properties, they may present with diagnostic challenges that the emergency clinician must be aware of. This review examines the effects of blunt trauma to the pediatric chest, as well as its relevant etiologies and associated mortality. Diagnostic and treatment options for commonly encountered injuries such as pulmonary contusions, rib fractures, and pneumothoraces are examined. Additionally, this review discusses rarely encountered--yet highly lethal--chest wall injuries such as blunt cardiac injuries, commotio cordis, nonaccidental trauma, and aortic injuries.

  14. Studying morbidity and predicting mortality in patients with blunt chest trauma using a novel clinical score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini Manay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A departmental audit in March 2015 revealed significant mortality rate of 40% in blunt chest trauma patients (much greater than the global 25%. A study was thus planned to study morbidity and predictors of mortality in blunt chest trauma patients admitted to our hospital. Methods: This study was a prospective observational study of 139 patients with a history of blunt chest trauma between June 2015 and November 2015 after the Institutional Ethics Committee approval in April 2015. The sample size was calculated from the prevalence rate in our institute from the past medical records. Results: The morbidity factors following blunt chest injuries apart from pain were need for Intensive Care Unit stay, mechanical ventilation, and pneumonia/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Significant predictors of mortality in our study were SpO2 16, and need for mechanical ventilation. By calculating the likelihood ratios of each respiratory sign, a clinical score was devised. Conclusion: The modifiable factors affecting morbidity and mortality were identified. Mild to moderate chest injury due to blunt trauma is difficult to diagnose. The restoration of respiratory physiology has not only significant implications on recovery from chest injury but also all other injuries. It is our sincere hope that the score we have formulated will help reduce mortality and morbidity after further trials.

  15. Blunt chest trauma in a non-specialist centre: Right treatment, right place?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Lesley; Jayathissa, Sisira

    2016-12-01

    To compare patient characteristics, management and outcomes for patients admitted with isolated blunt chest trauma, managed by medical or surgical teams. We reviewed adult patients admitted with blunt chest trauma between 1 September 2006 and 31 August 2011 to a secondary hospital in New Zealand. Inclusion criteria were: blunt chest trauma, with at least one radiologically demonstrated rib fracture. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality, and secondary outcomes were development of pneumonia, and use of analgesia. Seventy-two patients were included. Thirty-three patients were managed by medical teams and 39 by surgical teams. In-hospital mortality was greater amongst medical patients 5/33 (15%) versus surgical 0/39 (0%); P = 0.012. Pneumonia occurred in 15/33 (45%); medical patients versus surgical 2/39 (5%), P trauma fall compared to surgically managed patients (28/33 [85%] vs 9/39 [27%]; P chest trauma, those managed by medical teams were older, had more comorbidities and were more likely to have become injured with a low trauma fall than those managed by surgical teams. They had less access to analgesic options, developed pneumonia more often and had higher mortality. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  16. On-scene time and outcome after penetrating trauma: an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamillia S.; Steinmetz, Jacob; Petersen, John Asger

    2011-01-01

    This was an observational cohort study of penetrating trauma patients treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit in Copenhagen with a 30-day follow-up. Between January 2002 and September 2009, data were prospectively registered regarding the anatomical location of the trauma, time intervals and procedures performed......-scene time might be important in penetrating trauma, and ALS procedures should not delay transport to definite care at the hospital....

  17. Chest and spine radiography abnormality in blunt chest trauma correlated with major vessel injury in an unselected patient population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, G.; Kadir, S.; Encarnacion, C.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the true incidence of major vessel injury, the authors retrospectively reviewed all arch aortograms obtained for blunt chest trauma (BCT) during a 24-month period beginning December 1986. Aortograms were correlated with preangiographic chest radiographic and operative findings. The goals of this review were to examine the usefulness of commonly employed screening criteria for aortography and determine whether thoracic spine fractures imply a decreased likelihood of aortic injury. One hundred twenty aortograms were obtained during this period. The incidence of aortic laceration was 6.7%, and 7.5% had brachiocerebral vascular injury. Only 51% of chest radiographs were suggestive of vascular injury. Two patients with subtle radiographic findings had aortic laceration. One patient with a burst fracture of T-4 had aortic laceration. The results of this review indicate the incidence of great vessel injury is as high as that of injury to the aorta itself and that the presence of spine fractures does not exclude vascular injury

  18. Alveolar macrophage phagocytosis is enhanced after blunt chest trauma and alters the posttraumatic mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Daniel H; Palmer, Annette; Niesler, Ulrike; Fröba, Janine S; Heidemann, Vera; Rittlinger, Anne; Braumüller, Sonja T; Zhou, Shaoxia; Gebhard, Florian; Knöferl, Markus W

    2011-12-01

    Blunt chest trauma is known to induce a pulmonary invasion of short-lived polymorphonuclear neutrophils and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type 2 (AT2) cells. Apoptotic cells are removed by alveolar macrophages (AMΦ). We hypothesized that chest trauma alters the phagocytic response of AMΦ as well as the mediator release of AMΦ during phagocytosis. To study this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to blunt chest trauma. Phagocytosis assays were performed in AMΦ isolated 2 or 24 h after trauma with apoptotic cells or opsonized beads. Phagocytosis of apoptotic AT2 cells by unstimulated AMΦ was significantly increased 2 h after trauma. At 24 h, AMΦ from traumatized animals, stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, ingested significantly more apoptotic polymorphonuclear neutrophils than AMΦ from sham animals. Alveolar macrophages after trauma released significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 when they incorporated latex beads, but significantly lower levels of interleukin 1β and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α when they ingested apoptotic cells. In vivo, phagocytosis of intratracheally instilled latex beads was decreased in traumatized rats. The bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of the phagocytosis-supporting surfactant proteins A and D after blunt chest trauma were slightly decreased, whereas surfactant protein D mRNA expression in AT2 cells was significantly increased after 2 h. These findings indicate that chest trauma augments the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by AMΦ. Phagocytosis of opsonized beads enhances and ingestion of apoptotic cells downregulates the immunologic response following lung contusion. Our data emphasize the important role of phagocytosis during posttraumatic inflammation after lung contusion.

  19. Predictors of abnormal chest CT after blunt trauma: a critical appraisal of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, M.; Kool, D.R.; Dekker, H.M.; Deunk, J.; Jager, G.J.; Kuijk, C. van; Edwards, M.J.R.; Blickman, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To identify and to evaluate predictors that determine whether chest computed tomography (CT) is likely to reveal relevant injuries in adult blunt trauma patients. Methods: After a comprehensive literature search for original studies on blunt chest injury diagnosis, two independent observers included studies on the accuracy of parameters derived from history, physical examination, or diagnostic imaging that might predict injuries at (multidetector row) CT in adults and that allowed construction of 2 x 2 contingency tables. For each article, methodological quality was scored and relevant predictors for injuries at CT were extracted. For each predictor, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) including 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Of 147 articles initially identified, the observers included 10 original studies in consensus. Abnormalities at physical examination (abnormal respiratory effort, need for assisted ventilation, reduced airentry, coma, chest wall tenderness) and pelvic fractures were significant predictors (DOR: 2.1-6.7). The presence of any injuries at conventional radiography of the chest (eight articles) was a more powerful significant predictor (DOR: 2.2-37). Abnormal chest ultrasonography (four articles) was the most accurate predictor for chest injury at CT (DOR: 491-infinite). Conclusion: The current literature indicates that in blunt trauma patients with abnormal physical examination, abnormal conventional radiography, or abnormal ultrasonography of the chest, CT was likely to reveal relevant chest injuries. However, there was no strong evidence to suggest that CT could be omitted in patients without these criteria, or whether these findings are beneficial for patients

  20. High-velocity penetrating thoracic trauma with suspected cardiac involvement in a combat support hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, F.; Gentlesk, P.J.; Eckart, R.E.; Beekley, A.C.; Huffer, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The most common cardiac injuries in the United States are blunt trauma from motor vehicle accidents or low-velocity trauma from stabbings. During military conflict, high-velocity injuries, including gunshot wounds (GSW) and fragment injury from improvised explosive devices (IED), are relatively more common. This is a retrospective review of cases with high-velocity penetrating injury and suspected myocardial involvement during a 6-month period in Baghdad, Iraq, at a United States Army hospital during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Eleven cases survived to admission (GSW in 5, IED in 6). The mean age of the all-male cohort was 27 years (range, 3-54 years). Eight of the 11 patients (73%) were victims of polytrauma. The entrance involved the right ventricle (n=3), right atrium (n=2), left ventricle (n=1), or mediastinum and pericardial reflections (n=5). Echocardiography was performed in all 11 patients. In 7 patients, no foreign body was identifiable, and in 2 patients the foreign body was identified within the pericardial fat pad. Three patients were identified as having a suspected ventricular septal defect, ranging in size from 2 to 8 mm. The most common electrocardiographic abnormality was atrioventricular block and right bundle branch block. In 4 patients, the management of the chest injury was nonsurgical, and in 1 patient the treatment was a chest tube only. Four of the patients underwent median sternotomy, 1 underwent emergent lateral thoracotomy, and 1 underwent an infradiaphragmatic approach. This case series is too small to draw definitive conclusions; however, a multidisciplinary approach to high-velocity injuries with potential for cardiac involvement augments preoperative assessment for myocardial injury and may allow selective nonoperative management. (author)

  1. Prehospital chest tube thoracostomy: effective treatment or additional trauma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.R.; Bergs, B.; Krijen, P.; Schipper, I.; Ringburg, A.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Schipper, I.B.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of prehospital chest tube thoracostomy (TT) remains controversial because of presumed increased complication risks. This study analyzed infectious complication rates for physician-performed prehospital and emergency department (ED) TT. METHODS: Over a 40-month period, all

  2. Primary intraocular lens implantation for penetrating lens trauma in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, R J; Yorston, D; Wood, M; Gilbert, C; Foster, A

    1998-09-01

    This study aimed to audit the surgical strategy of primary posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation for cases of recent penetrating trauma involving the lens in an African population. Retrospective, noncomparative case series. Seventy-two cases are reported, including all patients who underwent primary intraocular lens implantation for traumatic cataract extraction performed within 1 month of injury between 1988 and 1996. Demographic characteristics and follow-up attendance rates are analyzed. Surgical technique and the occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications are reported. Visual outcomes are reported with detailed analysis for cases of poor visual outcome. Mean age was 14.3 years (standard deviation = 11.1), 57 (79%) were male and 15 (21%) were female (chi-square = 23.66, P capsule had been breached by the trauma in 27 (38%) cases, and 15 of these required anterior vitrectomy. Capsular fixation of the implant was achieved in 49% of patients, the remainder having sulcus fixation. Intraoperative rupture of the posterior capsule occurred in four cases. The only common postoperative complication was acute fibrinous anterior uveitis, which occurred in 29 (40%) patients, and 32% of patients followed up for at least 6 months required secondary posterior capsulotomy. This was more common in younger patients (chi-square = 4.2, P < 0.05). Corrected postoperative visual acuities were available for 51 patients, of which 71% achieved 20/60 or better visual acuity. Patients 6 years of age or younger were less likely to achieve 20/60 (chi-square = 6.61, P = 0.01). This surgical strategy has proved successful, producing good visual results and causing no sight-threatening complications. Primary posterior capsulotomy may be appropriate for younger patients.

  3. The importance of plain radiographic signs for emergency aortography in blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, K.A.; Trost, K.; Bargon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective study of plain radiographic findings in 11 patients with traumatic rupture of the aorta was conducted, and the results compared with the incidence of numerous chest x-rays signs previously described in 294 cases of angiographically proven thoracic aorta dissection. It is concluded that positive plain radiographic signs obtained from patients with blunt chest trauma reveal high sensitivity and may thus be used as an indication for emergency aortography. However, since this procedure lacks 100% specificity even those patients with normal x-ray findings but clinically and/or anamnestically adequate thoracic trauma should be submitted to aortography. (orig.) [de

  4. Mitral Perivalvular Leak after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Rare Cause of Severe Subacute Mitral Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Nicola; Facciorusso, Antonio; Vigna, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Blunt chest trauma is a very rare cause of valve disorder. Moreover, mitral valve involvement is less frequent than is aortic or tricuspid valve involvement, and the clinical course is usually acute. In the present report, we describe the case of a 49-year-old man with a perivalvular mitral injury that became clinically manifest one year after a violent, nonpenetrating chest injury. This case is atypical in regard to the valve involved (isolated mitral damage), the injury type (perivalvular leak in the absence of subvalvular abnormalities), and the clinical course (interval of one year between trauma and symptoms).

  5. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocysts after blunt chest trauma: Prevalence, mechanisms of injury, and computed tomography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Jin; Jeon, Yang Bin; Ma, Dae Sung; Lee, Jung Nam; Chung, Min

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst (TPP) is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma and closely related with severe injury. However, it has been poorly documented. We present a retrospective review of TPP cases treated at our hospital. The medical records and chest computed tomography scans of patients with TPP treated from January 2010 to December 2013 were retrospectively studied. A total of 978 patients underwent chest computed tomography for blunt chest trauma during the study period, and 81 (8.3%) had a total of 150 TPPs. The most common mechanism of injury was being struck by a motorized vehicle (n = 25, 30.9%). The mean (SD) Injury Severity Score (ISS) of the 81 patients was 33.2 (11.4). The prevalence of TPP was higher in younger patients (p = 0.011), but the total number of fractured ribs was significantly lower (p = 0.001). In a subgroup analysis performed according to pseudocyst location, the intraparenchymal group had more severe injuries than the subpleural group (ISS, 23.3 vs. 32.4, p chest Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score, 3.4 vs. 4.0, p chest trauma was 8.3% and was higher in those struck by a vehicle and younger patients. Intraparenchymal pseudocyst was found to be related to more severe injuries. TPP was a self-limiting condition that does not require specific treatment. Prognostic/epidemiologic study, level IV.

  6. What is the yield of routine chest radiography following tube thoracostomy for trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Victor Y; Oosthuizen, George V; Clarke, Damian L

    2015-01-01

    Routine chest radiography (CXR) following tube thoracostomy (TT) is a standard practice in most trauma centres worldwide. Evidence supporting this routine practice is lacking and the actual yield is unknown. We performed a retrospective review of 1042 patients over a 4-year period who had a routine post-insertion CXR performed in accordance with current ATLS® recommendations. A total 1042 TTs were performed on 1004 patients. Ninety-one per cent of patients (913/1004) were males, and the median age for all patients was 24 years. Seventy-five per cent of all injuries (756/1004) were from penetrating trauma, and the remaining 25% (248/1004) were from blunt. The initial pathologies requiring TT were: haemopneumothorax: 34% (339/1042), haemothroax: 31% (314/1042), simple pneumothorax: 25% (256/1042), tension pneumothorax: 8% (77/1042) and open pneumothorax: 5% (54/1042). One hundred and three patients had TTs performed on clinical grounds alone without a pre-insertion CXR [Group A]. One hundred and ninety-one patients had a pre-insertion CXR but had persistent clinical concerns following insertion [Group B]. Seven hundred and ten patients had pre-insertion CXR but no clinical concerns following insertion [Group C]. Overall, 15% (152/1004) [9 from Group A, 111 from Group B and 32 from Group C] of all patients had their clinical management influenced as a direct result of the post-insertion CXR. Despite the widely accepted practice of routine CXR following tube thoracostomy, the yield is relatively low. In many cases, good clinical examination post tube insertion will provide warnings as to whether problems are likely to result. However, in the more rural setting, and in resource challenged environments, there is a relatively high yield from the CXR, which alters management. Further prospective studies are needed to establish or refute the role of the existing ATLS® guidelines in these specific environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pneumomediastinum in Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mansella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt trauma is the most common mechanism of injury in patients with pneumomediastinum and may occur in up to 10% of patients with severe blunt thoracic and cervical trauma. In this case report we present a 24-year-old man with pneumomediastinum due to blunt chest trauma after jumping from a bridge into a river. He complained of persistent retrosternal pain with exacerbation during deep inspiration. Physical examination showed only a slight tenderness of the sternum and the extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (e-FAST was normal. Pneumomediastinum was suspected by chest X-ray and confirmed by computed tomography, which showed a lung contusion as probable cause of the pneumomediastinum due to the “Mackling effect.” Sonographic findings consistent with pneumomediastinum, like the “air gap” sign, are helpful for quick bedside diagnosis, but the diagnostic criteria are not yet as well established as for pneumothorax. This present case shows that despite minimal findings in physical examination and a normal e-FAST a pneumomediastinum is still possible in a patient with chest pain after blunt chest trauma. Therefore, pneumomediastinum should always be considered to prevent missing major aerodigestive injuries, which can be associated with a high mortality rate.

  8. Significance of X-ray examination in the diagnosis of contralateral pneumonia in closed chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anan'ina, G.V.; Parizhskij, Z.M.; Abramova, T.T.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that after unilateral closed chest traumas X-ray examination of both lungs should be conducted to except traumatic pneumonia as at the side of the trauma as in contralateral lung and to exclude pneumonia complications. Special attention must be paid to the patients with traumatic rib fractures and to those who has chromic nonspecific diseases of lungs and abused with alcochol

  9. Pathophysiological effects and changes in potassium, ionised calcium, glucose and haemoglobin early after severe blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocksén, David; Gryth, Dan; Druid, Henrik; Gustavsson, Jenny; Arborelius, Ulf P

    2012-05-01

    Severe lung contusion is often observed after blunt chest trauma due to traffic accidents or fall from heights, but may also occur after a non-penetrating ballistic impact against body armour. Such trauma has been designated behind armour blunt trauma (BABT). Our aim in the present study has been to evaluate pathophysiological changes and compensatory mechanisms that occur early after such severe lung contusion. Twelve pigs wearing body armour were shot with a 7.62mm assault rifle to produce a standardised pulmonary contusion. Exposed animals were compared with five control animals shot with blank ammunition. Physiological parameters and levels of potassium, glucose, haemoglobin, calcium, lactate and pH were monitored for two hours after the shot. The impact induced severe pulmonary contusion with apnoea, desaturation and hypotension in all exposed animals. Increased haemoglobin, glucose and severe hyperkalaemia were seen shortly after impact. Seven of twelve animals died due to the trauma. Dense cardiac tissue was observed during post mortem examination in six of the animals that died during the experimental course. In conclusion, this study has shown that life-threatening hyperkalaemia occurs early after severe lung contusion. Moreover, dense cardiac tissue and early increase of haemoglobin and glucose are intriguing findings that should be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Use of Chest Computed Tomographic Angiography in Blunt Trauma Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasadia, Rabea; DuBose, Joseph; Peleg, Kobi; Stephenson, Jacob; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2018-02-05

    Blunt chest trauma in children is common. Although rare, associated major thoracic vascular injuries (TVIs) are lethal potential sequelae of these mechanisms. The preferred study for definitive diagnosis of TVI in stable patients is computed tomographic angiography imaging of the chest. This imaging modality is, however, associated with high doses of ionizing radiation that represent significant carcinogenic risk for pediatric patients. The aim of the present investigation was to define the incidence of TVI among blunt pediatric trauma patients in an effort to better elucidate the usefulness of computed tomographic angiography use in this population. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including all blunt pediatric (age blunt trauma victims, 119,821patients were younger than 14 years. Twelve (0.0001%, 12/119821) of these children were diagnosed with TVI. The most common mechanism in this group was pedestrian hit by a car. Mortality was 41.7% (5/12). Thoracic vascular injury is exceptionally rare among pediatric blunt trauma victims but does contribute to the high morbidity and mortality seen with blunt chest trauma. Computed tomographic angiography, with its associated radiation exposure risk, should not be used as a standard tool after trauma in injured children. Clinical protocols are needed in this population to minimize radiation risk while allowing prompt identification of life-threatening injuries.

  11. Developing risk factors for post traumatic empyema in patients with chest trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara del Pilar Quiroga; Jos Daniel Charry; Nicols Becerra; Juan Camilo Garcia; Eliana Karina Muoz; Rodrigo Lara

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To establish the risk factors associated to development of empyema posttraumatic in patients with chest trauma managed with closed thoracostomy. Methods: It was a descriptive and observational study of patients with chest trauma who were admitted between January 2013 and May 2014. The variables were evaluated and the results according to management with closed thoracostomy in patients with thoracic trauma was determined. Univariate analysis was performed and measures of central tendency were calculated. Results: In total 240 patients were analyzed. Among them, 10.4% (25) developed posttraumatic empyema. In patients who developed empyema, the mean age was 34.2 years, and the mean injury severity score was 20.6. It was identified as a risk factor closed chest trauma in 68%(17) and 84%coagulated hemothorax trauma. Empyema management thoracoscopy was in 100%of cases. Conclusions: The posttraumatic empyema is a complication that occurs in patients with thoracic trauma. One of the most important risk factors is coagulated hemothorax which could be identified and treated in time to avoid comorbidities during hospital stay.

  12. Secondary left ventricular injury with haemopericardium caused by a rib fracture after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsekhar Ganti

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trauma is the third most common cause of death in the West. In the US, approximately 90,000 deaths annually are traumatic in nature and over 75% of casualties from blunt trauma are due to chest injuries. Cardiac injuries from rib fractures following blunt trauma are extremely rare. We report the unusual case of a patient who fell from a height and presented with haemopericardium and haemothorax as a result of left ventricular and lingular lacerations and was sucessfully operated upon.

  13. Scapular Fractures in Blunt Chest Trauma – Self-Experience Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadek, Tabet A.; Niklev, Desislav; Al-Sadek, Ahmed; Al-Sadek, Lina

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this retrospective study was to report the scapular fractures in patients with blunt chest trauma and to present the type and the frequency of associated thoracic injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Nine patients with fractures of the scapula were included in the study. The mechanisms of the injury, the type of scapular fractures and associated thoracic injuries were analysed. RESULTS: Scapular fractures were caused by high-energy blunt chest trauma. The body of the scapula was fractured in all scapular fractures. In all cases, scapular fractures were associated with other thoracic injuries (average 3.25/per case). Rib fractures were present in eight patients, fractured clavicula - in four cases, the affection of pleural cavity - in eight of the patients and pulmonary contusion in all nine cases. Eight patients were discharged from the hospital up to the 15th day. One patient had died on the 3rd day because of postconcussional lung oedema. CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms the role of scapular fractures as a marker for the severity of the chest trauma (based on the number of associated thoracic injuries), but doesn’t present scapular fractures as an indicator for high mortality in blunt chest trauma patients. PMID:28028415

  14. Criteria for the selective use of chest computed tomography in blunt trauma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Deunk, J.; Dekker, H.M.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Kool, D.R.; Vugt, A.B. van; Kuijk, C. van; Blickman, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to derive parameters that predict which high-energy blunt trauma patients should undergo computed tomography (CT) for detection of chest injury. METHODS: This observational study prospectively included consecutive patients (>or=16 years old) who underwent

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma: a heartbreaking soccer-shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarassy Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac injury occasionally occurs as a result of blunt chest trauma. Most cardiac complications in chest trauma are due to myocardial contusion rather than direct damage to the coronary arteries. However, traumatic coronary injury has been reported, and a variety of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed. We present a 26 year old patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome as a consequence of a soccer-shot impact to the chest. CMR showed apical inferior infarction, as well as multiple small septal lesions which were presumed to have resulted from embolization. The culprit lesion was a proximal 75% LAD stenosis with a prominent plaque-rupture and thrombus-formation, and the distal LAD was occluded by thromboembolic material.

  16. Myocardial contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma as evaluated by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodin, L.; Rouby, J.J.; Viars, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fifty five patients suffering from blunt chest trauma were studied to assess the diagnosis of myocardial contusion using thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy. Thirty-eight patients had consistent scintigraphic defects and were considered to have a myocardial contusion. All patients with scintigraphic defects had paroxysmal arrhythmias and/or ECG abnormalities. Of 38 patients, 32 had localized ST-T segment abnormalities; 29, ST-T segment abnormalities suggesting involvement of the same cardiac area as scintigraphic defects; 21, echocardiographic abnormalities. Sixteen patients had segmental hypokinesia involving the same cardiac area as the scintigraphic defects. Fifteen patients had clinical signs suggestive of myocardial contusion and scintigraphic defects. Almost 70 percent of patients with blunt chest trauma had scintigraphic defects related to areas of myocardial contusion. When thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy directly showed myocardial lesion, two-dimensional echocardiography and standard ECG detected related functional consequences of cardiac trauma

  17. Delayed chest wall hematoma caused by progressive displacement of rib fractures after blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rib fracture is a common injury resulting from blunt thoracic trauma. Although hemothorax and pneumothorax are known delayed complications of rib fracture, delayed chest wall hematoma has rarely been reported. We discuss the case of an 81-year-old woman who was not undergoing antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy who presented to our emergency department after a traffic injury. This patient had a nondisplaced rib fracture that went undetected on the initial computed tomography scan; the development of progressive displacement led to hemorrhagic shock due to delayed chest wall hematoma. The chest wall hematoma was effectively diagnosed and treated via contrast-enhanced computed tomography and angiographic embolization. This case highlights the possibility of this potential delayed complication from a common injury such as a rib fracture. Keywords: Angiography, Chest wall, Delayed complication, Rib fracture, Thoracic injury

  18. The number of displaced rib fractures is more predictive for complications in chest trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chih-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hsien; Han, Shih-Tsung; Blaney, Gerald N; Huang, Ting-Shuo; Chen, Kuan-Fu

    2017-02-28

    Traumatic rib fractures can cause chest complications that need further treatment and hospitalization. We hypothesized that an increase in the number of displaced rib fractures will be accompanied by an increase in chest complications. We retrospectively reviewed the trauma registry between January 2013 and May 2015 in a teaching hospital in northeastern Taiwan. Patients admitted with chest trauma and rib fractures without concomitant severe brain, splenic, pelvic or liver injuries were included. The demographic data, such as gender, age, the index of coexistence disease, alcohol consumption, trauma mechanisms were analyzed as potential predictors of pulmonary complications. Pulmonary complications were defined as pneumothorax, hemothorax, flail chest, pulmonary contusion, and pneumonia. In the 29 months of the study period, a total of 3151 trauma patients were admitted to our hospital. Among them, 174 patients were enrolled for final analysis. The most common trauma mechanism was road traffic accidents (58.6%), mainly motorbike accidents (n = 70, 40.2%). Three or more displaced rib fractures had higher specificity for predicting complications, compared to three or more total rib fractures (95.5% vs 59.1%). Adjusting the severity of chest trauma using TTSS and Ribscore by multivariable logistic regression analysis, we found that three or more rib fractures or any displaced rib fracture was the most significant predictor for developing pulmonary complication (aOR: 5.49 95% CI: 1.82-16.55). Furthermore, there were 18/57 (31.6%) patients with fewer than three ribs fractures developed pulmonary complications. In these 18 patients, only five patients had delayed onset complications and four of them had at least one displaced rib fracture. In this retrospective cohort study, we found that the number of displaced or total rib fractures, bilateral rib fractures, and rib fractures in more than two areas were associated with the more chest complications. Furthermore

  19. Hemorrhagic lesion on the chest wall after trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman presented with a burning, rapidly progressive mass on the midchest, occurring after a fall, 4 months prior. Examination found a large well-circumscribed mass over the lower xiphisternum (Figs 1 and 2). Results of baseline investigations were normal apart from mildly elevated liver function values. A computerized tomography scan confirmed a 6.4- x 4.9-cm lobulated soft tissue heterogeneous-density mass located in the subcutaneous fat with ill-defined borders and no obvious infiltration of the chest wall. A single focal abnormality\\r\

  20. Average chest wall thickness at two anatomic locations in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Elizabeth; Valdez, Carrie; Krauthamer, Andres; Khati, Nadia; Rasmus, Jessica; Amdur, Richard; Brindle, Kathleen; Sarani, Babak

    2013-09-01

    Needle thoracostomy is the emergent treatment for tension pneumothorax. This procedure is commonly done using a 4.5cm catheter, and the optimal site for chest wall puncture is controversial. We hypothesize that needle thoracostomy cannot be performed using this catheter length irrespective of the site chosen in either gender. A retrospective review of all chest computed tomography (CT) scans obtained on trauma patients from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011 was performed. Patients aged 18 and 80 years were included and patients whose chest wall thickness exceeded the boundary of the images acquired were excluded. Chest wall thickness was measured at the 2nd intercostal (ICS), midclavicular line (MCL) and the 5th ICS, anterior axillary line (AAL). Injury severity score (ISS), chest wall thickness, and body mass index (BMI) were analyzed. 201 patients were included, 54% male. Average (SD) BMI was 26 (7)kg/m(2). The average chest wall thickness in the overall cohort was 4.08 (1.4)cm at the 2nd ICS/MCL and 4.55 (1.7)cm at the 5th ICS/AAL. 29% of the overall cohort (27 male and 32 female) had a chest wall thickness greater than 4.5cm at the 2nd ICS/MCL and 45% (54 male and 36 female) had a chest wall thickness greater than 4.5cm at the 5th ICS/AAL. There was no significant interaction between gender and chest wall thickness at either site. BMI was positively associated with chest wall thickness at both the 2nd and 5th ICS/AAL. A 4.5cm catheter is inadequate for needle thoracostomy in most patients regardless of puncture site or gender. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation protection. Factors influencing compliance to referral guidelines in minor chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tack, Denis; Louage, Fabian; Muylem, Alain van; Howarth, Nigel; Gevenois, Pierre Alain

    2018-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that referral guidelines are not sufficiently known by prescribers and that medico-legal concerns could influence the prescription of radiographs in minor chest trauma. We submitted a questionnaire including a typical clinical history and questions on reasons for prescribing radiographs of the ribs in minor chest trauma to 112 prescriptors (33 residents, 18 surgeons, 7 internists, 24 general practitioners and 30 ER physicians). All accepted to participate. Comparisons were performed by Fisher's exact test followed by a post-hoc analysis and by a McNemar test. Fifty-eight percent of prescriptors proposed rib radiographs, most (89%) being unaware of the guidelines. Only 11% of them changed their intention to order radiographs after information on referral guidelines and radiation dose (P=0.057). The mean dose delivered by rib radiographs was 38 times higher than that of a chest X-ray. Legal and medico-legal concerns (requirements from insurance policies and avoidance of lawsuits) were the main reasons for requesting radiographs. Unsharpness of guidelines in addition to social and medico-legal issues, rather than medical reasons or the lack of knowledge of the guidelines, strongly influence the prescription of radiographs of the ribs in minor chest trauma. (orig.)

  2. How early should VATS be performed for retained haemothorax in blunt chest trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Lin; Huang, Wen-Yen; Yang, Chyan; Chou, Shih-Min; Chiang, Hsin-I; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Lin, Tsung-Ying; Chou, Yi-Pin

    2014-09-01

    Blunt chest injury is not uncommon in trauma patients. Haemothorax and pneumothorax may occur in these patients, and some of them will develop retained pleural collections. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has become an appropriate method for treating these complications, but the optimal timing for performing the surgery and its effects on outcome are not clearly understood. In this study, a total of 136 patients who received VATS for the management of retained haemothorax from January 2003 to December 2011 were retrospectively enrolled. All patients had blunt chest injuries and 90% had associated injuries in more than two sites. The time from trauma to operation was recorded and the patients were divided into three groups: 2-3 days (Group 1), 4-6 days (Group 2), and 7 or more days (Group 3). Clinical outcomes such as the length of stay (LOS) at the hospital and intensive care unit (ICU), and duration of ventilator and chest tube use were all recorded and compared between groups. The mean duration from trauma to operation was 5.9 days. All demographic characteristics showed no statistical differences between groups. Compared with other groups, Group 3 had higher rates of positive microbial cultures in pleural collections and sputum, longer duration of chest tube insertion and ventilator use. Lengths of hospital and ICU stay in Groups 1 and 2 showed no statistical difference, but were longer in Group 3. The frequency of repeated VATS was lower in Group 1 but without statistically significant difference. This study indicated that an early VATS intervention would decrease chest infection. It also reduced the duration of ventilator dependency. The clinical outcomes were significantly better for patients receiving VATS within 3 days under intensive care. In this study, we suggested that VATS might be delayed by associated injuries, but should not exceed 6 days after trauma. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features

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    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Rauber, K.; Rau, W.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Justus Liebig Univ., Giessen (Germany); Hoppe, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Popella, C. [Dept. of ENT, Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard. (orig.)

  4. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Rauber, K.; Rau, W.S.; Hoppe, M.; Popella, C.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard. (orig.)

  5. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Wolbrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma.

  6. Pneumopericardium and Deep Sulcus Sign After Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Tarladacalisir

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumopericardium is defined as air between the leaves of the pericardium, which is usually self-limited. In tension pneumopericardium, however, rapid fluid resuscitation and haemodynamic monitoring followed by pericardial fenestration and drainage should be performed. A 49-year-old male falling from height was brought to the emergency room. On chest X-ray in supine position, a deep sulcus sign and subcutaneous emphysema with multiple rib fractures were detected. At computerized tomography, pericardial free air, right pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were detected. A tube thoracostomy was applied to the patient. During follow-up with cardiac enzymes in the intensive care unit, no tension pneumopericardium developed, and subcutaneous emphysema regressed. A control computerized tomography scan showed a complete regression in the pneumopericardium on the tenth day.

  7. Occult pneumothorax in Chinese patients with significant blunt chest trauma: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ka L; Graham, Colin A; Yeung, Janice H H; Ahuja, Anil T; Rainer, Timothy H

    2010-05-01

    Occult pneumothorax (OP) is a pneumothorax not visualised on a supine chest X-ray (CXR) but detected on computed tomography (CT) scanning. With increasing CT use for trauma, more OP may be detected. Management of OP remains controversial, especially for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. This study aimed to identify the incidence of OP using thoracic CT as the gold standard and describe its management amongst Hong Kong Chinese trauma patients. Analysis of prospectively collected trauma registry data. Consecutive significantly injured trauma patients admitted through the emergency department (ED) suffering from blunt chest trauma who underwent thoracic computed tomography (TCT) between in calendar years 2007 and 2008 were included. An OP was defined as the identification (by a specialist radiologist) of a pneumothorax on TCT that had not been previously detected on supine CXR. 119 significantly injured patients were included. 56 patients had a pneumothorax on CXR and a further 36 patients had at least one OP [OP incidence 30% (36/119)]. Bilateral OP was present in 8/36 patients, so total OP numbers were 44. Tube thoracostomy was performed for 8/44 OP, all were mechanically ventilated in the ED. The remaining 36 OP were managed expectantly. No patients in the expectant group had pneumothorax progression, even though 8 patients required subsequent ventilation in the operating room for extrathoracic surgery. The incidence of OP (seen on TCT) in Chinese patients in Hong Kong after blunt chest trauma is higher than that typically reported in Caucasians. Most OP were managed expectantly without significant complications; no pneumothorax progressed even though some patients were mechanically ventilated. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pre-hospital transport times and survival for Hypotensive patients with penetrating thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Swaroop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving definitive care within the "Golden Hour" by minimizing response times is a consistent goal of regional trauma systems . This study hypothesizes that in urban Level I Trauma Centers, shorter pre-hospital times would predict outcomes in penetrating thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed using a statewide trauma registry for the years 1999-2003 . Total pre-hospital times were measured for urban victims of penetrating thoracic trauma. Crude and adjusted mortality rates were compared by pre-hospital time using STATA statistical software. Results: During the study period, 908 patients presented to the hospital after penetrating thoracic trauma, with 79% surviving . Patients with higher injury severity scores (ISS were transported more quickly. Injury severity scores (ISS ≥16 and emergency department (ED hypotension (systolic blood pressure, SBP <90 strongly predicted mortality (P < 0.05 for each . In a logistic regression model including age, race, and ISS, longer transport times for hypotensive patients were associated with higher mortality rates (all P values <0.05. This was seen most significantly when comparing patient transport times 0-15 min and 46-60 min (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In victims of penetrating thoracic trauma, more severely injured patients arrive at urban trauma centers sooner . Mortality is strongly predicted by injury severity, although shorter pre-hospital times are associated with improved survival . These results suggest that careful planning to optimize transport time-encompassing hospital capacity and existing resources, traffic patterns, and trauma incident densities may be beneficial in areas with a high burden of penetrating trauma.

  9. Can ultrasound extended emergency (EFAST) replace the chest radiograph in the initial approach to trauma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre Jimenez, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity diagnosed between ultrasound Extended emergency (EFAST) and portable radiography was compared. Life-threatening pathologies are detected in the initial approach to trauma, through an analysis comparative between EFAST and portable chest radiography. So, the need or not both studies or if the use of EFAST as the only diagnostic method in primary evaluation of trauma can be limited. The study has concluded that the EFAST can be used as the only tool for polytrauma patients, although in this analysis the sample has been very small [es

  10. Massive Hematemesis from a Splenic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Presenting Two Years after Penetrating Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Abbey-Mensah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic artery pseudoaneurysms (PSA are rare entities and far less common than true aneurysms of the splenic artery. The most common etiology is pancreatitis, recurrent either in the setting of chronic pancreatitis or as an episode of acute pancreatitis. Less common causes include trauma, peptic ulcer disease, or iatrogenic causes. Almost all of the trauma-related case reports have been due to blunt trauma. We believe this to be the first reported case of a splenic artery PSA presenting with massive hematemesis at a significant time frame after penetrating trauma. Successful transcatheter treatment was performed and alternative techniques are also discussed.

  11. Thorax computed tomography findings in patients victims of chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jose Rodrigues de Moura Filho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe thorax computed tomography findings in patients assisted in the emergency unit of Institute Dr Jose Frota (IJF. Materials and Methods: Descriptive study analyzing 160 consecutive contrast-enhanced thorax computed tomography of patients victims of thoracic trauma admitted to the emergency unit of IJF, between November 1st, 2014 and January 31st, 2015. Results: Abnormal findings were observed in 91,2 % of the patients. Among them, the following findings were most frequently observed: fractures (48%, hemothorax (43%, atelectasis (37%, pneumothorax (26% and lung contusions (17% Rupture of the esophagus was seen in three patients. Conclusion: We recognize that the findings encountered in our study are of similar prevalence to the ones reported in the literature and that CT scan is essencial to quickly diagnose these findings.

  12. Provider perceptions concerning use of chest x-ray studies in adult blunt trauma assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Georgina; Perez, Daniel; Fortman, Jonathan; Kea, Bory; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    Although they infrequently lead to management changing diagnoses, chest x-rays (CXRs) are the most commonly ordered imaging study in blunt trauma evaluation. To determine: 1) the reasons physicians order chest X-ray studies (CXRs) in blunt trauma assessments; 2) what injuries they expect CXRs to reveal; and 3) whether physicians can accurately predict low likelihood of injury on CXR. At a Level I Trauma Center, we asked resident and attending physicians treating adult blunt trauma patients: 1) the primary reason(s) for getting CXRs; 2) what, if any, significant intrathoracic injuries (SITI) they expected CXRs to reveal; and 3) the likelihood of these injuries. An expert panel defined SITI as two or more rib fractures, sternal fracture, pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, hemothorax, or aortic injury on official CXR readings. There were 484 patient encounters analyzed--65% of participating physicians were residents and 35% were attendings; 16 (3.3%) patients had SITI. The most common reasons for ordering CXRs were: "enough concern for significant injury" (62.9%) and belief that CXR is a "standard part of trauma work-up" (24.8%). Residents were more likely than attendings to cite "standard trauma work-up" (mean difference = 13.5%, p = 0.003). When physicians estimated a 25% likelihood, 9.1% (95% CI 3.0-20.0%) had SITI. Physicians order CXRs in blunt trauma patients because they expect to find injuries and believe that CXRs are part of a "standard" work-up. Providers commonly do not expect CXRs to reveal SITI. When providers estimated low likelihood of SITI, the rate of SITI was very low. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Risk factors for adverse outcomes in older adults with blunt chest trauma: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Jake; Green, Robert S; Thoma, Brent; Erdogan, Mete; Davis, Philip J

    2017-08-11

    The objective of this study was to systematically review the published literature for risk factors associated with adverse outcomes in older adults sustaining blunt chest trauma. EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched from inception until March 2017 for prognostic factors associated with adverse outcomes in older adults sustaining blunt chest trauma using a pre-specified search strategy. References were independently screened for inclusion by two reviewers. Study quality was assessed using the Quality in Prognostic Studies tool. Where appropriate, descriptive statistics were used to evaluate study characteristics and predictors of adverse outcomes. Thirteen cohort studies representing 79,313 patients satisfied our selection criteria. Overall, 26 prognostic factors were examined across studies and were reported for morbidity (8 studies), length of stay (7 studies), mortality (6 studies), and loss of independence (1 study). No studies examined patient quality of life or emergency department recidivism. Prognostic factors associated with morbidity and mortality included age, number of rib fractures, and injury severity score. Although age and rib fractures were found to be associated with adverse outcomes in more than 3 studies, meta-analysis was not performed due to heterogeneity amongst included studies in how these variables were measured. While blunt chest wall trauma in older adults is relatively common, the literature on prognostic factors for adverse outcomes in this patient population remains inadequate due to a paucity of high quality studies and lack of consistent reporting standards.

  14. Blunt chest trauma--an audit of injuries diagnosed by the MDCT examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkalj, Ivan; Petrović, Kosta; Stojanović, Sanja; Petrović, Djordje; Brakus, Alma; Ristić, Jelena

    2014-02-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) characterised by speed and precision is increasingly accessible in emergency wards. The aim of our study was to determine the most common injuries to the chest region, as well as type associated extrathoracic injuries, and the treatment outcome. This prospective study included 61 patients with blunt trauma who were submitted to computed tomography (CT) of the thorax. The number of injuries was evaluated by organs and organ systems of the chest. The cause of the injury, the length and the outcome of the treatment, and the presence of injuries in other regions were assessed. Chest injuries were associated with injuries to other regions in 80.3% cases, predominantly injuries to extremities or pelvic bones in 54.1% cases, followed by head injuries in 39.3% patients. Associated thoracic injuries were present in 90.9% of patients with lethal outcome. Lung parenchymal lesions, pleural effusions and rib fractures were the most common injuries affecting 77.1%, 65.6% and 63.9% of the cases, respectively. Blunt chest trauma is a significant problem affecting predominantly males in their forties and it is usually caused by a motor vehicle accident. In case of pneumomediastinum or mediastinal haematoma, the use of 3D reconstructions is advised for diagnosing possible tracheobronchial ruptures and thoracic aorta injuries. Increased resolution of CT scanners yielded a large number of findings that are occult on radiography, especially in the event of lung parenchymal and pleural injuries. However, none imaging modality can replace surgical judgement.

  15. An audit of the complications of intercostal chest drain insertion in a high volume trauma service in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, V Y; Oosthuizen, G V; Sartorius, B; Keene, C; Clarke, D L

    2014-11-01

    Intercostal chest drain (ICD) insertion is a commonly performed procedure in trauma and may be associated with significant morbidity. This was a retrospective review of ICD complications in a major trauma service in South Africa over a four-year period from January 2010 to December 2013. A total of 1,050 ICDs were inserted in 1,006 patients, of which 91% were male. The median patient age was 24 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 20-29 years). There were 962 patients with unilateral ICDs and 44 with bilateral ICDs. Seventy-five per cent (758/1,006) sustained penetrating trauma and the remaining 25% (248/1006) sustained blunt trauma. Indications for ICD insertion were: haemopneumothorax (n=338), haemothorax (n=314), simple pneumothorax (n=265), tension pneumothorax (n=79) and open pneumothorax (n=54). Overall, 203 ICDs (19%) were associated with complications: 18% (36/203) were kinked, 18% (36/203) were inserted subcutaneously, 13% (27/203) were too shallow and in 7% (14/203) there was inadequate fixation resulting in dislodgement. Four patients (2%) sustained visceral injuries and two sustained vascular injuries. Forty-one per cent (83/203) were inserted outside the 'triangle of safety' but without visceral or vascular injuries. One patient had the ICD inserted on the wrong side. Junior doctors inserted 798 ICDs (76%) while senior doctors inserted 252 (24%). Junior doctors had a significantly higher complication rate (24%) compared with senior doctors (5%) (p Conclusions ICD insertion is associated with a high rate of complications. These complications are significantly higher when junior doctors perform the procedure. A multifaceted quality improvement programme is needed to improve the situation.

  16. Our Experiences with Chest Trauma Patients in Syrian Civil War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samil Gunay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Thoracic surgery is a branch, the efficiency of which is unquestionable for war. And during the civil war in Syria, thoracic surgery specialists have been feeling this efficiency so closely. So we want to share our experiences on patients sent from this region. Material and Method: The cases comprised of 41 patients in total, 33 men and 8 women, between the ages of 16-75, who were brought from Syria between the dates of August 2012 %u2013 November 2013. The files of the patients were received from archive. Results: Except 11 isolated thorax trauma patients, it was determined thorax and abdomen injuries at 9 patients (21.9%, thorax and extremity injuries at 8 patients (19.5%, thorax and vertebra injuries at 3 patients (7.3%, thorax, abdomen and cranium injuries at 5 patients (12.1%, thorax, abdomen and eye injuries at one patient (2.4%, thorax, abdomen and vertebra injuries at 3 patients (7.3%, thorax, abdomen and extremity injuries at one patient (2.4%. Discussion: Thoracic surgery is a lifesaving branch in case of fast and effectual medical intervention to injuries during war.

  17. Using 99mTc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung scan as compared with computed tomography to detect lung injury in blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esme, H.; Kaya, E.; Solak, O.; Yavuz, Y.; Yurumez, Y.; Sezer, M.

    2007-01-01

    Detection of pulmonary contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma is very important so as to commence therapy immediately to avoid irreversible damage. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy in comparison with chest computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of pulmonary contusion at acute blunt chest trauma. Twenty-nine patients with isolated blunt chest trauma were referred to the emergency department of our hospital, and nine healthy people participated in this study. Sixteen patients who had pulmonary contusion on CT scans were referred to as group 1, and 13 patients who had normal CT scans as group 2. Nine healthy people comprised a control group. 99m Tc-DTPA aerosol inhalation lung scintigraphy was performed on the first day in all patients. The mean half time (T 1/2 ) and penetration index values of 99m Tc-DTPA clearance were significantly lower in groups 1 and 2 compared with the control group. Among the three groups, there were no significant differences in arterial blood gas analysis except for PO 2 . The mean T 1/2 value of 99m Tc-DTPA clearance did correlate with PO 2 values but not with pH, PCO 2 , or HCO 3 values. 99m Tc-DTPA radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging may serve as a useful adjunct and supportive method to chest CT scanning for detecting mild pulmonary contusion. (author)

  18. What is the clinical significance of chest CT when the chest x-ray result is normal in patients with blunt trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, Bory; Gamarallage, Ruwan; Vairamuthu, Hemamalini; Fortman, Jonathan; Lunney, Kevin; Hendey, Gregory W; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been shown to detect more injuries than plain radiography in patients with blunt trauma, but it is unclear whether these injuries are clinically significant. This study aimed to determine the proportion of patients with normal chest x-ray (CXR) result and injury seen on CT and abnormal initial CXR result and no injury on CT and to characterize the clinical significance of injuries seen on CT as determined by a trauma expert panel. Patients with blunt trauma older than 14 years who received emergency department chest imaging as part of their evaluation at 2 urban level I trauma centers were enrolled. An expert trauma panel a priori classified thoracic injuries and subsequent interventions as major, minor, or no clinical significance. Of 3639 participants, 2848 (78.3%) had CXR alone and 791 (21.7%) had CXR and chest CT. Of 589 patients who had chest CT after a normal CXR result, 483 (82.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 78.7-84.9%]) had normal CT results, and 106 (18.0% [95% CI, 15.1%-21.3%]) had CTs diagnosing injuries-primarily rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, and incidental pneumothorax. Twelve patients had injuries classified as clinically major (2.0% [95% CI, 1.2%-3.5%]), 78 were clinically minor (13.2% [95% CI, 10.7%-16.2%]), and 16 were clinically insignificant (2.7% (95% CI, 1.7%-4.4%]). Of 202 patients with CXRs suggesting injury, 177 (87.6% [95% CI, 82.4%-91.5%]) had chest CTs confirming injury and 25 (12.4% [95% CI, 8.5%-17.6%]) had no injury on CT. Chest CT after a normal CXR result in patients with blunt trauma detects injuries, but most do not lead to changes in patient management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of penetrating trunk trauma and mechanical ventilation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-10-08

    Oct 8, 2010 ... surgical intervention to identify and treat injuries to the internal organs. During this period patients are managed in the ... of trauma survivors, it is uncertain whether they too would benefit .... All subjects received in-hospital physiotherapy, but none ... the SV group had returned to their pre-admission level.

  20. Early detection of thoracic spine fracture in the multiple-trauma patient: Findings on the initial anteroposterior chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrason, J.N.; Novelline, R.A.; Rhea, J.T.; DeLuca, S.A.; Sacknoff, R.

    1987-01-01

    In the unconscious, multiple-trauma patient, thoracic spine fractures may be initially overlooked due to a combination of immediate concern given to more obvious injuries and a failure to carefully scrutinize the initial, often anteroposterior (AP) and portable chest radiograph. In a recent review of their cases the authors retrospectively identified primary or secondary signs of thoracic spine fracture in 80% of the initial chest radiographs of multiple-trauma patients with this injury. This paper reviews these obvious and subtle, bony and soft-tissue AP chest radiograph signs of thoracic spine fracture and compare them with matching spine radiographs, tomography, and CT

  1. Predictors of poor outcomes after significant chest trauma in multiply injured patients: a retrospective analysis from the German Trauma Registry (Trauma Register DGU®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stephan; Biberthaler, Peter; Delhey, Patrick; Trentzsch, Heiko; Winter, Hauke; van Griensven, Martijn; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2014-09-03

    Blunt thoracic trauma is one of the critical injury mechanisms in multiply injured trauma victims. Although these patients present a plethora of potential structural damages to vital organs, it remains debated which injuries actually influence outcome and thereby should be addressed initially. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the influence of critical structural damages on mortality. All patients in the database of the TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) from 2002-2011 with AIS Chest ≥ 2, blunt trauma, age of 16 or older and an ISS ≥ 16 were analyzed. Outcome parameters were in-hospital mortality as well as ventilation time in patients surviving the initial 14 days after trauma. 22613 Patients were included (mean ISS 30.5 ± 12.6; 74.7% male; Mean Age 46.1 ± 197 years; mortality 17.5%; mean duration of ventilation 7.3 ± 11.5; mean ICU stay 11.7 ± 14.1 days). Only a limited number of specific injuries had a significant impact on survival. Major thoracic vessel injuries (AIS ≥5), bilateral lung contusion, bilateral flail chest, structural heart injury (AIS ≥3) significantly influence mortality in study patients. Several extrathoracic factors (age, blood transfusion, systolic blood pressure and extrathoracic severe injuries) were also predictive of increased mortality. Most injuries of the thoracic wall had no or only a moderate effect on the duration of ventilation. Injuries to the lung (laceration, contusion or pneumothoraces) had a moderate prolonging effect. Cardiac injuries and severe injuries to the thoracic vessels induced a substantially prolonged ventilation interval. We demonstrate quantitatively the influence of specific structural damages of the chest on critical outcome parameters. While most injuries of the chest wall have no or only limited impact in the study collective, injuries to the lung overall show adverse outcome. Injuries to the heart or thoracic vessels have a devastating prognosis following blunt

  2. Injuries to the colon from blast effect of penetrating extra-peritoneal thoraco-abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Om P; Oswanski, Michael F; White, Patrick W

    2004-03-01

    Although rare, blast injury to the intestine can result from penetrating thoraco-abdominal extra-peritoneal gunshot (and shotgun) wounds despite the absence of injury to the diaphragm or to the peritoneum. Injuries of the spleen, small intestine and the mesentery by this mechanism have been previously reported in the world literature. This paper reports the first two cases of non-penetrating ballistic trauma to the colon.

  3. Surgical repair of right atrial wall rupture after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telich-Tarriba, Jose E; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Reardon, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Right atrial wall rupture after blunt chest trauma is a catastrophic event associated with high mortality rates. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who was ejected 40 feet during a motor vehicle accident. Upon presentation, she was awake and alert, with a systolic blood pressure of 100 mmHg. Chest computed tomography disclosed a large pericardial effusion; transthoracic echocardiography confirmed this finding and also found right ventricular diastolic collapse. A diagnosis of cardiac tamponade with probable cardiac injury was made; the patient was taken to the operating room, where median sternotomy revealed a 1-cm laceration of the right atrial appendage. This lesion was directly repaired with 4-0 polypropylene suture. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she continued to recover from injuries to the musculoskeletal system. This case highlights the need for a high degree of suspicion of cardiac injuries after blunt chest trauma. An algorithm is proposed for rapid recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of these lesions.

  4. Spiral CT for evaluation of chest trauma; Spiral-CT beim Thoraxtrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehnert, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Weise, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1997-07-01

    After implementation of spiral CT in our department, we carried out an analysis for determining anew the value of CT as a modality of chest trauma diagnosis in the emergency department. The retrospective study covers a period of 10 months and all emergency patients with chest trauma exmined by spiral CT. The major lesions of varying seriousness covered by this study are: pneumothorax, hematothorax, pulmonary contusion or laceration, mediastinal hematoma, rupture of a vessel, injury of the heart and pericardium. The various fractures are not included in this study. In many cases, spiral CT within relatively short time yields significant diagnostic findings, frequently saving additional angiography. A rigid diagnostic procedure cannot be formulated. Plain-film chest radiography still remains a diagnostic modality of high value. (Orig.) [Deutsch] Nach Einfuehrung der Spiral-CT in unserer Einrichtung versuchten wir, den Stellenwert der Computertomographie in der Notfalldiagnostik des Thoraxtraumas neu zu bestimmen. Dazu wurden retrospektiv ueber einen Zeitraum von 10 Monaten alle mittels Spiral-CT untersuchten Notfallpatienten mit Thoraxverletzungen ausgewertet. Im Vordergrund standen folgende Befunde unterschiedlichen Schweregrades: Pneumothorax, Haematothorax, Lungenkontusion/-lazeration, Mediastinalhaematom, Gefaessruptur, Herz- und Herzbeutelverletzung. Auf die unterschiedlichen Frakturen wird bewusst nicht naeher eingegangen. In vielen Faellen liefert die Spiral-CT mit relativ geringem Zeitaufwand wesentliche diagnostische Aussagen. Haeufig kann auf eine Angiographie verzichtet werden. Ein starres diagnostisches Stufenschema laesst sich nicht definieren. Die Thoraxuebersichtsaufnahme besitzt einen unveraendert hohen Stellenwert. (orig.)

  5. "Anterior convergent" chest probing in rapid ultrasound transducer positioning versus formal chest ultrasonography to detect pneumothorax during the primary survey of hospital trauma patients: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziapour, Behrad; Haji, Houman Seyedjavady

    2015-01-01

    Occult pneumothorax represents a diagnostic pitfall during the primary survey of trauma patients, particularly if these patients require early positive pressure ventilation. This study investigated the accuracy of our proposed rapid model of ultrasound transducer positioning during the primary survey of trauma patients after their arrival at the hospital. This diagnostic trial was conducted over 12 months and was based on the results of 84 ultrasound (US) exams performed on patients with severe multiple trauma. Our index test (US) was used to detect pneumothorax in four pre-defined locations on the anterior of each hemi-thorax using the "Anterior Convergent" approach, and its performance was limited to the primary survey. Consecutively, patients underwent chest-computed tomography (CT) with or without chest radiography. The diagnostic findings of both chest radiography and chest ultrasounds were compared to the gold-standard test (CT). The diagnostic sensitivity was 78 % for US and 36.4 % for chest radiography (p chest radiography (not significant); the positive predictive values were 74 % for US and 80 % for chest radiography (not significant); the negative predictive values were 94 % for US and 87 % for chest radiography (not significant); the positive likelihood ratio was 10 for US and 18 for chest radiography (p = 0.007); and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.25 for US and 0.65 for chest radiography (p = 0.001). The mean required time for performing the new method was 64 ± 10 s. An absence of the expected diffused dynamic view among ultrasound images obtained from patients with pneumothorax was also observed. We designated this phenomenon "Gestalt Lung Recession." "Anterior convergent" chest US probing represents a brief but efficient model that provides clinicians a safe and accurate exam and adequate resuscitation during critical minutes of the primary survey without interrupting other medical staff activities taking place around the

  6. CIVILIAN GUNSHOT WOUNDS TO THE CHEST: A CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF AN ANNUAL CASELOAD AT A LEVEL 1 TRAUMA CENTRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijering, V M; Hattam, A T; Navsaria, P H; Nicol, A J; Edu, S

    2017-06-01

    Gunshot wounds (GSW) to the chest are common presentations to trauma centres in South Africa. The clinical management and outcome of GSW to the chest are significantly altered by missile trajectory and the associated anatomical structures injured making them challenging injuries to treat. Currently, the management of GSW chest is based on scant evidence and treatment is typically according to algorithms based largely on the anecdotal experience of high volume institutions and experienced clinicians. Ethical approval was obtained for this study. The Electronic Trauma Health Registry (eTHR) Application of the Trauma Centre at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town was interrogated for the year 2015 for all patients with GSW chest. The data was then analysed using descriptive statistics. A total of 141 patients with GSW to the chest were admitted to the Trauma Centre with a median age of 26 years. More than half of the patients, 53. 2% (n = 75) sustained an isolated GSW to the chest. Overall, 29.1% (n = 41) patients sustained a thoracoabdominal injury, which accounts for a significant higher amount of emergency surgeries compared to patients with non thoracoabdominal injuries (54% vs 15%, p = chest surgery of which 5 patients survived. Overall mortality was 7.1% (n = 10) of which 5 patients died from a thoracic cause. Civilian GSW to the chest are common injuries seen in Cape Town, often with concomitant injuries leading to increased morbidity. Significantly more emergency surgeries were done in patients with thoracoabdominal injury. Overall few patients needed chest-related emergency operative intervention (9.2%) with a survival rate of 38.5%. Overall mortality of patients with GSW chest who reached the hospital was 7.1% of whom 50% died from a thoracic cause.

  7. Postoperative evaluation of penetrating hepatic trauma and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Dittman, W.

    1984-01-01

    Postoperative hepatobiliary scintigraphy is recommended in selected cases of hepatic trauma to evaluate the integrity and patency of the biliary system. The authors present a patient with a traumatic hematoma that eventuated in a biloma with spontaneous biliary-cutaneous fistula. Repeat study demonstrated biliary obstruction at the canalicular level, which by more invasive imaging was found secondary to toal obstruction of the common hepatic duct. The precise anatomical level and cause of his obstruction were defined by the findings of endoscopic retrograde cannulation of the pancreas, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiongraphy, and surgery

  8. EVALUATION OF THORACOSCOPY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF DIAPHRAGMATIC INJURIES IN PENETRATING THORACOABDOMINAL TRAUMA WITHOUT LUNG DEFLATION AT DR GEORGE MUKHARI ACADEMIC HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsakala, L

    2017-06-01

    With a mortality estimated at 25% when missed, diaphragmatic injuries due to penetrating thoracoabdominal trauma present a diagnostic challenge for both the radiologist and the surgeon. In the current literature, chest x-ray has a sensitivity of 27-60% for left-sided injuries and only 17% for right-sided injuries while, CT scan has a sensitivity of 14-61% and a specificity of 76-99%. Thoracoscopy using a single lung ventilation is one of the modalities of choice for the diagnosis of these injuries with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 87.5%. This was a prospective study; all stable trauma patients with penetrating thoracoabdominal injury aged 18 years and above admitted to the trauma unit at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital during the period of the study were included. All patients with penetrating thoracoabdominal trauma who were unstable, or necessitating prompt management and all paediatric patients were excluded from the study. In theatre, under general anaesthesia, we first performed thoracoscopy without single lung ventilation followed by laparoscopy as control on each patient. Data was collected using a standard proforma by the attending surgeon and was analysed by a statistician using IBM SPSS 22 software. A total of 32 patients met the inclusion criteria of which 4 were female (12.5%) and 28 male (87.5%) with the median age of 29 years. Of the 32 patients, 27 had thoracoabdominal stab wounds (84.3%) and 5 had gunshot wounds (15.6%). Fourteen patients (43.75%) had left sided injury and 18 patients (56.25%) had injury to the right side. The incidence of diaphragmatic injury was 37.5% (n = 12). No injuries were missed on thoracoscopy; there was no mortality or morbidity. Thoracoscopy without single lung ventilation is safe and comparable to thoracoscopy with single lung ventilation as a diagnostic tool for diaphragmatic injuries in stable patients with penetrating thoracoabdominal trauma.

  9. 74 Year-Old-Man With Pneumopericardium Due to Blunt Chest Trauma: Case Report

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    Alper Avcı

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumopericardium is the presence of air in the pericardial space. It may be seen in the context with severe blunt chest trauma. Usually, pneumopericardium is self-limiting and requiring no specific therapy. However, a continuous monitoring of the electrocardiography and the blood pressure is necessary at an intermediate care unit. We report a 74 year-old-man had been presented with Pneumopericardium, after a car striking. He had bilateral pneumohematothoraces, pneumomediastinum and bilateral multiple rib fractures. Pneumopericardium was diasappeared without surgical management like written in english literature. Frequent cardiac and vital signs monitoring and general support treatment were successful in our treatment.

  10. Rupture of the right upper pulmonary vein and left atrium caused by blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Motoo; Nagai, Ryo; Koishizawa, Tadashi

    2017-11-01

    A 49-year-old man was transferred to our hospital by ambulance due to blunt chest trauma sustained in a car accident. Echocardiography and enhanced computed tomography showed hemopericardium without other vital organ damage. Emergent surgery was performed under strong suspicion of traumatic cardiac rupture. Careful inspection showed a rupture of the right upper pulmonary vein at the junction of the left atrium, a laceration of the inferior vena cava, and a left-side pericardium rupture, and they were repaired with running 4-0 polypropylene suture. Postoperative hemodynamics were stable. The patient was discharged ambulatory on postoperative day 15.

  11. Bile fistula after penetrating hepatic trauma with expectant management in the "era" of endoscopic treatment: clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Armenta-Duran, Eduardo; Enríquez-Domínguez, Lenin; Díaz-Rosales, Juan de Dios; Duarte-Erives, Ever

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to report a clinical case of bile fistula after penetrating hepatic trauma given its low incidence, which was expectant managed by not having endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Clinical case: we present a 28 years-old man, with biliary fistula resulting after a penetrating hepatic trauma. Discussion: bile leakage is a major complication after liver surgery and a rare one in complication of major hepatic trauma. Conventional treatment has consisted of surgical intervent...

  12. Diffuse Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum Secondary to a Minor Blunt Chest Trauma

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    Maximilian Andreas Storz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Full medical evaluation is paramount for all trauma patients. Minor traumas are often overlooked, as they are thought to bear low injury potential. In this case report, we describe the case of a 48-year-old man presenting to our Emergency Department with mild to moderate right-sided shoulder and scapular pain following a fall from his own height ten days previously. Clinical and paraclinical investigations (CT revealed diffuse right shoulder pain, with crepitations on palpation of the neck, right shoulder, and right lateral chest wall. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated right-sided costal fractures (ribs 7 to 9, with diffuse subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to laceration of the visceral and parietal pleura and the adjacent lung parenchyma. In addition, a small ipsilateral pneumothorax was found. Surprisingly, the clinical status was only minimally affected by mild to moderate pain and minor functional impairment.

  13. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors Associated with Complications in Older Adults with Isolated Blunt Chest Trauma

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    Lotfipour, Shahram

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of adverse events in elderly trauma patients with isolated blunt thoracic trauma, and to identify variables associated with these adverse events.METHODS: We performed a chart review of 160 trauma patients age 65 and older with significant blunt thoracic trauma, drawn from an American College of Surgeons Level I Trauma Center registry. Patients with serious injury to other body areas were excluded to prevent confounding the cause of adverse events. Adverse events were defined as acute respiratory distress syndrome or pneumonia, unanticipated intubation, transfer to the intensive care unit for hypoxemia, or death. Data collected included history, physical examination, radiographic findings, length of hospital stay, and clinical outcomes.RESULTS: Ninety-nine patients had isolated chest injury, while 61 others had other organ systems injured and were excluded. Sixteen patients developed adverse events [16.2% 95% confidence interval (CI 9.5-24.9%], including two deaths. Adverse events were experienced by 19.2%, 6.1%, and 28.6% of those patients 65-74, 75-84, and >/=85 years old, respectively. The mean length of stay was 14.6 days in patients with an adverse event and 5.8 days in patients without. Post hoc analysis revealed that all 16 patients with an adverse event had one or more of the following: age >/=85, initial systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg, hemothorax, pneumothorax, three or more unilateral rib fractures, or pulmonary contusion (sensitivity 100%, CI 79.4-100%; specificity 38.6%, CI 28.1-49.9%.CONCLUSION: Adverse events from isolated thoracic trauma in elderly patients complicate 16% of our sample. These criteria were 100% sensitive and 38.5% specific for these adverse events. This study is a first step to identifying variables that might aid in identifying patients at high risk for serious adverse events.

  15. Derivation and validation of two decision instruments for selective chest CT in blunt trauma: a multicenter prospective observational study (NEXUS Chest CT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Robert M; Langdorf, Mark I; Nishijima, Daniel; Baumann, Brigitte M; Hendey, Gregory W; Medak, Anthony J; Raja, Ali S; Allen, Isabel E; Mower, William R

    2015-10-01

    Unnecessary diagnostic imaging leads to higher costs, longer emergency department stays, and increased patient exposure to ionizing radiation. We sought to prospectively derive and validate two decision instruments (DIs) for selective chest computed tomography (CT) in adult blunt trauma patients. From September 2011 to May 2014, we prospectively enrolled blunt trauma patients over 14 y of age presenting to eight US, urban level 1 trauma centers in this observational study. During the derivation phase, physicians recorded the presence or absence of 14 clinical criteria before viewing chest imaging results. We determined injury outcomes by CT radiology readings and categorized injuries as major or minor according to an expert-panel-derived clinical classification scheme. We then employed recursive partitioning to derive two DIs: Chest CT-All maximized sensitivity for all injuries, and Chest CT-Major maximized sensitivity for only major thoracic injuries (while increasing specificity). In the validation phase, we employed similar methodology to prospectively test the performance of both DIs. We enrolled 11,477 patients-6,002 patients in the derivation phase and 5,475 patients in the validation phase. The derived Chest CT-All DI consisted of (1) abnormal chest X-ray, (2) rapid deceleration mechanism, (3) distracting injury, (4) chest wall tenderness, (5) sternal tenderness, (6) thoracic spine tenderness, and (7) scapular tenderness. The Chest CT-Major DI had the same criteria without rapid deceleration mechanism. In the validation phase, Chest CT-All had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%), a specificity of 20.8% (95% CI 19.2%-22.4%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.8% (95% CI 98.9%-100%) for major injury, and a sensitivity of 95.4% (95% CI 93.6%-96.9%), a specificity of 25.5% (95% CI 23.5%-27.5%), and a NPV of 93.9% (95% CI 91.5%-95.8%) for either major or minor injury. Chest CT-Major had a sensitivity of 99.2% (95% CI 95.4%-100%), a specificity of

  16. Prevalence and Clinical Import of Thoracic Injury Identified by Chest Computed Tomography but Not Chest Radiography in Blunt Trauma: Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, Mark I; Medak, Anthony J; Hendey, Gregory W; Nishijima, Daniel K; Mower, William R; Raja, Ali S; Baumann, Brigitte M; Anglin, Deirdre R; Anderson, Craig L; Lotfipour, Shahram; Reed, Karin E; Zuabi, Nadia; Khan, Nooreen A; Bithell, Chelsey A; Rowther, Armaan A; Villar, Julian; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) diagnoses more injuries than chest radiography, so-called occult injuries. Wide availability of chest CT has driven substantial increase in emergency department use, although the incidence and clinical significance of chest CT findings have not been fully described. We determine the frequency, severity, and clinical import of occult injury, as determined by changes in management. These data will better inform clinical decisions, need for chest CT, and odds of intervention. Our sample included prospective data (2009 to 2013) on 5,912 patients at 10 Level I trauma center EDs with both chest radiography and chest CT at physician discretion. These patients were 40.6% of 14,553 enrolled in the parent study who had either chest radiography or chest CT. Occult injuries were pneumothorax, hemothorax, sternal or greater than 2 rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, thoracic spine or scapula fracture, and diaphragm or great vessel injury found on chest CT but not on preceding chest radiography. A priori, we categorized thoracic injuries as major (having invasive procedures), minor (observation or inpatient pain control >24 hours), or of no clinical significance. Primary outcome was prevalence and proportion of occult injury with major interventions of chest tube, mechanical ventilation, or surgery. Secondary outcome was minor interventions of admission rate or observation hours because of occult injury. Two thousand forty-eight patients (34.6%) had chest injury on chest radiography or chest CT, whereas 1,454 of these patients (71.0%, 24.6% of all patients) had occult injury. Of these, in 954 patients (46.6% of injured, 16.1% of total), chest CT found injuries not observed on immediately preceding chest radiography. In 500 more patients (24.4% of injured patients, 8.5% of all patients), chest radiography found some injury, but chest CT found occult injury. Chest radiography found all injuries in only 29.0% of injured patients. Two hundred and two

  17. Successful management of threatened aortic rupture late after rib fracture caused by blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Sugimoto, Takaki; Sakahira, Hideki; Matsuoka, Hidehito; Yoshioka, Yuki; Arase, Hiroki

    2014-05-01

    A 62-year-old man was crushed in a car accident and diagnosed with a fractured left ninth rib, pulmonary and heart contusion, hemopneumothorax, and descending aortic injury based on a computed tomography scan. He underwent chest tube drainage and was intubated for mechanical ventilation because a bone fragment of the ninth rib threatened to penetrate the descending aorta. On the second posttrauma day, computed tomography showed the bone fragment of the ninth rib approaching the descending aorta. He underwent graft replacement of the injured portion of the descending thoracic aorta, and we removed the fractured left ninth rib. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Delayed Cerebral Ischemia following to Repair of Penetrating Trauma to External Carotid artery Introduction

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    M. Eskandarlou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Penetrating trauma to anterior neck can induce cerebral ischemia due to carotid artery injury. Brain ischemia also can present after surgical carotid repairs. Early diagnosis and suitable treatment modality prevent from permanent neurologic deficit post operatively. Case Report: A 30 years old man with stab wound to zone two left side of neck underwent exploration and penrose insertion. Due to excessive bleeding through drain tube, patient was transferred to Besat Hospital of Hamadan. Surgical repair of external carotid artery successfully was done. Four days later patient developed right hemiparesis suddenly. According to MRI and color Doppler sonography finding of thrombosis of left common and internal carotid artery, reoperation was done. After thrombectomy cerebral ischemia and hemi-paralysis improved. Conclusions: Surgical approach to symptomatic penetrating neck trauma is oblique cervical incision, control of bleeding, repair of internal carotid, repair or ligature of external carotid artery base on some factors and preferential repair of internal jugular vein. Meticulous and fine surgical technique for both vascular repair and protection of adjacent normal vessels for avoiding to blunt trauma or compression with retractors is noticeable. Exact postoperative care as repeated clinical examination with goal of early diagnosis of internal carotid artery thrombosis and rapid diagnostic and treatment planning of this complication are important factors for taking of good result in treatment of penetrating trauma to carotid. Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci . 2016; 22 (4 :353-357

  19. Ruptura do septo interventricular após trauma torácico fechado Ventricular septal rupture following blunt chest trauma

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    Ronaldo Peixoto de Mello

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos a seguir um caso de ruptura do septo interventricular após trauma torácico automobilístico com evolução relativamente benigna a despeito da extensão da lesão anatômica.We report a case of ventricular septal rupture following chest trauma resulting from a car accident. The outcome was relatively favorable despite the extension of the anatomic lesion.

  20. Frequency of myocardial injury after blunt chest trauma as evaluated by radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, G.R.; Driedger, A.A.; Holliday, R.L.; Cheung, H.W.; Sibbald, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients who had sustained multisystem trauma, including severe blunt chest injury, were prospectively evaluated to assess the frequency of associated traumatic myocardial injury. Traumatic injury to either the right or left ventricle was defined by the presence of discrete abnormalities of wall motion on electrocardiographically gated cardiac scintigraphy in patients without a clinical history of heart disease. Forty-two patients (55%) (Group 1) had focal abnormalities of wall motion; 27 involved the right ventricle, 7 the left ventricle, 7 were biventricular, and 1 involved only the septum. Both the right and left ventricular ejection fractions were significantly lower (31 +/- 11% and 47 +/- 14%, respectively) than those in the 35 traumatized patients without wall motion abnormalities on scintigraphy (Group 2) (49 +/- 8% and 58 +/- 11%, respectively). Repeat scintigraphic examination in 32 Group 1 patients at a time remote from initial injury showed improvement or resolution of previously defined focal wall motion abnormalities in 27 of 32 patients (84%). The electrocardiogram and serum enzyme tests were insensitive indexes of traumatic myocardial injury when defined by the scintigraphic abnormalities. Thus, severe blunt chest trauma results in a higher frequency of traumatic myocardial injury than heretofore recognized, and frequently involves the anteriorly situated right ventricle

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Initial Evaluation of Chest Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Ali; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Heidary, Kamran; Alimohammadi, Hosein; Tarbiyat, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Application of chest radiography for all multiple trauma patients is associated with a significant increase in total costs, exposure to radiation, and overcrowding of the emergency department. Ultrasound has been introduced as an alternative diagnostic tool in this regard. The aim of the present study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography and radiography in detection of traumatic intrathoracic injuries. In the present prospective cross-sectional study, patients with traumatic intrathoracic injuries, who were referred to the emergency department from December 2013 to December 2014, were assessed. The patients underwent bedside ultrasound, radiographic and computed tomography (CT) scan examinations based on ATLS recommendations. Screening performance characteristics of ultrasonography and radiography were compared using SPSS 21.0. Chest CT scan was considered as gold standard. 152 chest trauma patients with a mean age of 31.4 ± 13.8 years (range: 4 ‒ 67), were enrolled (77.6% male). Chest CT scan showed pulmonary contusion in 48 (31.6%) patients, hemothorax in 29 (19.1%), and pneumothorax in 55 (36.2%) cases. Area under the ROC curve of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pulmonary contusion were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86‒0.96), 0.86 (95% CI: 0.78‒0.94), and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.88), respectively. Area under the ROC curve of radiography was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.87) for detection of pneumothorax, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68‒0.86) for hemothorax, and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.5‒0.67) for pulmonary contusion. Comparison of areas under the ROC curve declared the significant superiority of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax (p = 0.02) and pulmonary contusion (p < 0.001). However, the diagnostic value of the two tests was equal in detection of hemothorax (p = 0.08). The results of the present study showed that ultrasonography is preferable to radiography in the initial evaluation of patients with traumatic injuries to the

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Initial Evaluation of Chest Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Vafaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of chest radiography for all multiple trauma patients is associated with a significant increase in total costs, exposure to radiation, and overcrowding of the emergency department. Ultrasound has been introduced as an alternative diagnostic tool in this regard. The aim of the present study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography and radiography in detection of traumatic intrathoracic injuries. Methods: In the present prospective cross-sectional study, patients with traumatic intrathoracic injuries, who were referred to the emergency department from December 2013 to December 2014, were assessed. The patients underwent bedside ultrasound, radiographic and computed tomography (CT scan examinations based on ATLS recommendations. Screening performance characteristics of ultrasonography and radiography were compared using SPSS 21.0. Chest CT scan was considered as gold standard. Results: 152 chest trauma patients with a mean age of 31.4 ± 13.8 years (range: 4 ‒ 67, were enrolled (77.6% male. Chest CT scan showed pulmonary contusion in 48 (31.6% patients, hemothorax in 29 (19.1%, and pneumothorax in 55 (36.2% cases. Area under the ROC curve of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pulmonary contusion were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86‒0.96, 0.86 (95% CI: 0.78‒0.94, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.88, respectively. Area under the ROC curve of radiography was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.87 for detection of pneumothorax, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68‒0.86 for hemothorax, and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.5‒0.67 for pulmonary contusion. Comparison of areas under the ROC curve declared the significant superiority of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax (p = 0.02 and pulmonary contusion (p < 0.001. However, the diagnostic value of the two tests was equal in detection of hemothorax (p = 0.08. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that ultrasonography is preferable to radiography in the initial

  3. Use of intubating laryngeal mask airway in a morbidly obese patient with chest trauma in an emergency setting

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    Tripat Bindra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A morbidly obese male who sustained blunt trauma chest with bilateral pneumothorax was referred to the intensive care unit for management of his condition. Problems encountered in managing the patient were gradually increasing hypoxemia (chest trauma with multiple rib fractures with lung contusions and difficult mask ventilation and intubation (morbid obesity, heavy jaw, short and thick neck. We performed awake endotracheal intubation using an intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA size 4 and provided mechanical ventilation to the patient. This report suggests that ILMA can be very useful in the management of difficult airway outside the operating room and can help in preventing adverse events in an emergency setting.

  4. The significance of routine thoracic computed tomography in patients with blunt chest trauma.

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    Çorbacıoğlu, Seref Kerem; Er, Erhan; Aslan, Sahin; Seviner, Meltem; Aksel, Gökhan; Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Güler, Sertaç; Bitir, Aysen

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the use of thoracic computed tomography (TCT) as part of nonselective computed tomography (CT) guidelines is superior to selective CT during the diagnosis of blunt chest trauma. This study was planned as a prospective cohort study, and it was conducted at the emergency department between 2013 and 2014. A total of 260 adult patients who did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. All patients were evaluated by an emergency physician, and their primary surveys were completed based on the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) principles. Based on the initial findings and ATLS recommendations, patients in whom thoracic CT was indicated were determined (selective CT group). Routine CTs were then performed on all patients. Thoracic injuries were found in 97 (37.3%) patients following routine TCT. In 53 (20%) patients, thoracic injuries were found by selective CT. Routine TCT was able to detect chest injury in 44 (16%) patients for whom selective TCT would not otherwise be ordered based on the EP evaluation (nonselective TCT group). Five (2%) patients in this nonselective TCT group required tube thoracostomy, while there was no additional treatment provided for thoracic injuries in the remaining 39 (15%). In conclusion, we found that the nonselective TCT method was superior to the selective TCT method in detecting thoracic injuries in patients with blunt trauma. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate that the nonselective TCT method can change the course of patient management albeit at low rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Incidence and Imaging Findings of Costal Cartilage Fractures in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma: A Retrospective Review of 1461 Consecutive Whole-Body CT Examinations for Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummela, Mari T; Bensch, Frank V; Pyhältö, Tuomo T; Koskinen, Seppo K

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To assess the incidence of costal cartilage (CC) fractures in whole-body computed tomographic (CT) examinations for blunt trauma and to evaluate distribution of CC fractures, concomitant injuries, mechanism of injury, accuracy of reporting, and the effect on 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. All whole-body CT examinations for blunt trauma over 36 months were reviewed retrospectively and chest trauma CT studies were evaluated by a second reader. Of 1461 patients who underwent a whole-body CT examination, 39% (574 of 1461) had signs of thoracic injuries (men, 74.0% [425 of 574]; mean age, 46.6 years; women, 26.0% [149 of 574]; mean age, 48.9 years). χ 2 and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Interobserver agreement was calculated by using Cohen kappa values. Results A total of 114 patients (men, 86.8% [99 of 114]; mean age, 48.6 years; women, 13.2% [15 of 114]; mean age, 45.1 years) had 221 CC fractures. The incidence was 7.8% (114 of 1461) in all whole-body CT examinations and 19.9% (114 of 574) in patients with thoracic trauma. Cartilage of rib 7 (21.3%, 47 of 221) was most commonly injured. Bilateral multiple consecutive rib fractures occurred in 36% (41 of 114) versus 14% (64 of 460) in other patients with chest trauma (OR, 3.48; 95% CI: 2.18, 5.53; P chest trauma with CC fractures (13%, 15 of 114) versus patients with chest trauma without CC fractures (4%, 18 of 460) (OR, 3.72; 95% CI: 1.81, 7.64; P = .0001), as well as aortic injuries (n = 4 vs n = 0; P = .0015; OR, unavailable). Kappa value for interobserver agreement in detecting CC fractures was 0.65 (substantial agreement). CC fractures were documented in 39.5% (45 of 114) of primary reports. The 30-day mortality of patients with CC fractures was 7.02% (eight of 114) versus 4.78% (22 of 460) of other patients with chest trauma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI: 0.65, 3.47; P = .3371). Conclusion

  6. Selective common and uncommon imaging manifestations of blunt nonaortic chest trauma: when time is of the essence.

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    Altoos, Rola; Carr, Robert; Chung, Jonathan; Stern, Eric; Nevrekar, Dipti

    2015-01-01

    This is a pictorial essay in which we review and illustrate a variety of thoracic injuries related to blunt trauma. Non-aortic blunt thoracic trauma can be divided anatomically into injuries of the chest wall, lungs, pleura, mediastinum, and diaphragm. Some injuries involve more than one anatomic compartment, and multiple injuries commonly coexist. This article provides common imaging findings and discussion of both common and uncommon but critical thoracic injuries encountered. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The role of repairing lung lacerations during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery evacuations for retained haemothorax caused by blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Pin; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Soo, Kwan-Ming; Tarng, Yih-Wen; Chiang, Hsin-I; Huang, Fong-Dee; Lin, Hsing-Lin

    2014-07-01

    Retained haemothorax and pneumothorax are the most common complications after blunt chest traumas. Lung lacerations derived from fractures of the ribs are usually found in these patients. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is usually used as a routine procedure in the treatment of retained pleural collections. The objective of this study was to find out if there is any advantage in adding the procedure for repairing lacerated lungs during VATS. Patients who were brought to our hospital with blunt chest trauma were enrolled into this prospective cohort study from January 2004 to December 2011. All enrolled patients had rib fractures with type III lung lacerations diagnosed by CT scans. They sustained retained pleural collections and surgical drainage was indicated. On one group, only evacuation procedure by VATS was performed. On the other group, not only evacuations but also repair of lung injuries were performed. Patients with penetrating injury or blunt injury with massive bleeding, that required emergency thoracotomy, were excluded from the study, in addition to those with cardiovascular or oesophageal injuries. During the study period, 88 patients who underwent thoracoscopy were enrolled. Among them, 43 patients undergoing the simple thoracoscopic evacuation method were stratified into Group 1. The remaining 45 patients who underwent thoracoscopic evacuation combined with resection of lung lacerations were stratified into Group 2. The rates of post-traumatic infection were higher in Group 1. The durations of chest-tube drainage and ventilator usage were shorter in Group 2, as were the lengths of patient intensive care unit stay and hospital stay. When compared with simple thoracoscopic evacuation methods, repair and resection of the injured lungs combined may result in better clinical outcomes in patients who sustained blunt chest injuries. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio

  8. Emergency treatment of violent trauma: clinical cases and surgical treatment of penetrating thoracoabdominal, perineal and anorectal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccon, William; Paternollo, Roberto; Del Re, Luca; Cordovana, Andrea; De Murtas, Giovanni; Gaverini, Giacomo; Baffa, Giulia; Lunghi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The authors analyse clinical cases of penetrating thoracic, abdominal, perineal and anorectal injury and describe the traumatic event and type of lesion, the principles of surgical treatment, the complication rate and follow up. In the last 24 months, we analyzed 10 consecutive cases of penetrating thoracic and abdominal wounds [stab wound (n=7), with evisceration (n=4), gunshot wound (n=1)], and penetrating perineal and anorectal wounds (impalement n=4). In addition, we report an unusual case of neck injury from a stab wound. All the patients underwent emergency surgery for the lesions reported. In 7 cases of perforating vulnerant thoracoabdominal trauma from stab wounds there was hemoperitoneum due to bleeding from the abdominal wall (n=3), the omentum (n=1), the vena cava (n=1) and the liver (n=2). Evisceration of the omentum was observed in 4 cases. In 2 cases laparoscopy was performed. In one case laparotomy and thoracoscopy was performed. In a patient with an abdominoperineal gunshot wound, exploration was extraperitoneal. The 4 cases of perineal and anorectal impalement were treated with primary reconstruction, while in one case a laparotomy was needed to suture the rectum and fashion a temporary colostomy. In one case of anorectal injury rehabilitation resulted in a gradual improvement of fecal continence, while in the patient with the colostomy follow up at 2 months was scheduled to plan colostomy closure. Based on the our clinical experience and the literature, in penetrating abdominal trauma laparotomy may be required if patients are hemodynamically unstable (or in hemorrhagic shock), in patients with evisceration and peritonitis, or for exploration of penetrating thoracoabdominal and epigastric lesions. In anterior injuries of the abdominal wall from gunshot or stab wounds, laparotomy is indicated when there is peritoneal violation and significant intraperitoneal damage. In patients with actively bleeding wounds of the abdominal wall muscles minimal

  9. The impact of mechanism on the management and outcome of penetrating colonic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuizen, G V; Kong, V Y; Estherhuizen, T; Bruce, J L; Laing, G L; Odendaal, J J; Clarke, D L

    2018-02-01

    Introduction In light of continuing controversy surrounding the management of penetrating colonic injuries, we set out to compare the outcome of penetrating colonic trauma according to whether the mechanism of injury was a stab wound or a gunshot wound. Methods Our trauma registry was interrogated for the 5-year period from January 2012 to December 2016. All patients over the age of 18 years with penetrating trauma (stab or gunshot) and with intraoperatively proven colonic injury were reviewed. Details of the colonic and concurrent abdominal injuries were recorded, together with the operative management strategy. In-hospital morbidities were divided into colon-related and non-colon related morbidities. The length of hospital stay and mortality were recorded. Direct comparison was made between patients with stab wounds and gunshot wounds to the colon. Results During the 5-year study period, 257 patients sustained a colonic injury secondary to penetrating trauma; 95% (244/257) were male and the mean age was 30 years. A total of 113 (44%) sustained a gunshot wound and the remaining 56% (144/257) sustained a stab wound. Some 88% (226/257) of all patients sustained a single colonic injury, while 12% (31/257) sustained more than one colonic injury. A total of 294 colonic injuries were found at laparotomy. Multiple colonic injuries were less commonly encountered in stab wounds (6%, 9/144 vs. 19%, 22/113, P colonic stab wounds and colonic gunshot wounds are different in terms of severity of the injury and in terms of outcome. While primary repair is almost always applicable to the management of colonic stab wounds, the same cannot be said for colonic gunshot wounds. The management of colonic gunshot wounds should be examined separately from that of stab wounds.

  10. Childhood trauma and dissociation among women with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Özen B; Özdemir YO; Beştepe EE

    2018-01-01

    Beliz Özen, Y Özay Özdemir, E Emrem Beştepe Erenköy Mental Health and Neurological Diseases Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Objective: Causes such as childhood trauma, negative attitude about sexuality, inadequate sexual knowledge and education, relationship problems, and unconscious motivation are reported about psychosexual development in the etiology of genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPP/PD). There are few studies that focus directly on res...

  11. Childhood trauma and dissociation among women with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ozen,Beliz; Özdemir,Yusuf Ozay; Bestepe,Engin Emrem

    2018-01-01

    Beliz Özen, Y Özay Özdemir, E Emrem Beştepe Erenköy Mental Health and Neurological Diseases Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Objective: Causes such as childhood trauma, negative attitude about sexuality, inadequate sexual knowledge and education, relationship problems, and unconscious motivation are reported about psychosexual development in the etiology of genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPP/PD). There are few studies that focu...

  12. The effect of hospital care on early survival after penetrating trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David E; Doolittle, Peter C; Winchell, Robert J; Betensky, Rebecca A

    2014-12-01

    The effectiveness of emergency medical interventions can be best evaluated using time-to-event statistical methods with time-varying covariates (TVC), but this approach is complicated by uncertainty about the actual times of death. We therefore sought to evaluate the effect of hospital intervention on mortality after penetrating trauma using a method that allowed for interval censoring of the precise times of death. Data on persons with penetrating trauma due to interpersonal assault were combined from the 2008 to 2010 National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) and the 2004 to 2010 National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS). Cox and Weibull proportional hazards models for survival time (t SURV ) were estimated, with TVC assumed to have constant effects for specified time intervals following hospital arrival. The Weibull model was repeated with t SURV interval-censored to reflect uncertainty about the precise times of death, using an imputation method to accommodate interval censoring along with TVC. All models showed that mortality was increased by older age, female sex, firearm mechanism, and injuries involving the head/neck or trunk. Uncensored models showed a paradoxical increase in mortality associated with the first hour in a hospital. The interval-censored model showed that mortality was markedly reduced after admission to a hospital, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.68 (95% CI 0.63, 0.73) during the first 30 min declining to a HR of 0.01 after 120 min. Admission to a verified level I trauma center (compared to other hospitals in the NTDB) was associated with a further reduction in mortality, with a HR of 0.93 (95% CI 0.82, 0.97). Time-to-event models with TVC and interval censoring can be used to estimate the effect of hospital care on early mortality after penetrating trauma or other acute medical conditions and could potentially be used for interhospital comparisons.

  13. Operative videothoracoscopy in the surgical treatment of penetrating firearms wounds of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusov, P G; Kuritsyn, A N; Urazovsky, N Y; Tariverdiev, M L

    1998-09-01

    We prospectively analyzed our experience with operative videothoracoscopy (OVT) performed in a field military hospital in cases of penetrating firearms wounds of the thorax (PFAWT) sustained in Chechnya. From February to April 1996, we treated 206 wounded patients, of whom 37 (18.0%) had sustained chest injuries. PFAWT were present in 23 soldiers, accounting for 62.2% of all chest injuries. Twelve injuries were confined to the thorax, eight patients had associated injuries, and three soldiers had thoracoabdominal injuries. Nineteen patients had pleural drainage performed during medical evacuation. The thoracic injuries were right-sided (17), involved bullets or shell splinters (23); were through and through (16), represented solitary wounds (19), and were associated with internal organ injuries (21). Fifteen patients had indications for OVT when they were delivered from the battle-field 1.5 to 22 hours after injury. All patients manifested signs of hemorrhagic shock and hemodynamic instability. Indications for OVT were ongoing intrapleural bleeding (6), clotted hemothorax (6), or marked air leakage (3) preventing lung inflation with the OP-02 apparatus (field modification). OVT revealed 12 lung wounds, nine of which were multiple wounds, pleural bleeding in 6 patients, clotted hemothorax in 11 patients, and foreign bodies in 5 patients. Two patients underwent thoracotomy, one for suspicion of heart injury and the second because we could not adequately visualize and control bleeding revealed at OVT to be from the intercostal artery in the left costovertebral angle. Eight of 23 patients had no indication for operative videothoracoscopy and were managed with continued pleural aspiration and drug therapy. Wedge resection of the lung using an Endo-GIA-30 stapler was necessary in two patients because of parenchymal destruction and bleeding. Evacuation of clotted blood by fragmentation and aspiration was satisfactory in all cases. Satisfactory manual suturing of selected

  14. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-01-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractu...

  15. Utility of extended FAST in blunt chest trauma: is it the time to be used in the ATLS algorithm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Yassir; Musthafa, Shameel; Hakim, Suhail Y; Nabir, Syed; Qanbar, Ahad; Mahmood, Ismail; Siddiqui, Tariq; Hussein, Wafaa A; Ali, Hazim H; Afifi, Ibrahim; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    The clinical significance of extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (EFAST) for diagnosis of pneumothorax is not well defined. To investigate the utility of EFAST in blunt chest trauma (BCT) patients. A single blinded, prospective study. All patients admitted with BCT (2011-2013). Level 1 trauma center in Qatar. Patients were screened by EFAST and results were compared to the clinical examination (CE) and chest X-ray (CXR). Chest-computed tomography (CT) scoring system was used to confirm and measure the pneumothorax. Diagnostic accuracy of diagnostic modalities of pneumothorax was measured using sensitivity, specificity, predictive values (PVs), and likelihood ratio. A total of 305 BCT patients were included with median age of 34 (18-75). Chest CT was positive for pneumothorax in 75 (24.6 %) cases; of which 11 % had bilateral pneumothorax. Chest CT confirmed the diagnosis of pneumothorax in 43, 41, and 11 % of those who were initially diagnosed by EFAST, CE, and CXR, respectively. EFAST was positive in 42 hemithoraces and its sensitivity (43 %) was higher in comparison to CXR (11 %). Positive and negative PVs of EFAST were 76 and 92 %, respectively. The frequency of missed cases by CXR was higher in comparison to EFAST and CE. The lowest median score of missed pneumothorax was observed by EFAST. EFAST can be used as an efficient triaging tool in BCT patients to rule out pneumothorax. Based on our analysis, we would recommend EFAST as an adjunct in ATLS algorithm.

  16. The utility of computed tomography as a screening tool for the evaluation of pediatric blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Troy A; Kumar, Rajiv; Koontz, Nicholas A; Scherer, L R; Applegate, Kimberly E

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing concern that computed tomography (CT) is being unnecessarily overused for the evaluation of pediatric patients. The purpose of this study was to analyze the trends and utility of chest CT use compared with chest X-ray (CXR) for the evaluation of children with blunt chest trauma. A 4-year retrospective review was performed for pediatric patients who underwent chest CT within 24 hours of sustaining blunt trauma at a Level-I trauma center. Trends in the use of CT and CXR were documented, and results of radiology reports were analyzed and compared with clinical outcomes. Three hundred thirty-three children, mean age 11 years, had chest CTs, increasing from 5.5% in 2001-2002 to 10.5% in 2004-2005 (p tool to analyze which patients may require CT evaluation. A multidisciplinary approach is warranted to develop guidelines that standardize the use of CT and thereby decreases unnecessary radiation exposure to pediatric patients.

  17. Surgical management of penetrating pelvic trauma: a case report and literature review

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    ZHANG Peng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 High-velocity penetrating pelvic injury is one of the most difficult challenges to trauma surgeons. The injury sites frequently include soft tissue, pelvis, geni-tourinary tract, vascular structures and intraabdominal viscera. We present an unusual case of a male patient suf-fering a collision at night with a deformed steel bar penetrat-ing into his right groin. Careful planning of the surgical approach is important before extracting the foreign body. The possibility of multiorgan damage to intrapelvic struc-tures such as colon, urinary bladder, vessels and nerves, frequently necessitates a multidisciplinary involvement and systematic approach. Besides, limited incision as well as modification should be considered, and debridement and perioperative antibiotics can be used to reduce the risk of serious wound infection. Key words: Pelvis; Debridement; Wounds, penetrating

  18. Outcomes of patients with blunt chest trauma encountered at emergency department and possible risk factors affecting mortality

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    Yuan-Ming Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt chest trauma is associated with a high risk of mortality. Respiratory complications may necessitate prolonged ventilation and result in death. The present study aimed to investigate possible signs of trauma and the prognosis of trauma patients with thoracic injuries and identify risk factors for mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of trauma patients with blunt chest injuries who underwent thoracic computed tomography on arrival in the emergency department (January 2010–December 2013. Patients with brain injuries were excluded from the study. The prognostic values of age, sex, trauma type, injury severity score, revised trauma score (RTS, ventilator requirement, days in Intensive Care Unit (ICU, associated thoracic injury, and laboratory examinations (including arterial blood gas [ABG] were evaluated. Results: Fifteen of 30 analyzed patients died during their ICU stays; accordingly, we classified patients as survivors and nonsurvivors. These groups differed significantly regarding the RTS (P = 0.002, mechanical ventilation requirement (P = 0.007, total stay length (P = 0.009, and the presence of hemothorax (P = 0.030. However, no significant differences in the pneumothorax, rib fractures, and blood tests (including ABG analysis were observed between the groups. Conclusion: Among hospitalized trauma patients with blunt thoracic injuries, RTS, mechanical ventilation requirement, and hemothorax were identified as risk factors for mortality. Patients with hemothorax should receive multidisciplinary care and be monitored closely to improve survival.

  19. Chest x-ray as a screening tool for blunt thoracic trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchar, Natalie L; Woo, Kenneth; Brennan, Maureen; Palmer, Cameron S; Zs Ee, Michael; Sweeney, Brian; Crameri, Joe

    2013-10-01

    With the increasing use of thoracic computed tomography (CT) to screen for injuries in pediatric blunt thoracic trauma (BTT), we determined whether chest x-ray (CXR) and other clinical and epidemiologic variables could be used to predict significant thoracic injuries, to inform the selective use of CT in pediatric BTT. We further queried if these were discrepant from factors associated with the decision to obtain a thoracic CT. This retrospective cohort study included cases of BTT from three Level I pediatric trauma centers between April 1999 and March 2008. Pre-CT epidemiologic, clinical, and radiologic variables associated with CT findings of any thoracic injury or a significant thoracic injury as well as the decision to obtain a thoracic CT were determined using logistic regression. Of 425 patients, 40% patients had a significant thoracic injury, 49% had nonsignificant thoracic injury, and 11% had no thoracic injury at all. Presence of hydrothorax and/or pneumothorax on CXR significantly increased the likelihood of significant chest injury visualized by CT (adjusted odds ratio 10.8; 95% confidence interval, 6.5-18), as did the presence of isolated subcutaneous emphysema (adjusted odds ratio, 19.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.3-168). Although a normal CXR finding was not statistically associated with a reduced risk of significant thoracic injury, 8 of the 9 cases with normal CXR findings and significant injuries involved occult pneumothoraces or hemothoraces not requiring intervention. Converse to features suggesting increased risk of significant injury, the decision to obtain a thoracic CT was only associated with later period in the study and obtaining a CT scan of another body region. CXR can be used to screen for significant thoracic injuries and direct the selective use of thoracic CT in pediatric BTT. Prospective studies are needed to validate these findings and develop guidelines that include CXR to define indications for thoracic CT in pediatric BTT

  20. Penetrating and blunt trauma to the neck: clinical presentation, assessment and emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdonck, P; de Schoutheets, J C; Monsieurs, K G; Van Laer, C; Vander Poorten, V; Vanderveken, O

    Penetrating and blunt trauma to the neck: clinical presentation, assessment ana emergency management. In Belgium, and even in Western Europe, penetrating and blunt injury to the neck is relatively uncommon in both the civilian and military populations. Pre-hospital and emergency assessment and management will therefore always prove challenging, as individual exposure to this specific type of injury remains low. Historically, the neck has been divided into three anatomical zones with specific landmarks to guide the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to penetrating neck injuries. Most penetrating injuries need to be explored surgically, although with the advent of multi-detector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA), which yields high diagnostic sensitivity, this inflexible approach has recently changed to a more targeted management, based on clinical, radiographic and, if deemed necessary, endoscopic findings. However, some authors have addressed their concern about this novel, 'no-zone' approach, since the risk of missing less apparent aerodigestive tract injuries may increase. It is recommended, therefore, that all patients with penetrating neck injuries be closely observed, irrespective of the initial findings. The incidence of blunt neck injury is much lower, and this makes risk assessment and management even more difficult in comparison with penetrating injuries. Again, MDCTA is most often the first diagnostic tool if a blunt neck injury is suspected, due to its good sensitivity for blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) as well as for aerodigestive tract injuries. Specific patterns of injury and unexpected neurological and neuro-radiological findings in trauma patients should always warrant further investigation. Despite ongoing debate, systemic anticoagulation is recommended for most BCVI, sometimes combined with endovascular treatment. Aerodigestive tract injuries may present dramatically, but are often more subtle, making the diagnosis more difficult

  1. Evidence-Based Assignment of Diagnostic Peritoneal Lavage (DPL Sensitivity in Penetrating Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sharifi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:There are a large number of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma who have normal vital signs and negative abdominal examination when referred to trauma centers. Agreat deal of controversy exists between authorities about screening these patients for emergency explorative laparotomy. Many references have reported more than 90% sensitivity for DPL as a diagnostic method to determine whether intraabdominal injuries were present and emergent laparotomy is indicated or not. This study is for reassignment of this sensitivity according to our own evidence. Methods: All of the patients with abdominal stab wounds and normal vital signs plus negative abdominal examination who were referred to Shohada-e-Tajrish hospital between March 2004 to December 2005, underwent local wound exploration and those confirmed to have peritoneal penetration, underwent emergency laparotomy. In the operating room and prior to surgery, under general anesthesia, DPL was performed. Then DPL results were compared with laparotomy findings and DPL sensitivity was assigned. Results: Of the total number of 34 patients, 8 had a positive DPL and positive laparotomy; 2 had a positive DPL and negative laparotomy; 8 had negative DPL and positive laparotomy, and 16 patients had negative DPL and negative laparotomy. Conclusion: According to our study, DPL sensitivity is much less than mentioned in trauma texts (approximately 50%. So, it is not a valuable tool to discriminate between operative and conservative approaches in penetrating abdominal trauma. We suggest more sensitive modalities. Laparotomy is the most sensitive approach but at the price of a high negative laparotomy rate.

  2. CT evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal injury due to blunt chest trauma and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimi, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    The CT findings of pulmonary parenchymal injury due to blunt chest trauma in 73 patients and their clinical significance were analyzed. CT was obtained within 6 hours after trauma. Findings were analyzed according to the number of injured segments and severity which was classified into three grades. A correlation was also made with arterial blood PaO 2 and thoracic complications. Pulmonary parenchymal injury was identified in multisegmental portions bilaterally in most cases. It was most frequently observed in the posterior portion of the lung such as segment 6. More than 50% of lesions were classified as Grade 1. Pulmonary laceration, defined as patchy density with the cavitary lesion (Grade 3), was noted in 9.2%. There was a good correlation between extent of pulmonary injury and degree of hypoxia. The correlation of pneumothorax was also found with extensive lesion and frequency of Grade 3 lesion. Cases with pulmonary laceration tend to have extensive injury, and be related to the degree of hypoxia. In conclusion, CT evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal injury is valuable not only for morphological evaluation but also for estimation of hypoxia. (author)

  3. CT evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal injury due to blunt chest trauma and its clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimi, Hiroshi (St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    The CT findings of pulmonary parenchymal injury due to blunt chest trauma in 73 patients and their clinical significance were analyzed. CT was obtained within 6 hours after trauma. Findings were analyzed according to the number of injured segments and severity which was classified into three grades. A correlation was also made with arterial blood PaO{sub 2} and thoracic complications. Pulmonary parenchymal injury was identified in multisegmental portions bilaterally in most cases. It was most frequently observed in the posterior portion of the lung such as segment 6. More than 50% of lesions were classified as Grade 1. Pulmonary laceration, defined as patchy density with the cavitary lesion (Grade 3), was noted in 9.2%. There was a good correlation between extent of pulmonary injury and degree of hypoxia. The correlation of pneumothorax was also found with extensive lesion and frequency of Grade 3 lesion. Cases with pulmonary laceration tend to have extensive injury, and be related to the degree of hypoxia. In conclusion, CT evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal injury is valuable not only for morphological evaluation but also for estimation of hypoxia. (author).

  4. Operation CeaseFire-New Orleans: an infectious disease model for addressing community recidivism from penetrating trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Erin; Duchesne, Juan C; Sarlati, Siavash; O'Neal, Michael; Johnson, Kelly; Avegno, Jennifer

    2014-07-01

    CeaseFire, using an infectious disease approach, addresses violence by partnering hospital resources with the community by providing violence interruption and community-based services for an area roughly composed of a single city zip code (70113). Community-based violence interrupters start in the trauma center from the moment penetrating trauma occurs, through hospital stay, and in the community after release. This study interprets statistics from this pilot program, begun May 2012. We hypothesize a decrease in penetrating trauma rates in the target area compared with others after program implementation. This was a 3-year prospective data collection of trauma registry from May 2010 to May 2013. All intentional, target area, penetrating trauma treated at our Level I trauma center received immediate activation of CeaseFire personnel. Incidences of violent trauma and rates of change, by zip code, were compared with the same period for 2 years before implementation. During this period, the yearly incidence of penetrating trauma in Orleans Parish increased. Four of the highest rates were found in adjacent zip codes: 70112, 70113, 70119, and 70125. Average rates per 100,000 were 722.7, 523.6, 286.4, and 248, respectively. These areas represent four of the six zip codes citywide that saw year-to-year increases in violent trauma during this period. Zip 70113 saw a lower rate of rise in trauma compared with 70112 and a higher but comparable rise compared with that of 70119 and 70125. Hospital-based intervention programs that partner with culturally appropriate personnel and resources outside the institution walls have potential to have meaningful impact over the long term. While few conclusions of the effect of such a program can be drawn in a 12-month period, we anticipate long-term changes in the numbers of penetrating injuries in the target area and in the rest of the city as this program expands. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  5. Penetrating bladder trauma: a high risk factor for associated rectal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, B M; Reis, L O; Calderan, T R; de Campos, C C; Fraga, G P

    2014-01-01

    Demographics and mechanisms were analyzed in prospectively maintained level one trauma center database 1990-2012. Among 2,693 trauma laparotomies, 113 (4.1%) presented bladder lesions; 51.3% with penetrating injuries (n = 58); 41.3% (n = 24) with rectal injuries, males corresponding to 95.8%, mean age 29.8 years; 79.1% with gunshot wounds and 20.9% with impalement; 91.6% arriving the emergence room awake (Glasgow 14-15), hemodynamically stable (average systolic blood pressure 119.5 mmHg); 95.8% with macroscopic hematuria; and 100% with penetrating stigmata. Physical exam was not sensitive for rectal injuries, showing only 25% positivity in patients. While 60% of intraperitoneal bladder injuries were surgically repaired, extraperitoneal ones were mainly repaired using Foley catheter alone (87.6%). Rectal injuries, intraperitoneal in 66.6% of the cases and AAST-OIS grade II in 45.8%, were treated with primary suture plus protective colostomy; 8.3% were sigmoid injuries, and 70.8% of all injuries had a minimum stool spillage. Mean injury severity score was 19; mean length of stay 10 days; 20% of complications with no death. Concomitant rectal injuries were not a determinant prognosis factor. Penetrating bladder injuries are highly associated with rectal injuries (41.3%). Heme-negative rectal examination should not preclude proctoscopy and eventually rectal surgical exploration (only 25% sensitivity).

  6. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig M. Idris

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Blunt traumatic large pneumothorax in a clinically stable patient can be managed conservatively. Current recommendations for tube placement may need to be reevaluated. This may reduce morbidity associated with chest tube thoracostomy.

  7. Factors affecting mortality after penetrating cardiac injuries: 10-year experience at urban level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Michael J; Jhunjhunwala, Rashi; Gelbard, Rondi B; Dougherty, Stacy D; Carr, Jacquelyn S; Dente, Christopher J; Nicholas, Jeffrey M; Wyrzykowski, Amy D; Salomone, Jeffrey P; Vercruysse, Gary A; Feliciano, David V; Morse, Bryan C

    2017-06-01

    Despite the lethality of injuries to the heart, optimizing factors that impact mortality for victims that do survive to reach the hospital is critical. From 2003 to 2012, prehospital data, injury characteristics, and clinical patient factors were analyzed for victims with penetrating cardiac injuries (PCIs) at an urban, level I trauma center. Over the 10-year study, 80 PCI patients survived to reach the hospital. Of the 21 factors analyzed, prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (odds ratio [OR] = 30), scene time greater than 10 minutes (OR = 58), resuscitative thoracotomy (OR = 19), and massive left hemothorax (OR = 15) had the greatest impact on mortality. Cardiac tamponade physiology demonstrated a "protective" effect for survivors to the hospital (OR = .08). Trauma surgeons can improve mortality after PCI by minimizing time to the operating room for early control of hemorrhage. In PCI patients, tamponade may provide a physiologic advantage (lower mortality) compared to exsanguination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Childhood trauma and dissociation among women with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özen B

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Beliz Özen, Y Özay Özdemir, E Emrem Beştepe Erenköy Mental Health and Neurological Diseases Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Objective: Causes such as childhood trauma, negative attitude about sexuality, inadequate sexual knowledge and education, relationship problems, and unconscious motivation are reported about psychosexual development in the etiology of genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPP/PD. There are few studies that focus directly on research etiology of GPP/PD and use structured scales. The aim of this study was to research childhood trauma and dissociation forms among women with GPP/PD.Patients and methods: Fifty-five women with GPP/PD according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and 61 healthy women with no complaints of sexual function as a control group, in the age range of 18–60 years, were included in this study. Sociodemographic data form, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28, Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES, and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20 were administered to all participants.Results: Sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and emotional neglect scores, which comprise the subgroups of CTQ, were found high among women with GPP/PD compared with the control group (p=0.003, p=0.006, p=0.001. While a significant difference between the two groups’ SDQ scores was obtained (p=0.000, no significant difference was detected between the two groups’ DES scores (p=0.392.Discussion: The results evoke the question are genitopelvic pain conditions, vaginismus and dyspareunia, that cannot be explained with a medical cause and that cause penetration disorder, a kind of dissociative symptom prone to develop in some women with childhood psychogenic trauma. Keywords: dyspareunia, sexual phobia, abuse, sexual dysfunction, intercourse, avoidance 

  9. Childhood trauma and dissociation among women with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, Beliz; Özdemir, Y Özay; Beştepe, E Emrem

    2018-01-01

    Objective Causes such as childhood trauma, negative attitude about sexuality, inadequate sexual knowledge and education, relationship problems, and unconscious motivation are reported about psychosexual development in the etiology of genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPP/PD). There are few studies that focus directly on research etiology of GPP/PD and use structured scales. The aim of this study was to research childhood trauma and dissociation forms among women with GPP/PD. Patients and methods Fifty-five women with GPP/PD according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and 61 healthy women with no complaints of sexual function as a control group, in the age range of 18–60 years, were included in this study. Sociodemographic data form, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20) were administered to all participants. Results Sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and emotional neglect scores, which comprise the subgroups of CTQ, were found high among women with GPP/PD compared with the control group (p=0.003, p=0.006, p=0.001). While a significant difference between the two groups’ SDQ scores was obtained (p=0.000), no significant difference was detected between the two groups’ DES scores (p=0.392). Discussion The results evoke the question are genitopelvic pain conditions, vaginismus and dyspareunia, that cannot be explained with a medical cause and that cause penetration disorder, a kind of dissociative symptom prone to develop in some women with childhood psychogenic trauma. PMID:29503548

  10. Childhood trauma and dissociation among women with genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, Beliz; Özdemir, Y Özay; Beştepe, E Emrem

    2018-01-01

    Causes such as childhood trauma, negative attitude about sexuality, inadequate sexual knowledge and education, relationship problems, and unconscious motivation are reported about psychosexual development in the etiology of genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPP/PD). There are few studies that focus directly on research etiology of GPP/PD and use structured scales. The aim of this study was to research childhood trauma and dissociation forms among women with GPP/PD. Fifty-five women with GPP/PD according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and 61 healthy women with no complaints of sexual function as a control group, in the age range of 18-60 years, were included in this study. Sociodemographic data form, Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20) were administered to all participants. Sexual abuse, emotional abuse, and emotional neglect scores, which comprise the subgroups of CTQ, were found high among women with GPP/PD compared with the control group ( p =0.003, p =0.006, p =0.001). While a significant difference between the two groups' SDQ scores was obtained ( p =0.000), no significant difference was detected between the two groups' DES scores ( p =0.392). The results evoke the question are genitopelvic pain conditions, vaginismus and dyspareunia, that cannot be explained with a medical cause and that cause penetration disorder, a kind of dissociative symptom prone to develop in some women with childhood psychogenic trauma.

  11. Occult pneumothoraces in Chinese patients with significant blunt chest trauma: radiological classification and proposed clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ryan K L; Graham, Colin A; Yeung, Janice H H; Ahuja, Anil T; Rainer, Timothy H

    2012-12-01

    An occult pneumothorax (OP) is a pneumothorax not seen on a supine chest X-ray (CXR) but detected on abdominal or thoracic computed tomography (CT) scanning. With the increasing use of CT in the management of significantly injured trauma patients, more OPs are being detected. The aim of this study was to classify OPs diagnosed on thoracic CT (TCT) and correlate them with their clinical significance. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected trauma registry data. Total 36 (N=36) consecutive significantly injured trauma patients admitted through the emergency department (ED) who sustained blunt chest trauma and underwent TCT between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2008 were included. OP was defined as the identification (by a consultant radiologist) of a pneumothorax on TCT that had not been detected on supine CXR. OPs were classified by laterality (unilateral/bilateral) and location (apical, basal, non apical/basal). The size of pneumothoraces, severity of injury [including number of associated thoracic injuries and injury severity score (ISS)], length of hospital stay and mortality were compared between groups. The need for tube thoracostomy and clinical outcome were also analysed. Patients with bilateral OPs (N=8) had significantly more associated thoracic injuries (median: 2 vs. 1, p=0.01), higher ISS (median: 35 vs. 23, p=0.02) and longer hospital stay (median: 20 days vs. 11 days, p=0.01) than those with a unilateral OP (N=28). Basal OPs (N=7) were significantly larger than apical (N=10) and non-apical/basal Ops (N=11). Basal OPs were associated with significantly more associated thoracic injuries (median: 2 vs. 1, p=0.01), higher ISS (median: 35 vs. 25, p=0.04) and longer hospital stays (median: 23 days vs. 17 days, p=0.02) than apical Ops, which had higher ISS (median: 35 vs. 25, p=0.04) and longer hospital stays (median: 23 days vs. 15 days, p=0.02) than non-apical/basal OPs. Non-apical/basal OPs were associated with more related injuries (median: 2

  12. EPIDEMIOLOGY, AETIOLOGY AND PATTERN OF PENETRATING OCULAR TRAUMA IN KOLKATA AND SURROUNDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthapratim Mandal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The purpose of the study was to determine the epidemiology, aetiology and pattern of penetrating ocular trauma in Kolkata and surroundings. MATERIALS AND METHODS It was a retrospective study of patients with open globe injuries who underwent surgery from July 2015 to June 2016 at Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Calcutta Medical College, West Bengal. We examined and classified the injuries based on BETTS (Birmingham eye trauma terminology system. We included 192 eyes from 192 patients. The majority of injuries occurred in young (48% patients were <16 years. 54.17% patients were male and 45.83% were female. Most common mode of trauma was Stone (52, Followed by Iron Rod or Piece (44 and Wood (32. Other causes were Cow’s horn (14, Needle (12 Knife (8, Arrow (6, Sickle (6, Rubber Tube (4, Glass (2, Crackers (4, Metal Instrument (2, Bird Beak (2 and Pencil (2. RESULTS The highest proportion of injuries occurred at home followed by outside. According to BETTS, 61 patients had zone 1, 29 patients - zone 2, 6 patients - Zone 3 injury. Associated features were iris prolapse, hyphaema, anterior capsular rupture, lid tear and impacted foreign body. Mean period of presenting at hospital was 2.72 days. Most common visual acuity at presentation was less than 6/60 to perception of light. CONCLUSION In our study, serious ocular trauma frequently occurred at home followed by outside and the young were particularly at risk. Most common mode of trauma was stone. Most of the injuries were limited to cornea up to limbus. More adequate adult supervision and educational measures are necessary in order to reduce the prevalence of these accidents.

  13. Blunt trauma of bone structures of the chest--computed tomography vs multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Kosta; Turkalj, Ivan; Stojanović, Sanja; Vucaj-Cirilović, Viktorija; Nikolić, Olivera; Stojiljković, Dragana

    2013-08-01

    Computerized tomography (CT), especially multidetector CT (MDCT), has had a revolutionary impact in diagnostic in traumatized patients. The aim of the study was to identify and compare the frequency of injuries to bone structures of the thorax displayed with 5-mm-thick axial CT slices and thin-slice (MDCT) examination with the use of 3D reconstructions, primarily multiplanar reformations (MPR). This prospective study included 61 patients with blunt trauma submitted to CT scan of the thorax as initial assessment. The two experienced radiologists inde pendently and separately described the findings for 5-mm-thick axial CT slices (5 mm CT) as in monoslice CT examination; MPR and other 3D reconstructions along with thin-slice axial sections which were available in modern MDCT technologies. After describing thin-slice examination in case of disagreement in the findings, the examiners redescribed thin-slice examination together which was ultimately considered as a real, true finding. No statistically significant difference in interobserver evaluation of 5 mm CT examination was recorded (p > 0.05). Evaluation of fractures of sternum with 5 mm CT and MDCT showed a statistically significant difference (p tool that can describe higher number of bone fractures of the chest in traumatized patients compared to 5 mm CT, especially in the region of sternum for which a statistical significance was obtained using MPR. Moreover, the importance of MDCT is also set by easier and more accurate determination of the level of bone injury.

  14. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  15. Risk factors that predict mortality in patients with blunt chest wall trauma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Ceri E; Hutchings, Hayley; Evans, Phillip A

    2012-01-01

    The risk factors for mortality following blunt chest wall trauma have neither been well established or summarised. To summarise the risk factors for mortality in blunt chest wall trauma patients based on available evidence in the literature. A systematic review of English and non-English articles using MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library from their introduction until May 2010. Additional studies were identified by hand-searching bibliographies and contacting relevant clinical experts. Grey literature was sought by searching abstracts from all Emergency Medicine conferences. Broad search terms and inclusion criteria were used to reduce the number of missed studies. A two step study selection process was used. All published and unpublished observational studies were included if they investigated estimates of association between a risk factor and mortality for blunt chest wall trauma patients. A two step data extraction process using pre-defined data fields, including study quality indicators. Each study was appraised using a previously designed quality assessment tool and the STROBE checklist. Where sufficient data were available, odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Mantel-Haenszel method for the risk factors investigated. The I(2) statistic was calculated for combined studies in order to assess heterogeneity. Age, number of rib fractures, presence of pre-existing disease and pneumonia were found to be related to mortality in 29 identified studies. Combined odds ratio of 1.98 (1.86-2.11, 95% CI), 2.02 (1.89-2.15, 95% CI), 2.43 (1.03-5.72, 95% CI) and 5.24 (3.51-7.82) for mortality were calculated for blunt chest wall trauma patients aged 65 years or more, with three or more rib fractures, pre-existing conditions and pneumonia respectively. The risk factors for mortality in patients sustaining blunt chest wall trauma were a patient age of 65 years or more, three or more rib fractures and the presence of pre-existing disease especially

  16. Traumatic aortic injury score (TRAINS): an easy and simple score for early detection of traumatic aortic injuries in major trauma patients with associated blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Boix, Ricardo; Lopez-Perez, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2012-09-01

    To develop a risk score based on physical examination and chest X-ray findings to rapidly identify major trauma patients at risk of acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI). A multicenter retrospective study was conducted with 640 major trauma patients with associated blunt chest trauma classified into ATAI (aortic injury) and NATAI (no aortic injury) groups. The score data set included 76 consecutive ATAI and 304 NATAI patients from a single center, whereas the validation data set included 52 consecutive ATAI and 208 NATAI patients from three independent institutions. Bivariate analysis identified variables potentially influencing the presentation of aortic injury. Confirmed variables by logistic regression were assigned a score according to their corresponding beta coefficient which was rounded to the closest integer value (1-4). Predictors of aortic injury included widened mediastinum, hypotension less than 90 mmHg, long bone fracture, pulmonary contusion, left scapula fracture, hemothorax, and pelvic fracture. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.96. In the score data set, sensitivity was 93.42 %, specificity 85.85 %, Youden's index 0.79, positive likelihood ratio 6.60, and negative likelihood ratio 0.08. In the validation data set, sensitivity was 92.31 % and specificity 85.1 %. Given the relative infrequency of traumatic aortic injury, which often leads to missed or delayed diagnosis, application of our score has the potential to draw necessary clinical attention to the possibility of aortic injury, thus providing the chance of a prompt specific diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  17. Effects of exogenous ubiquitin in a polytrauma model with blunt chest trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Todd A.; Romero, Jacqueline; Bach, Harold H.; Strom, Joel A.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Majetschak, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether treatment with the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4 agonist ubiquitin results in beneficial effects in a polytrauma model consisting of bilateral femur fractures plus blunt chest trauma (Injury Severity Score 18-25). Design Treatment study. Setting Research Laboratory. Subjects Seventeen Yorkshire pigs. Interventions Intravenous (i.v.) injection of 1.5 mg/kg ubiquitin or albumin (=control) at 60 min after polytrauma. Measurements and Main Results Anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs underwent polytrauma, followed by a simulated 60 min shock phase. At the end of the shock phase ubiquitin or albumin were administered and animals were resuscitated to a mean arterial blood pressure of 70 mmHg until t = 420 min. After i.v. ubiquitin, ubiquitin plasma concentrations increased sixteen-fold to 2870 ± 1015 ng/mL at t = 90 min and decreased with t1/2 = 60 min. Endogenous plasma ubiquitin increased two-fold in the albumin group with peak levels of 359 ± 210 ng/mL. Plasma levels of the cognate CXCR4 ligand stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α were unchanged in both groups. Ubiquitin treatment reduced arterial lactate levels and prevented a continuous decrease in arterial oxygenation, which occurred in the albumin group during resuscitation. Wet weight to dry weight ratios of the lung contralateral from the injury, heart, spleen and jejunum were lower with ubiquitin. With ubiquitin treatment, tissue levels of IL-8, IL-10, TNFα and SDF-1α were reduced in the injured lung and of IL-8 in the contralateral lung, respectively. Conclusions Administration of exogenous ubiquitin modulates the local inflammatory response, improves resuscitation, reduces fluid shifts into tissues and preserves arterial oxygenation after blunt polytrauma with lung injury. This study further supports the notion that ubiquitin is a promising protein therapeutic and implies CXCR4 as a drug target after polytrauma. PMID:22622399

  18. Blunt trauma of bone structures of the chest: Computed tomography vs multidetector computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Kosta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Computerized tomography (CT, especially multidetector CT (MDCT, has had a revolutionary impact in diagnostic in traumatized patients. The aim of the study was to identify and compare the frequency of injuries to bone structures of the thorax displayed with 5-mm-thick axial CT slices and thin-slice (MDCT examination with the use of 3D reconstructions, primarily multiplanar reformations (MPR. Methods. This prospective study included 61 patients with blunt trauma submitted to CT scan of the thorax as initial assessment. The two experienced radiologists independently and separately described the findings for 5-mmthick axial CT slices (5 mm CT as in monoslice CT examination; MPR and other 3D reconstructions along with thin-slice axial sections which were available in modern MDCT technologies. After describing thin-slice examination in case of disagreement in the findings, the examiners redescribed thinslice examination together which was ultimately considered as a real, true finding. Results. No statistically significant difference in interobserver evaluation of 5 mm CT examination was recorded (p > 0.05. Evaluation of fractures of sternum with 5 mm CT and MDCT showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 in favor of better display of injury by MDCT examination. Conclusion. MDCT is a powerful diagnostic tool that can describe higher number of bone fractures of the chest in traumatized patients compared to 5 mm CT, especially in the region of sternum for which a statistical significance was obtained using MPR. Moreover, the importance of MDCT is also set by easier and more accurate determination of the level of bone injury.

  19. MDCT diagnosis of penetrating diaphragm injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodanapally, Uttam K.; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Mirvis, Stuart E.; Sliker, Clint W.; Fleiter, Thorsten R.; Sarada, Kamal; Miller, Lisa A. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Stein, Deborah M. [University of Maryland, Department of Surgery, Shock Trauma Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Alexander, Melvin [National Study Center for Trauma and Emergency Medical Systems, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of multidetector CT (MDCT) in detection of diaphragmatic injury following penetrating trauma. Chest and abdominal CT examinations performed preoperatively in 136 patients after penetrating trauma to the torso with injury trajectory in close proximity to the diaphragm were reviewed by radiologists unaware of surgical findings. Signs associated with diaphragmatic injuries in penetrating trauma were noted. These signs were correlated with surgical diagnoses, and their sensitivity and specificity in assisting the diagnosis were calculated. CT confirmed diaphragmatic injury in 41 of 47 injuries (sensitivity, 87.2%), and an intact diaphragm in 71 of 98 patients (specificity, 72.4%). The overall accuracy of MDCT was 77%. The most accurate sign helping the diagnosis was contiguous injury on either side of the diaphragm in single-entry penetrating trauma (sensitivity, 88%; specificity, 82%). Thus MDCT has high sensitivity and good specificity in detecting penetrating diaphragmatic injuries. (orig.)

  20. MDCT diagnosis of penetrating diaphragm injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodanapally, Uttam K.; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Mirvis, Stuart E.; Sliker, Clint W.; Fleiter, Thorsten R.; Sarada, Kamal; Miller, Lisa A.; Stein, Deborah M.; Alexander, Melvin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of multidetector CT (MDCT) in detection of diaphragmatic injury following penetrating trauma. Chest and abdominal CT examinations performed preoperatively in 136 patients after penetrating trauma to the torso with injury trajectory in close proximity to the diaphragm were reviewed by radiologists unaware of surgical findings. Signs associated with diaphragmatic injuries in penetrating trauma were noted. These signs were correlated with surgical diagnoses, and their sensitivity and specificity in assisting the diagnosis were calculated. CT confirmed diaphragmatic injury in 41 of 47 injuries (sensitivity, 87.2%), and an intact diaphragm in 71 of 98 patients (specificity, 72.4%). The overall accuracy of MDCT was 77%. The most accurate sign helping the diagnosis was contiguous injury on either side of the diaphragm in single-entry penetrating trauma (sensitivity, 88%; specificity, 82%). Thus MDCT has high sensitivity and good specificity in detecting penetrating diaphragmatic injuries. (orig.)

  1. Thin chest wall is an independent risk factor for the development of pneumothorax after chest tube removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Rahul J; Whelan, James F; Ferrada, Paula; Duane, Therese M; Malhotra, Ajai K; Aboutanos, Michel B; Ivatury, Rao R

    2012-04-01

    The factors contributing to the development of pneumothorax after removal of chest tube thoracostomy are not fully understood. We hypothesized that development of post pull pneumothorax (PPP) after chest tube removal would be significantly lower in those patients with thicker chest walls, due to the "protective" layer of adipose tissue. All patients on our trauma service who underwent chest tube thoracostomy from July 2010 to February 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient age, mechanism of trauma, and chest Abbreviated Injury Scale score were analyzed. Thoracic CTs were reviewed to ascertain chest wall thickness (CW). Thickness was measured at the level of the nipple at the midaxillary line, as perpendicular distance between skin and pleural cavity. Chest X-ray reports from immediately prior and after chest tube removal were reviewed for interval development of PPP. Data are presented as average ± standard deviation. Ninety-one chest tubes were inserted into 81 patients. Patients who died before chest tube removal (n = 11), or those without thoracic CT scans (n = 13) were excluded. PPP occurred in 29.9 per cent of chest tube removals (20/67). When PPP was encountered, repeat chest tube was necessary in 20 per cent of cases (4/20). After univariate analysis, younger age, penetrating mechanism, and thin chest wall were found to be significant risk factors for development of PPP. Chest Abbreviated Injury Scale score was similar in both groups. Logistic regression showed only chest wall thickness to be an independent risk factor for development of PPP.

  2. Non-operative management for penetrating splenic trauma : how far can we go to save splenic function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerman, Roy; Teuben, Michel Paul Johan; Hoosain, Fatima; Taylor, Liezel Phyllis; Hardcastle, Timothy Craig; Blokhuis, Taco Johan; Warren, Brian Leigh; Leenen, Luke Petrus Hendrikus

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selective non-operative management (NOM) for the treatment of blunt splenic trauma is safe. Currently, the feasibility of selective NOM for penetrating splenic injury (PSI) is unclear. Unfortunately, little is known about the success rate of spleen-preserving surgical procedures. The aim

  3. High plasma levels of high mobility group box 1 is associated with the risk of sepsis in severe blunt chest trauma patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Wen; Karki, Avash; Zhao, Xing-Ji; Xiang, Xiao-Yong; Lu, Zhi-Qian

    2014-08-02

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a late mediator of systemic inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 play a central pathogenic role in critical illness. The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between plasma HMGB1 concentrations and the risk of poor outcomes in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. The plasma concentrations of HMGB1 in patients with severe blunt chest trauma (AIS ≥ 3) were measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at four time points during seven days after admission, and the dynamic release patterns were monitored. The biomarker levels were compared between patients with sepsis and non-sepsis, and between patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and non-MODS. The related factors of prognosis were analyzed by using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The short-form 36 was used to evaluate the quality of life of patients at 12 months after injury. Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly higher both in sepsis and MODS group on post-trauma day 3, 5, and 7 compared with the non-sepsis and non-MODS groups, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that HMGB1 levels and ISS were independent risk factors for sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Plasma HMGB1 levels were significantly elevated in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. HMGB1 levels were associated with the risk of poor outcome in patients with severe blunt chest trauma. Daily HMGB1 levels measurements is a potential useful tool in the early identification of post-trauma complications. Further studies are needed to determine whether HMGB1 intervention could prevent the development of sepsis and MODS in patients with severe blunt chest trauma.

  4. Association of Prehospital Mode of Transport With Mortality in Penetrating Trauma: A Trauma System-Level Assessment of Private Vehicle Transportation vs Ground Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandling, Michael W; Nathens, Avery B; Shapiro, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2018-02-01

    Time to definitive care following injury is important to the outcomes of trauma patients. Prehospital trauma care is provided based on policies developed by individual trauma systems and is an important component of the care of injured patients. Given a paucity of systems-level trauma research, considerable variability exists in prehospital care policies across trauma systems, potentially affecting patient outcomes. To evaluate whether private vehicle prehospital transport confers a survival advantage vs ground emergency medical services (EMS) transport following penetrating injuries in urban trauma systems. Retrospective cohort study of data included in the National Trauma Data Bank from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2012, comprising 298 level 1 and level 2 trauma centers that contribute data to the National Trauma Data Bank that are located within the 100 most populous metropolitan areas in the United States. Of 2 329 446 patients assessed for eligibility, 103 029 were included in this study. All patients were 16 years or older, had a gunshot wound or stab wound, and were transported by ground EMS or private vehicle. In-hospital mortality. Of the 2 329 446 records assessed for eligibility, 103 029 individuals at 298 urban level 1 and level 2 trauma centers were included in the analysis. The study population was predominantly male (87.6%), with a mean age of 32.3 years. Among those included, 47.9% were black, 26.3% were white, and 18.4% were Hispanic. Following risk adjustment, individuals with penetrating injuries transported by private vehicle were less likely to die than patients transported by ground EMS (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; 95% CI, 0.31-0.47). This association remained statistically significant on stratified analysis of the gunshot wound (OR,  0.45; 95% CI, 0.36-0.56) and stab wound (OR,  0.32; 95% CI, 0.20-0.52) subgroups. Private vehicle transport is associated with a significantly lower likelihood of death when compared with

  5. Prehospital spine immobilization/spinal motion restriction in penetrating trauma: A practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velopulos, Catherine G; Shihab, Hasan M; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Feinman, Marcie; Raja, Ali; Salomone, Jeffrey; Haut, Elliott R

    2018-05-01

    Spine immobilization in trauma has remained an integral part of most emergency medical services protocols despite a lack of evidence for efficacy and concern for associated complications, especially in penetrating trauma patients. We reviewed the published evidence on the topic of prehospital spine immobilization or spinal motion restriction in adult patients with penetrating trauma to structure a practice management guideline. We conducted a Cochrane style systematic review and meta-analysis and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to construct recommendations. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were used to evaluate the literature on the critical outcomes of mortality, neurologic deficit, and potentially reversible neurologic deficit. A total of 24 studies met inclusion criteria, with qualitative review conducted for all studies. We used five studies for the quantitative review (meta-analysis). No study showed benefit to spine immobilization with regard to mortality and neurologic injury, even for patients with direct neck injury. Increased mortality was associated with spine immobilization, with risk ratio [RR], 2.4 (confidence interval [CI], 1.07-5.41). The rate of neurologic injury or potentially reversible injury was very low, ranging from 0.002 to 0.076 and 0.00034 to 0.055, with no statistically significant difference for neurologic deficit or potentially reversible deficit, RR, 4.16 (CI, 0.56-30.89), and RR, 1.19 (CI, 0.83-1.70), although the point estimates favored no immobilization. Spine immobilization in penetrating trauma is associated with increased mortality and has not been shown to have a beneficial effect on mitigating neurologic deficits, even potentially reversible neurologic deficits. We recommend that spine immobilization not be used routinely for adult patients with penetrating trauma. Systematic review with meta-analysis study, level III.

  6. The impact of a chest tube management protocol on the outcome of trauma patients with tube thoracostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Emanuelle Maria Sávio; Machado, Carla Jorge; Pastore Neto, Mario; de Rezende Neto, João Baptista; Sanches, Marcelo Dias

    2015-01-01

    to investigate the effect of standardized interventions in the management of tube thoracostomy patients and to assess the independent effect of each intervention. A chest tube management protocol was assessed in a retrospective cohort study. The tube thoracostomy protocol (TTP) was implemented in August 2012, and consisted of: antimicrobial prophylaxis, chest tube insertion in the operating room (OR), admission post chest tube thoracostomy (CTT) in a hospital floor separate from the emergency department (ED), and daily respiratory therapy (RT) sessions post-CTT. The inclusion criteria were, hemodynamic stability, patients between the ages of 15 and 59 years, and injury severity score (ISS) chest wall, lung, and pleura. During the study period 92 patients were managed according to the standardized protocol. The outcomes of those patients were compared to 99 patients treated before the TTP. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent effect of each variable of the protocol on selected outcomes. Demographics, injury severity, and trauma mechanisms were similar among the groups. As expected, protocol compliance increased after the implementation of the TTP. There was a significant reduction (pchest tube days. Respiratory therapy was independently linked to significant reduction (pchest tube insertion was associated with significant (ptrauma patients.

  7. Blow/trauma to the chest and sudden cardiac death: Commotio cordis and contusio cordis are leading causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krexi, Lydia; Sheppard, Mary N

    2018-01-01

    Background In forensic practice, a blow to the chest can lead to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Commotio cordis and contusio cordis are leading causes. Methods From a database of 4678 patients who suffered from SCD, we found three patients with commotio cordis and two patients with contusio cordis. All the patients were examined macroscopically and microscopically and had negative toxicology screen. Results The three patients who died due to commotio cordis were young males (16, 23 and 38 years old). The circumstances of death were: a blow to the chest by a football, by a friend during a party and during an assault. The hearts were completely normal at autopsy. The two patients who had contusio cordis were older males (42 and 63 years old). Both patients died during traffic accidents. At autopsy, one had significant contusion over the left ventricle, and the second had contusion over the right ventricle. Conclusion This study indicates that a blow to the chest is very important to document in the circumstances of death, and a detailed history is vital. It raises the left ventricular intra-cavitary pressure, leading to commotio cordis with immediate death with a normal heart. Blunt chest trauma can cause direct myocardial lesions, with acute changes leading to contusio cordis.

  8. Prehospital interventions for penetrating trauma victims: a prospective comparison between Advanced Life Support and Basic Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Mark J; Doane, Stephen M; Gaughan, John P; Kulp, Heather; D'Andrea, Anthony P; Pathak, Abhijit S; Santora, Thomas A; Goldberg, Amy J; Wydro, Gerald C

    2013-05-01

    Advanced Life Support (ALS) providers may perform more invasive prehospital procedures, while Basic Life Support (BLS) providers offer stabilisation care and often "scoop and run". We hypothesised that prehospital interventions by urban ALS providers prolong prehospital time and decrease survival in penetrating trauma victims. We prospectively analysed 236 consecutive ambulance-transported, penetrating trauma patients an our urban Level-1 trauma centre (6/2008-12/2009). Inclusion criteria included ICU admission, length of stay >/=2 days, or in-hospital death. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes were compared between ALS and BLS patients. Single and multiple variable logistic regression analysis determined predictors of hospital survival. Of 236 patients, 71% were transported by ALS and 29% by BLS. When ALS and BLS patients were compared, no differences in age, penetrating mechanism, scene GCS score, Injury Severity Score, or need for emergency surgery were detected (p>0.05). Patients transported by ALS units more often underwent prehospital interventions (97% vs. 17%; p<0.01), including endotracheal intubation, needle thoracostomy, cervical collar, IV placement, and crystalloid resuscitation. While ALS ambulance on-scene time was significantly longer than that of BLS (p<0.01), total prehospital time was not (p=0.98) despite these prehospital interventions (1.8 ± 1.0 per ALS patient vs. 0.2 ± 0.5 per BLS patient; p<0.01). Overall, 69.5% ALS patients and 88.4% of BLS patients (p<0.01) survived to hospital discharge. Prehospital resuscitative interventions by ALS units performed on penetrating trauma patients may lengthen on-scene time but do not significantly increase total prehospital time. Regardless, these interventions did not appear to benefit our rapidly transported, urban penetrating trauma patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100% O2.

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    Wagner, Katja; Gröger, Michael; McCook, Oscar; Scheuerle, Angelika; Asfar, Pierre; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Ignatius, Anita; Jung, Birgit; Duechs, Matthias; Möller, Peter; Georgieff, Michael; Calzia, Enrico; Radermacher, Peter; Wagner, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1) CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2) hyperoxia may attenuate this effect. Immediately after blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma, mice (n=32) with or without 3-4 weeks of CS exposure underwent 4 hours of pressure-controlled, thoraco-pulmonary compliance-titrated, lung-protective mechanical ventilation with air or 100% O2. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and acid-base status were measured together with blood and tissue cytokine and chemokine concentrations, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), activated caspase-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, nitrotyrosine formation, purinergic receptor 2X4 (P2XR4) and 2X7 (P2XR7) expression, and histological scoring. CS exposure prior to chest trauma lead to higher pulmonary compliance and lower PaO2 and Horovitz-index, associated with increased tissue IL-18 and blood MCP-1 concentrations, a 2-4-fold higher inflammatory cell infiltration, and more pronounced alveolar membrane thickening. This effect coincided with increased activated caspase-3, nitrotyrosine, P2XR4, and P2XR7 expression, NF-κB activation, and reduced HIF-1α expression. Hyperoxia did not further affect lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary and systemic cytokine and chemokine concentrations, or histological scoring, except for some patchy alveolar edema in CS exposed mice. However, hyperoxia attenuated tissue HIF-1α, nitrotyrosine, P2XR7, and P2XR4 expression, while it increased HO-1 formation in CS exposed mice. Overall, CS exposure aggravated post

  10. Blunt Chest Trauma in Mice after Cigarette Smoke-Exposure: Effects of Mechanical Ventilation with 100% O2.

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    Katja Wagner

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking (CS aggravates post-traumatic acute lung injury and increases ventilator-induced lung injury due to more severe tissue inflammation and apoptosis. Hyper-inflammation after chest trauma is due to the physical damage, the drop in alveolar PO2, and the consecutive hypoxemia and tissue hypoxia. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that 1 CS exposure prior to blunt chest trauma causes more severe post-traumatic inflammation and thereby aggravates lung injury, and that 2 hyperoxia may attenuate this effect. Immediately after blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma, mice (n=32 with or without 3-4 weeks of CS exposure underwent 4 hours of pressure-controlled, thoraco-pulmonary compliance-titrated, lung-protective mechanical ventilation with air or 100% O2. Hemodynamics, lung mechanics, gas exchange, and acid-base status were measured together with blood and tissue cytokine and chemokine concentrations, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, activated caspase-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α expression, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation, nitrotyrosine formation, purinergic receptor 2X4 (P2XR4 and 2X7 (P2XR7 expression, and histological scoring. CS exposure prior to chest trauma lead to higher pulmonary compliance and lower PaO2 and Horovitz-index, associated with increased tissue IL-18 and blood MCP-1 concentrations, a 2-4-fold higher inflammatory cell infiltration, and more pronounced alveolar membrane thickening. This effect coincided with increased activated caspase-3, nitrotyrosine, P2XR4, and P2XR7 expression, NF-κB activation, and reduced HIF-1α expression. Hyperoxia did not further affect lung mechanics, gas exchange, pulmonary and systemic cytokine and chemokine concentrations, or histological scoring, except for some patchy alveolar edema in CS exposed mice. However, hyperoxia attenuated tissue HIF-1α, nitrotyrosine, P2XR7, and P2XR4 expression, while it increased HO-1 formation in CS exposed mice. Overall, CS exposure

  11. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan.

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    Suzuki, Kodai; Inoue, Shigeaki; Morita, Seiji; Watanabe, Nobuo; Shintani, Ayumi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Ogura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions. This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching. In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1%) underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9%) received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P chest compressions (P chest compressions.

  12. The effect of pre-injury anti-platelet therapy on the development of complications in isolated blunt chest wall trauma: a retrospective study.

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    Ceri Battle

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The difficulties in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department due to the development of late complications are well recognised in the literature. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy has been previously investigated as a risk factor for poor outcomes following traumatic head injury, but not in the blunt chest wall trauma patient cohort. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-injury anti-platelet therapy as a risk factor for the development of complications in the recovery phase following blunt chest wall trauma. METHODS: A retrospective study was completed in which the medical notes were analysed of all blunt chest wall trauma patients presenting to a large trauma centre in Wales in 2012 and 2013. Using univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis, pre-injury platelet therapy was investigated as a risk factor for the development of complications following blunt chest wall trauma. Previously identified risk factors were included in the analysis to address the influence of confounding. RESULTS: A total of 1303 isolated blunt chest wall trauma patients presented to the ED in Morriston Hospital in 2012 and 2013 with complications recorded in 144 patients (11%. On multi-variable analysis, pre-injury anti-platelet therapy was found to be a significant risk factor for the development of complications following isolated blunt chest wall trauma (odds ratio: 16.9; 95% confidence intervals: 8.2-35.2. As in previous studies patient age, number of rib fractures, chronic lung disease and pre-injury anti-coagulant use were also found to be significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy is being increasingly used as a first line treatment for a number of conditions and there is a concurrent increase in trauma in the elderly population. Pre-injury anti-platelet therapy should be considered as a risk factor for the development of complications by clinicians managing

  13. Co-existence of Posttraumatic Empyema Thoracis and Lung Abscess in a Child After Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

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    Chang-Hung Kuo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic empyema is a rare complication of trauma with an incidence of 1.6–2.4% in trauma patients. However, it is rarely reported in children. We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who was involved in a traffic accident and diagnosed with a pulmonary contusion at a local hospital. Fourteen days after the accident, posttraumatic empyema thoracis and lung abscess developed with clinical presentations of fever, productive cough and right chest pain. He was successfully treated with computed tomography-guided catheter drainage and intravenous cefotaxime. We emphasize that posttraumatic empyema thoracis and lung abscess are very rare in children, and careful follow-up for posttraumatic lung contusion is essential. Image-guided catheter drainage can be an adjunctive tool for treating selected patients, although most complicated cases of post-traumatic empyema thoracis require decortication therapy.

  14. Laparoscopic management of retroperitoneal injuries from penetrating abdominal trauma in haemodynamically stable patients.

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    Koto, Modise Zacharia; Matsevych, Oleh Y; Mosai, Fusi; Balabyeki, Moses; Aldous, Colleen

    2018-02-27

    Laparoscopy is increasingly utilised in the trauma setting. However, its safety and reliability in evaluating and managing retroperitoneal injuries are not known. The aim of this study was to analyse our experience with laparoscopic management of retroperitoneal injuries due to penetrating abdominal trauma (PAT) and to investigate its feasibility, safety and accuracy in haemodynamically stable patients. Over a 4-year period, patients approached laparoscopically with retroperitoneal injuries were analysed. Mechanism, location and severity of injuries were recorded. Surgical procedures, conversion rate and reasons for conversion and outcomes were described. Of the 284 patients with PAT, 56 patients had involvement of retroperitoneum. Stab wounds accounted 62.5% of patients. The mean Injury Severity Score was 7.4 (4-20). Among retroperitoneal injuries, the colon (27%) was the most commonly involved hollow viscera followed by duodenum (5%). The kidney (5%) and the pancreas (4%) were the injured solid organs. The conversion rate was 19.6% and was mainly due to active bleeding (73%). Significantly more patients with gunshot wound were converted to laparotomy (38% vs. 9%). Therapeutic laparoscopy was performed in 36% of patients. There were no recorded missed injuries or mortality. Five (9%) patients developed the Clavien-Dindo Grade 3 complications, three were managed with reoperation, one with drainage/debridement and one with endovascular technique. Laparoscopic management of retroperitoneal injuries is safe and feasible in haemodynamically stable patients with PAT. However, a high conversion rate indicates difficulties in managing these injuries. The requirements are the dexterity in laparoscopy and readiness to convert in the event of bleeding.

  15. "No zone" approach in penetrating neck trauma reduces unnecessary computed tomography angiography and negative explorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibraheem, Kareem; Khan, Muhammad; Rhee, Peter; Azim, Asad; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andrew; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Joseph, Bellal

    2018-01-01

    The most recent management guidelines advocate computed tomography angiography (CTA) for any suspected vascular or aero-digestive injuries in all zones and give zone II injuries special consideration. We hypothesized that physical examination can safely guide CTA use in a "no zone" approach. An 8-year retrospective analysis of all adult trauma patients with penetrating neck trauma (PNT) was performed. We included all patients in whom the platysma was violated. Patients were classified into three groups as follows: hard signs, soft signs, and asymptomatic. CTA use, positive CTA (contrast extravasation, dissection, or intimal flap) and operative details were reported. Primary outcomes were positive CTA and therapeutic neck exploration (TNE) (defined by repair of major vascular or aero-digestive injuries). A total of 337 patients with PNT met the inclusion criteria. Eighty-two patients had hard signs and all of them went to the operating room, of which 59 (72%) had TNE. One hundred fifty-six patients had soft signs, of which CTA was performed in 121 (78%), with positive findings in 12 (10%) patients. The remaining 35 (22%) underwent initial neck exploration, of which 14 (40%) were therapeutic yielding a high rate of negative exploration. Ninty-nine patients were asymptomatic, of which CTA was performed in 79 (80%), with positive findings in 3 (4%), however, none of these patients required TNE. On sub analysis based on symptoms, there was no difference in the rate of TNE between the neck zones in patients with hard signs (P = 0.23) or soft signs (P = 0.51). Regardless of the zone of injury, asymptomatic patients did not require a TNE. Physical examination regardless of the zone of injury should be the primary guide to CTA or TNE in patients with PNT. Following traditional zone-based guidelines can result in unnecessary negative explorations in patients with soft signs and may need rethinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Effect of Human-Immunodeficiency Virus Status on Outcomes in Penetrating Abdominal Trauma: An Interim Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Deidre; Neuhaus, Valentin; Dhar, Rohin; Edu, Sorin; Nicol, Andrew J; Navsaria, Pradeep H

    2018-01-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the outcomes of hemodynamically stable patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy for penetrating abdominal trauma differed as a result of their HIV status. This was an observational, prospective study from February 2016 to May 2017. All hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating abdominal trauma requiring a laparotomy were included. The mechanism of injury, the HIV status, age, the penetrating abdominal trauma index (PATI), and the revised trauma score (RTS) were entered into a binary logistic regression model. Outcome parameters were in-hospital death, morbidity, admission to intensive care unit (ICU), relaparotomy within 30 days, and length of stay longer than 30 days. A total of 209 patients, 94% male, with a mean age of 29 ± 10 years were analysed. Twenty-eight patients (13%) were HIV positive. The two groups were comparable. Ten (4.8%) laparotomies were negative. There were two (0.96%) deaths, both in the HIV negative group. The complication rate was 34% (n = 72). Twenty-nine patients (14%) were admitted to the ICU. A higher PATI, older age, and a lower RTS were significant risk factors for ICU admission. After 30 days, 12 patients (5.7%) were still in hospital. Twenty-four patients (11%) underwent a second laparotomy. The PATI score was the single independent predictor for complications, relaparotomy, and hospital stay longer than 30 days. Preliminary results reveal that HIV status does not influence outcomes in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma.

  17. Age-associated impact on presentation and outcome for penetrating thoracic trauma in the adult and pediatric patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollberg, Nathan M; Tabachnick, Deborah; Lin, Fang-Ju; Merlotti, Gary J; Varghese, Thomas K; Arensman, Robert M; Massad, Malek G

    2014-02-01

    Studies reporting on penetrating thoracic trauma in the pediatric population have been limited by small numbers and implied differences with the adult population. Our objectives were to report on a large cohort of pediatric patients presenting with penetrating thoracic trauma and to determine age-related impacts on management and outcome through comparison with an adult cohort. A Level I trauma center registry was queried between 2006 and 2012. All patients presenting with penetrating thoracic trauma were identified. Patient demographics, injury mechanism, injury severity, admission physiology, and outcome were recorded. Patients were compared, and outcomes were analyzed based on age at presentation, with patients 17 years or younger defining our pediatric cohort. A total of 1,423 patients with penetrating thoracic trauma were admitted during the study period. Two hundred twenty patients (15.5%) were pediatric, with 205 being adolescents (13-17 years) and 15 being children (≤ 12 years). In terms of management for the pediatric population, tube thoracostomy alone was needed in 32.7% (72 of 220), whereas operative thoracic exploration was performed in 20.0% (44 of 220). Overall mortality was 13.6% (30 of 220). There was no significant difference between the pediatric and adult population with regard to injury mechanism or severity, need for therapeutic intervention, operative approach, use of emergency department thoracotomy, or outcome. Stepwise logistic regression failed to identify age as a predictor for the need for either therapeutic intervention or mortality between the two age groups as a whole. However, subgroup analysis revealed that being 12 years or younger (odds ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-11.4) was an independent predictor of mortality. Management of traumatic penetrating thoracic injuries in terms of the need for therapeutic intervention and operative approach was similar between the adult and pediatric populations. Mortality from

  18. Diagnostic significance of rib series in minor thorax trauma compared to plain chest film and computed tomography.

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    Hoffstetter, Patrick; Dornia, Christian; Schäfer, Stephan; Wagner, Merle; Dendl, Lena M; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G

    2014-01-01

    Rib series (RS) are a special radiological technique to improve the visualization of the bony parts of the chest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of rib series in minor thorax trauma. Retrospective study of 56 patients who received RS, 39 patients where additionally evaluated by plain chest film (PCF). All patients underwent a computed tomography (CT) of the chest. RS and PCF were re-read independently by three radiologists, the results were compared with the CT as goldstandard. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value were calculated. Significance in the differences of findings was determined by McNemar test, interobserver variability by Cohens kappa test. 56 patients were evaluated (34 men, 22 women, mean age =61 y.). In 22 patients one or more rib fracture could be identified by CT. In 18 of these cases (82%) the correct diagnosis was made by RS, in 16 cases (73%) the correct number of involved ribs was detected. These differences were significant (p = 0.03). Specificity was 100%, negative and positive predictive value were 85% and 100%. Kappa values for the interobserver agreement was 0.92-0.96. Sensitivity of PCF was 46% and was significantly lower (p = 0.008) compared to CT. Rib series does not seem to be an useful examination in evaluating minor thorax trauma. CT seems to be the method of choice to detect rib fractures, but the clinical value of the radiological proof has to be discussed and investigated in larger follow up studies.

  19. Pleural Drainage and its Role in Management of the Isolated Penetrating Chest Injuries During the War Time in Sarajevo, 1992.-1995.

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    Ademir Hadžismajlović

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating chest injuries are the most frequent causes of serious demage and death in wounded indivisuals. In reports from the last wars where wounds caused by high velocity projectiles predominated, thoracotomies were perfomed in about 15% of the wounded individuals, mostly encompassing injuries of the heart and great vessels, accomanied by massive bleeding that could not be resolved by chest tube insertion. This retrospective analysis was performed on the medical records of 477 patients tretaed for isolated penetrating chest injuries in Department of Thoracic Surgery Clinical Center of the University in Sarajevo between april 1992 - june 1995. We analised the ways of their menagement with special view on pleural drainage, indication for this method and results of treatment. 398 (83,4% wounded individuals have been treated with pleural tube inserting as definitive mesaure and for the urgent thoracotomy there were 79 (16,6% patients left. Average hospital treatment in wounded drained patients was 7,68 days. With shrapnels there were 357 (74,84% wounded individuals, and with bullet 120 (25,16% wounded individuals. The complications of plaural tube inserting were - empyema in 34 (7,13% patients and there were no other complications. Chest tube inserting as definitive mesaure was used in 398 (83,44% patients. Chest tube inserting as preoperative measure (urgent thoracotomy was used in 79 (16,56% patients. There were 460 (96,44% healed patients. Death occurred in 17 (3,56% patients.

  20. Pleural drainage and its role in management of the isolated penetrating chest injuries during the war time in Sarajevo, 1992.-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzismajlović, Ademir; Pilav, Alen

    2007-05-01

    Penetrating chest injuries are the most frequent causes of serious demage and death in wounded indivisuals. In reports from the last wars where wounds caused by high velocity projectiles predominated, thoracotomies were perfomed in about 15% of the wounded individuals, mostly encompassing injuries of the heart and great vessels, accomanied by massive bleeding that could not be resolved by chest tube insertion. This retrospective analysis was performed on the medical records of 477 patients tretaed for isolated penetrating chest injuries in Department of Thoracic Surgery Clinical Center of the University in Sarajevo between april 1992 - june 1995. We analised the ways of their menagement with special view on pleural drainage, indication for this method and results of treatment. 398 (83,4%) wounded individuals have been treated with pleural tube inserting as definitive mesaure and for the urgent thoracotomy there were 79 (16,6%) patients left. Average hospital treatment in wounded drained patients was 7,68 days. With shrapnels there were 357 (74,84%) wounded individuals, and with bullet 120 (25,16%) wounded individuals. The complications of plaural tube inserting were - empyema in 34 (7,13%) patients and there were no other complications. Chest tube inserting as definitive mesaure was used in 398 (83,44%) patients. Chest tube inserting as preoperative measure (urgent thoracotomy) was used in 79 (16,56%) patients. There were 460 (96,44%) healed patients. Death occurred in 17 (3,56%) patients.

  1. An Unusual Case of Cerebral Penetrating Injury by a Driven Bone Fragment Secondary to Blunt Head Trauma

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    Lee, Jae Il; Ko, Jun Kyeung; Cha, Seung Heon; Han, In Ho

    2011-01-01

    Temple trauma that appears initially localized to the skin might possess intracranial complications. Early diagnosis and management of such complications are important, to avoid neurologic sequelae. Non-penetrating head injuries with intracranial hemorrhage caused by a driven bone fragment are extremely rare. A 53-year-old male was referred to our hospital because of intracerebral hemorrhage. He was a mechanic and one day before admission to a local clinic, tip of metallic rod hit his right t...

  2. Penetrating injuries to the duodenum: An analysis of 879 patients from the National Trauma Data Bank, 2010 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Bradley; Turco, Lauren; McDonald, Dan; Mause, Alison; Walters, Ryan W

    2017-11-01

    Despite wide belief that the duodenal Organ Injury Scale has been validated, this has not been reported in the published literature. Based on clinical experience, we hypothesize that the American Association for Surgery of Trauma Organ Injury Scale (AAST-OIS) for duodenal injuries can independently predict mortality. Our objectives were threefold: (1) describe the national profile of penetrating duodenal injuries, (2) identify predictors of morbidity and mortality, and (3) validate the duodenum AAST-OIS as a statistically significant predictor of mortality. Using the Abbreviated Injury Scale 2005 and International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev.-Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) E-codes, we identified 879 penetrating duodenal trauma patients from the National Trauma Data Bank between 2010 and 2014. We controlled patient-level covariates of age, biological sex, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, pulse, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Organ Injury Scale (OIS) grade. We estimated multivariable generalized linear mixed models to account for the nesting of patients within trauma centers. Our results indicated an overall mortality rate of 14.4%. Approximately 10% of patients died within 24 hours of admission, of whom 76% died in the first 6 hours. Patients averaged approximately five associated injuries, 45% of which involved the liver and colon. Statistically significant independent predictors of mortality were firearm mechanism, SBP, GCS, pulse, ISS, and AAST-OIS grade. Specifically, odds of death were decreased with 10 mm Hg higher admission SBP (13% decreased odds), one point higher GCS (14.4%), 10-beat lower pulse (8.2%), and 10-point lower ISS (51.0%). This study is the first to report the national profile of penetrating duodenal injuries. Using the National Trauma Data Bank, we identified patterns of injury, predictors of outcome, and validated the AAST-OIS for duodenal injuries as a statistically significant predictor of morbidity

  3. Liver trauma from penetrating injuries. Miscellanea, personal series, clinical and CT findings; Traumi epatici da lesioni penetranti. Miscellanea, casistica personale, aspetti clinici e con Tomografia Computerizzata

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    Salzano, A.; Nocera, V. [Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio di Frattamaggiore, Servizio di Radiologia, Frattamaggiore, NA (Italy); De Rosa, A.; Vigliotti, A. [Azienda Sanitaria Locale NA1, Radiologia, Naples (Italy); Rossi, E.; Carbone, M.; Gatta, G. [Naples Univ. Federico 2., Naples (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Radiologiche; Vitale, L. [Ospedale di Sorrento, Servizio di Radiologia, Sorrento, NA (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    Penetrating liver wounds are related to many causes and rank second after blunt abdominal and liver trauma. In this report are examined the clinical and radiological findings of personal series of patients with penetrating trauma, especially by firearms and stab and cut wounds. It will also tried to define the diagnostic workup of these traumas, which is especially based on CT signs of liver damage and associated changes and which is of basic importance for following treatment, both surgical or conservative. In the last seven years it was retrospectively reviewed 31 cases of penetrating liver trauma. The patients were 19 men and 12 women, ranging in age 18 to 73 (mean 42), with penetrating liver injuries from firearms (16 patients) and stab (9 cases) wounds; 6 patients had injuries from different cases. Abdominal CT was carried out in emergency with the CT Angiography (CTA) technique in all patients. In the patients with suspected chest and abdomen involvement CT was performed from the mid-chest for accurate assessment of diaphragm and lung bases and to exclude associated pleuropulmonary damage. Penetrating liver wounds were caused by firearms in 70% of cases, by stabbing in 12% and, in the extant 18%, by other cases such as home accidents, road and work traumas, and liver biopsy. In this series, the liver was most frequently involved, especially by firearms wounds; in the 16 cases the most frequent injuries were hemorrhagic tears. It was found bullets in the liver in 6 cases. In one case of home accident the patient wounded himself while slicing bread with a long knife, which cut into the anterior abdominal wall and tore the anterior liver capsule, as seen at CTA. Penetrating wounds to liver and abdomen are less frequent than those to the chest. In the past decade the use of CT has changed the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to such injuries completely, decreasing the resort to explorative laparotomy and hepatorrhaphy. Indeed, CT provides a clear picture of

  4. Prehospital endotracheal intubation and chest tubing does not prolong the overall resuscitation time of severely injured patients: a retrospective, multicentre study of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Martin; Helm, Matthias; Lefering, Rolf; Walcher, Felix

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) and chest tube placement is unnecessarily time consuming in severely injured patients. A retrospective, multicentre study including all adult patients (ISS ≥9; 2002-7) of the Trauma Registry of the German Society of Trauma Surgery who were not secondarily transferred to a trauma centre and received a definitive airway and a chest tube. Creating four groups: AA (n=963) receiving ETI and chest tube on scene, AB (n=1547) ETI performed in the prehospital setting but chest tubing later in the emergency department (ED) and BB (n=640) receiving both procedures in the ED. The BA collective (ETI performed in the ED, but chest tubing on scene) was excluded from the study because of the small sample size (n=41). The trauma resuscitation time (TRT), demographic data, injuries, treatment and outcome of the remaining three collectives were compared. The prehospital TRT of the AA collective was longer than the AB and BB subgroups (80±37 min vs 77±44 min 65±46 min; pchest tube placement do not prolong the total TRT of severely injured patients.

  5. Use of Chest Computed Tomography in Stable Patients with Blunt Thoracic Trauma: Clinical and Forensic Perspective

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    Makbule Ergin

    2011-01-01

    fractures were the most common injury. Thorax computed tomography was significantly superior to chest radiography in detecting pneumothorax , hemothorax and lung contusion. Eightyone life threatening lesions were detected and 50 (61%; pneumothorax 13, hemothorax 24, lung contusion 9,and pneumomediastinum 4 of these lesions could not be detected with plain chest radiography. The clinical management [in 15 patients (30%], and the forensic assesment was changed [in 14 (28%] patients were changed.  Conclusion:We concluded that using Computed Tomography of the thorax in thoracic travmas prive meticulous assesment in management of patients and forens icissues.

  6. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

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    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  7. Evaluation of respiratory functions in chest trauma patients treated with thoracic wall stabilization

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    Karam E. Moslam

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgical stabilization of flail chest with metallic plates is a safe and effective therapy in properly selected patients. These patients had a significantly smoother course during the intensive care unit and hospital stays, had improved respiratory functions and decreased rate of complications.

  8. MODERN DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE CHEST TRAUMA ASSOCIATED WITH THE FALL FROM A HEIGHT IN THE REPUBLIC RESEARCH CENTRE OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE

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    A. M. Khadzhibayev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. The rate of the multisystem chest trauma and mortality in patients with catatrauma remains high.OBJECTIVE. To study the diagnosis and treatment of the multisystem chest trauma in patients associated with the fall from a height.MATERIAL AND METHODS. 243 patients (208 multisystem injuries and 35 isolated injuries with a chest trauma associated with the fall from a height were examined in the surgical department of Republic research centre of emergency medicine. We performed X-ray, CT and endosurgical examinations.RESULTS. Instrumental examination revealed pneumothorax and hydrothorax in 24.4% and 22.6% of victims respectively. The rib injuries were observed in 181 patients, sternum fractures in 8 victims and thoracic vertebrae fractures in 84 patients. The puncture and thoracocentesis of the pleural cavities were performed in 85 cases. The thoracoscopy was performed in 21 patients, the thoracotomy – in 15 patients, suturing of the lung – in 22 patients, coagulation – in 15 patients, external plate fixation of multiple injured ribs – in 10 patients. The mortality rate was 21.4%.CONCLuSION. The specifics of the multisystem chest trauma associated with the fall from a height is the development of hemothorax and pneumothorax. Thoracocentesis and videothoracoscopy allow to diagnose and stop the hemorrhage properly, to restore the lung rupture and perform the thoracotomy in severe cases, as well as reduce of complications frequency and mortality rate. 

  9. [Rupture of interventricular septum secondary to blunt chest trauma. Report of a case surgically treated with success (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotti, R; Gordini, V; Botta, M; Pezzano, A

    1976-01-01

    A case of interventricular septal defect secondary to blunt chest trauma is reported. It was characterized by a disconnection of the interventricular muscolar septal in the anterosuperior part of the heart wall. The diagnosis, suspected by clinical and instrumental parameters, was definitely confirmedy by hemodynamic and contrastographic examination. Repair surgery of the defect with a dacron patch was performed, using extracorporea normothermic circulation seven months after the accident. The patient was examined three months and twelve months after the operation; the clinical examinations did not reveal any cardiac murmur and the patient's health was satisfactory. The incidence, mechanism of rupture of interventricular septum and the main surgical and clinical aspects of this type of pathology are discussed.

  10. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma

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    Milanchi S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. Materials and Methods: All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Results: Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26 and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58. There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2, or in the early (day 2-7 or late (after day 7 phases of trauma. Conclusion: VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late, each with different indications.

  11. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma.

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    Milanchi, S; Makey, I; McKenna, R; Margulies, D R

    2009-01-01

    The role of video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) is still being defined in the management of thoracic trauma. We report our trauma cases managed by VATS and review the role of VATS in the management of thoracic trauma. All the trauma patients who underwent VATS from 2000 to 2007 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center were retrospectively studied. Twenty-three trauma patients underwent 25 cases of VATS. The most common indication for VATS was retained haemothorax. Thoracotomy was avoided in 21 patients. VATS failed in two cases. On an average VATS was performed on trauma day seven (range 1-26) and the length of hospital stay was 20 days (range 3-58). There was no mortality. VATS was performed in an emergency (day 1-2), or in the early (day 2-7) or late (after day 7) phases of trauma. VATS can be performed safely for the management of thoracic traumas. VATS can be performed before or after thoracotomy and at any stage of trauma. The use of VATS in trauma has a trimodal distribution (emergent, early, late), each with different indications.

  12. Surgical treatment of multiple rib fractures and flail chest in trauma: a one-year follow-up study.

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    Caragounis, Eva-Corina; Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Pazooki, David; Granhed, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rib fractures and unstable thoracic cage injuries are common in blunt trauma. Surgical management of rib fractures has received increasing attention in recent years and the aim of this 1-year, prospective study was to assess the long-term effects of surgery. Fifty-four trauma patients with median Injury Severity Score 20 (9-66) and median New Injury Severity Score 34 (16-66) who presented with multiple rib fractures and flail chest, and underwent surgical stabilization with plate fixation were recruited. Patients responded to a standardized questionnaire concerning pain, local discomfort, breathlessness and use of analgesics and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-3 L) questionnaire at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Lung function, breathing movements, range of motion and physical function were measured at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Symptoms associated with pain, breathlessness and use of analgesics significantly decreased from 6 weeks to 1 year following surgery. After 1 year, 13 % of patients complained of pain at rest, 47 % had local discomfort and 9 % used analgesics. The EQ-5D-3 L index increased from 0.78 to 0.93 and perceived overall health state increased from 60 to 90 % (p rib fractures and flail chest show a gradual improvement in symptoms associated with pain, quality of life, mobility, disability and lung function over 1 year post surgery. Therefore, the final outcome of surgery cannot be assessed before 1 year post-operatively.

  13. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

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    Scaglione, M.; Pinto, A.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A.; Grassi, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  14. A subgroup analysis of penetrating injuries to the pancreas: 777 patients from the National Trauma Data Bank, 2010-2014.

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    Phillips, Bradley; Turco, Lauren; McDonald, Dan; Mause, Elizabeth; Walters, Ryan W

    2018-05-01

    This study is the first to analyze penetrating injuries to the pancreas within subgroups of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), early deaths, and potential survivors. Our objectives were to identify national patterns of injury, predictors of mortality, and to validate the American Association for Surgery of Trauma Organ Injury Scale (AAST-OIS) pancreas injury grades by mortality. Secondary outcomes included hospital and intensive care unit length of stay and days on mechanical ventilation. Using the Abbreviated Injury Scale 2005 and ICD-9-CM E-codes, we identified 777 penetrating pancreatic trauma patients from the National Trauma Data Bank that occurred between 2010 and 2014. Severe TBI was identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS; n = 7), early deaths were those that occurred within 24 h of admission (n = 82), and potential survivors included patients without severe TBI who survived longer than 24 h following admission (n = 690). We estimated multivariable generalized linear mixed models to predict mortality to account for the nesting of potential survivors within trauma centers. Our results indicated that overall mortality decreased from 16.9% to 6.8% after excluding severe TBI and early deaths. Approximately, 11% of patients died within 24 h of admission, of whom 78% died in the first 6 h. Associated injuries to the stomach, liver, and major vasculature occurred in approximately 50% of patients; rates of associated injuries were highest in patients who died within 6 h of admission. In potential survivors, mortality increased by AAST-OIS grade: 3.5% I/II; 8.3% III; 9.6% IV; and 13.8% V. Predictors of mortality with significantly increased odds of death were patients with increasing age, lower admission GCS, higher admission pulse rate, and more severe injuries as indicated by Organ Injury Scale grade. From 777 patients, we identified national patterns of injury, predictors of outcome, and mortality by AAST-OIS grade within

  15. Single-incision video-assisted thoracoscopic evaluation and emergent surgery for severe lung and chest wall injury after thoracic trauma in a water park.

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    Sesma, Julio; Alvarez, Melodie; Lirio, Francisco; Galvez, Carlos; Galiana, Maria; Baschwitz, Benno; Fornes, Francisca; Bolufer, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Thoracic trauma is a challenging situation with potential severe chest wall and intrathoracic organ injuries. We present a case of emergent surgery in a 23-year-old man with hemorrhagic shock due to massive lung and chest wall injury after thoracic trauma in a water slide. We performed a SI-VATS approach in order to define intrathoracic and chest wall injuries, and once checked the extension of the chest wall injury, we added a middle size thoracotomy just over the affected area in order to stabilize rib fractures with Judet plates, that had caused massive laceration in left lower lobe (LLL) and injured the pericardium causing myocardical tear. After checking bronchial and vascular viability of LLL we suggested a lung parenchyma preserving technique with PTFE protected pulmonary primary suture in order to avoid a lobectomy. Chest tubes were removed on 3 rd postoperative day and patient was discharged on 14 th postoperative day. He has already recovered his normal activity 6 months after surgery.

  16. [Cohort study on the prevalence and risk factors of late pulmonary complications in adults following a closed minor chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Miville; Émond, Marcel; Lavoie, André; Guimont, Chantal; Le Sage, Natalie; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Bergeron, Éric; Vanier, Laurent; Moore, Lynne; Allain-Boulé, Nadine; Fratu, Ramona-Florina; Dufresne, Maryline

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and time to onset of delayed hemothorax and pneumothorax in adults who experienced a minor blunt thoracic trauma. A prospective cohort of 450 consecutive patients was recruited. Eligible patients had to be over 16 years of age, consulted within 72 hours for a trauma, and available for outpatient follow-up at 2, 7, and 14 days posttrauma. The clinical outcome investigated was the presence of delayed pneumothorax or hemothorax on the follow-up chest x-ray. Delayed hemothorax occurred in 11.8% (95% CI 8.8-14.8), and delayed pneumothorax occurred in 0.9% (95% CI 0.2-2.3) of participants. During the 14-day follow-up period, 87.0% of these delayed complications developed in the first week. In the multivariate analysis, the only statistically significant risk factor for delayed complications was the location of fractures on the x-ray of the hemithorax. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.52 (95% CI 0.62-3.73) for the lower ribs (tenth to twelfth rib), 3.11 (95% CI 1.60-6.08) for the midline ribs (sixth to ninth rib), and 5.05 (95% CI 1.80-14.19) for the upper ribs (third to fifth rib) versus patients with no fractures. The presence of at least one rib fracture between the third and ninth rib on the x-ray of the hemithorax is a significant risk factor for delayed hemothorax and pneumothorax.

  17. A combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin is effective for the treatment of cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma in rats

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    Demir, F. [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dicle University, Diyarbakır (Turkey); Güzel, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Katı, C. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Karadeniz, C. [Pediatric Cardiology Services, Behçet Uz Children' s Hospital, İzmir (Turkey); Akdemir, U. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Okuyucu, A. [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Gacar, A. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Özdemir, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey); Güvenç, T. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun (Turkey)

    2014-08-01

    Cardiac contusion is a potentially fatal complication of blunt chest trauma. The effects of a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone against trauma-induced cardiac contusion were studied. Thirty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups (n=7) as follows: sham, cardiac contusion with no therapy, treated with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg on the first day, and 3 mg/kg on the following days), treated with quercetin (50 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}), and treated with a combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin. Serum troponin I (Tn-I) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels and cardiac histopathological findings were evaluated. Tn-I and TNF-α levels were elevated after contusion (P=0.001 and P=0.001). Seven days later, Tn-I and TNF-α levels decreased in the rats treated with methylprednisolone, quercetin, and the combination of methylprednisolone and quercetin compared to the rats without therapy, but a statistical significance was found only with the combination therapy (P=0.001 and P=0.011, respectively). Histopathological degeneration and necrosis scores were statistically lower in the methylprednisolone and quercetin combination group compared to the group treated only with methylprednisolone (P=0.017 and P=0.007, respectively). However, only degeneration scores were lower in the combination therapy group compared to the group treated only with quercetin (P=0.017). Inducible nitric oxide synthase positivity scores were decreased in all treatment groups compared to the untreated groups (P=0.097, P=0.026, and P=0.004, respectively). We conclude that a combination of quercetin and methylprednisolone can be used for the specific treatment of cardiac contusion.

  18. Management of penetrating extraperitoneal rectal injuries: An Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma practice management guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosarge, Patrick L; Como, John J; Fox, Nicole; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Haut, Elliott R; Dorion, Heath A; Patel, Nimitt J; Rushing, Amy; Raff, Lauren A; McDonald, Amy A; Robinson, Bryce R H; McGwin, Gerald; Gonzalez, Richard P

    2016-03-01

    The management of penetrating rectal trauma invokes a complex decision tree that advocates the principles of proximal diversion (diversion) of the fecal stream, irrigation of stool from the distal rectum, and presacral drainage based on data from World War II and the Vietnam War. This guideline seeks to define the initial operative management principles for nondestructive extraperitoneal rectal injuries. A systematic review of the MEDLINE database using PubMed was performed. The search retrieved English language articles regarding penetrating rectal trauma from January 1900 to July 2014. Letters to the editor, case reports, book chapters, and review articles were excluded. Topics of investigation included the management principles of diversion, irrigation of stool from the distal rectum, and presacral drainage using the GRADE methodology. A total of 306 articles were screened leading to a full-text review of 56 articles. Eighteen articles were used to formulate the recommendations of this guideline. This guideline consists of three conditional evidence-based recommendations. First, we conditionally recommend proximal diversion for management of these injuries. Second, we conditionally recommend the avoidance of routine presacral drains and distal rectal washout in the management of these injuries.

  19. Open pneumothorax resulting from blunt thoracic trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintick, Colleen M

    2008-01-01

    Cases of open pneumothorax have been documented as early as 326 BC. Until the last 50 years, understanding of the epidemiology and treatment of penetrating chest trauma has arisen from military surgery. A better understanding of cardiopulmonary dynamics, advances in ventilatory support, and improvement in surgical technique have drastically improved treatment and increased the survival rate of patients with penetrating thoracic trauma. Open pneumothorax is rare in blunt chest trauma, but can occur when injury results in a substantial loss of the chest wall. This case study presents an adolescent who sustained a large open pneumothorax as a result of being run over by a car. Early and appropriate surgical intervention coupled with coordinated efforts by all members of the trauma team resulted in a positive outcome for this patient.

  20. Penetrating injury to the chest by an attenuated energy projectile: a case report and literature review of thoracic injuries caused by "less-lethal" munitions

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    Porto Leonardo BO

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the case of a patient who sustained a penetrating injury to the chest caused by an attenuated energy rubber bullet and review the literature on thoracic injuries caused by plastic and rubber "less-lethal" munitions. The patient of this report underwent a right thoracotomy to extract the projectile as well as a wedge resection of the injured lung parenchyma. This case demonstrates that even supposedly safe riot control munition fired at close range, at the torso, can provoke serious injury. Therefore a thorough investigation and close clinical supervision are justified.

  1. Penetrating injury to the chest by an attenuated energy projectile: a case report and literature review of thoracic injuries caused by "less-lethal" munitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende-Neto, Joao; Silva, Fabriccio Df; Porto, Leonardo Bo; Teixeira, Luiz C; Tien, Homer; Rizoli, Sandro B

    2009-06-26

    We present the case of a patient who sustained a penetrating injury to the chest caused by an attenuated energy rubber bullet and review the literature on thoracic injuries caused by plastic and rubber "less-lethal" munitions. The patient of this report underwent a right thoracotomy to extract the projectile as well as a wedge resection of the injured lung parenchyma. This case demonstrates that even supposedly safe riot control munition fired at close range, at the torso, can provoke serious injury. Therefore a thorough investigation and close clinical supervision are justified.

  2. FLAIL CHEST

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    Anton Crnjac

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major thoracic trauma is consistent with high mortality rate because of associated injuries of vital thoracic organs and dangerous complications. The flail chest occurs after disruption of the skeletal continuity of chest wall and demands because of its pathophysiological complexity rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment.Conclusions. Basic pathophysiological mechanism of the flail chest is respiratory distress, which is provoked by pulmonary contusions and paradoxical chest wall motion. The treatment should be pointed to improvement and support of respiratory functions and include aggressive pain control, pulmonary physiotherapy and selective mechanical ventilation. Views about operative fixation of the flail chest are still controversial. Neither mortality rate neither long-term disability are improved after operative fixation.

  3. The Role of Intraoperative Cerebral Angiography in Transorbital Intracranial Penetrating Trauma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jonathan P; Boucher, Andrew B; Kim, Denise S; Barrow, Daniel L; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    Transorbital intracranial penetrating trauma with a retained intracranial foreign body is a rare event lacking a widely accepted diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm. Intraoperative catheter angiography (IOA) has been advocated by some authorities to rule out cerebrovascular injury before and/or after removal of the object, but no standard of care currently exists. A 19-year-old man was involved in a construction site accident whereby a framing nail penetrated the left globe, traversed the lateral bony orbit, and terminated in the midtemporal lobe. No hematoma or injury to the middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) was apparent on noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) or CT angiography, respectively. The foreign body was removed in the operating room under direct visualization after a frontotemporal craniotomy without incident. No significant venous or arterial bleeding was encountered. All visualized MCA branches appeared intact. Indocyanine green videoangiography performed immediately after object removal showed adequate filling of the MCA branches. Given these uneventful clinical and radiographic findings, IOA was not performed. Postoperative head CT and CT angiography showed no obvious neurovascular injury. On postoperative day 2, the patient was noted to have an expressive aphasia. Cerebral angiography showed absent antegrade filling of the angular artery with some retrograde perfusion. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed an ischemic infarction in the midtemporal lobe. The patient's expressive aphasia improved to near baseline during his hospitalization and he made an excellent clinical recovery. In transorbital intracranial penetrating trauma with a retained intracranial object, we advocate microsurgical removal of the object under direct visualization followed immediately by IOA. IOA should be strongly considered even in the setting of minimal intraoperative bleeding and normal findings on videoangiography (a course of action that was not followed in the

  4. Forty hours with a traumatic carotid transection: A diagnostic caveat and review of the contemporary management of penetrating neck trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Eugene; Campbell, Ian; Choong, Andrew; Kruger, Allan; Walker, Philip J

    2018-02-20

    Although penetrating neck trauma (PNT) is uncommon, it is associated with the significant morbidity and mortality. The management of PNT has changed significantly over the past 50 years. A radiological assessment now is a vital part of the management with a traditional surgical exploration. A 22 years old male was assaulted by a screwdriver and sustained multiple penetrating neck injuries. A contrast CT scan revealed a focal pseudoaneurysm in the left common carotid artery bulb. There was no active bleeding or any other vascular injuries and the patient remained haemodynamically stable. In view of these findings, he was initially managed conservatively without an open surgical exploration. However, the patient was noted to have an acute drop in his hemoglobin count overnight post injury and the catheter directed angiography showed active bleeding from the pseudoaneurysm. Surgical exploration 40 hours following the initial injury revealed a penetrating injury through both arterial walls of the left carotid bulb which was repaired with a great saphenous vein patch. A percutaneous drain was inserted in the carotid triangle and a course of intravenous antibiotics for five days was commenced. The patient recovered well with no complications and remained asymptomatic at five months followup. Copyright © 2018 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Emergency Resuscitative Thoracotomy versus Closed Chest Compressions among Patients with Critical Blunt Trauma: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Japan.

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    Kodai Suzuki

    Full Text Available Although emergency resuscitative thoracotomy is performed as a salvage maneuver for critical blunt trauma patients, evidence supporting superior effectiveness of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy compared to conventional closed-chest compressions remains insufficient. The objective of this study was to investigate whether emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at the emergency department or in the operating room was associated with favourable outcomes after blunt trauma and to compare its effectiveness with that of closed-chest compressions.This was a retrospective nationwide cohort study. Data were obtained from the Japan Trauma Data Bank for the period between 2004 and 2012. The primary and secondary outcomes were patient survival rates 24 h and 28 d after emergency department arrival. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis. We adjusted for the effects of different hospitals by introducing random intercepts in regression analysis to account for the differential quality of emergency resuscitative thoracotomy at hospitals where patients in cardiac arrest were treated. Sensitivity analyses were performed using propensity score matching.In total, 1,377 consecutive, critical blunt trauma patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department or operating room were included in the study. Of these patients, 484 (35.1% underwent emergency resuscitative thoracotomy and 893 (64.9% received closed-chest compressions. Compared to closed-chest compressions, emergency resuscitative thoracotomy was associated with lower survival rate 24 h after emergency department arrival (4.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively, P < 0.001 and 28 d after arrival (1.2% vs. 6.0%, respectively, P < 0.001. Multivariable generalized mixed-effects regression analysis with and without a propensity score-matched dataset revealed that the odds ratio for an unfavorable survival rate after 24 h was lower for

  6. Current management of penetrating torso trauma: nontherapeutic is not good enough anymore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G

    2014-04-01

    A highly organized approach to the evaluation and treatment of penetrating torso injuries based on regional anatomy provides rapid diagnostic and therapeutic consistency. It also minimizes delays in diagnosis, missed injuries and nontherapeutic laparotomies. This review discusses an optimal sequence of structured rapid assessments that allow the clinician to rapidly proceed to gold standard therapies with a minimal risk of associated morbidity.

  7. Chylous ascites associated with chylothorax; a rare sequela of penetrating abdominal trauma: a case report

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    Plummer Joseph M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the case of a patient with the rare combination of chylous ascites and chylothorax resulting from penetrating abdominal injury. This patient was successfully managed with total parenteral nutrition. This case report is used to highlight the clinical features and management options of this uncommon but challenging clinical problem.

  8. "Luck's always to blame": silent wounds of a penetrating gunshot trauma sustained 20 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomos, Ioannis; Manali, Effrosyni D; Argentos, Stylianos; Raptakis, Thomas; Papiris, Spyros A

    2015-01-01

    Gunshot tracheal injuries represent life-threatening events and usually necessitate emergent surgical intervention. We report a case of an exceptional finding of a patient with retained ballistic fragments in the soft tissues of the thorax, proximal to the right subclavian artery and the trachea, carrying silently his wounds for two decades without any medical or surgical intervention. The bullet pellet on the upper part of the trachea seen accidentally in the chest computed tomography, was also found during bronchoscopy. In short "luck's always to blame".

  9. Simple X-ray versus ultrasonography examination in blunt chest trauma: effective tools of accurate diagnosis and considerations for rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Gu; Lee, Yunjung

    2016-12-01

    Simple radiography is the best diagnostic tool for rib fractures caused by chest trauma, but it has some limitations. Thus, other tools are also being used. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of ultrasonography (US) for identifying rib fractures and to identify influencing factors of its effectiveness. Between October 2003 and August 2007, 201 patients with blunt chest trauma were available to undergo chest radiographic and US examinations for diagnosis of rib fractures. The two modalities were compared in terms of effectiveness based on simple radiographic readings and US examination results. We also investigated the factors that influenced the effectiveness of US examination. Rib fractures were detected on radiography in 69 patients (34.3%) but not in 132 patients. Rib fractures were diagnosed by using US examination in 160 patients (84.6%). Of the 132 patients who showed no rib fractures on radiography, 92 showed rib fractures on US. Among the 69 patients of rib fracture detected on radiography, 33 had additional rib fractures detected on US. Of the patients, 76 (37.8%) had identical radiographic and US results, and 125 (62.2%) had fractures detected on US that were previously undetected on radiography or additional fractures detected on US. Age, duration until US examination, and fracture location were not significant influencing factors. However, in the group without detected fractures on radiography, US showed a more significant effectiveness than in the group with detected fractures on radiography ( P =0.003). US examination could detect unnoticed rib fractures on simple radiography. US examination is especially more effective in the group without detected fractures on radiography. More attention should be paid to patients with chest trauma who have no detected fractures on radiography.

  10. An unusual case of cerebral penetrating injury by a driven bone fragment secondary to blunt head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Il; Ko, Jun Kyeung; Cha, Seung Heon; Han, In Ho

    2011-12-01

    Temple trauma that appears initially localized to the skin might possess intracranial complications. Early diagnosis and management of such complications are important, to avoid neurologic sequelae. Non-penetrating head injuries with intracranial hemorrhage caused by a driven bone fragment are extremely rare. A 53-year-old male was referred to our hospital because of intracerebral hemorrhage. He was a mechanic and one day before admission to a local clinic, tip of metallic rod hit his right temple while cutting the rod. Initial brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated scanty subdural hematoma at right temporal lobe and left falx and intracerebral hematoma at both frontal lobes. Facial CT with 3-D reconstruction images showed a small bony defect at the right sphenoid bone's greater wing and a small bone fragment at the left frontal lobe, crossing the falx. We present the unusual case of a temple trauma patient in whom a sphenoid bone fragment migrated from its origin upward, to the contralateral frontal lobe, producing hematoma along its trajectory.

  11. When Physics Meets Biology: Low and High Velocity Penetration, Blunt Trauma and Blast Injuries to the Brain

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    Leanne eYoung

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of TBI in the US has reached epidemic proportions with well over 2 million new cases reported each year. TBI can occur in both civilians and warfighters, with head injuries occurring in both combat and non-combat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic penetration, acceleration, blunt impact, and blast. Most generally, TBI is a condition in which physical loads exceed the capacity of brain tissues to absorb without injury. More specifically, TBI results when sufficient external force is applied to the head and is subsequently converted into stresses that must be absorbed or redirected by protective equipment. If the stresses are not sufficiently absorbed or redirected, they will lead to damage of extracranial soft tissue and the skull. Complex interactions and kinematics of the head, neck and jaw cause strains within the brain tissue, resulting in structural, anatomical damage that is characteristic of the inciting insult. This mechanical trauma then initiates a neuro-chemical cascade that leads to the functional consequences of TBI, such as cognitive impairment. To fully understand the mechanisms by which TBI occurs, it is critically important to understand the effects of the loading environments created by these threats. In the following, a review is made of the pertinent complex loading conditions and how these loads cause injury. Also discussed are injury thresholds and gaps in knowledge, both of which are needed to design improved protective systems.

  12. Penetrating Obturator Artery Injury after Gunshot Wounds: A Successful Multidisciplinary Trauma Team Approach to a Potentially Lethal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraqa, Tareq I; Shin, Ji-Sun J; Diallo, Ismael; Sachwani-Daswani, Gul R; Mercer, Leo C

    2017-11-17

    Obturator artery injury (OAI) from pelvic gunshot wounds (GSW) is a rarely reported condition. Hemorrhages from pelvic trauma (PT) are mostly venous. Arterial hemorrhages represent about 10-20% of PTs. When arterial hemorrhages from PT occur, they are a severe and deadly complication often causing significant hemodynamic instability and eventual shock. A  23-year-old male presented to our emergency service via a private vehicle with multiple gunshot wounds to both thighs and to the lower back, resulted in rectal and obturator artery (OA) injuries. The patient underwent a successful coil-embolization of the right OA. Given the density of structures within the pelvis, patients who sustain gunshot wounds to the pelvic region are at high risk for injury to the small bowel, sigmoid colon, rectum, bladder, and/or vascular structures. While bleeding is the major cause of early mortality in PT, rectal injuries carry the highest mortality due to visceral injuries. A high clinical index of suspicion is needed to diagnose an iliac artery injury or injury to its branches. Prompt computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) and embolization of the OA is the best method to control and stop the bleeding and improve the mortality outcome. Clinicians caring for patients presenting with pelvic gunshot wounds should pay attention to the delayed presentation of internal hemorrhage from the OAs. A multidisciplinary team approach is crucial in the successful management of penetrating injuries to the obturator artery.

  13. Missed rib fractures on evaluation of initial chest CT for trauma patients: pattern analysis and diagnostic value of coronal multiplanar reconstruction images with multidetector row CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S H; Sung, Y M; Kim, M S

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to review the prevalence and radiological features of rib fractures missed on initial chest CT evaluation, and to examine the diagnostic value of additional coronal images in a large series of trauma patients. 130 patients who presented to an emergency room for blunt chest trauma underwent multidetector row CT of the thorax within the first hour during their stay, and had follow-up CT or bone scans as diagnostic gold standards. Images were evaluated on two separate occasions: once with axial images and once with both axial and coronal images. The detection rates of missed rib fractures were compared between readings using a non-parametric method of clustered data. In the cases of missed rib fractures, the shapes, locations and associated fractures were evaluated. 58 rib fractures were missed with axial images only and 52 were missed with both axial and coronal images (p=0.088). The most common shape of missed rib fractures was buckled (56.9%), and the anterior arc (55.2%) was most commonly involved. 21 (36.2%) missed rib fractures had combined fractures on the same ribs, and 38 (65.5%) were accompanied by fracture on neighbouring ribs. Missed rib fractures are not uncommon, and radiologists should be familiar with buckle fractures, which are frequently missed. Additional coronal imagescan be helpful in the diagnosis of rib fractures that are not seen on axial images.

  14. Outcome of and prognostic indicators for dogs and cats with pneumoperitoneum and no history of penetrating trauma: 54 cases (1988-2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelstoys, Jennifer A; Davis, Garrett J; Learn, Amy E; Shofer, Frances E; Brown, Dorothy Cimino

    2004-07-15

    To determine the outcome of and prognostic indicators for dogs and cats with pneumoperitoneum and no history of penetrating trauma. Retrospective study. 43 dogs and 11 cats. Medical records of dogs and cats with radiographic evidence of pneumoperitoneum and no history of penetrating trauma were reviewed. Information collected included signalment, previous medical problems, initial complaint, duration of illness, physical examination findings, radiographic findings, laboratory abnormalities, abdominocentesis results, bacterial culture results, concurrent diseases, hospitalization time, and outcome. Abdominal radiographs were reviewed, and radiographic severity of pneumoperitoneum was classified. For those animals that underwent exploratory laparotomy, time from admission to surgery and results of histologic examination of biopsy specimens were recorded. 24 (44%) animals survived and were discharged from the hospital, but none of the variables examined was associated with whether animals survived. Rupture of the gastrointestinal tract was the cause of pneumoperitoneum in 40 animals. However, cause and location of gastrointestinal tract rupture was not associated with whether animals survived. Twenty-three of 40 (58%) animals that underwent exploratory laparotomy survived, compared with only 1 of 14 animals that did not undergo surgery. Results suggest that pneumoperitoneum in dogs and cats without any history of penetrating trauma is most commonly associated with rupture of the gastrointestinal tract and requires immediate surgical intervention. Even when appropriate treatment is instituted, the shortterm prognosis is only fair.

  15. Reprodaetion of an animal model of multiple intestinal injuries mimicking "lethal triad" caused by severe penetrating abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-fei WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce an animal model of multi-intestinal injuries with "lethal triad" characterized by low body temperature,acidosis and coagulopathy.Methods Six female domestic outbred pigs were anesthetized,and the carotid artery and jugular vein were cannulated for monitoring the blood pressure and heart rate and for infusion of fluid.The animals were shot with a gun to create a severe penetrating abdominal trauma.Immediately after the shooting,50% of total blood volume(35ml/kg hemorrhage was drawn from the carotid artery in 20min.After a 40min shock period,4h of pre-hospital phase was mimicked by normal saline(NS resuscitation to maintain systolic blood pressure(SBP > 80mmHg or mean arterial pressure(MAP > 60mmHg.When SBP > 80mmHg or MAP > 60mmHg,no fluid infusion or additional bleeding was given.Hemodynamic parameters were recorded,and pathology of myocardium,lung,small intestine and liver was observed.Results There were multiple intestinal perforations(8-10 site injuries/pig leading to intra-abdominal contamination,mesenteric injury(1-2 site injuries/pig resulted in partial intestinal ischemia and intra-abdominal hemorrhage,and no large colon and mesenteric vascular injury.One pig died before the completion of the model establishment(at the end of pre-hospital resuscitation.The typical symptoms of trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock were observed in survival animals.Low temperature(33.3±0.5℃,acidosis(pH=7.242±0.064,and coagulopathy(protrombin time and activated partial thromboplasting time prolonged were observed after pre-hospital resuscitation.Pathology showed that myocardium,lung,small intestine and liver were severely injured.Conclusions A new model,simulating three stages of "traumatic hemorrhagic shock,pre-hospital recovery and hospital treatment" and inducing the "lethal triad" accompanied with abdominal pollution,has been successfully established.This model has good stability and high reproducibility.The survival animals can be

  16. Ethyl pyruvate ameliorates hepatic injury following blunt chest trauma and hemorrhagic shock by reducing local inflammation, NF-kappaB activation and HMGB1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Nils; Dieteren, Scott; Franz, Niklas; Köhler, Kernt; Mörs, Katharina; Nicin, Luka; Schmidt, Julia; Perl, Mario; Marzi, Ingo; Relja, Borna

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of patients with multiple trauma including blunt chest/thoracic trauma (TxT) and hemorrhagic shock (H) is still challenging. Numerous studies show detrimental consequences of TxT and HS resulting in strong inflammatory changes, organ injury and mortality. Additionally, the reperfusion (R) phase plays a key role in triggering inflammation and worsening outcome. Ethyl pyruvate (EP), a stable lipophilic ester, has anti-inflammatory properties. Here, the influence of EP on the inflammatory reaction and liver injury in a double hit model of TxT and H/R in rats was explored. Female Lewis rats were subjected to TxT followed by hemorrhage/H (60 min, 35±3 mm Hg) and resuscitation/R (TxT+H/R). Reperfusion was performed by either Ringer`s lactated solution (RL) alone or RL supplemented with EP (50 mg/kg). Sham animals underwent all surgical procedures without TxT+H/R. After 2h, blood and liver tissue were collected for analyses, and survival was assessed after 24h. Resuscitation with EP significantly improved haemoglobin levels and base excess recovery compared with controls after TxT+H/R, respectively (ptrauma and hemorrhagic shock is associated with NF-κB. In particular, the beneficial anti-inflammatory effects of ethyl pyruvate seem to be regulated by the HMGB1/NF-κB axis in the liver, thereby, restraining inflammatory responses and liver injury after double hit trauma in the rat.

  17. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trauma and on most vascular injuries. South Africa is one of the few .... scan of the brain and abdomen showed a sliver of left subdural and subarachnoid .... and especially on RT. In the event of a life-threatening condition, the rapid response ...

  18. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... However, the physical and financial resources to manage this massive burden of disease are inadequate. This is especially the case in terms of access to critical care facilities. The development of an electronic trauma registry at our institution has allowed us to capture data in real time on all patients and.

  19. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... unit in Durban, and to correlate it with injury severity, length of hospital stay ... and via a password protected mobile application program within 6 ..... usage and costs performed in larger numbers on major trauma patients will ...

  20. MINIMALLY INVASIVE TECHNIQUES IN THE INTEGRATED TREATMENT OF THOSE SUFFERING FROM SEVERE CONCURRENT INJURY WITH DOMINATING CHEST TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Tseymakh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment outcomes of 226 patients have been analyzed. Treatment and diagnostic algorithm has been developed for the management of patients with severe concurrent injury and dominating chest trauma. The indications for the following interventions have been formulated: emergency thoracotomy, emergency and urgent video-assisted thoracoscopy, local fibrinolytic therapy in case of clotted hemothorax and post-traumatic pleural empyema, valve bronchial block in tension and continuously persistent pneumothorax, osteosynthesis of fragmentary costal fractures. Using minimally invasive treatment techniques allowed decreasing the number of surgeries in the patients and increasing the number of recovered patients when discharged from the hospital.

  1. Radiographic evaluation of hepatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    The incidence of significant abdominal trauma continues to rise and accounts currently for approximately 10 percent of the annual 130,000 trauma-related deaths in the United States. Over 60 percent of patients are from 10 to 40 years of age, with a striking predominance of males. Children are mostly victims of blunt trauma, while some large reviews of liver trauma in adults show a prevalence of penetrating injuries. Injury to the liver is second only to the spleen in incidence of intraperitoneal injuries. Morbidity and mortality from hepatic trauma are related to the mechanism and extent of injury. Penetrating injuries generally have a lower mortality, about 5 percent, especially if they are due to stab wounds or low velocity gunshot wounds. Shotgun and high velocity gunshot wounds may cause massive fragmentation of the liver and are associated with proportionately greater mortality. The mortality from blunt trauma is from 15 to 45 percent in many large series. Death from isolated liver injury is uncommon, but is usually due to uncontrolled hemorrhage. Injury to other abdominal organs is associated in many cases, as are injuries to the head, chest, and limbs. The extraabdominal injuries are frequently more apparent clinically, but may mask potentially life-threatening abdominal visceral injuries

  2. The evil of good is better: Making the case for basic life support transport for penetrating trauma victims in an urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappold, Joseph F; Hollenbach, Kathryn A; Santora, Thomas A; Beadle, Dania; Dauer, Elizabeth D; Sjoholm, Lars O; Pathak, Abhijit; Goldberg, Amy J

    2015-09-01

    Controversy remains over the ideal way to transport penetrating trauma victims in an urban environment. Both advance life support (ALS) and basic life support (BLS) transports are used in most urban centers. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at an urban Level I trauma center. Victims of penetrating trauma transported by ALS, BLS, or police from January 1, 2008, to November 31, 2013, were identified. Patient survival by mode of transport and by level of care received was analyzed using logistic regression. During the study period, 1,490 penetrating trauma patients were transported by ALS (44.8%), BLS (15.6%), or police (39.6%) personnel. The majority of injuries were gunshot wounds (72.9% for ALS, 66.8% for BLS, 90% for police). Median transport minutes were significantly longer for ALS (16 minutes) than for BLS (14.5 minutes) transports (p = 0.012). After adjusting for transport time and Injury Severity Score (ISS), among victims with an ISS of 0 to 30, there was a 2.4-fold increased odds of death (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-4.4) if transported by ALS as compared with BLS. With an ISS of greater than 30, this relationship did not exist (odds ratio, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.3-2.7). When examined by type of care provided, patients with an ISS of 0 to 30 given ALS support were 3.7 times more likely to die than those who received BLS support (95% CI, 2.0-6.8). Among those with an ISS of greater than 30, no relationship was evident (odds ratio, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.3-2.7). Among penetrating trauma victims with an ISS of 30 or lower, an increased odds of death was identified for those treated and/or transported by ALS personnel. For those with an ISS of greater than 30, no survival advantage was identified with ALS transport or care. Results suggest that rapid transport may be more important than increased interventions. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  3. Perfil epidemiológico do trauma ocular penetrante antes e após o novo código de trânsito Epidemiological profile of penetrating ocular trauma before and after the new traffic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Caldas Silber

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar o perfil epidemiológico dos pacientes com trauma ocular penetrante (TOP antes e após a regulamentação do novo código de trânsito. Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de 253 pacientes com TOP examinados na Seção de Trauma Ocular (UNIFESP de janeiro de 1997 a abril de 1999. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: Grupo I, pacientes com trauma ocular antes da implantação do novo código; Grupo II, história de trauma após sua implantação. Os pacientes foram avaliados em relação a diferentes aspectos do trauma e exame oftalmológico. Resultados: Os achados epidemiológicos em relação à idade, sexo e raça foram similares em ambos os grupos. No grupo I, os pacientes entre 21 e 50 anos apresentaram distribuição similar quanto à etiologia do trauma, ao passo que no grupo II, no mesmo intervalo de idade, predominaram os acidentes automobilísticos. Em relação ao uso do cinto de segurança, 60% e 92% dos pacientes não estavam usando o cinto, nos grupos I e II, respectivamente. 60% dos pacientes no grupo II mencionaram consumo de álcool, contra 40%, no grupo I. Conclusão: Apesar das medidas de impacto tomadas pelo governo para controlar os acidentes, os danos do trauma ocular continuam relacionados a fatores passíveis de prevenção, como o uso do cinto de segurança e consumo de álcool.Purpose: To study the epidemiologic profile of the patients with penetrating ocular trauma (POT before and after the application of the new traffic code. Methods: Retrospective study of 253 patients with POT examined at the Ocular Trauma Section (UNIFESP from January 1997 to April 1999. The patients were divided into 2 groups: Group I, patients with ocular trauma before the new traffic code; Group II, trauma history after the new code. The patients were evaluated regarding different aspects on trauma and ophthalmic evaluation. Results: The epidemiological findings regarding age, sex and race were similar in both groups. In

  4. A comparison of base deficit and vital signs in the early assessment of patients with penetrating trauma in a high burden setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Mark Peter; Sartorius, Benn; Laing, Grant Llewellyn; Bruce, John Lambert; Clarke, Damian Luiz

    2017-09-01

    An assessment of physiological status is a key step in the early assessment of trauma patients with implications for triage, investigation and management. This has traditionally been done using vital signs. Previous work from large European trauma datasets has suggested that base deficit (BD) predicts clinically important outcomes better than vital signs (VS). A BD derived classification of haemorrhagic shock appeared superior to one based on VS derived from ATLS criteria in a population of predominantly blunt trauma patients. The initial aim of this study was to see if this observation would be reproduced in penetrating trauma patients. The power of each individual variable (BD, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), shock index(SI) (HR/SBP) and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS)) to predict mortality was then also compared. A retrospective analysis of adult trauma patients presenting to the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service was performed. Patients were classified into four "shock" groups using VS or BD and the outcomes compared. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were then generated to compare the predictive power for mortality of each individual variable. 1863 patients were identified. The overall mortality rate was 2.1%. When classified by BD, HR rose and SBP fell as the "shock class" increased but not to the degree suggested by the ATLS classification. The BD classification of haemorrhagic shock appeared to predict mortality better than that based on the ATLS criteria. Mortality increased from 0.2% (Class 1) to 19.7% (Class 4) based on the 4 level BD classification. Mortality increased from 0.3% (Class 1) to 12.6% (Class 4) when classified based by VS. Area under the receiver operator characteristic (AUROC) curve analysis of the individual variables demonstrated that BD predicted mortality significantly better than HR, GCS, SBP and SI. AUROC curve (95% Confidence Interval (CI)) for BD was 0.90 (0.85-0.95) compared to HR 0

  5. [Chest Injury and its Surgical Treatment in Polytrauma Patients. Five-Year Experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodička, J; Doležal, J; Vejvodová, Š; Šafránek, J; Špidlen, V; Třeška, V

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Thoracic trauma, one of the most frequent injuries in patients with multiple traumata, is found in 50 to 80% of these patients and it is crucial for the patient's prognosis. It accounts for 25% of all death from polytraumatic injuries. The aim of this retrospective study was an analysis of the occurrence of chest injuries in polytrauma patients and their surgical treatment in the Trauma Centre or Department of Surgery of the University Hospital Pilsen in a five-year period. MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients with injuries meeting the definition of polytrauma and an Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥16 were included. The demographic characteristics, mechanism of multiple trauma, ISS value and chest injury were recorded in each patient. The number of injured patients in each year of the study was noted. In the patients with chest injury, the type of injury and method of treatment were assessed. The therapy was further analysed including its timing. The number of deaths due to polytrauma involving chest injury, the cause of death and its time in relation to the patient's admission to the Trauma Centre were evaluated. RESULTS In the period 2010-14, 513 polytrauma patients were treated; of them 371 (72.3%) were men with an average age of 40.5 years. The most frequent cause of injury was a traffic accident (74%). The average ISS of the whole group was 35 points. Chest injury was diagnosed in 469 patients (91.4%) of whom only five (1.1%) had penetrating injury. Pulmonary contusion was most frequent (314 patients; 67%). A total of 212 patients with chest injury underwent surgery (45.2%); urgent surgery was performed in 143 (67.5%), acute surgery in 49 (23.1%) and delayed surgery in 63 (29.7%) patients. Chest drainage was the major surgical procedure used in the whole group. Of 61 patients who died, 52 had chest injury. In this subgroup the most frequent cause of death was decompensated traumatic shock (26 patients; 50%). In the whole group, 32 polytrauma

  6. Spontaneous obliteration of right ventricular pseudoaneurysm after blunt chest trauma: Diagnosis and follow-up with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Kyung; Kang, Mi Jin; Kim, Jae Hyung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Right ventricular (RV) pseudoaneurysm caused by trauma is very rare. We report a case of RV pseudoaneurysm which resolved without surgical treatment in a patient who survived a falling accident. Echocardiography failed to identify the pseudoaneurysm. Electrocardiography-gated CT showed a 17-mm-sized saccular pseusoaneurysm arsing from the RV outflow tract with a narrow neck. Follow-up CT after two months showed spontaneous obliteration of the lesion.

  7. A Pseudoaneurysm of the Deep Palmar Arch After Penetrating Trauma to the Hand: Successful Exclusion by Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Thrombin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bosman

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Pseudoaneurysm of the hand is a rare condition; most are treated surgically. Ultrasound guided thrombin injection has not previously been reported as a treatment option for pseudoaneurysms of the deep palmar arch. Report: A man was referred to the emergency department with a swollen, painful hand after penetrating trauma. On physical examination, a pulsating tumor was found on the dorsum of the hand. Imaging revealed a pseudoaneurysm vascularized by the deep palmar arch. Ultrasound guided percutaneous thrombin injection was successfully performed. Conclusion: Thrombin injection might be a safe alternative option in the treatment of pseudoaneurysm of the deep palmar arch. Keywords: Deep palmar arch, Pseudoaneurysm, Thrombin injection

  8. Emergency department thoracotomy for penetrating injuries of the heart and great vessels: an appraisal of 283 consecutive cases from two urban trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Mark J; Shiroff, Adam M; Franco, Michael; Stawicki, S Peter; Molina, Ezequiel J; Gaughan, John P; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William; Pryor, John P; Goldberg, Amy J

    2009-12-01

    Historically, patients with penetrating cardiac injuries have enjoyed the best survival after emergency department thoracotomy (EDT), but further examination of these series reveals a preponderance of cardiac stab wound (SW) survivors with only sporadic cardiac gunshot wound (GSW) survivors. Our primary study objective was to determine which patients requiring EDT for penetrating cardiac or great vessel (CGV) injury are salvageable. All patients who underwent EDT for penetrating CGV injuries in two urban, level I trauma centers during 2000 to 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Demographics, injury (mechanism, anatomic injury), prehospital care, and physiology (signs of life [SOL], vital signs, and cardiac rhythm) were analyzed with respect to hospital survival. The study population (n = 283) comprised young (mean age, 27.1 years +/- 10.1 years) men (96.1%) injured by gunshot (GSW, 88.3%) or SWs (11.7%). Patients were compared by injury mechanism and number of CGV wounds with respect to survival (SW, 24.2%; GSW, 2.8%; p cumulative impact of penetrating injury mechanism, ED SOL, and number of CGV wounds was analyzed together, we established that those sustaining multiple CGV GSWs (regardless of ED SOL) were nearly unsalvageable. These results indicate that when multiple CGV GSWs are encountered after EDT, further resuscitative efforts may be terminated without limiting the opportunity for survival.

  9. Penetrating trauma to the kidney and Meckel’s Diverticulum in a patient with unilateral renal agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanju Sobnach

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Although congenital visceral anomalies are spectacular findings at laparotomy, they should not distract the trauma surgeon. Adhering to damage control surgery principles and careful inspection of the peritoneal cavity for further abnormalities remain the mainstay of successful management.

  10. 12 A multi-centre randomised feasibility study evaluating the impact of a prognostic model for management of blunt chest wall trauma patients: stumbl trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Ceri; Hutchings, Hayley; Abbott, Zoe; O'neill, Claire; Groves, Sam; Watkins, Alan; Lecky, Fiona; Jones, Sally; Gagg, James; Body, Rick; Evans, Phillip

    2017-12-01

    A new prognostic model has been developed and externally validated, the aim of which is to assist in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department (ED). A definitive randomised controlled trial (impact trial), is required to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the new model, before it can be accepted in clinical practice. The purpose of this trial is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of such a definitive trial and inform its design. This feasibility trial is designed to test the methods of a multi-centre, cluster-randomised (stepped wedge) trial, with a substantial qualitative component. Four EDs in England and Wales will collect data for all blunt chest wall trauma patients over a five month period; in the initial period acting as the controls (normal care) and the second period, acting as the interventions (in which the new model will be used). Baseline measurements including completion of the SF-12v2 will be obtained on initial assessment in the ED. Patient outcome data will then be collected for any subsequent hospitalisations. Data collection will conclude with a six week follow-up completion of two surveys (SF-12v2 and Client Services Receipt Inventory).Analysis of outcomes will focus on feasibility, acceptability and trial processes and will include recruitment and retention rates, attendance at clinician training rates and use of model in the ED. Qualitative feedback will be obtained through clinician interviews and a research nurse focus group. An evaluation of the feasibility of health economics outcomes data will be completed. Wales Research Ethics Committee 6 granted approval for the trial in September 2016. Health Care Research Wales Research Permissions and the HRA have granted approval for the study. Patient recruitment commenced in February 2017. Planned dissemination is through publication in a peer-reviewed Emergency Medicine Journal, presentation at appropriate conferences and to

  11. Protocol for a multicentre randomised feasibility STUdy evaluating the impact of a prognostic model for Management of BLunt chest wall trauma patients: STUMBL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Ceri; Abbott, Zoe; Hutchings, Hayley A; O'Neill, Claire; Groves, Sam; Watkins, Alan; Lecky, Fiona E; Jones, Sally; Gagg, James; Body, Richard; Evans, Philip A

    2017-07-10

    A new prognostic model has been developed and externally validated, the aim of which is to assist in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the emergency department (ED). A definitive randomised controlled trial (impact trial) is required to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the new model before it can be accepted in clinical practice. The purpose of this trial is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of such a definitive trial and inform its design. This feasibility trial is designed to test the methods of a multicentre, cluster-randomised (stepped- wedge) trial, with a substantial qualitative component. Four EDs in England and Wales will collect data for all blunt chest wall trauma patients over a 5-month period; in the initial period acting as the controls (normal care), and in the second period acting as the interventions (in which the new model will be used). Baseline measurements including completion of the SF-12v2 will be obtained on initial assessment in the ED. Patient outcome data will then be collected for any subsequent hospitalisations. Data collection will conclude with a 6-week follow-up completion of two surveys (SF-12v2 and Client Services Receipt Inventory). Analysis of outcomes will focus on feasibility, acceptability and trial processes and will include recruitment and retention rates, attendance at clinician training rates and use of model in the ED. Qualitative feedback will be obtained through clinician interviews and a research nurse focus group. An evaluation of the feasibility of health economics outcomes data will be completed. Wales Research Ethics Committee 6 granted approval for the trial in September 2016. Patient recruitment will commence in February 2017. Planned dissemination is through publication in a peer-reviewed Emergency Medicine Journal , presentation at appropriate conferences and to stakeholders at professional meetings. ISRCTN95571506; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their

  12. Analysis of the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) in 200 victims of different trauma mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Bruno Durante; Razente, Danilo Mardegam; Lacerda, Daniel Augusto Mauad; Lother, Nicole Silveira; VON-Bahten, Luiz Carlos; Stahlschmidt, Carla Martinez Menini

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the epidemiological profile and mortality associated with the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) in trauma victims treated at a university hospital. we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study of trauma protocols (prospectively collected) from December 2013 to February 2014, including trauma victims admitted in the emergency room of the Cajuru University Hospital. We set up three groups: (G1) penetrating trauma to the abdomen and chest, (G2) blunt trauma to the abdomen and chest, and (G3) traumatic brain injury. The variables we analyzed were: gender, age, day of week, mechanism of injury, type of transportation, RTS, hospitalization time and mortality. we analyzed 200 patients, with a mean age of 36.42 ± 17.63 years, and 73.5% were male. The mean age was significantly lower in G1 than in the other groups (p grupos foram criados: (G1) trauma penetrante em abdome e tórax, (G2) trauma contuso em abdome e tórax, e (G3) trauma cranioencefálico. As variáveis analisadas foram: sexo, idade, dia da semana, mecanismo de trauma, tipo de transporte, RTS, tempo de internamento e mortalidade. analisou-se 200 pacientes, com média de idade de 36,42 ± 17,63 anos, sendo 73,5% do sexo masculino. A média de idade no G1 foi significativamente menor do que nos demais grupos (p grupos (p grupos G1, G2 e G3, respectivamente. A mediana do RTS entre os óbitos foi 5,49, 7,84 e 1,16, respectivamente, para os três grupos. a maioria dos pacientes eram homens jovens. O RTS mostrou-se efetivo na predição de mortalidade no trauma cranioencefálico, entretanto falhou ao analisar pacientes vítimas de trauma contuso e penetrante.

  13. Imaging of Combat-Related Thoracic Trauma - Blunt Trauma and Blast Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberger, John P; Kim, Andrew M; Fisher, Dane; Tatum, Peter S; Neubauer, Brian; Peterson, P Gabriel; Carter, Brett W

    2018-03-01

    Combat-related thoracic trauma (CRTT) is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality of the casualties from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Penetrating, blunt, and blast injuries are the most common mechanisms of trauma to the chest. Imaging plays a key role in the battlefield management of CRTT casualties. This work discusses the imaging manifestations of thoracic injuries from blunt trauma and blast injury, emphasizing epidemiology and diagnostic clues seen during OEF and OIF. The assessment of radiologic findings in patients who suffer from combat-related blunt thoracic trauma and blast injury is the basis of this work. The imaging modalities for this work include multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and chest radiography. Multiple imaging modalities are available to imagers on or near the battlefront, including radiography, fluoroscopy, and MDCT. MDCT with multi-planar reconstructions is the most sensitive imaging modality available in combat hospitals for the evaluation of CRTT. In modern combat, blunt and blast injuries account for a significant portion of CRTT. Individual body armor converts penetrating trauma to blunt trauma, leading to pulmonary contusion that accounted for 50.2% of thoracic injuries during OIF and OEF. Flail chest, a subset of blunt chest injury, is caused by significant blunt force to the chest and occurs four times as frequently in combat casualties when compared with the civilian population. Imaging features of CRTT have significant diagnostic and prognostic value. Pulmonary contusions on chest radiography appear as patchy consolidations in the acute setting with ill-defined and non-segmental borders. MDCT of the chest is a superior imaging modality in diagnosing and evaluating pulmonary contusion. Contusions on MDCT appear as crescentic ground-glass opacities (opacities through which lung interstitium and vasculature are still visible) and areas of consolidation that often do not

  14. Thoracic trauma: presentation and management outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaiq, M.; Shah, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the presentation and management outcome of thoracic trauma in a tertiary care setting. A total of 143 patients, who presented with chest trauma, were included in the study. All the patients were assessed by the history, physical examination and ancillary investigations. Appropriate managements were instituted as required. Data was described in percentages. out of 143 patients, 119 (83)% were males and 24 (17)% were females. Most of the patients belonged to the age group of 21-50 years. Ninety seven (66)% patients were admitted for indoor management. Blunt injury was found in 125 (87.4%) patients, while penetrating injuries in only 18 (12.6%) patients. Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs) were the commonest cause of trauma (n=103, 72%). Rib fracture was the commonest chest injury (74% patients). Head injury was the most frequently associated injury (18% of the patients). Tube thoracostomy was the commonest intervention undertaken in 65 (45%) patients. Seventeen (11.88%) patients were managed with mechanical ventilation. there were 17 deaths with a mortality rate of 11.88%. Thoracic trauma is an important cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in the younger population. RTAs constitute the leading cause of thoracic trauma in our setup. Tube thoracostomy is the most frequent and at times the only invasive procedure required as a definitive measure in thoracic trauma patients. A policy of selective hospitalization helps to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions. (author)

  15. TRIAGE OF PATIENTS TO ANGIOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF AORTIC RUPTURE AFTER BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA - COST-EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS OF USING CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUNINK, MGM; BOS, JJ

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of dynamic chest CT, compared with plain chest radiography and immediate angiography, in deciding when angiography should be performed in hemodynamically stable patients with suspected aortic rupture after blunt chest

  16. Intrabronchial Microdialysis: Effects of Probe Localization on Tissue Trauma and Drug Penetration into the Pulmonary Epithelial Lining Fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottbøll, Lisa Amanda Holm; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Barington, Kristiane

    2015-01-01

    (PELF). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of intrabronchial microdialysis on the integrity of the bronchial epithelium. Microdialysis sampling in PELF in proximal (n=4) and distal bronchi (n=4) was performed after intravenous inulin and florfenicol administration in anaesthetized...... pigs. Inulin was used as a marker molecule of permeability of the epithelium, and florfenicol was used as test drug. Bronchial tissue was examined by histopathology (distal and proximal bronchi) and gene expression analysis (RT-qPCR, proximal bronchi) at the termination of the experiment (6.5hr....... Likewise, florfenicol penetration into PELF was unaffected by bronchial histopathology. However, this independency of pathology on drug penetration may not be valid for other antibiotics. We conclude that short-term microdialysis drug quantification can be performed in proximal bronchi without disruption...

  17. A Direct Carotid-Cavernous Fistula due to Penetrating Trauma by a Knitting Needle to the Temporal Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcuk Gocmen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic carotid-cavernous and #64257;stulas (CCF usually occur after closed head injuries. In addition, CCFs can also be caused by penetrating injuries with stab or gunshot injuries. We present the case of traumatic CCF that was caused with a knitting needle directly penetrating through the temporal region. A 46-year-old man consulted with a progressive left swollen eye. His head computed tomography (CT revealed a left temporal lobe contusion and fracture of the left temporal bone. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA showed a direct high-flow fistula (Type-A lesion. After the balloon occlusion test, which was well tolerated by the patient, the internal carotid artery was occluded by the interventional radiologist. A review of the literature demonstrated that all of the traumatic CCFs occurred due to penetrating stab injuries through the orbita. To our knowledge, such a case has not been previously reported. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(4.000: 261-264

  18. Analysis of the Revised Trauma Score (RTS in 200 victims of different trauma mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNO DURANTE ALVAREZ

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the epidemiological profile and mortality associated with the Revised Trauma Score (RTS in trauma victims treated at a university hospital. Methods: we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study of trauma protocols (prospectively collected from December 2013 to February 2014, including trauma victims admitted in the emergency room of the Cajuru University Hospital. We set up three groups: (G1 penetrating trauma to the abdomen and chest, (G2 blunt trauma to the abdomen and chest, and (G3 traumatic brain injury. The variables we analyzed were: gender, age, day of week, mechanism of injury, type of transportation, RTS, hospitalization time and mortality. Results: we analyzed 200 patients, with a mean age of 36.42 ± 17.63 years, and 73.5% were male. The mean age was significantly lower in G1 than in the other groups (p <0.001. Most (40% of the visits occurred on weekends and the most common pre-hospital transport service (58% was the SIATE (Emergency Trauma Care Integrated Service. The hospital stay was significantly higher in G1 compared with the other groups (p <0.01. Regarding mortality, there were 12%, 1.35% and 3.95% of deaths in G1, G2 and G3, respectively. The median RTS among the deaths was 5.49, 7.84 and 1.16, respectively, for the three groups. Conclusion: the majority of patients were young men. RTS was effective in predicting mortality in traumatic brain injury, however failing to predict it in patients suffering from blunt and penetrating trauma.

  19. The use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of blunt and penetrating abdominal injuries: 10-year experience at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy J; Garwe, Tabitha; Raines, Alexander R; Thurman, Joseph B; Carter, Sandra; Bender, Jeffrey S; Albrecht, Roxie M

    2013-03-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy (DL) has decreased the rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients suffering from penetrating injuries. We evaluated whether DL similarly lowers the rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients with blunt injuries. All patients undergoing DL over a 10-year period (ie, 2001-2010) in a single level 1 trauma center were classified by the mechanism of injury. Demographic and perioperative data were compared using the Student t and Fisher exact tests. There were 131 patients included, 22 of whom sustained blunt injuries. Patients suffering from blunt injuries were more severely injured (Injury Severity Score 18.0 vs 7.3, P = .0001). The most common indication for DL after blunt injury was a computed tomographic scan concerning for bowel injury (59.1%). The rate of nontherapeutic laparotomy for patients sustaining penetrating vs blunt injury was 1.8% and nil, respectively. DL, when coupled with computed tomographic findings, is an effective tool for the initial management of patients with blunt injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Surgical treatment of chest instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitka, M.; Masek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the ribs is the most common thoracic injury after blunt trauma. Chest wall instability (flail chest) is a common occurrence in the presence of multiple ribs fracture. Unilateral or bilateral fractures more ribs anteriorly or posteriorly will produce enough instability that paradoxical respiratory motion results in hypoventilation of an unacceptable degree. Open approach and surgical stabilisation of the chest preserved pulmonary function, improved pain control, minimized posttraumatic deformities and shorter back to work time. (author)

  1. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA- CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaja Ratnakumari Billa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the recent times there has been increased incidence of abdominal trauma cases due to several causes. Quick and prompt intervention is needed to decrease the mortality of the patients. So we conducted a study to assess the cause and the management of abdominal trauma cases in our institution. The aim of this study was to know the incidence of blunt and penetrating injuries and their causes, age and sex incidence, importance of various investigations, mode of treatment offered and post-operative complications. To study the cause of death and evolve better management. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study comprises of patients admitted to and operated in various surgical units in the Department of Surgery at Government General Hospital, attached to Guntur Medical College Guntur, from August 2014 to October 2016. RESULTS Increase incidence seen in age group 20-29 years (30%. Male predominance 77.5%. Mechanism of injury–road traffic accidents 65%. Isolated organ injury–colon and rectum 40%. Other associated injuries–chest injuries with rib fractures 7.5%. Complications–wound infection 17.5%. Duration of hospital stay 8–14 days. Bowel injury management–closure of perforation 84.6%. Resection anastomosis 15.38%. CONCLUSION Thorough clinical examination, diagnostic paracentesis, plain X-ray erect abdomen and ultrasound proved to be very helpful in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries. Spleen is the commonest organ involved in blunt trauma and colon is the commonly injured organ in penetrating abdominal trauma, many patients have associated extremity and axial skeleton injuries. With advances in diagnosis and intensive care technologies, most patients of solid visceral injuries with hemodynamic stability can be managed conservatively. Surgical site infection is the most common complication following surgery. The mortality is high; reason might be patient reaching the hospital late, high incidence of postoperative septic

  2. Utility of Chest Computed Tomography after a "Normal" Chest Radiograph in Patients with Thoracic Stab Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Brian M; Plurad, David; Abrishami, Sadaf; Neville, Angela; Putnam, Brant; Kim, Dennis Y

    2015-10-01

    Chest computed tomography (CCT) is used to screen for injuries in hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating injury. We aim to determine the incidence of missed injuries detected on CCT after a negative chest radiograph (CXR) in patients with thoracic stab wounds. A 10-year retrospective review of a Level I trauma center registry was performed on patients with thoracic stab wounds. Patients who were hemodynamically unstable or did not undergo both CXR and CCT were excluded. Patients with a negative CXR were evaluated to determine if additional findings were diagnosed on CCT. Of 386 patients with stab wounds to the chest, 154 (40%) underwent both CXR and CCT. One hundred and fifteen (75%) had a negative screening CXR. CCT identified injuries in 42 patients (37%) that were not seen on CXR. Pneumothorax and/or hemothorax occurred in 40 patients (35%), of which 14 patients underwent tube thoracostomy. Two patients had hemopericardium on CCT and both required operative intervention. Greater than one-third of patients with a normal screening CXR were found to have abnormalities on CCT. Future studies comparing repeat CXR to CCT are required to further define the optimal diagnostic strategy in patients with stab wounds to chest after normal screening CXR.

  3. Changing pattern and outcome of pediatric chest injuries in urban Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Bassam; Mahfouz, Mohammad Z; Al-Nosairat, Saeed; Izzat, Mohammad Bashar

    2018-01-01

    Background Pediatric chest injuries were infrequent in our practice, but the outbreak of the Syrian crisis resulted in an increase in number and a change in the pattern of thoracic trauma incidents. We compared our experience of pediatric chest injuries before and during the crisis. Methods We reviewed the records of 256 children aged 12.8 ± 5 years who were admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of chest trauma over a 12-year period. Collected data included mechanism of injury, associated injuries, method of management, length of hospital stay, complications, and mortality. Results The incidence of pediatric chest injuries increased significantly following the outbreak of the crisis, and penetrating injuries prevailed, mainly due to shrapnel, bullets, and stab wounds. Forty percent of patients with blunt injuries and 20% of those with penetrating injuries were managed conservatively, whereas urgent thoracotomies were indicated in 10%, mostly in patients with penetrating injuries. Associated injuries were more frequent in patients with blunt injuries and resulted in a longer hospital stay and an increased mortality rate. The overall mortality rate was 7.8% and it was higher in children younger than 7 years of age and in patients who had been subjected to blunt injuries. Conclusions There has been a recent substantial upsurge in the incidence of pediatric thoracic trauma, with a predominance of penetrating injuries. Most patients could be managed nonoperatively, but a small subset required an open thoracotomy. The presence of associated injuries constitutes the main determinant of prognosis in this group of patients.

  4. Analysis of 162 colon injuries in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma: concomitant stomach injury results in a higher rate of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patricia A; Kirton, Orlando C; Dresner, Lisa S; Tortella, Bartholomew; Kestner, Mark M

    2004-02-01

    Fecal contamination from colon injury has been thought to be the most significant factor for the development of surgical site infection (SSI) after trauma. However, there are increasing data to suggest that other factors may play a role in the development of postinjury infection in patients after colon injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of gastric wounding on the development of SSI and nonsurgical site infection (NSSI) in patients with colon injury. Post hoc analysis was performed on data prospectively collected for 317 patients presenting with penetrating hollow viscus injury. One hundred sixty-two patients with colon injury were subdivided into one of three groups: patients with isolated colon wounds (C), patients with colon and stomach wounds with or without other organ injury (C+S), and patients with colon and other organ injury but no stomach injury (C-S) and assessed for the development of SSI and NSSI. Infection rates were also determined for patients who sustained isolated gastric injury (S) and gastric injury in combination with other injuries other than colon (S-C). Penetrating Abdominal Trauma Index, operative times, and transfusion were assessed. Discrete variables were analyzed by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel chi2 test and Fisher's exact test. Risk factor analysis was performed by multivariate logistic regression. C+S patients had a higher rate of SSI infection (31%) than C patients (3.6%) (p=0.008) and C-S patients (13%) (p=0.021). Similarly, the incidence of NSSI was also significantly greater in the C+S group (37%) compared with the C patients (7.5%) (p=0.07) and the C-S patients (17%) (p=0.019). There was no difference in the rate of SSI or NSSI between the C and C-S groups (p=0.3 and p=0.24, respectively). The rate of SSI was significantly greater in the C+S patients when compared with the S-C patients (31% vs. 10%, p=0.008), but there was no statistical difference in the rate of NSSI in the C+S group and the S-C group (37

  5. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Brandon C.; Overbey, Douglas M.; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T.; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Burlew, Clay C.; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E.; Pieracci, Fredric M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Methods Retrospective coho...

  6. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  7. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  8. Skull penetrating wound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Orlandi, Yvei; Junco Martin, Reinel; Rojas Manresa, Jorge; Duboy Limonta, Victor; Matos Herrera, Omar; Saez Corvo, Yunet

    2011-01-01

    The cranioencephalic trauma is common in the emergence centers to care for patients with multiple traumata and it becames in a health problem in many countries. Skull penetrating trauma is located in a special place due to its low frequency. In present paper a case of male patient aged 52 severely skull-injured with penetrating wound caused by a cold steel that remained introduced into the left frontotemporal region. After an imaging study the emergence surgical treatment was applied and patient evolves adequately after 25 days of hospitalization. Nowadays, she is under rehabilitation treatment due to a residual right hemiparesis.(author)

  9. Trauma Reports. Volume 12, Number 6, November/December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    lung injuries such as pneumothorax , Figure 3. Chest Radiograph of Intubated Trauma Patient with a Significant Pulmonary Contusion 6  Trauma ...Pulmonary Contusions Pulmonary contusions are a frequent complication of chest trauma and may have serious morbidity and mortality associated with...described in the medical literature by Morgani in 1761, when he noted extensive underlying parenchymal lung damage without evidence of chest wall trauma

  10. The role of diagnostic VATS in penetrating thoracic injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guasti Guido

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Penetrating chest injuries account for 1–13% of thoracic trauma hospital admissions and most of these are managed with a conservative approach. Nevertheless, 18–30% of cases managed only with tube thoracostomy have residual clotted blood, considered the major risk factor for the development of fibrothorax and empyema. In addition, 4–23% of chest injury patients present persistent pneumothorax and 15–59% present an injury to the diaphragm, which is missed in 30% of cases. In order to make a correct diagnosis, reduce the number of missed injuries, chronic sequelae and late mortality we propose performing surgical exploration of all patients with a penetrating injury of the pleural cavity. Methods 1270 patients who sustained thoracic trauma were admitted to our hospital between 1994 and 2004. Of these, 16 patients had penetrating injuries: thirteen were surgically explored by means of Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS, and 3 with thoracotomy due to hemodynamic instability or suspected lesion of the heart or great vessels. Results In the 13 patients who underwent VATS, 5 injuries to the diaphragm, 3 lesions to an intercostal artery, and 1 lesion to the diaphragmatic artery were detected. In 12 of these patients a laceration of the pulmonary parenchyma was also present. A conversion to thoracotomy was necessary due to a broad laceration of the diaphragm and due to hemostasis of an intercostal artery. In all but one case, which was later converted, diagnostic imaging missed the diagnosis of laceration of the diaphragm. There was no intra- or postoperative mortality, and average hospital stay was five days. Conclusion VATS is a safe and effective way to diagnose and manage penetrating thoracic injuries, and its extensive use leads to a reduction in the number of missed, potentially fatal lesions as well as in chronic sequelae.

  11. Traumatic chest injury in children: A single thoracic surgeon′s experience in two Nigerian tertiary hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelechi Emmanuel Okonta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was to determine the extent and outcome of childhood chest injury in Nigeria, and to compare results with that of other literatures. Patients and Methods: A Prospective study of all children under 18 years of age with chest trauma in two tertiary hospitals in Southern Nigeria from January 2012 to December 2014 was reviewed. The aetiology, type, associated injury, mechanism, treatment and outcome were evaluated. The patients were followed up in the clinic. The data were analysed using SPSS version 20.0 with a significant P 12-h versus 2 who presented <12-h and 6 of children between 0 and 9 years versus 3 at 10-18 years of age had empyema thoracis (P value not significant. One death was recorded. Conclusion: Chest trauma in children is still not common, and blunt chest injury from falls and automobile accidents are more common than penetrating chest injury. Treatment with tube thoracostomy is the major management modality with empyema thoracis as the most common complication.

  12. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  13. Vented chest seals for prevention of tension pneumothorax in a communicating pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotora, Joseph G; Henao, Jose; Littlejohn, Lanny F; Kircher, Sara

    2013-11-01

    Tension pneumothorax accounts for 3%-4% of combat casualties and 10% of civilian chest trauma. Air entering a wound via a communicating pneumothorax rather than by the trachea can result in respiratory arrest and death. In such cases, the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care advocates the use of unvented chest seals to prevent respiratory compromise. A comparison of three commercially available vented chest seals was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of tension pneumothorax prevention after seal application. A surgical thoracostomy was created and sealed by placing a shortened 10-mL syringe barrel (with plunger in place) into the wound. Tension pneumothorax was achieved via air introduction through a Cordis to a maximum volume of 50 mL/kg. A 20% drop in mean arterial pressure or a 20% increase in heart rate confirmed hemodynamic compromise. After evacuation, one of three vented chest seals (HyFin(®), n = 8; Sentinel(®), n = 8, SAM(®), n = 8) was applied. Air was injected to a maximum of 50 mL/kg twice, followed by a 10% autologous blood infusion, and finally, a third 50 mL/kg air bolus. Survivors completed all three interventions, and a 15-min recovery period. The introduction of 29.0 (±11.5) mL/kg of air resulted in tension physiology. All three seals effectively evacuated air and blood. Hemodynamic compromise failed to develop with a chest seal in place. HyFin(®), SAM(®), and Sentinel(®) vented chest seals are equally effective in evacuating blood and air in a communicating pneumothorax model. All three prevented tension pneumothorax formation after penetrating thoracic trauma. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Correção de aneurisma do tronco braquiocefálico, 10 anos após traumatismo torácico fechado Correction of an innominate artery aneurysm, 10 years after a blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Almeida Lopes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aneurismas do tronco braquiocefálico são extremamente raros. Os autores apresentam o caso clínico de um doente de 22 anos de idade, com antecedente de atropelamento de alta energia há cerca de 10 anos por motociclo, com traumatismo toraco-abdominal anterior, em quem foi acidentalmente descoberto um aneurisma do tronco braquiocefálico com 52mm. Para a exclusão do referido aneurisma o doente foi submetido com sucesso à construção de um bypass aorta ascendente-carotídio-subclávio com prótese bifurcada de Dacron® (14x7mm, com abordagem por esternotomia mediana, cervical e supra-clavicular. É feita uma revisão da literatura, sendo descritas e discutidas as características clínicas, o tratamento cirúrgico e o mecanismo de traumatismo torácico sobre o tronco braquiocefálico.Innominate artery aneurysms are extremely rare. The authors present a case report of a 22-year-old patient, in whom was accidently discovered an innominate artery aneurysm of 52 mm, 10 years after a blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma caused by a high energy running over by a motorcycle. For the exclusion of the aneurysm, the patient was successfully submitted to the construction of an ascending aorta-carotid-subclavian bypass with bifurcated Dacron® graft (14x7mm, by means of a median sternotomy, right cervical and supra-clavicular approaches. Review of the literature, clinical features, surgical treatment and chest trauma mechanisms over the innominate artery are described and discussed.

  15. Direct to Operating Room Trauma Resuscitation Decreases Mortality Among Severely Injured Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, Minna M; Cunningham, Aaron J; Behrens, Brandon; Ohm, Erika T; Maxwell, Bryan G; Hamilton, Nicholas A; Adams, M Christopher; Cole, Frederick J; Jafri, Mubeen A

    2018-03-16

    Expediting evaluation and intervention for severely injured patients has remained a mainstay of advanced trauma care. One technique, direct to operating room (DOR) resuscitation, for selective adult patients has demonstrated decreased mortality. We sought to investigate the application of this protocol in children. All DOR pediatric patients from 2009-2016 at a pediatric Level I Trauma Center were identified. DOR criteria included penetrating injury, chest injuries, amputations, significant blood loss, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and surgeon discretion. Demographics, injury patterns, interventions, and outcomes were analyzed. Observed mortality was compared to expected mortality, calculated using Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) methodology, with two-tailed t-tests and a p-value 15, 33% had GCS≤8, and 9% were hypotensive. The most commonly injured body regions were external (66%), head (34%), chest (30%), and abdomen (27%). Sixty-seven patients (82%) required emergent procedural intervention, most commonly wound exploration/repair (35%), central venous access (22%), tube thoracostomy (19%) and laparotomy (18%). Predictors of intervention were ISS>15 (odds ratio=14, p=0.013) and GCS<9 (odds ratio=8.5, p=0.044). The survival rate to discharge for DOR patients was 84% compared with an expected survival of 79% (TRISS) (p=0.4). The greatest improvement relative to expected mortality was seen in the subgroup with penetrating trauma (84.5% vs. 74.4%, p=0.002). A selective policy of resuscitating the most severely injured children in the operating room can decrease mortality. Patients suffering penetrating trauma with the highest ISS and diminished GCS have the greatest benefit. Trauma centers with appropriate resources should evaluate implementing similar policies. Level II. Diagnostic tests or criteria.

  16. Radiology of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.

    1987-01-01

    This course provides an overview of the radiologic manifestations of trauma to the chest. The basic mechanisms of injury are discussed. The effect of trauma on the chest wall, the lung parenchyma, and the pleural space is described. Rib fractures, sternal fractures, lung contusion, lung hematoma, lung laceration, post-traumatic atelectasis, hemothorax, chylothorax, pneumothorax, and adult respiratory distress syndrome are discussed and illustrated. Injuries to the tracheobronchial tree, the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels, the esophagus, the diaphragm, and the heart are also presented. The purpose of the lecture is to familiarize the audience with common and unusual radiologic presentations of traumatic injury to the thorax

  17. Advanced Technologies in Trauma Critical Care Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    largely replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for identifying intra-abdominal fluid in trauma patients. Furthermore, with the addition of chest windows...authors use chest ultrasound in the following manner: To identify a pneumothorax or hemothorax that needs to be drained acutely To differentiate...these situations, Technologies in the Trauma ICU 913 the authors first insert 2 or 3 chest tubes and position them as usual. A sterile nonad- herent

  18. Contemporary management of flail chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vana, P Geoff; Neubauer, Daniel C; Luchette, Fred A

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic injury is currently the second leading cause of trauma-related death and rib fractures are the most common of these injuries. Flail chest, as defined by fracture of three or more ribs in two or more places, continues to be a clinically challenging problem. The underlying pulmonary contusion with subsequent inflammatory reaction and right-to-left shunting leading to hypoxia continues to result in high mortality for these patients. Surgical stabilization of the fractured ribs remains controversial. We review the history of management for flail chest alone and when combined with pulmonary contusion. Finally, we propose an algorithm for nonoperative and surgical management.

  19. Ultrasound and supine chest radiograph in road traffic accident patients: a reliable and convenient way to diagnose pleural effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtaz, U.; Zahur, Z.; Raza, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Portable bed side ultrasound and supine chest radiograph of 80 traumatic patients excluding very clinically unstable patients who subsequently underwent CT scan chest was done for traumatic effusion showing that ultrasound had a higher sensitivity than CXR, 88.23% and 77.94%, respectively, and a similar specificity of 100% and 100%, respectively. Objective of the study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high resolution ultrasound and supine chest x-ray in detection of pleural effusion in road traffic accident patients keeping plain CT chest as gold standard. Methods: This study was conducted in PIMS and PAEC General Hospital, Islamabad from 1st January to 15th December 2015. The current study examined total of 80 trauma (blunt and penetrating) patients coming to emergency departments of both hospitals specifically those who had road traffic accident history. Their portable bed side ultrasound and supine chest radiograph were performed for assessing pleural effusion and subsequently CT scan chest was done for confirmation as it's a gold standard. Results: Using CT findings as gold standard the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value was assessed for both ultrasonography and chest radiography and found to be 88.23%,100%, 100%, 40% and 77.94%, 100%, 100%, 55.55% respectively with diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound 90% as compared to 81.25% for supine chest x-rays when compared with gold standard. Conclusion: Ultrasound and chest x-ray can be used as a useful and suitable adjunct to CT in road traffic accident patients as these are easily available, non-invasive, no contrast required, can be performed on bed side and carries no or little radiation risk. (author)

  20. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very small dose ... Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the most commonly performed diagnostic ...

  1. Chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez A, Juan Carlos; Saenz M, Oscar; Martinez M, Camilo; Gonzales A Francisco; Nicolas R, Jose; Vergara V, Erika P; Pereira G, Alberto M

    2010-01-01

    In emergency departments, chest pain is one of the leading motives of consultation. We thus consider it important to review aspects such as its classification, causes, and clinical profiles. Initial assessment should include a full clinical history comprising thorough anamnesis and physical examination. Adequate interpretation of auxiliary tests, ordered in accordance with suspected clinical conditions, should lead to accurate diagnosis. We highlight certain symptoms and clinical signs, ECG and X-ray findings, cardiac bio markers, arterial blood gases, and CT-scanning. Scores of severity and prognosis such as TIMI are assessed. Optimal treatment of the clinical conditions leading to chest pain depends on adequate initial approach and assessment.

  2. A study on the evaluation of pneumothorax by imaging methods in patients presenting to the emergency department for blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Şeyhmus; Çevik, Arif Alper; Acar, Nurdan; Döner, Egemen; Sivrikoz, Cumhur; Özkan, Ragıp

    2015-09-01

    Pneumothorax (PNX) is the collection of air between parietal and visceral pleura, and collapsed lung develops as a complication of the trapped air. PNX is likely to develop spontaneously in people with risk factors. However, it is mostly seen with blunt or penetrating trauma. Diagnosis is generally confirmed by chest radiography [posteroanterior chest radiography (PACR)]. Chest ultrasound (US) is also a promising technique for the detection of PNX in trauma patients. There is not much literature on the evaluation of blunt thoracic trauma (BTT) and pneumothorax (PNX) in the emergency department (ED). The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of chest US for the diagnosis of PNX in patients presenting to ED with BTT. This study was carried out for a period of nine months in the ED of a university hospital. The chest US of patients was performed by emergency physicians trained in the field. The results were compared with anteroposterior chest radiography and/or CT scan of the chest. The APCR and chest CT results were evaluated by a radiology specialist blind to US findings. The evaluation of the radiology specialist was taken as the gold standard for diagnosis by imaging methods. Clinical follow-up was taken into consideration for the diagnosis of PNX in patients on whom CT scan was not performed. Chest US was performed on all two hundred and twelve patients (144 female and 68 male patients; mean age 45.8) who participated in this study. The supine APCR was performed on two hundred and ten (99%) patients and chest CT was performed on one hundred and twenty (56.6%). Out of the twenty-five (11.8%) diagnosed cases of PNX, 22 (88%) were diagnosed by chest US and 8 were diagnosed by APCR. For the detection of PNX, compared to clinical follow-up and chest CT, the sensitivity of chest US was 88%, specificity 99.5%, positive predictive value 95.7% and negative predictive value 98.4%. Chest US has not superseded supine and standing chest radiography for PNX

  3. Ultrasonography in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) protocol is considered beneficial in emergent evaluation of trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injury and has become integrated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocol. No guidelines exist as to the use...... of ultrasonography in trauma in Denmark. We aimed to determine the current use of ultrasonography for assessing trauma patients in Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a nation-wide cross-sectional investigation of ultrasonography usage in trauma care. The first phase consisted of an Internet-based investigation....... Twenty-one (95.5%) of the guidelines included and recommended FAST as part of trauma assessment. The recommended person to perform the examination was the radiologist in n = 11 (50.0%), the surgeon in n = 6 (27.3%), the anesthesiologist in n = 1 (4.5%), and unspecified in n = 3 (13.6%) facilities. FAST...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the ... treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray ...

  5. Computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1982-01-01

    This book is intended to be the current standard for computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma. It summarizes two years of experience at San Francisco General Hospital. The book is organized into seven chapters, covering head, maxillofacial, laryngeal, spinal, chest, abdominal, acetabular, and pelvic trauma. Extremity trauma is not discussed

  6. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  7. Hepatic trauma: a 21-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Thiago Messias; Pereira, Bruno Monteiro; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Alves, Maria Silveira Carvalho; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araujo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the epidemiological aspects, behavior, morbidity and treatment outcomes for liver trauma. We conducted a retrospective study of patients over 13 years of age admitted to a university hospital from 1990 to 2010, submitted to surgery or nonoperative management (NOM). 748 patients were admitted with liver trauma. The most common mechanism of injury was penetrating trauma (461 cases, 61.6%), blunt trauma occurring in 287 patients (38.4%). According to the degree of liver injury (AAST-OIS) in blunt trauma we predominantly observed Grades I and II and in penetrating trauma, Grade III. NOM was performed in 25.7% of patients with blunt injury. As for surgical procedures, suturing was performed more frequently (41.2%). The liver-related morbidity was 16.7%. The survival rate for patients with liver trauma was 73.5% for blunt and 84.2% for penetrating trauma. Mortality in complex trauma was 45.9%. trauma remains more common in younger populations and in males. There was a reduction of penetrating liver trauma. NOM proved safe and effective, and often has been used to treat patients with penetrating liver trauma. Morbidity was high and mortality was higher in victims of blunt trauma and complex liver injuries.

  8. Pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema secondary to blunt chest injury

    OpenAIRE

    Porhomayon, Jahan; Doerr, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This is the case of a patient with a history of blunt chest trauma associated with subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax. The patient complained of inspiratory stridor on presentation. Anatomical relationships can explain the pathophysiological process.

  9. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Injury and Emergency Diseases of Chest Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Khadjibaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research: to evaluate efficiency of videothoracoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of patients with injuries and emergency diseases ща chest organs.Material and methods: Study wasbased on treatment results analysis of 2111 patients with injuries and chest organs emergency diseases, who were treated at Republican Research Centre of Emergency Medicine in 2001-2014. Chest trauma made up 1396 (66,1% victims. There were 477 (22,6% patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. At the stages of initial diagnosis, the radiologic evaluations, CT investigations and videothoracoscopies were performed. In chest trauma patients the videothoracoscopy underwent in 844 cases, in spontaneous pneu#mothorax this method was employed in 290 patients. Complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were observed in 238 (11,3% patients and complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were evident in 72 patients.Results. Videothoracoscopy and video-assisted interventions allowed to eliminate lungs and pleura pathology in 1206 (57,1% patients, whereas the traditional methods were effective only in 905 cases (42,9%.Conclusions. Investigation methods such as multiplanar radioscopy, radiography, chest CT and videothora-coscopy must be included into algorithm of diagnosis and surgical treatment of chest injuries and emergency diseases of chest organs. At chest trauma the videothoracoscopy allows to avoid broad thoracotomy from 9,4% to 4,7% of cases, to reduce the frequency of repeated interventions from 17,4% to 0,5% and diminish a number of early postsurgery complications from 25,4% to 10,9%. Videothoracoscopy of chest traumas allows to reduce frequency of repeated interventions from 19,8 to 1,7%.

  10. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  11. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  13. Papel da dosagem seriada de troponina nos pacientes com suspeita de contusão miocárdica após trauma torácico fechado The role of serial measurement of troponin in patients with a suspected myocardial injury after chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Domingos Corrêa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A contusão miocárdica está freqüentemente associada ao trauma torácico fechado. Seu correto diagnóstico é um constante desafio aos profissionais que trabalham em unidades de emergência, devido aos seus sintomas inespecíficos e a ausência de exames subsidiários com precisão para fazer o diagnóstico. Dentre os diversos métodos diagnósticos estudados, tem-se destacado nos últimos anos o papel dos indicadores de necrose miocárdica troponina I e troponina T. Por serem proteí­nas constituintes do aparelho de regulação contrátil celular, são liberadas na corrente sanguínea somente após a perda da integridade de membrana dos miócitos e, portanto, são altamente específicas para detectar lesão miocárdica. CONTEUDO: Foi realizada uma revisão de estudos clínicos nas bases eletrônicas de dados MedLine e LILACS, no período de janeiro de 1980 a novembro de 2006, sobre a importância da dosagem seriada de troponina como instrumento diagnóstico e preditor de evolução clínica desfavorável nos pacientes com contusão miocárdica. CONCLUSÕES: Embora exista maior especificidade das troponinas I e T quando comparadas aos indicadores tradicionais, CKMB massa e CPK total, esses dois indicadores apresentarem sensibilidade e valor preditivo positivo baixos para diagnosticar contusão miocárdica. Pacientes que apresentam alterações eletrocardiográficas, elevação de troponinas, ou ambas, devem permanecer em observação em unidade de terapia intensiva (UTI, por no mínimo 24 horas, período em que se desenvolve a maioria das complicações decorrentes da contusão miocárdica.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myocardial contusion is often associated with blunt chest trauma. Its diagnosis is challenging to the professionals who work in emergency department due to nonspecific symptoms and the lack of auxiliary exams with enough accuracy to diagnose. Among the available diagnostic tools, the biomarkers of

  14. Is case triaging a useful tool for emergency surgeries? A review of 106 trauma surgery cases at a level 1 trauma center in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sharfuddin; Nicol, Andrew John; Moydien, Mahammed Riyaad; Navsaria, Pradeep Harkison; Montoya-Pelaez, Luis Felipe

    2018-01-01

    The optimal timing for emergency surgical interventions and implementation of protocols for trauma surgery is insufficient in the literature. The Groote Schuur emergency surgery triage (GSEST) system, based on Cape Triaging Score (CTS), is followed at Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH) for triaging emergency surgical cases including trauma cases. The study aimed to look at the effect of delay in surgery after scheduling based on the GSEST system has an impact on outcome in terms of postoperative complications and death. Prospective audit of patients presenting to GSH trauma center following penetrating or blunt chest, abdominal, neck and peripheral vascular trauma who underwent surgery over a 4-month period was performed. Post-operative complications were graded according to Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications. One-hundred six patients underwent surgery during the study period. One-hundred two (96.2%) cases were related to penetrating trauma. Stab wounds comprised 71 (67%) and gunshot wounds (GSW) 31 (29.2%) cases. Of the 106 cases, 6, 47, 40, and 13 patients were booked as red, orange, yellow, and green, respectively. The median delay for green, yellow, and orange cases was within the expected time. The red patients took unexpectedly longer (median delay 48 min, IQR 35-60 min). Thirty-one (29.3%) patients developed postoperative complications. Among the booked red, orange, yellow, and green cases, postoperative complications developed in 3, 18, 9, and 1 cases, respectively. Only two (1.9%) postoperative deaths were documented during the study period. There was no statistically significant association between operative triage and post-operative complications ( p  = 0.074). Surgical case categorization has been shown to be useful in prioritizing emergency trauma surgical cases in a resource constraint high-volume trauma center.

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gives detailed pictures of structures within the chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and ... helpful to assess the vessels of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  17. Successful Management of a Combined Abdominal and Thoracic Trauma with Rectal Impalement: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kasapas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Combined abdominal and thoracic impalement injuries are a rare form of penetrating trauma. Nowadays, they occur more frequently as an accident and not so often as a deliberate violent action. Case Report. A 35-year-old man was admitted to our emergency department with chest pain and respiratory distress after he had reportedly slipped in his bathtub. Abdominal and thoracic imaging, including computed tomography (CT, confirmed a right-sided pneumothorax and a liver laceration without bleeding or further endoperitoneal trauma. A chest tube was placed. During his hospitalization in the first 24-hour period, he complained of abdominal and right shoulder pain accompanied by fever. A new abdominal and thoracic CT scanning revealed a rupture of the rectosigmoid, a rupture of right hemidiaphragm, and a foreign body in the thoracic cavity. The patient admitted that a broomstick was violently placed through his rectum, and he underwent a thoracotomy with an exploratory laparotomy. The foreign object was removed, the diaphragmatic rupture was repaired, and a Hartmann’s procedure was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusion. In cases of combined thoracoabdominal trauma, high index of suspicion is required when medical history is misleading and the injuries are not obvious immediately. A coordinated team effort in a well-organized trauma center is also very important.

  18. Occult Pneumothoraces in Acute Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Berryman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many traumatic pneumothoraces (PTX are not seen on initial chest radiograph (CR(occult PTX but are detected only on computed tomography (CT. Although CR remains the first toolfor detecting PTX, most trauma patients with significant thoracoabdominal injuries will receive both CTand CR. The primary objective of this study was to retrospectively determine the effectiveness of CR fordetecting PTX in trauma patients. Our hypotheses were that CR is a sensitive indicator of PTX on CT,that chest pain and shortness of breath are good predictors of PTX on CR, and that we could determineother predictors of PTX on CR.Methods: All trauma patients presenting to our Level I trauma center with a CT-diagnosed PTX over a2-year period who had both a CR and a chest CT were included. The CT reading was considered thegold standard for PTX diagnosis. Electronic medical records were searched using key words fordiagnoses, symptoms, demographics, and radiologic results. We recorded the official radiologistreadings for both CR and CT (positive or negative and the size of the PTX on CT (large, moderate,small, or tiny. The outcome variable was dichotomized based on presence or absence of PTXdetected on CR. Descriptive statistics and v2 tests were used for univariate analysis. A regressionanalysis was performed to determine characteristics predictive of a PTX on CR, and 1 variable wasadded to the model for every 10 positive CRs. With equal-size groups, this study has the power of 80%to detect a 10% absolute difference in single predictors of PTX on CR with 45 subjects in each group.Results: There were 134 CT-documented PTXs included in the study. Mean age was 42, and 74%were men. For 66 (49% patients, PTX was detected on CR (sensitivity¼50%. The CR detected 30%of small PTX, 35% of moderate PTX, and 33% of large PTX. Comparing patients with and without PTXon CR, there were no significant differences in shortness of breath or chest pain. There no

  19. Occult pneumothoraces in acute trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Amy A; McIntyre, William A; Weiss, Steven J; Berryman, Chad

    2012-11-01

    Many traumatic pneumothoraces (PTX) are not seen on initial chest radiograph (CR) (occult PTX) but are detected only on computed tomography (CT). Although CR remains the first tool for detecting PTX, most trauma patients with significant thoracoabdominal injuries will receive both CT and CR. The primary objective of this study was to retrospectively determine the effectiveness of CR for detecting PTX in trauma patients. Our hypotheses were that CR is a sensitive indicator of PTX on CT, that chest pain and shortness of breath are good predictors of PTX on CR, and that we could determine other predictors of PTX on CR. All trauma patients presenting to our Level I trauma center with a CT-diagnosed PTX over a 2-year period who had both a CR and a chest CT were included. The CT reading was considered the gold standard for PTX diagnosis. Electronic medical records were searched using key words for diagnoses, symptoms, demographics, and radiologic results. We recorded the official radiologist readings for both CR and CT (positive or negative) and the size of the PTX on CT (large, moderate, small, or tiny). The outcome variable was dichotomized based on presence or absence of PTX detected on CR. Descriptive statistics and χ(2) tests were used for univariate analysis. A regression analysis was performed to determine characteristics predictive of a PTX on CR, and 1 variable was added to the model for every 10 positive CRs. With equal-size groups, this study has the power of 80% to detect a 10% absolute difference in single predictors of PTX on CR with 45 subjects in each group. There were 134 CT-documented PTXs included in the study. Mean age was 42, and 74% were men. For 66 (49%) patients, PTX was detected on CR (sensitivity = 50%). The CR detected 30% of small PTX, 35% of moderate PTX, and 33% of large PTX. Comparing patients with and without PTX on CR, there were no significant differences in shortness of breath or chest pain. There no relationships between PTX detected

  20. A rare case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Marko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chylothorax is an accumulation of chyle in the pleural cavity due to a disruption of the thoracic duct. Traumatic chylothoraces are usually a result of a penetrating trauma and disruption of the thoracic duct, but blunt traumatic chylothorax is a rare condition. The aim of this paper is to present a rare case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma. Case Outline. We present a case of traumatic chylothorax after blunt thoracic trauma in a patient injured in a motor vehicle accident. The patient had a right-sided fracture of rib XI, hydropneumothorax, lung contusion, and signs of pneumomediastinum. We performed thoracic drainage, but a few days later, according to the increase of amount of the fluid daily drained, and the confirmation of laboratory findings of the analyzed fluid, we made a diagnosis of chylothorax and the patient underwent a thoracotomy, where we sutured the thoracic duct. Conclusion. Chylothorax should be considered in patients after chest trauma if they develop a milky pleural effusion. Analysis of pleural fluid and level of triglycerides is important for the diagnosis and treatment of chylothorax. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III41007

  1. BRONCHIAL FRACTURE FOLLOWING BLUNT CHEST TRAUMA*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-01-02

    Jan 2, 1971 ... reversal of bronchiectasis after re-anastomosing the two bronchial ends, it is felt that this is the exception rather than the rule. Coxatto and Lanari," in their study of the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis, feel that where there is complete obstruction to the distal bronchus, bronchial secretion will cease before ...

  2. Efficacy of Blunt Force Trauma, a Novel Mechanical Cervical Dislocation Device, and a Non-Penetrating Captive Bolt Device for On-Farm Euthanasia of Pre-Weaned Kits, Growers, and Adult Commercial Meat Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jessica L; Percival, Aaron; Turner, Patricia V

    2017-12-15

    The commercial meat rabbit industry is without validated on-farm euthanasia methods, potentially resulting in inadequate euthanasia protocols. We evaluated blunt force trauma (BFT), a mechanical cervical dislocation device (MCD), and a non-penetrating captive bolt device (NPCB) for euthanasia of pre-weaned kits, growers, and adult rabbits. Trials were conducted on three commercial meat rabbit farms using 170 cull rabbits. Insensibility was assessed by evaluating absence of brainstem and spinal reflexes, rhythmic breathing, and vocalizations. Survey radiographs on a subsample of rabbits ( n = 12) confirmed tissue damage prior to gross dissection and microscopic evaluation. All 63 rabbits euthanized by the NPCB device were rendered immediately and irreversibly insensible. The MCD device was effective in 46 of 49 (94%) rabbits. Method failure was highest for BFT with euthanasia failures in 13 of 58 (22%) rabbits. Microscopically, brain sections from rabbits killed with the NPCB device had significantly more damage than those from rabbits killed with BFT ( p = 0.001). We conclude that BFT is neither consistently humane nor effective as a euthanasia method. MCD is an accurate and reliable euthanasia method generally causing clean dislocation and immediate and irreversible insensibility, and the NPCB device was 100% effective and reliable in rabbits >150 g.

  3. Efficacy of Blunt Force Trauma, a Novel Mechanical Cervical Dislocation Device, and a Non-Penetrating Captive Bolt Device for On-Farm Euthanasia of Pre-Weaned Kits, Growers, and Adult Commercial Meat Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Walsh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The commercial meat rabbit industry is without validated on-farm euthanasia methods, potentially resulting in inadequate euthanasia protocols. We evaluated blunt force trauma (BFT, a mechanical cervical dislocation device (MCD, and a non-penetrating captive bolt device (NPCB for euthanasia of pre-weaned kits, growers, and adult rabbits. Trials were conducted on three commercial meat rabbit farms using 170 cull rabbits. Insensibility was assessed by evaluating absence of brainstem and spinal reflexes, rhythmic breathing, and vocalizations. Survey radiographs on a subsample of rabbits (n = 12 confirmed tissue damage prior to gross dissection and microscopic evaluation. All 63 rabbits euthanized by the NPCB device were rendered immediately and irreversibly insensible. The MCD device was effective in 46 of 49 (94% rabbits. Method failure was highest for BFT with euthanasia failures in 13 of 58 (22% rabbits. Microscopically, brain sections from rabbits killed with the NPCB device had significantly more damage than those from rabbits killed with BFT (p = 0.001. We conclude that BFT is neither consistently humane nor effective as a euthanasia method. MCD is an accurate and reliable euthanasia method generally causing clean dislocation and immediate and irreversible insensibility, and the NPCB device was 100% effective and reliable in rabbits >150 g.

  4. Chest injuries in Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa: a three year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chest drainage is a life-saving procedure for patients with chest injuries which all doctors should be confident with. Introduction. Trauma is a leading cause of .... This retrospective review of 72 cases demonstrated that the majority of patients presenting with chest injury can be treated with simple pleural cavity drainage.

  5. Extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) in the diagnosis of pneumothorax: experience at a community based level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, Kalyana C; Allamaneni, Shyam; Kakarla, Ravindra; Wong, Alfredo; Richards, Neil; Satterfield, James; Turner, James W; Sung, Kae-Jae

    2011-05-01

    Early identification of pneumothorax is crucial to reduce the mortality in critically injured patients. The objective of our study is to investigate the utility of surgeon performed extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) in the diagnosis of pneumothorax. We prospectively analysed 204 trauma patients in our level I trauma center over a period of 12 (06/2007-05/2008) months in whom EFAST was performed. The patients' demographics, type of injury, clinical examination findings (decreased air entry), CXR, EFAST and CT scan findings were entered into the data base. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated. Of 204 patients (mean age--43.01+/-19.5 years, sex--male 152, female 52) 21 (10.3%) patients had pneumothorax. Of 21 patients who had pneumothorax 12 were due to blunt trauma and 9 were due to penetrating trauma. The diagnosis of pneumothorax in 204 patients demonstrated the following: clinical examination was positive in 17 patients (true positive in 13/21, 62%; 4 were false positive and 8 were false negative), CXR was positive in 16 (true positive in 15/19, 79%; 1 false positive, 4 missed and 2 CXR not performed before chest tube) patients and EFAST was positive in 21 patients (20 were true positive [95.2%], 1 false positive and 1 false negative). In diagnosing pneumothorax EFAST has significantly higher sensitivity compared to the CXR (P=0.02). Surgeon performed trauma room extended FAST is simple and has higher sensitivity compared to the chest X-ray and clinical examination in detecting pneumothorax. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Infarto do miocárdio causado por lesão arterial coronariana após trauma torácico fechado Infarto de miocardio causado por lesión arterial coronaria post traumatismo torácico cerrado Myocardial infarction caused by coronary artery injury after a blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Silva Miguel Lima

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de um indivíduo do sexo masculino de 29 anos de idade, vítima de um acidente de carro no qual sofreu trauma torácico fechado, evoluindo com insuficiência cardíaca congestiva. O paciente apresentava boa saúde previamente, sem sintomas de doença cardiovascular. Na avaliação inicial, o eletrocardiograma mostrou ondas Q nas derivações precordiais e o ecocardiograma mostrou disfunção ventricular esquerda importante. A angiografia coronária mostrou uma lesão na artéria coronária descendente anterior esquerda (ADE, com acinesia da parede anterior na ventriculografia com contraste. A tomografia computadorizada por emissão de fóton único (SPECT com Tálio-201 não mostrou viabilidade. O paciente foi mantido em tratamento clínico com boa evolução.Relatamos el caso de un individuo del sexo masculino, de 29 años de edad, víctima de accidente automovilístico en el cual sufrió traumatismo torácico cerrado, evolucionando con insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva. El paciente presentaba buena salud previamente, sin síntomas de enfermedad cardiovascular. En la evaluación inicial, el electrocardiograma mostró ondas Q en las derivaciones precordiales y el ecocardiograma mostró disfunción ventricular izquierda importante. La angiografía coronaria mostró una lesión en la arteria coronaria descendente anterior izquierda (ADI, con acinesia de la pared anterior en la ventriculografía de contraste. La tomografía computada por emisión de fotón único (SPECT con Talio-201 no mostró viabilidad. El paciente fue mantenido en tratamiento clínico con buena evolución.We report the case of a 29-year-old man, victim of a car accident, who suffered a severe blunt chest trauma, with evolving congestive heart failure. He had previously had a good overall health status, with no symptoms of cardiovascular disease. At the initial assessment, the electrocardiogram showed Q waves in the precordial leads and the echocardiogram

  7. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most ... far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  8. Chest Pain: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Chest pain: First aid Chest pain: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Causes of chest pain can vary from minor problems, such as indigestion ... 26, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-chest-pain/basics/ART-20056705 . Mayo ...

  9. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  11. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdon, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  12. Epidemiological evaluation of hepatic trauma victims undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Mitre; Amaral, Isaac Massaud Amim

    2016-02-01

    to evaluate the epidemiological variables and diagnostic and therapeutic modalities related to hepatic trauma patients undergoing laparotomy in a public referral hospital in the metropolitan region of Vitória-ES. we conducted a retrospective study, reviewing charts of trauma patients with liver injuries, whether isolated or in association with other organs, who underwent exploratory laparotomy, from January 2011 to December 2013. We studied 392 patients, 107 of these with liver injury. The male: female ratio was 6.6 : 1 and the mean age was 30.12 years. Penetrating liver trauma occurred in 78.5% of patients, mostly with firearms. Associated injuries occurred in 86% of cases and intra-abdominal injuries were more common in penetrating trauma (p trauma was 60%, and penetrating trauma, 87.5% (p trauma remain high, especially in patients suffering from blunt trauma in relation to penetrating one.

  13. Pediatric chest imaging. Chest imaging in infants and children. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucaya, Javier [Vall d' Hebron Hospitals, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Pediatric Radiology and Inst. of Diagnostic Imaging; Hospital Quiron, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Strife, Janet L. (eds.) [Cincinnati Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center

    2008-07-01

    Imaging of the pediatric chest continues to evolve rapidly. All chapters in this 2nd edition of Pediatric Chest Imaging have been extensively updated, with additional disease-specific information and numerous new illustrations. The book thus presents the state of the art in the diagnosis of pediatric chest disorders, highlighting the role played by advanced technology. As the conventional features of most of these disorders are extremely well known, special attention is devoted to the technical aspects of the modern imaging modalities, their indications, and the diagnostic information that they supply. Individual chapters focus on chest ultrasound, nuclear medicine imaging, high-resolution chest CT, helical CT, and pediatric cardiac CT and pediatric cardiacMRI. Others are directed towards specific disorders, including congenital malformations of the chest, chest tumors, pulmonary infection, trauma, the lung in systemic diseases, the pediatric airway, foreign bodies, the thymus, and the chest wall. Without exception, the authors of this book are internationally known specialists with great expertise in the field. This book will serve as a handy, superbly illustrated reference for all who routinely image children, as well as for those who need access to information on how best to image them. (orig.)

  14. More than just a urinary catheter — Haemorrhage control by using a Foley catheter in a penetrating aortic root injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Elmoghrabi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of great vessel injuries in thoracic trauma is reported at 0.3–10%, predominantly due to a penetrating mechanism. Thoracic aortic injuries, more specifically those within proximity of the aortic root are challenging to manage and unceasing bleeding hampers adequate visualisation for performing repair. We report a case of a 31-year-old male that presented to the emergency department 1 h after sustaining a stab wound injury within proximity of the left upper sternal border. Vital signs were stable on presentation. Physical examination revealed a 1.5 cm laceration in the 3rd intercostal space. Chest X-ray revealed a small left pneumothorax, FAST scan was negative, and CT of the chest revealed left sided haemopneumothorax and haemopericardium. The patient was emergently transferred to the operating room where median thoracotomy was performed. A significant amount of bleeding was observed originating from a 1 cm laceration of the aortic root. Bleeding was controlled using a Foley catheter after unsuccessful attempts of digital compression, and the laceration was repaired using pledgeted sutures. Postoperative echocardiography and CT scan of the chest revealed normal cardiac functions with resolution of haemopericardium and haemopneumothorax, and the patient was discharged in a stable condition. High index of suspicion should be maintained for injury to the great vessels in patients with penetrating chest injuries, despite apparent haemodynamic stability. In this case, balloon tamponade using a Foley catheter served as a quick and simple technique that resulted in an almost bloodless field, facilitating adequate visualisation for definitive repair. Although the use of this technique has been previously described, this report serves as a reminder that a Foley catheter can be successfully used for balloon catheter tamponade in injuries to the aortic root. Keywords: Aortic root, Injury, Foley's catheter, Balloon catheter, Aorta

  15. The forgotten view: Chest X-ray - Lateral view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M. Ittyachen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With CT (computed tomography chest gaining more importance as a diagnostic tool, chest X-ray especially the lateral view is taken less commonly nowadays. Besides CT chest is also proven to be superior to chest X-ray in patients with major blunt trauma. We are presenting a 68-year old male who was partially treated from outside for a left sided pneumonia. He came to our hospital because of persisting chest pain. Chest X-ray, frontal view (postero-anterior was almost normal except for a mild opacity in the left lower zone. CT scan of the chest revealed a fluid collection posteriorly enclosed within enhancing pleura. Chest X-ray, left lateral view showed a corresponding posterior pleural based opacity. We are presenting this case to highlight the importance of the lateral view of the chest X-ray. In selected cases there is still a role for the lateral view. With the three dimensional visualization provided by the CT, the lateral view of the chest may be easier to understand. Consequent to the initial diagnosis by CT further follow up can be done with the chest X-ray. In a limited way this mitigates unnecessary expenditure and more importantly prevents the patient from exposure to harmful radiation in the form of repeated CT.

  16. CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia

  17. CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

    1984-11-01

    A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia.

  18. Complications in the management of bladder trauma in a third level hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría-García, Fernando Enrique; García-Perdomo, Herney Andrés; Barney, Erika

    2014-05-01

    To determine the frecuency of complications during the management of bladder trauma and its associated factors in a third level reference Hospital. A cross-sectional study of adult patients admitted in a reference Hospital from January 2006 to June 2011 with the diagnosis of bladder trauma. We identified demographic variables, type of trauma (blunt, penetrating), diagnostic method, associated traumatisms, management of bladder traumatism, frequency of complications and mortality. Univariate analysis was performed with frequency tables, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Similarly, bivariate analysis was performed to explore the association between variables. We used chi-square test for categorical variables and Student's t test to compare quantitative variables. We reviewed 40 medical records, which met the eligibility criteria. The median age was 27 years (range 16-;67) and 85% (34 patients) were male. Twenty-nine patients (72.5%) had penetrating injuries, being mainly firearm projectile (96.55%) and 11 patients (27.5%) blunt injuries. Most patients had intraoperative diagnosis (67.5%), while 25%, 5% and 2% were diagnosed by CT-cystography, cystoscopy and voiding cystography respectively. 70% (28 patients) had intraperitoneal bladder injuries. Of the forty patients enrolled, thirty six (90%) underwent surgery, while only four (10%) received conservative management. A total of ten patients (25%) had some type of complication. The most frequent was persistent hematuria (40%) followed by surgical site infection (30%), orchitis (20%), urinary tract infection (10%), urine leakage through the operative site, or to the peritoneal cavity (10%). No mortality was detected. On the bivariate logistic regression model type of trauma, number of injuries, performance of cystostomy, use of perivesical drainage tube, chest trauma and small bowel trauma, no association was found with the presence of complications. The frequency of complications was 25%. The presence of

  19. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and chest wall and may be used to help evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest ... or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  4. Chest tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... Be careful there are no kinks in your tube. The drainage system should always sit upright and be placed ...

  5. The diagnosis and management of children with blunt injury of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorelli, Kennith H; Vane, Dennis W

    2004-05-01

    Thoracic trauma remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in injured children, and is second only to brain injuries as a cause of death. The presence of a chest injury increases an injured child's mortality by 20-fold. Greater than 80% of chest injuries in children are secondary to blunt trauma. The compliant chest wall in children makes pulmonary contusions and rib fractures the most common chest injuries in children. Injuries to the great vessels, esophagus, and diaphragm are rare. Failure to promptly diagnose and treat these injuries results in increased morbidity and mortality.

  6. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  7. American College of Chest Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation Participate in the e-Community Get Social Career Connection Publications CHEST Journal CHEST SEEK Guidelines & Consensus Statements CHEST Physician CHEST NewsBrief Coding for Chest Medicine Tobacco Dependence Toolkit (3rd Ed.) Mobile Websites and Apps CHEST Journal ...

  8. Penetrating cardiothoracic war wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biocina, B; Sutlić, Z; Husedzinović, I; Rudez, I; Ugljen, R; Letica, D; Slobodnjak, Z; Karadza, J; Brida, V; Vladović-Relja, T; Jelić, I

    1997-03-01

    Penetrating cardiothoracic war wounds are very common among war casualties. Those injuries require prompt and specific treatment in an aim to decrease mortality and late morbidity. There are a few controversies about the best modality of treatment for such injuries, and there are not many large series of such patients in recent literature. We analysed a group of 259 patients with penetrating cardiothoracic war wounds admitted to our institutions between May 1991 and October 1992. There were 235 (90.7%) patients with thoracic wounds, 14 (5.4%) patients with cardiac, wounds and in 10 (3.7%) patients both heart and lungs were injured. The cause of injury was shrapnel in 174 patients (67%), bullets in 25 patients (9.7%), cluster bomb particles in 45 patients (17.3%) and other (blast etc.) in 15 patients (6%). Patients, 69, had concomitant injuries of various organs. The initial treatment in 164 operated patients was chest drainage in 76 (46.3%) patients, thoracotomy and suture of the lung in 71 (43.2%) patients, lobectomy in 12 (7.3%) patients and pneumonectomy in 5 (3%) patients. Complications include pleural empyema and/or lung abscess in 20 patients (8.4%), incomplete reexpansion of the lung in 10 patients (4.2%), osteomyelitis of the rib in 5 patients (2.1%) and bronchopleural fistula in 1 patient (0.4%). Secondary procedures were decortication in 12 patients, rib resection in 5 patients, lobectomy in 2 patients, pneumonectomy in 4 patients, reconstruction of the chest wall in 2 patients and closure of the bronchopleural fistula in 1 patient. The cardiac chamber involved was right ventricle in 12 patients, left ventricular in 6 patients, right atrium in 7 patients, left atrium in 3 patients, ascending aorta in 2 patients and 1 patient which involved descending aorta, right ventricle and coronary artery (left anterior descending) and inferior vena cava, respectively. The primary procedure was suture in 17 patients (in 10 patients with the additional suture of the

  9. Nonoperative Management of Multiple Penetrating Cardiac and Colon Wounds from a Shotgun: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Jaramillo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgery for cardiac trauma is considered fatal and for wounds of the colon by associated sepsis is normally considered; however, conservative management of many traumatic lesions of different injured organs has progressed over the years. Presentation of the Case. A 65-year-old male patient presented with multiple shotgun wounds on the left upper limb, thorax, and abdomen. On evaluation, he was hemodynamically stable with normal sinus rhythm and normal blood pressure, no dyspnea, or abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT scan of the chest shows hematoma around the aorta without injury to the blood vessel wall with an intramyocardial projectile without pericardial effusion. CT scan of the abdomen showed pellets in the transverse colon and descending colon endoluminal without extravasation of contrast medium or intra-abdominal fluid. The patient remains hemodynamically stable, and nonsurgical procedure was established. Discussion. Patients with asymptomatic intramyocardial projectiles can be safely managed without surgery. Nonsurgical management is only possible in asymptomatic patients with trauma of the colon through close surveillance and with very selective patients since standard management is surgery. Conclusion. Nonsurgical management of cardiac trauma, as well as colon penetrating trauma, can be performed in carefully selected patients with proper clinical follow-up, imaging, and laboratory studies.

  10. Role of clamping tube thoracostomy prior to removal in non-cardiac thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheed, M.A.; Majeed, F.A.; Naz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The frequently encountered thoracic trauma in surgical emergencies is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Eighty percent of thoracic trauma can be managed by simple insertion of tube thoracostomy. Though guidelines for insertion are comprehensively explained in literature, an ideal algorithm for discontinuation is not available. A standard and safe defined protocol would eliminate hesitancy in confident removal among general surgeons. The objective of this study was to determine role of clamping trial prior to removal in terms of frequency of recurrent pneumothorax. Methods: This study was conducted in department of Surgery Combined military hospital/Military Hospital Rawalpindi from April 2013 to March 2014. Total 180 patients with blunt or penetrating thoracic trauma were included in the study. Chest tube (28-36 Fr) was inserted in Trauma centre under strict asepsis. Tubes were then connected to under water seal for minimum six hours. Patients were randomly divided in two equal groups (90 in each). In Group A, Clamping trial was given before attempting removal while in Group B, tube was removed immediately without clamping trial. Patients of both groups were observed two hourly for development of recurrent pneumothorax. Data was analysed using SPSS-18. Results: The comparison of frequency of recurrent pneumothorax in Group A (9 patients, 10%) and in Group B (4 patients, 4.5%) was not found to be statistically significant. (p-value 2.073). Conclusion: Clamping trial is unnecessary prior to removal of tube thoracostomy in blunt and penetrating non-cardiac thoracic trauma in terms of recurrent pneumothorax. (author)

  11. Reconstruction of the chest wall after excision of a giant malignant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-29

    Jul 29, 2011 ... Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) of the chest wall is even rarer and its incidence on ... manubrium. There was no preceding history of trauma, fever, ... were related to pneumothorax and respiratory failures.[5].

  12. CT quantification of pleuropulmonary lesions in severe thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Bachmann, G.; Weimar, B.; Bauer, T.; Rau, W.S.; Hoppe, M.; Zickmann, B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Computed quantification of the extent of pleuropulmonary trauma by CT and comparison with conventional chest X-ray - Impact on therapy and correlation with mechanical ventilation support and clinical outcome. Method: In a prospective trial, 50 patients with clinically suspicious blunt chest trauma were evaluated using CT and conventional chest X-ray. The computed quantification of ventilated lung provided by CT volumetry was correlated with the consecutive artificial respiration parameters and the clinical outcome. Results: We found a high correlation between CT volumetry and artificial ventilation concerning maximal pressures and inspiratory oxygen concentration (FiO 2 , Goris-Score) (r=0.89, Pearson). The graduation of thoracic trauma correlated highly with the duration of mechanical ventilation (r=0.98, Pearson). Especially with regard to atelectases and lung contusions CT is superior compared to conventional chest X-ray; only 32% and 43%, respectively, were identified by conventional chest X-ray. (orig./AJ) [de

  13. Needle thoracostomy in the treatment of a tension pneumothorax in trauma patients: what size needle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengerink, Imme; Brink, Peter R; Laupland, Kevin B; Raber, Earl L; Zygun, Dave; Kortbeek, John B

    2008-01-01

    A tension pneumothorax requires immediate decompression using a needle thoracostomy. According to advanced trauma life support guidelines this procedure is performed in the second intercostal space (ICS) in the midclavicular line (MCL), using a 4.5-cm (2-inch) catheter (5-cm needle). Previous studies have shown a failure rate of up to 40% using this technique. Case reports have suggested that this high failure rate could be because of insufficient length of the needle. To analyze the average chest wall thickness (CWT) at the second ICS in the MCL in a trauma population and to evaluate the length of the needle used in needle thoracostomy for emergency decompression of tension pneumothoraces. Retrospective review of major trauma admissions (Injury Severity Score >12) at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, Canada, who underwent a computed tomography chest scan admitted in the period from October 2001 until March 2004. Subgroup analysis on men and women, /=40 years of age was defined a priori. CWT was measured to the nearest 0.01 cm at the second ICS in the MCL. The mean CWT in the 604 male patients and 170 female patients studied averaged 3.50 cm at the left second ICS MCL and 3.51 cm on the right. The mean CWT was significantly higher for women than men (p 4.5 cm and 24.1% to 35.4% of the women studied. A catheter length of 4.5 cm may not penetrate the chest wall of a substantial amount (9.9%-35.4%) of the population, depending on age and gender. This study demonstrates the need for a variable needle length for relief of a tension pneumothorax in certain population groups to improve effectiveness of needle thoracostomy.

  14. Pneumothorax in severe thoracic traumas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camassa, N.W.; Boccuzzi, F.; Diettorre, E.; Troilo, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors reviewed CT scans and supine chest X-ray of 47 patients affected by severe thoracic trauma, examined in 1985-86. The sensibility of the two methodologies in the assessment of pneumothorax was compared. CT detected 25 pneumothorax, whereas supine chest X-ray allowed a diagnosis in 18 cases only. In 8 of the latter (44.4%) the diagnosis was made possible by the presence of indirect signs of pneumothorax only - the most frequent being the deep sulcus sign. The characterization of pneumothorax is important especially in the patients who need to be treated with mechanical ventilation therapy, or who are to undergo surgery in total anaesthesia

  15. Predictors of Intrathoracic Injury after Blunt Torso Trauma in Children Presenting to an Emergency Department as Trauma Activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Caitlin; Mironova, Irina; Lehman, Erik; Olympia, Robert P

    2017-06-01

    Thoracic injuries are a major cause of death associated with blunt trauma in children. Screening for injury with chest x-ray study, compared with chest computed tomography (CT) scan, has been controversial, weighing the benefits of specificity with the detriment of radiation exposure. To identify predictors of thoracic injury in children presenting as trauma activations to a Level I trauma center after blunt torso trauma, and to compare these predictors with those previously reported in the literature. We performed a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (trauma center between June 2010 and June 2013 as a trauma activation after sustaining a blunt torso trauma and who received diagnostic imaging of the chest as part of their initial evaluation. Data analysis was performed on 166 patients. There were 33 patients (20%) with 45 abnormalities detected on diagnostic imaging of the chest, with the most common abnormalities being lung contusion (36%), pneumothorax (22%), and rib fracture (13%). Statistically significant predictors of abnormal diagnostic imaging of the chest included Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) trauma include GCS < 15, hypoxia, syncope/dizziness, cervical spine tenderness, thoraco-lumbar-sacral spine tenderness, and abdominal/pelvic tenderness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Blunt traumatic pericardial rupture and cardiac herniation with a penetrating twist: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galloway Robert

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blunt Traumatic Pericardial Rupture (BTPR with resulting cardiac herniation following chest trauma is an unusual and often fatal condition. Although there has been a multitude of case reports of this condition in past literature, the recurring theme is that of a missed injury. Its occurrence in severe blunt trauma is in the order of 0.4%. It is an injury that frequently results in pre/early hospital death and diagnosis at autopsy, probably owing to a combination of diagnostic difficulties, lack of familiarity and associated polytrauma. Of the patients who survive to hospital attendance, the mortality rate is in the order of 57-64%. Methods We present two survivors of BTPR and cardiac herniation, one with a delayed penetrating cardiac injury secondary to rib fractures. With these two cases and literature review, we hope to provide a greater awareness of this injury Conclusion BTPR and cardiac herniation is a complex and often fatal injury that usually presents under the umbrella of polytrauma. Clinicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for BTPR but, even then, the diagnosis is fraught with difficulty. In blunt chest trauma, patients should be considered high risk for BTPR when presenting with: Cardiovascular instability with no obvious cause Prominent or displaced cardiac silhouette and asymmetrical large volume pneumopericardium Potentially, with increasing awareness of the injury and improved use and availability of imaging modalities, the survival rates will improve and cardiac Herniation could even be considered the 5th H of reversible causes of blunt traumatic PEA arrest.

  17. A prehospital use of ITClamp for haemostatic control and fixation of a chest tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnung, S; Steinmetz, J

    2014-01-01

    We here present three cases in which a new device, the ITClamp Hemorrhage Control System (Innovative Trauma Care, Inc., Edmonton, Canada), was used for bleeding control and for securing a chest tube.......We here present three cases in which a new device, the ITClamp Hemorrhage Control System (Innovative Trauma Care, Inc., Edmonton, Canada), was used for bleeding control and for securing a chest tube....

  18. Spectrum and outcome of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantharia, Chetan V; Prabhu, R Y; Dalvi, A N; Raut, Abhijit; Bapat, R D; Supe, Avinash N

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often difficult and surgery poses a formidable challenge. Data from 17 patients of pancreatic trauma gathered from a prospectively maintained database were analysed and the following parameters were considered: mode of injury, diagnostic modalities, associated injury, grade of pancreatic trauma and management. Pancreatic trauma was graded from I through IV, as per Modified Lucas Classification. The median age was 39 years (range 19-61). The aetiology of pancreatic trauma was blunt abdominal trauma in 14 patients and penetrating injury in 3. Associated bowel injury was present in 4 cases (3 penetrating injury and 1 blunt trauma) and 1 case had associated vascular injury. 5 patients had grade I, 3 had grade II, 7 had grade III and 2 had grade IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan was used to diagnose pancreatic trauma in all patients with blunt abdominal injury. Immediate diagnosis could be reached in only 4 (28.5%) patients. 7 patients responded to conservative treatment. Of the 10 patients who underwent surgery, 6 required it for the pancreas and the duodenum. (distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy-3, pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy-1, debridement with external drainage-1, associated injuries-duodenum-1). Pancreatic fistula, recurrent pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation were seen in 3 (17.05%), 2 (11.7%) and 1 (5.4%) patient respectively. Death occurred in 4 cases (23.5%), 2 each in grades III and IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan is a useful modality for diagnosing, grading and following up patients with pancreatic trauma. Although a majority of cases with pancreatic trauma respond to conservative treatment, patients with penetrating trauma, and associated bowel injury and higher grade pancreatic trauma require surgical intervention and are also associated with higher morbidity and mortality.

  19. Accuracy of Physical Examination, Ankle-Brachial Index, and Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Arterial Injury in Patients With Penetrating Extremity Trauma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSouza, Ian S; Benabbas, Roshanak; McKee, Sean; Zangbar, Bardiya; Jain, Ashika; Paladino, Lorenzo; Boudourakis, Leon; Sinert, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Penetrating Extremity Trauma (PET) may result in arterial injury, a rare but limb- and life-threatening surgical emergency. Timely, accurate diagnosis is essential for potential intervention in order to prevent significant morbidity. Using a systematic review/meta-analytic approach, we determined the utility of physical examination, Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI), and Ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of arterial injury in emergency department (ED) patients who have sustained PET. We applied a test-treatment threshold model to determine which evaluations may obviate CT Angiography (CTA). We searched PubMed, Embase, and Scopus from inception to November 2016 for studies of ED patients with PET. We included studies on adult and pediatric subjects. We defined the reference standard to include CTA, catheter angiography, or surgical exploration. When low-risk patients did not undergo the reference standard, trials must have specified that patients were observed for at least 24 hours. We used the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) to evaluate bias and applicability of the included studies. We calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) of physical examination ("hard signs" of vascular injury), US, and ABI. Using established CTA test characteristics (sensitivity = 96.2%, specificity = 99.2%) and applying the Pauker-Kassirer method, we developed a test-treatment threshold model (testing threshold = 0.14%, treatment threshold = 72.9%). We included eight studies (n = 2,161, arterial injury prevalence = 15.5%). Studies had variable quality with most at high risk for partial and double verification bias. Some studies investigated multiple index tests: physical examination (hard signs) in three studies (n = 1,170), ABI in five studies (n = 1,040), and US in four studies (n = 173). Due to high heterogeneity (I 2  > 75%) of the results, we could not calculate LR+ or LR- for hard signs or LR+ for ABI. The weighted

  20. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interest in developing an appropriate and sustainable trauma system in South ... trauma evolved with the social instability which accompanied political change in the ... increased use of military style assault weapons resulted in severe injuries ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  2. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...

  3. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mustafa Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, Stavros M

    2007-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with no previous medical history presented to hospital with sudden onset of acute epigastric pain radiating to the anterior chest wall and both shoulders. There was no history of recent trauma and he had not been vomiting.

  4. Acquired ventricular septal defect: A rare sequel of blunt chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is the most common congenital cardiac lesion encountered worldwide. Only very rarely is it acquired, and causation through blunt injury in a child is extremely rare. A previously healthy 7‑year‑old boy suffered blunt chest trauma while at play. He presented 11 days later with features of acute ...

  5. Trauma Imaging: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Jason Heath; Wertz, Christopher Ira; Onstott, Kimberly L; Wertz, Joss R

    2017-01-01

    To inform radiologic technologists about which imaging modalities and examinations are best suited for evaluating specific anatomical structures in patients who have sustained a traumatic injury. Two scholarly research databases were searched to identify articles focused on trauma imaging of the head, cervical spine, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Articles focused on trauma diagnosis were excluded. Thirty-two articles were selected for analysis. Physical examination and plain-film radiographs typically are used to assess nasal bone fracures. Computed tomography (CT) can be used to assess zygomaticomaxillary complex, mandibular, and temporal bone fractures. Traumatic brain injuries are difficult to assess, and broad classifications are used. Depending on the severity of cervical spine trauma, plain-film radiographs or CT imaging is adequate, with magnetic resonance imaging used as a means for further evaluation. Trauma to the thorax typically is assessed with radiography and CT, and CT is recommended for assesment of abdominal and pelvic trauma. The literature was consistent regarding which examinations to perform to best evaluate suspected injuries to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. The need for, and correct use of, imaging in evaluating trauma to the head and cervical spine is more controversial. Despite the need for additional research, emergency department care providers should be familiar with the structures most commonly injured during trauma and the role of medical imaging for diagnosis.

  6. Vented versus unvented chest seals for treatment of pneumothorax and prevention of tension pneumothorax in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Terrazas, Irasema B; Koller, Alexandra; Allen, Paul B; Klemcke, Harold G; Convertino, Victor A; Dubick, Michael A; Gerhardt, Robert T; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2013-07-01

    Unvented chest seals (CSs) are currently recommended for the management of penetrating thoracic injuries in the battlefield. Since no supporting data exist, we compared the efficacy of a preferred unvented with that of a vented CS in a novel swine model of pneumothorax (PTx). An open chest wound was created in the left thorax of spontaneously air-breathing anesthetized pigs (n = 8). A CS was applied over the injury, then tension PTx was induced by incremental air injections (0.2 L) into the pleural cavity via a cannula that was also used to measure intrapleural pressure (IP). Both CS were tested on each pig in series. Tidal volume (V(T)), respiratory rate, IP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, venous and peripheral oxygen saturations (SvO2, SpO2) were recorded. Tension PTx was defined as a mean IP equal to or greater than +1 mm Hg plus significant (20-30%) deviation in baseline levels of the previously mentioned parameters and confirmed by chest x-ray study. PaO2 and PaCo2 were also measured. PTx produced immediate breathing difficulty and significant rises in IP and pulmonary arterial pressure and falls in V(T), SpO2, and SvO2. Both CSs returned these parameters to near baseline within 5 minutes of application. After vented CS was applied, serial air injections up to 2 L resulted in no significant change in the previously mentioned parameters. After unvented CS application, progressive deterioration of all respiratory parameters and onset of tension PTx were observed in all subjects after approximately 1.4-L air injection. Both vented and unvented CSs provided immediate improvements in breathing and blood oxygenation in our model of penetrating thoracic trauma. However, in the presence of ongoing intrapleural air accumulation, the unvented CS led to tension PTx, hypoxemia, and possible respiratory arrest, while the vented CS prevented these outcomes.

  7. A method to detect occult pneumothorax with chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shokei; Kishikawa, Masanobu; Hayakawa, Koichi; Narumi, Atsushi; Matsunami, Katsutoshi; Kitano, Mitsuhide

    2011-04-01

    Small pneumothoraces are often not visible on supine screening chest radiographs because they develop anteriorly to the lung. These pneumothoraces are termed occult. Occult pneumothoraces account for an astonishingly high 52% to 63% of all traumatic pneumothoraces. A 19-year-old obese woman was involved in a head-on car accident. The admission anteroposterior chest radiographs were unremarkable. Because of the presence of right chest tenderness and an abrasion, we suspected the presence of a pneumothorax. Thus, we decided to take a supine oblique chest radiograph of the right side of the thorax, which clearly revealed a visceral pleural line, consistent with a diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax. A pneumothorax may be present when a supine chest radiograph reveals either an apparent deepening of the costophrenic angle (the "deep sulcus sign") or the presence of 2 diaphragm-lung interfaces (the "double diaphragm sign"). However, in practice, supine chest radiographs have poor sensitivity for occult pneumothoraces. Oblique chest radiograph is a useful and fast screening tool that should be considered for cases of blunt chest trauma, especially when transport of critically ill patients to the computed tomographic suite is dangerous or when imminent transfer to another hospital is being arranged and early diagnosis of an occult pneumothorax is essential. Copyright © 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcomes of Complete Versus Partial Surgical Stabilization of Flail Chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Terry P; Thiels, Cornelius A; Kim, Brian D; Zielinski, Martin D; Jenkins, Donald H; Schiller, Henry J

    2016-01-01

    Rib fractures are common after chest wall trauma. For patients with flail chest, surgical stabilization is a promising technique for reducing morbidity. Anatomical difficulties often lead to an inability to completely repair the flail chest; thus, the result is partial flail chest stabilization (PFS). We hypothesized that patients with PFS have outcomes similar to those undergoing complete flail chest stabilization (CFS). A prospectively collected database of all patients who underwent rib fracture stabilization procedures from August 2009 until February 2013 was reviewed. Abstracted data included procedural and complication data, extent of stabilization, and pulmonary function test results. Of 43 patients who underwent operative stabilization of flail chest, 23 (53%) had CFS and 20 (47%) underwent PFS. Anterior location of the fracture was the most common reason for PFS (45%). Age, sex, operative time, pneumonia, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay, and narcotic use were the same in both groups. Total lung capacity was significantly improved in the CFS group at 3 months. No chest wall deformity was appreciated on follow-up, and no patients underwent additional stabilization procedures following PFS. Despite advances in surgical technique, not all fractures are amenable to repair. There was no difference in chest wall deformity, narcotic use, or clinically significant impairment in pulmonary function tests among patients who underwent PFS compared with CFS. Our data suggest that PFS is an acceptable strategy and that extending or creating additional incisions for CFS is unnecessary.

  9. Multidetector computed tomography-spectrum of blunt chest wall and lung injuries in polytraumatized patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S., E-mail: soeren.peters@rub.d [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany); Nicolas, V.; Heyer, C.M. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Universitaetsklinikum Bergmannsheil, Buerkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Accidental injuries are the leading cause of death in the 15 to 44-year-old age group. Blunt chest trauma is often encountered in these patients and is associated with a mortality of up to 25%. Although conventional radiography still plays an important role in the initial emergency room setting, for follow-up in the intensive care unit, multidetector computed tomography has established itself as the standard imaging method for the evaluation of chest trauma patients. The following review presents salient radiological findings of the chest wall and shoulder girdle, thoracic spine, pleural space, and lung in polytraumatized patients.

  10. Nutrition management of a trauma patient with pneumatosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Roberts K, BScDiet, Postgrad Dip Diet. Dietitian ... Keywords: developed pneumatosis intestinalis, trauma patient ... presented with blunt abdominal and chest trauma, a head injury and ... and the goal rate of 93 ml/hour was reached, providing 18% protein, .... result from the side-effects of medication, most commonly from.

  11. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi; Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  12. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romeo, Daniela de Araujo; Escudero, Carlos Caparros; Falcon, Maria del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi, E-mail: jaherrero5@hotmail.com [Unidade de Gestao Clinica (UGC) de Diagnostico por Imagem - Hosppital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilha (Spain); Vazquez, Rosa Maria Lepe [Unit of Radiodiagnosis - Hospital Nuestra Senora de la Merced, Osuna, Sevilha (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease. (author)

  13. Does EMS Perceived Anatomic Injury Predict Trauma Center Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, E. Brooke; Roberts, Jennifer; Guse, Clare E.; Shah, Manish N.; Swor, Robert; Cushman, Jeremy T.; Blatt, Alan; Jurkovich, Gregory J.; Brasel, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine the predictive value of the anatomic step of the 2011 Field Triage Decision Scheme for identifying trauma center need. Methods EMS providers caring for injured adults transported to regional trauma centers in 3 midsized communities were interviewed over two years. Patients were included, regardless of injury severity, if they were at least 18 years old and were transported by EMS with a mechanism of injury that was an assault, motor vehicle or motorcycle crash, fall, or pedestrian or bicyclist struck. The interview was conducted upon ED arrival and collected physiologic condition and anatomic injury data. Patients who met the physiologic criteria were excluded. Trauma center need was defined as non-orthopedic surgery within 24 hours, intensive care unit admission, or death prior to hospital discharge. Data were analyzed by calculating descriptive statistics including positive likelihood ratios (+LR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results 11,892 interviews were conducted. One was excluded because of missing outcome data and 1,274 were excluded because they met the physiologic step. EMS providers identified 1,167 cases that met the anatomic criteria, of which 307 (26%) needed the resources of a trauma center (38% sensitivity, 91% specificity, +LR 4.4; CI: 3.9 - 4.9). Criteria with a +LR ≥5 were flail chest (9.0; CI: 4.1 - 19.4), paralysis (6.8; CI: 4.2 - 11.2), two or more long bone fractures (6.3; CI: 4.5 - 8.9), and amputation (6.1; CI: 1.5 - 24.4). Criteria with a +LR >2 and <5 were penetrating injury (4.8; CI: 4.2 - 5.6), and skull fracture (4.8; CI: 3.0 - 7.7). Only pelvic fracture (1.9; CI: 1.3 - 2.9) had a +LR less than 2. Conclusions The anatomic step of the Field Triage Guidelines as determined by EMS providers is a reasonable tool for determining trauma center need. Use of EMS perceived pelvic fracture as an indicator for trauma center need should be re-evaluated. PMID:23627418

  14. Radiological diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis: CT versus chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fugeng; Pan Jishu; Chen Qihang; Zhou Cheng; Yu Jingying; Tang Dairong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of CT or Chest radiograph in diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. Methods: The study population included 21 patients with chest wall tuberculosis confirmed by operation or biopsy. Chest radiograph and plain CT were performed in all eases, while enhanced CT in 9 cases, and all images were reviewed by 2 radiologists. Results: Single soft tissue mass of the chest wall was detected in all cases on CT, but not on chest radiograph(χ 2 =42.000, P 2 =4.421, P<0.05). Conclusion: CT, especially enhanced CT scan is the first choice in the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. (authors)

  15. Emergency Anaesthetic Management of Extensive Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Chandola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed vehicles, drug abuse, alcohol and easy availability of handguns are the main reasons of increasing number of trauma especially thoracic trauma. Anaesthesiologist plays an important role in the management of extensive thoracic trauma. Thoracic trauma, penetrating or blunt, may cause damage to organs suspended in thorax viz. pleura, lungs, heart, great vessels, trachea and oesophagus. It may lead to pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade or life threatening haemorrhage. With aggressive care and management of these factors, majority of patients can survive and return to normal life.

  16. Research Status of the Skeletalre Construction of Chest Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daixing ZHONG

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall defect may be caused by many factors such as the resection of tumor and trauma, and the reconstruction of bone-defection is still the key point of thoracic surgery. With the development of material science, more and more new materials have been used in medical practice, which makes huge progress in the surgery of chest wall. However, none of these materials satisfy all the practical needs of the reconstruction. Recently, with the development of the capacity of computer, 3D-printing technology has been gradually used in clinical work, and the idea of individual treatment has been accepted by more and more people. The weakness of these materials may be solved by the new material and the application of individual treatment, which could also make great advance in chest wall surgery. This article will make a summary of the research on the reconstruction of chest wall.

  17. Diagnostic Laparoscopy for Trauma: How Not to Miss Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koto, Modise Z; Matsevych, Oleh Y; Aldous, Colleen

    2018-05-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy (DL) is a well-accepted approach for penetrating abdominal trauma (PAT). However, the steps of procedure and the systematic laparoscopic examination are not clearly defined in the literature. The aim of this study was to clarify the definition of DL in trauma surgery by auditing DL performed for PAT at our institution, and to describe the strategies on how to avoid missed injuries. The data of patients managed with laparoscopy for PAT from January 2012 to December 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The details of operative technique and strategies on how to avoid missed injuries were discussed. Out of 250 patients managed with laparoscopy for PAT, 113 (45%) patients underwent DL. Stab wounds sustained 94 (83%) patients. The penetration of the peritoneal cavity or retroperitoneum was documented in 67 (59%) of patients. Organ evisceration was present in 21 (19%) patients. Multiple injuries were present in 22% of cases. The chest was the most common associated injury. Two (1.8%) iatrogenic injuries were recorded. The conversion rate was 1.7% (2/115). The mean length of hospital stay was 4 days. There were no missed injuries. In the therapeutic laparoscopy (TL) group, DL was performed as the initial part and identified all injuries. There were no missed injuries in the TL group. The predetermined sequential steps of DL and the standard systematic examination of intraabdominal organs were described. DL is a feasible and safe procedure. It accurately identifies intraabdominal injuries. The selected use of preoperative imaging, adherence to the predetermined steps of procedure and the standard systematic laparoscopic examination will minimize the rate of missed injuries.

  18. Facial trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  1. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  3. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain from a chest injury (with a possible rib fracture or lung complication) or from heart problems Coughing ... arteries Evidence of heart failure In the bones: Fractures or other problems of the ribs and spine Osteoporosis

  4. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  9. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, a radiologist ... about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight Recently posted: ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) ... on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. Moderate and conscious sedation can be ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... detailed pictures of the structures within the chest. It is primarily used to assess abnormal masses such ... and determine the size, extent and degree of its spread to adjacent structures. It’s also used to ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  15. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ... of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an abnormal ballooning out of the ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... primarily used to assess abnormal masses such as cancer and determine the size, extent and degree of ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either ...

  20. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a computer to produce detailed pictures of the structures within the chest. It is primarily used to ... extent and degree of its spread to adjacent structures. It’s also used to assess the anatomy and ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed ... sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... exams and use a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction of blood flow). determine ... ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. ...

  9. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... June is Men's Health Month Recently posted: Pancreatic Cancer The Limitations of Online Dose Calculators Video: The ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... around the heart) disease. characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ...

  11. Radiological diagnosis and therapy of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Ernst, H.

    1980-01-01

    The causes and localization of chest pain are numerous. They can derive from infections, traumas, or tumors. Possible sites of origin are: skeletal portions, vertebral column, ribs, and sternum, as well as mediastinum and pleura. In women, occurrence tends to be cyclic and affect the mamma region. Radiological diagnosis includes radiography, nuclear techniques as well as whole body computer-tomography. Radiation therapy is indicated in cases of mediastinal tumor formation. Radiation of painful osteolytic vertebral metastases and rib destructions proves to be an efficient palliative measure. (orig.) [de

  12. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik

    ,3 mAs and SID SID of 180 centimetres using a phantom and lithium fluoride thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). Dose to risk organs mamma, thyroid and colon are measured at different collimations with one-centimetre steps. TLD results are used to estimate dose reduction for different collimations...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  13. Endovascular interventions for multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinstner, C.; Funovics, M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years interventional radiology has significantly changed the management of injured patients with multiple trauma. Currently nearly all vessels can be reached within a reasonably short time with the help of specially preshaped catheters and guide wires to achieve bleeding control of arterial und venous bleeding. Whereas bleeding control formerly required extensive open surgery, current interventional methods allow temporary vessel occlusion (occlusion balloons), permanent embolization and stenting. In injured patients with multiple trauma preinterventional procedural planning is performed with the help of multidetector computed tomography whenever possible. Interventional radiology not only allows minimization of therapeutic trauma but also a considerably shorter treatment time. Interventional bleeding control has developed into a standard method in the management of vascular trauma of the chest and abdomen as well as in vascular injuries of the upper and lower extremities when open surgical access is associated with increased risk. Additionally, pelvic trauma, vascular trauma of the superior thoracic aperture and parenchymal arterial lacerations of organs that can be at least partially preserved are primarily managed by interventional methods. In an interdisciplinary setting interventional radiology provides a safe and efficient means of rapid bleeding control in nearly all vascular territories in addition to open surgical access. (orig.) [de

  14. Multi-Detector CT Findings of Palpable Chest Wall Masses in Children: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Ho; Kim, Young Tong [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    A wide variety of diseases manifest as palpable chest wall masses in children. These include normal variation, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, axillary lymphadenopathies, soft tissue tumors and bone tumors. Given that most of these diseases are associated with chest wall deformity, diagnosis is difficult by physical examination or ultrasonography alone. However, multi-detector CT with three dimensional reconstruction is useful in the characterization and differential diagnosis of palpable chest wall lesions. In this article, we review the spectrum of palpable chest wall diseases and illustrate their multi-detector CT presentation.

  15. Analysis of 178 penetrating stomach and small bowel injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Ali; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Inaba, Kenji; Brown, Carlos; Browder, Timothy; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2008-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs), such as wound infection, fascial dehiscence, and intraabdominal abscess, commonly occur following penetrating abdominal trauma. However, most of the literature involves penetrating colon injuries. There are few reports describing complications following penetrating stomach and small bowel injuries. Based on the hypothesis that SSIs are commonly found following penetrating stomach and small bowel trauma, a prospective observational study was performed at an academic Level I trauma center from March 1, 2004 until August 31, 2006. The subjects were patients who had sustained a penetrating injury to the stomach or small bowel. Patients were followed for the development of an SSI, defined as wound infection, fascial dehiscence, or intraabdominal abscess. A total of 178 patients were admitted with penetrating stomach or small bowel injuries over the 29-month period. There were 121 (68%) gunshot injuries and 57 (32%) stab wounds. Associated intraabdominal injuries occurred in 74% of patients. Overall, SSIs occurred in 20% of cases. Risk factors for SSI included associated duodenal or colon injury, whereas time to operating room, blood loss, and type and duration of antibiotic use were not. When associated colon injuries were excluded, SSIs occurred in 16% of patients with gastric injuries and 13% of those with small bowel injuries. SSIs commonly follow penetrating stomach and small bowel trauma. Risk factors for SSI include associated duodenal or colon injury. Delay to operating room, blood loss, and type and length of antibiotic prophylaxis were not associated with an increased risk of SSI.

  16. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described.

  17. Multiple Trauma and Emergency Room Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Michael; Lechler, Philipp; Debus, Florian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2017-07-24

    The care of severely injured patients remains a challenge. Their initial treatment in the emergency room is the essential link between first aid in the field and definitive in-hospital treatment. We present important elements of the initial in-hospital care of severely injured patients on the basis of pertinent publications retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and the current German S3 guideline on the care of severely and multiply traumatized patients, which was last updated in 2016. The goal of initial emergency room care is the rapid recognition and prompt treatment of acutely life-threatening injuries in the order of their priority. The initial assessment includes physical examination and ultrasonography according to the FAST concept (Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma) for the recognition of intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Patients with penetrating chest injuries, massive hematothorax, and/or severe injuries of the heart and lungs undergo emergency thoracotomy; those with signs of hollow viscus perforation undergo emergency laparotomy. If the patient is hemo - dynamically stable, the most important diagnostic procedure that must be performed is computerized tomography with contrast medium. Therapeutic decision-making takes the patient's physiological parameters into account, along with the overall severity of trauma and the complexity of the individual injuries. Depending on the severity of trauma, the immediate goal can be either the prompt restoration of organ structure and function or so-called damage control surgery. The latter focuses, in the acute phase, on hemostasis and on the avoidance of secondary damage such as intra-abdominal contamination or compartment syndrome. It also involves the temporary treatment of fractures with external fixation and the planning of definitive care once the patient's organ functions have been securely stabilized. The care of the severely injured patient should be performed in structured fashion according to the

  18. Use of the omentum in chest-wall reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, R.J.; Vasconez, L.O.

    1989-01-01

    Increased use of the omentum in chest-wall reconstruction has paralleled the refinement of anatomic knowledge and the development of safe mobilization techniques. Important anatomic points are the omental attachments to surrounding structures, the major blood supply from the left and right gastroepiploic vessels, and the collateral circulation via the gastroepiploic arch and Barkow's marginal artery. Mobilization of the omentum to the thorax involves division of its attachments to the transverse colon and separation from the greater curvature to fabricate a bipedicled flap. Most anterior chest wounds and virtually all mediastinal wounds can be covered with the omentum based on both sets of gastroepiploic vessels. The arc of transposition is increased when the omentum is based on a single pedicle, allowing coverage of virtually all chest-wall defects. The final method of increasing flap length involves division of the gastroepiploic arch and reliance on Barkow's marginal artery as collateral circulation to maintain flap viability. With regard to chest-wall reconstruction, we have included the omentum in the armamentarium of flaps used to cover mediastinal wounds. The omentum is our flap of choice for the reconstruction of most radiation injuries of the chest wall. The omentum may also be used to provide protection to visceral anastomoses, vascular conduits, and damaged structures in the chest, as well as to cover defects secondary to tumor excision or trauma. In brief, the omentum has proved to be a most dependable and versatile flap, particularly applicable to chest-wall reconstruction

  19. Ultrasound detection of pneumothorax compared with chest X-ray and computed tomography scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarsheth, Khanjan; Kurek, Stanley

    2011-04-01

    Pneumothorax after trauma can be a life threatening injury and its care requires expeditious and accurate diagnosis and possible intervention. We performed a prospective, single blinded study with convenience sampling at a Level I trauma center comparing thoracic ultrasound with chest X-ray and CT scan in the detection of traumatic pneumothorax. Trauma patients that received a thoracic ultrasound, chest X-ray, and chest CT scan were included in the study. The chest X-rays were read by a radiologist who was blinded to the thoracic ultrasound results. Then both were compared with CT scan results. One hundred and twenty-five patients had a thoracic ultrasound performed in the 24-month period. Forty-six patients were excluded from the study due to lack of either a chest X-ray or chest CT scan. Of the remaining 79 patients there were 22 positive pneumothorax found by CT and of those 18 (82%) were found on ultrasound and 7 (32%) were found on chest X-ray. The sensitivity of thoracic ultrasound was found to be 81.8 per cent and the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The sensitivity of chest X-ray was found to be 31.8 per cent and again the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The negative predictive value of thoracic ultrasound for pneumothorax was 0.934 and the negative predictive value for chest X-ray for pneumothorax was found to be 0.792. We advocate the use of chest ultrasound for detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

  20. Diagnostic problems in chest injuries (angiography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Strecker, E.P.; Kloehn, I.

    1979-01-01

    Roentgenography is the simplest and most reliable means to arrive at the diagnosis of chest injury. General roentgenograms are difficult to interpret as they tend to be technically imperfect. Fractures, emphysema, pneumothorax, accumulation of fluid can usually be ascertained directly; but the traumatic origin of changes in the pulmonary parenchyma or of an enlarged heart shadow cannot be reliably deduced from the X-ray appearance. It may provide some differential-diagnostic information but the correct interpretation of the findings depends on further observation. In 6-7% of severe chest trauma with vascular injuries and rupture of the diaphragm angiography is indicated. The evidence to be obtained from chest radiography should not be overestimated: fractures of ribs are sometimes overlocked, even by the expert; parenchymatous lesions may manifest themselves as shadows but their nature remains obscure until they have been related to the clinical and subsequent radiological findings. The same applies to rupture of the diaphragm, bronchi or vessels, if only the immediate posttraumatic roentgenographs are examined. A tent-shaped heart shadow is considered characteristic of the presence of fluid in the pericardium; this is valid only for chronic hydropericardium, but not for the potentially fatal cardiac tamponade; if the pericardium has lost its elasticity a haemorrhage of not more than 150 ml may prove fatal. Nor does the roentgenogram provide information about pulmonary function. Especially in cases of pulmonary shock minor changes in the chest roentgenogram may give a false sense of security when, in fact, blood gas analyses show that a life-endangering situation has developed. The radiologist who is aware of the limitations of the method will derive maximum diagnostic benefit from a chest angiography. No other method is capable of supplying information of such great importance in such a short time. (orig.) [de

  1. Selective conservatism in the management of thoracic trauma remains appropriate in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, V Y; Oosthuizen, G V; Clarke, D L

    2015-04-01

    Selective conservatism for thoracic trauma is well established but the emergence of new technologies may cause management strategies to continue to evolve. A retrospective study was conducted on thoracic trauma patients managed in a single institution in South Africa over a 4-year period to determine the appropriateness of our current policy of selective conservatism. A total of 1,239 patients were included in the study; 112 required an emergency thoracotomy, 125 were admitted for observation and 1,002 required a tube thoracostomy (TT). Ninety-one per cent of the patients were male and the median age was 24 years. Seventy-five per cent of the cases were penetrating trauma and the remaining were blunt trauma. The indications for TT were pneumothorax (PTX) (n=382, 38%), haemothorax (HTX) (n=300, 30%) and haemopneumothorax (HPTX) (n=320, 32%). A total of 13% (127/1,002) of all chest x-rays (CXR) following tube removal demonstrated residual pathologies that precluded immediate discharge: 32 (8%) in Group A (PTX), 44 (15%) in Group B (HTX) and 51 (16%) in Group C (HPTX). All 32 patients in Group A were simply observed and did not require further intervention. In Group B, 17 patients required repeat TTs and 27 required video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for clearance of residual HTX. Twenty-nine patients in Group C required repeat TTs and twenty-two required VATS. The vast majority of patients with thoracic trauma can be managed conservatively with TT alone. Residual pathology appeared to be lowest in patients with a PTX, which seldom requires treatment, while only a minority of patients required repeat TTs or VATS for a retained HTX. Selective conservatism is still appropriate in the current era in a developing world setting.

  2. Selective conservatism in the management of thoracic trauma remains appropriate in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuizen, GV; Clarke, DL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Selective conservatism for thoracic trauma is well established but the emergence of new technologies may cause management strategies to continue to evolve. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on thoracic trauma patients managed in a single institution in South Africa over a 4-year period to determine the appropriateness of our current policy of selective conservatism. Results A total of 1,239 patients were included in the study; 112 required an emergency thoracotomy, 125 were admitted for observation and 1,002 required a tube thoracostomy (TT). Ninety-one per cent of the patients were male and the median age was 24 years. Seventy-five per cent of the cases were penetrating trauma and the remaining were blunt trauma. The indications for TT were pneumothorax (PTX) (n=382, 38%), haemothorax (HTX) (n=300, 30%) and haemopneumothorax (HPTX) (n=320, 32%). A total of 13% (127/1,002) of all chest x-rays (CXR) following tube removal demonstrated residual pathologies that precluded immediate discharge: 32 (8%) in Group A (PTX), 44 (15%) in Group B (HTX) and 51 (16%) in Group C (HPTX). All 32 patients in Group A were simply observed and did not require further intervention. In Group B, 17 patients required repeat TTs and 27 required video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for clearance of residual HTX. Twenty-nine patients in Group C required repeat TTs and twenty-two required VATS. Conclusions The vast majority of patients with thoracic trauma can be managed conservatively with TT alone. Residual pathology appeared to be lowest in patients with a PTX, which seldom requires treatment, while only a minority of patients required repeat TTs or VATS for a retained HTX. Selective conservatism is still appropriate in the current era in a developing world setting. PMID:26263809

  3. The contemporary management of penetrating splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Regan J; Inaba, Kenji; Okoye, Obi; Pasley, Jason; Teixeira, Pedro G; Esparza, Michael; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2014-09-01

    Selective non-operative management (NOM) is standard of care for clinically stable patients with blunt splenic trauma and expectant management approaches are increasingly utilised in penetrating abdominal trauma, including in the setting of solid organ injury. Despite this evolution of clinical practice, little is known about the safety and efficacy of NOM in penetrating splenic injury. Trauma registry and medical record review identified all consecutive patients presenting to LAC+USC Medical Center with penetrating splenic injury between January 2001 and December 2011. Associated injuries, incidence and nature of operative intervention, local and systemic complications and mortality were determined. During the study period, 225 patients experienced penetrating splenic trauma. The majority (187/225, 83%) underwent emergent laparotomy. Thirty-eight clinically stable patients underwent a deliberate trial of NOM and 24/38 (63%) were ultimately managed without laparotomy. Amongst patients failing NOM, 3/14 (21%) underwent splenectomy while an additional 6/14 (42%) had splenorrhaphy. Hollow viscus injury (HVI) occurred in 21% of all patients failing NOM. Forty percent of all NOM patients had diaphragmatic injury (DI). All patients undergoing delayed laparotomy for HVI or a splenic procedure presented symptomatically within 24h of the initial injury. No deaths occurred in patients undergoing NOM. Although the vast majority of penetrating splenic trauma requires urgent operative management, a group of patients does present without haemodynamic instability, peritonitis or radiologic evidence of hollow viscus injury. Management of these patients is complicated as over half may remain clinically stable and can avoid laparotomy, making them potential candidates for a trial of NOM. HVI is responsible for NOM failure in up to a fifth of these cases and typically presents within 24h of injury. Delayed laparotomy, within this limited time period, did not appear to increase

  4. Predictors of abdominal injuries in blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrath, Samiris; Parreira, José Gustavo; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Solda, Silvia C; Assef, José Cesar

    2012-01-01

    To identify predictors of abdominal injuries in victims of blunt trauma. retrospective analysis of trauma protocols (collected prospectively) of adult victims of blunt trauma in a period of 15 months. Variables were compared between patients with abdominal injuries (AIS>0) detected by computed tomography or/and laparotomy (group I) and others (AIS=0, group II). Student's t, Fisher and qui-square tests were used for statistical analysis, considering p3) in head (18.5% vs. 7.9%), thorax (29.2% vs. 2.4%) and extremities (40.0% vs. 13.7%). The highest odds ratios for the diagnosis of abdominal injuries were associated flail chest (21.8) and pelvic fractures (21.0). Abdominal injuries were more frequently observed in patients with hemodynamic instability, changes in Glasgow coma scale and severe lesions to the head, chest and extremities.

  5. What is optimal timing for trauma team alerts? A retrospective observational study of alert timing effects on the initial management of trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillebo B

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Borge Lillebo,1 Andreas Seim,2 Ole-Petter Vinjevoll,3 Oddvar Uleberg31Norwegian EHR Research Centre, Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 2Department of Computer and Information Science, Faculty of Information Technology, Mathematics and Electrical Engineering, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Anaesthesia and Emergency Medicine, St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Trauma teams improve the initial management of trauma patients. Optimal timing of trauma alerts could improve team preparedness and performance while also limiting adverse ripple effects throughout the hospital. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how timing of trauma team activation and notification affects initial in-hospital management of trauma patients.Methods: Data from a single hospital trauma care quality registry were matched with data from a trauma team alert log. The time from patient arrival to chest X-ray, and the emergency department length of stay were compared with the timing of trauma team activations and whether or not trauma team members received a preactivation notification.Results: In 2009, the trauma team was activated 352 times; 269 times met the inclusion criteria. There were statistically significant differences in time to chest X-ray for differently timed trauma team activations (P = 0.003. Median time to chest X-ray for teams activated 15–20 minutes prearrival was 5 minutes, and 8 minutes for teams activated <5 minutes before patient arrival. Timing had no effect on length of stay in the emergency department (P = 0.694. We found no effect of preactivation notification on time to chest X-ray (P = 0.474 or length of stay (P = 0.684.Conclusion: Proactive trauma team activation improved the initial management of trauma patients. Trauma teams should be activated prior to patient arrival.Keywords: emergency medical service communication systems

  6. Operative management versus non-operative management of rib fractures in flail chest injuries: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, Jaap; Goslings, J. C.; Schepers, T.

    2017-01-01

    Flail chest is a life-threatening complication of severe chest trauma with a mortality rate of up to 15 %. The standard non-operative management has high comorbidities with pneumonia and often leads to extended Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay, due to insufficient respiratory function and

  7. Algorithms for managing the common trauma patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiratory distress. Did injury penetrate platysma muscle? Zone III. (above angle of mandible). C-spine X-ray. Angiogram. Laryngoscopy. Sialogram. Suspected pharyngeal injury. Suspected parotid gland injury. Zone II. (between the cricoid cartilage and angle of the mandible). Chest X-ray. C-spine X-ray. Angiogram.

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately available, as is often necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  10. Chest sonography. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, Gebhard (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    Chest sonography is an established procedure in the stepwise imaging diagnosis of pulmonary and pleural disease. It is the method of choice to distinguish between solid and liquid lesions and allows the investigator to make an unequivocal diagnosis without exposing the patient to costly and stressful procedures. This book presents the state of the art in chest investigation by means of ultrasonography. A number of excellent illustrations and the compact text provide concise and easy-to-assimilate information about the diagnostic procedure. Basic el