WorldWideScience

Sample records for pbfa

  1. Preliminary PBFA II design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.L.; VanDevender, J.P.; Martin, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    The upgrade of Sandia National Laboratories particle beam fusion accelerator, PBFA I, to PBFA II presents several interesting and challenging pulsed power design problems. PBFA II requires increasing the PBFA I output parameters from 2 MV, 30 TW, 1 MJ to 4 MV, 100 TW, 3.5 MJ with the constraint of using much of the same PBFA I hardware. The increased PBFA II output will be obtained by doubling the number of modules (from 36 to 72), increasing the primary energy storage (from 4 MJ to 15 MJ), lowering the pulse forming line (PFL) output impedance, and adding a voltage doubling network

  2. Pulsed power performance of PBFA Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Stygar, W.A.; Seamen, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    PBFA Z is a new 60-TW/5-MJ electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories. The authors use PBFA Z to drive z pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator, water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn and PBFA II accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ in a 60-TW/105-ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers 3.0 MJ and 50 TW of electrical energy to the z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, the authors attain peak currents of 16-20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the z-pinch load through self magnetically-insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electric fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV/cm. The current from the four independent conical-disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. The authors achieved x-ray powers of 200 TW and x-ray energies of 1.9 MJ from tungsten wire-array z-pinch loads

  3. PBFA II energy storage section design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    PBFA II will be the second thirty-six module accelerator built at Sandia National Laboratories for particle beam fusion feasibility studies. Each module of the machine will deliver 2.8 terawatts to a central experimental chamber. The total power delivered (100 terawatts) is expected to permit ignition scaling studies beginning in 1986. The PBFA II energy storage system consists of thirty-six 6.0 mv, 400 kj. Marx generators with their high voltage trigger and charging systems, and electromechanical output switching system. The paper describes the current design of this section of the machine. Constraints imposed by the existing tank and building are presented, as they relate to locating support systems in the oil section of PBFA II. The charging system and output switches have been designed and are described. A conceptual design for the Marx triggering system is also presented. Additional hardware (monitors, grounding connections, etc.) is discussed briefly with design details given where available

  4. A status report on the PBFA II construction project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, G.W.; Furaus, J.P.; Cook, D.L.; Shirley, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). PBFA II contains 36 individual power modules configured in a stacked radial geometry and synchronized to provide greater than 3.5 MJ of energy into the vacuum section in a single 55-ns-wide 90-TW peak power pulse. This R and D construction project is being implemented in a fast track schedule mode in which final design of the accelerator components occurs in parallel with the construction of the laboratory building and the accelerator tank. PBFA II is scheduled to become operational in January 1986 with its first multi-module shot into an applied-B ion diode that will generate and transport a beam of lithium ions. Plans are now being made for experimental work on PBFA II beyond the construction phase

  5. Progress in light ion beam fusion research on PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.; Allshouse, G.O.; Bailey, J.

    1986-01-01

    PBFA II is a 100 TW pulsed power accelerator constructed at Sandia National Laboratories for use in the Light Ion Fusion Program. The objective of PBFA II is to accelerate and focus upon an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target a lithium beam with sufficient energy, power, and power density to perform ignition scaling experiments. The technologies used in PBFA II include: (1) primary energy storage and compression with 6 MV, low-inductance Marx generators, (2) pulse forming in water-insulated, water-dielectric lines with self-closing water switches, (4) voltage addition in vacuum using self-magnetically-insulated biconic transmission lines, (5) inductive energy storage and pulse compression using a fast-opening plasma erosion switch, (6) beam formation using a magnetically-insulated ion diode, and (7) space-charge and current-neutralized beam propagation to the target in a gas-filled cell. The first multimodule shot was on December 11, 1985. The plans for PBFA II include development and demonstration of the pulse-shaping techniques which are necessary for high-gain target compressions. Following a modification of the accelerator which will probably include an ''extraction'' ion diode, a 4- to 5-meter plasma channel for beam bunching during propagation, and a target chamber located beneath the accelerator, temporally-shaped ion beam pulses will be available for pulse-shaped target experiments. (author)

  6. Lithium ion beam driven hohlraums for PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukart, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    In our light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, fusion capsules are driven with an intense x-ray radiation field produced when an intense beam of ions penetrates a radiation case and deposits energy in a foam x-ray conversion region. A first step in the program is to generate and measure these intense fields on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II). Our goal is to generate a 100-eV radiation temperature in lithium ion beam driven hohlraums, the radiation environment which will provide the initial drive temperature for ion beam driven implosion systems designed to achieve high gain. In this paper, we describe the design of such hohlraum targets and their predicted performance on PBFA II as we provide increasing ion beam intensities

  7. Status of and plans for the PBFA II Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    PBFA II is a 100 TW pulsed power accelerator being constructed for use in the Light Ion Fusion Program. The objective of PBFA II is to accelerate and focus upon an ICF target a lithium beam with sufficicent energy, power, and power density to perform ignition scaling experiments. The technologies used in PBFA II include: (1) primary energy storage and compression with 6 MV, low-inductance Marx generators, (2) pulse forming in water-insulated, water-dielectric lines with self-closing water switches, (3) module synchronization using laser-triggerred, 6 MV multistage gas switches, (4) voltage addition in vacuum using self-magnetically-insulated biconic transmission lines, (5) inductive energy storage and pulse compression using a fast-opening plasma erosion switch, (6) beam formation using a magnetically-insulated ion diode, and (7) space charge and current neutralized beam propagation to the target in a gas-filled cell. Presently, accelerator construction is nearing completion, with the first multimodule shot expected by the end of January 1986

  8. PBFA Z: A 50 TW/5 MJ Electrical Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, R. B.

    1997-05-01

    PBFA Z is a new 50 TW/5 MJ short electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories. We use PBFA Z to magnetically-implode solid or plasma shells. These configurations are historically known as z pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z(R. B. Spielman, et al., Proc. of the Ninth IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., Albuquerque, NM 1995) is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator, water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn (D. D. Bloomquist, et al., Proc. of the Sixth IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., Arlington, VA edited by P. J. Turchi and B. H. Bernstein (IEEE, New York, 1987), p. 310) and PBFA II(B. N. Turman, et al., Proc. of the Fifth IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., Arlington, VA 1985, pp. 155) accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ in a 50 TW/100 ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers 3.4 MJ and 40 TW of electrical energy to the z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, we attain a peak current of 16-20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the z-pinch load through self magnetically-insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electric fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV /cm. The current from the four independent conical disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. The measured system performance of the water transmission lines, the vacuum insulator stack, the MITLs, and the double post-hole vacuum convolute differed from preshot predictions by ~ 5%. Using a 2-cm radius and a 2-cm length tungsten wire array with 240, 7.5-=B5m diameter wires (4.1-mg mass) as the z-pinch load, we achieved x-ray powers of 160 TW and x-ray energies of 1.85 MJ as measured by x-ray diodes and resistive bolometry.

  9. Lithium beam characterization of cylindrical PBFA II hohlraum experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moats, A.R.; Derzon, M.S.; Chandler, G.A.; Haill, T.A.; Johnson, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Ruiz, C.L.; Wenger, D.F.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is actively engaged in exploring indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA II) with pulsed-power accelerated lithium ions as the driver. Experiments utilizing cylindrical hohlraum targets were conducted in 1994. Using the incoming ion beam-induced line radiation from titanium wires surrounding these hohlraums, beam profiles during these experiments have been measured and characterized. These data, their comparison/cross-correlation with particle-based beam diagnostics, and an analysis of the beam parameters that most significantly influence target temperature are presented

  10. Optical system for laser triggering of PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamil, R.A.; Seamons, L.O.; Schanwald, L.P.; Gerber, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The PBFA II laser triggering optical system consists of nearly 300 optical components. These optics must be sufficiently precise to preserve the laser beam quality, as well as to equally distribute the energy of the UV laser beam to the 36, 5.5 MV gas-filled switches at precisely the same instant. Both index variation and cleanliness of the air long the laser path must be controlled. The manual alignment system is capable of alignment to better than the acceptable error of 200 microradians (laser to switches). A technique has been devised to ease the alignment procedure by using a special high gain video camera and a tool alignment telescope to view retroreflective tape targets having optical brightness gains over white surfaces of 10/sup 3/. The camera is a charge-coupled detector intensified by a double microchannel plate having an optical gain of between 10/sup 4/ and 10/sup 5/

  11. An overview of the main design and performance of PBFA Z machine

    CERN Document Server

    Song Sheng Yi

    2002-01-01

    PBFA Z is a new 60 TW/5 MJ electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). It has been used to drive Z-pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator with water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn and PBFA II accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ in a 60 TW/105 ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers 3.0 MJ and 50 TW of electrical energy to the Z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, PBFA Z has attained peak currents of 16-20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the Z-pinch load through self-magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electrical fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV/cm. The current from the four independent conical-disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. SNL has achieved X-ray powers of 200TW and X-ray energies of 1.9 MJ from...

  12. An overview of the main design and performance of PBFA Z machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Shengyi

    2002-01-01

    PBFA Z is a new 60 TW/5 MJ electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). It has been used to drive Z-pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator with water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn and PBFA II accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ in a 60 TW/105 ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers 3.0 MJ and 50 TW of electrical energy to the Z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, PBFA Z has attained peak currents of 16-20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the Z-pinch load through self-magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electrical fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV/cm. The current from the four independent conical-disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. SNL has achieved X-ray powers of 200TW and X-ray energies of 1.9 MJ from tungsten wire-array Z-pinch loads

  13. A shot parameter specification subsystem for automated control of PBFA II accelerator shots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiller, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The author reports on the shot parameter specification subsystem (SPSS), an integral part of the automatic control system developed for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II). This system has been designed to fully utilize the accelerator by tailoring shot parameters to the needs of the experimenters. The SPSS is the key to this flexibility. Automatic systems will be required on many pulsed power machines for the fastest turnaround, the highest reliability, and most cost effective operation. These systems will require the flexibility and the ease of use that is part of the SPSS. The author discusses how the PBFA II control system has proved to be an effective modular system, flexible enough to meet the demands of both the fast track construction of PBFA II and the control needs of Hermes III. This system is expected to meet the demands of most future machine changes

  14. Design concepts for PBFA-II's applied-B ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovang, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The lithium ion diode to be used at the center of Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-II (PBFA-II) at Sandia National Laboratories is an applied-B ion diode. The center section of the PBFA-II accelerator is where the electrical requirements of the accelerator, the design requirements of the diode, and the operational requirements must all be satisfied simultaneously for a successful experiment. From an operational standpoint, the ion diode is the experimental hub of the accelerator and needs to be easily and quickly installed and removed. Because of the physical size and geometry of the PBFA-II center section, achieving the operational requirements has presented an interesting design challenge. A discussion of the various design requirements and the proposed concepts for satisfying them is presented

  15. LEVIS lithium ion source experiments on PBFA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renk, T.J.; Tisone, G.C.; Adams, R.G.; Lopez, M.; Clark, B.F.; Schroeder, J.; Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Carlson, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    PBFA-II is a pulsed power generator designed to apply up to a 25 MV, 20 ns pulse to a focusing 15 cm-radius Applied-B ion diode for inertial confinement fusion applications. Several different approaches have been pursued to produce a high-purity (> 90%), high-current density (5--10 kA/cm 2 ) singly ionized lithium ion source for acceleration in this diode. In addition to having high source purity, such a source should be active, i.e. the ions should be produced before the power pulse arrives, to provide better electrical coupling from the accelerator to the diode. In the LEVIS (Laser EVaporation Ion Source) process, energy from two lasers impinges on a thin (500 nm) lithium or lithium-bearing film on an insulating substrate. The authors will discuss a new series of LEVIS experiments, with a number of improvements: (1) the laser distribution cone was redesigned, resulting in a more uniform illumination of the 4 cm-tall Li-producing surface; (2) the anode surface is being slow-heated to 120--150 C to help drive off contaminants; and (3) they have expanded the number of source and beam diagnostics

  16. LEVIS ion source and beam characterization on PBFA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renk, T.J.; Tisone, G.C.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Johnson, D.J.; Pointon, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    We report on the continuing development of the LEVIS (Laser Evaporation Ion Source) lithium active ion source for the 15-cm radial focussing ion diode on PBFA-11. We found previously that DC-heating of the anode surface to 150 degrees C maximum for 5 hours resulted in a pure lithium beam. This paper discusses the characterization of LEVIS source uniformity by Faraday cup arrays and multiple lines of sight for visible light spectroscopy. These diagnostics give some evidence of nonuniformity in both A-K gap electric fields and ion current density. Despite this, however, the measured focal spot size appears smaller than with a passive LiF source operated in the same magnetic field topology. Experiments using a curved anode for vertical beam focussing show reduced ion beam turn-on delay by 5 ns by altering the magnetic field topology as well as anode curvature. Another 3--5 ns reduction was achieved by switching from a passive LiF to the active LEVIS source

  17. Design and optimization of the PBFA II vacuum interface and transmission lines for light ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mc Daniel, D.H.; Stinnett, R.W.; Gray, E.W.; Mattis, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The PBFA II vacuum insulator was originally designed for optimum coupling to a proton ion diode with minimum inductance. In July 1983 it was decided that lithium ions at 30 MeV would be the baseline for PBFA II. This requires the use of Plasma Opening Switches (POS) and vacuum inductor to reach 30 MV. To achieve this, the vacuum magnetically insulated transmission lines had to be redesigned as an inductive energy store. To gain optimum coupling to this vacuum inductor, the output impedance of the water section was increased by the use of a water-dielectric transformer. The calculations leading to the final design are discussed

  18. Plasma-filled diode experiments on PBFA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renk, T.J.; Rochau, G.E.; McDaniel, D.H.; Moore, W.B.; Zuchowski, N.; Padilla, R.

    1987-01-01

    The PBFA-II accelerator is designed to use a Plasma Opening Switch (POS) for pulse shaping and voltage multiplication using inductive storage. The vacuum section of the machine consists of a set of short magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) that both act as a voltage adder for series stacking of the pulses out of the 72 parallel plate water lines, and as a 100 nH (total) storage inductor upstream of a biconically shaped POS region. There are two POS plasma injection areas, located above and below an equatorial load, which has consisted of either a short circuit, a blade (electron beam) diode, or an Applied B magnetically insulated ion diode. The POS is designed to conduct up to 6 MA, and open into a 5 ohm diode load in 10 ns or less. Under these conditions, the voltage at the load is predicted to exceed 24 MV. Initial POS experiments using these loads have produced 1) opening times of typically 20 ns or longer, 2) poor current transfer efficiency (less than 50%) when load impedances averaged 2 ohms or more, and 3) differential switch opening in azimuthal segments of the power feed, thought to be caused by poor plasma uniformity across the flashboard plasma source. One possible explanation for 2) is that efficient transfer out of the POS requires that the current carried to the load be magnetically insulated, or else considerable energy will be deposited in the feed region between the POS and load. This had indeed been observed. The problem is further exacerbated by the longer current turn-on times that occur when an ion diode is used as the load

  19. PBFA Z: A 55 TW/4.5 MJ electrical generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Stygar, W.A.; Struve, K.W.; Seamen, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    PBFA Z is a new 55 TW/4.5 MJ short pulse electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories. The authors use PBFA Z to magnetically-implode plasma shells. These configurations are historically known as z pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator, water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn and PBFA II accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in a 55-TW/105-ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers up to 3.0 MJ and 40 TW of electrical energy to the z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, they attain peak currents of 16--20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the z-pinch load through self magnetically-insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electric fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV/cm. The current from the four independent conical disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. The measured system performance of the water transmission lines, the vacuum insulator stack, the MITLs, and the double post-hole vacuum convolute differed from preshot predictions by ∼ 5%. Using a 2-cm radius and a 2-cm length tungsten wire array with 240, 7.5-microm diameter wires (4.1-mg mass) as the z-pinch load, they achieved x-ray powers of 200 TW and x-ray energies of 1.85 MJ as measured by x-ray diodes and resistive bolometry

  20. PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II: The pulsed power characterization phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; Turman, B.N.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II, PBFA II, is now the largest pulsed power device in operation. This paper summarizes its first year and a half of operation for the Department of Energy (DOE) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. Thirty-six separate modules provide 72 output pulses that combine to form a 100 TW output pulse at the accelerator center. PBFA II was successfully test fired for the first time on December 11, 1985. This test completed the construction phase (Phase 1) within the expected schedule and budget. The accelerator checkout phase then started (Phase 2). The first priority during checkout was to bring the Phase 1 subsystems into full operation. The accelerator was first tested to determine overall system performance. Next, subsystems that were not performing adequately were modified. The accelerator is now being used for ion diode studies. 32 refs

  1. Plasma opening switch development for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinnett, R.W.; McDaniel, D.H.; Rochau, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors conducted plasma opening switch (POS) experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' new Particle Beam Fusin Accelerator II (PBFA II) (12 MV, 100 TW, 50 ns), on the Supermite accelerator (2 MV, 2 TW, 50 ns) and on the Naval Research Laboratory's Gamble II accelerator (1.8 MV, 1.6 TW, 70 ns). The POS systems on the PBFA II and Supermite accelerators use a newly developed flashboard plasma source to provide the plasma necessary to conduct the large (> 1 MA) currents produced byu these accelerators. In the Supermite experiments, the plasma opening switch conducted currents up to 1 MA before opening in less than 10 ns into an electron beam load. These experiments achieved significant voltage gain relative to the voltage across a matched load. In experiments on Gamble II, power gains of up to 1.7 were achieved using a POS in a strongly coaxial geometry (r/sub outer//r/sub inner/ = 2) with a large magnetic field at the cathode. The POS system on PBFA II is unique because of its size and voltage. This POS system is designed to conduct over 6 MA before opening. In present experiments it has conducted currents of 4-5 MA for over 50 ns

  2. A Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem for automated control of PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II accelerator shots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiller, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem (SPSS) is an integral part of the automatic control system developed for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) by the Control Monitor (C/M) Software Development Team. This system has been designed to fully utilize the accelerator by tailoring shot parameters to the needs of the experimenters. The SPSS is the key to this flexibility. Automatic systems will be required on many pulsed power machines for the fastest turnaround, the highest reliability, and most cost effective operation. These systems will require the flexibility and the ease of use that is part of the SPSS. The PBFA II control system has proved to be an effective modular system, flexible enough to meet the demands of both the fast track construction of PBFA II and the control needs of Hermes III at the Simulation Technology Laboratory. This system is expected to meet the demands of most future machine changes

  3. LEVIS active anode lithium ion source development on PBFA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renk, T.J.; Tisone, G.C.; Adams, R.G.; Clark, B.F.; Reyes, C.; Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Johnson, D.J.; Carlson, A.L.; Lake, P.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are ongoing on the PBFA-II Accelerator (10 MV typical, 50 ns) to optimize an active lithium ion source in a 15-cm focusing Applied-B ion diode using the LEVIS (Laser Evaporation Ion Source) process. Two laser pulses impinge on a thin (500 nm) Li or Li-bearing alloy on an insulating substrate. A Nd:YAG laser beam (1 μm, 8 ns, 0.1--0.2 J/cm 2 ) creates a thin (∼1 mm) Li vapor, which is then ionized by a 30--60 mJ/cm 2 dye laser tuned to the first resonant transition of Li (670.8 nm). In order to achieve a high-purity Li beam on PBFA-II with LEVIS, it has proven necessary to clean the anode surface in some way. The principal technique has been DC-heating of the anode to temperatures of 150--200 C for typically 5 hours, and for as long as 13 hours, prior to machine firing. Use of a LiAg alloy and YAG energy densities of 200 mJ/cm 2 have yielded beams of Li purity greater than 90%. They authors also plan to test a diode configuration that deposits Li in-situ on the anode surface just prior to the machine shot, as an alternative to DC-heating

  4. PBFA Z: A 20-MA z-pinch driver for plasma radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Breeze, S.F.; Deeney, C.

    1996-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing a major modification to the PBFA-II facility. PBFA Z will be a z-pinch driver capable of delivering up to 20 MA to a z-pinch load. It optimizes the electrical coupling to the implosion energy of z pinches at implosion velocities of ∼ 40 cm/μs. Design constraints resulted in an accelerator with a 0.12-Ω impedance, a 10.25-nH inductance, and a 120-ns pulse width. The design required new water transmission lines, insulator stack, and vacuum power feeds. Current is delivered to the z-pinch load through four, self-magnetically-insulated vacuum transmission lines and a double post-hole convolute. A variety of design codes are used to model the power flow. These predict a peak current of 20 MA to a z-pinch load having a 2-cm length, a 2-cm radius, and a 15--mg mass, coupling 1.5 MJ into kinetic energy. We present 2-D Rad-Hydro calculations showing MJ x-ray outputs from tungsten wire-array z pinches

  5. PBFA Z: A 20-MA Z-pinch driver for plasma radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Breeze, S.F.; Deeney, C.

    1996-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing a major modification to the PBFA-II facility. PBFA Z will be capable of delivering up to 20 MA to a z-pinch load. It optimizes the electrical coupling to the implosion energy of z pinches at implosion velocities of ∼ 40 cm/μs. Design constraints resulted in an accelerator with a 0.12-Ω impedance, a 10.25-nH inductance, and a 120-ns pulse width. The design required new water transmission lines, insulator stack, and vacuum power feeds. Current is delivered to the z-pinch load through four self-magnetically-insulated vacuum transmission lines and a double post-hole convolute. A variety of design codes are used to model the power flow. These predict a peak current of 20 MA to a z-pinch load having a 2-cm length, a 2-cm radius, and a 15-mg mass, coupling 1.5 MJ into kinetic energy. Calculations are presented showing MJ x-ray outputs from tungsten wire-array z pinches. (author). 4 figs., 14 refs

  6. PBFA Z: A 60-TW/5-MJ Z-pinch driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Deeney, C.; Chandler, G.A.; Douglas, M.R.; Fehl, D.L.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.; Nash, T.J.; Porter, J.L.; Sanford, T.W.; Seamen, J.F.; Stygar, W.A.; Struve, K.W.; Breeze, S.P.; McGurn, J.S.; Torres, J.A.; Zagar, D.M.; Gilliland, T.L.; Jobe, D.O.; McKenney, J.L.; Mock, R.C.; Vargas, M.; Wagoner, T.; Peterson, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    PBFA Z, a new 60-TW/5-MJ electrical accelerator located at Sandia National Laboratories, is now the world's most powerful z-pinch driver. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ into a 60-TW/105-ns FWHM pulse to the 120-mΩ water transmission lines, and delivers 3.0 MJ and 50 TW of electrical energy to the z-pinch load. Depending on load parameters, we attain peak load currents of 16-20 MA with a current rise time of ∼105ns with wire-array z-pinch loads. We have extended the x-ray performance of tungsten wire-array z pinches from earlier Saturn experiments. Using a 2-cm-radius, 2-cm-long tungsten wire array with 240, 7.5-μm diameter wires (4.1-mg mass), we achieved an x-ray power of 210 TW and an x-ray energy of 1.9 MJ. Preliminary spectral measurements suggest a mostly optically-thick, Planckian-like radiator below 1000 eV. Data indicate ∼100kJ of x rays radiated above 1000 eV. An intense z-pinch x-ray source with an overall coupling efficiency greater than 15% has been demonstrated. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  7. Design and analysis of the PBFA-Z vacuum insulator stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.W.; Long, F.; Martin, T.H.; Stygar, W.A.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Mostrom, M.; Corcoran, P.; Smith, I.

    1996-01-01

    Sandia is developing PBFA-Z, a 20-MA driver for z-pinch experiments by replacing the water lines, insulator stack, and MITLs on PBFA II with new hardware. The design of the vacuum insulator stack was dictated by the drive voltage, the electric field stress and grading requirements, the water line and MITL interface requirements, and the machine operations and maintenance requirements. The insulator stack will consist of four separate modules, each of a different design because of different voltage drive and hardware interface requirements. The shape of the components in each module, i.e., grading rings, insulator rings, flux excluders, anode and cathode conductors, and the design of the water line and MITL interfaces, were optimized by using the electrostatic analysis codes, ELECTRO and JASON. The time-dependent performance of the insulator stack was evaluated using IVORY, a 2-D PIC code. The insulator stack design and present the results of the ELECTRO and IVORY analyses are described. (author). 2 tabs., 9 figs., 3 refs

  8. Design and analysis of the PBFA-Z vacuum insulator stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoup, R W [Field Command Defense Nuclear Agency, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Long, F; Martin, T H; Stygar, W A; Spielman, R B [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept 9573; Ives, H [EG and G, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Struve, K W; Mostrom, M [Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Corcoran, P; Smith, I [Pulse Sciences, Inc., San Leandro, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Sandia is developing PBFA-Z, a 20-MA driver for z-pinch experiments by replacing the water lines, insulator stack, and MITLs on PBFA II with new hardware. The design of the vacuum insulator stack was dictated by the drive voltage, the electric field stress and grading requirements, the water line and MITL interface requirements, and the machine operations and maintenance requirements. The insulator stack will consist of four separate modules, each of a different design because of different voltage drive and hardware interface requirements. The shape of the components in each module, i.e., grading rings, insulator rings, flux excluders, anode and cathode conductors, and the design of the water line and MITL interfaces, were optimized by using the electrostatic analysis codes, ELECTRO and JASON. The time-dependent performance of the insulator stack was evaluated using IVORY, a 2-D PIC code. The insulator stack design and present the results of the ELECTRO and IVORY analyses are described. (author). 2 tabs., 9 figs., 3 refs.

  9. PBFA Z: A 20-MA Z-pinch driver for plasma radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielman, R B; Breeze, S F; Deeney, C [Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    1997-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing a major modification to the PBFA-II facility. PBFA Z will be capable of delivering up to 20 MA to a z-pinch load. It optimizes the electrical coupling to the implosion energy of z pinches at implosion velocities of {approx} 40 cm/{mu}s. Design constraints resulted in an accelerator with a 0.12-{Omega} impedance, a 10.25-nH inductance, and a 120-ns pulse width. The design required new water transmission lines, insulator stack, and vacuum power feeds. Current is delivered to the z-pinch load through four self-magnetically-insulated vacuum transmission lines and a double post-hole convolute. A variety of design codes are used to model the power flow. These predict a peak current of 20 MA to a z-pinch load having a 2-cm length, a 2-cm radius, and a 15-mg mass, coupling 1.5 MJ into kinetic energy. Calculations are presented showing MJ x-ray outputs from tungsten wire-array z pinches. (author). 4 figs., 14 refs.

  10. Simulation and interpretation of ion beam diagnostics on PBFA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Nelson, W.E.; Maenchen, J.E.; Stygar, W.A.; Ruiz, C.L.; Lockner, T.R.; Johnson, D.J.

    1988-03-01

    Ion diode and beam focusing experiments are in progress on PBFA-II working towards an ultimate goal of significant burn of an ICF pellet. Beam diagnostics on these experiments include a Thomson parabola, K/sub alpha/ x-ray pinhole cameras, filtered ion pinhole cameras, and a magnetic spectrometer. We are developing two new computer programs to simulate and interpret the data obtained from these diagnostics. VIDA is a VAX-based program that manipulates and unfolds data from digitized particle and x-ray diagnostic images. VIDA operations include: image display, background substraction, relative-to-absolute coordinate transformations, and image projection into the beam reference frame. PICDIAG allows us to study the effects of time-dependent ion focusing on the performance of ion beam diagnostics. 10 refs., 5 figs

  11. Comprehensive diagnostic set for intense lithium ion hohlraum experiments on PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    A review of the comprehensive diagnostic package developed at Sandia National Laboratories for intense lithium ion hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II will be presented. This package contains an extensive suite of x-ray spectral and imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target radiation smoothing, hydro-motion, and temperature. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved 1-D streaked imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target radiation smoothing, hydro-motion, and temperature. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved 1-D streaked imaging diagnostics, time-integrated and time-resolved grazing incidence spectrographs, a transmission grating spectrography, an elliptical crystal spectrograph, a bolometer array, an eleven element x-ray diode (XRD) array, and an eleven element PIN diode detector array. A hohlraum temperature measurement technique under development is a shock breakout diagnostic that measures the radiation pressure at the hohlraum wall. The incident Li beam symmetry and an estimate of incident Li beam power density are measured from ion beam-induced characteristic x-ray line and neutron emissions. An attempt to measure the Li beam intensity directly on target used Rutherford scattered ions into an ion movie camera and a magnetic spectrograph. The philosophy used in designing all the diagnostics in the set has emphasized redundant and independent measurements of fundamental physical quantities relevant to the performance of the target. Details of each diagnostic, its integration, data reduction procedures, and recent PBFA-II data will be discussed

  12. Recent TWOQUICK particle simulations of one- and two- stage transmission lines and diodes on PBFA and SABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poukey, J.W.; Cuneo, M.E.; Lockner, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents recent particle simulation studies of the pulsed-power machines PBFA and SABRE. The code used is the 2-D electromagnetic TWOQUICK. For SABRE we emphasize the single-stage case and compare with experiment. Here the voltage adder, magnetically-insulated-transmission-line (MITL), and proton applied-B extraction diode are all included in the fully time-dependent simulations. Results include vacuum wave precursor effects vs. cathode turn-on threshold, and the sheath-retrapping benefits of diode undermatching. For PBFA we emphasize the 2-stage case and compare with experiments using lithium ions. Here we include the transmission lines and MITLs feeding the 2-stage barrel diode. Results show that good operation is critically dependent on careful B-field shaping in the feeds and diode

  13. Detailed spectral simulations in support of PBFA-Z dynamic hohlraum Z-pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.; Derzon, M.S.; Haill, A.; Nash, T.J.; Peterson, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    In PBFA-Z dynamic hohlraum Z-pinch experiments, 16--18 MA of current is delivered to a load comprises of a tungsten wire array surrounding a low-density cylindrical CH foam. The magnetic field accelerates the W plasma radially inward at velocities ∼ 40--60 cm/micros. The W plasma impacts into the foam, generating a high T R radiation field which diffuses into the foam. The authors are investigating several types of spectral diagnostics which can be used to characterize the time-dependent conditions in the foam. In addition, they are examining the potential ramifications of axial jetting on the interpretation of axial x-ray diagnostics. In the analysis, results from 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulations are post-processed using a hybrid spectral analysis code in which low-Z material is treated using a detailed collisional-radiative atomic model, while high-Z material is modeled using LTE UTA (unresolved transition array) opacities. They will present results from recent simulations and discuss ramifications for x-ray diagnostics

  14. Intense ion beam diagnostics for light ion inertial fusion experiments on PBFA 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Stygar, W.A.; Bailey, J.E.; Baldwin, G.T.; Bloomquist, D.D.; Carlson, A.L.; Chandler, G.; Crist, C.E.; Cooper, G.; Derszon, M.S.; Dukart, R.J.; Fehl, D.L.; Hebron, D.E.; Johnson, D.J.; Kensek, R.P.; Landron, C.O.; Lee, J.R.; Lockner, T.R.; Mattson, C.R.; Matzen, M.K.; Maenchen, J.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Mix, L.P.; Muron, D.J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, W.E.; Reyes, P.; Rockett, P.; Ruiz, C.L.; Schmidlapp, A.; Stinnett, R.W.; Sujka, B.; Wenger, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    A review of recent developments in intense ion beam diagnostics used in the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program on the PBFA-2 accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories will be presented. These developments have occurred in each of several generic classes of diagnostics, namely, imaging diagnostics, particle spectrograph diagnostics, nuclear activation, and visible spectroscopy. Critical beam parameters measured by the diagnostic include spatial profile, absolute number, species, anode plasma temperature and density, beam divergence, and beam voltage current density, and power density. A unique feature of these diagnostics is that they are capable of operating in hard (multi-Mev) X-ray (bremsstrahlung) backgrounds of some 10 10 - 10 12 rad/s. The operating principles of each diagnostic will be summarized in the paper, with examples of how the diagnostics may be integrated together to form a complete diagnostic system. The paper will close with a discussion of several near diagnostic systems that are presently being developed. 13 refs., 6 figs

  15. Time-resolved measurements of the focused ion beams on PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mix, L.P.; Stygar, W.A.; Leeper, R.J.; Maenchen, J.E.; Wenger, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    A time-resolved camera has been developed to image the intense ion beam focus on PBFA II. Focused ions from a sector of the ion diode are Rutherford scattered from a thin gold foil on the diode axis and pinhole imaged onto an array of up to 49 PIN detectors to obtain the spatially and temporally resolved images. The signals from these detectors are combined to provide a movie of the beam focus with a time resolution of about 3 ns and a spatial resolution of 2 mm over a 12 mm field of view. Monte Carlo simulations of the camera response are used with the measured ion energy to account for the time-of-flight dispersion of the beam and to convert the recorded signals to an intensity. From measurements on an 81 degree sector of the diode, average intensities on a 6 mm sphere of about 5 TW/cm 2 and energies approaching 80 kJ/cm 2 are calculated for standard proton diodes. Corresponding numbers for a lithium diode are less than those measured with protons. The details of the analysis and image reconstruction will be presented along with scaled images from recent ion focusing experiments

  16. PBFA II lithium beam characterization from inner-shell x-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moats, A.R.; Derzon, M.S.; Chandler, G.A.; Dukart, R.J.; Haill, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA II) is not driving targets with ICF-relevant lithium ion beams. During the most recent lithium beam target series, time-integrated x-ray pinhole cameras viewed the ion-induced inner-shell x-ray fluorescence from the central gold cone target and a titanium-coated strip. Ion beam profiles at a nominal 10 mm radius and fixed azimuthal direction were obtained from images of the Ti K α , fluorescence of a Ti-coated Al diagnostic wire. The gold cone gave us beam profiles at a nominal 3 mm radius and at all azimuthal angles from the Au L α fluorescence. From these profiles, we obtained the ion beam vertical focus position, full-width-at-half-maximum, and the degree of azimuthal uniformity for the lithium target shots. For these initial results, beam steering problems were evident. Azimuthal uniformity was measured from the ion beam footprint on the outer Au case (predominantly Au L α ) of the hohlraum target and were found to be in the same range (up to 30%) as for previous proton beam target series. We then present plans for Li beam diagnostics for an upcoming target experimental series

  17. Production of lithium positive ions from LiF thin films on the anode in PBFA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, T.A.; Stinnett, R.W.; Gerber, R.A.

    1995-09-01

    The production of positive lithium ions using a lithium-fluoride-coated stainless steel anode in the particle beam fusion accelerator PBFA II is considered from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. It is concluded that the mechanism of Li + ion production is electric field desorption from the tenth-micron-scale crystallites which compose the columnar growth of the LiF thin film. The required electric field is estimated to be of the order of 5 MV/cm. An essential feature of the mechanism is that the crystallites are rendered electronically conducting through electron-hole pair generation by MeV electron bombardment of the thin film during the operation of the diode. It is proposed that the ion emission mechanism is an electronic conductivity analogue to that discovered by Rollgen for lithium halide crystallites which were rendered ionically conducting by heating to several hundred degrees Celsius. Since an electric field desorption mechanism cannot operate if a surface flashover plasma has formed and reduced the anode electric field to low values, the possibility of flashover on the lithium fluoride coated anode of the PBFA II Li + ion source is studied theoretically. It is concluded with near certainty that flashover does not occur

  18. Wire-array initiation and interwire-plasma merger concerns in PBFA-Z tungsten z-pinch implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Allshouse, G.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Experiments with annular wire-array loads to generate high quality, high-power, z-pinch implosions on Saturn have shown the importance of maintaining azimuthal symmetry and how the individual wire plasmas merge to form a plasma shell. Here the authors discuss the impact of current symmetry, current prepulse, interwire spacing, and wire size on generating high-quality, high-power, z-pinch implosions on PBFA-Z, with annular tungsten wire loads. B-dot monitors measured the current as a function of azimuth in the MITLs and 4.5 cm upstream of the load. Bolometers and filtered XRDs and PCDs, spanning the energy range {approximately} 0 eV to 6 keV, monitored the temporal characteristics of the radiation. Time-integrated and time-resolved, filtered, fast-framing, x-ray pinhole cameras, and a crystal spectrometer monitored the spatial and spectral structure of the radiation. The radial dynamics of single-wire plasmas from the solid-state, using the measured current, was calculated by 1D radiation magnetohydrodynamics code (RMHC) and used as input to an xy RMHC. These calculations together with 2D RMHC simulations in the rz plane are discussed and correlated with the measurements.

  19. Wire-array initiation and interwire-plasma merger concerns in PBFA-Z tungsten z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Spielman, R.B.; Allshouse, G.O.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments with annular wire-array loads to generate high quality, high-power, z-pinch implosions on Saturn have shown the importance of maintaining azimuthal symmetry and how the individual wire plasmas merge to form a plasma shell. Here the authors discuss the impact of current symmetry, current prepulse, interwire spacing, and wire size on generating high-quality, high-power, z-pinch implosions on PBFA-Z, with annular tungsten wire loads. B-dot monitors measured the current as a function of azimuth in the MITLs and 4.5 cm upstream of the load. Bolometers and filtered XRDs and PCDs, spanning the energy range ∼ 0 eV to 6 keV, monitored the temporal characteristics of the radiation. Time-integrated and time-resolved, filtered, fast-framing, x-ray pinhole cameras, and a crystal spectrometer monitored the spatial and spectral structure of the radiation. The radial dynamics of single-wire plasmas from the solid-state, using the measured current, was calculated by 1D radiation magnetohydrodynamics code (RMHC) and used as input to an xy RMHC. These calculations together with 2D RMHC simulations in the rz plane are discussed and correlated with the measurements

  20. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA [Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator] II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards

  1. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  2. The influence of electrical resistivity, magnetic field strength, boundary conditions, and injection conditions on the behavior of the magnetically injected plasma in the PBFA-II opening switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watrous, J.J.; Frese, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The Plasma Opening Switch used on PBFA-II uses a source plasma which is injected into the inter-electrode gap along the field lines of a modest-strength applied poloidal magnetic field. The distribution of this plasma within the gap plays an important role in the behavior of the switch. Knowledge of this distribution is critical for performing relevant switch calculations and for interpreting experimental data. In the work reported here, the influence on that distribution of the plasma electrical resistivity, the applied magnetic field strength, and the boundary and injection conditions have been investigated with the 2 1/2-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation code, MACH2. The injected plasma has density in the 10 14 cm -3 range and temperature in the several eV range. In this parameter regime, the classical collision time scale is on the order of 10 ns, which, when compared to the 100 ns time scale of the inflowing plasma, means that the plasma is classically collisionless. However, mechanisms other than classical collisions are likely to contribute to electrical resistivity. The authors have investigated the effect of an anomalous resistivity which scales with the plasma frequency, varying the scaling from the electron plasma frequency to the ion plasma frequency. They will compare these results with results based on the assumption of an ideal plasma, and discuss other anomalous resistivity models

  3. Plasma opening switch experiments on the Particle Beam Accelerator II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.A.; McDaniel, D.H.; Mendel, C.W.; Rochau, G.E.; Moore, W.B.S.; Mowrer, G.R.; Simpson, W.W.; Zagar, D.M.; Grasser, T.; McDougal, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma opening switch (POS) experiments have been done since 1986 on the PBFA-II ion beam accelerator to develop a rugged POS that will open rapidly ( 80%) into a high impedance (> 10 ohm) load. In a recent series of experiments on PBFA II, the authors have developed and tested three different switch designs that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. All three configurations couple current efficiently to a 5-ohm electron beam diode. In this experimental series, the PBFA-II Delta Series, more extensive diagnostics were used than in previous switch experiments on PBFA II or on the Blackjack 5 accelerator at Maxwell Laboratories. Data from the experiments with these three switch designs is presented

  4. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed

  5. Isolation of Lead Resistant Bacteria from Lead Contaminated Soil Samples Collected from Sundar Industrial Estate and their Potential Use in Bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, F.; Adalat, R.; Munir, N.; Aftab, F.

    2015-01-01

    Industrial waste water pollution is one of the most controversial problem especially in countries like Pakistan. Human activities and the release of industrial waste have resulted the accumulation of metals in the environment. Noxious chemicals like heavy metals include cadmium, lead, chromium, copper, nickel, etc. that pollute the soils, ground water, sediments and surface waters re present in soluble form. Biosorpotion is a form of bioremediation by which metal ions are adsorbed from polluted site by microorganisms. Samples collected from industrial area were analyzed for lead contamination by Flame Atomic Spectrophotometer. Soil samples of Sundar Industrial Estate were highly resistant to different concentrations (300ppm, 800ppm, and 1600ppm) of Pb+2 whereas, the sample PbFa-458 showed maximum (127.9819mg/L) absorption of Pb+2, so can be used for environmental cleanup. From 24 selected lead resistant strains PbFa-136, PbFa-287, PbFa-960 showed resistance to multimetals, multidrug and high lead concentrations i.e 1800ppm, 2000ppm. Lead resistant strains were predicted as Klebsiella or Eenterobacter, Bacillus, Shigella, Salmonella and Enteroccocus. (author)

  6. Generation and focusing of pulsed intense ion beams. Technical progress report, 20 August 1981-30 September 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1983-07-01

    The progress on this contract is described in two parts. The first deals with the technical operation of the LION accelerator which is the exact equivalent to one line of PBFA-I. The second part is concerned with the experimental results on the ion diode mounted at the front end of the LION accelerator

  7. Pulsed power driven hohlraum research at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Alberts, T.E.; Allshouse, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    Three pulsed power driven hohlraum concepts are being investigated at Sandia for application to inertial fusion research. These hohlraums are driven by intense proton and Li ion beams as well as by two different types of z-pinch x-ray sources. Research on these hohlraum systems will continue on Sandia's PBFA II-Z facility

  8. Engineering high reliability, low-jitter Marx generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, L.X.; Lockwood, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Multimodule pulsed power accelerators typically require high module reliability and nanosecond regime simultaneity between modules. Energy storage using bipolar Marx generators can meet these requirements. Experience gained from computer simulations and the development of the DEMON II Marx generator has led to a fundamental understanding of the operation of these multistage devices. As a result of this research, significant improvements in erection time jitter and reliability have been realized in multistage, bipolar Marx generators. Erection time jitter has been measured as low as 2.5 nanoseconds for the 3.2MV, 16-stage PBFA I Marx and 3.5 nanoseconds for the 6.0MV, 30-stage PBFA II (DEMON II) Marx, while maintaining exceptionally low prefire rates. Performance data are presented from the DEMON II Marx research program, as well as discussions on the use of computer simulations in designing low-jitter Marx generators

  9. Advances in ion beam intensity at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bailey, J.E.; Coats, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 lithium beam intensities ≥1 TW/cm 2 were achieved and lithium-driven target experiments at the ∼1,400 TW/g level were performed on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) at Sandia National Laboratories. Hohlraum radiation temperatures of up to 60 eV were achieved using this lithium beam. The 1995 Light-Ion ICF Program milestone of achieving a 100 eV radiation temperature in an ion-driven hohlraum will require a lithium beam intensity of 5 ± 1 TW/cm 2 on a 4 mm diameter cylindrical target; this will require both an increase in coupled lithium power and a decrease in total lithium beam divergence. The lithium beam power has been limited to ∼5--6 TW by a so-called ''parasitic load.'' This parasitic current loss in the ion diodes has recently been identified as being carried by ions that are accelerated from plasmas that are formed when high voltage electrons are lost to anodes with many monolayers of hydrocarbon surface contamination. Control of anode and cathode plasmas on the SABRE accelerator using RF-discharge cleaning, anode heating, and cryogenic cooling of the cathode have increased the efficiency of the production of lithium current by a factor of 2--3. A new ion diode incorporating glow discharge cleaning and titanium gettering pumps has been installed in PBFA II and will be tested in December, 1994. Anode heaters should be available in January, 1995. Circuit model calculations indicate that one can more than double the coupled lithium ion power on PBFA II by eliminating the parasitic current. LiF source divergence presently dominates the total beam divergence. Progress in lithium beam focal intensity using diode cleaning techniques coupled with an active lithium source is reported

  10. Particle beam fusion progress report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the pulsed power approach to inertial confinement fusion. In 1989, the authors achieved a proton focal intensity of 5 TW/cm 2 on PBFA-II in a 15-cm-radius applied magnetic-field (applied-B) ion diode. This is an improvement by a factor of 4 compared to previous PBFA-II experiments. They completed development of the three-dimensional (3-D), electromagnetic, particle-in-cell code QUICKSILVER and obtained the first 3-D simulations of an applied-B ion diode. The simulations, together with analytic theory, suggest that control of electromagnetic instabilities could reduce ion divergence. In experiments using a lithium fluoride source, they delivered 26 kJ of lithium energy to the diode axis. Rutherford-scattered ion diagnostics have been developed and tested using a conical foil located inside the diode. They can now obtain energy density profiles by using range filters and recording ion images on nuclear track recording film. Timing uncertainties in power flow experiments on PBFA-II have been reduced by a factor of 5. They are investigating three plasma opening switches that use magnetic fields to control and confine the injected plasma. These new switches provide better power flow than the standard plasma erosion switch. Advanced pulsed-power fusion drivers will require extraction-geometry applied-B ion diodes. During this reporting period, progress was made in evaluating the generation, transport, and focus of multiple ion beams in an extraction geometry and in assessing the probable damage to a target chamber first wall

  11. Simulation of plasma erosion opening switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the modeling of Plasma Erosion Opening Switches is reviewed, and new results from both fluid and particle simulation compared. Three-fluid simulations with the ANTHEM code for switches on the NRL GAMBLE I machine and SNL PBFA II machine have shown strong dependence of the opening dynamics on the anode structure, the threshold for electron emission, on the possible presence of anomalous resistivity, and on advection of the magnetic field with cathode emitted electrons. Simulations with the implicit particle-in-cell code ISIS confirm these observations, but manifest broader current channels---in better agreement with GAMBLE I experimental results. 7 refs., 3 figs

  12. Shear flow stabilization of the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, N.F.; Shumlak, U.; Douglas, M.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Ruden, E.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical simulations have indicated that shear flow may help stabilize the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in imploding plasma z-pinches. A simple extension to a model presented in Chandrasekhar has been developed to study the linear stability of incompressible plasma subjected to both a shear flow and acceleration. The model has been used to investigate the stability plasma implosion schemes using externally imposed velocity shear which develops from the plasma flow itself. Specific parameters were chosen to represent plasma implosions driven by the Saturn and PBFA-Z, pulsed power generators at Sandia National Laboratories. Results indicate a high shear is necessary to stabilize the z-pinch implosions studied

  13. Fusion with Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.

    1998-06-01

    In the past thirty-six months, great progress has been made in x-ray production using high-current z-pinches. Today, the x-ray energy and power output of the Z accelerator (formerly PBFA-II) is the largest available in the laboratory. These z-pinch x-ray sources have the potential to drive high-yield ICF reactions at affordable cost if several challenging technical problems can be overcome. In this paper, the recent technical progress with Z-pinches will be described, and a technical strategy for achieving high-yield ICF with z-pinches will be presented

  14. Electrochemical characterization of liquid resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.M.; Whiteley, R.V.

    1983-01-01

    During the first two years of operation of Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA I) the reliability of the CuSO 4 solution resistors in the Marx Generator Energy Storage System has been unsatisfactory. Resistor failure, which is characterized by a large increase in resistance, has been attributed to materials, production techniques, and operating parameters. The problems associated with materials and production techniques have been identified and solutions are proposed. Non-ideal operating parameters are shown to cause polarization of the cathode in the resistor. This initiates electrochemical reactions in the resistor. These reactions often lead to resistance changes and to eventual resistor failure

  15. Intense light-ion beams provide a robust, common-driver path toward ignition, gain, and commercial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Cook, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Intense light-ion beams are being developed for investigations of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This effort has concentrated on developing the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) at Sandia as a driver for ICF target experiments, on design concepts for a high-yield, high-gain Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), and on a comprehensive system study of a light-ion beam-driven commercial fusion reactor (LIBRA). Reports are given on the status of design concepts and research in these areas. (author)

  16. Engineering aspects of particle beam fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy is supporting research directed toward demonstration of DT fuel ignition in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule. As part of the ICF effort, two major Particle Beam Fusion Accelerators (PBFA I and II) are being developed at Sandia National Laboratories with the objective of providing energetic light ion beams of sufficient power density for target implosion. Supporting light ion beam research is being performed at the Naval Research Laboratory and at Cornell University. If the answers to several key physics and engineering questions are favorable, pulsed power accelerators will be able to provide an efficient and inexpensive approach to high target gain and eventual power production applications

  17. Engineering aspects of particle-beam fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy is supporting research directed toward demonstration of DT fuel ignition in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule. As part of the ICF effort, two major Particle Beam Fusion Accelerators (PBFA I and II) are being developed at Sandia National Laboratories with the objective of providing energetic light ion beams of sufficient power density for target implosion. Supporting light ion beam research is being performed at the Naval Research Laboratory and at Cornell University. If the answers to several key physics and engineering questions are favorable, pulsed power accelerators will be able to provide an efficient and inexpensive approach to high target gain and eventual power production applications

  18. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 ± 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy (∼10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 ± 0.3 TW/cm 2 and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of ∼2 cm/micros is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented

  19. Status of light ion inertial fusion research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P.F.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    High-brightness proton beams have recently been extracted from axial pinch-reflex diodes mounted on the NRL Gamble II generator. The source power brightness that was measured exceeded 10 TW/cm 2 rad 2 . Analysis of a modular ICF system using such diodes shows that an operational window for transport of light-ion species exists. Multi-terawatt beams can be transported a few meters in channels a few centimeters in diameter. A proof-of-principle experiment for the required final focusing cell has been successfully carried out on Gamble II. A new barrel-shaped equatorial PRD that can be coupled to PBFA II as a single diode has also been operated on Gamble II and has demonstrated 50% ion efficiency with predominately azimuthally-symmetric charged-particle flow. Preliminary experiments using vacuum inductive storage and plasma opening switches have demonstrated factor-of-three pulse compressions, with corresponding power and voltage multiplications for pulse durations of interest to PBFA II. In other experiments the stopping power of deuterons in hot plasmas was measured. Results show about 40% enhancement in stopping power over that in cold targets when the deutron beam is focused on the target to about 0.25 MA/cm 2

  20. Performance of magnetically-injected-plasma opening switches on the particle beam fusion accelerator 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.; McDaniel, D.H.; Mendel, C.W.; Sweeney, M.A.; Moore, W.B.S.; Mowrer, G.R.; Zagar, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma opening switch (POS) experiments have been performed on the PBFA II ion beam accelerator to develop a switch which will provide voltage and power gain to an applied-B lithium ion diode. These experiments have successfully coupled power to electron and ion beam diodes using a Magnetically-Injected-Plasma (MIP) POS. Carbon plasma with electron densities of 1 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 13 /cm 3 have been injected from the anode into the 8 cm gap of the 20-ohm Magnetically-Insulated-Transmission Line (MITL) of PBFA II along a B r,z magnetic field. The MIP switch uses the inertia of the plasma to keep the switch closed and the magnetic pressure of B θ from the conduction current to open the switch. The configuration of the injecting magnetic field and the plasma source has a significant effect on the efficiency of coupling power to high impedance loads. Plasma near the center of the injecting magnetic field limits the opening impedance of the switch and subsequently the power delivered to the load. The axial location of the switch with respect to the load has also been identified as a critical parameter in increasing the coupling efficiency. A length of 10 to 20 cm of MITL between the POS and the load has increased the power delivered to the load. Data on switch performance with high impedance loads and factors which improved performance are discussed

  1. Uniform current density and divergence control in high power extraction ion diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjarlais, M.P.; Coats, R.S.; Lockner, T.R.; Pointon, T.D.; Johnson, D.J.; Slutz, S.A.; Lemke, R.W.; Cuneo, M.E.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    A theory of radial beam uniformity in extraction ion diodes is presented. The theory is based on a locally one-dimensional analysis of the diamagnetic compression of magnetic streamlines and the self-consistent determination of the virtual cathode location. The radial dependence of the applied magnetic field is used to determine the critical parameters of this locally one-dimensional treatment. The theory has been incorporated into the ATHETA magnetic field code to allow the rapid evaluation of realistic magnetic field configurations. Comparisons between the theoretical results, simulations with the QUICKSILVER code, and experiments on the PBFA-X accelerator establish the usefulness of this tool for tuning magnetic fields to improve ion beam uniformity. The consequences of poor beam uniformity on the evolution of ion diode instabilities are discussed with supporting evidence from simulations, theory, and experiments. (author). 8 figs., 15 refs

  2. Uniform current density and divergence control in high power extraction ion diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjarlais, M.P.; Coats, R.S.; Lockner, T.R.; Pointon, T.D.; Johnson, D.J.; Slutz, S.A.; Lemke, R.W.; Cuneo, M.E.; Melhorn, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    A theory of radial beam uniformity in extraction ion diodes is presented. The theory is based on a locally one dimensional analysis of the diamagnetic compression of magnetic streamlines and the self consistent determination of the virtual cathode location. The radial dependence of the applied magnetic field is used to determine the critical parameters of this locally one dimensional treatment. The theory has been incorporated into the ATHETA magnetic field code to allow the rapid evaluation of realistic magnetic field configurations. Comparisons between the theoretical results, simulations with the QUICKSILVER code, and experiments on the PBFA-X accelerator establish the usefulness of this tool for tuning magnetic fields to improve ion beam uniformity. The consequences of poor beam uniformity on the evolution of ion diode instabilities are discussed with supporting evidence from simulations, theory, and experiments

  3. LIF standoff research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.; Cuneo, M.E.; Desjarlais, M.P.; Filuk, A.B.; Hanson, D.L.; Lockner, T.R.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Hubbard, R.F.; Lampe, M.; Greenly, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Present LIF target experiments on PBFA II use a barrel diode in which the total transport length from the anode to the target is ≤ 15 cm. Future LIF development includes high yield applications (LMF) and energy production (ETF and LIBRA power plants) that require standoff - the generation of extracted ion beams and transport of these beams over distances of several meters. Standoff research includes the development of high efficiency extraction diodes (single stage and two-stage), improvements in beam quality (divergence, purity, uniformity, etc.), and the efficient transport and focusing of these beams over distances of several meters to a fusion target. Progress in all of these areas is discussed, as well as a strategy to reduce the divergence from the present 17 mrad for 5 MeV protons on SABRE to the required mrad for 35 MeV Li ions for LMF. The status of experiments is summarized, and future directions are indicated

  4. Pulsed power systems for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanDevender, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Sandis's Particle Beam Fusion Program is investigating pulsed electron and light ion beam accelerators with the goal of demonstrating the practical application of such drivers as igniters in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. The power and energy requirements for net energy gain are 10 14 to 10 15 W and 1 to 10 MJ. Recent advances in pulsed power and power flow technologies permit suitable accelerators to be built. The first accelerator of this new generation is PBFA I. It operates at 2 MV, 15 MA, 30 TW for 35 ns and is scheduled for completion in June 1980. The principles of this new accelerator technology and their application to ICF will be presented

  5. XUV preionization effects in high power magnetically insulated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenchen, J.; Woodworth, J.R.; Foltz, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Electrode surface desorption and photoionization by an intense XUV pulse has been shown to dramatically improve a vacuum diode impedance history. The 6-Terawatt Applied-B ion diode experiment on PBFA I is limited by a delay in both diode and ion current initiation. The insulation magnetic field impedes electron crossings which are believed to aid the ion source initiation. The diode is therefore initially a severe overmatch to the accelerator 40-nsec, 2.2-MV, 0.5-ohm pulse. The diode current increases during the pulse, leading to a rapidly falling impedance history. The application of an intense (30 to 50-kW/cm 2 ) XUV flux from an array of sixteen 60-kA spark sources is found to cause immediate diode current flow, resulting in both a greatly improved impedance history and the prompt initiation of an intense higher power ion beam

  6. Research and application of pulsed-power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.

    1980-01-01

    Pulsed-power technology relating to that branch which was stimulated by military applications in the 1960's is addressed. A history of the development and characteristics of some devices producing intense electron and ion beams which resulted in Sandia's particle beam fusion program is presented. These include Hermes II, Aurora, Hydra, and Proto II. Research on inertial confinement fusion ignition is described, and the most critical issue in ICF today still is the demonstration of ignition and efficient burnup of a small amount of thermonuclear fuel. Progress on the Sandia particle beam fusion accelerator (PBFA I and II) is reported, but already plans are underway to further upgrade the device and if these modifications are carried out in 1983, fusion ignition concepts may be tested by 1985. Fusion could possibly provide an inexhaustible supply of energy in the next century

  7. Progress toward fusion with light ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    New results in target design, beam generation and transport, and pulse power technology have led to a program shift stressing light ion-driven inertial confinement fusion. According to present estimates, a gain ten fusion pellet will require at least one megajoule and approx. 100 TW power input. Progress in ion sources has resulted in beam power density of approx. 1 TW/cm 2 , a factor of ten increase over the last year, and cylindrical implosion experiments have been performed. Other experiments have demonstrated the ability to transport ion and electron beams with high efficiency and have confirmed numerical predictions on the properties of beam transport channels converging at a target. These developments together with improvements in pulse power technology allow us to project that the 72 beam, 100 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator, PBFA-II will attain target output energy equal to stored energy in the accelerator

  8. Uniform current density and divergence control in high power extraction ion diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjarlais, M P; Coats, R S; Lockner, T R; Pointon, T D; Johnson, D J; Slutz, S A; Lemke, R W; Cuneo, M E; Mehlhorn, T A [Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A theory of radial beam uniformity in extraction ion diodes is presented. The theory is based on a locally one-dimensional analysis of the diamagnetic compression of magnetic streamlines and the self-consistent determination of the virtual cathode location. The radial dependence of the applied magnetic field is used to determine the critical parameters of this locally one-dimensional treatment. The theory has been incorporated into the ATHETA magnetic field code to allow the rapid evaluation of realistic magnetic field configurations. Comparisons between the theoretical results, simulations with the QUICKSILVER code, and experiments on the PBFA-X accelerator establish the usefulness of this tool for tuning magnetic fields to improve ion beam uniformity. The consequences of poor beam uniformity on the evolution of ion diode instabilities are discussed with supporting evidence from simulations, theory, and experiments. (author). 8 figs., 15 refs.

  9. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that ∼10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit ∼1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm 3 ), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described

  10. High-intensity light-ion beam research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Colombant, D.G.; Barker, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    High-brightness proton beams (.4 MA, 1 MV) have recently been extracted from 20 cm 2 axial pinch-reflex diodes (PRDs) mounted on the NRL Gamble II generator. A source power brightness of GT 10 TW/cm 2 rad 2 was achieved in these experiments. A new barrel-shaped equitorial PRD that can be coupled to PBFA-II has also been operated on Gamble II and has demonstrated 50% proton efficiency with predominately azimuthally-symmetric charged-particle flow. In other experiments the stopping power of deuterons in hot plasmas was measured using a PRD on Gamble II. Results show about 40% enhancement in stopping power over that in cold targets when the beam was focused to about .25 MA/cm 2 . Research is also being performed on transporting ion beams in large-diameter channels (>= 2.5 cm) and on a post-transport, plasma-filled, magnetic-focusing section to bring the beam to pellet dimensions. (author)

  11. Inertial confinement fusion with light ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanDevender, J.P.; Cook, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) is presently under construction and is the only existing facility with the potential of igniting thermonuclear fuel in the laboratory. The accelerator will generate up to 5 megamperes of lithium ions at 30 million electron volts and will focus them onto an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target after beam production and focusing have been optimized. Since its inception, the light ion approach to ICF has been considered the one that combines low cost, high risk, and high payoff. The beams are of such high density that their self-generated electric and magnetic fields were thought to prohibit high focal intensities. Recent advances in beam production and focusing demonstrate that these self-forces can be controlled to the degree required for ignition, break-even, and high gain experiments. ICF has been pursued primarily for its potential military applications. However, the high efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the light ion approach enhance its potential for commercial energy application as well

  12. Light-ion inertial confinement fusion research at Naval Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Colombant, D.G.; Barker, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    High-brightness proton beams (0.4 MA, 1 MV) have recently been extracted from 20 cm 2 axial pinch-reflex diodes (PRDs) mounted on the NRL Gamble II generator. A source power brightness of >=10 TW.cm - 2 .rad - 2 was achieved in these experiments. A new barrel-shaped equatorial PRD that can be coupled to PBFA II has also been operated on Gamble II and has demonstrated 50% proton efficiency with predominantly azimuthally symmetric charged-particle flow. In other experiments the stopping power of deuterons in hot plasmas was measured using a PRD on Gamble II. Results show about 40% increase in stopping power over that in cold targets when the beam was focused to about 0.25 MA.cm - 2 . Research is also being performed on transporting ion beams in large-diameter channels (>or approx. 2.5 cm) and on a post-transport plasma-filled magnetic focusing section to bring the beam to pellet dimensions. (author)

  13. Status of light ion inertial fusion research at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Barker, R.J.; Colombant, D.G.; Goldstein, S.A.; Meger, R.A.; Mosher, D.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports on the use of high-brightness proton beams, extracted from axial pinch-reflex diodes mounted on the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Gamble II generator, to study light ion inertial fusion. Topics covered include the modular approach, ion beam brightness studies, light-ion beam transport, final focusing, the single diode approach, the inductive storage approach, an energy loss experiment, and future plans. Analysis of a modular inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system using axial pinch-reflex diodes shows that an operational window for transport of light-ion species exists. A proof-of-principle experiment for the required final focusing cell was conducted on Gamble II. Preliminary experiments using vacuum inductive storage and plasma opening switches have demonstrated factorof-three pulse compressions, with corresponding power and voltage multiplications for pulse durations of interest to PBFA II. The stopping power of deuterons in hot plasmas was measured in other experiments. It is demonstrated that about 40% enhancement in stopping power over that in cold targets when the deuteron beam is focused on the target to about .25 MA/cm 2 . Includes 6 diagrams

  14. Repetitive pulse accelerator technology for light ion inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttram, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Successful ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellet is calculated to require that several megajoules of energy be deposited in the pellet's centimeter-sized shell within 10 ns. This implies a driver power of several hundreds of terawatts and power density around 100 TW/cm 2 . The Sandia ICF approach is to deposit the energy with beams of 30 MV lithium ions. The first accelerator capable of producing these beams (PBFA II, 100 TW) will be used to study beam formation and target physics on a single pulse basis. To utilize this technology for power production, repetitive pulsing at rates that may be as high as 10 Hz will be required. This paper will overview the technologies being studied for a repetitively pulsed ICF accelerator. As presently conceived, power is supplied by rotating machinery providing 16 MJ in 1 ms. The generator output is transformed to 3 MV, then switched into a pulse compression system using laser triggered spark gaps. These must be synchronized to about 1 ns. Pulse compression is performed with saturable inductor switches, the output being 40 ns, 1.5 MV pulses. These are transformed to 30 MV in a self-magnetically insulated cavity adder structure. Space charge limited ion beams are drawn from anode plasmas with electron counter streaming being magnetically inhibited. The ions are ballistically focused into the entrances of guiding discharge channels for transport to the pellet. The status of component development from the prime power to the ion source will be reviewed

  15. Experiences developing ALEGRA: A C++ coupled physics framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budge, K.G.; Peery, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    ALEGRA is a coupled physics framework originally written to simulate inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments being conducted at the PBFA-II facility at Sandia National Laboratories. It has since grown into a large software development project supporting a number of computational programs at Sandia. As the project has grown, so has the development team, from the original two authors to a group of over fifteen programmers crossing several departments. In addition, ALEGRA now runs on a wide variety of platforms, from large PCs to the ASCI Teraflops massively parallel supercomputer. The authors discuss the reasons for ALEGRA`s success, which include the intelligent use of object-oriented techniques and the choice of C++ as the programming language. They argue that the intelligent use of development tools, such as build tools (e.g. make), compiler, debugging environment (e.g. dbx), version control system (e.g. cvs), and bug management software (e.g. ClearDDTS), is nearly as important as the choice of language and paradigm.

  16. Intense ion beam research for inertial confinement fusion. Final technical report, 1 October 1981-31 October 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.A.; Kusse, B.R.; Sudan, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research has been performed on the application of intense light ion beams to inertial confinement fusion. The following achievements are documented. A 1 TW accelerator (a module of the PBFA 1 device at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque), has been installed at Cornell and it has been used to develop high power magnetically insulated ion diodes. Ion beams at 0.3 TW level have been produced. The use of spectroscopic techniques to diagnose conditions in detail with in magnetically insulated diodes was proposed, and preliminary experiments have been successfully performed. These have revealed the anode plasma density, transverse velocities of ions within the diode (from Doppler broadening of ion emission lines) and the electric field profile in the accelerating gap (from the Stark shifted line profile of especially selected emission lines). Theoretical studies on the effects of lack of symmetry in the electron drift direction on the leakage electron current in a magnetically insulated diode show that even very small perturbations can cause a substantial enhancement of the leakage current. Experiments involving electron flow in a magnetically insulated diode have shown cathode sheath losses to occur in local burst as well as in a smooth manner

  17. Experiences developing ALEGRA: A C++ coupled physics framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budge, K.G.; Peery, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    ALEGRA is a coupled physics framework originally written to simulate inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments being conducted at the PBFA-II facility at Sandia National Laboratories. It has since grown into a large software development project supporting a number of computational programs at Sandia. As the project has grown, so has the development team, from the original two authors to a group of over fifteen programmers crossing several departments. In addition, ALEGRA now runs on a wide variety of platforms, from large PCs to the ASCI Teraflops massively parallel supercomputer. The authors discuss the reasons for ALEGRA's success, which include the intelligent use of object-oriented techniques and the choice of C++ as the programming language. They argue that the intelligent use of development tools, such as build tools (e.g. make), compiler, debugging environment (e.g. dbx), version control system (e.g. cvs), and bug management software (e.g. ClearDDTS), is nearly as important as the choice of language and paradigm

  18. New developments and applications of intense pulsed radiation sources at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D.

    1998-02-01

    In the past thirty-six months, tremendous strides have been made in x-ray production using high-current z-pinches. Today, the x-ray energy (1.9 MJ) and power (200 TW) output of the Z accelerator (formerly PBFA-II) is the largest available in the laboratory. These z-pinch x-ray sources are being developed for research into the physics of high energy density plasmas of interest in weapon behavior and in inertial confinement fusion. Beyond the Z accelerator current of 20 MA, an extrapolation to the X-1 accelerator level of 60 MA may have the potential to drive high-yield ICF reactions at affordable cost if several challenging technical problems can be overcome. New developments have also taken place at Sandia in the area of high current, mm-diameter electron beams for advanced hydrodynamic radiography. On SABRE, x-ray spot diameters were less than 2 mm with a dose of 100 R at 1 meter in a 40 ns pulse.

  19. Making project documentation a positive tool for management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1980, Sandia National Laboratory has been designing and constructing Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. One managerial challenge of a large project is the problem of handling information. The scope of the PBFA-II projet may be gauged by its cost: $19.4 million for the accelerator itself, $9.5 million for buildings and standard utilities, and $9.6 million for specialized utilities and support systems. The first need of the project at its outset, then, was communication, and this remains a chief function of the CPO. If the nature or magnitude of the risk changes in any one area, the entire project team must know. If a design is changed, persons working on interdependent efforts must know. Some of this communication takes place naturally and informally. But project procedures must guarantee that all important communication is received by all necessary people, that the communication creates accountability, and that management receives timely, accurate reports. To put it another way, important communication requires project documentation. Documentation is both a record of the project and a tool for management

  20. Launched electrons in plasma opening switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Rochau, G.E.; Sweeney, M.A.; McDaniel, D.H.; Quintenz, J.P.; Savage, M.E.; Lindman, E.L.; Kindel, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma opening switches have provided a means to improve the characteristics of super-power pulse generators. Recent advances involving plasma control with fast and slow magnetic fields have made these switches more versatile, allowing for improved switch uniformity, triggering, and opening current levels that are set by the level of auxiliary fields. Such switches necessarily involve breaks in the translational symmetry of the transmission line geometry and therefore affect the electron flow characteristics of the line. These symmetry breaks are the result of high electric field regions caused by plasma conductors remaining in the transmission line, ion beams crossing the line, or auxilliary magnetic field regions. Symmetry breaks cause the canonical momentum of the electrons to change, thereby moving them away from the cathode. Additional electrons are pulled from the cathode into the magnetically insulated flow, resulting in an excess of electron flow over that expected for the voltage and line current downstream of the switch. We call these electrons ''launched electrons''. Unless they are recaptured at the cathode or else are fed into the load and used beneficially, they cause a large power loss downstream. This paper will show examples of SuperMite and PBFA II data showing these losses, explain the tools we are using to study them, and discuss the mechanisms we will employ to mitigate the problem. The losses will be reduced primarily by reducing the amount of launched electron flow. 7 refs., 9 figs

  1. Fluid simulation of the conduction phase of the plasma erosion opening switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossmann, J.M.; Mosher, D.; Ottinger, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    The conduction phase of the plasma erosion openings switch (PEOS) is studied using a 1 1/2-D electromagnetic two-fluid code. The focus of this work is on understanding how two effects, a current-limiting model of electron emission, and the magnetic insulation of electrons at the cathode, determine current conduction in the plasma. Simulations are performed in the parameter regimes of the Gamble I, POP, and PBFA II pulsed power generators, and previous low-density, short-rise time simulations of the PEOS. Fluid code results are compared to a 1-D analytic theory and to the Gamble I and POP experiments. Good agreement between theory and simulation, but mixed agreement between simulation and experiment is found. Experimental Β-field measurements on POP show weaker j x Β compression than the simulation. Current penetration and plasma current channels qualitatively similar to experimental observation are found in the Gamble I regime. However, magnetic insulation of electrons emitted from the cathode bunches the electron flow into narrower current channels than observed experimentally. In several cases, the presence of an electron-scattering or energy-loss mechanism near the cathode must be invoked to overcome magnetic insulation and widen the current channels

  2. Analytic theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a uniform density plasma-filled ion diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussey, T.W.; Payne, S.S.

    1987-04-01

    The J-vector x B-vector forces associated with the surface current of a plasma-filled ion diode will accelerate this plasma fill toward the anode surface. It is well known that such a configuration with a high I is susceptible to the hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in certain geometries. A number of ion diode plasma sources have been proposed, most of which have a falling density going away from the wall. A somewhat more unstable case, however, is that of uniform density. In this report we attempt to establish an upper limit on this effect with a simple analytic model in which a uniform-density plasma is accelerated by the magnetic field anticipated in a PBFA-II diode. We estimate the number of linear e-foldings experienced by an unstable surface as well as the most damaging wavelength initial perturbation. This model, which accounts approximately for stabilization due to field diffusion, suggests that even with a uniform fill, densities in excess of a few 10 15 are probably not damaged by the instability. In addition, even lower densities might be tolerated if perturbations near the most damaging wavelength can be kept very small

  3. Simulation of plasma erosion opening switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The plasma erosion opening switch (PEOS) has been studied with the ANTHEM and ISIS implicit simulation codes. The switch consists of plasma fill injected into a transmission line. The plasma initially shorts out the circuit, but eventually it is removed by self-electrical forces, allowing for the delivery of energy to a load. ANTHEM models the plasma by multiple fluids with electron inertia retained, or by the particle-in-cell (PIC) technique. ISIS is an optimized PIC code. Both codes determine electric and magnetic fields by the implicit moment method. This allows for the study of long time full-switch behavior with simulational zone sizes and time steps that are large compared to a Debye length and plasma period, respectively. Thus, the authors have modeled switch behavior at densities ranging from 5 x 10 11 to 5 x 10 14 electrons/cm -3 over drive pulses ranging from 5 to 250 ns. Here, the magnetic field rose linearly from zero to 0.8 or 3.0 Tesla. Switch gaps spanned from 1.0 to 8.0 cm, and inner radii ranged from 0.5 to 20.0 cm. Opening dynamics is shown to depend sensitively on the assumed electron emission thresholds at the cathode, and on the effective conductivity of the anode. The particle simulations predict broader current channels than the multi-fluid calculations - reasons for this are discussed. The effect of numerical diffusion in implicit simulations is examined. The response to realistic load impedances (10 Ohms for Sandia National Laboratory's PBFA II accelerator) of the opening characteristics is described. Advantages from plasma fill near the load are investigated. The action of preset initial magnetic fields aligned with the power flow, and of trigger magnetic fields for controlled removal of the plasma is discussed

  4. Phenomenological studies of electron-beam transport in wire-plasma channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Beezhold, W.

    1980-01-01

    Multiple electron-beam transport in air through plasma channels is an important method for delivering many intense beams to a bremsstrahlung converter system. This paper reports work intended to optimize this transport technique with emphasis on transport through curved channels and on transport efficiencies. Curved-channel transport allows accelerators such as Sandia's PROTO II and PBFA I facilities to be used as flash x-ray sources for weapon effects simulation without reconfiguring the diodes or developing advanced converters. The formation mechanisms of wire-initiated plasma channels in air were examined and the subsequent transport efficiencies of relativistic electron beams through various-length straight and curved plasma channels were determined. Electron transport efficiency through a channel was measured to be 80 to 100% of a zero length channel for 40 cm long straight channels and for curved channels which re-directed the electron beam through an angle of 90 0 . Studies of simultaneous e-beam transport along two curved channels closely spaced at the converter showed that transport efficiency remained at 80 to 100%. However, it was observed that the two e-beams were displaced towards each other. Transport efficiency was observed to depend only weakly on parameters such as wire material, wire length and shape, diode anode aperture, e-beam injection time, and wire-channel applied voltage. For off-center injection conditions the electron beam strongly perturbed the plasma channel in periodic or regularly spaced patterns even though the total energy lost by the electron beam remained small. Plasma-channel transport, when all experimental parameters have been optimized for maximum transport efficiency, is a workable method for directing electron beams to a converter target

  5. Fusion by 1990: the Sandia ion beam program can do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Recent experimental results at Sandia National Laboratories demonstrate that light ion beam accelerator devices can deliver considerably more than the power necessary for achieving high-gain fusion energy - millions of joules at power densities of 10,000 trillion watts/cm 2 . This means that commercial fusion energy with an inertial-confinement fusion device can be realized by the 1990s, despite the general curtailment of the US fusion research budget over the past eight years. Dr. J. Pace VanDevender, pulsed power sciences director at Sandia, and Professor Ravindra N. Sudan, director of the Cornell University Laboratory of Plasma Studies, discussed the experimental and theoretical advances underlying this happy prognosis at the April 17-19 conference at the Rochester University for Laser Energetics. Sudan showed that experiments with high-current ion beam pulses over the past decade have demonstrated that such pulses, instead of diffusing, tend to self-focus nonlinearly to higher power densities. Second, weak magnetic fields do not interact and change the trajectory of such high-current beam pulses. At the Rochester meeting, VanDevender reviewed experiments on Sandia's Proto I device in which 1.5 trillion watts per square centimeter were delivered to a target in May 1984. This spring, Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator I, PBFA I, delivered an 8-trillion watt pulse onto a spot 4.0 to 4.5 millimeters in diameter. This demonstrated that the Sandia light ion beam focusing process maintains itself as the current is increased. 3 figures

  6. Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates ∼500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed ∼15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed

  7. Very high pulse-energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    The dominant trend in the development of pulsed power accelerator technology over the last decade has been towards higher power and shorter pulse widths. Limitations in high voltage, high current switch performance, and in power flow through vacuum insulator housings led to the development of highly modular designs. This modular approach requires precise synchronization of the various modules and efficient methods of combining the power from these modules to drive a common load. The need to drive very low impedance loads led to effective ways to combine these modules in parallel. The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator I (PBFA I) and Saturn are representative of these designs. Hermes III represent a new approach towards the efficient generation of higher voltages. It is designed to drive a 22-MV, 730-kA, 40-ns electron beam diode and combines conventional, modular pulsed power technology with linear induction accelerator concepts. High-power induction accelerator cavities are combined with voltage addition along a MITL to generate the desired output. This design differs from a conventional linac in that the voltages are added by the MITL flow rather than by a drifting beam that gains kinetic energy at each stage. This design is a major extrapolation of previous state-of-the-art technology represented by the injector module of the Advanced Test Accelerator and has proven to be efficient and reliable. The design and performance of Hermes III are presented together with a discussion of the application of this technology to the light ion beam inertial confinement fusion program. 18 refs., 9 figs

  8. Some introductory notes on the problem of nuclear energy by controlled fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedretti, E.

    1988-01-01

    Written for scientists and technologist interested in, but unfamiliar with nuclear energy by controlled fusion reactions, this ''sui generis'' review paper attempts to provide the reader, as shortly as possible, with a general idea of the main issues at stake in nuclear fusion research. With the purpose of keeping this paper within a reasonable length, the various subjects are only outlined in their essence, basic features, underlying principles, etc., without entering into details, which are left to the quoted literature. Due to the particular readership of this journal, vacuum problems and/or aspects of fusion research anyhow related with vacuum science and technology are evidentiated. After reviewing fusion reactions' cross sections, fusion by accelerators and muon catalyzed fusion are described, followed by mention of Lawson's criteria and of plasma confinement features. Then, inertial confinement fusion is dealt with, also including one example of laser system (Nova), one of accelerator facility (PBFA-II) and some guesses on the classified Centurion-Halite program. Magnetic confinement fusion research is also reviewed, in particulary reporting one example of linear machine (MFTF-B), two examples of toroidal machines other than Tokamak (ATF and Eta-Beta-II) and various examples of Tokamaks, including PBX and PBX-M; TFTR, JET, JT-60, T-15 and Tore-Supra (large machines); Alcator A, FT, Alcator C/MTX, Alcator C-Mod and T-14 (compact high field machines). Tokamaks under design for ignition experiments (Ignitor, CIT, Ignitex and NET) are also illustrated. Thermal conversion of fusion power and direct generation of electricity are mentioned; conceptual design of fusion power plants are considered and illustrated by four examples (STARFIRE, WILDCAT, MARS and CASCADE). The D 3 He fuel cycle is discussed as an alternative more acceptable than Deuterium-Tritium, and thw Candor proposal is reported. After recalling past experience of the fission power development, some

  9. 1996 ICF program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correll, D

    1996-01-01

    The continuing objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is the demonstration of thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. The underlying theme of all ICF activities as a science research and development program is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Defense Programs (DP) science-based Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM) Program. The extension of current program research capabilities in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is necessary for the ICF Program to satisfy its stewardship responsibilities. ICF resources (people and facilities) are increasingly being redirected in support of the performance, schedule, and cost goals of the NIF. One of the more important aspects of ICF research is the national nature of the program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) ICF Program falls within DOE's national ICF Program, which includes the Nova and Beamlet laser facilities at LLNL and the OMEGA, Nike, and Trident laser facilities at the University of Rochester (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UR/LLE), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), respectively. The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA) and Saturn pulsed-power facilities are at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). General Atomics, Inc. (GA) develops and provides many of the targets for the above experimental facilities. LLNL's ICF Program supports activities in two major interrelated areas: (1) target physics and technology (experimental, theoretical, and computational research); and (2) laser science and optics technology development. Experiments on LLNL's Nova laser primarily support ignition and weapons physics research. Experiments on LLNL's Beamlet laser support laser science and optics technology development. In addition, ICF sciences and technologies, developed as part of the DP mission goals, continue to support additional DOE objectives. These objectives are (1) to achieve diversity in energy sources