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Sample records for pax6 transcription factor

  1. Positive autoregulation of the transcription factor Pax6 in response to increased levels of either of its major isoforms, Pax6 or Pax6(5a, in cultured cells

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    Mason John O

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pax6 is a transcription factor essential for normal development of the eyes and nervous system. It has two major isoforms, Pax6 and Pax6(5a, and the ratios between their expression levels vary within narrow limits. We tested the effects of overexpressing either one or other isoform on endogenous Pax6 expression levels in Neuro2A and NIH3T3 cells. Results We found that both isoforms caused an up-regulation of endogenous Pax6 expression in cells with (Neuro2A or without (NIH3T3 constitutive Pax6 expression. Western blots showed that cells stably transfected with constructs expressing either Pax6 or Pax6(5a contained raised levels of both Pax6 and Pax6(5a. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed an increase in levels of Pax6(5a mRNA in cells containing Pax6-expressing constructs and an increase in levels of Pax6 mRNA in cells containing Pax6(5a-expressing constructs. The fact that the introduction of constructs expressing only one isoform increased the cellular levels of not only that isoform but also the other indicates that activation of the endogenous Pax6 locus occurred. The ratio between the levels of the two isoforms was maintained close to physiological values. The overexpression of either isoform in neuroblastoma (Neuro2A cell lines also promoted morphological change and an increase in β-III-tubulin expression, indicating an increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Pax6 can up-regulate production of Pax6 protein from an entire intact endogenous Pax6 locus in its genomic environment. This adds to previous studies showing that Pax6 can up-regulate reporter expression driven by isolated Pax6 regulatory elements. Furthermore, our results suggest that an important function of positive feedback might be to stabilise the relative levels of Pax6 and Pax6(5a.

  2. The level of the transcription factor Pax6 is essential for controlling the balance between neural stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis.

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    Stephen N Sansom

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cell self-renewal, neurogenesis, and cell fate determination are processes that control the generation of specific classes of neurons at the correct place and time. The transcription factor Pax6 is essential for neural stem cell proliferation, multipotency, and neurogenesis in many regions of the central nervous system, including the cerebral cortex. We used Pax6 as an entry point to define the cellular networks controlling neural stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis in stem cells of the developing mouse cerebral cortex. We identified the genomic binding locations of Pax6 in neocortical stem cells during normal development and ascertained the functional significance of genes that we found to be regulated by Pax6, finding that Pax6 positively and directly regulates cohorts of genes that promote neural stem cell self-renewal, basal progenitor cell genesis, and neurogenesis. Notably, we defined a core network regulating neocortical stem cell decision-making in which Pax6 interacts with three other regulators of neurogenesis, Neurog2, Ascl1, and Hes1. Analyses of the biological function of Pax6 in neural stem cells through phenotypic analyses of Pax6 gain- and loss-of-function mutant cortices demonstrated that the Pax6-regulated networks operating in neural stem cells are highly dosage sensitive. Increasing Pax6 levels drives the system towards neurogenesis and basal progenitor cell genesis by increasing expression of a cohort of basal progenitor cell determinants, including the key transcription factor Eomes/Tbr2, and thus towards neurogenesis at the expense of self-renewal. Removing Pax6 reduces cortical stem cell self-renewal by decreasing expression of key cell cycle regulators, resulting in excess early neurogenesis. We find that the relative levels of Pax6, Hes1, and Neurog2 are key determinants of a dynamic network that controls whether neural stem cells self-renew, generate cortical neurons, or generate basal progenitor cells

  3. Developmental and daily expression of the Pax4 and Pax6 homeobox genes in the rat retina: localization of Pax4 in photoreceptor cells

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    Rath, Martin F; Bailey, Michael J; Kim, Jong-So

    2009-01-01

    Pax4 is a homeobox gene encoding Pax4, a transcription factor that is essential for embryonic development of the endocrine pancreas. In the pancreas, Pax4 counters the effects of the related transcription factor, Pax6, which is known to be essential for eye morphogenesis. In this study, we have...... in the foetal eye. Histological analysis revealed that Pax4 mRNA is exclusively expressed in the retinal photoreceptors, whereas Pax6 mRNA and protein are present in the inner nuclear layer and in the ganglion cell layer of the mature retina. In the adult retina, Pax4 transcripts exhibit a diurnal rhythm...

  4. DNA-mediated cooperativity facilitates the co-selection of cryptic enhancer sequences by SOX2 and PAX6 transcription factors.

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    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Pillay, Shubhadra; Huang, Yong-Heng; Jayabal, Sriram; Udayasuryan, Barath; Veerapandian, Veeramohan; Kolatkar, Prasanna; Cojocaru, Vlad; Pervushin, Konstantin; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-02-18

    Sox2 and Pax6 are transcription factors that direct cell fate decision during neurogenesis, yet the mechanism behind how they cooperate on enhancer DNA elements and regulate gene expression is unclear. By systematically interrogating Sox2 and Pax6 interaction on minimal enhancer elements, we found that cooperative DNA recognition relies on combinatorial nucleotide switches and precisely spaced, but cryptic composite DNA motifs. Surprisingly, all tested Sox and Pax paralogs have the capacity to cooperate on such enhancer elements. NMR and molecular modeling reveal very few direct protein-protein interactions between Sox2 and Pax6, suggesting that cooperative binding is mediated by allosteric interactions propagating through DNA structure. Furthermore, we detected and validated several novel sites in the human genome targeted cooperatively by Sox2 and Pax6. Collectively, we demonstrate that Sox-Pax partnerships have the potential to substantially alter DNA target specificities and likely enable the pleiotropic and context-specific action of these cell-lineage specifiers. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Transcriptional activity of Pax3 is co-activated by TAZ

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    Murakami, Masao; Tominaga, Junji; Makita, Ryosuke; Uchijima, Yasunobu; Kurihara, Yukiko; Nakagawa, Osamu; Asano, Tomoichiro; Kurihara, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    Pax3 is a transcription factor which functions in embryonic development and human diseases. In a yeast two-hybrid screen with full-length Pax3 as bait, we isolated a clone encoding transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) from an E10.5 mouse embryo cDNA library. Co-immunoprecipitation and nuclear co-localization of TAZ with Pax3 suggest that their association is functionally relevant. In situ hybridization revealed TAZ and Pax3 expression to partially overlap in the paraxial mesoderm, limb buds, and the neural tube. In C2C12 myoblast cells and NIH3T3 cells, TAZ enhanced the transcriptional activity of Pax3 on artificial and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor promoter-luciferase constructs, suggesting that TAZ can function as a co-activator of Pax3. Functional interaction between Pax3 and TAZ may provide a clue to clarifying the mechanism by which Pax3 serves as a transcriptional activator during embryogenesis

  6. Evolution of the vertebrate Pax4/6 class of genes with focus on its novel member, the Pax10 gene.

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    Feiner, Nathalie; Meyer, Axel; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2014-06-19

    The members of the paired box (Pax) family regulate key developmental pathways in many metazoans as tissue-specific transcription factors. Vertebrate genomes typically possess nine Pax genes (Pax1-9), which are derived from four proto-Pax genes in the vertebrate ancestor that were later expanded through the so-called two-round (2R) whole-genome duplication. A recent study proposed that pax6a genes of a subset of teleost fishes (namely, acanthopterygians) are remnants of a paralog generated in the 2R genome duplication, to be renamed pax6.3, and reported one more group of vertebrate Pax genes (Pax6.2), most closely related to the Pax4/6 class. We propose to designate this new member Pax10 instead and reconstruct the evolutionary history of the Pax4/6/10 class with solid phylogenetic evidence. Our synteny analysis showed that Pax4, -6, and -10 originated in the 2R genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. The phylogenetic analyses of relationships between teleost pax6a and other Pax4, -6, and -10 genes, however, do not support the proposed hypothesis of an ancient origin of the acanthopterygian pax6a genes in the 2R genome duplication. Instead, we confirmed the traditional scenario that the acanthopterygian pax6a is derived from the more recent teleost-specific genome duplication. Notably, Pax6 is present in all vertebrates surveyed to date, whereas Pax4 and -10 were lost multiple times in independent vertebrate lineages, likely because of their restricted expression patterns: Among Pax6-positive domains, Pax10 has retained expression in the adult retina alone, which we documented through in situ hybridization and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments on zebrafish, Xenopus, and anole lizard. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Pax3 stimulates p53 ubiquitination and degradation independent of transcription.

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    Xiao Dan Wang

    Full Text Available Pax3 is a developmental transcription factor that is required for neural tube and neural crest development. We previously showed that inactivating the p53 tumor suppressor protein prevents neural tube and cardiac neural crest defects in Pax3-mutant mouse embryos. This demonstrates that Pax3 regulates these processes by blocking p53 function. Here we investigated the mechanism by which Pax3 blocks p53 function.We employed murine embryonic stem cell (ESC-derived neuronal precursors as a cell culture model of embryonic neuroepithelium or neural crest. Pax3 reduced p53 protein stability, but had no effect on p53 mRNA levels or the rate of p53 synthesis. Full length Pax3 as well as fragments that contained either the DNA-binding paired box or the homeodomain, expressed as GST or FLAG fusion proteins, physically associated with p53 and Mdm2 both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, Splotch Pax3, which causes neural tube and neural crest defects in homozygous embryos, bound weakly, or not at all, to p53 or Mdm2. The paired domain and homeodomain each stimulated Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and p53 degradation in the absence of the Pax3 transcription regulatory domains, whereas Splotch Pax3 did not stimulate p53 ubiquitination or degradation.Pax3 inactivates p53 function by stimulating its ubiquitination and degradation. This process utilizes the Pax3 paired domain and homeodomain but is independent of DNA-binding and transcription regulation. Because inactivating p53 is the only required Pax3 function during neural tube closure and cardiac neural crest development, and inactivating p53 does not require Pax3-dependent transcription regulation, this indicates that Pax3 is not required to function as a transcription factor during neural tube closure and cardiac neural crest development. These findings further suggest novel explanations for PAX3 functions in human diseases, such as in neural crest-derived cancers and Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 3.

  8. Pax6 represses androgen receptor-mediated transactivation by inhibiting recruitment of the coactivator SPBP.

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    Julianne Elvenes

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer.

  9. Heterozygous defects in PAX6 gene and congenital hypopituitarism.

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    Takagi, Masaki; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Ikuma; Ishii, Tomohiro; Amano, Naoko; Asakura, Yumi; Muroya, Koji; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Adachi, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital hypopituitarism (CH) attributable to known transcription factor mutations appears to be rare and other causative genes for CH remain to be identified. Due to the sporadic occurrence of CH, de novo chromosomal rearrangements could be one of the molecular mechanisms participating in its etiology, especially in syndromic cases. To identify the role of copy number variations (CNVs) in the etiology of CH and to identify novel genes implicated in CH. We enrolled 88 (syndromic: 30; non-syndromic: 58) Japanese CH patients. We performed an array comparative genomic hybridization screening in the 30 syndromic CH patients. For all the 88 patients, we analyzed PAX6 by PCR-based sequencing. We identified one heterozygous 310-kb deletion of the PAX6 enhancer region in one patient showing isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), cleft palate, and optic disc cupping. We also identified one heterozygous 6.5-Mb deletion encompassing OTX2 in a patient with bilateral anophthalmia and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. We identified a novel PAX6 mutation, namely p.N116S in one non-syndromic CH patient showing IGHD. The p.N116S PAX6 was associated with an impairment of the transactivation capacities of the PAX6-binding elements. This study showed that heterozygous PAX6 mutations are associated with CH patients. PAX6 mutations may be associated with diverse clinical features ranging from severely impaired ocular and pituitary development to apparently normal phenotype. Overall, this study identified causative CNVs with a possible role in the etiology of CH in <10% of syndromic CH patients. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  10. PAX6 gene variations associated with aniridia in south India

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    Shashikant Shetty

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transcription factor gene PAX6 have been shown to be the cause of the aniridia phenotype. The purpose of this study was to analyze patients with aniridia to uncover PAX6 gene mutations in south Indian population. Methods Total genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of twenty-eight members of six clinically diagnosed aniridia families and 60 normal healthy controls. The coding exons of the human PAX6 gene were amplified by PCR and allele specific variations were detected by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP followed by automated sequencing. Results The sequencing results revealed novel PAX6 mutations in three patients with sporadic aniridia: c.715ins5, [c.1201delA; c.1239A>G] and c.901delA. Two previously reported nonsense mutations were also found: c.482C>A, c.830G>A. A neutral polymorphism was detected (IVS9-12C>T at the boundary of intron 9 and exon 10. The two nonsense mutations found in the coding region of human PAX6 gene are reported for the first time in the south Indian population. Conclusion The genetic analysis confirms that haploinsuffiency of the PAX6 gene causes the classic aniridia phenotype. Most of the point mutations detected in our study results in stop codons. Here we add three novel PAX6 gene mutations in south Indian population to the existing spectrum of mutations, which is not a well-studied ethnic group. Our study supports the hypothesis that a mutation in the PAX6 gene correlates with expression of aniridia.

  11. Isolation and expression of a Pax-6 gene in the regenerating and intact Planarian Dugesia(G)tigrina

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    Callaerts, P.; Munoz-Marmol, A. M.; Glardon, S.; Castillo, E.; Sun, H.; Li, W.-H.; Gehring, W. J.; Salo, E.

    1999-01-01

    The Pax-6 gene encodes a transcription factor containing both a paired and a homeodomain and is highly conserved among Metazoa. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, Pax-6 is required for eye morphogenesis, development of parts of the central nervous system, and, in some phyla, for the development of olfactory sense organs. Ectopic expression of Pax-6 from insects, mammals, cephalopods, and ascidians induces ectopic eyes in Drosophila, suggesting that Pax-6 may be a universal master control gene for eye morphogenesis. Platyhelminthes are an ancient phylum, originating from the base of spiralian protostomes, that bear primitive eyes, consisting of a group of rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells enclosed in a cup of pigment cells. The analysis of Pax-6 and its expression pattern should provide insights into the ancestral function of Pax-6 in eye morphogenesis. We have identified the Pax-6 gene of the planarian Dugesia(G)tigrina (Platyhelminthes; Turbellaria; Tricladida). This gene shares significant sequence identity and conserved genomic organization with Pax-6 proteins from other phyla. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that it clusters with the other Pax-6 genes, but in the most basal position. DtPax-6 is expressed as a single transcript in both regenerating and fully grown eyes, and electron microscopy studies show strong expression in the perykarion of both photoreceptor and pigment cells. Very low levels of expression also are detectable in other body regions. Because a bona fide Pax-6 homolog so far has not been detected in diploblastic animals, we speculate that Pax-6 may be typical for triploblasts and that the appearance of additional Pax genes may have coincided with increasingly complex body plans. PMID:9892672

  12. Onecut1 and Onecut2 transcription factors operate downstream of Pax6 to regulate horizontal cell development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klímová, Lucie; Antošová, Barbora; Kuželová, Andrea; Strnad, Hynek; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 402, č. 1 (2015), s. 48-60 ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2198; GA ČR GA15-23675S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pax6 * Onecut * Retina * Horizontal cell Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.155, year: 2015

  13. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A): a transcriptional target of PAX3-FKHR and mediates PAX3-FKHR–dependent motility in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

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    Liu, Lingling; Wang, Yong-Dong; Wu, Jing; Cui, Jimmy; Chen, Taosheng

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) has a high propensity to metastasize, leading to its aggressiveness and a poor survival rate among those with the disease. More than 80% of aggressive ARMSs harbor a PAX3-FKHR fusion transcription factor, which regulates cell migration and promotes metastasis, most likely by regulating the fusion protein’s transcriptional targets. Therefore, identifying druggable transcription targets of PAX3-FKHR that are also downstream effectors of PAX3-FKHR–mediated cell migration and metastasis may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for treating ARMS. To identify genes whose expression is directly affected by the level of PAX3-FKHR in an ARMS cellular-context, we first developed an ARMS cell line in which PAX3-FKHR is stably down-regulated, and showed that stably downregulating PAX3-FKHR in ARMS cells significantly decreased the cells’ motility. We used microarray analysis to identify genes whose expression level decreased when PAX3-FKHR was downregulated. We used mutational analysis, promoter reporter assays, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to determine whether PAX3-FKHR binds to the promoter region of the target gene. We used siRNA and pharmacologic inhibitor to downregulate the target gene of PAX3-FKHR and investigated the effect of such downregulation on cell motility. We found that when PAX3-FKHR was downregulated, the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) decreased. We showed that PAX3-FKHR binds to a paired-domain binding-site in the CPT1A promoter region, indicating that CPT1A is a novel transcriptional target of PAX3-FKHR. Furthermore, downregulating CPT1A decreased cell motility in ARMS cells, indicating that CPT1A is a downstream effector of PAX3-FKHR–mediated cell migration and metastasis. Taken together, we have identified CPT1A as a novel transcriptional target of PAX3-FKHR and revealed the novel function of CPT1A in promoting cell motility. CPT1A may represent a novel therapeutic target for

  14. Generation of H1 PAX6WT/EGFP reporter cells to purify PAX6 positive neural stem/progenitor cells.

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    Wu, Wei; Liu, Juli; Su, Zhenghui; Li, Zhonghao; Ma, Ning; Huang, Ke; Zhou, Tiancheng; Wang, Linli

    2018-08-25

    Neural conversion from human pluripotent cells (hPSCs) is a potential therapy to neurological disease in the future. However, this is still limited by efficiency and stability of existed protocols used for neural induction from hPSCs. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a reporter system to screen PAX6 + neural progenitor/stem cells using transcription activator like effector nuclease (TALEN). We found that knock-in 2 A-EGFP cassette into PAX6 exon of human embryonic stem cells H1 with TALEN-based homology recombination could establish PAX6 WT/EGFP H1 reporter cell line fast and efficiently. This reporter cell line could differentiate into PAX6 and EGFP double positive neural progenitor/stem cells (NPCs/NSCs) after neural induction. Those PAX6 WT/EGFP NPCs could be purified, expanded and specified to post-mitotic neurons in vitro efficiently. With this reporter cell line, we also screened out 1 NPC-specific microRNA, hsa-miR-99a-5p, and 3 ESCs-enriched miRNAs, hsa-miR-302c-5p, hsa-miR-512-3p and hsa-miR-518 b. In conclusion, the TALEN-based neural stem cell screening system is safe and efficient and could help researcher to acquire adequate and pure neural progenitor cells for further application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Penetrance of eye defects in mice heterozygous for mutation of Gli3 is enhanced by heterozygous mutation of Pax6

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    Price David J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the consequences of heterozygous mutations of developmentally important genes is important for understanding human genetic disorders. The Gli3 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor and homozygous loss-of-function mutations of Gli3 are lethal. Humans heterozygous for mutations in this gene suffer Greig cephalopolysyndactyly or Pallister-Hall syndromes, in which limb defects are prominent, and mice heterozygous for similar mutations have extra digits. Here we examined whether eye development, which is abnormal in mice lacking functional Gli3, is defective in Gli3+/- mice. Results We showed that Gli3 is expressed in the developing eye but that Gli3+/- mice have only very subtle eye defects. We then generated mice compound heterozygous for mutations in both Gli3 and Pax6, which encodes another developmentally important transcription factor known to be crucial for eye development. Pax6+/-; Gli3+/- eyes were compared to the eyes of wild-type, Pax6+/- or Gli3+/- siblings. They exhibited a range of abnormalities of the retina, iris, lens and cornea that was more extensive than in single Gli3+/- or Pax6+/- mutants or than would be predicted by addition of their phenotypes. Conclusion These findings indicate that heterozygous mutations of Gli3 can impact on eye development. The importance of a normal Gli3 gene dosage becomes greater in the absence of a normal Pax6 gene dosage, suggesting that the two genes co-operate during eye morphogenesis.

  16. High-fat diet induced insulin resistance in pregnant rats through pancreatic pax6 signaling pathway.

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    Wu, Hao; Liu, Yunyun; Wang, Hongkun; Xu, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    To explore the changes in pancreas islet function of pregnant rats after consumption of high-fat diet and the underlying mechanism. Thirty pregnant Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: high-fat diet group and normal control group. Twenty days after gestation, fasting blood glucose concentration (FBG) and fasting serum insulin concentration (FINS) were measured. Then, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release test (IRT) were performed. Finally, all the rats were sacrificed and pancreas were harvested. Insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were calculated according to FBG and FINS. RT-PCR and Real-time PCR were performed to study the expression of paired box 6 transcription factor (Pax6) and its target genes in pancreatic tissues. The body weight was significantly increased in the high-fat diet group compared with that of normal control rats (Pinsulin concentration between the two groups. OGTT and IRT were abnormal in the high-fat diet group. The high-fat diet rats were more prone to impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. The level of the expression of Pax6 transcription factor and its target genes in pancreas, such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (Pdx1), v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A (MafA) and glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) were decreased significantly compared with those of normal control group. High-fat diet feeding during pregnancy may induce insulin resistance in maternal rats by inhibiting pancreatic Pax6 and its target genes expression.

  17. Overexpression of Pax6 results in microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia and defective retinal ganglion cell axon guidance

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    Jeffery Glen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor Pax6 is expressed by many cell types in the developing eye. Eyes do not form in homozygous loss-of-function mouse mutants (Pax6Sey/Sey and are abnormally small in Pax6Sey/+ mutants. Eyes are also abnormally small in PAX77 mice expressing multiple copies of human PAX6 in addition to endogenous Pax6; protein sequences are identical in the two species. The developmental events that lead to microphthalmia in PAX77 mice are not well-characterised, so it is not clear whether over- and under-expression of Pax6/PAX6 cause microphthalmia through similar mechanisms. Here, we examined the consequences of over-expression for the eye and its axonal connections. Results Eyes form in PAX77+/+ embryos but subsequently degenerate. At E12.5, we found no abnormalities in ocular morphology, retinal cell cycle parameters and the incidence of retinal cell death. From E14.5 on, we observed malformations of the optic disc. From E16.5 into postnatal life there is progressively more severe retinal dysplasia and microphthalmia. Analyses of patterns of gene expression indicated that PAX77+/+ retinae produce a normal range of cell types, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. At E14.5 and E16.5, quantitative RT-PCR with probes for a range of molecules associated with retinal development showed only one significant change: a slight reduction in levels of mRNA encoding the secreted morphogen Shh at E16.5. At E16.5, tract-tracing with carbocyanine dyes in PAX77+/+ embryos revealed errors in intraretinal navigation by RGC axons, a decrease in the number of RGC axons reaching the thalamus and an increase in the proportion of ipsilateral projections among those RGC axons that do reach the thalamus. A survey of embryos with different Pax6/PAX6 gene dosage (Pax6Sey/+, Pax6+/+, PAX77+ and PAX77+/+ showed that (1 the total number of RGC axons projected by the retina and (2 the proportions that are sorted into the ipsilateral and

  18. Pax6 downregulation mediates abnormal lineage commitment of the ocular surface epithelium in aqueous-deficient dry eye disease.

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    Ying Ting Chen

    Full Text Available Keratinizing squamous metaplasia (SQM of the ocular surface is a blinding consequence of systemic autoimmune disease and there is no cure. Ocular SQM is traditionally viewed as an adaptive tissue response during chronic keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS that provokes pathological keratinization of the corneal epithelium and fibrosis of the corneal stroma. Recently, we established the autoimmune regulator-knockout (Aire KO mouse as a model of autoimmune KCS and identified an essential role for autoreactive CD4+ T cells in SQM pathogenesis. In subsequent studies, we noted the down-regulation of paired box gene 6 (Pax6 in both human patients with chronic KCS associated with Sjögren's syndrome and Aire KO mice. Pax6 encodes a pleiotropic transcription factor guiding eye morphogenesis during development. While the postnatal function of Pax6 is largely unknown, we hypothesized that its role in maintaining ocular surface homeostasis was disrupted in the inflamed eye and that loss of Pax6 played a functional role in the initiation and progression of SQM. Adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells from Aire KO mice to immunodeficient recipients confirmed CD4+ T cells as the principal downstream effectors promoting Pax6 downregulation in Aire KO mice. CD4+ T cells required local signaling via Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1 to provoke Pax6 loss, which prompted a switch from corneal-specific cytokeratin, CK12, to epidermal-specific CK10. The functional role of Pax6 loss in SQM pathogenesis was indicated by the reversal of SQM and restoration of ocular surface homeostasis following forced expression of Pax6 in corneal epithelial cells using adenovirus. Thus, tissue-restricted restoration of Pax6 prevented aberrant epidermal-lineage commitment suggesting adjuvant Pax6 gene therapy may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent SQM in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases of the ocular surface.

  19. Temporally Regulated Neural Crest Transcription Factors Distinguish Neuroectodermal Tumors of Varying Malignancy and Differentiation

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    Timothy R. Gershon

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroectodermal tumor cells, like neural crest (NC cells, are pluripotent, proliferative, and migratory. We tested the hypothesis that genetic programs essential to NC development are activated in neuroectodermal tumors. We examined the expression of transcription factors PAX3, PAX7, AP-2α, and SOX10 in human embryos and neuroectodermal tumors: neurofibroma, schwannoma, neuroblastoma, malignant nerve sheath tumor, melanoma, medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and Ewing's sarcoma. We also examined the expression of P0, ERBB3, and STX, targets of SOX10, AP-2α, and PAX3, respectively. PAX3, AP-2α, and SOX10 were expressed sequentially in human NC development, whereas PAX7 was restricted to mesoderm. Tumors expressed PAX3, AP-2α, SOX10, and PAX7 in specific combinations. SOX10 and AP-2α were expressed in relatively differentiated neoplasms. The early NC marker, PAX3, and its homologue, PAX7, were detected in poorly differentiated tumors and tumors with malignant potential. Expression of NC transcription factors and target genes correlated. Transcription factors essential to NC development are thus present in neuroectodermal tumors. Correlation of specific NC transcription factors with phenotype, and with expression of specific downstream genes, provides evidence that these transcription factors actively influence gene expression and tumor behavior. These findings suggest that PAX3, PAX7, AP-2α, and SOX10 are potential markers of prognosis and targets for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-jun

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    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Aumercier, Marc [IRI, CNRS USR 3078, Université de Lille-Nord de France, Parc CNRS de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley, BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Tyagi, Rakesh K., E-mail: rktyagi@yahoo.com [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling. - Highlights: • The study identified cis-regulatory elements in the nuclear receptor PXR promoter. • Several trans-acting factors modulating the PXR-promoter have been identified. • PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1, c-Jun, LyF-VI and NF-1 act as modulators of the PXR-promoter. • Ets-1 in conjunction with LEF-1 and c-Jun exhibit 5-fold activation of the PXR-promoter. • Insights into PXR-regulation have relevance in normal and pathological conditions.

  1. Pax6 interacts with Iba1 and shows age-associated alterations in brain of aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Shashank Kumar; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2017-07-01

    The Pax6, a transcriptional regulator and multifunctional protein, has been found critical for neurogenesis, neuro-degeneration, mental retardation, neuroendocrine tumors, glioblastoma and astrocytomas. The age-associated alteration in the expression of Pax6 in neuron and glia has also been observed in the immunologically privileged brain. Therefore, it is presumed that Pax6 may modulate brain immunity by activation of microglia either directly interacting with genes or proteins of microglia or indirectly though inflammation associated with neurodegeneration. This report describes evaluation of expression, co-localization and interactions of Pax6 with Ionized binding protein1 (Iba1) in brain of aging mice by Immunohistochemistry, Chromatin Immuno-precipitation (ChIP) and Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP), respectively. The co-localization of Pax6 with Iba1 was observed in the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, midbrain and olfactory lobe. The Pax6 and Iba1 also interact physically. The age-dependent alteration in their expression and co-localization were also observed in mice. Results indicate Pax6-dependent activities of Iba1 in the remodelling of microglia during immunological surveillance of the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of Pax8 binding provides new insights into thyroid functions

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    Ruiz-Llorente Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor Pax8 is essential for the differentiation of thyroid cells. However, there are few data on genes transcriptionally regulated by Pax8 other than thyroid-related genes. To better understand the role of Pax8 in the biology of thyroid cells, we obtained transcriptional profiles of Pax8-silenced PCCl3 thyroid cells using whole genome expression arrays and integrated these signals with global cis-regulatory sequencing studies performed by ChIP-Seq analysis Results Exhaustive analysis of Pax8 immunoprecipitated peaks demonstrated preferential binding to intragenic regions and CpG-enriched islands, which suggests a role of Pax8 in transcriptional regulation of orphan CpG regions. In addition, ChIP-Seq allowed us to identify Pax8 partners, including proteins involved in tertiary DNA structure (CTCF and chromatin remodeling (Sp1, and these direct transcriptional interactions were confirmed in vivo. Moreover, both factors modulate Pax8-dependent transcriptional activation of the sodium iodide symporter (Nis gene promoter. We ultimately combined putative and novel Pax8 binding sites with actual target gene expression regulation to define Pax8-dependent genes. Functional classification suggests that Pax8-regulated genes may be directly involved in important processes of thyroid cell function such as cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis, cell polarity, motion and adhesion, and a plethora of DNA/protein-related processes. Conclusion Our study provides novel insights into the role of Pax8 in thyroid biology, exerted through transcriptional regulation of important genes involved in critical thyrocyte processes. In addition, we found new transcriptional partners of Pax8, which functionally cooperate with Pax8 in the regulation of thyroid gene transcription. Besides, our data demonstrate preferential location of Pax8 in non-promoter CpG regions. These data point to an orphan CpG island-mediated mechanism

  3. Spatiotemporal distribution of PAX6 and MEIS2 expression and total cell numbers in the ganglionic eminence in the early developing human forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen B; Lutterodt, Melissa C; Laursen, Henning

    2010-01-01

    The development of the human neocortex is a complex and highly regulated process involving a time-related expression of many transcription factors including the homeobox genes Pax6 and Meis2. During early development, Pax6 is expressed in nuclei of radial glia cells in the neocortical proliferative...... in the same time window. We demonstrate by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry that the two homeobox genes are expressed during early fetal brain development in humans. PAX6 mRNA and protein were located in the proliferative zones of the neocortex and in single cells in the cortical preplate at 7...... in the proliferative zones of the human fetal neocortex and a higher expression of MEIS2 than PAX6 was observed in these areas at 9 fetal weeks. Further, MEIS2 was expressed at a very high level in the developing ganglionic eminence and at a more moderate level in the cortical plate....

  4. Generation of Pax6-IRES-EGFP knock-in mouse via the cloning-free CRISPR/Cas9 system to reliably visualize neurodevelopmental dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yukiko U; Morimoto, Yuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2018-07-01

    Pax6 encodes a transcription factor that plays pivotal roles in eye development, early brain patterning, neocortical arealization, and so forth. Visualization of Pax6 expression dynamics in these events could offer numerous advantages to neurodevelopmental studies. While CRISPR/Cas9 system has dramatically accelerated one-step generation of knock-out mouse, establishment of gene-cassette knock-in mouse via zygote injection has been considered insufficient due to its low efficiency. Recently, an improved CRISPR/Cas9 system for effective gene-cassette knock-in has been reported, where the native form of guide RNAs (crRNA and tracrRNA) assembled with recombinant Cas9 protein are directly delivered into mouse fertilized eggs. Here we apply this strategy to insert IRES-EGFP-pA cassette into Pax6 locus and achieve efficient targeted insertions of the 1.8 kb reporter gene. In Pax6-IRES-EGFP mouse we have generated, EGFP-positive cells reside in the eyes and cerebellum as endogenous Pax6 expressing cells at postnatal day 2. At the early embryonic stages when the embryos are transparent, EGFP-positive regions can be easily identified without PCR-based genotyping, precisely recapitulating the endogenous Pax6 expression patterns. Remarkably, at E12.5, the graded expression patterns of Pax6 in the developing neocortex now become recognizable in our knock-in mice, serving a sufficiently sensitive and useful tool to precisely visualize neurodevelopmental processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression and clinical significance of Pax6 gene in retinoblastoma

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    Hai-Dong Huang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To discuss the expression and clinical significance of Pax6 gene in retinoblastoma(Rb. METHODS: Totally 15 cases of fresh Rb organizations were selected as observation group and 15 normal retinal organizations as control group. Western-Blot and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCRmethods were used to detect Pax6 protein and Pax6 mRNA expressions of the normal retina organizations and Rb organizations. At the same time, Western Blot method was used to detect the Pax6 gene downstream MATH5 and BRN3b differentiation gene protein level expression. After the comparison between two groups, the expression and clinical significance of Pax6 gene in Rb were discussed. RESULTS: In the observation group, average value of mRNA expression of Pax6 gene was 0.99±0.03; average value of Pax6 gene protein expression was 2.07±0.15; average value of BRN3b protein expression was 0.195±0.016; average value of MATH5 protein expression was 0.190±0.031. They were significantly higher than the control group, and the differences were statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: Abnormal expression of Pax6 gene is likely to accelerate the occurrence of Rb.

  6. Coop-Seq Analysis Demonstrates that Sox2 Evokes Latent Specificities in the DNA Recognition by Pax6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Caizhen; Malik, Vikas; Chang, Yiming Kenny; Veerapandian, Veeramohan; Srivastava, Yogesh; Huang, Yong-Heng; Hou, Linlin; Cojocaru, Vlad; Stormo, Gary D; Jauch, Ralf

    2017-11-24

    Sox2 and Pax6 co-regulate genes in neural lineages and the lens by forming a ternary complex likely facilitated allosterically through DNA. We used the quantitative and scalable cooperativity-by-sequencing (Coop-seq) approach to interrogate Sox2/Pax6 dimerization on a DNA library where five positions of the Pax6 half-site were randomized yielding 1024 cooperativity factors. Consensus positions normally required for the high-affinity DNA binding by Pax6 need to be mutated for effective dimerization with Sox2. Out of the five randomized bases, a 5' thymidine is present in most of the top ranking elements. However, this thymidine maps to a region outside of the Pax half site and is not expected to directly interact with Pax6 in known binding modes suggesting structural reconfigurations. Re-analysis of ChIP-seq data identified several genomic regions where the cooperativity promoting sequence pattern is co-bound by Sox2 and Pax6. A highly conserved Sox2/Pax6 bound site near the Sprouty2 locus was verified to promote cooperative dimerization designating Sprouty2 as a potential target reliant on Sox2/Pax6 cooperativity in several neural cell types. Collectively, the functional interplay of Sox2 and Pax6 demands the relaxation of high-affinity binding sites and is enabled by alternative DNA sequences. We conclude that this binding mode evolved to warrant that a subset of target genes is only regulated in the presence of suitable partner factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of the Methylation Status of Pax7 and Myogenic Regulator Factors in Cell Myogenic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Zhe; Zheng, Xin-Li; Sun, Rui-Ping; Liu, Hai-Long; Huang, Li-Li; Cao, Zong-Xi; Deng, Chang-Yan; Wang, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic processes in the development of skeletal muscle have been appreciated for over a decade. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic modification important for regulating gene expression and suppressing spurious transcription. Up to now, the importance of epigenetic marks in the regulation of Pax7 and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression is far less explored. In the present study, semi-quantitative the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses showed MyoD and Myf5 were expressed in activated and quiescent C2C12 cells. MyoG was expressed in a later stage of myogenesis. Pax7 was weakly expressed in differentiated C2C12 cells. To further understand the regulation of expression of these genes, the DNA methylation status of Pax7, MyoD, and Myf5 was determined by bisulfite sequencing PCR. During the C2C12 myoblasts fusion process, the changes of promoter and exon 1 methylation of Pax7, MyoD, and Myf5 genes were observed. In addition, an inverse relationship of low methylation and high expression was found. These results suggest that DNA methylation may be an important mechanism regulating Pax7 and MRFs transcription in cell myogenic differentiation.

  8. Xenopus pax6 mutants affect eye development and other organ systems, and have phenotypic similarities to human aniridia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takuya; Fisher, Marilyn; Nakajima, Keisuke; Odeleye, Akinleye O; Zimmerman, Keith B; Fish, Margaret B; Yaoita, Yoshio; Chojnowski, Jena L; Lauderdale, James D; Netland, Peter A; Grainger, Robert M

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the Pax6 gene cause ocular defects in both vertebrate and invertebrate animal species, and the disease aniridia in humans. Despite extensive experimentation on this gene in multiple species, including humans, we still do not understand the earliest effects on development mediated by this gene. This prompted us to develop pax6 mutant lines in Xenopus tropicalis taking advantage of the utility of the Xenopus system for examining early development and in addition to establish a model for studying the human disease aniridia in an accessible lower vertebrate. We have generated mutants in pax6 by using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN) constructs for gene editing in X. tropicalis. Embryos with putative null mutations show severe eye abnormalities and changes in brain development, as assessed by changes in morphology and gene expression. One gene that we found is downregulated very early in development in these pax6 mutants is myc, a gene involved in pluripotency and progenitor cell maintenance and likely a mediator of some key pax6 functions in the embryo. Changes in gene expression in the developing brain and pancreas reflect other important functions of pax6 during development. In mutations with partial loss of pax6 function eye development is initially relatively normal but froglets show an underdeveloped iris, similar to the classic phenotype (aniridia) seen in human patients with PAX6 mutations. Other eye abnormalities observed in these froglets, including cataracts and corneal defects, are also common in human aniridia. The frog model thus allows us to examine the earliest deficits in eye formation as a result of pax6 lesions, and provides a useful model for understanding the developmental basis for the aniridia phenotype seen in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Optimedin gene is a downstream target of Pax6

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grinchuk, O.; Kozmik, Zbyněk; Wu, X.; Tomarev, S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 280, č. 42 (2005), s. 35228-35237 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/04/1358 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Pax6 * optimedin * promotor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2005

  10. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  11. Pax4 acts as a key player in pancreas development and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Tiziana; Avolio, Fabio; Courtney, Monica; Vieira, Andhira; Druelle, Noémie; Ben-Othman, Nouha; Hadzic, Biljana; Navarro, Sergi; Collombat, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    The embryonic development of the pancreas is orchestrated by a complex and coordinated transcription factor network. Neurogenin3 (Neurog3) initiates the endocrine program by activating the expression of additional transcription factors driving survival, proliferation, maturation and lineage allocation of endocrine precursors. Among the direct targets of Neurog3, Pax4 appears as one of the key regulators of β-cell specification. Indeed, mice lacking Pax4 die a few days postpartum, as they develop severe hyperglycemia due to the absence of mature pancreatic β-cells. Pax4 also directly regulates the expression of Arx, a gene that plays a crucial role in α-cell specification. Comparative analysis of Pax4 and Arx mutants, as well as Arx/Pax4 double mutants, showed that islet subtype destiny is mainly directed by cross-repression of the Pax4 and Arx factors. Importantly, the ectopic expression of Pax4 in α-cells was found sufficient to induce their neogenesis and conversion into β-like cells, not only during development but also in adult rodents. Therefore, differentiated endocrine α-cells can be considered as a putative source for insulin-producing β-like cells. These findings have clearly widened our understanding regarding pancreatic development, but they also open new research avenues in the context of diabetes research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. PAX3-FOXO1: Zooming in on an "undruggable" target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtel, Marco; Schäfer, Beat W

    2018-06-01

    Driver oncogenes are prime targets for therapy in tumors many of which, including leukemias and sarcomas, express recurrent fusion transcription factors. One specific example for such a cancer type is alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, which is associated in the majority of cases with the fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Since fusion transcription factors are challenging targets for development of small molecule inhibitors, indirect inhibitory strategies for this type of oncogenes represent a more promising approach. One can envision strategies at different molecular levels including upstream modifiers and activators, epigenetic and transcriptional co-regulators, and downstream effector targets. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding potential therapeutic targets that might contribute to indirect interference with PAX3-FOXO1 activity in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma at the different molecular levels and extrapolate these findings to fusion transcription factors in general. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro differentiation of adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neural retinal cells through expression of human PAX6 (5a) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanejad, Habib; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Haddad, Farhang; Matin, Maryam M; Samiei, Shahram; Manafi, Ali; Ahmadieh, Hamid

    2014-04-01

    The neural retina is subjected to various degenerative conditions. Regenerative stem-cell-based therapy holds great promise for treating severe retinal degeneration diseases, although many drawbacks remain to be overcome. One important problem is to gain authentically differentiated cells for replacement. Paired box 6 protein (5a) (PAX6 (5a)) is a highly conserved master control gene that has an essential role in the development of the vertebrate visual system. Human adipose-tissue-derived stem cell (hADSC) isolation was performed by using fat tissues and was confirmed by the differentiation potential of the cells into adipocytes and osteocytes and by their surface marker profile. The coding region of the human PAX6 (5a) gene isoform was cloned and lentiviral particles were propagated in HEK293T. The differentiation of hADSCs into retinal cells was characterized by morphological characteristics, quantitative real-time reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) for some retinal cell-specific and retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cell-specific markers. hADSCs were successfully isolated. Flow cytometric analysis of surface markers indicated the high purity (~97 %) of isolated hADSCs. After 30 h of post-transduction, cells gradually showed the characteristic morphology of neuronal cells and small axon-like processes emerged. qPCR and ICC confirmed the differentiation of some neural retinal cells and RPE cells. Thus, PAX6 (5a) transcription factor expression, together with medium supplemented with fibronectin, is able to induce the differentiation of hADSCs into retinal progenitors, RPE cells and photoreceptors.

  14. The formation of an aberrant PAX5 transcript in a patient with mixed phenotype acute leukemia harboring der(9t(7;9(q11.2;p13

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    Jun Amaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We experienced the case of a 56-year-old male with B-lymphoid/myeloid lineage mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL. A cytogenetic analysis of the patient's bone marrow revealed a complex karyotype, including der(9t(7;9(q11.2;p13. We identified an aberrant PAX5 transcript, including the exons 1A to 5 and the contiguous intron 5/6 sequence using the 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction method, and confirmed their expression in the leukemic cells. Our case suggests that der(9t(7;9(q11.2;p13 can cause the truncation of the PAX5 transcript, which is supposed to contribute to the generation of MPAL, in addition to three previously reported types of PAX5 fusion.

  15. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-08-14

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Pax9 paired domain bound to a DC5 enhancer DNA element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Hilbig, Antonia; Udayasuryan, Barath; Jayabal, Sriram; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    Pax genes belong to a family of metazoan transcription factors that are known to play a critical role in eye, ear, kidney and neural development. The mammalian Pax family of transcription factors is characterized by a ∼128-amino-acid DNA-binding paired domain that makes sequence-specific contacts with DNA. The diversity in Pax gene activities emerges from complex modes of interaction with enhancer regions and heterodimerization with multiple interaction partners. Based on in vitro optimal binding-site selection studies and enhancer identification assays, it has been suggested that Pax proteins may recognize and bind their target DNA elements with different binding modes/topologies, however this hypothesis has not yet been structurally explored. One of the most extensively studied DNA target elements of the Pax6 paired domain is the eye-lens specific DC5 (δ-crystallin) enhancer element. In order to shed light on Pax6-DC5 DNA interactions, the related paired-domain prototype Pax9 was crystallized with the minimal δ-crystallin DC5 enhancer element and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was attempted. A 3.0 Å resolution native data set was collected at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven from crystals grown in a solution consisting of 10%(w/v) PEG 20K, 20%(v/v) PEG 550 MME, 0.03 M NaNO3, 0.03 M Na2HPO4, 0.03 M NH2SO4, 0.1 M MES/imidazole pH 6.5. The data set was indexed and merged in space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.74, b = 165.59, c = 70.14 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The solvent content in the unit cell is consistent with the presence of one Pax9 paired domain bound to duplex DNA in the asymmetric unit.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Pax9 paired domain bound to a DC5 enhancer DNA element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Hilbig, Antonia; Udayasuryan, Barath; Jayabal, Sriram; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Pax genes belong to a family of metazoan transcription factors that are known to play a critical role in eye, ear, kidney and neural development. The mammalian Pax family of transcription factors is characterized by a ∼128-amino-acid DNA-binding paired domain that makes sequence-specific contacts with DNA. The diversity in Pax gene activities emerges from complex modes of interaction with enhancer regions and heterodimerization with multiple interaction partners. Based on in vitro optimal binding-site selection studies and enhancer identification assays, it has been suggested that Pax proteins may recognize and bind their target DNA elements with different binding modes/topologies, however this hypothesis has not yet been structurally explored. One of the most extensively studied DNA target elements of the Pax6 paired domain is the eye-lens specific DC5 (δ-crystallin) enhancer element. In order to shed light on Pax6–DC5 DNA interactions, the related paired-domain prototype Pax9 was crystallized with the minimal δ-crystallin DC5 enhancer element and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis was attempted. A 3.0 Å resolution native data set was collected at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven from crystals grown in a solution consisting of 10%(w/v) PEG 20K, 20%(v/v) PEG 550 MME, 0.03 M NaNO3, 0.03 M Na2HPO4, 0.03 M NH2SO4, 0.1 M MES/imidazole pH 6.5. The data set was indexed and merged in space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.74, b = 165.59, c = 70.14 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The solvent content in the unit cell is consistent with the presence of one Pax9 paired domain bound to duplex DNA in the asymmetric unit. PMID:25286939

  18. Stage-dependent requirement of neuroretinal Pax6 for lens and retina development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klímová, Lucie; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 6 (2014), s. 1292-1302 ISSN 0950-1991 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2198; GA AV ČR IAA500520908; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pax6 * Retinal progenitor * mRx-Cre * Lens induction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.462, year: 2014

  19. Level of PAX5 in differential diagnosis of non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma

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    Brij Bharti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The PAX5, a paired box transcription factor and B-cell activator protein (BSAP, activates B-cell commitment genes and represses non-B-cell lineage genes. About 14 transcript variants of PAX5 have been observed in human. Any alteration in its expression pattern leads to lymphogenesis or associated diseases and carcinogenesis in non-lymphoid tissues. Its mechanisms of function in pathophysiology of non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma (NHL are unclear. This study was intended to explore influence of PAX5 in cascade of NHL pathogenesis and diagnosis. Methods: Samples of 65 patients were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining for cellular localization of PAX5, CD19, CD3, cABL, p53, Ras and Raf and by TUNEL assay, RNA-isolation and reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR, w0 estern blot analysis, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH specific staining. Results: B-cell type NHL patients were positive for PAX5, p53, Ras, CD19, Raf and CD3. All of them showed TUNEL-positive cells. The differential expression pattern of PAX5, CD19, p53, CD3, Zap700 , HIF 1α, Ras, Raf and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase at the levels of transcripts and proteins was observed. The LDH assay showed modulation of LDH4 and LDH5 isoforms in the lymph nodes of NHL patients. Interpretation & conclusions: The histological observations suggested that the patients represent diverse cases of NHL like mature B-cell type, mature T-cell type and high grade diffuse B-cell type NHL. The findings indicate that patients with NHL may also be analyzed for status of PAX5, CD19 and ZAP70, and their transcriptional and post-translational variants for the differential diagnosis of NHL and therapy.

  20. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina

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    Jack W Hickmott

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6 gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia.

  1. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-Yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia.

  2. A recurrent germline PAX5 mutation confers susceptibility to pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.; Schrader, K.A.; Waanders, E.; Timms, A.E.; Vijai, J.; Miething, C.; Wechsler, J.; Yang, J.; Hayes, J.; Klein, R.J.; Zhang, J.; Wei, L.; Wu, G.; Rusch, M.; Nagahawatte, P.; Ma, J; Chen, S.C.; Song, G.; Cheng, J.; Meyers, P.; Bhojwani, D.; Jhanwar, S.; Maslak, P.; Fleisher, M.; Littman, J.; Offit, L.; Rau-Murthy, R.; Fleischut, M.H.; Corines, M.; Murali, R.; Gao, X.; Manschreck, C.; Kitzing, T.; Murty, V.V.; Raimondi, S.C.; Kuiper, R.P.; Simons, A.; Schiffman, J.D.; Onel, K.; Plon, S.E.; Wheeler, D.A.; Ritter, D.; Ziegler, D.S.; Tucker, K.; Sutton, R.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Li, J.; Huntsman, D.G.; Hansford, S.; Senz, J.; Walsh, T.; Lee (Helen Dowling Instituut), M. van der; Hahn, C.N.; Roberts, K.G.; King, M.C.; Lo, S.M.; Levine, R.L.; Viale, A.; Socci, N.D.; Nathanson, K.L.; Scott, H.S.; Daly, M.; Lipkin, S.M.; Lowe, S.W.; Downing, J.R.; Altshuler, D.; Sandlund, J.T.; Horwitz, M.S.; Mullighan, C.G.; Offit, K.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic alterations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene PAX5 (also known as BSAP) are a hallmark of B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), but inherited mutations of PAX5 have not previously been described. Here we report a new heterozygous germline variant, c.547G>A

  3. Down-regulation of Pax6 is associated with abnormal differentiation of corneal epithelial cells in severe ocular surface diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Chen, Y-T; Hayashida, Y; Blanco, G; Kheirkah, A; He, H; Chen, S-Y; Liu, C-Y; Tseng, SCG

    2010-01-01

    Pax6 is the universal master control gene for eye morphogenesis. Other than retina and lens, Pax6 also expressed in the ocular surface epithelium from early gestation until the postnatal stage, in which little is known about the function of Pax6. In this study, corneal pannus tissues from patients with ocular surface diseases such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS), chemical burn, aniridia and recurrent pterygium were investigated. Our results showed that normal ocular surface epithelial cells expressed Pax6. However, corneal pannus epithelial cells from the above patients showed a decline or absence of Pax6 expression, accompanied by a decline or absence of K12 keratin but an increase of K10 keratin and filaggrin expression. Pannus basal epithelial cells maintained nuclear p63 expression and showed activated proliferation, evidenced by positive Ki67 and K16 keratin staining. On 3T3 fibroblast feeder layers, Pax6 immunostaining was negative in clones generated from epithelial cells harvested from corneal pannus from SJS or aniridia, but positive in those from the normal limbal epithelium; whereas western blots showed that some epithelial clones expanded from pannus retained Pax6 expression. Transient transfection of an adenoviral vector carrying EGFP–Pax6 transgenes into these Pax6− clones increased both Pax6 and K12 keratin expression. These results indicate that Pax6 helps to maintain the normal corneal epithelial phenotype postnatally, and that down-regulation of Pax6 is associated with abnormal epidermal differentiation in severe ocular surface diseases. Reintroduction of activation of the Pax6 gene might be useful in treating squamous metaplasia of the ocular surface epithelium. PMID:18027901

  4. Pax7 lineage contributions to the mammalian neural crest.

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    Barbara Murdoch

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are vertebrate-specific multipotent cells that contribute to a variety of tissues including the peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, and craniofacial bones and cartilage. Abnormal development of the neural crest is associated with several human maladies including cleft/lip palate, aggressive cancers such as melanoma and neuroblastoma, and rare syndromes, like Waardenburg syndrome, a complex disorder involving hearing loss and pigment defects. We previously identified the transcription factor Pax7 as an early marker, and required component for neural crest development in chick embryos. In mammals, Pax7 is also thought to play a role in neural crest development, yet the precise contribution of Pax7 progenitors to the neural crest lineage has not been determined.Here we use Cre/loxP technology in double transgenic mice to fate map the Pax7 lineage in neural crest derivates. We find that Pax7 descendants contribute to multiple tissues including the cranial, cardiac and trunk neural crest, which in the cranial cartilage form a distinct regional pattern. The Pax7 lineage, like the Pax3 lineage, is additionally detected in some non-neural crest tissues, including a subset of the epithelial cells in specific organs.These results demonstrate a previously unappreciated widespread distribution of Pax7 descendants within and beyond the neural crest. They shed light regarding the regionally distinct phenotypes observed in Pax3 and Pax7 mutants, and provide a unique perspective into the potential roles of Pax7 during disease and development.

  5. Effects of light and covering behavior on PAX6 expression in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

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    Chong Zhao

    Full Text Available We studied the diel expression pattern of PAX6 (a structural gene that is commonly involved in the eye development and photoreception of eye forming animals and the effects of light and covering behavior on PAX6 expression in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius. We confirmed that aphotic condition significantly reduced covering behavior in S. intermedius. The diel expression pattern of PAX6 was significantly different in S. intermedius under photic and aphotic conditions. The gene expression of PAX6 significantly deceased in covered S. intermedius both under natural light and in darkness. The present finding provides valuable insight into the probable link between covering and PAX6 expression of sea urchins. Further studies are required to investigate the detailed expression network of light detection involved genes in order to fully reveal the molecular mechanism of the light-induced covering behavior of sea urchins.

  6. Evolutionary history of chordate PAX genes: dynamics of change in a complex gene family.

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    Vanessa Rodrigues Paixão-Côrtes

    Full Text Available Paired box (PAX genes are transcription factors that play important roles in embryonic development. Although the PAX gene family occurs in animals only, it is widely distributed. Among the vertebrates, its 9 genes appear to be the product of complete duplication of an original set of 4 genes, followed by an additional partial duplication. Although some studies of PAX genes have been conducted, no comprehensive survey of these genes across the entire taxonomic unit has yet been attempted. In this study, we conducted a detailed comparison of PAX sequences from 188 chordates, which revealed restricted variation. The absence of PAX4 and PAX8 among some species of reptiles and birds was notable; however, all 9 genes were present in all 74 mammalian genomes investigated. A search for signatures of selection indicated that all genes are subject to purifying selection, with a possible constraint relaxation in PAX4, PAX7, and PAX8. This result indicates asymmetric evolution of PAX family genes, which can be associated with the emergence of adaptive novelties in the chordate evolutionary trajectory.

  7. Novel mutations in PAX6, OTX2 and NDP in anophthalmia, microphthalmia and coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deml, Brett; Reis, Linda M; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Clark, Robin D; Kariminejad, Ariana; Semina, Elena V

    2016-04-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are developmental ocular malformations defined as the complete absence or reduction in size of the eye. A/M is a highly heterogeneous disorder with SOX2 and FOXE3 playing major roles in dominant and recessive pedigrees, respectively; however, the majority of cases lack a genetic etiology. We analyzed 28 probands affected with A/M spectrum (without mutations in SOX2/FOXE3) by whole-exome sequencing. Analysis of 83 known A/M factors identified pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants in PAX6, OTX2 and NDP in three patients. A novel heterozygous likely pathogenic variant in PAX6, c.767T>C, p.(Val256Ala), was identified in two brothers with bilateral microphthalmia, coloboma, primary aphakia, iris hypoplasia, sclerocornea and congenital glaucoma; the unaffected mother appears to be a mosaic carrier. While A/M has been reported as a rare feature, this is the first report of congenital primary aphakia in association with PAX6 and the identified allele represents the first variant in the PAX6 homeodomain to be associated with A/M. A novel pathogenic variant in OTX2, c.651delC, p.(Thr218Hisfs*76), in a patient with syndromic bilateral anophthalmia and a hemizygous pathogenic variant in NDP, c.293 C>T, p.(Pro98Leu), in two brothers with isolated bilateral microphthalmia and sclerocornea were also identified. Pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants were not discovered in the 25 remaining A/M cases. This study underscores the utility of whole-exome sequencing for identification of causative mutations in highly variable ocular phenotypes as well as the extreme genetic heterogeneity of A/M conditions.

  8. Giant Subependymoma Developed in a Patient with Aniridia: Analyses of PAX6 and Tumor-relevant Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Motoko; Fujisawa, Hironori; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Tamase, Akira; Toyota, Tomoko; Osumi, Noriko; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    We observed an unusually large subependymoma in a female patient with congenital aniridia. To analyze the genetic mechanisms of tumorigenesis, we first examined the paired box 6 (PAX6) gene using both tumor tissue and peripheral lymphocytes. Tumor suppressor activity has been proposed for PAX6 in gliomas, in addition to its well-known role in the eye development. Using genomic quantitative PCR and loss of heterozygosity analysis, we identified hemizygous deletions in the 5′-region of PAX6. In lymphocytes, the deletion within PAX6 spanned from between exons 6 and 7 to the 5′-upstream region of the gene, but did not reach the upstream gene, RNC1, which is reported to be associated with tumors. The subependymoma had an additional de novo deletion spanning from the intron 4 to intron 6 of PAX6, although we could not completely determine whether these two deletions are on the same chromosome or not. We also examined other potentially relevant tumor suppressor genes: PTEN, TP53 and SOX2. However, we detected no exonic mutations or deletions in these genes. Collectively, we speculate that the defect in PAX6 may have contributed to the extremely large size of the subependymoma, due to a loss of tumor suppressor activity in glial cell lineage. PMID:20500513

  9. Characterization of Pax2 expression in the goldfish optic nerve head during retina regeneration.

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    Marta Parrilla

    Full Text Available The Pax2 transcription factor plays a crucial role in axon-guidance and astrocyte differentiation in the optic nerve head (ONH during vertebrate visual system development. However, little is known about its function during regeneration. The fish visual system is in continuous growth and can regenerate. Müller cells and astrocytes of the retina and ONH play an important role in these processes. We demonstrate that pax2a in goldfish is highly conserved and at least two pax2a transcripts are expressed in the optic nerve. Moreover, we show two different astrocyte populations in goldfish: Pax2(+ astrocytes located in the ONH and S100(+ astrocytes distributed throughout the retina and the ONH. After peripheral growth zone (PGZ cryolesion, both Pax2(+ and S100(+ astrocytes have different responses. At 7 days after injury the number of Pax2(+ cells is reduced and coincides with the absence of young axons. In contrast, there is an increase of S100(+ astrocytes in the retina surrounding the ONH and S100(+ processes in the ONH. At 15 days post injury, the PGZ starts to regenerate and the number of S100(+ astrocytes increases in this region. Moreover, the regenerating axons reach the ONH and the pax2a gene expression levels and the number of Pax2(+ cells increase. At the same time, S100(+/GFAP(+/GS(+ astrocytes located in the posterior ONH react strongly. In the course of the regeneration, Müller cell vitreal processes surrounding the ONH are primarily disorganized and later increase in number. During the whole regenerative process we detect a source of Pax2(+/PCNA(+ astrocytes surrounding the posterior ONH. We demonstrate that pax2a expression and the Pax2(+ astrocyte population in the ONH are modified during the PGZ regeneration, suggesting that they could play an important role in this process.

  10. A developmental transcriptomic analysis of Pax1 and Pax9 in embryonic intervertebral disc development

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    V. Sivakamasundari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pax1 and Pax9 play redundant, synergistic functions in the patterning and differentiation of the sclerotomal cells that give rise to the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs (IVD of the axial skeleton. They are conserved in mice and humans, whereby mutation/deficiency of human PAX1/PAX9 has been associated with kyphoscoliosis. By combining cell-type-specific transcriptome and ChIP-sequencing data, we identified the roles of Pax1/Pax9 in cell proliferation, cartilage development and collagen fibrillogenesis, which are vital in early IVD morphogenesis. Pax1 is up-regulated in the absence of Pax9, while Pax9 is unaffected by the loss of Pax1/Pax9. We identified the targets compensated by a single- or double-copy of Pax9. They positively regulate many of the cartilage genes known to be regulated by Sox5/Sox6/Sox9 and are connected to Sox5/Sox6 by a negative feedback loop. Pax1/Pax9 are intertwined with BMP and TGF-B pathways and we propose they initiate expression of chondrogenic genes during early IVD differentiation and subsequently become restricted to the outer annulus by the negative feedback mechanism. Our findings highlight how early IVD development is regulated spatio-temporally and have implications for understanding kyphoscoliosis.

  11. Evaluation of Pax6 mutant rat as a model for autism.

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    Toshiko Umeda

    Full Text Available Autism is a highly variable brain developmental disorder and has a strong genetic basis. Pax6 is a pivotal player in brain development and maintenance. It is expressed in embryonic and adult neural stem cells, in astrocytes in the entire central nervous system, and in neurons in the olfactory bulb, amygdala, thalamus, and cerebellum, functioning in highly context-dependent manners. We have recently reported that Pax6 heterozygous mutant (rSey(2/+ rats with a spontaneous mutation in the Pax6 gene, show impaired prepulse inhibition (PPI. In the present study, we further examined behaviors of rSey(2/+ rats and revealed that they exhibited abnormality in social interaction (more aggression and withdrawal in addition to impairment in rearing activity and in fear-conditioned memory. Ultrasonic vocalization (USV in rSey(2+ rat pups was normal in male but abnormal in female. Moreover, treatment with clozapine successfully recovered the defects in sensorimotor gating function, but not in fear-conditioned memory. Taken together with our prior human genetic data and results in other literatures, rSey(2/+ rats likely have some phenotypic components of autism.

  12. Pax6- and Six3-mediated induction of lens cell fate in mouse and human ES cells.

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    Raymond M Anchan

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem (ES cells provide a potentially useful in vitro model for the study of in vivo tissue differentiation. We used mouse and human ES cells to investigate whether the lens regulatory genes Pax6 and Six3 could induce lens cell fate in vitro. To help assess the onset of lens differentiation, we derived a new mES cell line (Pax6-GFP mES that expresses a GFP reporter under the control of the Pax6 P0 promoter and lens ectoderm enhancer. Pax6 or Six3 expression vectors were introduced into mES or hES cells by transfection or lentiviral infection and the differentiating ES cells analyzed for lens marker expression. Transfection of mES cells with Pax6 or Six3 but not with other genes induced the expression of lens cell markers and up-regulated GFP reporter expression in Pax6-GFP mES cells by 3 days post-transfection. By 7 days post-transfection, mES cell cultures exhibited a>10-fold increase over controls in the number of colonies expressing γA-crystallin, a lens fiber cell differentiation marker. RT-PCR and immunostaining revealed induction of additional lens epithelial or fiber cell differentiation markers including Foxe3, Prox1, α- and β-crystallins, and Tdrd7. Moreover, γA-crystallin- or Prox1-expressing lentoid bodies formed by 30 days in culture. In hES cells, Pax6 or Six3 lentiviral vectors also induced lens marker expression. mES cells that express lens markers reside close to but are distinct from the Pax6 or Six3 transduced cells, suggesting that the latter induce nearby undifferentiated ES cells to adopt a lens fate by non-cell autonomous mechanisms. In sum, we describe a novel mES cell GFP reporter line that is useful for monitoring induction of lens fate, and demonstrate that Pax6 or Six3 is sufficient to induce ES cells to adopt a lens fate, potentially via non-cell autonomous mechanisms. These findings should facilitate investigations of lens development.

  13. PAX2 regulates ADAM10 expression and mediates anchorage-independent cell growth of melanoma cells.

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    Sophia Boyoung Lee

    Full Text Available PAX transcription factors play an important role during development and carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated PAX2 protein levels in melanocytes and melanoma cells by Western Blot and immunofluorescence analysis and characterized the role of PAX2 in the pathogenesis of melanoma. In vitro we found weak PAX2 protein expression in keratinocytes and melanocytes. Compared to melanocytes increased PAX2 protein levels were detectable in melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, in tissue sections of melanoma patients nuclear PAX2 expression strongly correlated with nuclear atypia and the degree of prominent nucleoli, indicating an association of PAX2 with a more atypical cellular phenotype. In addition, with chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, PAX2 overexpression and PAX2 siRNA we present compelling evidence that PAX2 can regulate ADAM10 expression, a metalloproteinase known to play important roles in melanoma metastasis. In human tissue samples we found co-expression of PAX2 and ADAM10 in melanocytes of benign nevi and in melanoma cells of patients with malignant melanoma. Importantly, the downregulation of PAX2 by specific siRNA inhibited the anchorage independent cell growth and decreased the migratory and invasive capacity of melanoma cells. Furthermore, the downregulation of PAX2 abrogated the chemoresistance of melanoma cells against cisplatin, indicating that PAX2 expression mediates cell survival and plays important roles during melanoma progression.

  14. Role of PAX8 in the regulation of MET and RON receptor tyrosine kinases in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanteti, Rajani; El-Hashani, Essam; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; Tretiakova, Maria; Husain, Aliya N; Sharma, Sherven; Sharma, Jay; Vokes, Everett E; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are highly heterogeneous at the molecular level and comprise 75% of all lung tumors. We have previously shown that the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) MET frequently suffers gain-of-function mutations that significantly promote lung tumorigenesis. Subsequent studies from our lab also revealed that PAX5 transcription factor is preferentially expressed in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and promotes MET transcription. PAX8, however, is also expressed in NSCLC cell lines. We therefore investigated the role of PAX8 in NSCLC. Using IHC analysis, PAX8 protein expression was determined in archival NSCLC tumor tissues (n = 254). In order to study the effects of PAX8 knockdown on NSCLC cellular functions such as apoptosis and motility, siRNA against PAX8 was used. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to monitor the localization of MET, RON and PAX8. The combinatorial effect of PAX8 knockdown and MET inhibition using SU11274 was investigated in NSCLC cell viability assay. Relative levels of PAX8 protein were elevated (≥ + 2 on a scale of 0–3) in adenocarcinoma (58/94), large cell carcinoma (50/85), squamous cell carcinoma (28/47), and metastatic NSCLC (17/28; lymph node). Utilizing early progenitors isolated from NSCLC cell lines and fresh tumor tissues, we observed robust overexpression of PAX8, MET, and RON. PAX8 knockdown A549 cells revealed abrogated PAX8 expression with a concomitant loss in MET and the related RON kinase expression. A dramatic colocalization between the active form of MET (also RON) and PAX8 upon challenging A549 cells with HGF was visualized. A similar colocalization of MET and EGL5 (PAX8 ortholog) proteins was found in embryos of C. elegans. Most importantly, knockdown of PAX8 in A549 cells resulted in enhanced apoptosis (~6 fold) and decreased cell motility (~45%), thereby making PAX8 a potential therapeutic target. However, the combinatorial approach of PAX8 knockdown and treatment with MET inhibitor, SU

  15. Ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Required to Maintain Pax7 Protein Levels in Proliferating Muscle Progenitors.

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    Natalia González

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle regeneration and long term maintenance is directly link to the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. In turn, satellite cell fate is influenced by a functional interaction between the transcription factor Pax7 and members of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors. Thus, changes in the Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratio may act as a molecular rheostat fine-tuning acquisition of lineage identity while preventing precocious terminal differentiation. Pax7 is expressed in quiescent and proliferating satellite cells, while its levels decrease sharply in differentiating progenitors Pax7 is maintained in cells (reacquiring quiescence. While the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood, we have recently described that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4, thus promoting proteasome-dependent Pax7 degradation in differentiating satellite cells. Here we show that Pax7 levels are maintained in proliferating muscle progenitors by a mechanism involving casein kinase 2-dependent Pax7 phosphorylation at S201. Point mutations preventing S201 phosphorylation or casein kinase 2 inhibition result in decreased Pax7 protein in proliferating muscle progenitors. Accordingly, this correlates directly with increased Pax7 ubiquitination. Finally, Pax7 down regulation induced by casein kinase 2 inhibition results in precocious myogenic induction, indicating early commitment to terminal differentiation. These observations highlight the critical role of post translational regulation of Pax7 as a molecular switch controlling muscle progenitor fate.

  16. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of two forms of Pax8 in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Nobuto; Uemae, Youji; Sakamoto, Joe; Hidaka, Yoshie; Susa, Takao; Kato, Yukio; Kimura, Shioko; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    We have identified two distinct Pax8 (a and b) mRNAs from the thyroid gland of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), which seemed to be generated by alternative splicing. Both Pax8a and Pax8b proteins were predicted to possess the paired domain, octapeptide, and partial homeodomain, while Pax8b lacked the carboxy-terminal portion due to an insertion in the coding region of the mRNA. RT-PCR analysis showed each of Pax8a and Pax8b mRNAs to be abundantly expressed in the thyroid and kidney. In situ hybridization histochemistry further detected the expression of Pax8 mRNA in the epithelial cells of the thyroid follicles of the adult trout and in the thyroid primordial cells of the embryo. The functional properties of Pax8a and Pax8b were investigated by dual luciferase assay. The transcriptional regulation by the rat thyroid peroxidase (TPO) promoter was found to be increased by Pax8a, but not by Pax8b. Pax8a further showed synergistic transcriptional activity with rat Nkx2-1 for the human TPO upstream region including the enhancer and promoter. On the other hand, Pax8b decreased the synergistic activity of Pax8a and Nkx2-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay additionally indicated that not only Pax8a but also Pax8b can bind to the TPO promoter and enhancer, implying that the inhibitory effect of Pax8b might result from the lack of the functional carboxy-terminal portion. Collectively, the results suggest that for the trout thyroid gland, Pax8a may directly increase TPO gene expression in cooperation with Nkx2-1 while Pax8b may work as a non-activating competitor for the TPO transcription. PMID:24380675

  17. A new gestational diabetes mellitus model: hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation via inhibition of Pax6 in the chick embryo

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    Shi-Jie Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is one of the leading causes of fetal malformations. However, few models have been developed to study the underlying mechanisms of GDM-induced fetal eye malformation. In this study, a high concentration of glucose (0.2 mmol per egg was injected into the air sac of chick embryos on embryo development day (EDD 1 to develop a hyperglycemia model. Results showed that 47.3% of embryonic eye malformation happened on EDD 5. In this model, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, Six3 and Otx2, were downregulated by hyperglycemia. Among these genes, the expression of Pax6 was the most vulnerable to hyperglycemia, being suppressed by 70%. A reduction in Pax6 gene expression induced eye malformation in chick embryos. However, increased expression of Pax6 in chick embryos could rescue hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. Hyperglycemia stimulated O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation, which caused oxidative stress in chick embryos. Pax6 was found to be vulnerable to free radicals, but the antioxidant edaravone could restore Pax6 expression and reverse eye malformation. These results illustrated a successful establishment of a new chick embryo model to study the molecular mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. The suppression of the Pax6 gene is probably mediated by oxidative stress and could be a crucial target for the therapy of GDM-induced embryonic eye malformation.

  18. A new gestational diabetes mellitus model: hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation via inhibition of Pax6 in the chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tan, Rui-Rong; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Huang, Yi-Hua; Tang, Xiao-Long; Hu, Dan; Yao, Nan; Yang, Xuesong; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2016-02-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of fetal malformations. However, few models have been developed to study the underlying mechanisms of GDM-induced fetal eye malformation. In this study, a high concentration of glucose (0.2 mmol per egg) was injected into the air sac of chick embryos on embryo development day (EDD) 1 to develop a hyperglycemia model. Results showed that 47.3% of embryonic eye malformation happened on EDD 5. In this model, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, Six3 and Otx2, were downregulated by hyperglycemia. Among these genes, the expression of Pax6 was the most vulnerable to hyperglycemia, being suppressed by 70%. A reduction in Pax6 gene expression induced eye malformation in chick embryos. However, increased expression of Pax6 in chick embryos could rescue hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. Hyperglycemia stimulated O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation, which caused oxidative stress in chick embryos. Pax6 was found to be vulnerable to free radicals, but the antioxidant edaravone could restore Pax6 expression and reverse eye malformation. These results illustrated a successful establishment of a new chick embryo model to study the molecular mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced eye malformation. The suppression of the Pax6 gene is probably mediated by oxidative stress and could be a crucial target for the therapy of GDM-induced embryonic eye malformation. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Genetic interaction between Pax6 and β-catenin in the developing retinal pigment epithelium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fujimura, Naoko; Klímová, Lucie; Antošová, Barbora; Smolíková, Jana; Machoň, Ondřej; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 225, č. 2 (2015), s. 121-128 ISSN 0949-944X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2198; GA ČR GAP305/10/2141; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11214 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pax6 * beta-Catenin * Retina * Pigmentation * Transdifferentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.508, year: 2015

  20. Expression quantitative trait loci for PAX8 contributes to the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Shijie Ma

    Full Text Available Paired-box family member PAX8 encodes a transcription factor that has a role in cell differentiation and cell growth and may participate in the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. By bioinformatics analysis, we identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within a newly identified long non-coding RNA (lncRNA AC016683.6 as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs for PAX8. Hence, we hypothesized that PAX8eQTLs in lncRNA AC016683.6 may influence the HCC prognosis. We then performed a case-only study to assess the association between the two SNPs as well as the prognosis of HCC in 331 HBV-positive HCC patients without surgical treatment. Cox proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis with adjustments for the age, gender, smoking status, drinking status, Barcelona-Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC stage, and chemotherapy or TACE (transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization status. We found that the G allele of rs1110839 and the T allele of rs4848320 in PAX8was significantly associated with a better prognosis compared with the T allele of rs1110839 and the C allele of rs4848320 (adjusted HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.61-0.91, P = 0.004 for rs1110839 and adjusted HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.54-0.94, P = 0.015 for rs4848320 in the additive model. Furthermore, the combined effect of the variant genotypes for these two SNPs was more prominent in patients with the BCLC-C stage orpatients with chemotherapy or TACE. Although the exact biological function remains to be explored, our findings suggest a possible association of PAX8eQTLs in lncRNA AC016683.6 with the HCC prognosis inthe Chinese population. Further large and functional studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  1. TRAF6 regulates satellite stem cell self-renewal and function during regenerative myogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindi, Sajedah M.; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Satellite cells are a stem cell population within adult muscle and are responsible for myofiber regeneration upon injury. Satellite cell dysfunction has been shown to underlie the loss of skeletal muscle mass in many acquired and genetic muscle disorders. The transcription factor paired box-protein-7 (PAX7) is indispensable for supplementing the reservoir of satellite cells and driving regeneration in normal and diseased muscle. TNF receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an adaptor protein and an E3 ubiquitin ligase that mediates the activation of multiple cell signaling pathways in a context-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrated that TRAF6-mediated signaling is critical for homeostasis of satellite cells and their function during regenerative myogenesis. Selective deletion of Traf6 in satellite cells of adult mice led to profound muscle regeneration defects and dramatically reduced levels of PAX7 and late myogenesis markers. TRAF6 was required for the activation of MAPKs ERK1/2 and JNK1/2, which in turn activated the transcription factor c-JUN, which binds the Pax7 promoter and augments Pax7 expression. Moreover, TRAF6/c-JUN signaling repressed the levels of the microRNAs miR-1 and miR-206, which promote differentiation, to maintain PAX7 levels in satellite cells. We also determined that satellite cell–specific deletion of Traf6 exaggerates the dystrophic phenotype in the mdx (a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy) mouse by blunting the regeneration of injured myofibers. Collectively, our study reveals an essential role for TRAF6 in satellite stem cell function. PMID:26619121

  2. Biological effects of tolerable level chronic boron intake on transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenay Boyacioglu, Seda; Korkmaz, Mehmet; Kahraman, Erkan; Yildirim, Hatice; Bora, Selin; Ataman, Osman Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of boron effect on human transcription and translation has not been fully understood. In the current study it was aimed to reveal the role of boron on the expression of certain transcription factors that play key roles in many cellular pathways on human subjects chronically exposed to low amounts of boron. The boron concentrations in drinking water samples were 1.57±0.06mg/l for boron group while the corresponding value for the control group was 0.016±0.002mg/l. RNA isolation was performed using PAX gene RNA kit on the blood samples from the subjects. The RNA was then reverse transcribed into cDNA and analyzed using the Human Transcription Factors RT 2 Profiler™ PCR Arrays. While the boron amount in urine was detected as 3.56±1.47mg/day in the boron group, it was 0.72±0.30mg/day in the control group. Daily boron intake of the boron and control groups were calculated to be 6.98±3.39 and 1.18±0.41mg/day, respectively. The expression levels of the transcription factor genes were compared between the boron and control groups and no statistically significant difference was detected (P>0.05). The data suggest that boron intake at 6.98±3.39mg/day, which is the dose at which beneficial effects might be seen, does not result in toxicity at molecular level since the expression levels of transcription factors are not changed. Although boron intake over this level will seem to increase RNA synthesis, further examination of the topic is needed using new molecular epidemiological data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic impact of anterior segment angiography of limbal stem cell insufficiency in PAX6-related aniridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käsmann-Kellner, Barbara; Latta, Lorenz; Fries, Fabian N; Viestenz, Arne; Seitz, Berthold

    2018-04-01

    PAX6 is a master gene of ocular development and postnatal ocular equilibrium. Congenital aniridia is the hallmark of PAX6 gene haploinsufficiency (Chr. 11 p. 13), but PAX6-associated aniridia is a profound, progressive pan-ocular developmental disorder often leading to blindness. There is congenital visual impairment with advancing loss of vision mainly due to secondary glaucoma and to corneal blindness caused by limbal stem cell insufficiency (LSCI). LSCI leads to ARK (aniridia-related keratopathy), which typically develops in four stages. Incipient LSCI with vessels starting to grow into the cornea can be imaged by fluorescein anterior segment angiography, which enables fine vessels to be more easily detected than by routine slit lamp examination, especially in patients with nystagmus. Thus, clinical stage 1 ARK is often diagnosed at stage 2 by angiography. Corneal neovascularizations often start at the 12 and 6 positions and subsequently progress circumferentially, not at the 3 and 9 positions as previously believed. Anterior segment angiography can provide an easily standardizable tool for monitoring progress, treatment-induced regress or stabilization of ARK. Especially in children, angiography could be used to monitor new treatment regimens for reducing LSCI. Angiography could enable treatment to begin earlier to preserve corneal hemostasis. In addition, the fact that vascularization often starts at the subpalpebral 6 and 12 positions as opposed to the 3 and 9 positions raises more questions concerning factors that promote LSCI and related corneal injuries. Clin. Anat. 31:392-397, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Using protein design algorithms to understand the molecular basis of disease caused by protein-DNA interactions: the Pax6 example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibes, A.; Nadra, A.; De Masi, Federico

    2010-01-01

    diseases such as aniridia. The validity of FoldX to deal with protein-DNA interactions was demonstrated by showing that high levels of accuracy can be achieved for mutations affecting these interactions. Also we showed that protein-design algorithms can accurately reproduce experimental DNA-binding logos......Quite often a single or a combination of protein mutations is linked to specific diseases. However, distinguishing from sequence information which mutations have real effects in the protein's function is not trivial. Protein design tools are commonly used to explain mutations that affect protein...... stability, or protein-protein interaction, but not for mutations that could affect protein-DNA binding. Here, we used the protein design algorithm FoldX to model all known missense mutations in the paired box domain of Pax6, a highly conserved transcription factor involved in eye development and in several...

  5. A PAX3 polymorphism (T315K) in a family exhibiting Waardenburg Syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Kim, E; Attaie, A; Smith, T N; Wilcox, E R; Lalwani, A K

    1998-02-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder phenotypically characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances. Presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1 and results from defects in the PAX3 gene, whereas normally located medial canthi is characteristic of type 2 WS (WS2) and is associated with defects in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MIFT) gene. Here a neutral polymorphism is reported in the PAX3 gene (T315K) in a family with WS2. Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited

  6. Recurrent PAX3-MAML3 Fusion in Biphenotypic Sinonasal Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoke; Bledsoe, Krista L.; Graham, Rondell P.; Asmann, Yan W.; Viswanatha, David S.; Lewis, Jean E.; Lewis, Jason T.; Chou, Margaret M.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Jen, Jin; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Oliveira, André M.

    2014-01-01

    Biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma (SNS) is a newly described tumor of the nasal and paranasal areas. Herein, we report the novel recurring chromosomal translocation t(2;4)(q35;q31.1) in SNS. The translocation results in the formation of the fusion protein PAX3-MAML3, which is a potent transcriptional activator of PAX3 response elements. The SNS phenotype is characterized by aberrant expression of genes involved in neuroectodermal and myogenic differentiation, which closely simulates the developmental roles of PAX3. PMID:24859338

  7. Spontaneous and radiation-induced leukemogenesis of the mouse small eye mutant, Pax6Sey3H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Yumiko; Satoh, Kenichi; Yoshida, Kazuko; Senba, Kei; Nakagata, Naomi; Peters, J.; Cattanach, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Allelic loss on the chromosome 2 is associated with radiation-induced murine acute myeloid leukemia. However, the gene, which contributes mainly to the leukemogenesis has not yet been identified. Expecting any predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia, we performed a radiation leukemogenesis experiment with Pax6 SeY3H , one of the small eye mutants carrying a congenital hemizygosity of the chromosome 2 middle region. A deletion mapping of Pax6 SeY3H with 50 sequence-tagged site (STS) markers indicated that the deleted segment extended between the 106.00 and 111.47 Mb site from the centromere with a length of 5.47 Mb. In the deleted segment, 6 known and 17 novel genes were located. Pax6 SeY3H mutants that crossed back into C3H/He did not develop myeloid leukemia spontaneously, but they did when exposed to gamma-rays. The final incidence of myeloid leukemia in mutants (25.8%) was as high as that in normal sibs (21.4%). Survival curves of leukemia-bearing mutants shifted toward the left (p=0.043 by the Log rank test). F1 hybrids of Pax6 SeY3H with JF1 were less susceptible to radiation than Pax6 SeY3H onto C3H/He in regard to survival (p=0.003 and p<0.00001 for mutants and normal sibs, respectively, by a test of the difference between two proportions). Congenital deletion of the 5.47 Mb segment at the middle region on chromosome 2 alone did not trigger myeloid stem cells to expand clonally in vivo; however, the deletion shortcut the latency of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. (author)

  8. Enrichment of putative PAX8 target genes at serous epithelial ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Adler, Emily; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 loci associated with serous ovarian cancer (SOC) susceptibility but the biological mechanisms driving these findings remain poorly characterised. Germline cancer risk loci may be enriched for target genes of transcription factors...... (TFs) critical to somatic tumorigenesis. METHODS: All 615 TF-target sets from the Molecular Signatures Database were evaluated using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and three GWAS for SOC risk: discovery (2196 cases/4396 controls), replication (7035 cases/21 693 controls; independent from discovery...... to interact with PAX8 in the literature to the PAX8-target set and applying an alternative to GSEA, interval enrichment, further confirmed this association (P=0.006). Fifteen of the 157 genes from this expanded PAX8 pathway were near eight loci associated with SOC risk at P

  9. BMP7 and SHH regulate Pax2 in mouse retinal astrocytes by relieving TLX repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Rachna; Sheibani, Nader; Rhodes, Simon J; Belecky Adams, Teri L

    2009-08-15

    Pax2 is essential for development of the neural tube, urogenital system, optic vesicle, optic cup and optic tract. In the eye, Pax2 deficiency is associated with coloboma, a loss of astrocytes in the optic nerve and retina, and abnormal axonal pathfinding of the ganglion cell axons at the optic chiasm. Thus, appropriate expression of Pax2 is essential for astrocyte determination and differentiation. Although BMP7 and SHH have been shown to regulate Pax2 expression, the molecular mechanism by which this regulation occurs is not well understood. In this study, we determined that BMP7 and SHH activate Pax2 expression in mouse retinal astrocyte precursors in vitro. SHH appeared to play a dual role in Pax2 regulation; 1) SHH may regulate BMP7 expression, and 2) the SHH pathway cooperates with the BMP pathway to regulate Pax2 expression. BMP and SHH pathway members can interact separately or together with TLX, a repressor protein in the tailless transcription factor family. Here we show that the interaction of both pathways with TLX relieves the repression of Pax2 expression in mouse retinal astrocytes. Together these data reveal a new mechanism for the cooperative actions of signaling pathways in astrocyte determination and differentiation and suggest interactions of regulatory pathways that are applicable to other developmental programs.

  10. Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 alternative splicing events in basal chordates and vertebrates: a focus on paired box domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fabian, Peter; Kozmiková, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbyněk; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, Jul 2 (2015) ISSN 1664-8021 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12047; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pax homologs * splicing * vertebrate evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. The orphan nuclear receptor Tlx regulates Pax2 and is essential for vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, R T; Chiang, M Y; Tanabe, T; Kobayashi, M; Yasuda, K; Evans, R M; Umesono, K

    2000-03-14

    Although the development of the vertebrate eye is well described, the number of transcription factors known to be key to this process is still limited. The localized expression of the orphan nuclear receptor Tlx in the optic cup and discrete parts of the central nervous system suggested the possible role of Tlx in the formation or function of these structures. Analyses of Tlx targeted mice revealed that, in addition to the central nervous system cortical defects, lack of Tlx function results in progressive retinal and optic nerve degeneration with associated blindness. An extensive screen of Tlx-positive and Tlx-negative P19 neural precursors identified Pax2 as a candidate target gene. This identification is significant, because Pax2 is known to be involved in retinal development in both the human and the mouse eye. We find that Pax2 is a direct target and that the Tlx binding site in its promoter is conserved between mouse and human. These studies show that Tlx is a key component of retinal development and vision and an upstream regulator of the Pax2 signaling cascade.

  12. Genetic Analysis of 'PAX6-Negative' Individuals with Aniridia or Gillespie Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansari, Morad; Rainger, Jacqueline; Hanson, Isabel M

    2016-01-01

    We report molecular genetic analysis of 42 affected individuals referred with a diagnosis of aniridia who previously screened as negative for intragenic PAX6 mutations. Of these 42, the diagnoses were 31 individuals with aniridia and 11 individuals referred with a diagnosis of Gillespie syndrome......) to PAX6 and one within a gene desert 5' (telomeric) to PITX2. Sequence analysis of the FOXC1 and PITX2 coding regions identified two plausibly pathogenic de novo FOXC1 missense mutations (p.Pro79Thr and p.Leu101Pro). No intragenic mutations were detected in PITX2. FISH mapping in an individual...... with Gillespie-like syndrome with an apparently balanced X;11 reciprocal translocation revealed disruption of a gene at each breakpoint: ARHGAP6 on the X chromosome and PHF21A on chromosome 11. In the other individuals with Gillespie syndrome no mutations were identified in either of these genes, or in HCCS...

  13. Functional analysis of Waardenburg syndrome-associated PAX3 and SOX10 mutations: report of a dominant-negative SOX10 mutation in Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Luo, Hunjin; An, Jing; Sun, Lin; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Jiang, Lu; Jiang, Wen; Xia, Kun; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2012-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four subtypes (WS1-WS4) based on additional symptoms. PAX3 and SOX10 are two transcription factors that can activate the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a critical transcription factor for melanocyte development. Mutations of PAX3 are associated with WS1 and WS3, while mutations of SOX10 cause WS2 and WS4. Recently, we identified some novel WS-associated mutations in PAX3 and SOX10 in a cohort of Chinese WS patients. Here, we further identified an E248fsX30 SOX10 mutation in a family of WS2. We analyzed the subcellular distribution, expression and in vitro activity of two PAX3 mutations (p.H80D, p.H186fsX5) and four SOX10 mutations (p.E248fsX30, p.G37fsX58, p.G38fsX69 and p.R43X). Except H80D PAX3, which retained partial activity, the other mutants were unable to activate MITF promoter. The H80D PAX3 and E248fsX30 SOX10 were localized in the nucleus as wild type (WT) proteins, whereas the other mutant proteins were distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Furthermore, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein retained the DNA-binding activity and showed dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. However, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein seems to decay faster than the WT one, which may underlie the mild WS2 phenotype caused by this mutation.

  14. PAX6 can substitute for LHX2 and override NFIA-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veena Kinare

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... versus glial cell fate in the developing hippocampus, and therefore, ... promoting and maintaining radial glial progenitor fate ... expression of Pax6 has a similar effect in suppressing NFIA- ... pulse length, * 1.0 s pulse interval]. Paddle electrodes. (5 mm diameter) were used to deliver the electrical pulses.

  15. Proanthocyanidins Prevent High Glucose-Induced Eye Malformation by Restoring Pax6 Expression in Chick Embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Rong Tan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is one of the leading causes of offspring malformations, in which eye malformation is an important disease. It has raised demand for therapy to improve fetal outcomes. In this study, we used chick embryo to establish a GDM model to study the protective effects of proanthocyanidins on eye development. Chick embryos were exposed to high glucose (0.2 mmol/egg on embryo development day (EDD 1. Proanthocyanidins (1 and 10 nmol/egg were injected into the air sac on EDD 0. Results showed that both dosages of proanthocyanidins could prevent the eye malformation and rescue the high glucose-induced oxidative stress significantly, which the similar effects were showed in edaravone. However, proanthocyanidins could not decrease the glucose concentration of embryo eye. Moreover, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, was down-regulated by high glucose. Proanthocyanidins could restore the suppressed expression of Pax6. These results indicated proanthocyanidins might be a promising natural agent to prevent high glucose-induced eye malformation by restoring Pax6 expression.

  16. PAX7 mutation in a syndrome of failure to thrive, hypotonia, and global neurodevelopmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskorovski-Ohayon, Regina; Kadir, Rotem; Michalowski, Analia; Flusser, Hagit; Perez, Yonatan; Hershkovitz, Eli; Sivan, Sara; Birk, Ohad S

    2017-12-01

    PAX7 encodes a transcription factor essential in neural crest formation, myogenesis, and pituitary lineage specification. Pax7 null mice fail to thrive and exhibit muscle weakness, dying within 3 weeks. We describe a human autosomal-recessive syndrome, with failure to thrive, severe global developmental delay, microcephaly, axial hypotonia, pyramidal signs, dystonic postures, seizures, irritability, and self-mutilation. Aside from low blood carnitine levels, biochemical and metabolic screen was normal, with growth hormone deficiency in one patient. Electromyography was normal, with no specific findings in brain MRI/MRS yet nondemonstrable neuropituitary, a finding of unclear significance. Muscle biopsy showed unaffected overall organization of muscle fibers, yet positive fetal alpha myosin staining, suggesting regeneration. Homozygosity mapping with whole-exome sequencing identified a single disease-associated mutation in PAX7, segregating as expected in the kindred with no homozygosity in 200 ethnically matched controls. Transfection experiments showed that the PAX7 splice-site mutation putatively causes nonsense-mediated mRNA decay affecting onlyPAX7 isoform 3. This isoform, expressed specifically in brain, skeletal muscle and testes, is the sole Pax7 variant normally found in mice. The human muscle phenotype is in line with that in conditional Pax7 null mutant mice, where initial aberrant histological findings resolve postnatally through muscle regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. PAX8 Expression in Solitary Fibrous Tumor: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, David; Gordetsky, Jennifer; Siegal, Gene P; Prieto-Granada, Carlos N; Wei, Shi; Stevens, Todd M

    2017-07-26

    PAX8 is used as a diagnostic aid in classifying retroperitoneal (RP) spindle cell tumors. PAX8 positivity in a spindled RP tumor is typically associated with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (SRCC). However, PAX8 expression in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), a tumor not uncommon to the RP, has not been extensively studied. We investigated the expression of PAX8 in SFTs and other spindle cell RP tumors. We collected 30 SFT, 23 SRCC, 11 gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 2 synovial sarcomas, 6 dedifferentiated liposarcomas (DDLS), 4 well differentiated liposarcomas (WDLS), and select other tumors. We identified nuclear PAX8 expression in 13 of 30 (43%) SFT, 0 of 6 (0%) DDLS, and 1 of 4 (25%) WDLS. Twenty-eight of 30 (93%) SFT, 0 of 23 (0%) SRCC, 2 of 6 (33%) DDLS, and 1 of 4 (25%) WDLS showed nuclear STAT6 expression. All gastrointestinal stromal tumors were negative for both PAX8 and STAT6. Of the 13 SFT showing PAX8 expression, 8 showed diffuse expression and 5 expressed PAX8 focally. Extrapleural SFTs were more likely to express PAX8 compared with pleural SFTs (10/13; 77% vs. 3/17; 18%, respectively; P=0.00117). Twenty of 23 (87%) SRCC expressed PAX8; the sarcomatoid component of all 23 SRCC was negative for STAT6. Of the other spindle cell tumors studied, 1 of 2 synovial sarcomas and 1 of 2 histiocytic sarcomas showed PAX8 expression. Pathologists should be aware of the potential pitfall of the relatively frequent expression of PAX8 by SFT and STAT6 expression in liposarcoma. PAX8 expression by a spindle cell lesion of RP would not allow distinction between SFT, SRCC, or sclerosing liposarcoma by itself. A STAT6/PAX8 phenotype excludes SRCC.

  18. Somatic drivers of B-ALL in a model of ETV6-RUNX1; Pax5+/− leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyden, Louise van der; Giotopoulos, George; Wong, Kim; Rust, Alistair G.; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Osaki, Hikari; Huntly, Brian J.; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is amongst the leading causes of childhood cancer-related mortality. Its most common chromosomal aberration is the ETV6-RUNX1 fusion gene, with ~25 % of ETV6-RUNX1 patients also carrying PAX5 alterations. We have recreated this mutation background by inter-crossing Etv6-RUNX1 (Etv6 RUNX1-SB ) and Pax5 +/− mice and performed an in vivo analysis to find driver genes using Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated mutagenesis and also exome sequencing. Combination of Etv6-RUNX1 and Pax5 +/− alleles generated a transplantable B220 + CD19+ B-ALL with a significant disease incidence. RNA-seq analysis showed a gene expression pattern consistent with arrest at the pre-B stage. Analysis of the transposon common insertion sites identified genes involved in B-cell development (Zfp423) and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway (Jak1, Stat5 and Il2rb), while exome sequencing revealed somatic hotspot mutations in Jak1 and Jak3 at residues analogous to those mutated in human leukemias, and also mutation of Trp53. Powerful synergies exists in our model suggesting STAT pathway activation and mutation of Trp53 are potent drivers of B-ALL in the context of Etv6-RUNX1;Pax5 +/− . The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1586-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  19. Monogenic diabetes associated with PAX4 gene mutations (MODY9: first description in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya A. Zubkova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by autosomal dominant type of inheritance and caused by genetic defects leading to dysfunction of pancreatic beta-cells. To date, at least 13 subtypes of MODY have been described in the literature, the most frequent of which are MODY types 1–3. MODY2 and MODY3 are the most prevalent subtypes, and were previously described in our country, Russia. Several cases of rare MODY subtypes were subsequently described in the Russian literature. The current report is the first in the Russian literature to present clinical and molecular genetic characteristics of two cases of another rare MODY subtype—MODY9. This type of MODY is associated with mutations in the PAX4 gene, which encodes transcription factor PAX4, one of the factors essential for pancreatic beta-cell differentiation. Molecular genetic analysis was performed using next-generation sequencing, a new method recently applied to verify monogenic diseases and, in particular, MODY. This study reports a novel mutation in the PAX4 gene in MODY patients.

  20. The role of Msx1 and Pax9 in pathogenetic mechanisms of tooth agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Corvianindya Rahayu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tooth agenesis is one of the most common developmental anomalies in human, which one or a few teeth are absent because they have never formed, may cause cosmetic or occlusal harm, while severe agenesis which are relatively rare require clinical attention to support and maintain the dental function. Molecular studies have demonstrated that tooth development is under strict genetic control. Purpose: This article want to review the genetic regulating that are responsible for tooth agenesis especially the role of Msx1 and Pax9 in pathogenetic mechanisms of tooth agenesis. Review: Tooth agenesis is a consequence of a qualitatively or quantitatively impaired function of genetic networks, which regulate tooth development. Mutations in Msx1 and Pax9 genes are dominant for tooth agenesis in humans. The Pax9 gene, which codes for a paired domain-containing transcription factor that plays an essential role in the development of mammal dentition, has been associated with selective tooth agenesis in humans and mice. Conclusion: Reduced amount of functional Msx1 or Pax9 protein in the tooth forming cells is able to cause severe and selective tooth agenesis. There are differences in the frequency of agenesis of specific teeth associated with the defects in Msx1 and defects in Pax9.

  1. The Hv NAC6 transcription factor: a positive regulator of penetration resistance in barley and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Rung, Jesper Henrik; Gregersen, Per Langkjaer

    2007-01-01

    Pathogens induce the expression of many genes encoding plant transcription factors, though specific knowledge of the biological function of individual transcription factors remains scarce. NAC transcription factors are encoded in plants by a gene family with proposed functions in both abiotic...... and biotic stress adaptation, as well as in developmental processes. In this paper, we provide convincing evidence that a barley NAC transcription factor has a direct role in regulating basal defence. The gene transcript was isolated by differential display from barley leaves infected with the biotrophic...... powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh). The full-length cDNA clone was obtained using 5'-RACE and termed HvNAC6, due to its high similarity to the rice homologue, OsNAC6. Gene silencing of HvNAC6 during Bgh inoculation compromises penetration resistance in barley epidermal cells...

  2. Chemically Induced Degradation of the Oncogenic Transcription Factor BCL6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kerres

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor BCL6 is a known driver of oncogenesis in lymphoid malignancies, including diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Disruption of its interaction with transcriptional repressors interferes with the oncogenic effects of BCL6. We used a structure-based drug design to develop highly potent compounds that block this interaction. A subset of these inhibitors also causes rapid ubiquitylation and degradation of BCL6 in cells. These compounds display significantly stronger induction of expression of BCL6-repressed genes and anti-proliferative effects than compounds that merely inhibit co-repressor interactions. This work establishes the BTB domain as a highly druggable structure, paving the way for the use of other members of this protein family as drug targets. The magnitude of effects elicited by this class of BCL6-degrading compounds exceeds that of our equipotent non-degrading inhibitors, suggesting opportunities for the development of BCL6-based lymphoma therapeutics.

  3. Pαx6 expression in postmitotic neurons mediates the growth of axons in response to SFRP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sebastián-Serrano

    Full Text Available During development, the mechanisms that specify neuronal subclasses are coupled to those that determine their axonal response to guidance cues. Pax6 is a homedomain transcription factor required for the specification of a variety of neural precursors. After cell cycle exit, Pax6 expression is often shut down in the precursor progeny and most postmitotic neurons no longer express detectable levels of the protein. There are however exceptions and high Pax6 protein levels are found, for example, in postmitotic retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, dopaminergic neurons of the olfactory bulb and the limbic system in the telencephalon. The function of Pax6 in these differentiating neurons remains mostly elusive. Here, we demonstrate that Pax6 mediates the response of growing axons to SFRP1, a secreted molecule expressed in several Pax6-positive forebrain territories. Forced expression of Pax6 in cultured postmitotic cortical neurons, which do not normally express Pax6, was sufficient to increment axonal length. Growth was blocked by the addition of anti-SFRP1 antibodies, whereas exogenously added SFRP1 increased axonal growth of Pax6-transfected neurons but not that of control or untransfected cortical neurons. In the reverse scenario, shRNA-mediated knock-down of Pax6 in mouse retinal explants specifically abolished RGCs axonal growth induced by SFRP1, but had no effect on RGCs differentiation and it did not modify the effect of Shh or Netrin on axon growth. Taken together these results demonstrate that expression of Pax6 is necessary and sufficient to render postmitotic neurons competent to respond to SFRP1. These results reveal a novel and unexpected function of Pax6 in postmitotic neurons and situate Pax6 and SFRP1 as pair regulators of axonal connectivity.

  4. Individual and School Organizational Factors that Influence Implementation of the PAX Good Behavior Game Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Celene E; Pas, Elise T; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Becker, Kimberly D; Keperling, Jennifer P; Embry, Dennis D; Ialongo, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Evidence-based interventions are being disseminated broadly in schools across the USA, but the implementation levels achieved in community settings vary considerably. The current study examined the extent to which teacher and school factors were associated with implementation dosage and quality of the PAX Good Behavior Game (PAX GBG), a universal classroom-based preventive intervention designed to improve student social-emotional competence and behavior. Specifically, dosage (i.e., number of games and duration of games) across the school year and quality (i.e., how well the game is delivered) of PAX GBG implementation across four time points in a school year were examined. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine the association between teacher-level factors (e.g., demographics, self-reports of personal resources, attitudes toward the intervention, and workplace perceptions) and longitudinal implementation data. We also accounted for school-level factors, including demographic characteristics of the students and ratings of the schools' organizational health. Findings indicated that only a few teacher-level factors were significantly related to variation in implementation. Teacher perceptions (e.g., fit with teaching style, emotional exhaustion) were generally related to dosage, whereas demographic factors (e.g., teachers' age) were related to quality. These findings highlight the importance of school contextual and proximal teacher factors on the implementation of classroom-based programs.

  5. Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus Oncoprotein LMP1 by Transcription Factors AP-2 and Early B Cell Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Chieko; Narita, Yohei; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Ashio, Keiji; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kanda, Teru; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Tsurumi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is a major oncogene essential for primary B cell transformation by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Previous studies suggested that some transcription factors, such as PU.1, RBP-Jκ, NF-κB, and STAT, are involved in this expression, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we identified binding sites for PAX5, AP-2, and EBF in the proximal LMP1 promoter (ED-L1p). We first confirmed the significance of PU.1 and POU domain transcription factor binding for activation of the promoter in latency III. We then focused on the transcription factors AP-2 and early B cell factor (EBF). Interestingly, among the three AP-2-binding sites in the LMP1 promoter, two motifs were also bound by EBF. Overexpression, knockdown, and mutagenesis in the context of the viral genome indicated that AP-2 plays an important role in LMP1 expression in latency II in epithelial cells. In latency III B cells, on the other hand, the B cell-specific transcription factor EBF binds to the ED-L1p and activates LMP1 transcription from the promoter. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is crucial for B cell transformation and oncogenesis of other EBV-related malignancies, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and T/NK lymphoma. Its expression is largely dependent on the cell type or condition, and some transcription factors have been implicated in its regulation. However, these previous reports evaluated the significance of specific factors mostly by reporter assay. In this study, we prepared point-mutated EBV at the binding sites of such transcription factors and confirmed the importance of AP-2, EBF, PU.1, and POU domain factors. Our results will provide insight into the transcriptional regulation of the major oncogene LMP1. PMID:26819314

  6. PAX2 is activated by estradiol in breast cancer cells of the luminal subgroup selectively, to confer a low invasive phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Metastasis is the leading cause of death among breast cancer patients. Identifying key cellular factors controlling invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells should pave the way to new therapeutic strategies efficiently interfering with the metastatic process. PAX2 (paired box 2) transcription factor is expressed by breast cancer cells in vivo and recently, it was shown to negatively regulate the expression of ERBB2 (erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2, HER-2/neu), a well-documented pro-invasive and pro-metastastic gene, in luminal/ERalpha-positive (ERα+) breast cancer cells. The objective of the present study was to investigate a putative role for PAX2 in the control of luminal breast cancer cells invasion, and to begin to characterize its regulation. Results PAX2 activity was higher in cell lines from luminal compared to non-luminal subtype, and activation of PAX2 by estradiol was selectively achieved in breast cancer cell lines of the luminal subtype. This process was blocked by ICI 182780 and could be antagonized by IGF-1. Knockdown of PAX2 in luminal MCF-7 cells completely abrogated estradiol-induced downregulation of ERBB2 and decrease of cell invasion, whereas overexpression of PAX2 in these cells enhanced estradiol effects on ERBB2 levels and cell invasion. Conclusions The study demonstrates that PAX2 activation by estradiol is selectively achieved in breast cancer cells of the luminal subtype, via ERα, and identifies IGF-1 as a negative regulator of PAX2 activity in these cells. Further, it reveals a new role for PAX2 in the maintenance of a low invasive behavior in luminal breast cancer cells upon exposure to estradiol, and shows that overexpression and activation of PAX2 in these cells is sufficient to reduce their invasive ability. PMID:22168360

  7. Lens morphogenesis is dependent on Pax6-mediated inhibition of the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the lens surface ectoderm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machoň, Ondřej; Krešlová, Jana; Růžičková, Jana; Vacík, Tomáš; Klímová, Lucie; Fujimura, Naoko; Láchová, Jitka; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 2 (2010), s. 86-95 ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/1618; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Wnt , Pax6 * lens * eye Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.395, year: 2010

  8. A splice-site mutation affecting the paired box of PAX3 in a three generation family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaie, A; Kim, E; Wilcox, E R; Lalwani, A K

    1997-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary disturbances and other developmental defects, is the most frequent form of congenital deafness in humans. Mutations in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, is associated with WS types I and III. Here we report the identification of a novel acceptor splice site mutation (86-2 A-->G) in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene causing WS type I in a three generation family.

  9. Suppression of Pax2 attenuates allodynia and hyperalgesia through ET-1-ETAR-NFAT5 signaling in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Lydia Wai; Pan, Zhiqiang; Sun, Liting; Li, Haobo; Gu, Pan; Wong, Stanley Sau Ching; Chung, Sookja K; Cheung, Chi Wai

    2018-05-27

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and its receptors (ETAR/ETBR) emerge to be a key signaling axis in neuropathic pain processing and are recognized as new therapeutic targets. Yet, little is known on the functional regulation of ET-1 axis during neuropathic pain. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that paired box gene 2 (Pax2) or nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (NFAT5), two transcription factors involved in the modulation of neurotransmission, may regulate ET-1. Therefore, we hypothesized that ET-1 axis may be regulated by Pax2 or NFAT5 in the development of neuropathic pain. After partial sciatic nerve ligation (pSNL), rats displayed allodynia and hyperalgesia, which was associated with increased mRNA and protein expressions of spinal Pax2, NFAT5, and mRNA levels of ET-1 and ETAR, but not ETBR. Knockdown of Pax2 or NFAT5 with siRNA, or inhibition of ETAR with BQ-123 attenuated pSNL-induced pain-like behaviors. At molecular level, Pax2 siRNA, but not NFAT5 siRNA, downregulated ET-1 and ETAR, while ETAR inhibitor reduced NFAT5, indicating Pax2 in the upstream of ET-1 axis with NFAT5 in the downstream. Further, suppression of Pax2 (inhibiting ET-1) or impairment of ET-1 signaling (inhibition of ETAR and/or decrease of NFAT5) deactivated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathways, supporting the significance of functional regulation of ET-1 axis in neuropathic pain signaling. These findings demonstrate that Pax2 targeting ET-1-ETAR-NFAT5 is a novel regulatory mechanism underlying neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Myostatin signals through Pax7 to regulate satellite cell self-renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, Craig; Hennebry, Alex; Thomas, Mark; Plummer, Erin; Ling, Nicholas; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    Myostatin, a Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) super-family member, has previously been shown to negatively regulate satellite cell activation and self-renewal. However, to date the mechanism behind Myostatin function in satellite cell biology is not known. Here we show that Myostatin signals via a Pax7-dependent mechanism to regulate satellite cell self-renewal. While excess Myostatin inhibited Pax7 expression via ERK1/2 signaling, an increase in Pax7 expression was observed following both genetic inactivation and functional antagonism of Myostatin. As a result, we show that either blocking or inactivating Myostatin enhances the partitioning of the fusion-incompetent self-renewed satellite cell lineage (high Pax7 expression, low MyoD expression) from the pool of actively proliferating myogenic precursor cells. Consistent with this result, over-expression of Pax7 in C2C12 myogenic cells resulted in increased self-renewal through a mechanism which slowed both myogenic proliferation and differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that increased expression of Pax7 promotes satellite cell self-renewal, and furthermore Myostatin may control the process of satellite cell self-renewal through regulation of Pax7. Thus we speculate that, in addition to the intrinsic factors (such as Pax7), extrinsic factors both positive and negative in nature, will play a major role in determining the stemness of skeletal muscle satellite cells

  11. Detection of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in pleural fluid with immunocytochemistry on cell block and determination of PAX/FKHR fusion mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Jinawath, Artit; Pongtippan, Atcharaporn; Anurathapan, Usanarat; Hongeng, Suradej

    2011-11-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma is a primitive malignant round cell neoplasm, which shows skeletal muscle differentiation. Although their histopathologic and immunohistochemical findings are well known, the cytology, immunocytochemistry and molecular study on pleural effusion have not been well documented. To apply molecular method in the diagnosis and monitoring of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. The case of a 14-year-old Thai male, who presented with dyspnea and left pleural effusion. Computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed a huge heterogeneous enhancing mass at the left retroperitoneum. Pleural fluid cytology showed malignant small round blue cells. Immunocytochemical stains on cell block material showed positive reactivity to vimentin, sarcomeric actin, desmin, MyoD1, myogenin, and CD56 in round cell tumor Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated PAX/FKHR fusion transcript. The patient received chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced-stage rhabdomyosarcoma. Finally, he succumbed to the disease, thirteen months after the diagnosis. Immunocytochemistry on cell block in conjunction with determination of PAX/FKHR fusion mRNA by RT-PCR is a molecular method in the diagnosis and monitoring of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma inpleural fluid.

  12. PAX5α and PAX5β mRNA expression in breast Cancer: Relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Many studies evaluated the role of paired box gene 5 (PAX5) in breast cancer. However, few investigated PAX5α and PAX5β isoforms individually. Objective: The aim of the present study is to evaluate mRNA expression of PAX5α and PAX5β in breast cancer and assessing their underlying pathological roles ...

  13. SOX2, OTX2 and PAX6 analysis in subjects with anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Lucia; Franzoni, Alessandra; Scarcello, Manuela; Sala, Stefano; Garavelli, Livia; Modugno, Alessandra; Grammatico, Paola; Patrosso, Maria Cristina; Piozzi, Elena; Del Longo, Alessandra; Gesu, Giovanni P; Manfredini, Emanuela; Primignani, Paola; Damante, Giuseppe; Penco, Silvana

    2015-02-01

    Anophthalmia (A) and microphthalmia (M) are rare developmental anomalies that have significant effects on visual activity. In fraction of A/M subjects, single genetic defects have been identified as causative. In this study we analysed 65 Italian A/M patients, 21 of whom are syndromic, for mutations in SOX2, OTX2 and PAX6 genes. In syndromic patients the presence of genome imbalances through array CGH was also investigated. No mutations were found for OTX2 and PAX6 genes. Three causative SOX2 mutations were found in subjects with syndromic A. In a subject with syndromic signs and monolateral M, two de novo 6.26 Mb and 1.37 Mb deletions in 4q13.2q13.3 have been identified. A SOX2 missense (p.Ala161Ser) mutation was found in 1 out of 39 a subject with non-syndromic monolateral M. Alanine at position 161 is conserved along phylogeny and the p.Ala161Ser mutation is estimated pathogenic by in silico analysis. However, this mutation was also present in the unaffected patient's daughter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeting pancreatic expressed PAX genes for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Petra I; López-Noriega, Livia; Gauthier, Benoit R

    2017-01-01

    Four members of the PAX family, PAX2, PAX4, PAX6 and PAX8 are known to be expressed in the pancreas. Accumulated evidences indicate that several pancreatic expressed PAX genes play a significant role in pancreatic development/functionality and alterations in these genes are involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic diseases. Areas covered: In this review, we summarize the ongoing research related to pancreatic PAX genes in diabetes mellitus and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. We dissect the current knowledge at different levels; from mechanistic studies in cell lines performed to understand the molecular processes controlled by pancreatic PAX genes, to in vivo studies using rodent models that over-express or lack specific PAX genes. Finally, we describe human studies associating variants on pancreatic-expressed PAX genes with pancreatic diseases. Expert opinion: Based on the current literature, we propose that future interventions to treat pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and diabetes mellitus could be developed via the modulation of PAX4 and/or PAX6 regulated pathways.

  15. Paternal Aging Affects Behavior in Pax6 Mutant Mice: A Gene/Environment Interaction in Understanding Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, Kaichi; Furuse, Tamio; Kimura, Ryuichi; Tucci, Valter; Kaneda, Hideki; Wakana, Shigeharu; Osumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have increased over the last few decades. These neurodevelopmental disorders are characterized by a complex etiology, which involves multiple genes and gene-environmental interactions. Various genes that control specific properties of neural development exert pivotal roles in the occurrence and severity of phenotypes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Moreover, paternal aging has been reported as one of the factors that contribute to the risk of ASD and ADHD. Here we report, for the first time, that paternal aging has profound effects on the onset of behavioral abnormalities in mice carrying a mutation of Pax6, a gene with neurodevelopmental regulatory functions. We adopted an in vitro fertilization approach to restrict the influence of additional factors. Comprehensive behavioral analyses were performed in Sey/+ mice (i.e., Pax6 mutant heterozygotes) born from in vitro fertilization of sperm taken from young or aged Sey/+ fathers. No body weight changes were found in the four groups, i.e., Sey/+ and wild type (WT) mice born to young or aged father. However, we found important differences in maternal separation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations of Sey/+ mice born from young father and in the level of hyperactivity of Sey/+ mice born from aged fathers in the open-field test, respectively, compared to WT littermates. Phenotypes of anxiety were observed in both genotypes born from aged fathers compared with those born from young fathers. No significant difference was found in social behavior and sensorimotor gating among the four groups. These results indicate that mice with a single genetic risk factor can develop different phenotypes depending on the paternal age. Our study advocates for serious considerations on the role of paternal aging in breeding strategies for animal studies.

  16. Paternal Aging Affects Behavior in Pax6 Mutant Mice: A Gene/Environment Interaction in Understanding Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichi Yoshizaki

    Full Text Available Neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD have increased over the last few decades. These neurodevelopmental disorders are characterized by a complex etiology, which involves multiple genes and gene-environmental interactions. Various genes that control specific properties of neural development exert pivotal roles in the occurrence and severity of phenotypes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. Moreover, paternal aging has been reported as one of the factors that contribute to the risk of ASD and ADHD. Here we report, for the first time, that paternal aging has profound effects on the onset of behavioral abnormalities in mice carrying a mutation of Pax6, a gene with neurodevelopmental regulatory functions. We adopted an in vitro fertilization approach to restrict the influence of additional factors. Comprehensive behavioral analyses were performed in Sey/+ mice (i.e., Pax6 mutant heterozygotes born from in vitro fertilization of sperm taken from young or aged Sey/+ fathers. No body weight changes were found in the four groups, i.e., Sey/+ and wild type (WT mice born to young or aged father. However, we found important differences in maternal separation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations of Sey/+ mice born from young father and in the level of hyperactivity of Sey/+ mice born from aged fathers in the open-field test, respectively, compared to WT littermates. Phenotypes of anxiety were observed in both genotypes born from aged fathers compared with those born from young fathers. No significant difference was found in social behavior and sensorimotor gating among the four groups. These results indicate that mice with a single genetic risk factor can develop different phenotypes depending on the paternal age. Our study advocates for serious considerations on the role of paternal aging in breeding strategies for animal studies.

  17. Hypoxia induces cyclophilin B through the activation of transcription factor 6 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kwon; Kim, Kiyoon; Kim, Hunsung; Oh, Yoojung; Kim, Seong-Jin; Jo, Yunhee; Choe, Wonchae

    2015-06-01

    Hypoxia is an important form of physiological stress that induces cell death, due to the resulting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, particularly in solid tumors. Although previous studies have indicated that cyclophilin B (CypB) plays a role in ER stress, there is currently no direct information supporting the mechanism of CypB involvement under hypoxic conditions. However, it has previously been demonstrated that ER stress positively regulates the expression of CypB. In the present study, it was demonstrated that CypB is transcriptionally regulated by hypoxia-mediated activation of transcription factor 6 (ATF6), an ER stress transcription factor. Subsequently, the effects of ATF6 on CypB promoter activity were investigated and an ATF6-responsive region in the promoter was identified. Hypoxia and ATF6 expression each increased CypB promoter activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ATF6 positively regulates the expression of CypB by binding to an ATF6-responsive region in the promoter, which may play an important role in the attenuation of apoptosis in the adaption to hypoxia. These results suggest that CypB may be a key molecule in the adaptation of cells to hypoxic conditions.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive transcription factor ATF6α directs recruitment of the Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription and multiple histone acetyltransferase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Dotan; Chen, Lu; Martin-Brown, Skylar; Washburn, Michael P; Florens, Laurence; Conaway, Joan Weliky; Conaway, Ronald C

    2012-06-29

    The basic leucine zipper transcription factor ATF6α functions as a master regulator of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response genes. Previous studies have established that, in response to ER stress, ATF6α translocates to the nucleus and activates transcription of ER stress response genes upon binding sequence specifically to ER stress response enhancer elements in their promoters. In this study, we investigate the biochemical mechanism by which ATF6α activates transcription. By exploiting a combination of biochemical and multidimensional protein identification technology-based mass spectrometry approaches, we have obtained evidence that ATF6α functions at least in part by recruiting to the ER stress response enhancer elements of ER stress response genes a collection of RNA polymerase II coregulatory complexes, including the Mediator and multiple histone acetyltransferase complexes, among which are the Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) and Ada-Two-A-containing (ATAC) complexes. Our findings shed new light on the mechanism of action of ATF6α, and they outline a straightforward strategy for applying multidimensional protein identification technology mass spectrometry to determine which RNA polymerase II transcription factors and coregulators are recruited to promoters and other regulatory elements to control transcription.

  19. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tingting; Chen, Man; Liu, Lian; Cheng, Huaiyan; Yan, You-E; Feng, Ying-Hong; Wang, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: ► Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. ► Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. ► Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination. ► Single CpG methylation located at Pax6 binding motif regulates St

  20. Housing system influences abundance of Pax3 and Pax7 in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H D; Li, D Y; Zhang, L; Yang, M Y; Zhao, X L; Wang, Y; Liu, Y P; Zhu, Q

    2014-06-01

    Paired box (Pax) proteins 3 and 7 are associated with activation of muscle satellite cells and play a major role in hyperplastic and hypertrophic growth in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of housing system on abundance of Pax3 and Pax7 in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles. At 42 d, 1,200 chickens with similar BW were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range group. The mRNA abundance was measured in pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d 56, 70, and 84, and the protein expression was quantified at d 84. Increases in mRNA abundance of PAX3 and PAX7 with age were less pronounced in caged system chickens than in pen and free-range chickens from d 56 to 84, and free-range chickens showed a more pronounced increase in gene expression with age compared with penned chickens. At d 84, quantities of PAX3 and PAX7 mRNA and protein were highest in both pectoralis major and thigh muscle of chickens raised in the free-range group, lowest in penned chickens, and intermediate in caged chickens (P system may influence muscle fiber muscle accretion by coordinating the expression of Pax3 and Pax7 in adult chicken skeletal muscles. Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Tlx and Pax6 co-operate genetically to establish the pallio-subpallial boundary in the embryonic mouse telencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, Jan; Yu, Ruth T; Evans, Ronald M; Campbell, Kenneth

    2003-03-01

    We have examined the role of Tlx, an orphan nuclear receptor, in dorsal-ventral patterning of the mouse telencephalon. Tlx is expressed broadly in the ventricular zone, with the exception of the dorsomedial and ventromedial regions. The expression spans the pallio-subpallial boundary, which separates the dorsal (i.e. pallium) and ventral (i.e. subpallium) telencephalon. Despite being expressed on both sides of the pallio-subpallial boundary, Tlx homozygous mutants display alterations in the development of this boundary. These alterations include a dorsal shift in the expression limits of certain genes that abut at the pallio-subpallial boundary as well as the abnormal formation of the radial glial palisade that normally marks this boundary. The Tlx mutant phenotype is similar to, but less severe than, that seen in Small eye (i.e. Pax6) mutants. Interestingly, removal of one allele of Pax6 on the homozygous Tlx mutant background significantly worsens the phenotype. Thus Tlx and Pax6 cooperate genetically to regulate the establishment of the pallio-subpallial boundary. The patterning defects in the Tlx mutant telencephalon result in a loss of region-specific gene expression in the ventral-most pallial region. This correlates well with the malformation of the lateral and basolateral amygdala in Tlx mutants, both of which have been suggested to derive from ventral portions of the pallium.

  2. Modulating Wnt Signaling Rescues Palate Morphogenesis in Pax9 Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Lan, Y; Krumlauf, R; Jiang, R

    2017-10-01

    Cleft palate is a common birth defect caused by disruption of palatogenesis during embryonic development. Although mutations disrupting components of the Wnt signaling pathway have been associated with cleft lip and palate in humans and mice, the mechanisms involving canonical Wnt signaling and its regulation in secondary palate development are not well understood. Here, we report that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in Pax9-mediated regulation of secondary palate development. We found that cleft palate pathogenesis in Pax9-deficient embryos is accompanied by significantly reduced expression of Axin2, an endogenous target of canonical Wnt signaling, in the developing palatal mesenchyme, particularly in the posterior regions of the palatal shelves. We found that expression of Dkk2, encoding a secreted Wnt antagonist, is significantly increased whereas the levels of active β-catenin protein, the essential transcriptional coactivator of canonical Wnt signaling, is significantly decreased in the posterior regions of the palatal shelves in embryonic day 13.5 Pax9-deficent embryos in comparison with control littermates. We show that small molecule-mediated inhibition of Dickkopf (DKK) activity in utero during palatal shelf morphogenesis partly rescued secondary palate development in Pax9-deficient embryos. Moreover, we found that genetic inactivation of Wise, which is expressed in the developing palatal shelves and encodes another secreted antagonist of canonical Wnt signaling, also rescued palate morphogenesis in Pax9-deficient mice. Furthermore, whereas Pax9 del/del embryos exhibit defects in palatal shelf elevation/reorientation and significant reduction in accumulation of hyaluronic acid-a high molecular extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan implicated in playing an important role in palatal shelf elevation-80% of Pax9 del/del ;Wise -/- double-mutant mouse embryos exhibit rescued palatal shelf elevation/reorientation, accompanied by restored

  3. Angiotensin II up-regulates PAX2 oncogene expression and activity in prostate cancer via the angiotensin II type I receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sudeep K; Gibson, Willietta; Giri, Shailendra; Nath, Narender; Donald, Carlton D

    2009-09-01

    Paired homeobox 2 gene (PAX2) is a transcriptional regulator, aberrantly expressed in prostate cancer cells and its down-regulation promotes cell death in these cells. The molecular mechanisms of tumor progression by PAX2 over-expression are still unclear. However, it has been reported that angiotensin-II (A-II) induces cell growth in prostate cancer via A-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and is mediated by the phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) as well as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Here we have demonstrated that A-II up-regulates PAX2 expression in prostate epithelial cells and prostate cancer cell lines resulting in increased cell growth. Furthermore, AT1R receptor antagonist losartan was shown to inhibit A-II induced PAX2 expression in prostate cancer. Moreover, analysis using pharmacological inhibitors against MEK1/2, ERK1/2, JAK-II, and phospho-STAT3 demonstrated that AT1R-mediated stimulatory effect of A-II on PAX2 expression was regulated in part by the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JAK II, and STAT3 pathways. In addition, we have showed that down-regulation of PAX2 by an AT1R antagonist as well as JAK-II and STAT3 inhibitors suppress prostate cancer cell growth. Collectively, these findings show for the first time that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may promote prostate tumorigenesis via up-regulation of PAX2 expression. Therefore, PAX2 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of carcinomas such as prostate cancer via the down-regulation of its expression by targeting the AT1R signaling pathways.

  4. Detection of satellite cells during skeletal muscle wound healing in rats: time-dependent expressions of Pax7 and MyoD in relation to wound age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhi-Ling; Jiang, Shu-Kun; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiao-Yong; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Lin-Lin; Li, Shan-Shan; Liu, Min; Zhang, Meng-Zhou; Guan, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The study was focused on time-dependent expressions of paired-box transcription factor 7 (Pax7) and myoblast determination protein (MyoD) during skeletal muscle wound healing. An animal model of skeletal muscle contusion was established in 40 Sprague-Dawley male rats. Samples were taken at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, and 21 days after injury, respectively (five rats in each posttraumatic interval). Five rats were employed as control. By morphometric analysis, the data based on the number of Pax7(+)/MyoD(-), Pax7(+)/MyoD(+), and Pax7(-)/MyoD(+) cells were highly correlated with the wound age. Pax7 and MyoD expressions were upregulated after injury by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR assays. The relative quantity of Pax7 protein peaked at 5 days after injury, which was >1.13, and decreased thereafter. Similarly, the relative quantity of MyoD mRNA expression peaked at 3 days after injury, which was >2.59. The relative quantity of Pax7 protein >0.73 or mRNA expression >2.38 or the relative quantity of MyoD protein >1.33 suggested a wound age of 3 to 7 days. The relative quantity of MyoD mRNA expression >2.02 suggested a wound age of 1 to 7 days post-injury. In conclusion, the expressions of Pax7 and MyoD are upregulated in a time-dependent manner during skeletal muscle wound healing, suggesting that Pax7 and MyoD may be potential markers for wound age estimation in skeletal muscle.

  5. Mapping Mammalian Cell-type-specific Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Using KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq Data in the TC-YIK Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizio, Marina; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Hasegawa, Akira; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Severin, Jessica; Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Yukio; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are composed of hundreds of different cell types with specialized functions. Each of these cellular phenotypes are controlled by different combinations of transcription factors. Using a human non islet cell insulinoma cell line (TC-YIK) which expresses insulin and the majority of known pancreatic beta cell specific genes as an example, we describe a general approach to identify key cell-type-specific transcription factors (TFs) and their direct and indirect targets. By ranking all human TFs by their level of enriched expression in TC-YIK relative to a broad collection of samples (FANTOM5), we confirmed known key regulators of pancreatic function and development. Systematic siRNA mediated perturbation of these TFs followed by qRT-PCR revealed their interconnections with NEUROD1 at the top of the regulation hierarchy and its depletion drastically reducing insulin levels. For 15 of the TF knock-downs (KD), we then used Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) to identify thousands of their targets genome-wide (KD-CAGE). The data confirm NEUROD1 as a key positive regulator in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), and ISL1, and PROX1 as antagonists. As a complimentary approach we used ChIP-seq on four of these factors to identify NEUROD1, LMX1A, PAX6, and RFX6 binding sites in the human genome. Examining the overlap between genes perturbed in the KD-CAGE experiments and genes with a ChIP-seq peak within 50 kb of their promoter, we identified direct transcriptional targets of these TFs. Integration of KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data shows that both NEUROD1 and LMX1A work as the main transcriptional activators. In the core TRN (i.e., TF-TF only), NEUROD1 directly transcriptionally activates the pancreatic TFs HSF4, INSM1, MLXIPL, MYT1, NKX6-3, ONECUT2, PAX4, PROX1, RFX6, ST18, DACH1, and SHOX2, while LMX1A directly transcriptionally activates DACH1, SHOX2, PAX6, and PDX1. Analysis of these complementary datasets suggests the need for caution in interpreting Ch

  6. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tingting [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Chen, Man; Liu, Lian [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cheng, Huaiyan [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Yan, You-E [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Ying-Hong, E-mail: yhfeng@usuhs.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination

  7. Mutation of the PAX6 gene in a sporadic patient with atypical aniridia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Li, Y.; Traboulsi, E.I. [Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A 28 year-old man presented with poor vision since childhood and gradual further decline of several years duration. His visual acuity measures 20/200 OD with -11.50 + 0.50 x 150 and 20/100 OS with -12.25 + 0.25 x 35. He had a fine nystagmus. His visual fields were full. There was a circumferential pannus with areas of corneal stromal opacification. The iris was hypoplastic with atypical colobomatous defects. The lenses had scattered cortical opacities. The intraocular pressures were normal. The optic nerves had cup disk ratios of 0.6 OU. The family history was negative for similar defects. A diagnosis of aniridia was made and blood was drawn for analysis of the PAX6 gene. PCR amplification of exon 5 showed heterozygous fragments with one allele being larger than normal. Direct DNA sequencing of the individual heterozygous allele showed a 41 base pair insertion at nucleotide 483 in exon 5 of the paired domain. This frameshift mutation changed codon 71 to a stop codon. The diagnosis of aniridia was confirmed in this atypical patient, who will need to be monitored for his high risk of glaucoma. The risk of developing Wilms` tumor in patients with mutations within the aniridia gene is presumably negligible since the neighboring Wilms` tumor gene is unaffected. The identification of intragenic mutations of the PAX6 gene in patients with sporadic aniridia modifies the management of such patients because of recognition of the increased risk of glaucoma and by reducing the necessity for frequent monitoring for the presence of Wilms` tumor.

  8. The Role of the PAX8/PPARγ Fusion Oncogene in Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Placzkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is uncommon and exhibits relatively low mortality rates. However, a subset of patients experience inexorable growth, metastatic spread, and mortality. Unfortunately, for these patients, there have been few significant advances in treatment during the last 50 years. While substantial advances have been made in recent years about the molecular genetic events underlying papillary thyroid cancer, the more aggressive follicular thyroid cancer remains poorly understood. The recent discovery of the PAX8/PPARγ translocation in follicular thyroid carcinoma has promoted progress in the role of PPARγ as a tumor suppressor and potential therapeutic target. The PAX8/PPARγ fusion gene appears to be an oncogene. It is most often expressed in follicular carcinomas and exerts a dominant-negative effect on wild-type PPARγ, and stimulates transcription of PAX8-responsive promoters. PPARγ agonists have shown promising results in vitro, although very few studies have been conducted to assess the clinical impact of these agents.

  9. A Bivalent Securinine Compound SN3-L6 Induces Neuronal Differentiation via Translational Upregulation of Neurogenic Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Liao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Developing therapeutic approaches that target neuronal differentiation will be greatly beneficial for the regeneration of neurons and synaptic networks in neurological diseases. Protein synthesis (mRNA translation has recently been shown to regulate neurogenesis of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs. However, it has remained unknown whether engineering translational machinery is a valid approach for manipulating neuronal differentiation. The present study identifies that a bivalent securinine compound SN3-L6, previously designed and synthesized by our group, induces potent neuronal differentiation through a novel translation-dependent mechanism. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis in Neuro-2a progenitor cells revealed that SN3-L6 upregulated a group of neurogenic transcription regulators, and also upregulated proteins involved in RNA processing, translation, and protein metabolism. Notably, puromycylation and metabolic labeling of newly synthesized proteins demonstrated that SN3-L6 induced rapid and robust activation of general mRNA translation. Importantly, mRNAs of the proneural transcription factors Foxp1, Foxp4, Hsf1, and Erf were among the targets that were translationally upregulated by SN3-L6. Either inhibition of translation or knockdown of these transcription factors blocked SN3-L6 activity. We finally confirmed that protein synthesis of a same set of transcription factors was upregulated in primary cortical NPCs. These findings together identify a new compound for translational activation and neuronal differentiation, and provide compelling evidence that reprogramming transcriptional regulation network at translational levels is a promising strategy for engineering NSPCs.

  10. The Transcription Factor STAT6 Mediates Direct Repression of Inflammatory Enhancers and Limits Activation of Alternatively Polarized Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Czimmerer, Zsolt; Daniel, Bence; Horvath, Attila; Rückerl, Dominik; Nagy, Gergely; Kiss, Mate; Peloquin, Matthew; Budai, Marietta M.; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Simandi, Zoltan; Steiner, Laszlo; Nagy, Bela; Poliska, Szilard; Banko, Csaba; Bacso, Zsolt

    2018-01-01

    Summary The molecular basis of signal-dependent transcriptional activation has been extensively studied in macrophage polarization, but our understanding remains limited regarding the molecular determinants of repression. Here we show that IL-4-activated STAT6 transcription factor is required for the direct transcriptional repression of a large number of genes during in vitro and in vivo alternative macrophage polarization. Repression results in decreased lineage-determining transcription fac...

  11. Effect of Qingguang'an II on expression of PAX6, Ngn1 and Ngn2 mRNA of rats with chronic high intraocular pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Sha Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To remark the effect of Qingguang'an II on expression of PAX6, Ngn1, and Ngn2 mRNA of rats with chronic high intraocular pressure. METHODS: Totally 40 male SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups, that was: A: blank group, B: model group, C: Qingguang'an II low dose group, D: Qingguang'an II moderate dose group, E: Qingguang'an II high dose group, F: Yimaikang disket group. B, C, D, E, F groups of experimental rats were established the model of chronic high intraocular pressure(IOPby cauterizing of superficial scleral vein. Animal model was established successfully by using monitoring IOP consistently keep above 25mmHg for 8wk as cut-off criterion. Tissues of Eyes were obtained after intragastric administration for 2wk and 4wk. The expressions of PAX6, Ngn1, and Ngn2 mRNA were investigated by Real-time PCR. RESULTS: At the time-point of 2wk, PAX6, Ngn1, and Ngn2 mRNA in group B were statistically expressed in lower level comparing with other groups(PPPP>0.05. CONCLUSION: In summar, Qingguang'an II and Yimaikang disket can remarkably increase the expressions of PAX6, Ngn1, and Ngn2, which suggest protecting the optic nerve of rats caused by chronic high IOP. What's more, this study indicated that, in the protection of optic nerve of rats with chronic high IOP, the high dose of Qingguang'an II at the time-point of 4wk was the better choice.

  12. PAX5О± and PAX5ОІ mRNA expression in breast Cancer: Relation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manal Basyouni Ahmed

    mRNA expression of PAX5a and PAX5b in breast cancer and assessing their underlying pathological roles through ... the molecular alterations that contribute to disease initiation and ... ring growth and survival of cancer cells [3]. PAX5 is ..... and CA15-3 are prognostic parameters for different molecular subtypes of · breast ...

  13. Natural selection and molecular evolution in primate PAX9 gene, a major determinant of tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tiago V; Salzano, Francisco M; Mostowska, Adrianna; Trzeciak, Wieslaw H; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Chies, José A B; Saavedra, Carmen; Nagamachi, Cleusa; Hurtado, Ana M; Hill, Kim; Castro-de-Guerra, Dinorah; Silva-Júnior, Wilson A; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira

    2006-04-11

    Large differences in relation to dental size, number, and morphology among and within modern human populations and between modern humans and other primate species have been observed. Molecular studies have demonstrated that tooth development is under strict genetic control, but, the genetic basis of primate tooth variation remains unknown. The PAX9 gene, which codes for a paired domain-containing transcription factor that plays an essential role in the development of mammal dentition, has been associated with selective tooth agenesis in humans and mice, which mainly involves the posterior teeth. To determine whether this gene is polymorphic in humans, we sequenced approximately 2.1 kb of the entire four-exon region (exons 1, 2, 3 and 4; 1,026 bp) and exon-intron (1.1 kb) boundaries of 86 individuals sampled from Asian, European, and Native American populations. We provided evidence that human PAX9 polymorphisms are limited to exon 3 only and furnished details about the distribution of a mutation there in 350 Polish subjects. To investigate the pattern of selective pressure on exon 3, we sequenced ortholog regions of this exon in four species of New World monkeys and one gorilla. In addition, orthologous sequences of PAX9 available in public databases were also analyzed. Although several differences were identified between humans and other species, our findings support the view that strong purifying selection is acting on PAX9. New World and Old World primate lineages may, however, have different degrees of restriction for changes in this DNA region.

  14. Evidence for a hierarchical transcriptional circuit in Drosophila male germline involving testis-specific TAF and two gene-specific transcription factors, Mod and Acj6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Gao, Zhengliang; Wang, Jian; Nurminsky, Dmitry I

    2018-01-01

    To analyze transcription factors involved in gene regulation by testis-specific TAF (tTAF), tTAF-dependent promoters were mapped and analyzed in silico. Core promoters show decreased AT content, paucity of classical promoter motifs, and enrichment with translation control element CAAAATTY. Scanning of putative regulatory regions for known position frequency matrices identified 19 transcription regulators possibly contributing to tTAF-driven gene expression. Decreased male fertility associated with mutation in one of the regulators, Acj6, indicates its involvement in male reproduction. Transcriptome study of testes from male mutants for tTAF, Acj6, and previously characterized tTAF-interacting factor Modulo implies the existence of a regulatory hierarchy of tTAF, Modulo and Acj6, in which Modulo and/or Acj6 regulate one-third of tTAF-dependent genes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. DNA replication initiator Cdc6 also regulates ribosomal DNA transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shijiao; Xu, Xiaowei; Wang, Guopeng; Lu, Guoliang; Xie, Wenbing; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Hongyin; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2016-04-01

    RNA-polymerase-I-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is fundamental to rRNA processing, ribosome assembly and protein synthesis. However, how this process is initiated during the cell cycle is not fully understood. By performing a proteomic analysis of transcription factors that bind RNA polymerase I during rDNA transcription initiation, we identified that the DNA replication initiator Cdc6 interacts with RNA polymerase I and its co-factors, and promotes rDNA transcription in G1 phase in an ATPase-activity-dependent manner. We further showed that Cdc6 is targeted to the nucleolus during late mitosis and G1 phase in a manner that is dependent on B23 (also known as nucleophosmin, NPM1), and preferentially binds to the rDNA promoter through its ATP-binding domain. Overexpression of Cdc6 increases rDNA transcription, whereas knockdown of Cdc6 results in a decreased association of both RNA polymerase I and the RNA polymerase I transcription factor RRN3 with rDNA, and a reduction of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, depletion of Cdc6 impairs the interaction between RRN3 and RNA polymerase I. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Cdc6 also serves as a regulator of rDNA transcription initiation, and indicate a mechanism by which initiation of rDNA transcription and DNA replication can be coordinated in cells. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. PAX6 aniridia syndrome: clinics, genetics, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Taek; Kim, Dae Hee; Kim, Hyuna

    2017-09-01

    Aniridia is a rare and panocular disorder affecting most of the ocular structures which may have significant impact on vision. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical features, genetics, and therapeutic options for this disease and to provide an update of current knowledge and latest research findings. Aside from the ocular features, a variety of associated systemic abnormalities, including hormonal, metabolic, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and neurologic pathologies have been reported in children with aniridia. Although mutations in PAX6 are a major cause of aniridia, genetic defects in nearby genes, such as TRIM44 or ELP4, have also been reported to cause aniridia. Recent improvement in genetic testing technique will help more rapid and precise diagnosis for aniridia. A promising therapeutic approach called nonsense suppression therapy has been introduced and successfully used in an animal model. Aniridia is a challenging disease. The progressive nature of this condition and its potential complications require continuous and life-long ophthalmologic care. Genetic diagnosis for aniridia is important for establishing definitive molecular characterization as well as identifying individuals at high risk for Wilms tumor. Recent advancement in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of this disease offers promise for the approaches to treatment.

  17. Sea urchin tube feet are photosensory organs that express a rhabdomeric-like opsin and PAX6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Michael P.; Carleton, Karen L.; Böttger, Stefanie A.; Barry, Thomas M.; Walker, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    All echinoderms have unique hydraulic structures called tube feet, known for their roles in light sensitivity, respiration, chemoreception and locomotion. In the green sea urchin, the most distal portion of these tube feet contain five ossicles arranged as a light collector with its concave surface facing towards the ambient light. These ossicles are perforated and lined with pigment cells that express a PAX6 protein that is universally involved in the development of eyes and sensory organs in other bilaterians. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based sequencing and real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) also demonstrate the presence and differential expression of a rhabdomeric-like opsin within these tube feet. Morphologically, nerves that could serve to transmit information to the test innervate the tube feet, and the differential expression of opsin transcripts in the tube feet is inversely, and significantly, related to the amount of light that tube feet are exposed to depending on their location on the test. The expression of these genes, the differential expression of opsin based on light exposure and the unique morphological features at the distal portion of the tube foot strongly support the hypothesis that in addition to previously identified functional roles of tube feet they are also photosensory organs that detect and respond to changes in the underwater light field. PMID:21450733

  18. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins and Pax6 cooperate to inhibit in vivo reprogramming of the developing Drosophila eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinjin; Ordway, Alison J; Weber, Lena; Buddika, Kasun; Kumar, Justin P

    2018-04-04

    How different cells and tissues commit to and determine their fates has been a central question in developmental biology since the seminal embryological experiments conducted by Wilhelm Roux and Hans Driesch in sea urchins and frogs. Here, we demonstrate that Polycomb group (PcG) proteins maintain Drosophila eye specification by suppressing the activation of alternative fate choices. The loss of PcG in the developing eye results in a cellular reprogramming event in which the eye is redirected to a wing fate. This fate transformation occurs with either the individual loss of Polycomb proteins or the simultaneous reduction of the Pleiohomeotic repressive complex and Pax6. Interestingly, the requirement for retinal selector genes is limited to Pax6, as the removal of more downstream members does not lead to the eye-wing transformation. We also show that distinct PcG complexes are required during different developmental windows throughout eye formation. These findings build on earlier observations that the eye can be reprogrammed to initiate head epidermis, antennal and leg development. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3 result in Waardenburg syndrome with increased penetrance in pigmentary defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T; Li, X; Huang, Q; Li, L; Chai, Y; Sun, L; Wang, X; Zhu, Y; Wang, Z; Huang, Z; Li, Y; Wu, H

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary defects of the hair, skin, and iris. Heterozygous mutations of MITF and its transactivator gene PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) and type I (WS1), respectively. Most patients with MITF or PAX3 mutations, however, show variable penetrance of WS-associated phenotypes even within families segregating the same mutation, possibly mediated by genetic background or specific modifiers. In this study, we reported a rare Waardenburg syndrome simplex family in which a pair of WS parents gave birth to a child with double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3. Compared to his parents who carried a single mutation in either MITF or PAX3, this child showed increased penetrance of pigmentary defects including white forelock, white eyebrows and eyelashes, and patchy facial depigmentation. This observation suggested that the expression level of MITF is closely correlated to the penetrance of WS, and variants in transcription regulator genes of MITF may modify the relevant clinical phenotypes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Transcription factor ZBED6 mediates IGF2 gene expression by regulating promoter activity and DNA methylation in myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were up regulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels wer...

  1. DOT/FAA Human Factors Workshop on Aviation (6th). Transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    This document is a verbatim transcript of the proceedings of the DOT/FAA Sixth Human Factors Workshop on Aviation held at the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma on July 7-8, 1981. The subject of the workshop was aviation maint...

  2. Stimulation of Pol III-dependent 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA gene expression by AP-1 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Richa; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-07-01

    RNA polymerase III transcribes structurally diverse group of essential noncoding RNAs including 5S ribosomal RNA (5SrRNA) and U6 snRNA. These noncoding RNAs are involved in RNA processing and ribosome biogenesis, thus, coupling Pol III activity to the rate of protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Even though a few Pol II-associated transcription factors have been reported to participate in Pol III-dependent transcription, its activation by activator protein 1 (AP-1) factors, c-Fos and c-Jun, has remained unexplored. Here, we show that c-Fos and c-Jun bind to specific sites in the regulatory regions of 5S rRNA (type I) and U6 snRNA (type III) gene promoters and stimulate their transcription. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation studies suggested that endogenous AP-1 factors bind to their cognate promoter elements during the G1/S transition of cell cycle apparently synchronous with Pol III transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the interaction of c-Jun with histone acetyltransferase p300 promoted the recruitment of p300/CBP complex on the promoters and facilitated the occupancy of Pol III transcriptional machinery via histone acetylation and chromatin remodeling. The findings of our study, together, suggest that AP-1 factors are novel regulators of Pol III-driven 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA expression with a potential role in cell proliferation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. WRKY transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  4. ZBED6, a novel transcription factor derived from a domesticated DNA transposon regulates IGF2 expression and muscle growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markljung, Ellen; Jiang, Lin; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2009-01-01

    and find that the protein, named ZBED6, is previously unknown, specific for placental mammals, and derived from an exapted DNA transposon. Silencing of Zbed6 in mouse C2C12 myoblasts affected Igf2 expression, cell proliferation, wound healing, and myotube formation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (Ch......, including development and transcriptional regulation. The phenotypic effects in mutant pigs and ZBED6-silenced C2C12 myoblasts, the extreme sequence conservation, its nucleolar localization, the broad tissue distribution, and the many target genes with essential biological functions suggest that ZBED6...... is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation, and growth....

  5. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, Tomoyuki; Nishizawa, Sono; Ohno, Yoshitaka; Goto, Ayumi; Ikuta, Akihiro; Suzuki, Miho; Ohira, Tomotaka; Egawa, Tatsuro; Nakai, Akira; Sugiura, Takao; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Beppu, Moroe; Goto, Katsumasa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (pmuscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  6. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Peng; Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian; Peng, Hui; Clewell, Rebecca; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Yue; Peng, Shuangqing; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), regulate IL6 transcription. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) is a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin 3-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ). Here, we found that stable knockdown of Keap1 (Keap1-KD) in RAW 264.7 (RAW) mouse macrophages and human monocyte THP-1 cells significantly increased expression of Il6, and Nrf2-target genes, under basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.001–0.1 μg/ml)-challenged conditions. However, Nrf2 activation alone, by tert-butylhydroquinone treatment of RAW cells, did not increase expression of Il6. Compared to cells transduced with scrambled non-target negative control shRNA, Keap1-KD RAW cells showed enhanced protein levels of IKKβ and increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 under non-stressed and LPS-treated conditions. Because the expression of Il6 in Keap1-KD RAW cells was significantly attenuated by silencing of Ikkβ, but not Nrf2, it appears that stabilized IKKβ is responsible for the enhanced transactivation of Il6 in Keap1-KD cells. This study demonstrated that silencing of Keap1 in macrophages boosts LPS-induced transcription of Il6 via NF-κB activation. Given the importance of IL6 in the inflammatory response, the Keap1–IKKβ–NF-κB pathway may be a novel target for treatment and prevention of inflammation and associated disorders. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Keap1 increases expression of Il6 in macrophages. • Silencing of Keap1 results in protein accumulation of IKKβ and NF-κB p65. • Induction of Il6 resulting from Keap1 silencing is attributed to NF-κB activation

  7. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peng [Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Peng, Hui [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Evaluation and Research Center for Toxicology, Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences (China); Clewell, Rebecca [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Wang, Aiping [Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Wang, Yue [Institute for Medical Device Standardization Administration, National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China); Peng, Shuangqing [Evaluation and Research Center for Toxicology, Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences (China); Qu, Weidong [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E. [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), regulate IL6 transcription. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) is a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin 3-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ). Here, we found that stable knockdown of Keap1 (Keap1-KD) in RAW 264.7 (RAW) mouse macrophages and human monocyte THP-1 cells significantly increased expression of Il6, and Nrf2-target genes, under basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.001–0.1 μg/ml)-challenged conditions. However, Nrf2 activation alone, by tert-butylhydroquinone treatment of RAW cells, did not increase expression of Il6. Compared to cells transduced with scrambled non-target negative control shRNA, Keap1-KD RAW cells showed enhanced protein levels of IKKβ and increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 under non-stressed and LPS-treated conditions. Because the expression of Il6 in Keap1-KD RAW cells was significantly attenuated by silencing of Ikkβ, but not Nrf2, it appears that stabilized IKKβ is responsible for the enhanced transactivation of Il6 in Keap1-KD cells. This study demonstrated that silencing of Keap1 in macrophages boosts LPS-induced transcription of Il6 via NF-κB activation. Given the importance of IL6 in the inflammatory response, the Keap1–IKKβ–NF-κB pathway may be a novel target for treatment and prevention of inflammation and associated disorders. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Keap1 increases expression of Il6 in macrophages. • Silencing of Keap1 results in protein accumulation of IKKβ and NF-κB p65. • Induction of Il6 resulting from Keap1 silencing is attributed to NF-κB activation.

  8. PAX9 gene mutations and tooth agenesis: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bonczek, Ondřej; Balcar, V. J.; Šerý, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 5 (2017), s. 467-476 ISSN 0009-9163 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : PAX9 * gene * hypodontia Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry OBOR OECD: Dentistry, oral surgery and medicine Impact factor: 3.326, year: 2016

  9. Functional Profiling of Transcription Factor Genes in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Carrillo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of gene expression by DNA-binding transcription factors is essential for proper control of growth and development in all organisms. In this study, we annotate and characterize growth and developmental phenotypes for transcription factor genes in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We identified 312 transcription factor genes, corresponding to 3.2% of the protein coding genes in the genome. The largest class was the fungal-specific Zn2Cys6 (C6 binuclear cluster, with 135 members, followed by the highly conserved C2H2 zinc finger group, with 61 genes. Viable knockout mutants were produced for 273 genes, and complete growth and developmental phenotypic data are available for 242 strains, with 64% possessing at least one defect. The most prominent defect observed was in growth of basal hyphae (43% of mutants analyzed, followed by asexual sporulation (38%, and the various stages of sexual development (19%. Two growth or developmental defects were observed for 21% of the mutants, while 8% were defective in all three major phenotypes tested. Analysis of available mRNA expression data for a time course of sexual development revealed mutants with sexual phenotypes that correlate with transcription factor transcript abundance in wild type. Inspection of this data also implicated cryptic roles in sexual development for several cotranscribed transcription factor genes that do not produce a phenotype when mutated.

  10. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, Barbara; Di Palma, Tina; Mascia, Anna; Motti, Maria Letizia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Nitsch, Lucio; Zannini, Mariastella

    2005-01-01

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca 2+ interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function

  11. Small-molecule Wnt agonists correct cleft palates in Pax9 mutant mice in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shihai; Zhou, Jing; Fanelli, Christopher; Wee, Yinshen; Bonds, John; Schneider, Pascal; Mues, Gabriele; D'Souza, Rena N

    2017-10-15

    Clefts of the palate and/or lip are among the most common human craniofacial malformations and involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. Defects can only be corrected surgically and require complex life-long treatments. Our studies utilized the well-characterized Pax9 -/- mouse model with a consistent cleft palate phenotype to test small-molecule Wnt agonist therapies. We show that the absence of Pax9 alters the expression of Wnt pathway genes including Dkk1 and Dkk2 , proven antagonists of Wnt signaling. The functional interactions between Pax9 and Dkk1 are shown by the genetic rescue of secondary palate clefts in Pax9 -/- Dkk1 f/+ ;Wnt1Cre embryos. The controlled intravenous delivery of small-molecule Wnt agonists (Dkk inhibitors) into pregnant Pax9 +/- mice restored Wnt signaling and led to the growth and fusion of palatal shelves, as marked by an increase in cell proliferation and osteogenesis in utero , while other organ defects were not corrected. This work underscores the importance of Pax9-dependent Wnt signaling in palatogenesis and suggests that this functional upstream molecular relationship can be exploited for the development of therapies for human cleft palates that arise from single-gene disorders. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Activating transcription factor 6 polymorphisms and haplotypes are associated with impaired glucose homeostasis and type 2 diabetes in dutch Caucasians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meex, Steven J. R.; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M. J.; Ayoubi, Torik A.; Vlietinck, Robert; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Hofker, Martin H.; Vermeulen, Vicky M. M. -J.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; van der Kallen, Carla J. H.; de Bruin, Tjerk W. A.

    Context: Activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) is critical for initiation and full activation of the unfolded protein response. An association between genetic variation in ATF6 and type 2 diabetes (DM2) was recently reported in Pima Indians. Objectives: To investigate the broader significance of

  13. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...

  14. In Silico Analysis for Transcription Factors With Zn(II2C6 Binuclear Cluster DNA-Binding Domains in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Maicas

    2005-01-01

    presence of the CysX2CysX6CysX5-16CysX2CysX6-8Cys motif and a putative nuclear localization signal. Using this approach, 70 putative Zn(II2C6 transcription factors have been found in the genome of C. albicans.

  15. Transcriptional regulation by competing transcription factor modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger Hermsen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks lie at the heart of cellular computation. In these networks, intracellular and extracellular signals are integrated by transcription factors, which control the expression of transcription units by binding to cis-regulatory regions on the DNA. The designs of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cis-regulatory regions are usually highly complex. They frequently consist of both repetitive and overlapping transcription factor binding sites. To unravel the design principles of these promoter architectures, we have designed in silico prokaryotic transcriptional logic gates with predefined input-output relations using an evolutionary algorithm. The resulting cis-regulatory designs are often composed of modules that consist of tandem arrays of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind cooperatively. Moreover, these modules often overlap with each other, leading to competition between them. Our analysis thus identifies a new signal integration motif that is based upon the interplay between intramodular cooperativity and intermodular competition. We show that this signal integration mechanism drastically enhances the capacity of cis-regulatory domains to integrate signals. Our results provide a possible explanation for the complexity of promoter architectures and could be used for the rational design of synthetic gene circuits.

  16. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramasinghe, Caroline M [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Domaschenz, Renae [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Gene Regulation and Chromatin Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, Hammersmith Campus, Du Cane Road, London W12 ONN (United Kingdom); Amagase, Yoko [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Doshisha Women' s College of Liberal Arts, Kodo, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0395 (Japan); Williamson, Daniel [Molecular Cytogenetics, The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Paul O' Gorman Building, Medical School, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet [Molecular Cytogenetics, The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Murai, Kasumi [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Jones, Philip H, E-mail: phj20@cam.ac.uk [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  17. The role of Pax genes in eye evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 75, 2-4 (2008), s. 335-339 ISSN 0361-9230 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520604; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : eye * Pax * evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.281, year: 2008

  18. The transcript release factor PTRF augments ribosomal gene transcription by facilitating reinitiation of RNA polymerase I

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jansa, Petr; Burek, C.; Sander, E. E.; Grummt, I.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2001), s. 423-429 ISSN 0305-1048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : rDNA transcription * PTRF * transcription reinitiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.373, year: 2001

  19. Spontaneous Physical Activity Downregulates Pax7 in Cancer Cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Coletti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that the muscle microenvironment plays a prominent role in cancer cachexia. We recently showed that NF-kB-induced Pax7 overexpression impairs the myogenic potential of muscle precursors in cachectic mice, suggesting that lowering Pax7 expression may be beneficial in cancer cachexia. We evaluated the muscle regenerative potential after acute injury in C26 colon carcinoma tumor-bearing mice and healthy controls. Our analyses confirmed that the delayed muscle regeneration observed in muscles form tumor-bearing mice was associated with a persistent local inflammation and Pax7 overexpression. Physical activity is known to exert positive effects on cachectic muscles. However, the mechanism by which a moderate voluntary exercise ameliorates muscle wasting is not fully elucidated. To verify if physical activity affects Pax7 expression, we hosted control and C26-bearing mice in wheel-equipped cages and we found that voluntary wheel running downregulated Pax7 expression in muscles from tumor-bearing mice. As expected, downregulation of Pax7 expression was associated with a rescue of muscle mass and fiber size. Our findings shed light on the molecular basis of the beneficial effect exerted by a moderate physical exercise on muscle stem cells in cancer cachexia. Furthermore, we propose voluntary exercise as a physiological tool to counteract the overexpression of Pax7 observed in cancer cachexia.

  20. Genetic analysis of PAX3 for diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Tatsuo; Mutai, Hideki; Namba, Kazunori; Morita, Noriko; Masuda, Sawako

    2013-04-01

    PAX3 genetic analysis increased the diagnostic accuracy for Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). Analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of PAX3 helped verify the pathogenicity of a missense mutation, and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of PAX3 increased the sensitivity of genetic diagnosis in patients with WS1. Clinical diagnosis of WS1 is often difficult in individual patients with isolated, mild, or non-specific symptoms. The objective of the present study was to facilitate the accurate diagnosis of WS1 through genetic analysis of PAX3 and to expand the spectrum of known PAX3 mutations. In two Japanese families with WS1, we conducted a clinical evaluation of symptoms and genetic analysis, which involved direct sequencing, MLPA analysis, quantitative PCR of PAX3, and analysis of the predicted 3D structure of PAX3. The normal-hearing control group comprised 92 subjects who had normal hearing according to pure tone audiometry. In one family, direct sequencing of PAX3 identified a heterozygous mutation, p.I59F. Analysis of PAX3 3D structures indicated that this mutation distorted the DNA-binding site of PAX3. In the other family, MLPA analysis and subsequent quantitative PCR detected a large, heterozygous deletion spanning 1759-2554 kb that eliminated 12-18 genes including a whole PAX3 gene.

  1. Transcription factors GATA-4 and GATA-6 in normal and neoplastic human gastrointestinal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäki Markku

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human gastrointestinal mucosa regenerates vigorously throughout life, but the factors controlling cell fate in mature mucosa are poorly understood. GATA transcription factors direct cell proliferation and differentiation in many organs, and are implicated in tumorigenesis. GATA-4 and GATA-6 are considered crucial for the formation of murine gastrointestinal mucosa, but their role in human gastrointestinal tract remains unexplored. We studied in detail the expression patterns of these two GATA factors and a GATA-6 down-stream target, Indian hedgehog (Ihh, in normal human gastrointestinal mucosa. Since these factors are considered important for proliferation and differentiation, we also explored the possible alterations in their expression in gastrointestinal neoplasias. The expression of the carcinogenesis-related protein Indian hedgehog was also investigated in comparison to GATA factors. Methods Samples of normal and neoplastic gastrointestinal tract from children and adults were subjected to RNA in situ hybridization with 33P labelled probes and immunohistochemistry, using an avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase system. The pathological tissues examined included samples of chronic and atrophic gastritis as well as adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the colon and rectum. Results GATA-4 was abundant in the differentiated epithelial cells of the proximal parts of the gastrointestinal tract but was absent from the distal parts. In contrast, GATA-6 was expressed throughout the gastrointestinal epithelium, and in the distal gut its expression was most intense at the bottom of the crypts, i.e. cells with proliferative capacity. Both factors were also present in Barrett's esophagus and metaplasia of the stomach. GATA-6 expression was reduced in colon carcinoma. Ihh expression overlapped with that of GATA-6 especially in benign gastrointestinal neoplasias. Conclusion The results suggest differential but overlapping functions for GATA-4 and

  2. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism....... The biosynthetic machinery of GLS is governed by interplay of six MYB and three bHLH transcription factors. MYB28, MYB29 and MYB76 regulate methionine-derived GLS, and MYB51, MYB34 and MYB122 regulate tryptophan-derived GLS. The three bHLH transcription factors MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 physically interact with all six...

  3. Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX): System concepts, facilities, and architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX) is a software operating system simulation that allows many computers to work on a single problem at the same time. PAX is currently implemented on a UNIVAC 1100/42 computer system. Independent UNIVAC runstreams are used to simulate independent computers. Data are shared among independent UNIVAC runstreams through shared mass-storage files. PAX has achieved the following: (1) applied several computing processes simultaneously to a single, logically unified problem; (2) resolved most parallel processor conflicts by careful work assignment; (3) resolved by means of worker requests to PAX all conflicts not resolved by work assignment; (4) provided fault isolation and recovery mechanisms to meet the problems of an actual parallel, asynchronous processing machine. Additionally, one real-life problem has been constructed for the PAX environment. This is CASPER, a collection of aerodynamic and structural dynamic problem simulation routines. CASPER is not discussed in this report except to provide examples of parallel-processing techniques.

  4. PAX7 Targets, CD54, Integrin α9β1, and SDC2, Allow Isolation of Human ESC/iPSC-Derived Myogenic Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Magli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem (PS-cell-derived cell types hold promise for treating degenerative diseases. However, PS cell differentiation is intrinsically heterogeneous; therefore, clinical translation requires the development of practical methods for isolating progenitors from unwanted and potentially teratogenic cells. Muscle-regenerating progenitors can be derived through transient PAX7 expression. To better understand the biology, and to discover potential markers for these cells, here we investigate PAX7 genomic targets and transcriptional changes in human cells undergoing PAX7-mediated myogenic commitment. We identify CD54, integrin α9β1, and Syndecan2 (SDC2 as surface markers on PAX7-induced myogenic progenitors. We show that these markers allow for the isolation of myogenic progenitors using both fluorescent- and CGMP-compatible magnetic-based sorting technologies and that CD54+α9β1+SDC2+ cells contribute to long-term muscle regeneration in vivo. These findings represent a critical step toward enabling the translation of PS-cell-based therapies for muscle diseases.

  5. A spontaneous and novel Pax3 mutant mouse that models Waardenburg syndrome and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Miura, Ikuo; Ohba, Hisako; Shimamoto, Chie; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2017-04-05

    Genes responsible for reduced pigmentation phenotypes in rodents are associated with human developmental defects, such as Waardenburg syndrome, where patients display congenital deafness along with various abnormalities mostly related to neural crest development deficiency. In this study, we identified a spontaneous mutant mouse line Rwa, which displays variable white spots on mouse bellies and white digits and tail, on a C57BL/6N genetic background. Curly tail and spina bifida were also observed, although at a lower penetrance. These phenotypes were dominantly inherited by offspring. We searched for the genetic mechanism of the observed phenotypes. We harnessed a rapid mouse gene mapping system newly developed in our laboratories to identify a responsible gene. We detected a region within chromosome 1 as a probable locus for the causal mutation. Dense mapping using interval markers narrowed the locus down to a 670-kbp region, containing four genes including Pax3, a gene known to be implicated in the types I and III Waardenburg syndrome. Extensive mutation screening of Pax3 detected an 841-bp deletion, spanning the promoter region and intron 1 of the gene. The defective allele of Pax3, named Pax3 Rwa , lacked the first coding exon and co-segregated perfectly with the phenotypes, confirming its causal nature. The genetic background of Rwa mice is almost identical to that of inbred C57BL/6N. These results highlight Pax3 Rwa mice as a beneficial tool for analyzing biological processes involving Pax3, in particular the development and migration of neural crest cells and melanocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel PAX3 mutations causing Waardenburg syndrome type 1 in Tunisian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Mediha; Nouira, Malek; Maazoul, Faouzi; Kraoua, Lilia; Meddeb, Rim; Ouertani, Ines; Chelly, Imen; Benoit, Valérie; Besbes, Ghazi; Mrad, Ridha

    2017-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disease characterized by a clinical and genetic variability. WS is classified into four types depending on the presence or absence of additional symptoms: WS1, WS2, WS3 and WS4. Type 1 and 3 are mostly caused by PAX3 mutations, while type 2 and type 4 are genetically heterogeneous. The aims of this study are to confirm the diagnostic of WS1 by the sequencing of PAX3 gene and to evaluate the genotype phenotype correlation. A clinical classification was established for 14 patients WS, as proposed by the Waardenburg Consortium, and noted a predominance of type 1 and type 2 with 6 patients WS1, 7 patients WS2 and 1 patient WS3. A significant inter and intra-familial clinical heterogeneity was also observed. A sequencing of PAX3 gene in the 6 patients WS1 confirmed the diagnosis in 4 of them by revealing three novel mutations that modify two functional domains of the protein: the c.942delC; the c.933_936dupTTAC and the c.164delTCCGCCACA. These three variations are most likely responsible for the phenotype, however their pathogenic effects need to be confirmed by functional studies. The MLPA analysis of the 2 patients who were sequence negative for PAX3 gene revealed, in one of them, a heterozygous deletion of exons 5 to 9 confirming the WS1 diagnosis. Both clinical and molecular approaches led to the conclusion that there is a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in WS1, an element that must be taken into account in genetic counseling. The absence of PAX3 mutation in one patient WS1 highlights the fact that the clinical classification is sometimes insufficient to distinguish WS1 from other types WS hence the interest of sequencing the other WS genes in this patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-06-19

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence

  8. Directing traffic on DNA-How transcription factors relieve or induce transcriptional interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Palmer, Adam C; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E

    2017-03-15

    Transcriptional interference (TI) is increasingly recognized as a widespread mechanism of gene control, particularly given the pervasive nature of transcription, both sense and antisense, across all kingdoms of life. Here, we discuss how transcription factor binding kinetics strongly influence the ability of a transcription factor to relieve or induce TI.

  9. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2010-01-01

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  10. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  11. The WRKY transcription factor family in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Langum, Tanner J; Boken, Ashley K; Rushton, Deena L; Boomsma, Darius D; Rinerson, Charles I; Rabara, Jennifer; Reese, R Neil; Chen, Xianfeng; Rohila, Jai S; Rushton, Paul J

    2012-06-22

    A complete assembled genome sequence of wheat is not yet available. Therefore, model plant systems for wheat are very valuable. Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) is such a system. The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating important agronomic traits. Studies of WRKY transcription factors in Brachypodium and wheat therefore promise to lead to new strategies for wheat improvement. We have identified and manually curated the WRKY transcription factor family from Brachypodium using a pipeline designed to identify all potential WRKY genes. 86 WRKY transcription factors were found, a total higher than all other current databases. We therefore propose that our numbering system (BdWRKY1-BdWRKY86) becomes the standard nomenclature. In the JGI v1.0 assembly of Brachypodium with the MIPS/JGI v1.0 annotation, nine of the transcription factors have no gene model and eleven gene models are probably incorrectly predicted. In total, twenty WRKY transcription factors (23.3%) do not appear to have accurate gene models. To facilitate use of our data, we have produced The Database of Brachypodium distachyon WRKY Transcription Factors. Each WRKY transcription factor has a gene page that includes predicted protein domains from MEME analyses. These conserved protein domains reflect possible input and output domains in signaling. The database also contains a BLAST search function where a large dataset of WRKY transcription factors, published genes, and an extensive set of wheat ESTs can be searched. We also produced a phylogram containing the WRKY transcription factor families from Brachypodium, rice, Arabidopsis, soybean, and Physcomitrella patens, together with published WRKY transcription factors from wheat. This phylogenetic tree provides evidence for orthologues, co-orthologues, and paralogues of Brachypodium WRKY transcription factors. The description of the WRKY transcription factor

  12. Regulation of the yeast metabolic cycle by transcription factors with periodic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellegrini Matteo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When growing budding yeast under continuous, nutrient-limited conditions, over half of yeast genes exhibit periodic expression patterns. Periodicity can also be observed in respiration, in the timing of cell division, as well as in various metabolite levels. Knowing the transcription factors involved in the yeast metabolic cycle is helpful for determining the cascade of regulatory events that cause these patterns. Results Transcription factor activities were estimated by linear regression using time series and genome-wide transcription factor binding data. Time-translation matrices were estimated using least squares and were used to model the interactions between the most significant transcription factors. The top transcription factors have functions involving respiration, cell cycle events, amino acid metabolism and glycolysis. Key regulators of transitions between phases of the yeast metabolic cycle appear to be Hap1, Hap4, Gcn4, Msn4, Swi6 and Adr1. Conclusions Analysis of the phases at which transcription factor activities peak supports previous findings suggesting that the various cellular functions occur during specific phases of the yeast metabolic cycle.

  13. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ is regulated by Krüppel-like transcription factors 6 & 9 under steatotic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalona-Nandez, Ivonne; Guerrero-Escalera, Dafne; Estanes-Hernández, Alma [Departamento de Gastroenterología, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Vasco de Quiroga 15 Sección XVI, Tlalpan, 14000, México, D.F. (Mexico); Ortíz-Ortega, Victor; Tovar, Armando R. [Departamento de Fisiología de la Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Vasco de Quiroga 15 Sección XVI, Tlalpan, 14000, México, D.F. (Mexico); Pérez-Monter, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.perezm@incmnsz.mx [Departamento de Gastroenterología, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Vasco de Quiroga 15 Sección XVI, Tlalpan, 14000, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-03-20

    Liver steatosis is characterised by lipid droplet deposition in hepatocytes that can leads to an inflammatory and fibrotic phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play key roles in energetic homeostasis by regulating lipid metabolism in hepatic tissue. In adipose tissue PPARγ regulates the adipocyte differentiation by promoting the expression of lipid-associated genes. Within the liver PPARγ is up-regulated under steatotic conditions; however, which transcription factors participate in its expression is not completely understood. Krüppel-like transcription factors (KLFs) regulate various cellular mechanisms, such as cell proliferation and differentiation. KLFs are key components of adipogenesis by regulating the expression of PPARγ and other proteins such as the C-terminal enhancer binding protein (C/EBP). Here, we demonstrate that the transcript levels of Klf6, Klf9 and Pparγ are increased in response to a steatotic insult in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIp) experiments showed that klf6 and klf9 are actively recruited to the Pparγ promoter region under these conditions. Accordingly, the loss-of-function experiments reduced cytoplasmic triglyceride accumulation. Here, we demonstrated that KLF6 and KLF9 proteins directly regulate PPARγ expression under steatotic conditions. - Highlights: • Palmitic acid promotes expression of KlF6 & KLF9 in HepG2 cells. • KLF6 and KLF9 promote the expression of PPARγ in response to palmitic acid. • Binding of KLF6 and KLF9 to the PPARγ promoter promotes steatosis in HepG2 cells. • KLF6 and KLF9 loss-of function diminishes the steatosis in HepG2 cells.

  14. Fatty Acid–Regulated Transcription Factors in the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump, Donald B.; Tripathy, Sasmita; Depner, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid regulation of hepatic gene transcription was first reported in the early 1990s. Several transcription factors have been identified as targets of fatty acid regulation. This regulation is achieved by direct fatty acid binding to the transcription factor or by indirect mechanisms where fatty acids regulate signaling pathways controlling the expression of transcription factors or the phosphorylation, ubiquitination, or proteolytic cleavage of the transcription factor. Although dietary fatty acids are well-established regulators of hepatic transcription factors, emerging evidence indicates that endogenously generated fatty acids are equally important in controlling transcription factors in the context of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Our first goal in this review is to provide an up-to-date examination of the molecular and metabolic bases of fatty acid regulation of key transcription factors controlling hepatic metabolism. Our second goal is to link these mechanisms to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a growing health concern in the obese population. PMID:23528177

  15. Overexpression of Pax5 is not sufficient for neoplastic transformation of mouse neuroectoderm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steinbach, P. J.; Kozmik, Zbyněk; Pfeffer, P.; Aguzzi, A.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 4 (2001), s. 459-467 ISSN 0020-7136 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : Pax5 * retrovirus * transgenic mice Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.233, year: 2001

  16. Tandem duplication of 11p12-p13 in a child with borderline development delay and eye abnormalities: dose effect of the PAX6 gene product?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalfs, C. M.; Fantes, J. A.; Wenniger-Prick, L. J.; Sluijter, S.; Hennekam, R. C.; van Heyningen, V.; Hoovers, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on a girl with a duplication of chromosome band 11p12-->13, which includes the Wilms tumor gene (WT1) and the aniridia gene (PAX6). The girl had borderline developmental delay, mild facial anomalies, and eye abnormalities. Eye findings were also present in most of the 11 other published

  17. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  18. Naturally occurring mutations in the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter that modify transcription factor binding and reporter gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, K H; Asano, K; Beier, D; Grobholz, J; Finn, P W; Silverman, E K; Silverman, E S; Collins, T; Fischer, A R; Keith, T P; Serino, K; Kim, S W; De Sanctis, G T; Yandava, C; Pillari, A; Rubin, P; Kemp, J; Israel, E; Busse, W; Ledford, D; Murray, J J; Segal, A; Tinkleman, D; Drazen, J M

    1997-03-01

    Five lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the first committed enzyme in the metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of the leukotrienes. We examined genomic DNA isolated from 25 normal subjects and 31 patients with asthma (6 of whom had aspirin-sensitive asthma) for mutations in the known transcription factor binding regions and the protein encoding region of the 5-LO gene. A family of mutations in the G + C-rich transcription factor binding region was identified consisting of the deletion of one, deletion of two, or addition of one zinc finger (Sp1/Egr-1) binding sites in the region 176 to 147 bp upstream from the ATG translation start site where there are normally 5 Sp1 binding motifs in tandem. Reporter gene activity directed by any of the mutant forms of the transcription factor binding region was significantly (P < 0.05) less effective than the activity driven by the wild type transcription factor binding region. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated the capacity of wild type and mutant transcription factor binding regions to bind nuclear extracts from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). These data are consistent with a family of mutations in the 5-LO gene that can modify reporter gene transcription possibly through differences in Sp1 and Egr-1 transactivation.

  19. Value of PAX1 Methylation Analysis by MS-HRM in the Triage of Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Rong; Wang, Zhen-Ming; Wang, Yu-Hui; Wang, Xi-Bo; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Xue, Hai-Bin; Jiang, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Detection of cervical high grade lesions in patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) is still a challenge. Our study tested the efficacy of the paired boxed gene 1 (PAX1) methylation analysis by methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) in the detection of high grade lesions in ASCUS and compared performance with the hybrid capture 2 (HC2) human papillomavirus (HPV) test. A total of 463 consecutive ASCUS women from primary screening were selected. Their cervical scrapings were collected and assessed by PAX1 methylation analysis (MS-HRM) and high-risk HPV-DNA test (HC2). All patients with ASCUS were admitted to colposcopy and cervical biopsies. The Chi- square test was used to test the differences of PAX1 methylation or HPV infection between groups. The specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy for detecting CIN2 + lesions were: 95.6%, 82.4%, and 94.6%, respectively, for the PAX1 MS-HRM test; and 59.7%, 64.7%, and 60.0% for the HC2 HPV test. The PAX1 methylation analysis by MS-HRM demonstrated a better performance than the high-risk HPV-DNA test for the detection of high grade lesions (CIN2 +) in ASCUS cases. This approach could screen out the majority of low grade cases of ASCUS, and thus reduce the referral rate to colposcopy.

  20. PA-X protein contributes to virulence of triple-reassortant H1N2 influenza virus by suppressing early immune responses in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guanlong; Zhang, Xuxiao; Liu, Qinfang; Bing, Guoxia; Hu, Zhe; Sun, Honglei; Xiong, Xin; Jiang, Ming; He, Qiming; Wang, Yu; Pu, Juan; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have identified a functional role of PA-X for influenza viruses in mice and avian species; however, its role in swine remains unknown. Toward this, we constructed PA-X deficient virus (Sw-FS) in the background of a Triple-reassortment (TR) H1N2 swine influenza virus (SIV) to assess the impact of PA-X in viral virulence in pigs. Expression of PA-X in TR H1N2 SIV enhanced viral replication and host protein synthesis shutoff, and inhibited the mRNA levels of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines in porcine cells. A delay of proinflammatory responses was observed in lungs of pigs infected by wild type SIV (Sw-WT) compared to Sw-FS. Furthermore, Sw-WT virus replicated and transmitted more efficiently than Sw-FS in pigs. These results highlight the importance of PA-X in the moderation of virulence and immune responses of TR SIV in swine, which indicated that PA-X is a pro-virulence factor in TR SIV in pigs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypermethylated ZNF582 and PAX1 genes in mouth rinse samples as biomarkers for oral dysplasia and oral cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chang, Chi-Feng; Ko, Hui-Hsin; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Wang, Huei-Jen; Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2018-02-01

    Effective biomarkers for oral cancer screening are important for early diagnosis and treatment of oral cancer. Oral epithelial cell samples collected by mouth rinse were obtained from 65 normal control subjects, 108 patients with oral potentially malignant disorders, and 94 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methylation levels of zinc-finger protein 582 (ZNF582) and paired-box 1 (PAX1) genes were quantified by real-time methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction after bisulfite conversion. An abrupt increase in methylated ZNF582 (ZNF582 m ) and PAX1 (PAX1 m ) levels and positive rates from mild dysplasia to moderate/severe dysplasia, indicating that both ZNF582 m and PAX1 m are effective biomarkers for differentiating moderate dysplasia or worse (MODY+) oral lesions. When ZNF582 m /PAX1 m tests were used for identifying MODY+ oral lesions, the sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratio (OR) were 0.65/0.64, 0.75/0.82, and 5.6/8.0, respectively. Hypermethylated ZNF582 and PAX1 genes in oral epithelial cells collected by mouth rinse are effective biomarkers for the detection of oral dysplasia and oral cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Differentiation of Odontoblast-Like Cells From Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Pax9 and Bmp4 Transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Daisuke; Takeshita, Nobuo; Oyanagi, Toshihito; Sasaki, Shutaro; Takano, Ikuko; Hasegawa, Masakazu; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2015-09-01

    The field of tooth regeneration has progressed in recent years, and human tooth regeneration could become viable in the future. Because induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can differentiate into odontogenic cells given appropriate conditions, iPS cells are a potential cell source for tooth regeneration. However, a definitive method to induce iPS cell-derived odontogenic cells has not been established. We describe a novel method of odontoblast differentiation from iPS cells using gene transfection. We generated mouse iPS cell-derived neural crest-like cells (iNCLCs), which exhibited neural crest markers. Next, we differentiated iNCLCs into odontoblast-like cells by transfection of Pax9 and Bmp4 expression plasmids. Exogenous Pax9 upregulated expression of Msx1 and dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1) in iNCLCs but not bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) or dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp). Exogenous Bmp4 upregulated expression of Msx1, Dmp1, and Dspp in iNCLCs, but not Pax9. Moreover, cotransfection of Pax9 and Bmp4 plasmids in iNCLCs revealed a higher expression of Pax9 than when Pax9 plasmid was used alone. In contrast, exogenous Pax9 downregulated Bmp4 overexpression. Cotransfection of Pax9 and Bmp4 synergistically upregulated Dmp1 expression; however, Pax9 overexpression downregulated exogenous Bmp4-induced Dspp expression. Together, these findings suggest that an interaction between exogenous Pax9- and Bmp4-induced signaling modulated Dmp1 and Dspp expression. In conclusion, transfection of Pax9 and Bmp4 expression plasmids in iNCLCs induced gene expression associated with odontoblast differentiation, suggesting that iNCLCs differentiated into odontoblast-like cells. The iPS cell-derived odontoblast-like cells could be a useful cell source for tooth regeneration. It has been reported that induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells differentiate into odontogenic cells by administration of recombinant growth factors and coculture with odontogenic cells. Therefore, they can

  3. NF-Y loss triggers p53 stabilization and apoptosis in HPV18-positive cells by affecting E6 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Basile, Valentina; Dolfini, Diletta; Belluti, Silvia; Tomei, Margherita; Imbriano, Carol

    2016-07-19

    The expression of the high risk HPV18 E6 and E7 oncogenic proteins induces the transformation of epithelial cells, through the disruption of p53 and Rb function. The binding of cellular transcription factors to cis-regulatory elements in the viral Upstream Regulatory Region (URR) stimulates E6/E7 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that the CCAAT-transcription factor NF-Y binds to a non-canonical motif within the URR and activates viral gene expression. In addition, NF-Y indirectly up-regulates HPV18 transcription through the transactivation of multiple cellular transcription factors. NF-YA depletion inhibits the expression of E6 and E7 genes and re-establishes functional p53. The activation of p53 target genes in turn leads to apoptotic cell death. Finally, we show that NF-YA loss sensitizes HPV18-positive cells toward the DNA damaging agent Doxorubicin, via p53-mediated transcriptional response.

  4. Naturally occurring mutations in the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter that modify transcription factor binding and reporter gene transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    In, K H; Asano, K; Beier, D; Grobholz, J; Finn, P W; Silverman, E K; Silverman, E S; Collins, T; Fischer, A R; Keith, T P; Serino, K; Kim, S W; De Sanctis, G T; Yandava, C; Pillari, A

    1997-01-01

    Five lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the first committed enzyme in the metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of the leukotrienes. We examined genomic DNA isolated from 25 normal subjects and 31 patients with asthma (6 of whom had aspirin-sensitive asthma) for mutations in the known transcription factor binding regions and the protein encoding region of the 5-LO gene. A family of mutations in the G + C-rich transcription factor binding region was identified consisting of the deletion of one, delet...

  5. The bZIP transcription factor HY5 interacts with the promoter of the monoterpene synthase gene QH6 in modulating its rhythmic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Sun, Tian-Hu; Zhao, Lei; Pan, Xi-Wu; Lu, Shan

    2015-01-01

    The Artemisia annua L. β-pinene synthase QH6 was previously determined to be circadian-regulated at the transcriptional level, showing a rhythmic fluctuation of steady-state transcript abundances. Here we isolated both the genomic sequence and upstream promoter region of QH6. Different regulatory elements, such as G-box (TGACACGTGGCA, -421 bp from the translation initiation site) which might have effects on rhythmic gene expression, were found. Using the yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), we confirmed that the bZIP transcription factor HY5 binds to this motif of QH6. Studies with promoter truncations before and after this motif suggested that this G-box was important for the diurnal fluctuation of the transgenic β-glucuronidase gene (GUS) transcript abundance in Arabidopsis thaliana. GUS gene driven by the promoter region immediately after G-box showed an arrhythmic expression in both light/dark (LD) and constant dark (DD) conditions, whereas the control with G-box retained its fluctuation in both LD and DD. We further transformed A. thaliana with the luciferase gene (LUC) driven by an 1400 bp fragment upstream QH6 with its G-box intact or mutated, respectively. The luciferase activity assay showed that a peak in the early morning disappeared in the mutant. Gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the rhythmic expression of LUC was abolished in the hy5-1 mutant.

  6. A novel mutation of PAX3 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Shu, Anli; Qian, Xueqing; Gao, Jianjun; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Yonglan; Li, Xingwang; Li, Sheng; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin

    2006-08-28

    The molecular characterization of 34 members of a Chinese family, with 22 members in four generations, affected with Waardenburg syndrome (WS1). A detailed family history and clinical data were collected. A genome-wide scan by two-point linkage analysis using more than 400 microsatellite markers in combination with haplotype analysis was performed. Mutation screening was carried out in the candidate gene by sequencing of amplified products. A maximum two-point lod score of 6.53 at theta = 0.00 was obtained with marker D2S2248. Haplotype analysis placed the WS1 locus to a 45.74 cM region between D2S117 and D2S206, in close proximity to the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2q35. Mutation screening in PAX3 identified a 701T > C mutation which converted a highly conserved Leu to Pro. This nucleotide alteration was neither seen in unaffected members of the family nor found in 50 unrelated control subjects. The present study identified a novel 701T > C mutation in PAX3. The mutation observed in this family highlights the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder.

  7. The barley HvNAC6 transcription factor affects ABA accumulation and promotes basal resistance against powdery mildew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yan-Jun; Perera, Venura; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Barley HvNAC6 is a member of the plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC2) transcription factor family and we have shown previously that it acts as a positive regulator of basal resistance in barley against the biotrophic pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). In this study, we use a trans...

  8. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo

    2005-01-01

    level and localization, and to the first indications of NAC participation in transcription factor networks. The recent determination of the DNA and protein binding NAC domain structure offers insight into the molecular functions of the protein family. Research into NAC transcription factors has......NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protein...

  9. A transcription factor active on the epidermal growth factor receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, R.; Merlino, G.T.; Pastan, I.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have developed an in vitro transcription system for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) oncogene by using nuclear extracts of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells, which overproduce EGFR. They found that a nuclear factor, termed EGFR-specific transcription factor (ETF), specifically stimulated EGFR transcription by 5- to 10-fold. In this report, ETF, purified by using sequence-specific oligonucleotide affinity chromatography, is shown by renaturing material eluted from a NaDodSO 4 /polyacrylamide gel to be a protein with a molecular mass of 120 kDa. ETF binds to the promoter region, as measured by DNase I footprinting and gel-mobility-shift assays, and specifically stimulates the transcription of the EGFR gene in a reconstituted in vitro transcription system. These results suggest that ETF could play a role in the overexpression of the cellular oncogene EGFR

  10. PAX1 methylation analysis by MS-HRM is useful in triage of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Ming

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to investigate the role of paired boxed gene 1 (PAX1) methylation analysis by methylation- sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) in the detection of high grade lesions in atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) and compared its performance with the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) human papillomavirus (HPV) test. In our study, 130 cases with a diagnosis of ASC-H from the cervical cytological screening by Thinprep cytologic test (TCT) technique were selected for triage. Their cervical scrapings were collected and evaluated by using PAX1 methylation analysis (MS-HRM) and high-risk HPV DNA test (HC2), followed by colposcopy and cervical biopsy. Chi-square test were used to test the differences of PAX1 methylation or HPV infection between groups. In the detection of CIN2+, the sensitivity, specificity, the PPV, NPV and the accuracy of PAX1 MS-HRM assay and high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) tests were respectively 80.6% vs 67.7%, 94.9% vs 54.5%, 83.3%, vs 31.8%, 94.0% vs 84.4%, and 91.5% vs 57.7%. The PAX1 MS-HRM assay proved superior to HR-HPV testing in the detection of high grade lesions (CIN2+) in ASC-H. This approach could screen out the majority of high grade lesion cases of ASC-H, and thus could reduce the referral rate to colposcopy.

  11. The bZIP transcription factor HY5 interacts with the promoter of the monoterpene synthase gene QH6 in modulating its rhythmic expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei eZhou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Artemisia annua L. β-pinene synthase QH6 was previously determined to be circadian-regulated at the transcriptional level, showing a rhythmic fluctuation of steady-state transcript abundances. Here we isolated both the genomic sequence and upstream promoter region of QH6. Different regulatory elements, such as G-box (TGACACGTGGCA, -421 bp from the translation initiation site which might have effects on rhythmic gene expression, were found. Using the yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, we confirmed that the bZIP transcription factor HY5 binds to this motif of QH6. Studies with promoter truncations before and after this motif suggested that this G-box was important for the diurnal fluctuation of the transgenic β-glucuronidase gene (GUS transcript abundance in Arabidopsis thaliana. GUS gene driven by the promoter region immediately after G-box showed an arrhythmic expression in both light/dark (LD and constant dark (DD conditions, whereas the control with G-box retained its fluctuation in both LD and DD. We further transformed A. thaliana with the luciferase gene (LUC driven by an 1400 bp fragment upstream QH6 with its G-box intact or mutated, respectively. The luciferase activity assay showed that a peak in the early morning disappeared in the mutant. Gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the rhythmic expression of LUC was abolished in the hy5-1 mutant.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) participates in anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) gene expression in mud crab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wan-Wei; Zhang, Xin-Xu; Wan, Wei-Song; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wen, Xiao-Bo; Zheng, Huai-Ping; Zhang, Yue-Ling; Li, Sheng-Kang

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is a key cytoplasm signal adaptor that mediates signals activated by tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily and the Interleukin-1 receptor/Toll-like receptor (IL-1/TLR) superfamily. The full-length 2492 bp TRAF6 (Sp-TRAF6) from Scylla paramamosain contains 1800 bp of open reading frame (ORF) encoding 598 amino acids, including an N-terminal RING-type zinc finger, two TRAF-type zinc fingers and a conserved C-terminal meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain. Multiple alignment analysis shows that the putative amino acid sequence of Sp-TRAf6 has highest identity of 88% with Pt-TRAF6 from Portunus trituberculatus, while the similarity of Sp-TRAF6 with other crustacean sequences was 54-55%. RT-PCR analysis indicated that Sp-TRAF6 transcripts were predominantly expressed in the hepatopancreas and stomach, whereas it was barely detected in the heart and hemocytes in our study. Moreover, Sp-TRAF6 transcripts were significantly up-regulated after Vibrio parahemolyticus and LPS challenges. RNA interference assay was carried out used by siRNA to investigate the genes expression patterns regulated by Sp-TRAF6. The qRT-PCR results showed that silencing Sp-TRAF6 gene could inhibit SpALF1, SpALF2, SpALF5 and SpALF6 expression in hemocytes, while inhibit SpALF1, SpALF3, SpALF4, SpALF5 and SpALF6 expression in hepatopancreas. Taken together, the acute-phase response to immune challenges and the inhibition of SpALFs gene expression indicate that Sp-TRAF6 plays an important role in host defense against pathogen invasions via regulation of ALF gene expression in S. paramamosain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. NF-Y loss triggers p53 stabilization and apoptosis in HPV18-positive cells by affecting E6 transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Benatti, Paolo; Basile, Valentina; Dolfini, Diletta; Belluti, Silvia; Tomei, Margherita; Imbriano, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the high risk HPV18 E6 and E7 oncogenic proteins induces the transformation of epithelial cells, through the disruption of p53 and Rb function. The binding of cellular transcription factors to cis-regulatory elements in the viral Upstream Regulatory Region (URR) stimulates E6/E7 transcription. Here, we demonstrate that the CCAAT-transcription factor NF-Y binds to a non-canonical motif within the URR and activates viral gene expression. In addition, NF-Y indirectly up-regulat...

  14. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brown, Zach K.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Higgins, John P.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator), IFNγ (a STAT1 activator), or TNFα (an NFκB activator) recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney. PMID:26678048

  15. Expression and function of the zinc finger transcription factor Sp6-9 in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königsmann, Tatiana; Turetzek, Natascha; Pechmann, Matthias; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2017-11-01

    Zinc finger transcription factors of the Sp6-9 group are evolutionarily conserved in all metazoans and have important functions in, e.g., limb formation and heart development. The function of Sp6-9-related genes has been studied in a number of vertebrates and invertebrates, but data from chelicerates (spiders and allies) was lacking so far. We have isolated the ortholog of Sp6-9 from the common house spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum and the cellar spider Pholcus phalangioides. We show that the Sp6-9 gene in these spider species is expressed in the developing appendages thus suggesting a conserved role in limb formation. Indeed, RNAi with Sp6-9 in P. tepidariorum leads not only to strong limb defects, but also to the loss of body segments and head defects in more strongly affected animals. Together with a new expression domain in the early embryo, these data suggest that Sp6-9 has a dual role P. tepidariorum. The early role in head and body segment formation is not known from other arthropods, but the role in limb formation is evolutionarily highly conserved.

  16. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kim, Byung J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Champaign, IL 61826-9005 (United States); Oh, Seok-Young, E-mail: quartzoh@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. {yields} DNAN is identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. {yields} Iron treatment not only removes energetic compounds but also eliminates the toxic constituents that inhibit the subsequent microbial process. - Abstract: US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21

  17. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P.; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. PMID:28977492

  18. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  19. Deficiency of heat shock transcription factor 1 suppresses heat stress-associated increase in slow soleus muscle mass of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Y; Egawa, T; Yokoyama, S; Nakai, A; Sugiura, T; Ohira, Y; Yoshioka, T; Goto, K

    2015-12-01

    Effects of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) deficiency on heat stress-associated increase in slow soleus muscle mass of mice were investigated. Both HSF1-null and wild-type mice were randomly assigned to control and heat-stressed groups. Mice in heat-stressed group were exposed to heat stress (41 °C for 60 min) in an incubator without anaesthesia. Significant increase in wet and dry weights, and protein content of soleus muscle in wild-type mice was observed seven days after the application of the heat stress. However, heat stress had no impact on soleus muscle mass in HSF1-null mice. Neither type of mice exhibited much effect of heat stress on HSF mRNA expression (HSF1, HSF2 and HSF4). On the other hand, heat stress upregulated heat shock proteins (HSPs) at the mRNA (HSP72) and protein (HSP72 and HSP110) levels in wild-type mice, but not in HSF1-null mice. The population of Pax7-positive nuclei relative to total myonuclei of soleus muscle in wild-type mice was significantly increased by heat stress, but not in HSF1-null mice. Furthermore, the absence of HSF1 gene suppressed heat stress-associated phosphorylation of Akt and p70 S6 kinase (p-p70S6K) in soleus muscle. Heat stress-associated increase in skeletal muscle mass may be induced by HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response that activates muscle satellite cells and Akt/p70S6K signalling pathway. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Nonsense mutations in the PAX3 gene cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Zhi; Cao, Ju-Yang; Zhang, Rui-Ning; Liu, Li-Xian; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Li, Mei; Han, Dong-Yi; Yuan, Hui-Jun; Yang, Wei-Yan

    2007-01-05

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmental abnormalities of the eye, hair and skin, and dystopia canthorum. The gene mainly responsible for WS1 is PAX3 which is involved in melanocytic development and survival. Mutations of PAX3 have been reported in familiar or sporadic patients with WS1 in several populations of the world except Chinese. In order to explore the genetic background of Chinese WS1 patients, a mutation screening of PAX3 gene was carried out in four WS1 pedigrees. A questionnaire survey and comprehensive clinical examination were conducted in four Chinese pedigrees of WS1. Genomic DNA from each patient and their family members was extracted and exons of PAX3 were amplified by PCR. PCR fragments were ethanol-purified and sequenced in both directions on an ABI_Prism 3100 DNA sequencer with the BigDye Terminator Cycle Sequencing Ready Reaction Kit. The sequences were obtained and aligned to the wild type sequence of PAX3 with the GeneTool program. Two nonsense PAX3 mutations have been found in the study population. One is heterozygous for a novel nonsense mutation S209X. The other is heterozygous for a previously reported mutation in European population R223X. Both mutations create stop codons leading to truncation of the PAX3 protein. This is the first demonstration of PAX3 mutations in Chinese WS1 patients and one of the few examples of an identical mutation of PAX3 occurred in different populations.

  1. Lune/eye gone, a Pax-like protein, uses a partial paired domain and a homeodomain for DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, S; Wallen, R V; Goriely, A; Kalionis, B; Desplan, C

    1998-11-10

    Pax proteins, characterized by the presence of a paired domain, play key regulatory roles during development. The paired domain is a bipartite DNA-binding domain that contains two helix-turn-helix domains joined by a linker region. Each of the subdomains, the PAI and RED domains, has been shown to be a distinct DNA-binding domain. The PAI domain is the most critical, but in specific circumstances, the RED domain is involved in DNA recognition. We describe a Pax protein, originally called Lune, that is the product of the Drosophila eye gone gene (eyg). It is unique among Pax proteins, because it contains only the RED domain. eyg seems to play a role both in the organogenesis of the salivary gland during embryogenesis and in the development of the eye. A high-affinity binding site for the Eyg RED domain was identified by using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment techniques. This binding site is related to a binding site previously identified for the RED domain of the Pax-6 5a isoform. Eyg also contains another DNA-binding domain, a Prd-class homeodomain (HD), whose palindromic binding site is similar to other Prd-class HDs. The ability of Pax proteins to use the PAI, RED, and HD, or combinations thereof, may be one mechanism that allows them to be used at different stages of development to regulate various developmental processes through the activation of specific target genes.

  2. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Vicari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2, encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  3. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Luisa; Calabrese, Giovanna; Forte, Stefano; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Colarossi, Cristina; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2), encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology.

  4. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-10-30

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)).

  5. Health Information in Pashto (Pax̌tō / پښتو )

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Well-Being 4 - Exercise - Pax̌tō / پښتو (Pashto) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center Healthy Numbers for Kids ... or More of Physical Activity - Pax̌tō / پښتو (Pashto) MP3 Minnesota Department of Health Birth Control Birth Control ...

  6. SoyDB: a knowledge database of soybean transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valliyodan Babu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors play the crucial rule of regulating gene expression and influence almost all biological processes. Systematically identifying and annotating transcription factors can greatly aid further understanding their functions and mechanisms. In this article, we present SoyDB, a user friendly database containing comprehensive knowledge of soybean transcription factors. Description The soybean genome was recently sequenced by the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI and is publicly available. Mining of this sequence identified 5,671 soybean genes as putative transcription factors. These genes were comprehensively annotated as an aid to the soybean research community. We developed SoyDB - a knowledge database for all the transcription factors in the soybean genome. The database contains protein sequences, predicted tertiary structures, putative DNA binding sites, domains, homologous templates in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, protein family classifications, multiple sequence alignments, consensus protein sequence motifs, web logo of each family, and web links to the soybean transcription factor database PlantTFDB, known EST sequences, and other general protein databases including Swiss-Prot, Gene Ontology, KEGG, EMBL, TAIR, InterPro, SMART, PROSITE, NCBI, and Pfam. The database can be accessed via an interactive and convenient web server, which supports full-text search, PSI-BLAST sequence search, database browsing by protein family, and automatic classification of a new protein sequence into one of 64 annotated transcription factor families by hidden Markov models. Conclusions A comprehensive soybean transcription factor database was constructed and made publicly accessible at http://casp.rnet.missouri.edu/soydb/.

  7. Radiation activation of transcription factors in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Stein, B.; Mai, S.; Kunz, E.; Koenig, H.; Ponta, H.; Herrlich, P.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Loferer, H.; Grunicke, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    In mammalian cells radiation induces the enhanced transcription of several genes. The cis acting elements in the control region of inducible genes have been delimited by site directed mutagenesis. Several different elements have been found in different genes. They do not only activate gene transcription in response to radiation but also in response to growth factors and to tumor promoter phorbol esters. The transcription factors binding to these elements are present also in non-irradiated cells, but their DNA binding activity and their transactivating capability is increased upon irradiation. The signal chain linking the primary radiation induced signal (damaged DNA) to the activation of transcription factors involves the action of (a) protein kinase(s). (orig.)

  8. Identification of the G13 (cAMP-response-element-binding protein-related protein) gene product related to activating transcription factor 6 as a transcriptional activator of the mammalian unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haze, K; Okada, T; Yoshida, H; Yanagi, H; Yura, T; Negishi, M; Mori, K

    2001-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells control the levels of molecular chaperones and folding enzymes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by a transcriptional induction process termed the unfolded protein response (UPR). The mammalian UPR is mediated by the cis-acting ER stress response element consisting of 19 nt (CCAATN(9)CCACG), the CCACG part of which is considered to provide specificity. We recently identified the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein ATF6 as a mammalian UPR-specific transcription factor; ATF6 is activated by ER stress-induced proteolysis and binds directly to CCACG. Here we report that eukaryotic cells express another bZIP protein closely related to ATF6 in both structure and function. This protein encoded by the G13 (cAMP response element binding protein-related protein) gene is constitutively synthesized as a type II transmembrane glycoprotein anchored in the ER membrane and processed into a soluble form upon ER stress as occurs with ATF6. The proteolytic processing of ATF6 and the G13 gene product is accompanied by their relocation from the ER to the nucleus; their basic regions seem to function as a nuclear localization signal. Overexpression of the soluble form of the G13 product constitutively activates the UPR, whereas overexpression of a mutant lacking the activation domain exhibits a strong dominant-negative effect. Furthermore, the soluble forms of ATF6 and the G13 gene product are unable to bind to several point mutants of the cis-acting ER stress response element in vitro that hardly respond to ER stress in vivo. We thus concluded that the two related bZIP proteins are crucial transcriptional regulators of the mammalian UPR, and propose calling the ATF6 gene product ATF6alpha and the G13 gene product ATF6beta.

  9. Amino acid-dependent signaling via S6K1 and MYC is essential for regulation of rDNA transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Kusnadi, Eric P.; Ogden, Allison J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Bammert, Lukas; Kutay, Ulrike; Hung, Sandy; Sanij, Elaine; Hannan, Ross D.; Hannan, Katherine M.; Pearson, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is a consistent feature of malignant transformation that can be targeted to treat cancer. Understanding how rDNA transcription is coupled to the availability of growth factors and nutrients will provide insight into how ribosome biogenesis is maintained in a tumour environment characterised by limiting nutrients. We demonstrate that modulation of rDNA transcription initiation, elongation and rRNA processing is an immediate, co-regulated response to altered amino acid abundance, dependent on both mTORC1 activation of S6K1 and MYC activity. Growth factors regulate rDNA transcription initiation while amino acids modulate growth factor-dependent rDNA transcription by primarily regulating S6K1-dependent rDNA transcription elongation and processing. Thus, we show for the first time amino acids regulate rRNA synthesis by a distinct, post-initiation mechanism, providing a novel model for integrated control of ribosome biogenesis that has implications for understanding how this process is dysregulated in cancer. PMID:27385002

  10. Novel PAX9 gene polymorphisms and mutations and susceptibility to tooth agenesis in the Czech population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hloušková, A.; Bonczek, Ondřej; Izakovičová Hollá, L.; Lochman, J.; Šoukalová, J.; Štembírek, Jan; Míšek, Ivan; Černochová, P.; Krejčí, P.; Vaněk, J.; Šerý, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 5 (2015), s. 101-106 ISSN 0172-780X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11420 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : odontogenesis * tooth agenesis * PAX9 gene Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 0.946, year: 2015

  11. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  12. Novel splice mutation in microthalmia-associated transcription factor in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Laura; Burke, Kelly; Leduc, Charles A; Guha, Saurav; Guo, Jiancheng; Chung, Wendy K

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is a syndromic form of hearing loss associated with mutations in six different genes. We identified a large family with WS that had previously undergone clinical testing, with no reported pathogenic mutation. Using linkage analysis, a region on 3p14.1 with an LOD score of 6.6 was identified. Microthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor, a gene known to cause WS, is located within this region of linkage. Sequencing of Microthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor demonstrated a c.1212 G>A synonymous variant that segregated with the WS in the family and was predicted to cause a novel splicing site that was confirmed with expression analysis of the mRNA. This case illustrates the need to computationally analyze novel synonymous sequence variants for possible effects on splicing to maximize the clinical sensitivity of sequence-based genetic testing.

  13. Sp6 and Sp8 Transcription Factors Control AER Formation and Dorsal-Ventral Patterning in Limb Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Endika; Delgado, Irene; Junco, Marisa; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Mansouri, Ahmed; Oberg, Kerby C.; Ros, Marian A.

    2014-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) is critical for the outgrowth and patterning of the vertebrate limb. The induction of the AER is a complex process that relies on integrated interactions among the Fgf, Wnt, and Bmp signaling pathways that operate within the ectoderm and between the ectoderm and the mesoderm of the early limb bud. The transcription factors Sp6 and Sp8 are expressed in the limb ectoderm and AER during limb development. Sp6 mutant mice display a mild syndactyly phenotype while Sp8 mutants exhibit severe limb truncations. Both mutants show defects in AER maturation and in dorsal-ventral patterning. To gain further insights into the role Sp6 and Sp8 play in limb development, we have produced mice lacking both Sp6 and Sp8 activity in the limb ectoderm. Remarkably, the elimination or significant reduction in Sp6;Sp8 gene dosage leads to tetra-amelia; initial budding occurs, but neither Fgf8 nor En1 are activated. Mutants bearing a single functional allele of Sp8 (Sp6−/−;Sp8+/−) exhibit a split-hand/foot malformation phenotype with double dorsal digit tips probably due to an irregular and immature AER that is not maintained in the center of the bud and on the abnormal expansion of Wnt7a expression to the ventral ectoderm. Our data are compatible with Sp6 and Sp8 working together and in a dose-dependent manner as indispensable mediators of Wnt/βcatenin and Bmp signaling in the limb ectoderm. We suggest that the function of these factors links proximal-distal and dorsal-ventral patterning. PMID:25166858

  14. The transcription factor KLF2 restrains CD4⁺ T follicular helper cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, June-Yong; Skon, Cara N; Lee, You Jeong; Oh, Soohwan; Taylor, Justin J; Malhotra, Deepali; Jenkins, Marc K; Rosenfeld, M Geoffrey; Hogquist, Kristin A; Jameson, Stephen C

    2015-02-17

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are essential for efficient B cell responses, yet the factors that regulate differentiation of this CD4(+) T cell subset are incompletely understood. Here we found that the KLF2 transcription factor serves to restrain Tfh cell generation. Induced KLF2 deficiency in activated CD4(+) T cells led to increased Tfh cell generation and B cell priming, whereas KLF2 overexpression prevented Tfh cell production. KLF2 promotes expression of the trafficking receptor S1PR1, and S1PR1 downregulation is essential for efficient Tfh cell production. However, KLF2 also induced expression of the transcription factor Blimp-1, which repressed transcription factor Bcl-6 and thereby impaired Tfh cell differentiation. Furthermore, KLF2 induced expression of the transcription factors T-bet and GATA3 and enhanced Th1 differentiation. Hence, our data indicate KLF2 is pivotal for coordinating CD4(+) T cell differentiation through two distinct and complementary mechanisms: via control of T cell localization and by regulation of lineage-defining transcription factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Control of cellulose biosynthesis by overexpression of a transcription factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyung-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Won-Chan; Kim; , Joo-Yeol

    2017-05-16

    The invention relates to the over-expression of a transcription factor selected from the group consisting of MYB46, HAM1, HAM2, MYB112, WRKY11, ERF6, and any combination thereof in a plant, which can modulate and thereby modulating the cellulose content of the plant.

  16. Structural and functional studies of FKHR-PAX3, a reciprocal fusion gene of the t(2;13 chromosomal translocation in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiande Hu

    Full Text Available Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS is an aggressive pediatric cancer of skeletal muscle. More than 70% of ARMS tumors carry balanced t(2;13 chromosomal translocation that leads to the production of two novel fusion genes, PAX3-FKHR and FKHR-PAX3. While the PAX3-FKHR gene has been intensely studied, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 gene has rarely been described. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of the FKHR-PAX3 gene as the first step towards a better understanding of its potential impact on ARMS biology. From RH30 ARMS cells, we detected and isolated three versions of FKHR-PAX3 cDNAs whose C-terminal sequences corresponded to PAX3c, PAX3d, and PAX3e isoforms. Unlike the nuclear-specific localization of PAX3-FKHR, the reciprocal FKHR-PAX3 proteins stayed predominantly in the cytoplasm. FKHR-PAX3 potently inhibited myogenesis in both non-transformed myoblast cells and ARMS cells. We showed that FKHR-PAX3 was not a classic oncogene but could act as a facilitator in oncogenic pathways by stabilizing PAX3-FKHR expression, enhancing cell proliferation, clonogenicity, anchorage-independent growth, and matrix adhesion in vitro, and accelerating the onset of tumor formation in xenograft mouse model in vivo. In addition to these pro-oncogenic behaviors, FKHR-PAX3 also negatively affected cell migration and invasion in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these functional characteristics suggested that FKHR-PAX3 might have a critical role in the early stage of ARMS development.

  17. Pax-Six-Eya-Dach network during amphioxus development: conservation in vitro but context specificity in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozmik, Zbyněk; Holland, N. D.; Krešlová, Jana; Olivery, D.; Schubert, M.; Jonášová, Kristýna; Holland, L. Z.; Pestarino, M.; Benes, V.; Candiani, S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 1 (2007), s. 143-159 ISSN 0012-1606 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Pax * gene * evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.714, year: 2007

  18. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  19. Transcription factors: normal and malignant development of blood cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravid, Katya; Licht, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    ... and the Development of the Erythroid Lineage James J. Bieker 71 II TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND THE MYELOID LINEAGE 85 6 RUNX1(AML1) and CBFB: Genes Required for the Development of All Definitive Hematopoietic Lineages 87 Nancy A. Speck and Elaine Dzierzak 7 PU.1 and the Development of the Myeloid Lineage Daniel G. Tenen 103 vvi CONTENTS 8 CCAAT/Enhancer-...

  20. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates.We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data.Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct-interaction detection and TFBS-discovery accuracy. We estimated the accuracy

  1. GATA transcription factors in testicular adrenal rest tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manon Engels

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Testicular adrenal rest tumours (TARTs are benign adrenal-like testicular tumours that frequently occur in male patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Recently, GATA transcription factors have been linked to the development of TARTs in mice. The aim of our study was to determine GATA expression in human TARTs and other steroidogenic tissues. We determined GATA expression in TARTs (n = 16, Leydig cell tumours (LCTs; n = 7, adrenal (foetal (n = 6 + adult (n = 10 and testis (foetal (n = 13 + adult (n = 8. We found testis-like GATA4, and adrenal-like GATA3 and GATA6 gene expressions by qPCR in human TARTs, indicating mixed testicular and adrenal characteristics of TARTs. Currently, no marker is available to discriminate TARTs from LCTs, leading to misdiagnosis and incorrect treatment. GATA3 and GATA6 mRNAs exhibited excellent discriminative power (area under the curve of 0.908 and 0.816, respectively, while immunohistochemistry did not. GATA genes contain several CREB-binding sites and incubation with 0.1 mM dibutyryl cAMP for 4 h stimulated GATA3, GATA4 and GATA6 expressions in a human foetal testis cell line (hs181.tes. Incubation of adrenocortical cells (H295RA with ACTH, however, did not induce GATA expression in vitro. Although ACTH did not dysregulate GATA expression in the only human ACTH-sensitive in vitro model available, our results do suggest that aberrant expression of GATA transcription factors in human TARTs might be involved in TART formation.

  2. Depletion of Pax7+ satellite cells does not affect diaphragm adaptations to running in young or aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; Confides, Amy L; Ho, Angel; Jackson, Janna R; Ghazala, Lina S; Peterson, Charlotte A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2017-10-01

    Satellite cell depletion does not affect diaphragm adaptations to voluntary wheel running in young or aged mice. Satellite cell depletion early in life (4 months of age) has minimal effect on diaphragm phenotype by old age (24 months). Prolonged satellite cell depletion in the diaphragm does not result in excessive extracellular matrix accumulation, in contrast to what has been reported in hind limb muscles. Up-regulation of Pax3 mRNA+ cells after satellite cell depletion in young and aged mice suggests that Pax3+ cells may compensate for a loss of Pax7+ satellite cells in the diaphragm. Future investigations should focus on the role of Pax3+ cells in the diaphragm during adaptation to exercise and ageing. Satellite cell contribution to unstressed diaphragm is higher compared to hind limb muscles, which is probably attributable to constant activation of this muscle to drive ventilation. Whether satellite cell depletion negatively impacts diaphragm quantitative and qualitative characteristics under stressed conditions in young and aged mice is unknown. We therefore challenged the diaphragm with prolonged running activity in the presence and absence of Pax7+ satellite cells in young and aged mice using an inducible Pax7 CreER -R26R DTA model. Mice were vehicle (Veh, satellite cell-replete) or tamoxifen (Tam, satellite cell-depleted) treated at 4 months of age and were then allowed to run voluntarily at 6 months (young) and 22 months (aged). Age-matched, cage-dwelling, Veh- and Tam-treated mice without wheel access served as activity controls. Diaphragm muscles were analysed from young (8 months) and aged (24 months) mice. Satellite cell depletion did not alter diaphragm mean fibre cross-sectional area, fibre type distribution or extracellular matrix content in young or aged mice, regardless of running activity. Resting in vivo diaphragm function was also unaffected by satellite cell depletion. Myonuclear density was maintained in young satellite cell

  3. Protein-protein interactions in the regulation of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yingjun; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2013-03-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor, SPF1, from sweet potato. Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Despite the functional diversity, almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TTGACC/T W-box sequences and, therefore, mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors. Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors. It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes. In this review, we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute, at different levels, to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  4. Emerging Functions of Transcription Factors in Malaria Parasite

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    Renu Tuteja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription is a process by which the genetic information stored in DNA is converted into mRNA by enzymes known as RNA polymerase. Bacteria use only one RNA polymerase to transcribe all of its genes while eukaryotes contain three RNA polymerases to transcribe the variety of eukaryotic genes. RNA polymerase also requires other factors/proteins to produce the transcript. These factors generally termed as transcription factors (TFs are either associated directly with RNA polymerase or add in building the actual transcription apparatus. TFs are the most common tools that our cells use to control gene expression. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for causing the most lethal form of malaria in humans. It shows most of its characteristics common to eukaryotic transcription but it is assumed that mechanisms of transcriptional control in P. falciparum somehow differ from those of other eukaryotes. In this article we describe the studies on the main TFs such as myb protein, high mobility group protein and ApiA2 family proteins from malaria parasite. These studies show that these TFs are slowly emerging to have defined roles in the regulation of gene expression in the parasite.

  5. PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Li, Shiqiang; Xiao, Xueshan; Wang, Panfeng; Guo, Xiangming

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To detect paired box gene 3 (PAX3) mutations and associated phenotypes in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Methods Five unrelated families with suspected WS1 were selected from our Genomic DNA Repository for Hereditary Eye Diseases. The coding and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the amplicons were then analyzed by cycle sequencing. Variations detected were further evaluated in available family members as well as one hundred controls with heteroduplex-single strand conformational polymorphism (heteroduplex-SSCP) analysis and/or clone sequencing. Results Three novel and two known mutations in PAX3 were detected in five patients, respectively: c.567_586+17del (p.Asp189_Gln505delinsGluGlyGlyAlaLeuAlaGly), c.456_459dupTTCC (p.Ile154PhefsX162), c.795_800delCTGGTT (p.Trp266_Phe267del), c.799T>A (p.Phe267Ile), and c.667C>T (p.Arg223X). Two novel mutations proved to be de novo as their parents did not carry the mutations. All five patients with PAX3 mutations had dystopia canthorum and different iris color and fundi between their two eyes. However, none had white forelock, skin hypopigmentation, and deafness. Conclusions Our findings expand the frequency and spectrum of PAX3 mutations and ethnic-related phenotypes in Chinese patients with WS1. De novo mutations in PAX3 have not been reported before. PMID:20664692

  6. PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Li, Shiqiang; Xiao, Xueshan; Wang, Panfeng; Guo, Xiangming; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2010-06-22

    To detect paired box gene 3 (PAX3) mutations and associated phenotypes in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Five unrelated families with suspected WS1 were selected from our Genomic DNA Repository for Hereditary Eye Diseases. The coding and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the amplicons were then analyzed by cycle sequencing. Variations detected were further evaluated in available family members as well as one hundred controls with heteroduplex-single strand conformational polymorphism (heteroduplex-SSCP) analysis and/or clone sequencing. Three novel and two known mutations in PAX3 were detected in five patients, respectively: c.567_586+17del (p.Asp189_Gln505delinsGluGlyGlyAlaLeuAlaGly), c.456_459dupTTCC (p.Ile154PhefsX162), c.795_800delCTGGTT (p.Trp266_Phe267del), c.799T>A (p.Phe267Ile), and c.667C>T (p.Arg223X). Two novel mutations proved to be de novo as their parents did not carry the mutations. All five patients with PAX3 mutations had dystopia canthorum and different iris color and fundi between their two eyes. However, none had white forelock, skin hypopigmentation, and deafness. Our findings expand the frequency and spectrum of PAX3 mutations and ethnic-related phenotypes in Chinese patients with WS1. De novo mutations in PAX3 have not been reported before.

  7. Cisgenic Rvi6 scab-resistant apple lines show no differences in Rvi6 transcription when compared with conventionally bred cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizzali, Cornelia; Gusberti, Michele; Schouten, Henk J; Gessler, Cesare; Broggini, Giovanni A L

    2016-03-01

    The expression of the apple scab resistance gene Rvi6 in different apple cultivars and lines is not modulated by biotic or abiotic factors. All commercially important apple cultivars are susceptible to Venturia inaequalis, the causal organism of apple scab. A limited number of apple cultivars were bred to express the resistance gene Vf from the wild apple genotype Malus floribunda 821. Positional cloning of the Vf locus allowed the identification of the Rvi6 (formerly HcrVf2) scab resistance gene that was subsequently used to generate cisgenic apple lines. It is important to understand and compare how this resistance gene is transcribed and modulated during infection in conventionally bred cultivars and in cisgenic lines. The aim of this work was to study the transcription pattern of Rvi6 in three classically bred apple cultivars and six lines of 'Gala' genetically modified to express Rvi6. Rvi6 transcription was analyzed at two time points using quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) following inoculation with V. inaequalis conidia or water. Rvi6 transcription was assessed in relation to five reference genes. β-Actin, RNAPol, and UBC were the most suited to performing RT-qPCR experiments on Malus × domestica. Inoculation with V. inaequalis conidia under conditions conducive to scab infection failed to produce any significant changes to the transcription level of Rvi6. Rvi6 expression levels were inconsistent in response to external treatments in the different apple cultivars, and transgenic, intragenic or cisgenic lines.

  8. Transcription Factor Functional Protein-Protein Interactions in Plant Defense Responses

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    Murilo S. Alves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Responses to biotic stress in plants lead to dramatic reprogramming of gene expression, favoring stress responses at the expense of normal cellular functions. Transcription factors are master regulators of gene expression at the transcriptional level, and controlling the activity of these factors alters the transcriptome of the plant, leading to metabolic and phenotypic changes in response to stress. The functional analysis of interactions between transcription factors and other proteins is very important for elucidating the role of these transcriptional regulators in different signaling cascades. In this review, we present an overview of protein-protein interactions for the six major families of transcription factors involved in plant defense: basic leucine zipper containing domain proteins (bZIP, amino-acid sequence WRKYGQK (WRKY, myelocytomatosis related proteins (MYC, myeloblastosis related proteins (MYB, APETALA2/ ETHYLENE-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING FACTORS (AP2/EREBP and no apical meristem (NAM, Arabidopsis transcription activation factor (ATAF, and cup-shaped cotyledon (CUC (NAC. We describe the interaction partners of these transcription factors as molecular responses during pathogen attack and the key components of signal transduction pathways that take place during plant defense responses. These interactions determine the activation or repression of response pathways and are crucial to understanding the regulatory networks that modulate plant defense responses.

  9. NUR TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS IN STRESS AND ADDICTION

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    Danae eCampos-Melo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Nur transcription factors Nur77 (NGFI-B, NR4A1, Nurr1 (NR4A2 and Nor-1 (NR4A3 are a sub-family of orphan members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. These transcription factors are products of immediate early genes, whose expression is rapidly and transiently induced in the central nervous system by several types of stimuli. Nur factors are present throughout the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis where are prominently induced in response to stress. Drugs of abuse and stress also induce the expression of Nur factors in nuclei of the motivation/reward circuit of the brain, indicating their participation in the process of drug addiction and in non-hypothalamic responses to stress. Repeated use of addictive drugs and chronic stress induce long-lasting dysregulation of the brain motivation/reward circuit, due to reprogramming of gene expression and enduring alterations in neuronal function. Here, we review the data supporting that Nur transcription factors are key players in the molecular basis of the dysregulation of neuronal circuits involved in chronic stress and addiction.

  10. Activating transcription factor 6 mediates oxidized LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation and apoptosis in macrophages by up-regulating CHOP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shutong; Zong, Chuanlong; Zhang, Ying; Sang, Hui; Yang, Mingfeng; Jiao, Peng; Fang, Yongqi; Yang, Nana; Song, Guohua; Qin, Shucun

    2013-01-01

    This study was to explore whether activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), an important sensor to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, would mediate oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)- induced cholesterol accumulation and apoptosis in cultured macrophages and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Intracellular lipid droplets and total cholesterol levels were assayed by oil red O staining and enzymatic colorimetry, respectively. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined using MTT assay and AnnexinV-FITC apoptosis detection kit, respectively. The nuclear translocation of ATF6 in cells was detected by immunofluorescence analysis. Protein and mRNA levels were examined by Western blot analysis and real time-PCR, respectively. ATF6 siRNA was transfected to RAW264.7 cells by lipofectamin. Exposure of cells to ox-LDL induced glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), a key-signaling component of ER stress-induced apoptosis, was up-regulated in ox-LDL-treated cells. ATF6, a factor that positively regulates CHOP expression, was activated by ox-LDL in a concentration- and time- dependent manner. The role of the ATF6-mediated ER stress pathway was further confirmed through the siRNA-mediated knockdown of ATF6, which attenuated ox-LDL-induced upregulation of CHOP, cholesterol accumulation and apoptosis in macrophages. In addition, the phosphorylation of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), another factor that positively regulates CHOP expression, was induced in the presence of ox-LDL, and PERK-specific siRNA also inhibited the ox-LDL-induced upregulation of CHOP and apoptosis in RAW264.7 cells. These results demonstrate that ER stress-related proteins, particularly ATF6 and its downstream molecule CHOP, are involved in ox-LDL-induced cholesterol accumulation and apoptosis in macrophages.

  11. LHX6, An Independent Prognostic Factor, Inhibits Lung Adenocarcinoma Progression through Transcriptional Silencing of β-catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juntang; Han, Fei; Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Mingqian; Huang, Yongsheng; Hao, Xianglin; Jiang, Xiao; Yin, Li; Chen, Hongqiang; Cao, Jia; Zhang, Huidong; Liu, Jinyi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Our previous study identified LIM homeobox domain 6 (LHX6) as a frequently epigenetically silenced tumor-suppressor gene in lung cancer. However, its clinical value has never been evaluated, and the in-depth anti-tumor mechanism remains unclear. Methods: Public database was used for lung cancer, lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous carcinoma patients and tissue microarray data was used for lung adenocarcinoma patients to study prognostic outcome of LHX6 expression by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. In vitro proliferation, metastasis and in vivo nude mice model were used to evaluate the anti-tumor effect of LHX6 on lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The mechanisms were explored using western blot, TOP/FOP flash assays and luciferase reporter assays. LHX6 expression and clinical stages data were collected from The Cancer Genome Atlas database (TCGA). Results: Expression of LHX6 was found to be a favorable independent prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) of total lung adenocarcinoma patients (P=0.014) and patients with negative lymph nodes status (P=0.014) but not related the prognostic outcome of lung squamous cell carcinoma patients. The expression status of LHX6 significantly correlated to histological grade (P<0.01), tumor size (P=0.026), lymph node status (P=0.039) and clinical stages (P<0.01) of lung adenocarcinoma patients. Functionally, LHX6 inhibited the proliferation and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo . Furthermore, LHX6 suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through transcriptionally silencing the expression of β-catenin, and the promoter region (-1161 bp to +27 bp) was crucial for its inhibitory activity. Conclusions: Our data indicate that the expression of LHX6 may serve as a favorable prognostic biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma patients and provide a novel mechanism of LHX6 involving in the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma.

  12. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Belostotsky, A. A.; Kasianov, Artem S.; Esipova, Natalia G.; Medvedeva, Yulia; Eliseeva, Irina A.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding

  13. Factor requirements for transcription in the Archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, S A; Bell, S D; Jackson, S P

    1997-05-15

    Archaea (archaebacteria) constitute a domain of life that is distinct from Bacteria (eubacteria) and Eucarya (eukaryotes). Although archaeal cells share many morphological features with eubacteria, their transcriptional apparatus is more akin to eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II and III than it is to eubacterial transcription systems. Thus, in addition to possessing a 10 subunit RNA polymerase and a homologue of the TATA-binding protein (TBP), Archaea possess a polypeptide termed TFB that is homologous to eukaryotic TFIIB. Here, we investigate the factor requirements for transcription of several promoters of the archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae and its associated virus SSV. Through in vitro transcription and immunodepletion, we demonstrate that S. shibatae TBP, TFB and RNA polymerase are not complexed tightly with one another and that each is required for efficient transcription of all promoters tested. Furthermore, full transcription is restored by supplementing respective depleted extracts with recombinant TBP or TFB, indicating that TBP-associated factors or TFB-associated factors are not required. Indeed, gel-filtration suggests that Sulfolobus TBP and TFB are not associated stably with other proteins. Finally, all promoters analysed are transcribed accurately and efficiently in an in vitro system comprising recombinant TBP and TFB, together with essentially homogeneous preparation of RNA polymerase. Transcription in Archaea is therefore fundamentally homologous to that in eukaryotes, although factor requirements appear to be much less complex.

  14. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  15. Detecting Differential Transcription Factor Activity from ATAC-Seq Data

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    Ignacio J. Tripodi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are managers of the cellular factory, and key components to many diseases. Many non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms affect transcription factors, either by directly altering the protein or its functional activity at individual binding sites. Here we first briefly summarize high-throughput approaches to studying transcription factor activity. We then demonstrate, using published chromatin accessibility data (specifically ATAC-seq, that the genome-wide profile of TF recognition motifs relative to regions of open chromatin can determine the key transcription factor altered by a perturbation. Our method of determining which TFs are altered by a perturbation is simple, is quick to implement, and can be used when biological samples are limited. In the future, we envision that this method could be applied to determine which TFs show altered activity in response to a wide variety of drugs and diseases.

  16. A MYB transcription factor, DcMYB6, is involved in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in purple carrot taproots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Feng, Kai; Que, Feng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2017-03-27

    Carrots are widely grown and enjoyed around the world. Purple carrots accumulate rich anthocyanins in the taproots, while orange, yellow, and red carrots accumulate rich carotenoids in the taproots. Our previous studies indicated that variation in the activity of regulatory genes may be responsible for variations in anthocyanin production among various carrot cultivars. In this study, an R2R3-type MYB gene, designated as DcMYB6, was isolated from a purple carrot cultivar. In a phylogenetic analysis, DcMYB6 was grouped into an anthocyanin biosynthesis-related MYB clade. Sequence analyses revealed that DcMYB6 contained the conserved bHLH-interaction motif and two atypical motifs of anthocyanin regulators. The expression pattern of DcMYB6 was correlated with anthocyanin production. DcMYB6 transcripts were detected at high levels in three purple carrot cultivars but at much lower levels in six non-purple carrot cultivars. Overexpression of DcMYB6 in Arabidopsis led to enhanced anthocyanin accumulation in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and upregulated transcript levels of all seven tested anthocyanin-related structural genes. Together, these results show that DcMYB6 is involved in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in purple carrots. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of anthocyanin synthesis in purple carrot cultivars.

  17. Aberrant Pax-8 expression in well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma and malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum: a clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Deyin; Banet, Natalie; Sharma, Rajni; Vang, Russell; Ronnett, Brigitte M; Illei, Peter B

    2018-02-01

    Serous ovarian neoplasms can overlap morphologically with peritoneal mesothelial proliferations, including well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma (WDPM) and malignant epithelioid mesothelioma (MM). Accurate histologic classification of these neoplasms is important for clinical management. The Pax-8 protein is commonly used for differentiating peritoneal MM from serous carcinoma, but the diagnostic value of Pax-8 for distinguishing WDPM from borderline or low-grade serous tumors is unknown. We used immunohistochemistry staining to assess Pax-8 expression in 33 WDPMs, 34 peritoneal MMs, 48 pleural MMs, 11 adenomatoid tumors, 5 peritoneal inclusion cysts, and 51 benign/reactive mesothelium specimens. Staining was noted in 20 WDPMs (61%), with 17 showing strong and diffuse nuclear staining and 3 patchy/focal staining. Calretinin was expressed in 33 cases (100%), whereas focal BerEP4 staining was noted in 2 of 29 cases (7%). In contrast, 4 peritoneal MM (12%) were Pax-8 positive (3 diffuse and 1 focal staining). All adenomatoid tumors and peritoneal inclusion cysts were negative for Pax-8. Of the 48 pleural MM cases, 2 (4%) showed focal weak to moderate nuclear labeling for Pax-8, and 2 cases (4%) of reactive mesothelium demonstrated focal and scattered Pax-8 staining. Pax-8 appears to be a useful marker for distinguishing MM from gynecologic malignancies but is not reliable for distinguishing WDPM from borderline or low-grade gynecologic lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Building pathway graphs from BioPAX data in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benis, Nirupama; Schokker, Dirkjan; Kramer, Frank; Smits, Mari A; Suarez-Diez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Biological pathways are increasingly available in the BioPAX format which uses an RDF model for data storage. One can retrieve the information in this data model in the scripting language R using the package rBiopaxParser , which converts the BioPAX format to one readable in R. It also has a function to build a regulatory network from the pathway information. Here we describe an extension of this function. The new function allows the user to build graphs of entire pathways, including regulated as well as non-regulated elements, and therefore provides a maximum of information. This function is available as part of the rBiopaxParser distribution from Bioconductor.

  19. Cyclin D3 interacts with human activating transcription factor 5 and potentiates its transcription activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenjin; Sun Maoyun; Jiang Jianhai; Shen Xiaoyun; Sun Qing; Liu Weicheng; Shen Hailian; Gu Jianxin

    2004-01-01

    The Cyclin D3 protein is a member of the D-type cyclins. Besides serving as cell cycle regulators, D-type cyclins have been reported to be able to interact with several transcription factors and modulate their transcriptional activations. Here we report that human activating transcription factor 5 (hATF5) is a new interacting partner of Cyclin D3. The interaction was confirmed by in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding analysis. Neither interaction between Cyclin D1 and hATF5 nor interaction between Cyclin D2 and hATF5 was observed. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that Cyclin D3 could colocalize with hATF5 in the nuclear region. Cyclin D3 could potentiate hATF5 transcriptional activity independently of its Cdk4 partner. But Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D2 had no effect on hATF5 transcriptional activity. These data provide a new clue to understand the new role of Cyclin D3 as a transcriptional regulator

  20. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  1. Transcriptional repression of BODENLOS by HD-ZIP transcription factor HB5 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, De I.; Lau, S.; Ehrismann, J.S.; Axiotis, I.; Kolb, M.; Kientz, M.; Weijers, D.; Jürgens, G.

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the phytohormone auxin is an important patterning agent during embryogenesis and post-embryonic development, exerting effects through transcriptional regulation. The main determinants of the transcriptional auxin response machinery are AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF)

  2. A critique on nuclear factor-kappa B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3: The key transcription factors in periodontal pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjith Ambili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is initiated by microorganisms in dental plaque, and host immunoinflammatory response to the microbial challenge helps in disease progression. Conventional periodontal therapy was mainly targeted on the elimination of microbial component. However, a better understanding of molecular aspects in host response will enable the clinicians to formulate effective host modulation therapy (HMT for the periodontal management. Inflammatory mediators were the main targets for HMT in the past. Transcription factors can regulate the production of multiple mediators simultaneously, and inhibition of these factors will be more beneficial than blocking individual molecule. Two important transcription factors implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases are nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3. The role of these factors in periodontal disease is a less explored area. This comprehensive review is aimed at unveiling the critical role of NF-κB and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 in periodontal pathogenesis. An online search was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed database. All publications till 2016 related to NF-κB, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, and inflammation were included in writing this review. A total of 27,390 references were published based on the search terms used. Out of these, 507 were related to the periodontal research published in English till 2016. Relevant papers were chosen after carefully reading the abstract. This review has attempted to comprehend the existing knowledge regarding the role of transcription factors NF-κB and STAT3 in periodontal disease. Moreover, it also provides a connecting molecular link for the periodontal medicine concept.

  3. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  4. E6-associated transcription patterns in human papilloma virus 16-positive cervical tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kezhi; Lu, Xulian; Chen, Jun; Zou, Ruanmin; Zhang, Lifang; Xue, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    The change in transcription pattern induced by post-transcriptional RNA splicing is an important mechanism in the regulation of the early gene expression of human papilloma virus (HPV). The present study was conducted to establish a method to specifically amplify HPV-16 E6-associated transcripts. The E6-related transcripts from 63 HPV-16-positive cervical tumor tissue samples were amplified, consisting of eight cases of low-risk intraepithelial lesions, 38 cases of high-risk intraepithelial lesions and 17 cases of cervical cancer (CxCa). The appropriate amplified segments were recovered following agarose gel electrophoresis, and subjected to further sequencing and sequence alignment analysis. Six groups of E6 transcription patterns were identified from HPV-16-positive cervical tumor tissue, including five newly-discovered transcripts. Different HPV-16 E6-associated transcription patterns were detected during the development of CxCa. Over the course of the progression of the low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions to CxCa, the specific HPV-16 E6-associated transcription patterns and the dominant transcripts were all different. As indicated by this study, the transcription pattern of the E6 early gene of HPV-16 was closely associated with the stages of cervical carcinogenesis, and may also be involved in the development of CxCa.

  5. Congenital Hypothyroidism Caused by a PAX8 Gene Mutation Manifested as Sodium/Iodide Symporter Gene Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakako Jo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations of the PAX8 gene are considered to mainly cause congenital hypothyroidism (CH due to thyroid hypoplasia. However, some patients with PAX8 mutation have demonstrated a normal-sized thyroid gland. Here we report a CH patient caused by a PAX8 mutation, which manifested as iodide transport defect (ITD. Hypothyroidism was detected by neonatal screening and L-thyroxine replacement was started immediately. Although 123I scintigraphy at 5 years of age showed that the thyroid gland was in the normal position and of small size, his iodide trapping was low. The ratio of the saliva/plasma radioactive iodide was low. He did not have goiter; however laboratory findings suggested that he had partial ITD. Gene analyses showed that the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS gene was normal; instead, a mutation in the PAX8 gene causing R31H substitution was identified. The present report demonstrates that individuals with defective PAX8 can have partial ITD, and thus genetic analysis is useful for differential diagnosis.

  6. MiR-495 and miR-218 regulate the expression of the Onecut transcription factors HNF-6 and OC-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simion, Alexandru; Laudadio, Ilaria; Prevot, Pierre-Paul; Raynaud, Peggy; Lemaigre, Frederic P. [Universite catholique de Louvain, de Duve Institute, 75 Avenue Hippocrate 7529, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium); Jacquemin, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.jacquemin@uclouvain.be [Universite catholique de Louvain, de Duve Institute, 75 Avenue Hippocrate 7529, B-1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression mainly by binding to the 3'UTR of their target mRNAs. Recent data revealed that microRNAs have an important role in pancreas and liver development and physiology. Using cloning and microarray profiling approaches, we show that a unique repertoire of microRNAs is expressed at the onset of liver and pancreas organogenesis, and in pancreas and liver at key stages of cell fate determination. Among the microRNAs that are expressed at these stages, miR-495 and miR-218 were predicted to, respectively, target the Onecut (OC) transcription factors Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-6 (HNF-6/OC-1) and OC-2, two important regulators of liver and pancreas development. MiR-495 and miR-218 are dynamically expressed in developing liver and pancreas, and by transient transfection, we show that they target HNF-6 and OC-2 3'UTRs. Moreover, when overexpressed in cultured cells, miR-495 and miR-218 decrease the endogenous levels of HNF-6 and OC-2 mRNA. These results indicate that the expression of regulators of liver and pancreas development is modulated by microRNAs. They also suggest a developmental role for miR-495 and miR-218.

  7. MiR-495 and miR-218 regulate the expression of the Onecut transcription factors HNF-6 and OC-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simion, Alexandru; Laudadio, Ilaria; Prevot, Pierre-Paul; Raynaud, Peggy; Lemaigre, Frederic P.; Jacquemin, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression mainly by binding to the 3'UTR of their target mRNAs. Recent data revealed that microRNAs have an important role in pancreas and liver development and physiology. Using cloning and microarray profiling approaches, we show that a unique repertoire of microRNAs is expressed at the onset of liver and pancreas organogenesis, and in pancreas and liver at key stages of cell fate determination. Among the microRNAs that are expressed at these stages, miR-495 and miR-218 were predicted to, respectively, target the Onecut (OC) transcription factors Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-6 (HNF-6/OC-1) and OC-2, two important regulators of liver and pancreas development. MiR-495 and miR-218 are dynamically expressed in developing liver and pancreas, and by transient transfection, we show that they target HNF-6 and OC-2 3'UTRs. Moreover, when overexpressed in cultured cells, miR-495 and miR-218 decrease the endogenous levels of HNF-6 and OC-2 mRNA. These results indicate that the expression of regulators of liver and pancreas development is modulated by microRNAs. They also suggest a developmental role for miR-495 and miR-218.

  8. BACH transcription factors in innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Roychoudhuri, Rahul

    2017-07-01

    BTB and CNC homology (BACH) proteins are transcriptional repressors of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family. Recent studies indicate widespread roles of BACH proteins in controlling the development and function of the innate and adaptive immune systems, including the differentiation of effector and memory cells of the B and T cell lineages, CD4 + regulatory T cells and macrophages. Here, we emphasize similarities at a molecular level in the cell-type-specific activities of BACH factors, proposing that competitive interactions of BACH proteins with transcriptional activators of the bZIP family form a common mechanistic theme underlying their diverse actions. The findings contribute to a general understanding of how transcriptional repressors shape lineage commitment and cell-type-specific functions through repression of alternative lineage programmes.

  9. Thirty-seven transcription factor genes differentially respond to a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plant transcription factors and insect defence si. Thirty-seven transcription factor genes differentially respond to a harpin protein and affect resistance to the green peach aphid in Arabidopsis. HUNLIN. PIN. RUOXUE LIŲ, BEIBEI LÜ, XIAOMENG WANG, CHUNLING ZHANG, SHUPING ZHANG, JUN QIAN, LEI CHEN,.

  10. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  11. Recovery of NIS expression in thyroid cancer cells by overexpression of Pax8 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presta, Ivan; Filetti, Sebastiano; Russo, Diego; Arturi, Franco; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Mattei, Tiziana; Scarpelli, Daniela; Tosi, Emanuele; Scipioni, Angela; Celano, Marilena; Gulino, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Recovery of iodide uptake in thyroid cancer cells by means of obtaining the functional expression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) represents an innovative strategy for the treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. However, the NIS gene expression alone is not always sufficient to restore radioiodine concentration ability in these tumour cells. In this study, the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma ARO cells were stably transfected with a Pax8 gene expression vector. A quantitative RT-PCR was performed to assess the thyroid specific gene expression in selected clones. The presence of NIS protein was detected by Western blot and localized by immunofluorescence. A iodide uptake assay was also performed to verify the functional effect of NIS induction and differentiation switch. The clones overexpressing Pax8 showed the re-activation of several thyroid specific genes including NIS, Pendrin, Thyroglobulin, TPO and TTF1. In ARO-Pax8 clones NIS protein was also localized both in cell cytoplasm and membrane. Thus, the ability to uptake the radioiodine was partially restored, associated to a high rate of efflux. In addition, ARO cells expressing Pax8 presented a lower rate of cell growth. These finding demonstrate that induction of Pax8 expression may determine a re-differentiation of thyroid cancer cells, including a partial recovery of iodide uptake, fundamental requisite for a radioiodine-based therapeutic approach for thyroid tumours

  12. Radiation susceptibility of the mouse smalleye mutants, Del(2)Sey3Hpax6 and Del(2)Sey4Hpax6, which delete the chromosome 2 middle regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Y.; Hoshi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Yamate, J.; Peters, J.; Cattanach, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: LOH at the chromosome 2 middle regions is common in the radiation-induced mouse acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To identify the suppressor or the modifier gene of AML at this region, the mouse deletion mutants, Del(2)Sey3H pax6 and Del(2)Sey3H pax6 could be the good models, as they deleted the chromosome 2 middle regions hemizygously. The allele of the partially deleted chromosome 2 was paternally generated and maintained hemizygously. The exact deleted regions of the two mutants were mapped by the PCR-based detection of polymorphism of the STS markers. The length of the deletions was 3.01Mb and 10.11MB for Del(2)Sey3H pax6 and Del(2)Sey3H pax6 , respectively. For the induction of tumors, a radiation, 3.0Gy of Co-60 and a chemical carcinogen, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea were applied to the mutants. Their tumorigenicity was compared with those of control as well as normal sibs by the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Both mutants were found to predispose to small intestinal tumors. Intestinal tumors developed spontaneously with the incidence of 30%. The radiation and the chemical accelerated the malignancy and increased the incidence of the intestinal tumors. Radiation shortened the latency of AML development in the Del(2)Sey3H pax6 mutant but not in the Del(2)Sey3H pax6 . Spontaneous AML has not been observed, nor any increase in the incidence of induced AMLs. The commonly deleted region of the two mutants, the 3.01Mb region, must be critical for the development of tumors and the high susceptibility to radiation. The role of Pax6 gene should be considered in the intestinal tumorigenesis, as the Pax6 gene plays an important role in the pancreas development during the embryogenesis. The Wt1, a tumor suppressor gene, which is deleted hemizygously in these mutants as well. The screening of homozygous deletion has been started using the induced as well as spontaneously developed tumors

  13. Chromatin-mediated transcriptional regulation by the yeast architectural factors NHP6A and NHP6B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    2000-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NHP6A and NHP6B proteins are chromatin architectural factors, functionally and structurally related to the mammalian high mobility group (HMG)-1 and -2 proteins, a family of non-sequence-specific DNA binding proteins. nhp6a nhp6b mutants have various morphological...

  14. NAC Transcription Factors in Stress Responses and Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte

    Plant-specific NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC) transcription factors have recently received considerable attention due to their significant roles in plant development and stress signalling. This interest has resulted in a number of physiological, genetic and cell biological studies of their functions. Some...... of these studies have also revealed emerging gene regulatory networks and protein-protein interaction networks. However, structural studies relating structure to function are lagging behind. Structure-function analysis of the NAC transcription factors has therefore been the main focus of this PhD thesis...... not involve significant folding-upon-binding but fuzziness or an extended ANAC046 region. The ANAC046 regulatory domain functions as an entropic chain with a bait for interactions with for example RCD1. RCD1 interacts with transcription factors from several different families, and the large stress...

  15. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian; Dijk, van Aalt-Jan; Immink, Richard G.H.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger

  16. Transcription factor interplay in T helper cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of CD4 helper T cells into specialized effector lineages has provided a powerful model for understanding immune cell differentiation. Distinct lineages have been defined by differential expression of signature cytokines and the lineage-specifying transcription factors necessary and sufficient for their production. The traditional paradigm of differentiation towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes driven by T-bet and GATA3, respectively, has been extended to incorporate additional T cell lineages and transcriptional regulators. Technological advances have expanded our view of these lineage-specifying transcription factors to the whole genome and revealed unexpected interplay between them. From these data, it is becoming clear that lineage specification is more complex and plastic than previous models might have suggested. Here, we present an overview of the different forms of transcription factor interplay that have been identified and how T cell phenotypes arise as a product of this interplay within complex regulatory networks. We also suggest experimental strategies that will provide further insight into the mechanisms that underlie T cell lineage specification and plasticity. PMID:23878131

  17. Transcription factor interplay in T helper cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catherine M; Jenner, Richard G

    2013-11-01

    The differentiation of CD4 helper T cells into specialized effector lineages has provided a powerful model for understanding immune cell differentiation. Distinct lineages have been defined by differential expression of signature cytokines and the lineage-specifying transcription factors necessary and sufficient for their production. The traditional paradigm of differentiation towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes driven by T-bet and GATA3, respectively, has been extended to incorporate additional T cell lineages and transcriptional regulators. Technological advances have expanded our view of these lineage-specifying transcription factors to the whole genome and revealed unexpected interplay between them. From these data, it is becoming clear that lineage specification is more complex and plastic than previous models might have suggested. Here, we present an overview of the different forms of transcription factor interplay that have been identified and how T cell phenotypes arise as a product of this interplay within complex regulatory networks. We also suggest experimental strategies that will provide further insight into the mechanisms that underlie T cell lineage specification and plasticity.

  18. Enhanceosomes as integrators of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and other transcription factors in the hypoxic transcriptional response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlus, Matthew R; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Hypoxia is a prevalent attribute of the solid tumor microenvironment that promotes the expression of genes through posttranslational modifications and stabilization of alpha subunits (HIF1α and HIF2α) of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Despite significant similarities, HIF1 (HIF1α/ARNT) and HIF2 (HIF2α/ARNT) activate common as well as unique target genes and exhibit different functions in cancer biology. More surprisingly, accumulating data indicates that the HIF1- and/or HIF2-mediated hypoxia responses can be oncogenic as well as tumor suppressive. While the role of HIF in the hypoxia response is well established, recent data support the concept that HIF is necessary, but not sufficient for the hypoxic response. Other transcription factors that are activated by hypoxia are also required for the HIF-mediated hypoxia response. HIFs, other transcription factors, co-factors and RNA poll II recruited by HIF and other transcription factors form multifactorial enhanceosome complexes on the promoters of HIF target genes to activate hypoxia inducible genes. Importantly, HIF1 or HIF2 requires distinct partners in activating HIF1 or HIF2 target genes. Because HIF enhanceosome formation is required for the gene activation and distinct functions of HIF1 and HIF2 in tumor biology, disruption of the HIF1 or HIF2 specific enhanceosome complex may prove to be a beneficial strategy in tumor treatment in which tumor growth is specifically dependent upon HIF1 or HIF2 activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA Binding by the Ribosomal DNA Transcription Factor Rrn3 Is Essential for Ribosomal DNA Transcription*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanchick, Ann; Zhi, Huijun; Cavanaugh, Alice H.; Rothblum, Katrina; Schneider, David A.; Rothblum, Lawrence I.

    2013-01-01

    The human homologue of yeast Rrn3 is an RNA polymerase I-associated transcription factor that is essential for ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription. The generally accepted model is that Rrn3 functions as a bridge between RNA polymerase I and the transcription factors bound to the committed template. In this model Rrn3 would mediate an interaction between the mammalian Rrn3-polymerase I complex and SL1, the rDNA transcription factor that binds to the core promoter element of the rDNA. In the course of studying the role of Rrn3 in recruitment, we found that Rrn3 was in fact a DNA-binding protein. Analysis of the sequence of Rrn3 identified a domain with sequence similarity to the DNA binding domain of heat shock transcription factor 2. Randomization, or deletion, of the amino acids in this region in Rrn3, amino acids 382–400, abrogated its ability to bind DNA, indicating that this domain was an important contributor to DNA binding by Rrn3. Control experiments demonstrated that these mutant Rrn3 constructs were capable of interacting with both rpa43 and SL1, two other activities demonstrated to be essential for Rrn3 function. However, neither of these Rrn3 mutants was capable of functioning in transcription in vitro. Moreover, although wild-type human Rrn3 complemented a yeast rrn3-ts mutant, the DNA-binding site mutant did not. These results demonstrate that DNA binding by Rrn3 is essential for transcription by RNA polymerase I. PMID:23393135

  20. DNA binding by the ribosomal DNA transcription factor rrn3 is essential for ribosomal DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanchick, Ann; Zhi, Huijun; Cavanaugh, Alice H; Rothblum, Katrina; Schneider, David A; Rothblum, Lawrence I

    2013-03-29

    The human homologue of yeast Rrn3 is an RNA polymerase I-associated transcription factor that is essential for ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription. The generally accepted model is that Rrn3 functions as a bridge between RNA polymerase I and the transcription factors bound to the committed template. In this model Rrn3 would mediate an interaction between the mammalian Rrn3-polymerase I complex and SL1, the rDNA transcription factor that binds to the core promoter element of the rDNA. In the course of studying the role of Rrn3 in recruitment, we found that Rrn3 was in fact a DNA-binding protein. Analysis of the sequence of Rrn3 identified a domain with sequence similarity to the DNA binding domain of heat shock transcription factor 2. Randomization, or deletion, of the amino acids in this region in Rrn3, amino acids 382-400, abrogated its ability to bind DNA, indicating that this domain was an important contributor to DNA binding by Rrn3. Control experiments demonstrated that these mutant Rrn3 constructs were capable of interacting with both rpa43 and SL1, two other activities demonstrated to be essential for Rrn3 function. However, neither of these Rrn3 mutants was capable of functioning in transcription in vitro. Moreover, although wild-type human Rrn3 complemented a yeast rrn3-ts mutant, the DNA-binding site mutant did not. These results demonstrate that DNA binding by Rrn3 is essential for transcription by RNA polymerase I.

  1. 12 CFR 407.6 - Transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed meetings. 407.6 Section 407.6 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES REGULATIONS GOVERNING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF EX-IM BANK MEETINGS § 407.6 Transcripts, recordings and minutes of closed...

  2. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  3. TrSDB: a proteome database of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Antoni; Aguilar, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Querol, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    TrSDB—TranScout Database—(http://ibb.uab.es/trsdb) is a proteome database of eukaryotic transcription factors based upon predicted motifs by TranScout and data sources such as InterPro and Gene Ontology Annotation. Nine eukaryotic proteomes are included in the current version. Extensive and diverse information for each database entry, different analyses considering TranScout classification and similarity relationships are offered for research on transcription factors or gene expression. PMID:14681387

  4. Using TESS to predict transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    This unit describes how to use the Transcription Element Search System (TESS). This Web site predicts transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in DNA sequence using two different kinds of models of sites, strings and positional weight matrices. The binding of transcription factors to DNA is a major part of the control of gene expression. Transcription factors exhibit sequence-specific binding; they form stronger bonds to some DNA sequences than to others. Identification of a good binding site in the promoter for a gene suggests the possibility that the corresponding factor may play a role in the regulation of that gene. However, the sequences transcription factors recognize are typically short and allow for some amount of mismatch. Because of this, binding sites for a factor can typically be found at random every few hundred to a thousand base pairs. TESS has features to help sort through and evaluate the significance of predicted sites.

  5. Microarray-Based Identification of Transcription Factor Target Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorte, M.; Horstman, A.; Page, R.B.; Heidstra, R.; Stromberg, A.; Boutilier, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Microarray analysis is widely used to identify transcriptional changes associated with genetic perturbation or signaling events. Here we describe its application in the identification of plant transcription factor target genes with emphasis on the design of suitable DNA constructs for controlling TF

  6. Repression of meiotic genes by antisense transcription and by Fkh2 transcription factor in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Rosebrock, Adam P; Khan, Sohail R; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    In S. pombe, about 5% of genes are meiosis-specific and accumulate little or no mRNA during vegetative growth. Here we use Affymetrix tiling arrays to characterize transcripts in vegetative and meiotic cells. In vegetative cells, many meiotic genes, especially those induced in mid-meiosis, have abundant antisense transcripts. Disruption of the antisense transcription of three of these mid-meiotic genes allowed vegetative sense transcription. These results suggest that antisense transcription represses sense transcription of meiotic genes in vegetative cells. Although the mechanism(s) of antisense mediated transcription repression need to be further explored, our data indicates that RNAi machinery is not required for repression. Previously, we and others used non-strand specific methods to study splicing regulation of meiotic genes and concluded that 28 mid-meiotic genes are spliced only in meiosis. We now demonstrate that the "unspliced" signal in vegetative cells comes from the antisense RNA, not from unspliced sense RNA, and we argue against the idea that splicing regulates these mid-meiotic genes. Most of these mid-meiotic genes are induced in mid-meiosis by the forkhead transcription factor Mei4. Interestingly, deletion of a different forkhead transcription factor, Fkh2, allows low levels of sense expression of some mid-meiotic genes in vegetative cells. We propose that vegetative expression of mid-meiotic genes is repressed at least two independent ways: antisense transcription and Fkh2 repression.

  7. Pulsed low-level infrared laser alters mRNA levels from muscle repair genes dependent on power output in Wistar rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Thomé, A. M. C.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Satellite cells are present in skeletal muscle functioning in the repair and regeneration of muscle injury. Activation of these cells depends on the expression of myogenic factor 5 (Myf5), myogenic determination factor 1(MyoD), myogenic regulatory factor 4 (MRF4), myogenin (MyoG), paired box transcription factors 3 (Pax3), and 7 (Pax7). Low-level laser irradiation accelerates the repair of muscle injuries. However, data from the expression of myogenic factors have been controversial. Furthermore, the effects of different laser beam powers on the repair of muscle injuries have been not evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level infrared laser at different powers and in pulsed emission mode on the expression of myogenic regulatory factors and on Pax3 and Pax7 in injured skeletal muscle from Wistar rats. Animals that underwent cryoinjury were divided into three groups: injury, injury laser 25 Mw, and injury laser 75 mW. Low-level infrared laser irradiation (904 nm, 3 J cm-2, 5 kHz) was carried out at 25 and 75 mW. After euthanasia, skeletal muscle samples were withdrawn and the total RNA was extracted for the evaluation of mRNA levels from the MyoD, MyoG, MRF4, Myf5, Pax3, and Pax7 gene. Pax 7 mRNA levels did not alter, but Pax3 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 25 mW. MyoD, MyoG, and MYf5 mRNA levels increased in the injured and laser-irradiated animals at both powers, and MRF4 mRNA levels decreased in the injured and laser-irradiated group at 75 mW. In conclusion, exposure to pulsed low-level infrared laser, by power-dependent effect, could accelerate the muscle repair process altering mRNA levels from paired box transcription factors and myogenic regulatory factors.

  8. Xylem specific activation of 5’ upstream regulatory region of two NAC transcription factors (MusaVND6 and MusaVND7) in banana is regulated by SNBE-like sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Deposition of secondary cell wall in the xylem elements is controlled by a subgroup of NAC (NAM, ATAF, CUC) family, known as vascular-related NAC transcription factors (VNDs). In the present study, we analyzed the 5’ upstream regulatory region of two banana NAC transcription factors (MusaVND6 and MusaVND7) for tissue specific expression and presence of 19-bp secondary-wall NAC binding element (SNBE)-like motifs. Transgenic banana plants of Musa cultivar Rasthali harboring either PMusaVND7::GUS or PMusaVND6::GUS showed specific GUS (β-D-Glucuronidase) activity in cells of the xylem tissue. Approximately 1.2kb promoter region of either MusaVND6 or MusaVND7 showed presence of at least two SNBE-like motifs. This 1.2kb promoter region was retarded in a gel shift assay by three banana VND protein (VND1,VND2 and VND3). The banana VND1-VND3 could also retard the mobility of isolated SNBE-like motifs of MusaVND6 or MusaVND7 in a gel shift assay. Transcript levels of MusaVND6 and MusaVND7 were elevated in transgenic banana overexpressing either banana VND1, VND2 or VND3. Present study suggested a probable regulation of banana VND6 and VND7 expression through direct interaction of banana VND1- VND3 with SNBE-like motifs. Our study also indicated two promoter elements for possible utilization in cell wall modifications in plants especially banana, which is being recently considered as a potential biofuel crop. PMID:29438404

  9. Basic aspects of tumor cell fatty acid-regulated signaling and transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comba, Andrea; Lin, Yi-Hui; Eynard, Aldo Renato; Valentich, Mirta Ana; Fernandez-Zapico, Martín Ernesto; Pasqualini, Marìa Eugenia

    2011-12-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge and experimental research about the mechanisms by which fatty acids and their derivatives control specific gene expression involved during carcinogenesis. Changes in dietary fatty acids, specifically the polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω-3 and ω-6 families and some derived eicosanoids from lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases, and cytochrome P-450, seem to control the activity of transcription factor families involved in cancer cell proliferation or cell death. Their regulation may be carried out either through direct binding to DNA as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors or via modulation in an indirect manner of signaling pathway molecules (e.g., protein kinase C) and other transcription factors (nuclear factor kappa B and sterol regulatory element binding protein). Knowledge of the mechanisms by which fatty acids control specific gene expression may identify important risk factors for cancer and provide insight into the development of new therapeutic strategies for a better management of whole body lipid metabolism.

  10. Small interfering RNA against transcription factor STAT6 leads to increased cholesterol synthesis in lung cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Dubey

    Full Text Available STAT6 transcription factor has become a potential molecule for therapeutic intervention because it regulates broad range of cellular processes in a large variety of cell types. Although some target genes and interacting partners of STAT6 have been identified, its exact mechanism of action needs to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to further characterize the molecular interactions, networks, and functions of STAT6 by profiling the mRNA expression of STAT6 silenced human lung cells (NCI-H460 using microarrays. Our analysis revealed 273 differentially expressed genes after STAT6 silencing. Analysis of the gene expression data with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA software revealed Gene expression, Cell death, Lipid metabolism as the functions associated with highest rated network. Cholesterol biosynthesis was among the most enriched pathways in IPA as well as in PANTHER analysis. These results have been validated by real-time PCR and cholesterol assay using scrambled siRNA as a negative control. Similar findings were also observed with human type II pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells, A549. In the present study we have, for the first time, shown the inverse relationship of STAT6 with the cholesterol biosynthesis in lung cancer cells. The present findings are potentially significant to advance the understanding and design of therapeutics for the pathological conditions where both STAT6 and cholesterol biosynthesis are implicated viz. asthma, atherosclerosis etc.

  11. Exploring the utility of organo-polyoxometalate hybrids to inhibit SOX transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Kamesh; Micoine, Kevin; Lacôte, Emmanuel; Thorimbert, Serge; Cheung, Edwin; Hasenknopf, Bernold; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    SOX transcription factors constitute an attractive target class for intervention with small molecules as they play a prominent role in the field of regenerative biomedicine and cancer biology. However, rationally engineering specific inhibitors that interfere with transcription factor DNA interfaces continues to be a monumental challenge in the field of transcription factor chemical biology. Polyoxometalates (POMs) are inorganic compounds that were previously shown to target the high-mobility group (HMG) of SOX proteins at nanomolar concentrations. In continuation of this work, we carried out an assessment of the selectivity of a panel of newly synthesized organo-polyoxometalate hybrids in targeting different transcription factor families to enable the usage of polyoxometalates as specific SOX transcription factor drugs. The residual DNA-binding activities of 15 different transcription factors were measured after treatment with a panel of diverse polyoxometalates. Polyoxometalates belonging to the Dawson structural class were found to be more potent inhibitors than the Keggin class. Further, organically modified Dawson polyoxometalates were found to be the most potent in inhibiting transcription factor DNA binding activity. The size of the polyoxometalates and its derivitization were found to be the key determinants of their potency. Polyoxometalates are highly potent, nanomolar range inhibitors of the DNA binding activity of the Sox-HMG family. However, binding assays involving a limited subset of structurally diverse polyoxometalates revealed a low selectivity profile against different transcription factor families. Further progress in achieving selectivity and deciphering structure-activity relationship of POMs require the identification of POM binding sites on transcription factors using elaborate approaches like X-ray crystallography and multidimensional NMR. In summary, our report reaffirms that transcription factors are challenging molecular architectures

  12. TcoF-DB v2: update of the database of human and mouse transcription co-factors and transcription factor interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian; Alam, Tanvir; Essack, Magbubah; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, making them crucial for cell survival and important biological functions. For the regulation of transcription, interactions of different regulatory proteins known as transcription co-factors (TcoFs) and TFs are essential in forming necessary protein complexes. Although TcoFs themselves do not bind DNA directly, their influence on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant, with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. In the TcoF-DB v2 database, we collect information on TcoFs. In this article, we describe updates and improvements implemented in TcoF-DB v2. TcoF-DB v2 provides several new features that enables exploration of the roles of TcoFs. The content of the database has significantly expanded, and is enriched with information from Gene Ontology, biological pathways, diseases and molecular signatures. TcoF-DB v2 now includes many more TFs; has substantially increased the number of human TcoFs to 958, and now includes information on mouse (418 new TcoFs). TcoF-DB v2 enables the exploration of information on TcoFs and allows investigations into their influence on transcriptional regulation in humans and mice. TcoF-DB v2 can be accessed at http://tcofdb.org/.

  13. TcoF-DB v2: update of the database of human and mouse transcription co-factors and transcription factor interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2016-10-17

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, making them crucial for cell survival and important biological functions. For the regulation of transcription, interactions of different regulatory proteins known as transcription co-factors (TcoFs) and TFs are essential in forming necessary protein complexes. Although TcoFs themselves do not bind DNA directly, their influence on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant, with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. In the TcoF-DB v2 database, we collect information on TcoFs. In this article, we describe updates and improvements implemented in TcoF-DB v2. TcoF-DB v2 provides several new features that enables exploration of the roles of TcoFs. The content of the database has significantly expanded, and is enriched with information from Gene Ontology, biological pathways, diseases and molecular signatures. TcoF-DB v2 now includes many more TFs; has substantially increased the number of human TcoFs to 958, and now includes information on mouse (418 new TcoFs). TcoF-DB v2 enables the exploration of information on TcoFs and allows investigations into their influence on transcriptional regulation in humans and mice. TcoF-DB v2 can be accessed at http://tcofdb.org/.

  14. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  15. Novel positive regulatory role for the SPL6 transcription factor in the N TIR-NB-LRR receptor-mediated plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu S Padmanabhan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the recognition of pathogen-encoded effectors, plant TIR-NB-LRR immune receptors induce defense signaling by a largely unknown mechanism. We identify a novel and conserved role for the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP-domain transcription factor SPL6 in enabling the activation of the defense transcriptome following its association with a nuclear-localized immune receptor. During an active immune response, the Nicotiana TIR-NB-LRR N immune receptor associates with NbSPL6 within distinct nuclear compartments. NbSPL6 is essential for the N-mediated resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus. Similarly, the presumed Arabidopsis ortholog AtSPL6 is required for the resistance mediated by the TIR-NB-LRR RPS4 against Pseudomonas syringae carrying the avrRps4 effector. Transcriptome analysis indicates that AtSPL6 positively regulates a subset of defense genes. A pathogen-activated nuclear-localized TIR-NB-LRR like N can therefore regulate defense genes through SPL6 in a mechanism analogous to the induction of MHC genes by mammalian immune receptors like CIITA and NLRC5.

  16. Demonstrating Interactions of Transcription Factors with DNA by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Nasim; Gould, David

    2017-01-01

    Confirming the binding of a transcription factor with a particular DNA sequence may be important in characterizing interactions with a synthetic promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay is a powerful approach to demonstrate the specific DNA sequence that is bound by a transcription factor and also to confirm the specific transcription factor involved in the interaction. In this chapter we describe a method we have successfully used to demonstrate interactions of endogenous transcription factors with sequences derived from endogenous and synthetic promoters.

  17. Repression of Meiotic Genes by Antisense Transcription and by Fkh2 Transcription Factor in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Khan, Sohail R.; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    In S. pombe, about 5% of genes are meiosis-specific and accumulate little or no mRNA during vegetative growth. Here we use Affymetrix tiling arrays to characterize transcripts in vegetative and meiotic cells. In vegetative cells, many meiotic genes, especially those induced in mid-meiosis, have abundant antisense transcripts. Disruption of the antisense transcription of three of these mid-meiotic genes allowed vegetative sense transcription. These results suggest that antisense transcription represses sense transcription of meiotic genes in vegetative cells. Although the mechanism(s) of antisense mediated transcription repression need to be further explored, our data indicates that RNAi machinery is not required for repression. Previously, we and others used non-strand specific methods to study splicing regulation of meiotic genes and concluded that 28 mid-meiotic genes are spliced only in meiosis. We now demonstrate that the “unspliced” signal in vegetative cells comes from the antisense RNA, not from unspliced sense RNA, and we argue against the idea that splicing regulates these mid-meiotic genes. Most of these mid-meiotic genes are induced in mid-meiosis by the forkhead transcription factor Mei4. Interestingly, deletion of a different forkhead transcription factor, Fkh2, allows low levels of sense expression of some mid-meiotic genes in vegetative cells. We propose that vegetative expression of mid-meiotic genes is repressed at least two independent ways: antisense transcription and Fkh2 repression. PMID:22238674

  18. Repression of meiotic genes by antisense transcription and by Fkh2 transcription factor in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available In S. pombe, about 5% of genes are meiosis-specific and accumulate little or no mRNA during vegetative growth. Here we use Affymetrix tiling arrays to characterize transcripts in vegetative and meiotic cells. In vegetative cells, many meiotic genes, especially those induced in mid-meiosis, have abundant antisense transcripts. Disruption of the antisense transcription of three of these mid-meiotic genes allowed vegetative sense transcription. These results suggest that antisense transcription represses sense transcription of meiotic genes in vegetative cells. Although the mechanism(s of antisense mediated transcription repression need to be further explored, our data indicates that RNAi machinery is not required for repression. Previously, we and others used non-strand specific methods to study splicing regulation of meiotic genes and concluded that 28 mid-meiotic genes are spliced only in meiosis. We now demonstrate that the "unspliced" signal in vegetative cells comes from the antisense RNA, not from unspliced sense RNA, and we argue against the idea that splicing regulates these mid-meiotic genes. Most of these mid-meiotic genes are induced in mid-meiosis by the forkhead transcription factor Mei4. Interestingly, deletion of a different forkhead transcription factor, Fkh2, allows low levels of sense expression of some mid-meiotic genes in vegetative cells. We propose that vegetative expression of mid-meiotic genes is repressed at least two independent ways: antisense transcription and Fkh2 repression.

  19. DNA dynamics play a role as a basal transcription factor in the positioning and regulation of gene transcription initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Gelev, Vladimir; Yoo, Sang Wook; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim ?.; Usheva, Anny

    2009-01-01

    We assess the role of DNA breathing dynamics as a determinant of promoter strength and transcription start site (TSS) location. We compare DNA Langevin dynamic profiles of representative gene promoters, calculated with the extended non-linear PBD model of DNA with experimental data on transcription factor binding and transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that DNA dynamic activity at the TSS can be suppressed by mutations that do not affect basal transcription factor binding–DNA co...

  20. The logic of communication: roles for mobile transcription factors in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yuchen; Scheres, Ben; Blilou, Ikram

    2015-02-01

    Mobile transcription factors play many roles in plant development. Here, we compare the use of mobile transcription factors as signals with some canonical signal transduction processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. After an initial survey, we focus on the SHORT-ROOT pathway in Arabidopsis roots to show that, despite the simplicity of the concept of mobile transcription factor signalling, many lines of evidence reveal a surprising complexity in control mechanisms linked to this process. We argue that these controls bestow precision, robustness, and versatility on mobile transcription factor signalling. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. AGO6 functions in RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Eun

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM is a small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated epigenetic modification that contributes to transposon silencing in plants. RdDM requires a complex transcriptional machinery that includes specialized RNA polymerases, named Pol IV and Pol V, as well as chromatin remodelling proteins, transcription factors, RNA binding proteins, and other plant-specific proteins whose functions are not yet clarified. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DICER-LIKE3 and members of the ARGONAUTE4 group of ARGONAUTE (AGO proteins are involved, respectively, in generating and using 24-nt siRNAs that trigger methylation and transcriptional gene silencing of homologous promoter sequences. AGO4 is the main AGO protein implicated in the RdDM pathway. Here we report the identification of the related AGO6 in a forward genetic screen for mutants defective in RdDM and transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root apical meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identification of AGO6, and not AGO4, in our screen is consistent with the primary expression of AGO6 in shoot and root growing points.

  2. Transcription factor NF-kB as a potential biomarker for oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, R. van den; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, H. van den; Bast, A.

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the involvement of transcription factors, such as of the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB), in the pathogenesis of various diseases. NF-κB is involved in the control of the transcription of a variety of cellular genes that regulate the inflammatory

  3. The ectopic expression of Pax4 in the mouse pancreas converts progenitor cells into alpha and subsequently beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collombat, Patrick; Xu, Xiaobo; Ravassard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that the loss of Arx and/or Pax4 gene activity leads to a shift in the fate of the different endocrine cell subtypes in the mouse pancreas, without affecting the total endocrine cell numbers. Here, we conditionally and ectopically express Pax4 using different cell......-specific promoters and demonstrate that Pax4 forces endocrine precursor cells, as well as mature alpha cells, to adopt a beta cell destiny. This results in a glucagon deficiency that provokes a compensatory and continuous glucagon+ cell neogenesis requiring the re-expression of the proendocrine gene Ngn3. However......, the newly formed alpha cells fail to correct the hypoglucagonemia since they subsequently acquire a beta cell phenotype upon Pax4 ectopic expression. Notably, this cycle of neogenesis and redifferentiation caused by ectopic expression of Pax4 in alpha cells is capable of restoring a functional beta cell...

  4. Transcription factor binding sites prediction based on modified nucleosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Talebzadeh

    Full Text Available In computational methods, position weight matrices (PWMs are commonly applied for transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction. Although these matrices are more accurate than simple consensus sequences to predict actual binding sites, they usually produce a large number of false positive (FP predictions and so are impoverished sources of information. Several studies have employed additional sources of information such as sequence conservation or the vicinity to transcription start sites to distinguish true binding regions from random ones. Recently, the spatial distribution of modified nucleosomes has been shown to be associated with different promoter architectures. These aligned patterns can facilitate DNA accessibility for transcription factors. We hypothesize that using data from these aligned and periodic patterns can improve the performance of binding region prediction. In this study, we propose two effective features, "modified nucleosomes neighboring" and "modified nucleosomes occupancy", to decrease FP in binding site discovery. Based on these features, we designed a logistic regression classifier which estimates the probability of a region as a TFBS. Our model learned each feature based on Sp1 binding sites on Chromosome 1 and was tested on the other chromosomes in human CD4+T cells. In this work, we investigated 21 histone modifications and found that only 8 out of 21 marks are strongly correlated with transcription factor binding regions. To prove that these features are not specific to Sp1, we combined the logistic regression classifier with the PWM, and created a new model to search TFBSs on the genome. We tested the model using transcription factors MAZ, PU.1 and ELF1 and compared the results to those using only the PWM. The results show that our model can predict Transcription factor binding regions more successfully. The relative simplicity of the model and capability of integrating other features make it a superior method

  5. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  6. Modulation of transcription factors by curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Shishir; Singh, Tulika; Chaturvedi, Madan M

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of turmeric that has been consumed as a dietary spice for ages. Turmeric is widely used in traditional Indian medicine to cure biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. Extensive investigation over the last five decades has indicated that curcumin reduces blood cholesterol, prevents low-density lipoprotein oxidation, inhibits platelet aggregation, suppresses thrombosis and myocardial infarction, suppresses symptoms associated with type II diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease, inhibits HIV replication, enhances wound healing, protects from liver injury, increases bile secretion, protects from cataract formation, and protects from pulmonary toxicity and fibrosis. Evidence indicates that the divergent effects of curcumin are dependent on its pleiotropic molecular effects. These include the regulation of signal transduction pathways and direct modulation of several enzymatic activities. Most of these signaling cascades lead to the activation of transcription factors. Curcumin has been found to modulate the activity of several key transcription factors and, in turn, the cellular expression profiles. Curcumin has been shown to elicit vital cellular responses such as cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation by activating a cascade of molecular events. In this chapter, we briefly review the effects of curcumin on transcription factors NF-KB, AP-1, Egr-1, STATs, PPAR-gamma, beta-catenin, nrf2, EpRE, p53, CBP, and androgen receptor (AR) and AR-related cofactors giving major emphasis to the molecular mechanisms of its action.

  7. Membrane-bound transcription factors: regulated release by RIP or RUP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, T; Rape, M; Jentsch, S

    2001-06-01

    Regulated nuclear transport of transcription factors from cytoplasmic pools is a major route by which eukaryotes control gene expression. Exquisite examples are transcription factors that are kept in a dormant state in the cytosol by membrane anchors; such proteins are released from membranes by proteolytic cleavage, which enables these transcription factors to enter the nucleus. Cleavage can be mediated either by regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) catalysed by specific membrane-bound proteases or by regulated ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent processing (RUP). In both cases processing can be controlled by cues that originate at or in the vicinity of the membrane.

  8. Transcription Factors in Heart: Promising Therapeutic Targets in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Kohli, Shrey; Ahuja, Suchit; Rani, Vibha

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is central to cell growth, differentiation and diseases. Context specific and signal dependent regulation of gene expression is achieved to a large part by transcription factors. Cardiac transcription factors regulate heart development and are also involved in stress regulation of the adult heart, which may lead to cardiac hypertrophy. Hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes is an outcome of the imbalance between prohypertrophic factors and anti-hypertrophic factors. Thi...

  9. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  10. Association analysis of KIT, MITF, and PAX3 variants with white markings in Spanish horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, S; Imsland, F; Valera, M; Molina, A; Solé, M; Andersson, L

    2017-06-01

    Several variants in the KIT, PAX3 and MITF genes have previously been associated with white markings in horses. In this study, we examined eight variants of these genes in 70 Menorca Purebred horses (PRMe, only black solid-coloured horses) and 70 Spanish Purebred horses (PRE, different coat colour patterns) that were scored for the extent of white markings. A maximum-likelihood chi-square test, logistic regression model and ridge regression analyses showed that a missense mutation (p.Arg682His) in KIT was associated with white facial markings (P horses. The relative contribution of this variant to white markings in PRMe horses was estimated at 47.6% (head) and 43.4% (total score). In PRE horses, this variant was also associated with hindlimb scores (P T intronic variant located 29.9 kb downstream from the transcription start site of the MITF gene was associated with less white markings on forelimbs (P horses, with a relative contribution of 63.9%, whereas in PRE horses this variant was associated with white facial markings (P horses, providing breeders with an opportunity to use genetic testing to aid in breeding for their desired level of white markings. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  11. Transcription factor cooperativity in early adipogenic hotspots and super-enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Rabiee, Atefeh; Nielsen, Ronni

    2014-01-01

    . Using a combination of advanced proteomics and genomics approaches, we identify ∼12,000 transcription factor hotspots (∼400 bp) in the early phase of adipogenesis, and we find evidence of both simultaneous and sequential binding of transcription factors at these regions. We demonstrate that hotspots...

  12. Fatty acid composition of Dioscorea dumetorum (Pax) varieties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the fatty acid compositions of edible and wild Dioscorea dumetorum (Pax) varieties harvested from farms and forests of Ikot Akpanabia village in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria in order to evaluate their nutritional and biochemical significance. Tubers were conveyed from farm ...

  13. A PTIP-PA1 subcomplex promotes transcription for IgH class switching independently from the associated MLL3/MLL4 methyltransferase complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starnes, Linda M; Su, Dan; Pikkupeura, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) diversifies antibodies for productive immune responses while maintaining stability of the B-cell genome. Transcription at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus targets CSR-associated DNA damage and is promoted by the BRCT domain-containing PTIP (Pax transacti...

  14. Regulation of cell proliferation by the E2F transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data generated in the past year have further emphasized the essential role for the E2F transcription factors in the regulation of cell proliferation. Genetic studies have shown that E2F activity is required for normal development in fruitflies, and the generation of E2F-1(-/-) mice h......Fs in the proteasomes. Novel target genes for the E2F transcription factors have been identified that link the E2Fs directly to the initiation of DNA replication.......Experimental data generated in the past year have further emphasized the essential role for the E2F transcription factors in the regulation of cell proliferation. Genetic studies have shown that E2F activity is required for normal development in fruitflies, and the generation of E2F-1(-/-) mice has...... demonstrated that individual members of the E2F transcription factor family are likely to have distinct roles in mammalian development and homeostasis. Additional mechanisms regulating the activity of the E2F transcription factors have been reported, including subcellular localization and proteolysis of the E2...

  15. Human melanocytes form a PAX3-expressing melanocyte cluster on Matrigel by the cell migration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunjung; Jin, Sun Hee; Han, Mi Hwa; Lee, Jinyoung; Ahn, Seyeon; Seong, Minjeong; Choi, Hyun; Han, Jiyeon; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong; Noh, Minsoo

    2014-10-01

    The interactions between human epidermal melanocytes and their cellular microenvironment are important in the regulation of human melanocyte functions or in their malignant transformation into melanoma. Although the basement membrane extracellular matrix (BM-ECM) is one of major melanocyte microenvironments, the effects of BM-ECM on the human melanocyte functions are not fully explained at a molecular level. This study was aimed to characterize the molecular and cellular interactions between normal human melanocytes (NHMs) and BM-ECM. We investigated cell culture models of normal human melanocytes or melanoma cells on three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel to understand the roles of the basement membrane microenvironment in human melanocyte functions. Melanogenesis and melanobast biomarker expression in both primary human melanocytes and melanoma cells on 3D Matrigel were evaluated. We found that NHMs migrated and formed reversible paired box 3 (PAX3) expressing cell clusters on three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel. The melanogenesis was significantly decreased in the PAX3 expressing cell cluster. The expression profile of PAX3, SOX10, and MITF in the melanocyte cluster on 3D Matrigel was similar to that of melanoblasts. Interestingly, PAX3 and SOX10 showed an inverse expression profile in NHMs, whereas the inverse expression pattern of PAX3 and SOX10 was disrupted in melanoma MNT1 and WM266-4 cells. The human melanocyte culture on 3D Matrigel provides an alternative model system to study functions of human melanoblasts. In addition, this system will contribute to the elucidation of PAX3-related tumorigenic mechanisms to understand human melanoma. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of Nampt expression by transcriptional coactivator NCOA6 in pancreatic β-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jin; Lee, Kyung Jin; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Kim, Geun Hyang; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear receptor coactivator 6 (NCOA6) is a transcriptional coactivator and crucial for insulin secretion and glucose metabolism in pancreatic β-cells. However, the regulatory mechanism of β-cell function by NCOA6 is largely unknown. In this study, we found that the transcript levels of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) were decreased in islets of NCOA6 +/− mice compared with NCOA6 +/+ mice. Moreover, NCOA6 overexpression increased the levels of Nampt transcripts in the mouse pancreatic β-cell line NIT-1. Promoter analyses showed that transcriptional activity of the Nampt promoter was stimulated by cooperation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and NCOA6. Additional studies using mutant promoters demonstrated that SREBP-1c activates Nampt promoter through the sterol regulatory element (SRE), but not through the E-box. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, NCOA6 was also shown to be directly recruited to the SRE region of the Nampt promoter. Furthermore, treatment with nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), a product of the Nampt reaction and a key NAD + intermediate, ameliorates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from NCOA6 +/− islets. These results suggest that NCOA6 stimulates insulin secretion, at least partially, by modulating Nampt expression in pancreatic β-cells. - Highlights: • Nampt transcription in β-cells is activated by SREBP-1c through the SRE element. • NCOA6 enhances the transcriptional activity of SREBP-1c in the Nampt promoter. • Defective insulin secretion of NCOA6 +/− islets is recovered by NMN treatment. • NCOA6 is reportedly the first coactivator involved in Nampt expression.

  17. The ectopic expression of Pax4 in the mouse pancreas converts progenitor cells into alpha and subsequently beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collombat, Patrick; Xu, Xiaobo; Ravassard, Philippe; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz; Dussaud, Sébastien; Billestrup, Nils; Madsen, Ole D; Serup, Palle; Heimberg, Harry; Mansouri, Ahmed

    2009-08-07

    We have previously reported that the loss of Arx and/or Pax4 gene activity leads to a shift in the fate of the different endocrine cell subtypes in the mouse pancreas, without affecting the total endocrine cell numbers. Here, we conditionally and ectopically express Pax4 using different cell-specific promoters and demonstrate that Pax4 forces endocrine precursor cells, as well as mature alpha cells, to adopt a beta cell destiny. This results in a glucagon deficiency that provokes a compensatory and continuous glucagon+ cell neogenesis requiring the re-expression of the proendocrine gene Ngn3. However, the newly formed alpha cells fail to correct the hypoglucagonemia since they subsequently acquire a beta cell phenotype upon Pax4 ectopic expression. Notably, this cycle of neogenesis and redifferentiation caused by ectopic expression of Pax4 in alpha cells is capable of restoring a functional beta cell mass and curing diabetes in animals that have been chemically depleted of beta cells.

  18. The evolution of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinerson, Charles I; Rabara, Roel C; Tripathi, Prateek; Shen, Qingxi J; Rushton, Paul J

    2015-02-27

    The availability of increasing numbers of sequenced genomes has necessitated a re-evaluation of the evolution of the WRKY transcription factor family. Modern day plants descended from a charophyte green alga that colonized the land between 430 and 470 million years ago. The first charophyte genome sequence from Klebsormidium flaccidum filled a gap in the available genome sequences in the plant kingdom between unicellular green algae that typically have 1-3 WRKY genes and mosses that contain 30-40. WRKY genes have been previously found in non-plant species but their occurrence has been difficult to explain. Only two WRKY genes are present in the Klebsormidium flaccidum genome and the presence of a Group IIb gene was unexpected because it had previously been thought that Group IIb WRKY genes first appeared in mosses. We found WRKY transcription factor genes outside of the plant lineage in some diplomonads, social amoebae, fungi incertae sedis, and amoebozoa. This patchy distribution suggests that lateral gene transfer is responsible. These lateral gene transfer events appear to pre-date the formation of the WRKY groups in flowering plants. Flowering plants contain proteins with domains typical for both resistance (R) proteins and WRKY transcription factors. R protein-WRKY genes have evolved numerous times in flowering plants, each type being restricted to specific flowering plant lineages. These chimeric proteins contain not only novel combinations of protein domains but also novel combinations and numbers of WRKY domains. Once formed, R protein WRKY genes may combine different components of signalling pathways that may either create new diversity in signalling or accelerate signalling by short circuiting signalling pathways. We propose that the evolution of WRKY transcription factors includes early lateral gene transfers to non-plant organisms and the occurrence of algal WRKY genes that have no counterparts in flowering plants. We propose two alternative hypotheses

  19. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  20. The formation of endoderm-derived taste sensory organs requires a Pax9-dependent expansion of embryonic taste bud progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Kist

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, taste buds develop in different regions of the oral cavity. Small epithelial protrusions form fungiform papillae on the ectoderm-derived dorsum of the tongue and contain one or few taste buds, while taste buds in the soft palate develop without distinct papilla structures. In contrast, the endoderm-derived circumvallate and foliate papillae located at the back of the tongue contain a large number of taste buds. These taste buds cluster in deep epithelial trenches, which are generated by intercalating a period of epithelial growth between initial placode formation and conversion of epithelial cells into sensory cells. How epithelial trench formation is genetically regulated during development is largely unknown. Here we show that Pax9 acts upstream of Pax1 and Sox9 in the expanding taste progenitor field of the mouse circumvallate papilla. While a reduced number of taste buds develop in a growth-retarded circumvallate papilla of Pax1 mutant mice, its development arrests completely in Pax9-deficient mice. In addition, the Pax9 mutant circumvallate papilla trenches lack expression of K8 and Prox1 in the taste bud progenitor cells, and gradually differentiate into an epidermal-like epithelium. We also demonstrate that taste placodes of the soft palate develop through a Pax9-dependent induction. Unexpectedly, Pax9 is dispensable for patterning, morphogenesis and maintenance of taste buds that develop in ectoderm-derived fungiform papillae. Collectively, our data reveal an endoderm-specific developmental program for the formation of taste buds and their associated papilla structures. In this pathway, Pax9 is essential to generate a pool of taste bud progenitors and to maintain their competence towards prosensory cell fate induction.

  1. The formation of endoderm-derived taste sensory organs requires a Pax9-dependent expansion of embryonic taste bud progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kist, Ralf; Watson, Michelle; Crosier, Moira; Robinson, Max; Fuchs, Jennifer; Reichelt, Julia; Peters, Heiko

    2014-10-01

    In mammals, taste buds develop in different regions of the oral cavity. Small epithelial protrusions form fungiform papillae on the ectoderm-derived dorsum of the tongue and contain one or few taste buds, while taste buds in the soft palate develop without distinct papilla structures. In contrast, the endoderm-derived circumvallate and foliate papillae located at the back of the tongue contain a large number of taste buds. These taste buds cluster in deep epithelial trenches, which are generated by intercalating a period of epithelial growth between initial placode formation and conversion of epithelial cells into sensory cells. How epithelial trench formation is genetically regulated during development is largely unknown. Here we show that Pax9 acts upstream of Pax1 and Sox9 in the expanding taste progenitor field of the mouse circumvallate papilla. While a reduced number of taste buds develop in a growth-retarded circumvallate papilla of Pax1 mutant mice, its development arrests completely in Pax9-deficient mice. In addition, the Pax9 mutant circumvallate papilla trenches lack expression of K8 and Prox1 in the taste bud progenitor cells, and gradually differentiate into an epidermal-like epithelium. We also demonstrate that taste placodes of the soft palate develop through a Pax9-dependent induction. Unexpectedly, Pax9 is dispensable for patterning, morphogenesis and maintenance of taste buds that develop in ectoderm-derived fungiform papillae. Collectively, our data reveal an endoderm-specific developmental program for the formation of taste buds and their associated papilla structures. In this pathway, Pax9 is essential to generate a pool of taste bud progenitors and to maintain their competence towards prosensory cell fate induction.

  2. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism.

  3. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism.

  4. Differential Expression of the Activator Protein 1 Transcription Factor Regulates Interleukin-1ß Induction of Interleukin 6 in the Developing Enterocyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Cahill

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is characterized by activation of transcription factors, nuclear factor kappa B and activator protein-1 and their downstream targets, the pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β and interleukin 6. Normal development of this response in the intestine is critical to survival of the human neonate and delays can cause the onset of devastating inflammatory diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis. Previous studies have addressed the role of nuclear factor kappa B in the development of the innate immune response in the enterocyte, however despite its central role in the control of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, little is known on the role of Activator Protein 1 in this response in the enterocyte. Here we show that the canonical Activator Protein 1 members, cJun and cFos and their upstream kinases JNK and p38 play an essential role in the regulation of interleukin 6 in the immature enterocyte. Our data supports a model whereby the cFos/cJun heterodimer and the more potent cJun homodimer downstream of JNK are replaced by less efficient JunD containing dimers, contributing to the decreased responsiveness to interleukin 1β and decreased interleukin 6 secretion observed in the mature enterocyte. The tissue specific expression of JunB in colonocytes and colon derived tissues together with its ability to repress Interleukin-1β induction of an Interleukin-6 gene reporter in the NCM-460 colonocyte suggests that induction of JunB containing dimers may offer an attractive therapeutic strategy for the control of IL-6 secretion during inflammatory episodes in this area of the intestine.

  5. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  6. The cellular transcription factor CREB corresponds to activating transcription factor 47 (ATF-47) and forms complexes with a group of polypeptides related to ATF-43.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, H C; Masson, N; Jones, N C; Lee, K A

    1990-01-01

    Promoter elements containing the sequence motif CGTCA are important for a variety of inducible responses at the transcriptional level. Multiple cellular factors specifically bind to these elements and are encoded by a multigene family. Among these factors, polypeptides termed activating transcription factor 43 (ATF-43) and ATF-47 have been purified from HeLa cells and a factor referred to as cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) has been isolated from PC12 cells and rat brain. We...

  7. The Onecut Transcription Factors Regulate Differentiation and Distribution of Dorsal Interneurons during Spinal Cord Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina U. Kabayiza

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, the dorsal spinal cord generates numerous interneuron populations eventually involved in motor circuits or in sensory networks that integrate and transmit sensory inputs from the periphery. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the specification of these multiple dorsal neuronal populations have been extensively characterized. In contrast, the factors that contribute to their diversification into smaller specialized subsets and those that control the specific distribution of each population in the developing spinal cord remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the Onecut transcription factors, namely Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-6 (HNF-6 (or OC-1, OC-2 and OC-3, regulate the diversification and the distribution of spinal dorsal interneuron (dINs. Onecut proteins are dynamically and differentially distributed in spinal dINs during differentiation and migration. Analyzes of mutant embryos devoid of Onecut factors in the developing spinal cord evidenced a requirement in Onecut proteins for proper production of a specific subset of dI5 interneurons. In addition, the distribution of dI3, dI5 and dI6 interneuron populations was altered. Hence, Onecut transcription factors control genetic programs that contribute to the regulation of spinal dIN diversification and distribution during embryonic development.

  8. Mutations in MITF and PAX3 Cause “Splashed White” and Other White Spotting Phenotypes in Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatter, Marlis; Brooks, Samantha A.; Burger, Dominik; Drögemüller, Cord; Gerber, Vincent; Henke, Diana; Janda, Jozef; Jude, Rony; Magdesian, K. Gary; Matthews, Jacqueline M.; Poncet, Pierre-André; Svansson, Vilhjálmur; Tozaki, Teruaki; Wilkinson-White, Lorna; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Rieder, Stefan; Leeb, Tosso

    2012-01-01

    During fetal development neural-crest-derived melanoblasts migrate across the entire body surface and differentiate into melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells. Alterations in this precisely regulated process can lead to white spotting patterns. White spotting patterns in horses are a complex trait with a large phenotypic variance ranging from minimal white markings up to completely white horses. The “splashed white” pattern is primarily characterized by an extremely large blaze, often accompanied by extended white markings at the distal limbs and blue eyes. Some, but not all, splashed white horses are deaf. We analyzed a Quarter Horse family segregating for the splashed white coat color. Genome-wide linkage analysis in 31 horses gave a positive LOD score of 1.6 in a region on chromosome 6 containing the PAX3 gene. However, the linkage data were not in agreement with a monogenic inheritance of a single fully penetrant mutation. We sequenced the PAX3 gene and identified a missense mutation in some, but not all, splashed white Quarter Horses. Genome-wide association analysis indicated a potential second signal near MITF. We therefore sequenced the MITF gene and found a 10 bp insertion in the melanocyte-specific promoter. The MITF promoter variant was present in some splashed white Quarter Horses from the studied family, but also in splashed white horses from other horse breeds. Finally, we identified two additional non-synonymous mutations in the MITF gene in unrelated horses with white spotting phenotypes. Thus, several independent mutations in MITF and PAX3 together with known variants in the EDNRB and KIT genes explain a large proportion of horses with the more extreme white spotting phenotypes. PMID:22511888

  9. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism. PMID:27081571

  10. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. Identification of a conserved archaeal RNA polymerase subunit contacted by the basal transcription factor TFB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, C P; Jackson, S P; Bell, S D

    2001-12-14

    Archaea possess two general transcription factors that are required to recruit RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoters in vitro. These are TBP, the TATA-box-binding protein and TFB, the archaeal homologue of TFIIB. Thus, the archaeal and eucaryal transcription machineries are fundamentally related. In both RNAP II and archaeal transcription systems, direct contacts between TFB/TFIIB and the RNAP have been demonstrated to mediate recruitment of the polymerase to the promoter. However the subunit(s) directly contacted by these factors has not been identified. Using systematic yeast two-hybrid and biochemical analyses we have identified an interaction between the N-terminal domain of TFB and an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoK. Intriguingly, homologues of RpoK are found in all three nuclear RNA polymerases (Rpb6) and also in the bacterial RNA polymerase (omega-subunit).

  12. Building executable biological pathway models automatically from BioPAX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Timo; Feenstra, Anton; Groth, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The amount of biological data exposed in semantic formats is steadily increasing. In particular, pathway information (a model of how molecules interact within a cell) from databases such as KEGG and WikiPathways are available in a standard RDF-based format BioPAX. However, these models are

  13. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahijdak, W.M.; Yang, Chin-Rang; Zuckerman, J.S.; Meyers, M.; Boothman, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs

  14. Association of PAX5 Expression with Clinical Outcome in Patients with TaT1 Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babjuk, M.; Soukup, V.; Mareš, J.; Dušková, J.; Pecen, Ladislav; Pešl, M.; Pavlík, I.; Dvořáček, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 4 (2006), s. 756-761 ISSN 0090-4295 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8095; GA MZd NR8934 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : bladder carcinoma * PAX5 expression Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.130, year: 2006

  15. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Identification of novel transcription factors regulating secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua eCassan-Wang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of lignin in secondary cell walls (SCW is a major factor preventing hydrolytic enzymes from gaining access to cellulose, thereby limiting the saccharification potential of plant biomass. To understand how lignification is regulated is a prerequisite for selecting plant biomass better adapted to bioethanol production. Because transcriptional regulation is a major mechanism controlling the expression of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis, our aim was to identify novel transcription factors dictating lignin profiles in the model plant Arabidopsis. To this end, we have developed a post-genomic approach by combining four independent in-house SCW-related transcriptome datasets obtained from (i the fiber cell wall-deficient wat1 Arabidopsis mutant, (ii Arabidopsis lines over-expressing either the master regulatory activator EgMYB2 or (iii the repressor EgMYB1 and finally (iv Arabidopsis orthologs of Eucalyptus xylem-expressed genes. This allowed us to identify 502 up- or down-regulated transcription factors. We preferentially selected those present in more than one dataset and further analyzed their in silico expression patterns as an additional selection criteria. This selection process led to 80 candidates. Notably, 16 of them were already proven to regulate SCW formation, thereby validating the overall strategy. Then, we phenotyped 43 corresponding mutant lines focusing on histological observations of xylem and interfascicular fibers. This phenotypic screen revealed six mutant lines exhibiting altered lignification patterns. Two of them (blh6 and a zinc finger transcription factor presented hypolignified SCW. Three others (myb52, myb-like TF, hb5 showed hyperlignified SCW whereas the last one (hb15 showed ectopic lignification. In addition, our meta-analyses highlighted a reservoir of new potential regulators adding to the gene network regulating SCW but also opening new avenues to ultimately improve SCW composition for biofuel

  17. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  18. Breaking the mold: transcription factors in the anucleate platelet and platelet-derived microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Lannan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleate blood cells derived from megakaryocytes. In addition to their pivotal roles in hemostasis, platelets are the smallest, yet most abundant, immune cell and regulate inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Although platelets lack DNA, and thus no functional transcriptional activities, they are nonetheless rich sources of RNAs, possess an intact spliceosome, and are thus capable of synthesizing proteins. Previously, it was thought that platelet RNAs and translational machinery were remnants from the megakaryocyte. We now know that the initial description of platelets as cellular fragments is an antiquated notion, as mounting evidence suggests otherwise. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that platelet transcription factors are not vestigial remnants from megakaryoctes, but have important, if only partly understood functions. Proteins play multiple cellular roles to minimize energy expenditure for maximum cellular function; thus, the same can be expected for transcription factors. In fact, numerous transcription factors have non-genomic roles, both in platelets and in nucleated cells. Our lab and others have discovered the presence and nongenomic roles of transcription factors in platelets, such as the nuclear factor kappa β (NFκB family of proteins and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. In addition to numerous roles in regulating platelet activation, functional transcription factors can be transferred to vascular and immune cells through platelet microparticles. This method of transcellular delivery of key immune molecules may be a vital mechanism by which platelet transcription factors regulate inflammation and immunity. At the very least, platelets are an ideal model cell to dissect out the nongenomic roles of transcription factors in nucleated cells. There is abundant evidence to suggest that transcription factors in platelets play key roles in regulating inflammatory and

  19. O-GlcNAc inhibits interaction between Sp1 and Elf-1 transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Kihong; Chang, Hyo-Ihl

    2009-01-01

    The novel protein modification, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), plays an important role in various aspects of cell regulation. Although most of nuclear transcription regulatory factors are modified by O-GlcNAc, O-GlcNAc effects on transcription remain largely undefined yet. In this study, we show that O-GlcNAc inhibits a physical interaction between Sp1 and Elf-1 transcription factors, and negatively regulates transcription of placenta and embryonic expression oncofetal protein gene (Pem). These findings suggest that O-GlcNAc inhibits Sp1-mediated gene transcription possibly by interrupting Sp1 interaction with its cooperative factor.

  20. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... regions with function-related, short sequence motifs and molecular recognition features with structural propensities. This review focuses on molecular aspects of TFs, which represent paradigms of ID-related features. Through specific examples, we review how the ID-associated flexibility of TFs enables....... It is furthermore emphasized how classic biochemical concepts like allostery, conformational selection, induced fit, and feedback regulation are undergoing a revival with the appreciation of ID. The review also describes the most recent advances based on computational simulations of ID-based interaction mechanisms...

  1. The transcription fidelity factor GreA impedes DNA break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Priya; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Halliday, Jennifer A; Liu, Jingjing; Núñez, María Angélica Bravo; Golding, Ido; Rosenberg, Susan M; Herman, Christophe

    2017-10-12

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks and must function even on actively transcribed DNA. Because break repair prevents chromosome loss, the completion of repair is expected to outweigh the transcription of broken templates. However, the interplay between DNA break repair and transcription processivity is unclear. Here we show that the transcription factor GreA inhibits break repair in Escherichia coli. GreA restarts backtracked RNA polymerase and hence promotes transcription fidelity. We report that removal of GreA results in markedly enhanced break repair via the classic RecBCD-RecA pathway. Using a deep-sequencing method to measure chromosomal exonucleolytic degradation, we demonstrate that the absence of GreA limits RecBCD-mediated resection. Our findings suggest that increased RNA polymerase backtracking promotes break repair by instigating RecA loading by RecBCD, without the influence of canonical Chi signals. The idea that backtracked RNA polymerase can stimulate recombination presents a DNA transaction conundrum: a transcription fidelity factor that compromises genomic integrity.

  2. Specificity versus redundancy in the RAP2.4 transcription factor family of Arabidopsis thaliana: transcriptional regulation of genes for chloroplast peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnik, Radoslaw; Bulcha, Jote Tafese; Reifschneider, Elena; Ellersiek, Ulrike; Baier, Margarete

    2017-08-23

    The Arabidopsis ERFIb / RAP2.4 transcription factor family consists of eight members with highly conserved DNA binding domains. Selected members have been characterized individually, but a systematic comparison is pending. The redox-sensitive transcription factor RAP2.4a mediates chloroplast-to-nucleus redox signaling and controls induction of the three most prominent chloroplast peroxidases, namely 2-Cys peroxiredoxin A (2CPA) and thylakoid- and stromal ascorbate peroxidase (tAPx and sAPx). To test the specificity and redundancy of RAP2.4 transcription factors in the regulation of genes for chloroplast peroxidases, we compared the DNA-binding sites of the transcription factors in tertiary structure models, analyzed transcription factor and target gene regulation by qRT-PCR in RAP2.4, 2-Cys peroxiredoxin and ascorbate peroxidase T-DNA insertion lines and RAP2.4 overexpressing lines of Arabidopsis thaliana and performed promoter binding studies. All RAP2.4 proteins bound the tAPx promoter, but only the four RAP2.4 proteins with identical DNA contact sites, namely RAP2.4a, RAP2.4b, RAP2.4d and RAP2.4h, interacted stably with the redox-sensitive part of the 2CPA promoter. Gene expression analysis in RAP2.4 knockout lines revealed that RAP2.4a is the only one supporting 2CPA and chloroplast APx expression. Rap2.4h binds to the same promoter region as Rap2.4a and antagonizes 2CPA expression. Like the other six RAP2.4 proteins, Rap2.4 h promotes APx mRNA accumulation. Chloroplast ROS signals induced RAP2.4b and RAP2.4d expression, but these two transcription factor genes are (in contrast to RAP2.4a) insensitive to low 2CP availability, and their expression decreased in APx knockout lines. RAP2.4e and RAP2.4f gradually responded to chloroplast APx availability and activated specifically APx expression. These transcription factors bound, like RAP2.4c and RAP2.4g, the tAPx promoter, but hardly the 2CPA promoter. The RAP2.4 transcription factors form an environmentally and

  3. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB activates transcription via two distinct genetic elements of the human glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose-6-phosphatase to glucose, the final step in the gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic pathways. Expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is induced by glucocorticoids and elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. The effect of cAMP in regulating glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription was corroborated by the identification of two genetic motifs CRE1 and CRE2 in the human and murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene promoter that resemble cAMP response elements (CRE. Results The cAMP response element is a point of convergence for many extracellular and intracellular signals, including cAMP, calcium, and neurotrophins. The major CRE binding protein CREB, a member of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP family of transcription factors, requires phosphorylation to become a biologically active transcriptional activator. Since unphosphorylated CREB is transcriptionally silent simple overexpression studies cannot be performed to test the biological role of CRE-like sequences of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The use of a constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein allowed us to uncouple the investigation of target genes of CREB from the variety of signaling pathways that lead to an activation of CREB. Here, we show that this constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein strikingly enhanced reporter gene transcription mediated by either CRE1 or CRE2 derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Likewise, reporter gene transcription was enhanced following expression of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in the nucleus of transfected cells. In contrast, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2, known to compete with CREB for binding to the canonical CRE sequence 5'-TGACGTCA-3', did not transactivate reporter genes containing CRE1, CRE2, or both CREs derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Conclusions Using a constitutively active CREB2

  4. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, Pedro; Gaj, Thomas; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Barbas, Carlos F; Goncalves, Joao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  5. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Perdigão

    Full Text Available The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula under salt stress identified a novel CBF transcription factor MtCBF4 that plays an important role in abiotic stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salt stress hinders the growth of plants and reduces crop production worldwide. However, different plant species might possess different adaptive mechanisms to mitigate salt stress. We conducted a detailed pathway analysis of transcriptional dynamics in the roots of Medicago truncatula seedlings under salt stress and selected a transcription factor gene, MtCBF4, for experimental validation. Results A microarray experiment was conducted using root samples collected 6, 24, and 48 h after application of 180 mM NaCl. Analysis of 11 statistically significant expression profiles revealed different behaviors between primary and secondary metabolism pathways in response to external stress. Secondary metabolism that helps to maintain osmotic balance was induced. One of the highly induced transcription factor genes was successfully cloned, and was named MtCBF4. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MtCBF4, which belongs to the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family, is a novel member of the CBF transcription factor in M. truncatula. MtCBF4 is shown to be a nuclear-localized protein. Expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula was induced by most of the abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, cold, and abscisic acid, suggesting crosstalk between these abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis over-expressing MtCBF4 enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress, and activated expression of downstream genes that contain DRE elements. Over-expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula also enhanced salt tolerance and induced expression level of corresponding downstream genes. Conclusion Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis revealed complex mechanisms exist in plants in response to salt stress. The novel transcription factor gene MtCBF4 identified here played an important role in response to abiotic stresses, indicating that it might be a good candidate gene for genetic improvement to produce stress-tolerant plants.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula under salt stress identified a novel CBF transcription factor MtCBF4 that plays an important role in abiotic stress responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Salt stress hinders the growth of plants and reduces crop production worldwide. However, different plant species might possess different adaptive mechanisms to mitigate salt stress. We conducted a detailed pathway analysis of transcriptional dynamics in the roots of Medicago truncatula seedlings under salt stress and selected a transcription factor gene, MtCBF4, for experimental validation. Results A microarray experiment was conducted using root samples collected 6, 24, and 48 h after application of 180 mM NaCl. Analysis of 11 statistically significant expression profiles revealed different behaviors between primary and secondary metabolism pathways in response to external stress. Secondary metabolism that helps to maintain osmotic balance was induced. One of the highly induced transcription factor genes was successfully cloned, and was named MtCBF4. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MtCBF4, which belongs to the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family, is a novel member of the CBF transcription factor in M. truncatula. MtCBF4 is shown to be a nuclear-localized protein. Expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula was induced by most of the abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, cold, and abscisic acid, suggesting crosstalk between these abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis over-expressing MtCBF4 enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress, and activated expression of downstream genes that contain DRE elements. Over-expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula also enhanced salt tolerance and induced expression level of corresponding downstream genes. Conclusion Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis revealed complex mechanisms exist in plants in response to salt stress. The novel transcription factor gene MtCBF4 identified here played an important role in response to abiotic stresses, indicating that it might be a good candidate gene for genetic improvement to produce stress-tolerant plants. PMID:21718548

  8. A novel mutation in the PAX3 gene causes Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment (HI) is one of the most frequent congenital defects, with a prevalence of 1 in 500 among neonates. Although there are over 400 syndromes involving HI, most cases of HI are nonsyndromic (70%), 20% of which follow autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Waardenburg syndrome (WS) ranks first among autosomal dominant syndromic forms of HI. WS is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, pigmentation abnormalities of hair and skin and hypoplastic blue eyes or heterochromia iridis. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4. WS1 is diagnosed by the presence of dystopia canthorum and PAX3 is the only gene involved. This study aims to determine the pathogenic mutation in a large Iranian pedigree affected with WS1 in order to further confirm the clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a family segregating HI was ascertained in a genetic counseling center. Upon clinical inspection, white forelock, dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys, characteristic of WS1 were evident. In order to clarify the genetic etiology and confirm the clinical data, primers were designed to amplify exons and exon-intron boundaries of the responsible gene, PAX3 with 10 exons, followed by the Sanger DNA sequencing method. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed a novel mutation in PAX3 (c.1024_1040 del AGCACGATTCCTTCCAA). Our data provide genotype-phenotype correlation for the mutation in PAX3 and WS1 in the studied family, with implications for genetic counseling, which necessitates detailed clinical inspection of HI patients to distinguish syndromic HI from the more common non-syndromic cases. Our results reveal the value of phenotype-directed genetic analysis and could further expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Germinal mosaicism of PAX3 mutation caused Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zong, Ling; Jiang, Hongyan

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome mutations are most often recurrent or de novo. The rate of familial recurrence is low and families with several affected children are extremely rare. In this study, we aimed to clarify the underlying hereditary cause of Waardenburg syndrome type I in two siblings in a Chinese family, with a mother affected by prelingual mild hearing loss and a father who was negative for clinical symptoms of Waardenburg syndrome and had a normal hearing threshold. Complete characteristic features of the family members were recorded and genetic sequencing and parent-child relationship analyses were performed. The two probands were found to share double mutations in the PAX3/GJB2 genes that caused concurrent hearing loss in Waardenburg syndrome type I. Their mother carried the GJB2 c.109G > A homozygous mutation; however, neither the novel PAX3 c.592delG mutation, nor the Waardenburg syndrome phenotype, was observed in either parent. These previously unreported digenic mutations in PAX3/GJB2 resulted in deafness associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in this family. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing germinal mosaicism in Waardenburg syndrome. This concept is important because it complicates genetic counseling of this family regarding the risk of recurrence of the mutations in subsequent pregnancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcription elongation factors are involved in programming hormone production in pituitary neuroendocrine GH4C1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2010-05-05

    Transcription elongation of many eukaryotic genes is regulated. Two negative transcription elongation factors, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) and negative elongation factor (NELF) are known to stall collaboratively RNA polymerase II promoter proximally. We discovered that DSIF and NELF are linked to hormone expression in rat pituitary GH4C1 cells. When NELF-E, a subunit of NELF or Spt5, a subunit of DSIF was stably knocked-down, prolactin (PRL) expression was increased both at the mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, stable knock-down of only Spt5 abolished growth hormone (GH) expression. Transient NELF-E knock-down increased coincidentally PRL expression and enhanced transcription of a PRL-promoter reporter gene. However, no direct interaction of NELF with the PRL gene could be demonstrated by chromatin immuno-precipitation. Thus, NELF suppressed PRL promoter activity indirectly. In conclusion, transcription regulation by NELF and DSIF is continuously involved in the control of hormone production and may contribute to neuroendocrine cell differentiation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma recruits the positive transcription elongation factor b complex to activate transcription and promote adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iankova, Irena; Petersen, Rasmus K; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, facilitating transcriptional elongation. In addition to its participation in general transcription, P-TEFb is recruited to specific promoters by some transcription factors such as c......-Myc or MyoD. The P-TEFb complex is composed of a cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk9) subunit and a regulatory partner (cyclin T1, cyclin T2, or cyclin K). Because cdk9 has been shown to participate in differentiation processes, such as muscle cell differentiation, we studied a possible role of cdk9...... with and phosphorylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), which is the master regulator of this process, on the promoter of PPARgamma target genes. PPARgamma-cdk9 interaction results in increased transcriptional activity of PPARgamma and therefore increased adipogenesis....

  12. Determination of specificity influencing residues for key transcription factor families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Ronak Y.; Garde, Christian; Stormo, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are major modulators of transcription and subsequent cellular processes. The binding of TFs to specific regulatory elements is governed by their specificity. Considering the gap between known TFs sequence and specificity, specificity prediction frameworks are highly de...

  13. A transcript cleavage factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis important for its survival.

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    Arnab China

    Full Text Available After initiation of transcription, a number of proteins participate during elongation and termination modifying the properties of the RNA polymerase (RNAP. Gre factors are one such group conserved across bacteria. They regulate transcription by projecting their N-terminal coiled-coil domain into the active center of RNAP through the secondary channel and stimulating hydrolysis of the newly synthesized RNA in backtracked elongation complexes. Rv1080c is a putative gre factor (MtbGre in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protein enhanced the efficiency of promoter clearance by lowering abortive transcription and also rescued arrested and paused elongation complexes on the GC rich mycobacterial template. Although MtbGre is similar in domain organization and shares key residues for catalysis and RNAP interaction with the Gre factors of Escherichia coli, it could not complement an E. coli gre deficient strain. Moreover, MtbGre failed to rescue E. coli RNAP stalled elongation complexes, indicating the importance of specific protein-protein interactions for transcript cleavage. Decrease in the level of MtbGre reduced the bacterial survival by several fold indicating its essential role in mycobacteria. Another Gre homolog, Rv3788 was not functional in transcript cleavage activity indicating that a single Gre is sufficient for efficient transcription of the M. tuberculosis genome.

  14. Identification of SNPs involved in regulating a novel alternative transcript of P450 CYP6ER1 in the brown planthopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi-Kun; Pang, Rui; Dong, Yi; Sun, Zhong-Xiang; Ling, Yan; Zhang, Wen-Qing

    2017-04-29

    Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic resistance is one of the major mechanisms involved in insecticide resistance. Although the up-regulation of cytochrome P450 plays a vital role in insecticide metabolism, the molecular basis for the transcriptional regulation of cytochrome P450 remains largely unknown. The P450 gene CYP6ER1, has been reported to confer imidacloprid resistance to the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens. Here, we identified a novel alternative transcript of CYP6ER1 (transcript A2) that had different expression patterns between resistant and susceptible populations, and was more stable after insecticide induction. The promoter of this transcript was sequenced and multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in individuals from susceptible and resistant field-collected populations. Resistant alleles of four SNPs were found to significantly enhance the promoter activity of the CYP6ER1 transcript A2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) revealed that these SNPs might regulate the binding of transcription factors to the promoter. Our findings provide novel evidence regarding the transcriptional regulation of a metabolic resistance-related gene and may be useful to understand the resistance mechanism of N. lugens in the field. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Overexpression of a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) bZIP transcription factor gene, TabZIP6, decreased the freezing tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings by down-regulating the expression of CBFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wangting; Yang, Yaling; Wang, Weiwei; Guo, Guangyan; Liu, Wei; Bi, Caili

    2018-03-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) proteins play important roles against abiotic stress in plants, including cold stress. However, most bZIPs involved in plant freezing tolerance are positive regulators. Only a few bZIPs function negatively in cold stress response. In this study, TabZIP6, a Group C bZIP transcription factor gene from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), was cloned and characterized. The transcript of TabZIP6 was strongly induced by cold treatment (4 °C). TabZIP6 is a nuclear-localized protein with transcriptional activation activity. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TabZIP6 showed decreased tolerance to freezing stress. Microarray as well as quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that CBFs and some key COR genes, including COR47 and COR15B, were down-regulated by cold treatment in TabZIP6-overexpressing Arabidopsis lines. TabZIP6 was capable of binding to the G-box motif and the CBF1 and CBF3 promoters in yeast cells. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that TabZIP6, as well as the other two Group S bZIP proteins involved in cold stress tolerance in wheat, Wlip19 and TaOBF1, can form homodimers by themselves and heterodimers with each other. These results suggest that TabZIP6 may function negatively in the cold stress response by binding to the promoters of CBFs, and thereby decreasing the expression of downstream COR genes in TabZIP6-overexpressing Arabidopsis seedlings. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) suppresses satellite cell self-renewal through inversely modulating Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yuji; Mishra, Vivek; Hindi, Sajedah M; Kuang, Shihuan; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-12-06

    Satellite cell self-renewal is an essential process to maintaining the robustness of skeletal muscle regenerative capacity. However, extrinsic factors that regulate self-renewal of satellite cells are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that TWEAK cytokine reduces the proportion of Pax7(+)/MyoD(-) cells (an index of self-renewal) on myofiber explants and represses multiple components of Notch signaling in satellite cell cultures. The number of Pax7(+) cells is significantly increased in skeletal muscle of TWEAK knock-out (KO) mice compared with wild-type in response to injury. Furthermore, Notch signaling is significantly elevated in cultured satellite cells and in regenerating myofibers of TWEAK-KO mice. Forced activation of Notch signaling through overexpression of the Notch1 intracellular domain (N1ICD) rescued the TWEAK-mediated inhibition of satellite cell self-renewal. TWEAK also activates the NF-κB transcription factor in satellite cells and inhibition of NF-κB significantly improved the number of Pax7(+) cells in TWEAK-treated cultures. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that a reciprocal interaction between NF-κB and Notch signaling governs the inhibitory effect of TWEAK on satellite cell self-renewal. Collectively, our study demonstrates that TWEAK suppresses satellite cell self-renewal through activating NF-κB and repressing Notch signaling.

  17. Regulation of expression of two LY-6 family genes by intron retention and transcription induced chimerism

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    Mallya Meera

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of the expression of particular genes can rely on mechanisms that are different from classical transcriptional and translational control. The LY6G5B and LY6G6D genes encode LY-6 domain proteins, whose expression seems to be regulated in an original fashion, consisting of an intron retention event which generates, through an early premature stop codon, a non-coding transcript, preventing expression in most cell lines and tissues. Results The MHC LY-6 non-coding transcripts have shown to be stable and very abundant in the cell, and not subject to Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. This retention event appears not to be solely dependent on intron features, because in the case of LY6G5B, when the intron is inserted in the artificial context of a luciferase expression plasmid, it is fully spliced but strongly stabilises the resulting luciferase transcript. In addition, by quantitative PCR we found that the retained and spliced forms are differentially expressed in tissues indicating an active regulation of the non-coding transcript. EST database analysis revealed that these genes have an alternative expression pathway with the formation of Transcription Induced Chimeras (TIC. This data was confirmed by RT-PCR, revealing the presence of different transcripts that would encode the chimeric proteins CSNKβ-LY6G5B and G6F-LY6G6D, in which the LY-6 domain would join to a kinase domain and an Ig-like domain, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, the LY6G5B and LY6G6D intron-retained transcripts are not subjected to NMD and are more abundant than the properly spliced forms. In addition, these genes form chimeric transcripts with their neighbouring same orientation 5' genes. Of interest is the fact that the 5' genes (CSNKβ or G6F undergo differential splicing only in the context of the chimera (CSNKβ-LY6G5B or G6F-LY6G6C and not on their own.

  18. Capparidaceae: Stuebelia Pax, sinónimo de Belencita Karsten

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    Dugand Armando

    1944-03-01

    Full Text Available El estudio de algunas Caparidáceas de Colombia me incito recientemente a examinar críticamente el género Relencita Karsten, descrito con una sola especie (B. Hagenii Karst. que crece en la costa del Mar Caribe, tanto en Venezuela como en Colombia. En la última recensión de las Caparidáceas, Pax y Hoffmann (en EngI. Pflanzenf. ed. 2, 17-b: 165 y 184. 1936 separan este género de Stuebelia Pax suponiendo que Stuebelia tiene ovario unilocular y Belencita bilocular.  Con todo, ladescripción original de Belencita Haqenii y del género Belencita así como la excelente ilustración que de esta planta ofrece Karsten, me han convencido de que se trata de la misma planta descrita en 1763 por Jacquin con el nombre Capparis nemorosa y que yo transferí en 1935 al género stuebelia. Por lo tanto se necesita hacer un cambio nomenclatural adscribiendo el epíteto nemorosa (1760-1763 al género Belencita (1857 descrito antes que Stuebelia (1887-1888.

  19. Inhibition of factor-dependent transcription termination in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inhibition of factor-dependent transcription termination in Escherichia coli might relieve xenogene silencing by abrogating. H-NS-DNA interactions in vivo. DEEPTI CHANDRAPRAKASH and ASWIN SAI NARAIN SESHASAYEE. Chromatin immunoprecipitation. MG1655 hns::3xFLAG cells were grown in liquid LB me-.

  20. Does Metformin affect ER, PR, IGF-1R, β-catenin and PAX-2 expression in women with diabetes mellitus and endometrial cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowska, Anna; Pawałowska, Monika; Filas, Violetta; Korski, Konstanty; Gryboś, Marian; Sajdak, Stefan; Olejek, Anita; Bednarek, Wiesława; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Lubin, Jolanta; Markowska, Janina

    2013-12-05

    Diabetes mellitus, as a risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), causes an increase in insulin and IGF-1 concentrations in the blood serum. The increase in insulin and IGF-1 are considered mitogenic factors contributory to cancer development. Studies suggest that metformin has preventive activity, decreasing mortality and the risk of neoplasms. Since estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR) and IGF-1 (IGF-1R) receptor expression and β-catenin and PAX-2 mutations are significant in the development of endometrial cancer, it was decided to study these factors in patients with endometrial cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), and to establish the effects of metformin on their expression. The expression of ER, PR, IGF-1R, β-catenin and PAX-2 have been immunohistochemically investigated in 86 type I endometrial cancer specimens. Patients were grouped according to the presence of DM2 and the type of hypoglycemic treatment administered. Comparing EC patients with DM2 and normal glycemic status, we found increased IGF-1R expression in women with DM2. A decrease in ER expression was noted in women with EC and DM2 receiving metformin as compared to women treated with insulin (p = 0.004). There was no statistically significant difference in PR, IGF-1R, β-catenin and PAX-2 expression among women receiving metformin and other hypoglycemic treatment. Although epidemiological studies suggest the beneficial role of metformin in many human cancers, there are still few studies confirming its favorable effect on endometrial cancer. Decreased ER expression in patients receiving metformin needs further research to allow evaluation of its clinical significance.

  1. Gene Expression Data from the Moon Jelly, Aurelia, Provide Insights into the Evolution of the Combinatorial Code Controlling Animal Sense Organ Development.

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    Nagayasu Nakanishi

    Full Text Available In Bilateria, Pax6, Six, Eya and Dach families of transcription factors underlie the development and evolution of morphologically and phyletically distinct eyes, including the compound eyes in Drosophila and the camera-type eyes in vertebrates, indicating that bilaterian eyes evolved under the strong influence of ancestral developmental gene regulation. However the conservation in eye developmental genetics deeper in the Eumetazoa, and the origin of the conserved gene regulatory apparatus controlling eye development remain unclear due to limited comparative developmental data from Cnidaria. Here we show in the eye-bearing scyphozoan cnidarian Aurelia that the ectodermal photosensory domain of the developing medusa sensory structure known as the rhopalium expresses sine oculis (so/six1/2 and eyes absent/eya, but not optix/six3/6 or pax (A&B. In addition, the so and eya co-expression domain encompasses the region of active cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and mechanoreceptor development in rhopalia. Consistent with the role of so and eya in rhopalial development, developmental transcriptome data across Aurelia life cycle stages show upregulation of so and eya, but not optix or pax (A&B, during medusa formation. Moreover, pax6 and dach are absent in the Aurelia genome, and thus are not required for eye development in Aurelia. Our data are consistent with so and eya, but not optix, pax or dach, having conserved functions in sensory structure specification across Eumetazoa. The lability of developmental components including Pax genes relative to so-eya is consistent with a model of sense organ development and evolution that involved the lineage specific modification of a combinatorial code that specifies animal sense organs.

  2. Investigation of PAX3/7-FKHR fusion genes and IGF2 gene expression in rhabdomyosarcoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Robson Ramos; Oliveira, Indhira Dias; Caran, Eliana Maria Monteiro; Alves, Maria Teresa de Seixas; Abib, Simone; Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the prevalence of the PAX3/7-FKHR fusion genes and quantify the IGF2 gene expression in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) samples. Soft tissue sarcomas account 5% of childhood cancers and 50% of them are RMS. Morphological evaluation of pediatric RMS has defined two histological subtypes, embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS). Chromosomal analyses have demonstrated two translocations associated with ARMS, resulting in the PAX3/7-FKHR rearrangements. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is extremely useful in the diagnosis of ARMS positive for these rearrangements. Additionally, several studies have shown a significant involvement of IGF pathway in the pathogenesis of RMS. The presence of PAX3/7-FKHR gene fusions was studied in 25 RMS samples from patients attending the IOP-GRAACC/UNIFESP and three RMS cell lines by RT-PCR. IGF2 gene expression was quantified by qPCR and related with clinic pathological parameters. Of the 25 samples, nine (36%) were ARMS and 16 (64%) were ERMS. PAX3/7-FKHR gene fusions expression was detected in 56% of ARMS tumor samples. IGF2 overexpression was observed in 80% of samples and could indicate an important role of this pathway in RMS biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of the CD56 promoter and its association with proliferation, anti-apoptosis and clinical factors in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Tina; Knudsen, Lene M; Dahl, Inger Marie S

    2009-01-01

    the regulation of the CD56 promoter in relation to typical clinical factors. We used qPCR and FACS to measure the expression levels of CD56, and potential regulatory factors in patients with MM and related these with MM progression/prognosis. The transcription factors BTBD3, Pax5, RUNX1 and MMSET were positively...... associated with CD56 expression, as was CYCLIN D1, which is involved in disease progression, anti-apoptosis and proliferation. RUNX1 was negatively associated with the survival of stem-cell transplanted patients. Our findings propose four potential activators of the CD56 promoter and for CD56 to be involved...

  4. MGMT DNA repair gene promoter/enhancer haplotypes alter transcription factor binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meixiang; Cross, Courtney E; Speidel, Jordan T; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2016-10-01

    The O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) protein removes O 6 -alkyl-guanine adducts from DNA. MGMT expression can thus alter the sensitivity of cells and tissues to environmental and chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. Previously, we defined the haplotype structure encompassing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MGMT promoter/enhancer (P/E) region and found that haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, alter MGMT promoter activity. The exact mechanism(s) by which these haplotypes exert their effect on MGMT promoter activity is currently unknown, but we noted that many of the SNPs comprising the MGMT P/E haplotypes are located within or in close proximity to putative transcription factor binding sites. Thus, these haplotypes could potentially affect transcription factor binding and, subsequently, alter MGMT promoter activity. In this study, we test the hypothesis that MGMT P/E haplotypes affect MGMT promoter activity by altering transcription factor (TF) binding to the P/E region. We used a promoter binding TF profiling array and a reporter assay to evaluate the effect of different P/E haplotypes on TF binding and MGMT expression, respectively. Our data revealed a significant difference in TF binding profiles between the different haplotypes evaluated. We identified TFs that consistently showed significant haplotype-dependent binding alterations (p ≤ 0.01) and revealed their role in regulating MGMT expression using siRNAs and a dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The data generated support our hypothesis that promoter haplotypes alter the binding of TFs to the MGMT P/E and, subsequently, affect their regulatory function on MGMT promoter activity and expression level.

  5. Genetic Variation among Major Human Geographic Groups Supports a Peculiar Evolutionary Trend in PAX9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa R.; Meyer, Diogo; Pereira, Tiago V.; Mazières, Stéphane; Elion, Jacques; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Zago, Marco A.; Silva, Wilson A.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2011-01-01

    A total of 172 persons from nine South Amerindian, three African and one Eskimo populations were studied in relation to the Paired box gene 9 (PAX9) exon 3 (138 base pairs) as well as its 5′and 3′flanking intronic segments (232 bp and 220 bp, respectively) and integrated with the information available for the same genetic region from individuals of different geographical origins. Nine mutations were scored in exon 3 and six in its flanking regions; four of them are new South American tribe-specific singletons. Exon3 nucleotide diversity is several orders of magnitude higher than its intronic regions. Additionally, a set of variants in the PAX9 and 101 other genes related with dentition can define at least some dental morphological differences between Sub-Saharan Africans and non-Africans, probably associated with adaptations after the modern human exodus from Africa. Exon 3 of PAX9 could be a good molecular example of how evolvability works. PMID:21298044

  6. Genetic variation among major human geographic groups supports a peculiar evolutionary trend in PAX9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa R Paixão-Côrtes

    Full Text Available A total of 172 persons from nine South Amerindian, three African and one Eskimo populations were studied in relation to the Paired box gene 9 (PAX9 exon 3 (138 base pairs as well as its 5'and 3'flanking intronic segments (232 bp and 220 bp, respectively and integrated with the information available for the same genetic region from individuals of different geographical origins. Nine mutations were scored in exon 3 and six in its flanking regions; four of them are new South American tribe-specific singletons. Exon3 nucleotide diversity is several orders of magnitude higher than its intronic regions. Additionally, a set of variants in the PAX9 and 101 other genes related with dentition can define at least some dental morphological differences between Sub-Saharan Africans and non-Africans, probably associated with adaptations after the modern human exodus from Africa. Exon 3 of PAX9 could be a good molecular example of how evolvability works.

  7. Transcription factor FoxO1 is essential for enamel biomineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A Poché

    Full Text Available The Transforming growth factor β (Tgf-β pathway, by signaling via the activation of Smad transcription factors, induces the expression of many diverse downstream target genes thereby regulating a vast array of cellular events essential for proper development and homeostasis. In order for a specific cell type to properly interpret the Tgf-β signal and elicit a specific cellular response, cell-specific transcriptional co-factors often cooperate with the Smads to activate a discrete set of genes in the appropriate temporal and spatial manner. Here, via a conditional knockout approach, we show that mice mutant for Forkhead Box O transcription factor FoxO1 exhibit an enamel hypomaturation defect which phenocopies that of the Smad3 mutant mice. Furthermore, we determined that both the FoxO1 and Smad3 mutant teeth exhibit changes in the expression of similar cohort of genes encoding enamel matrix proteins required for proper enamel development. These data raise the possibility that FoxO1 and Smad3 act in concert to regulate a common repertoire of genes necessary for complete enamel maturation. This study is the first to define an essential role for the FoxO family of transcription factors in tooth development and provides a new molecular entry point which will allow researchers to delineate novel genetic pathways regulating the process of biomineralization which may also have significance for studies of human tooth diseases such as amelogenesis imperfecta.

  8. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yuan(Alan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ( status and Estrogen Receptor negative ( status, respectively.

  9. Myocardin-related transcription factors are required for cardiac development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Carroll, Kelli J.; Cenik, Bercin K.; Chen, Beibei; Liu, Ning; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2015-01-01

    Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors A and B (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) are highly homologous proteins that function as powerful coactivators of serum response factor (SRF), a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor essential for cardiac development. The SRF/MRTF complex binds to CArG boxes found in the control regions of genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and muscle contraction, among other processes. While SRF is required for heart development and function, the role of MRTFs in the d...

  10. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sillam-Dusses, D.; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, M.; Roy, V.; Favier, M.; Vasseur-Cognet, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2016), č. článku 160080. ISSN 2046-2441 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12774S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : reproduction * phenotypic plasticity * carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein * transcription factor * social insects * lipogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.481, year: 2016 http://rsob.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/6/5/160080

  11. Exploring the utility of organo-polyoxometalate hybrids to inhibit SOX transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamesh Narasimhan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Polyoxometalates are highly potent, nanomolar range inhibitors of the DNA binding activity of the Sox-HMG family. However, binding assays involving a limited subset of structurally diverse polyoxometalates revealed a low selectivity profile against different transcription factor families. Further progress in achieving selectivity and deciphering structure-activity relationship of POMs require the identification of POM binding sites on transcription factors using elaborate approaches like X-ray crystallography and multidimensional NMR. In summary, our report reaffirms that transcription factors are challenging molecular architectures and that future polyoxometalate chemistry must consider further modification strategies, to address the substantial challenges involved in achieving target selectivity.

  12. Role of Transcription Factor Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver not due to alcohol abuse. NAFLD is accompanied by variety of symptoms related to metabolic syndrome. Although the metabolic link between NAFLD and insulin resistance is not fully understood, it is clear that NAFLD is one of the main cause of insulin resistance. NAFLD is shown to affect the functions of other organs, including pancreas, adipose tissue, muscle and inflammatory systems. Currently efforts are being made to understand molecular mechanism of interrelationship between NAFLD and insulin resistance at the transcriptional level with specific focus on post-translational modification (PTM of transcription factors. PTM of transcription factors plays a key role in controlling numerous biological events, including cellular energy metabolism, cell-cycle progression, and organ development. Cell type- and tissue-specific reversible modifications include lysine acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation. Moreover, phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation on serine and threonine residues have been shown to affect protein stability, subcellular distribution, DNA-binding affinity, and transcriptional activity. PTMs of transcription factors involved in insulin-sensitive tissues confer specific adaptive mechanisms in response to internal or external stimuli. Our understanding of the interplay between these modifications and their effects on transcriptional regulation is growing. Here, we summarize the diverse roles of PTMs in insulin-sensitive tissues and their involvement in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  13. Possible linkage of SP6 transcriptional activity with amelogenesis by protein stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Trianna W; Miyoshi, Keiko; Hagita, Hiroko; Yanuaryska, Ryna Dwi; Horiguchi, Taigo; Noma, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    Ameloblasts produce enamel matrix proteins such as amelogenin, ameloblastin, and amelotin during tooth development. The molecular mechanisms of ameloblast differentiation (amelogenesis) are currently not well understood. SP6 is a transcription factor of the Sp/KLF family that was recently found to regulate cell proliferation in a cell-type-specific manner. Sp6-deficient mice demonstrate characteristic tooth anomalies such as delayed eruption of the incisors and supernumerary teeth with disorganized amelogenesis. However, it remains unclear how Sp6 controls amelogenesis. In this study, we used SP6 high producer cells to identify SP6 target genes. Based on the observations that long-term culture of SP6 high producer cells reduced SP6 protein expression but not Sp6 mRNA expression, we found that SP6 is short lived and specifically degraded through a proteasome pathway. We established an in vitro inducible SP6 expression system coupled with siRNA knockdown and found a possible linkage between SP6 and amelogenesis through the regulation of amelotin and Rock1 gene expression by microarray analysis. Our findings suggest that the regulation of SP6 protein stability is one of the crucial steps in amelogenesis.

  14. Possible Linkage of SP6 Transcriptional Activity with Amelogenesis by Protein Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trianna W. Utami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblasts produce enamel matrix proteins such as amelogenin, ameloblastin, and amelotin during tooth development. The molecular mechanisms of ameloblast differentiation (amelogenesis are currently not well understood. SP6 is a transcription factor of the Sp/KLF family that was recently found to regulate cell proliferation in a cell-type-specific manner. Sp6-deficient mice demonstrate characteristic tooth anomalies such as delayed eruption of the incisors and supernumerary teeth with disorganized amelogenesis. However, it remains unclear how Sp6 controls amelogenesis. In this study, we used SP6 high producer cells to identify SP6 target genes. Based on the observations that long-term culture of SP6 high producer cells reduced SP6 protein expression but not Sp6 mRNA expression, we found that SP6 is short lived and specifically degraded through a proteasome pathway. We established an in vitro inducible SP6 expression system coupled with siRNA knockdown and found a possible linkage between SP6 and amelogenesis through the regulation of amelotin and Rock1 gene expression by microarray analysis. Our findings suggest that the regulation of SP6 protein stability is one of the crucial steps in amelogenesis.

  15. Interactome analysis of transcriptional coactivator multiprotein bridging factor 1 unveils a yeast AP-1-like transcription factor involved in oxidation tolerance of mycopathogen Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xin-Ling; Dong, Wei-Xia; Ding, Jin-Li; Feng, Ming-Guang; Ying, Sheng-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Oxidation tolerance is an important determinant to predict the virulence and biocontrol potential of Beauveria bassiana, a well-known entomopathogenic fungus. As a transcriptional coactivator, multiprotein bridging factor 1 mediates the activity of transcription factor in diverse physiological processes, and its homolog in B. bassiana (BbMBF1) contributes to fungal oxidation tolerance. In this study, the BbMBF1-interactomes under oxidative stress and normal growth condition were deciphered by mass spectrometry integrated with the immunoprecipitation. BbMBF1p factor has a broad interaction with proteins that are involved in various cellular processes, and this interaction is dynamically regulated by oxidative stress. Importantly, a B. bassiana homolog of yeast AP-1-like transcription factor (BbAP-1) was specifically associated with the BbMBF1-interactome under oxidation and significantly contributed to fungal oxidation tolerance. In addition, qPCR analysis revealed that several antioxidant genes are jointly controlled by BbAP-1 and BbMBF1. Conclusively, it is proposed that BbMBF1p protein mediates BbAP-1p factor to transcribe the downstream antioxidant genes in B. bassiana under oxidative stress. This study demonstrates for the first time a proteomic view of the MBF1-interactome in fungi, and presents an initial framework to probe the transcriptional mechanism involved in fungal response to oxidation, which will provide a new strategy to improve the biocontrol efficacy of B. bassiana.

  16. Emerging roles and regulation of MiT/TFE transcriptional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Liu, En; Tang, Li; Lei, Yuanyuan; Sun, Xuemei; Hu, Jiaxi; Dong, Hui; Yang, Shi-Ming; Gao, Mingfa; Tang, Bo

    2018-06-15

    The MiT/TFE transcription factors play a pivotal role in the regulation of autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis. The subcellular localization and activity of MiT/TFE proteins are primarily regulated through phosphorylation. And the phosphorylated protein is retained in the cytoplasm and subsequently translocates to the nucleus upon dephosphorylation, where it stimulates the expression of hundreds of genes, leading to lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy induction. The transcription factor-mediated lysosome-to-nucleus signaling can be directly controlled by several signaling molecules involved in the mTORC1, PKC, and AKT pathways. MiT/TFE family members have attracted much attention owing to their intracellular clearance of pathogenic factors in numerous diseases. Recently, multiple studies have also revealed the MiT/TFE proteins as master regulators of cellular metabolic reprogramming, converging on autophagic and lysosomal function and playing a critical role in cancer, suggesting that novel therapeutic strategies could be based on the modulation of MiT/TFE family member activity. Here, we present an overview of the latest research on MiT/TFE transcriptional factors and their potential mechanisms in cancer.

  17. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  18. Functional interrelationship between TFII-I and E2F transcription factors at specific cell cycle gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Nar, Rukiye; Fan, Alex X; Aryan, Mahmoud; Hossain, Mir A; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Wassel, Paul C; Tang, Ming; Lu, Jianrong; Strouboulis, John; Bungert, Jörg

    2018-01-01

    Transcription factor TFII-I is a multifunctional protein implicated in the regulation of cell cycle and stress-response genes. Previous studies have shown that a subset of TFII-I associated genomic sites contained DNA-binding motifs for E2F family transcription factors. We analyzed the co-association of TFII-I and E2Fs in more detail using bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The data show that TFII-I interacts with E2F transcription factors. Furthermore, TFII-I, E2F4, and E2F6 interact with DNA-regulatory elements of several genes implicated in the regulation of the cell cycle, including DNMT1, HDAC1, CDKN1C, and CDC27. Inhibition of TFII-I expression led to a decrease in gene expression and in the association of E2F4 and E2F6 with these gene loci in human erythroleukemia K562 cells. Finally, TFII-I deficiency reduced the proliferation of K562 cells and increased the sensitivity toward doxorubicin toxicity. The results uncover novel interactions between TFII-I and E2Fs and suggest that TFII-I mediates E2F function at specific cell cycle genes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Physical interactions among plant MADS-box transcription factors and their biological relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nougalli Tonaco, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The biological interpretation of the genome starts from transcription, and many different signaling pathways are integrated at this level. Transcription factors play a central role in the transcription process, because they select the down-stream genes and determine their spatial and temporal

  20. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  1. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  2. Specification of jaw identity by the Hand2 transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funato, Noriko; Kokubo, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masataka; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Saga, Yumiko

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of the lower jaw (mandible) was evolutionarily important for jawed vertebrates. In humans, syndromic craniofacial malformations often accompany jaw anomalies. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand2, which is conserved among jawed vertebrates, is expressed in the neural crest in the mandibular process but not in the maxillary process of the first branchial arch. Here, we provide evidence that Hand2 is sufficient for upper jaw (maxilla)-to-mandible transformation by regulating the expression of homeobox transcription factors in mice. Altered Hand2 expression in the neural crest transformed the maxillae into mandibles with duplicated Meckel’s cartilage, which resulted in an absence of the secondary palate. In Hand2-overexpressing mutants, non-Hox homeobox transcription factors were dysregulated. These results suggest that Hand2 regulates mandibular development through downstream genes of Hand2 and is therefore a major determinant of jaw identity. Hand2 may have influenced the evolutionary acquisition of the mandible and secondary palate. PMID:27329940

  3. In vivo bioimaging with tissue-specific transcription factor activated luciferase reporters.

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, SM; Delhove, JM; Perocheau, DP; Karda, R; Rahim, AA; Howe, SJ; Ward, NJ; Birrell, MA; Belvisi, MG; Arbuthnot, P; Johnson, MR; Waddington, SN; McKay, TR

    2015-01-01

    The application of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter cassettes in vitro is widespread but potential for in vivo application has not yet been realized. Bioluminescence imaging enables non-invasive tracking of gene expression in transfected tissues of living rodents. However the mature immune response limits luciferase expression when delivered in adulthood. We present a novel approach of tissue-targeted delivery of transcription factor activated luciferase reporter lentiviruse...

  4. Proconsuls and CINCs from the Roman Republic to the Republic of the United States of America: Lessons for the Pax Americana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bradford, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Political and media pundits have labeled the current period of post Cold-War world order the Pax Americana, reminiscent of the Pax Romana that occurred from 27 to 180 AD, during the zenith of the Roman Empire...

  5. Contraction-induced interleukin-6 gene transcription in skeletal muscle is regulated by c-Jun terminal kinase/activator protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, Martin; Chan, M H Stanley; Pal, Martin; Matthews, Vance B; Prelovsek, Oja; Lunke, Sebastian; El-Osta, Assam; Broenneke, Hella; Alber, Jens; Brüning, Jens C; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Lancaster, Graeme I; Febbraio, Mark A

    2012-03-30

    Exercise increases the expression of the prototypical myokine IL-6, but the precise mechanism by which this occurs has yet to be identified. To mimic exercise conditions, C2C12 myotubes were mechanically stimulated via electrical pulse stimulation (EPS). We compared the responses of EPS with the pharmacological Ca(2+) carrier calcimycin (A23187) because contraction induces marked increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels or the classical IκB kinase/NFκB inflammatory response elicited by H(2)O(2). We demonstrate that, unlike H(2)O(2)-stimulated increases in IL-6 mRNA, neither calcimycin- nor EPS-induced IL-6 mRNA expression is under the transcriptional control of NFκB. Rather, we show that EPS increased the phosphorylation of JNK and the reporter activity of the downstream transcription factor AP-1. Furthermore, JNK inhibition abolished the EPS-induced increase in IL-6 mRNA and protein expression. Finally, we observed an exercise-induced increase in both JNK phosphorylation and IL-6 mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of mice after 30 min of treadmill running. Importantly, exercise did not increase IL-6 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle-specific JNK-deficient mice. These data identify a novel contraction-mediated transcriptional regulatory pathway for IL-6 in skeletal muscle.

  6. Strand transfer and elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcription is facilitated by cell factors in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Warrilow

    Full Text Available Recent work suggests a role for multiple host factors in facilitating HIV-1 reverse transcription. Previously, we identified a cellular activity which increases the efficiency of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro. Here, we describe aspects of the activity which shed light on its function. The cellular factor did not affect synthesis of strong-stop DNA but did improve downstream DNA synthesis. The stimulatory activity was isolated by gel filtration in a single fraction of the exclusion volume. Velocity-gradient purified HIV-1, which was free of detectable RNase activity, showed poor reverse transcription efficiency but was strongly stimulated by partially purified cell proteins. Hence, the cell factor(s did not inactivate an RNase activity that might degrade the viral genomic RNA and block completion of reverse transcription. Instead, the cell factor(s enhanced first strand transfer and synthesis of late reverse transcription suggesting it stabilized the reverse transcription complex. The factor did not affect lysis of HIV-1 by Triton X-100 in the endogenous reverse transcription (ERT system, and ERT reactions with HIV-1 containing capsid mutations, which varied the biochemical stability of viral core structures and impeded reverse transcription in cells, showed no difference in the ability to be stimulated by the cell factor(s suggesting a lack of involvement of the capsid in the in vitro assay. In addition, reverse transcription products were found to be resistant to exogenous DNase I activity when the active fraction was present in the ERT assay. These results indicate that the cell factor(s may improve reverse transcription by facilitating DNA strand transfer and DNA synthesis. It also had a protective function for the reverse transcription products, but it is unclear if this is related to improved DNA synthesis.

  7. An engineered tale-transcription factor rescues transcription of factor VII impaired by promoter mutations and enhances its endogenous expression in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbon, Elena; Pignani, Silvia; Branchini, Alessio; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko; Bovolenta, Matteo

    2016-06-24

    Tailored approaches to restore defective transcription responsible for severe diseases have been poorly explored. We tested transcription activator-like effectors fused to an activation domain (TALE-TFs) in a coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency model. In this model, the deficiency is caused by the -94C > G or -61T > G mutation, which abrogate the binding of Sp1 or HNF-4 transcription factors. Reporter assays in hepatoma HepG2 cells naturally expressing FVII identified a single TALE-TF (TF4) that, by targeting the region between mutations, specifically trans-activated both the variant (>100-fold) and wild-type (20-40-fold) F7 promoters. Importantly, in the genomic context of transfected HepG2 and transduced primary hepatocytes, TF4 increased F7 mRNA and protein levels (2- to 3-fold) without detectable off-target effects, even for the homologous F10 gene. The ectopic F7 expression in renal HEK293 cells was modestly affected by TF4 or by TALE-TF combinations. These results provide experimental evidence for TALE-TFs as gene-specific tools useful to counteract disease-causing promoter mutations.

  8. PAX-FOXO1 fusion status drives unfavorable outcome for children with rhabdomyosarcoma: a children's oncology group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X; Anderson, James; Barr, Frederic G; Bridge, Julia A; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Parham, David M; Rudzinski, Erin R; Triche, Timothy; Hawkins, Douglas S

    2013-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is divided into two major histological subtypes: alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS), with most ARMS expressing one of two oncogenic genes fusing PAX3 or PAX7 with FOXO1 (P3F and P7F, respectively). The Children's Oncology Group (COG) carried out a multi-institutional clinical trial to evaluate the prognostic value of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status. Study participants were treated on COG protocol D9803 for intermediate risk ARMS or ERMS using multi-agent chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Central diagnostic pathology review and molecular testing for fusion genes were carried out on prospectively collected specimens. Event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were correlated with histological subtype and PAX-FOXO1 status. Of 616 eligible D9803 enrollees, 434 cases had adequate clinical, molecular, and pathology data for definitive classification as ERMS, ARMS P3F+ or P7F+, or ARMSn (without detectable fusion). EFS was worse for those with ARMS P3F+ (54%) and P7F+ (65%) than those with ERMS (77%; P < 0.001). EFS for ARMSn and ERMS were not statistically different (90% vs. 77%, P = 0.15). ARMS P3F+ had poorer OS (64%) than ARMS P7F+ (87%), ARMSn (89%), and ERMS (82%; P = 0.006). ARMSn has an outcome similar to ERMS and superior EFS compared to ARMS with either P3F or P7F, when given therapy designed for children with intermediate risk RMS. This prospective analysis supports incorporation of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status into risk stratification and treatment allocation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Characterization of senscence-associated NAC transcription factors in Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska, Dagmara Agata

    , such as yield, biomass production and nutrient quality, and NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) transcription factors are promising targets for the breeding. The aim of this thesis was thus to assess the role of NAC transcription factors in regulation of senescence in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and to contribute...

  10. Glucokinase links Kruppel-like factor 6 to the regulation of hepatic insulin sensitivity in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechmann, Lars P.; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Vetter, Diana; Patman, Gillian L.; Pascoe, Laura; Hannivoort, Rebekka A.; Lee, Ursula E.; Fiel, Isabel; Munoz, Ursula; Ciociaro, Demetrio; Lee, Young-Min; Buzzigoli, Emma; Miele, Luca; Hui, Kei Y.; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Burt, Alastair D.; Day, Christopher P.; Mari, Andrea; Agius, Loranne; Walker, Mark; Friedman, Scott L.; Reeves, Helen L.

    The polymorphism, KLF6-IVS1-27A, in the Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) transcription factor gene enhances its splicing into antagonistic isoforms and is associated with delayed histological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To explore a potential role for KLF6 in the development

  11. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Transcription Termination by the Rho Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Transcription termination comes in two forms in "E. coli" cells. Rho-dependent termination requires the binding of a termination protein called Rho factor to the transcriptional machinery at the terminator region, whereas Rho-independent termination is achieved by conformational changes in the transcript itself. This article presents a test…

  12. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    , such as Ace2 and Swi6, and stress response regulators, such as Yap1, were also shown to have significantly enriched target sets. Conclusion: Our work, which is the first genome-wide gene expression study to investigate specific growth rate and consider the impact of oxygen availability, provides a more......Background: Characterization of cellular growth is central to understanding living systems. Here, we applied a three-factor design to study the relationship between specific growth rate and genome-wide gene expression in 36 steady-state chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The three...... factors we considered were specific growth rate, nutrient limitation, and oxygen availability. Results: We identified 268 growth rate dependent genes, independent of nutrient limitation and oxygen availability. The transcriptional response was used to identify key areas in metabolism around which m...

  13. Pharmacological targeting of the transcription factor SOX18 delays breast cancer in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Jeroen; Fontaine, Frank; Moustaqil, Mehdi; Mittal, Deepak; Sierecki, Emma; Sacilotto, Natalia; Zuegg, Johannes; Robertson, Avril AB; Holmes, Kelly; Salim, Angela A; Mamidyala, Sreeman; Butler, Mark S; Robinson, Ashley S; Lesieur, Emmanuelle; Johnston, Wayne; Alexandrov, Kirill; Black, Brian L; Hogan, Benjamin M; De Val, Sarah; Capon, Robert J; Carroll, Jason S; Bailey, Timothy L; Koopman, Peter; Jauch, Ralf; Smyth, Mark J; Cooper, Matthew A; Gambin, Yann; Francois, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacological targeting of transcription factors holds great promise for the development of new therapeutics, but strategies based on blockade of DNA binding, nuclear shuttling, or individual protein partner recruitment have yielded limited success to date. Transcription factors typically engage in complex interaction networks, likely masking the effects of specifically inhibiting single protein-protein interactions. Here, we used a combination of genomic, proteomic and biophysical methods to discover a suite of protein-protein interactions involving the SOX18 transcription factor, a known regulator of vascular development and disease. We describe a small-molecule that is able to disrupt a discrete subset of SOX18-dependent interactions. This compound selectively suppressed SOX18 transcriptional outputs in vitro and interfered with vascular development in zebrafish larvae. In a mouse pre-clinical model of breast cancer, treatment with this inhibitor significantly improved survival by reducing tumour vascular density and metastatic spread. Our studies validate an interactome-based molecular strategy to interfere with transcription factor activity, for the development of novel disease therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21221.001 PMID:28137359

  14. Mitochondrial transcription factor A protects human retinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), as a modulator of NF-κB, on proliferation of hypoxia-induced human retinal endothelial cell (HREC), and the probable mechanism. Methods: After exposure to hypoxia (1 % O2) for 5 days, cell proliferation and cell cycle of HREC were ...

  15. Proteopedia: 3D Visualization and Annotation of Transcription Factor-DNA Readout Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Saleebyan, Skyler B.; Holmes, Bailey T.; Karelina, Maria; Tam, Julia; Kim, Sharon Y.; Kim, Keziah H.; Dror, Iris; Hodis, Eran; Martz, Eric; Compeau, Patricia A.; Rohs, Remo

    2012-01-01

    3D visualization assists in identifying diverse mechanisms of protein-DNA recognition that can be observed for transcription factors and other DNA binding proteins. We used Proteopedia to illustrate transcription factor-DNA readout modes with a focus on DNA shape, which can be a function of either nucleotide sequence (Hox proteins) or base pairing…

  16. PAX3 gene deletion detected by microarray analysis in a girl with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozniewska, Malgorzata; Haus, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Deletions of the PAX3 gene have been rarely reported in the literature. Mutations of this gene are a common cause of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and 3. We report a 16 year old female presenting hearing loss and normal intellectual development, without major features of Waardenburg syndrome type 1, and without family history of the syndrome. Her phenotype, however, overlaps with features of craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome. Microarray analysis showed ~862 kb de novo deletion at 2q36.1 including PAX3. The above findings suggest that the rearrangement found in our patient appeared de novo and with high probability is a cause of her phenotype.

  17. 11p Microdeletion including WT1 but not PAX6, presenting with cataract, mental retardation, genital abnormalities and seizures: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baekgaard Peter

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract WAGR syndrome (Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities and mental retardation and Potocki-Shaffer syndrome are rare contiguous gene deletion syndromes caused by deletions of the 11p14-p12 chromosome region. We present a patient with mental retardation, unilateral cataract, bilateral ptosis, genital abnormalities, seizures and a dysmorphic face. Cytogenetic analysis showed a deletion on 11p that was further characterized using FISH and MLPA analyses. The deletion (11p13-p12 located in the area between the deletions associated with the WAGR and Potocki-Shaffer syndromes had a maximum size of 8.5 Mb and encompasses 44 genes. Deletion of WT1 explains the genital abnormalities observed. As PAX6 was intact the cataract observed cannot be explained by a deletion of this gene. Seizures have been described in Potocki-Shaffer syndrome while mental retardation has been described in both WAGR and Potocki-Shaffer syndrome. Characterization of this patient contributes further to elucidate the function of the genes in the 11p14-p12 chromosome region.

  18. Deletion and Gene Expression Analyses Define the Paxilline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Penicillium paxilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Parker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The indole-diterpene paxilline is an abundant secondary metabolite synthesized by Penicillium paxilli. In total, 21 genes have been identified at the PAX locus of which six have been previously confirmed to have a functional role in paxilline biosynthesis. A combination of bioinformatics, gene expression and targeted gene replacement analyses were used to define the boundaries of the PAX gene cluster. Targeted gene replacement identified seven genes, paxG, paxA, paxM, paxB, paxC, paxP and paxQ that were all required for paxilline production, with one additional gene, paxD, required for regular prenylation of the indole ring post paxilline synthesis. The two putative transcription factors, PP104 and PP105, were not co-regulated with the pax genes and based on targeted gene replacement, including the double knockout, did not have a role in paxilline production. The relationship of indole dimethylallyl transferases involved in prenylation of indole-diterpenes such as paxilline or lolitrem B, can be found as two disparate clades, not supported by prenylation type (e.g., regular or reverse. This paper provides insight into the P. paxilli indole-diterpene locus and reviews the recent advances identified in paxilline biosynthesis.

  19. Reciprocal occupancy of BCL6 and STAT5 on Growth Hormone target genes: contrasting transcriptional outcomes and promoter-specific roles of p300 and HDAC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Grace; LaPensee, Christopher R; Qin, Zhaohui S; Schwartz, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    Expression of the Growth Hormone (GH)-stimulated gene Socs2 (Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 2) is mediated by the transcription activator STAT5 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5) and the transcription repressor BCL6 (B-Cell Lymphoma 6). ChIP-Sequencing identified Cish (Cytokine-Inducible SH2-containing protein) and Bcl6 as having similar patterns of reciprocal occupancy by BCL6 and STAT5 in response to GH, though GH stimulates Cish and inhibits Bcl6 expression. The co-activator p300 occupied Socs2, Cish and Bcl6 promoters, and enhanced STAT5-mediated activation of Socs2 and Cish. In contrast, on Bcl6, p300 functioned as a repressor and inhibited in conjunction with STAT5 or BCL6. The co-repressor HDAC3 (Histone deacetylase 3) inhibited the Socs2, Cish and Bcl6 promoters in the presence of STAT5. Thus transcriptional outcomes on GH-regulated genes occupied by BCL6 and STAT5 are determined in a promoter-specific fashion by co-regulatory proteins which mediate the distinction between activating and repressive transcription factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of sonic hedgehog-GLI1 downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, PAX6 and NKX2.2 and their epigenetic status in medulloblastoma and astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahi, Mehdi H; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Eberhart, Charles G; Rey, Juan A; Fan, Xing; Castresana, Javier S

    2010-01-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is critical for cell growth and differentiation. Impairment of this pathway can result in both birth defects and cancer. Despite its importance in cancer development, the Shh pathway has not been thoroughly investigated in tumorigenesis of brain tumors. In this study, we sought to understand the regulatory roles of GLI1, the immediate downstream activator of the Shh signaling pathway on its downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6 in medulloblastoma and astrocytic tumors. We silenced GLI1 expression in medulloblastoma and astrocytic cell lines by transfection of siRNA against GLI1. Subsequently, we performed RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) to assay the expression of downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6. We also attempted to correlate the pattern of expression of GLI1 and its regulated genes in 14 cell lines and 41 primary medulloblastoma and astrocytoma tumor samples. We also assessed the methylation status of the Cyclin D2 and PTCH1 promoters in these 14 cell lines and 58 primary tumor samples. Silencing expression of GLI1 resulted up-regulation of all target genes in the medulloblastoma cell line, while only PTCH1 was up-regulated in astrocytoma. We also observed methylation of the cyclin D2 promoter in a significant number of astrocytoma cell lines (63%) and primary astrocytoma tumor samples (32%), but not at all in any medulloblastoma samples. PTCH1 promoter methylation was less frequently observed than Cyclin D2 promoter methylation in astrocytomas, and not at all in medulloblastomas. Our results demonstrate different regulatory mechanisms of Shh-GLI1 signaling. These differences vary according to the downstream target gene affected, the origin of the tissue, as well as epigenetic regulation of some of these genes

  1. Identification of activated enhancers and linked transcription factors in breast, prostate, and kidney tumors by tracing enhancer networks using epigenetic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Guo, Yu; Tak, Yu Gyoung; Yao, Lijing; Shen, Hui; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Laird, Peter W; Farnham, Peggy J

    2016-01-01

    Although technological advances now allow increased tumor profiling, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms leading to the development of different cancers remains elusive. Our approach toward understanding the molecular events that lead to cancer is to characterize changes in transcriptional regulatory networks between normal and tumor tissue. Because enhancer activity is thought to be critical in regulating cell fate decisions, we have focused our studies on distal regulatory elements and transcription factors that bind to these elements. Using DNA methylation data, we identified more than 25,000 enhancers that are differentially activated in breast, prostate, and kidney tumor tissues, as compared to normal tissues. We then developed an analytical approach called Tracing Enhancer Networks using Epigenetic Traits that correlates DNA methylation levels at enhancers with gene expression to identify more than 800,000 genome-wide links from enhancers to genes and from genes to enhancers. We found more than 1200 transcription factors to be involved in these tumor-specific enhancer networks. We further characterized several transcription factors linked to a large number of enhancers in each tumor type, including GATA3 in non-basal breast tumors, HOXC6 and DLX1 in prostate tumors, and ZNF395 in kidney tumors. We showed that HOXC6 and DLX1 are associated with different clusters of prostate tumor-specific enhancers and confer distinct transcriptomic changes upon knockdown in C42B prostate cancer cells. We also discovered de novo motifs enriched in enhancers linked to ZNF395 in kidney tumors. Our studies characterized tumor-specific enhancers and revealed key transcription factors involved in enhancer networks for specific tumor types and subgroups. Our findings, which include a large set of identified enhancers and transcription factors linked to those enhancers in breast, prostate, and kidney cancers, will facilitate understanding of enhancer networks and mechanisms

  2. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  3. Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB transcription factor AtMYB60 functions as a transcriptional repressor of anthocyanin biosynthesis in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Sug; Kim, Jung-Bong; Cho, Kang-Jin; Cheon, Choong-Ill; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Choung, Myoung-Gun; Roh, Kyung-Hee

    2008-06-01

    The MYB transcription factors play important roles in the regulation of many secondary metabolites at the transcriptional level. We evaluated the possible roles of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB transcription factors in flavonoid biosynthesis because they are induced by UV-B irradiation but their associated phenotypes are largely unexplored. We isolated their genes by RACE-PCR, and performed transgenic approach and metabolite analyses in lettuce (Lactuca sativa). We found that one member of this protein family, AtMYB60, inhibits anthocyanin biosynthesis in the lettuce plant. Wild-type lettuce normally accumulates anthocyanin, predominantly cyanidin and traces of delphinidin, and develops a red pigmentation. However, the production and accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in AtMYB60-overexpressing lettuce was inhibited. Using RT-PCR analysis, we also identified the complete absence or reduction of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) transcripts in AtMYB60- overexpressing lettuce (AtMYB60-117 and AtMYB60-112 lines). The correlation between the overexpression of AtMYB60 and the inhibition of anthocyanin accumulation suggests that the transcription factorAtMYB60 controls anthocyanin biosynthesis in the lettuce leaf. Clarification of the roles of the AtMYB60 transcription factor will facilitate further studies and provide genetic tools to better understand the regulation in plants of the genes controlled by the MYB-type transcription factors. Furthermore, the characterization of AtMYB60 has implications for the development of new varieties of lettuce and other commercially important plants with metabolic engineering approaches.

  4. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an essential component of mitochondrial nucleoids. TFAM plays an important role in mitochondrial transcription and replication. TFAM has been previously reported to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro but NER has not yet been detected i...

  5. Transcription factors ETF, E2F, and SP-1 are involved in cytokine-independent proliferation of murine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellmer, Sebastian; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Godoy, Patricio; Weng, Honglei; Meyer, Christoph; Lehmann, Thomas; Sparna, Titus; Schormann, Wiebke; Hammad, Seddik; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Thürmann, Petra A; Merfort, Irmgard; Guthke, Reinhard; Dooley, Steven; Hengstler, Jan G; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2010-12-01

    The cellular basis of liver regeneration has been intensely investigated for many years. However, the mechanisms initiating hepatocyte "plasticity" and priming for proliferation are not yet fully clear. We investigated alterations in gene expression patterns during the first 72 hours of C57BL/6N mouse hepatocyte culture on collagen monolayers (CM), which display a high basal frequency of proliferation in the absence of cytokines. Although many metabolic genes were down-regulated, genes related to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and cell cycle were up-regulated. The latter genes showed an overrepresentation of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for ETF (TEA domain family member 2), E2F1 (E2F transcription factor 1), and SP-1 (Sp1 transcription factor) (P ETF, E2F1, and SP-1 and displayed increased expression of E2F1. Cultivation of murine hepatocytes on CM primes cells for proliferation through cytokine-independent activation of MAPK signaling. The transcription factors ETF, E2F1, and SP-1 seem to play a pronounced role in mediating proliferation-dependent differential gene expression. Similar events, but on a shorter time-scale, occur very early after liver damage in vivo. Copyright © 2010 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Interaction between FMDV Lpro and transcription factor ADNP is required for viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) leader protease (Lpro) inhibits host translation and transcription affecting the expression of several factors involved in innate immunity. In this study, we have identified the host transcription factor ADNP (activity dependent neuroprotective protein) as an ...

  7. Phenanthrene causes ocular developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryos and the possible mechanisms involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Lixing; Wang, Chonggang; Zhang, Youyu; Wu, Meifang; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Phe exposure caused obvious morphological changes in the retina. • Phe exposure caused apoptosis and reduction of cell proliferation in the retina. • Phe causes ocular toxicity might be via the AhR/Zeb1/Mitf/Pax6 signaling pathway. • AhR is a repressor of Zeb1. -- Abstract: Recent studies show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be a candidate cause of developmental defects of the retina, but the mechanism is still unclear. We evaluated the mechanism(s) underlying PAH-induced retinal development defects due to exposure to environmental concentrations of Phenanthrene (Phe) in zebrafish. We found that exposure to environmental concentrations of Phe caused obvious morphological changes, developmental retardation, apoptosis, and reduction of cell proliferation in the retina. Our results indicated that Phe could cause visual system developmental defects. Phe exposure up-regulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mtif) expression, and down-regulated zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (Zeb1) and paired box 6 (Pax6). Moreover, we demonstrated that AhR was a repressor of Zeb1. We propose that Phe's ocular toxicity is mediated by up-regulating AhR, which then down-regulates Zeb1, in turn inducing Mitf expression while inhibiting Pax6 expression

  8. Insights into the Transcriptional Architecture of Behavioral Plasticity in the Honey Bee Apis mellifera

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah M.

    2015-06-15

    Honey bee colonies exhibit an age-related division of labor, with worker bees performing discrete sets of behaviors throughout their lifespan. These behavioral states are associated with distinct brain transcriptomic states, yet little is known about the regulatory mechanisms governing them. We used CAGEscan (a variant of the Cap Analysis of Gene Expression technique) for the first time to characterize the promoter regions of differentially expressed brain genes during two behavioral states (brood care (aka “nursing”) and foraging) and identified transcription factors (TFs) that may govern their expression. More than half of the differentially expressed TFs were associated with motifs enriched in the promoter regions of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), suggesting they are regulators of behavioral state. Strikingly, five TFs (nf-kb, egr, pax6, hairy, and clockwork orange) were predicted to co-regulate nearly half of the genes that were upregulated in foragers. Finally, differences in alternative TSS usage between nurses and foragers were detected upstream of 646 genes, whose functional analysis revealed enrichment for Gene Ontology terms associated with neural function and plasticity. This demonstrates for the first time that alternative TSSs are associated with stable differences in behavior, suggesting they may play a role in organizing behavioral state.

  9. WRKY transcription factor superfamily: Structure, origin and functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    terminal ends contain the WRKYGQR amino acid sequence and a zinc-finger motif. WRKY transcription factors can regulate the expression of target genes that contain the W-box elements (C/T)TGAC(C/T) in the promoter regions by specifically ...

  10. Posttranslational modifications of Forkhead box O transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, Aart Arno van der

    2006-01-01

    FOXO transcription factors play an important role in essential biological processes such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism and stress resistance. Phosphorylation is the modification that was first found on FOXOs and much of the subsequent studies focused on this

  11. A family with unusual Waardenburg syndrome type I (WSI), cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease is not linked to PAX 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierpont, J W; St Jacques, D; Seaver, L H; Erickson, R P

    1995-03-01

    An unusual family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WSI), cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease is not linked to the PAX 3 gene since there is an obligate crossover which has occurred between PAX 3 DNA markers and the disorder in this family. This family may also have anticipation of the WSI traits as the proband's grandmother is nonpenetrant, his mother has dystopia canthorum, and severe cleft lip (palate), while the proband has dystopia canthorum, severe cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease. Thus, a locus other than PAX 3 is implicated in this Waardenburg-like syndrome with Hirschsprung disease and cleft lip (palate).

  12. Ménage à trois: the complex relationships between mitogen-activated protein kinases, WRKY transcription factors, and VQ-motif-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyhe, Martin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Pecher, Pascal; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Out of the 34 members of the VQ-motif-containing protein (VQP) family, 10 are phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), MPK3 and MPK6. Most of these MPK3/6-targeted VQPs (MVQs) interacted with specific sub-groups of WRKY transcription factors in a VQ-motif-dependent manner. In some cases, the MAPK appears to phosphorylate either the MVQ or the WRKY, while in other cases, both proteins have been reported to act as MAPK substrates. We propose a network of dynamic interactions between members from the MAPK, MVQ and WRKY families - either as binary or as tripartite interactions. The compositions of the WRKY-MVQ transcriptional protein complexes may change - for instance, through MPK3/6-mediated modulation of protein stability - and therefore control defense gene transcription.

  13. HOXB5 cooperates with NKX2-1 in the transcription of human RET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Zhu

    Full Text Available The enteric nervous system (ENS regulates peristaltic movement of the gut, and abnormal ENS causes Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR in newborns. HSCR is a congenital complex genetic disorder characterised by a lack of enteric ganglia along a variable length of the intestine. The receptor tyrosine kinase gene (RET is the major HSCR gene and its expression is crucial for ENS development. We have previously reported that (i HOXB5 transcription factor mediates RET expression, and (ii mouse with defective HOXB5 activity develop HSCR phenotype. In this study, we (i elucidate the underlying mechanisms that HOXB5 mediate RET expression, and (ii examine the interactions between HOXB5 and other transcription factors implicated in RET expression. We show that human HOXB5 binds to the promoter region 5' upstream of the binding site of NKX2-1 and regulates RET expression. HOXB5 and NKX2-1 form a protein complex and mediate RET expression in a synergistic manner. HSCR associated SNPs at the NKX2-1 binding site (-5G>A rs10900296; -1A>C rs10900297, which reduce NKX2-1 binding, abolish the synergistic trans-activation of RET by HOXB5 and NKX2-1. In contrast to the synergistic activation of RET with NKX2-1, HOXB5 cooperates in an additive manner with SOX10, PAX3 and PHOX2B in trans-activation of RET promoter. Taken together, our data suggests that HOXB5 in coordination with other transcription factors mediates RET expression. Therefore, defects in cis- or trans-regulation of RET by HOXB5 could lead to reduction of RET expression and contribute to the manifestation of the HSCR phenotype.

  14. Transcription factor expression uniquely identifies most postembryonic neuronal lineages in the Drosophila thoracic central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacin, Haluk; Zhu, Yi; Wilson, Beth A; Skeath, James B

    2014-03-01

    Most neurons of the adult Drosophila ventral nerve cord arise from a burst of neurogenesis during the third larval instar stage. Most of this growth occurs in thoracic neuromeres, which contain 25 individually identifiable postembryonic neuronal lineages. Initially, each lineage consists of two hemilineages--'A' (Notch(On)) and 'B' (Notch(Off))--that exhibit distinct axonal trajectories or fates. No reliable method presently exists to identify these lineages or hemilineages unambiguously other than labor-intensive lineage-tracing methods. By combining mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) analysis with gene expression studies, we constructed a gene expression map that enables the rapid, unambiguous identification of 23 of the 25 postembryonic lineages based on the expression of 15 transcription factors. Pilot genetic studies reveal that these transcription factors regulate the specification and differentiation of postembryonic neurons: for example, Nkx6 is necessary and sufficient to direct axonal pathway selection in lineage 3. The gene expression map thus provides a descriptive foundation for the genetic and molecular dissection of adult-specific neurogenesis and identifies many transcription factors that are likely to regulate the development and differentiation of discrete subsets of postembryonic neurons.

  15. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-31

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  17. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  18. Mechanism of transcription activation at the comG promoter by the competence transcription factor ComK of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanna, KA; van der Werff, AF; den Hengst, CD; Calles, B; Salas, M; Venema, G; Hamoen, LW; Kuipers, OP

    The development of genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis is regulated by a complex signal transduction cascade, which results in the synthesis of the competence transcription factor, encoded by comK. ComK is required for the transcription of the late competence genes that encode the DNA binding

  19. An epistatic interaction between the PAX8 and STK17B genes in papillary thyroid cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iñigo Landa

    Full Text Available Papillary Thyroid Cancer (PTC is a heterogeneous and complex disease; susceptibility to PTC is influenced by the joint effects of multiple common, low-penetrance genes, although relatively few have been identified to date. Here we applied a rigorous combined approach to assess both the individual and epistatic contributions of genetic factors to PTC susceptibility, based on one of the largest series of thyroid cancer cases described to date. In addition to identifying the involvement of TSHR variation in classic PTC, our pioneer study of epistasis revealed a significant interaction between variants in STK17B and PAX8. The interaction was detected by MD-MBR (p = 0.00010 and confirmed by other methods, and then replicated in a second independent series of patients (MD-MBR p = 0.017. Furthermore, we demonstrated an inverse correlation between expression of PAX8 and STK17B in a set of cell lines derived from human thyroid carcinomas. Overall, our work sheds additional light on the genetic basis of thyroid cancer susceptibility, and suggests a new direction for the exploration of the inherited genetic contribution to disease using association studies.

  20. Identification and functional analysis of a novel mutation in the PAX3 gene associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijie; Li, Jiada; Tang, Fen; Sun, Jie; Wang, Xueping; Jiang, Lu; Mei, Lingyun; Chen, Hongsheng; Liu, Yalan; Cai, Xinzhang; Feng, Yong; He, Chufeng

    2018-02-05

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder of neural crest cells (NCC) characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, and abnormal iris pigmentation. WS1 is due to loss-of-function mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). Here, we identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.808C>G, p.R270G) in a three-generation Chinese family with WS1, and then analyzed its in vitro activities. The R270G PAX3 retained nuclear distribution and normal DNA-binding ability; however, it failed to activate MITF promoter, suggesting that haploinsufficiency may be the underlying mechanism for the mild WS1 phenotype of the study family. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgical wisdom and Genghis Khan's Pax Mongolica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köstenbauer, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The unrivalled conquests of Genghis Khan (CE c.1162-1227) led to the establishment of the Greater Mongolian Empire. By 1279, the Mongol dynasty controlled a vast Empire which, for the first time in history, unified Europe and China via the famous Silk Road. The ensuing century of peace and stability is referred to by historians as the Pax Mongolica, which facilitated Europe's renaissance and remarkably contributed to the rise of modern medicine and surgery. Secondary sources from published literature, primary sources from manuscripts and illustrations courtesy of universities, museum libraries and archives. There is ample evidence detailing the Mongol Empire's power during the thirteenth century and the Silk Road's role as a vehicle of commercial, cultural and scientific exchange. Advances in medical knowledge and surgical skills were made in all parts of the Empire and exchanged from China to Constantinople and back. Prominent medical figures traversed these centres, and no doubt contributed to the spread of surgical science, including Rashid al-Din and Mansur Ibn Ilyas. Their works, it is argued, enriched the practice of surgery and may have indirectly ushered-in the rise of modern surgery in the early medical schools at Salerno, Bologna, Pavia, Oxford, Montpellier and Constantinople to name but a few. The blossoming and diversification of medical and surgical knowledge was an integral part of the great cultural exchange facilitated by the Pax Mongolica. This enhanced surgical practice in China, Persia and Arabia, while coinciding with the renaissance of surgical teaching in Europe. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. MiR-125a TNF receptor-associated factor 6 to inhibit osteoclastogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Li-Juan; Liao, Lan; Yang, Li; Li, Yu; Jiang, Tie-Jian

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. In the present study, we found that miR-125a was dramatically down-regulated during macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclastogenesis of circulating CD14+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overexpression of miR-125a in CD14+ PBMCs inhibited osteoclastogenesis, while inhibition of miR-125a promoted osteoclastogenesis. TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), a transduction factor for RANKL/RANK/NFATc1 signal, was confirmed to be a target of miR-125a. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed that NFATc1 bound to the promoter of the miR-125a. Overexpression of NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transcription, and block of NFATc1 expression attenuated RANKL-regulated miR-125a transcription. Here, we reported that miR-125a played a biological function in osteoclastogenesis through a novel TRAF6/ NFATc1/miR-125a regulatory feedback loop. It suggests that regulation of miR-125a expression may be a potential strategy for ameliorating metabolic disease. - Highlights: • MiR-125a was significantly down-regulated in osteoclastogenesis of CD14+ PBMCs. • MiR-125a inhibited osteoclast differentiation by targeting TRAF6. • NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transciption by binding to the promoter of miR-125a. • TRAF6/NFATc1 and miR-125a form a regulatory feedback loop in osteoclastogenesis

  3. Regulation of anti-Plasmodium immunity by a LITAF-like transcription factor in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C Smith

    Full Text Available The mosquito is the obligate vector for malaria transmission. To complete its development within the mosquito, the malaria parasite Plasmodium must overcome the protective action of the mosquito innate immune system. Here we report on the involvement of the Anopheles gambiae orthologue of a conserved component of the vertebrate immune system, LPS-induced TNFα transcription factor (LITAF, and its role in mosquito anti-Plasmodium immunity. An. gambiae LITAF-like 3 (LL3 expression is up-regulated in response to midgut invasion by both rodent and human malaria parasites. Silencing of LL3 expression greatly increases parasite survival, indicating that LL3 is part of an anti-Plasmodium defense mechanism. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified specific LL3 DNA-binding motifs within the promoter of SRPN6, a gene that also mediates mosquito defense against Plasmodium. Further experiments indicated that these motifs play a direct role in LL3 regulation of SRPN6 expression. We conclude that LL3 is a transcription factor capable of modulating SRPN6 expression as part of the mosquito anti-Plasmodium immune response.

  4. The identification of transcription factors expressed in the notochord of Ciona intestinalis adds new potential players to the brachyury gene regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José-Edwards, Diana S; Kerner, Pierre; Kugler, Jamie E; Deng, Wei; Jiang, Di; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2011-07-01

    The notochord is the distinctive characteristic of chordates; however, the knowledge of the complement of transcription factors governing the development of this structure is still incomplete. Here we present the expression patterns of seven transcription factor genes detected in the notochord of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis at various stages of embryonic development. Four of these transcription factors, Fos-a, NFAT5, AFF and Klf15, have not been directly associated with the notochord in previous studies, while the others, including Spalt-like-a, Lmx-like, and STAT5/6-b, display evolutionarily conserved expression in this structure as well as in other domains. We examined the hierarchical relationships between these genes and the transcription factor Brachyury, which is necessary for notochord development in all chordates. We found that Ciona Brachyury regulates the expression of most, although not all, of these genes. These results shed light on the genetic regulatory program underlying notochord formation in Ciona and possibly other chordates. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Differential developmental expression of transcription factors GATA-4 and GATA-6, their cofactor FOG-2 and downstream target genes in testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salonen, Jonna; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Mannisto, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is the most common malignancy among young males. The pre-invasive precursor, carcinoma in situ testis (CIS), presumably originates from arrested and transformed fetal gonocytes. Given that GATA transcription factors have essential roles in embryonic and testicular deve...... development, we explored the expression of GATA-4, GATA-6, cofactor friend of GATA (FOG)-2, and downstream target genes during human testis development and addressed the question whether changes in this pathway may contribute to germ cell neoplasms....

  6. PAX-FOXO1 Fusion Status Drives Unfavorable Outcome for Children With Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Children’s Oncology Group Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapek, Stephen X.; Anderson, James; Barr, Frederic G.; Bridge, Julia A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Parham, David M.; Rudzinski, Erin R.; Triche, Timothy; Hawkins, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is divided into two major histological subtypes: alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS), with most ARMS expressing one of two oncogenic genes fusing PAX3 or PAX7 with FOXO1 (P3F and P7F, respectively). The Children’s Oncology Group (COG) carried out a multi-institutional clinical trial to evaluate the prognostic value of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status. Methods Study participants were treated on COG protocol D9803 for intermediate risk ARMS or ERMS using multi-agent chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Central diagnostic pathology review and molecular testing for fusion genes were carried out on prospectively collected specimens. Event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were correlated with histological subtype and PAX-FOXO1 status. Results Of 616 eligible D9803 enrollees, 434 cases had adequate clinical, molecular, and pathology data for definitive classification as ERMS, ARMS P3F+ or P7F+, or ARMSn (without detectable fusion). EFS was worse for those with ARMS P3F+ (54%) and P7F+ (65%) than those with ERMS (77%; P < 0.001). EFS for ARMSn and ERMS were not statistically different (90% vs. 77%, P = 0.15). ARMS P3F+had poorer OS (64%) than ARMS P7F+ (87%), ARMSn (89%), and ERMS (82%; P = 0.006). Conclusions ARMSn has an outcome similar to ERMS and superior EFS compared to ARMS with either P3F or P7F, when given therapy designed for children with intermediate risk RMS. This prospective analysis supports incorporation of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status into risk stratification and treatment allocation. PMID:23526739

  7. The pro1(+) gene from Sordaria macrospora encodes a C6 zinc finger transcription factor required for fruiting body development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masloff, S; Pöggeler, S; Kück, U

    1999-05-01

    During sexual morphogenesis, the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora differentiates into multicellular fruiting bodies called perithecia. Previously it has been shown that this developmental process is under polygenic control. To further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in fruiting body formation, we generated the protoperithecia forming mutant pro1, in which the normal development of protoperithecia into perithecia has been disrupted. We succeeded in isolating a cosmid clone from an indexed cosmid library, which was able to complement the pro1(-) mutation. Deletion analysis, followed by DNA sequencing, subsequently demonstrated that fertility was restored to the pro1 mutant by an open reading frame encoding a 689-amino-acid polypeptide, which we named PRO1. A region from this polypeptide shares significant homology with the DNA-binding domains found in fungal C6 zinc finger transcription factors, such as the GAL4 protein from yeast. However, other typical regions of C6 zinc finger proteins, such as dimerization elements, are absent in PRO1. The involvement of the pro1(+) gene in fruiting body development was further confirmed by trying to complement the mutant phenotype with in vitro mutagenized and truncated versions of the pro1 open reading frame. Southern hybridization experiments also indicated that pro1(+) homologues are present in other sexually propagating filamentous ascomycetes.

  8. In silico identification of transcription factors associated with the biosynthesis of carotenoids in corn ( Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zinati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids, a diverse group of colorful pigments, contribute to the development, light harvesting and photoprotection in plants as well as human health. Due to the interesting properties of carotenoids, enhanced carotenoid biosynthesis has been of ongoing interest. Recent advances in computational biology and bioinformatics make it more feasible to understand the transcriptional regulatory network underlying carotenoid biosynthesis. Studies on carotenoid biosynthesis in corn ( Zea mays L. have indicated the pivotal role of the phytoene synthase gene PSY1 (accession: GRMZM2G300348 in endosperm color and carotenoid accumulation in corn kernels. Computational approaches such as Genomatix, PlantPAN, PlantCARE, PlantTFDB and IGDE6 have been used for promoter prediction, regulatory features and transcription factor identification, as well as pairwise promoter comparisons. Four transcripts have been identified for the PSY1 gene. Based on Genomatix and PlantPAN, the promoter predicted for GRMZM2G300348_T01 was different from that predicted for the other three transcripts (GRMZM2G300348_T02, GRMZM2G300348_T03 and GRMZM2G300348_T04. The results indiated that the promoter of GRMZM2G300348_T01 has more diverse motifs involved in hormonal/environmental stress responses. The most significant result obtained from this study is the discovery of two transcription factors belonging to the HB family that are co-expressed with all four transcripts of PSY1 under environmental stresses. It is, therefore, likely that these transcription factors may act as critical regulators of PSY1 gene expression in corn. Identification of the proteins acting upstream of PSY1 within corn will shed light on the fine tuning of PSY1 expression regulation. Such an understanding would also contribute to metabolic engineering aimed at enhanced carotenoid biosynthesis.

  9. Mechanism of Androgen Receptor Corepression by CKβBP2/CRIF1, a Multifunctional Transcription Factor Coregulator Expressed in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jiann-an; Bai, Suxia; Grossman, Gail; Titus, Mark A.; Ford, O. Harris; Pop, Elena A.; Smith, Gary J.; Mohler, James L.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; French, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor coregulator Casein kinase IIβbinding protein 2 or CR6-interacting factor 1 (CKβBP2/CRIF1) binds the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells and in response to dihydrotestosterone localizes with AR on the prostate-specific antigen gene enhancer, but does not bind DNA suggesting CKβBP2/CRIF1 localization in chromatin is determined by AR. In this study we show also that CKβBP2/CRIF1 inhibits wild-type AR and AR N-terminal transcriptional activity, binds to the AR...

  10. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  11. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Tretyakov

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  12. Peroxiredoxin 6 expression is inversely correlated with nuclear factor-κB activation during Clonorchis sinensis infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Jhang Ho; Son, Woo Chan; Seo, Sang-Beom; Hong, Sung-Jong; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2016-10-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is a carcinogenic human liver fluke. Its infection promotes persistent oxidative stress and chronic inflammation environments in the bile duct and surrounding liver tissues owing to direct contact with worms and their excretory-secretory products (ESPs), provoking epithelial hyperplasia, periductal fibrosis, and cholangiocarcinogenesis. We examined the reciprocal regulation of two ESP-induced redox-active proteins, NF-κB and peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6), during C. sinensis infection. Prdx6 overexpression suppressed intracellular free-radical generation by inhibiting NADPH oxidase2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase activation in the ESP-treated cholangiocarcinoma cells, substantially attenuating NF-κB-mediated inflammation. NF-κB overexpression decreased Prdx6 transcription levels by binding to two κB sites within the promoter. This transcriptional repression was compensated for by other ESP-induced redox-active transcription factors, including erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ). Distribution of immunoreactive Prdx6 and NF-κB was distinct in the early stages of infection in mouse livers but shared concomitant localization in the later stages. The intensity and extent of their immunoreactive staining in infected mouse livers are proportional to lesion severity and infection duration. The constitutive elevations of Prdx6 and NF-κB during C. sinensis infection may be associated with more severe persistent hepatobiliary abnormalities mediated by clonorchiasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA repair helicase: a component of BTF2 (TFIIH) basic transcription factor. (research article)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Schaeffer; R. Roy (Richard); S. Humbert; V. Moncollin; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Chambon; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 basic transcription factor (also called TFIIH), which is similar to the delta factor in rat and factor b in yeast, is required for class II gene transcription. A strand displacement assay was used to show that highly purified preparation of BTF2 had an adenosine

  14. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Troels T; Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida

    2008-01-01

    -founded choice. METHODOLOGY: We introduce a software package, Asap, for fast searching with position weight matrices that include several standard methods for assessing over-representation. We have compared the ability of these methods to detect over-represented transcription factor binding sites in artificial......BACKGROUND: In studies of gene regulation the efficient computational detection of over-represented transcription factor binding sites is an increasingly important aspect. Several published methods can be used for testing whether a set of hypothesised co-regulated genes share a common regulatory...... regime based on the occurrence of the modelled transcription factor binding sites. However there is little or no information available for guiding the end users choice of method. Furthermore it would be necessary to obtain several different software programs from various sources to make a well...

  15. Valproic acid disrupts the oscillatory expression of core circadian rhythm transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Chanel A; Malm, Scott W; Jaime-Frias, Rosa; Smith, Catharine L

    2018-01-15

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a well-established therapeutic used in treatment of seizure and mood disorders as well as migraines and a known hepatotoxicant. About 50% of VPA users experience metabolic disruptions, including weight gain, hyperlipidemia, and hyperinsulinemia, among others. Several of these metabolic abnormalities are similar to the effects of circadian rhythm disruption. In the current study, we examine the effect of VPA exposure on the expression of core circadian transcription factors that drive the circadian clock via a transcription-translation feedback loop. In cells with an unsynchronized clock, VPA simultaneously upregulated the expression of genes encoding core circadian transcription factors that regulate the positive and negative limbs of the feedback loop. Using low dose glucocorticoid, we synchronized cultured fibroblast cells to a circadian oscillatory pattern. Whether VPA was added at the time of synchronization or 12h later at CT12, we found that VPA disrupted the oscillatory expression of multiple genes encoding essential transcription factors that regulate circadian rhythm. Therefore, we conclude that VPA has a potent effect on the circadian rhythm transcription-translation feedback loop that may be linked to negative VPA side effects in humans. Furthermore, our study suggests potential chronopharmacology implications of VPA usage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. DOT/FAA Human Factors Workshop on Aviation (5th). Transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    This document is a verbatim transcript of the proceedings of the Fifth Human Factors Workshop held at the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on July 7-9, 1981. The Sixth Human Factors Workshop was held at the same facility ...

  17. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Töpf

    Full Text Available Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF.We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1 in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network.This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  18. The transcription factor ATF3 is upregulated during chondrocyte differentiation and represses cyclin D1 and A gene transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Claudine G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coordinated chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are required for normal endochondral bone growth. Transcription factors binding to the cyclicAMP response element (CRE are known to regulate these processes. One member of this family, Activating Tanscription Factor 3 (ATF3, is expressed during skeletogenesis and acts as a transcriptional repressor, but the function of this protein in chondrogenesis is unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that Atf3 mRNA levels increase during mouse chondrocyte differentiation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, Atf3 mRNA levels are increased in response to cytochalasin D treatment, an inducer of chondrocyte maturation. This is accompanied by increased Atf3 promoter activity in cytochalasin D-treated chondrocytes. We had shown earlier that transcription of the cell cycle genes cyclin D1 and cyclin A in chondrocytes is dependent on CREs. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of ATF3 in primary mouse chondrocytes results in reduced transcription of both genes, as well as decreased activity of a CRE reporter plasmid. Repression of cyclin A transcription by ATF3 required the CRE in the cyclin A promoter. In parallel, ATF3 overexpression reduces the activity of a SOX9-dependent promoter and increases the activity of a RUNX2-dependent promoter. Conclusion Our data suggest that transcriptional induction of the Atf3 gene in maturing chondrocytes results in down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin A expression as well as activation of RUNX2-dependent transcription. Therefore, ATF3 induction appears to facilitate cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation of chondrocytes.

  19. Transcription factors as readers and effectors of DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Heng; Wang, Guohua; Qian, Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to decode DNA methylomes at single-base-pair resolution under various physiological conditions. Many aberrant or differentially methylated sites have been discovered, but the mechanisms by which changes in DNA methylation lead to observed phenotypes, such as cancer, remain elusive. The classical view of methylation-mediated protein-DNA interactions is that only proteins with a methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) can interact with methylated DNA. However, evidence is emerging to suggest that transcription factors lacking a MBD can also interact with methylated DNA. The identification of these proteins and the elucidation of their characteristics and the biological consequences of methylation-dependent transcription factor-DNA interactions are important stepping stones towards a mechanistic understanding of methylation-mediated biological processes, which have crucial implications for human development and disease.

  20. The MYST family histone acetyltransferase complex regulates stress resistance and longevity through transcriptional control of DAF-16/FOXO transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Takako; Uno, Masaharu; Honjoh, Sakiko; Nishida, Eisuke

    2017-08-09

    The well-known link between longevity and the Sir2 histone deacetylase family suggests that histone deacetylation, a modification associated with repressed chromatin, is beneficial to longevity. However, the molecular links between histone acetylation and longevity remain unclear. Here, we report an unexpected finding that the MYST family histone acetyltransferase complex (MYS-1/TRR-1 complex) promotes rather than inhibits stress resistance and longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans Our results show that these beneficial effects are largely mediated through transcriptional up-regulation of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16. MYS-1 and TRR-1 are recruited to the promoter regions of the daf-16 gene, where they play a role in histone acetylation, including H4K16 acetylation. Remarkably, we also find that the human MYST family Tip60/TRRAP complex promotes oxidative stress resistance by up-regulating the expression of FOXO transcription factors in human cells. Tip60 is recruited to the promoter regions of the foxo1 gene, where it increases H4K16 acetylation levels. Our results thus identify the evolutionarily conserved role of the MYST family acetyltransferase as a key epigenetic regulator of DAF-16/FOXO transcription factors. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Multiple transcription factors directly regulate Hox gene lin-39 expression in ventral hypodermal cells of the C. elegans embryo and larva, including the hypodermal fate regulators LIN-26 and ELT-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ju; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M; Eisenmann, David M

    2014-05-13

    Hox genes encode master regulators of regional fate specification during early metazoan development. Much is known about the initiation and regulation of Hox gene expression in Drosophila and vertebrates, but less is known in the non-arthropod invertebrate model system, C. elegans. The C. elegans Hox gene lin-39 is required for correct fate specification in the midbody region, including the Vulval Precursor Cells (VPCs). To better understand lin-39 regulation and function, we aimed to identify transcription factors necessary for lin-39 expression in the VPCs, and in particular sought factors that initiate lin-39 expression in the embryo. We used the yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) method to screen for factors that bound to 13 fragments from the lin-39 region: twelve fragments contained sequences conserved between C. elegans and two other nematode species, while one fragment was known to drive reporter gene expression in the early embryo in cells that generate the VPCs. Sixteen transcription factors that bind to eight lin-39 genomic fragments were identified in yeast, and we characterized several factors by verifying their physical interactions in vitro, and showing that reduction of their function leads to alterations in lin-39 levels and lin-39::GFP reporter expression in vivo. Three factors, the orphan nuclear hormone receptor NHR-43, the hypodermal fate regulator LIN-26, and the GATA factor ELT-6 positively regulate lin-39 expression in the embryonic precursors to the VPCs. In particular, ELT-6 interacts with an enhancer that drives GFP expression in the early embryo, and the ELT-6 site we identified is necessary for proper embryonic expression. These three factors, along with the factors ZTF-17, BED-3 and TBX-9, also positively regulate lin-39 expression in the larval VPCs. These results significantly expand the number of factors known to directly bind and regulate lin-39 expression, identify the first factors required for lin-39 expression in the embryo, and hint at a

  2. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate ... alignments with parts annotated as gap lessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair- profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. ... Much research has gone into the study of the evolution of.

  3. Identification of a novel and unique transcription factor in the intraerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Komaki-Yasuda

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of stage-specific gene regulation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are largely unclear, with only a small number of specific regulatory transcription factors (AP2 family having been identified. In particular, the transcription factors that function in the intraerythrocytic stage remain to be elucidated. Previously, as a model case for stage-specific transcription in the P. falciparum intraerythrocytic stage, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of pf1-cys-prx, a trophozoite/schizont-specific gene, and suggested that some nuclear factors bind specifically to the cis-element of pf1-cys-prx and enhance transcription. In the present study, we purified nuclear factors from parasite nuclear extract by 5 steps of chromatography, and identified a factor termed PREBP. PREBP is not included in the AP2 family, and is a novel protein with four K-homology (KH domains. The KH domain is known to be found in RNA-binding or single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. PREBP is well conserved in Plasmodium species and partially conserved in phylum Apicomplexa. To evaluate the effects of PREBP overexpression, we used a transient overexpression and luciferase assay combined approach. Overexpression of PREBP markedly enhanced luciferase expression under the control of the pf1-cys-prx cis-element. These results provide the first evidence of a novel transcription factor that activates the gene expression in the malaria parasite intraerythrocytic stage. These findings enhance our understanding of the evolution of specific transcription machinery in Plasmodium and other eukaryotes.

  4. The T-box transcription factor Brachyury regulates epithelial–mesenchymal transition in association with cancer stem-like cells in adenoid cystic carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, Miyuki; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Imajyo, Ikumi; Ishii, Kotaro; Chigita, Satomi; Seki, Katsuhiro; Kobayashi, Yousuke; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu

    2012-01-01

    The high frequencies of recurrence and distant metastasis of adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) emphasize the need to better understand the biological factors associated with these outcomes. To analyze the mechanisms of AdCC metastasis, we established the green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transfected subline ACCS-GFP from the AdCC parental cell line and the metastatic ACCS-M GFP line from an in vivo metastasis model. Using these cell lines, we investigated the involvement of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cell (CSCs) in AdCC metastasis by real-time RT-PCR for EMT related genes and stem cell markers. Characteristics of CSCs were also analyzed by sphere-forming ability and tumorigenicity. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) silencing of target gene was also performed. ACCS-M GFP demonstrated characteristics of EMT and additionally displayed sphere-forming ability and high expression of EMT-related genes (Snail, Twist1, Twist2, Slug, zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 and 2 [Zeb1 and Zeb2], glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta [Gsk3β and transforming growth factor beta 2 [Tgf-β2]), stem cell markers (Nodal, Lefty, Oct-4, Pax6, Rex1, and Nanog), and differentiation markers (sex determining region Y [Sox2], Brachyury, and alpha fetoprotein [Afp]). These observations suggest that ACCS-M GFP shows the characteristics of CSCs and CSCs may be involved in the EMT of AdCC. Surprisingly, shRNA silencing of the T-box transcription factor Brachyury (also a differentiation marker) resulted in downregulation of the EMT and stem cell markers. In addition, sphere-forming ability, EMT characteristics, and tumorigenicity were simultaneously lost. Brachyury expression in clinical samples of AdCC was extremely high and closely related to EMT. This finding suggests that regulation of EMT by Brachyury in clinical AdCC may parallel that observed in vitro in this study. The use of a single cell line is a limitation of this study. However, parallel data from in vitro and

  5. Detection of E6/E7 HPV oncogene transcripts as biomarker of cervical intaepithelial displasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carcheri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that only persistent infection with high risk types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV HR is a significant risk factor for the development of an invasive squamous cervical cancer. The overexpression of viral oncogenes E6/E7 of HPV is considered a necessary process for incurring in a malignant phenotype.A HPV infection can be identified by detection of HPV DNA in biological samples, but the DNAbased tests cannot delineate between transient or persistent and potentially transforming infection. Instead there is many evidence to suggest that detection of HPV gene expression may constitute a more specific approach to highlight a clinically significant infection. Especially seems that the detection of E6/E7 transcripts can be usefully used for identify the women with a persistent HPV infection that will can induce a future cervical cancer. The aim of our study is to investigate if the detection of oncogenic viral gene activity by detecting transcripts of the E6 and E7 genes can be most usefull of HPV-DNA test in the triage of ASCUS or low grade cervical lesions. Our results confirm that HPV E6/E7 mRNA test can be considered a promising method to stratify HPV positive women for risk of future high-grade cervical lesions or cervical intaepithelial neoplasia.

  6. Induction of specific neuron types by overexpression of single transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teratani-Ota, Yusuke; Yamamizu, Kohei; Piao, Yulan; Sharova, Lioudmila; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S H; Sharov, Alexei A

    2016-10-01

    Specific neuronal types derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can facilitate mechanistic studies and potentially aid in regenerative medicine. Existing induction methods, however, mostly rely on the effects of the combined action of multiple added growth factors, which generally tend to result in mixed populations of neurons. Here, we report that overexpression of specific transcription factors (TFs) in ESCs can rather guide the differentiation of ESCs towards specific neuron lineages. Analysis of data on gene expression changes 2 d after induction of each of 185 TFs implicated candidate TFs for further ESC differentiation studies. Induction of 23 TFs (out of 49 TFs tested) for 6 d facilitated neural differentiation of ESCs as inferred from increased proportion of cells with neural progenitor marker PSA-NCAM. We identified early activation of the Notch signaling pathway as a common feature of most potent inducers of neural differentiation. The majority of neuron-like cells generated by induction of Ascl1, Smad7, Nr2f1, Dlx2, Dlx4, Nr2f2, Barhl2, and Lhx1 were GABA-positive and expressed other markers of GABAergic neurons. In the same way, we identified Lmx1a and Nr4a2 as inducers for neurons bearing dopaminergic markers and Isl1, Fezf2, and St18 for cholinergic motor neurons. A time-course experiment with induction of Ascl1 showed early upregulation of most neural-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Sets of Ascl1-induced mRNAs and miRNAs were enriched in Ascl1 targets. In further studies, enrichment of cells obtained with the induction of Ascl1, Smad7, and Nr2f1 using microbeads resulted in essentially pure population of neuron-like cells with expression profiles similar to neural tissues and expressed markers of GABAergic neurons. In summary, this study indicates that induction of transcription factors is a promising approach to generate cultures that show the transcription profiles characteristic of specific neural cell types.

  7. bZIPs and WRKYs: two large transcription factor families executing two different functional strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles eMarco Llorca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available bZIPs and WRKYs are two important plant transcription factor families regulating diverse developmental and stress-related processes. Since a partial overlap in these biological processes is obvious, it can be speculated that they fulfill non-redundant functions in a complex regulatory network. Here, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms that are so far described for bZIPs and WRKYs. bZIP factors need to heterodimerize for DNA-binding and regulation of transcription, and based on a bioinformatics approach, bZIPs can build up more than the double of protein interactions than WRKYs. In contrast, an enrichment of the WRKY DNA-binding motifs can be found in WRKY promoters, a phenomenon which is not observed for the bZIP family. Thus, the two transcription factor families follow two different functional strategies in which WRKYs regulate each other’s transcription in a transcriptional network whereas bZIP action relies on intensive heterodimerization.

  8. Cisplatin- and UV-damaged DNA lure the basal transcription factor TFIID/TBP.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vichi; F. Coin (Frédéric); J-P. Renaud (Jean-Paul); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Moras; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA connection between transcription and DNA repair was demonstrated previously through the characterization of TFIIH. Using filter binding as well as in vitro transcription challenge competition assays, we now show that the promoter recognition factor TATA box-binding protein (TBP)/TFIID

  9. Molecular and clinical characterization of Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian cohort with two novel PAX3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayeb; Emamdjomeh, Hesam; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-15

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a disease of abnormal neural-crest derived melanocyte development characterized by hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances in hair, eyes and skin. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4, where WS1 is recognized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, with PAX3 being the only known gene involved. This study aimed at investigating PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics of WS1 in a group of Iranian patients. A total of 12 WS1 patients from four unrelated Iranian families were enrolled. Waardenburg consortium guidelines were used for WS1 diagnosis. A detailed family history was traced and a thorough clinical examination was performed for all participants. Furthermore, WS1 patients underwent screening for PAX3 mutations using PCR-sequencing. Dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys were observed in all patients. Early graying, hair discoloration, hypoplastic blue eyes (characteristic brilliant blue iris) and hearing loss were the most common features observed, while heterochromia iridis was the least frequently observed sign among the studied Iranian WS1 patients. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed four mutations including c.667C>T, c.784C>T, c.951delT and c.451+3A>C. Two of the four mutations reported here (c.951delT and c.451+3A>C) are being reported for the first time in this study. Our data provide insight into genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of WS1 in an Iranian series of patients. Our results expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations and may have implications for the genetic counseling of WS in Iran. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Engineered zinc-finger transcription factors inhibit the replication and transcription of HBV in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Wang, Junxia; Xu, Dengfeng; Bai, Huili; Zhang, Yangli; Zhang, Yuhong; Li, Xiaosong

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, an artificial zinc-finger transcription factor eukaryotic expression vector specifically recognizing and binding to the hepatitis B virus (HBV) enhancer (Enh) was constructed, which inhibited the replication and expression of HBV DNA. The HBV EnhI‑specific pcDNA3.1‑artificial transcription factor (ATF) vector was successfully constructed, and then transformed or injected into HepG2.2.15 cells and HBV transgenic mice, respectively. The results demonstrated that the HBV EnhI (1,070‑1,234 bp)‑specific ATF significantly inhibited the replication and transcription of HBV DNA in vivo and in vitro. The HBV EnhI‑specific ATF may be a meritorious component of progressive combination therapies for eliminating HBV DNA in infected patients. A radical cure for chronic HBV infection may become feasible by using this bioengineering technology.

  11. MADS interactomics : towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of plant MADS-domain transcription factor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smaczniak, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions are essential for the molecular action of transcription factors. By combinatorial binding to target gene promoters, transcription factors are able to up- or down-regulate the expression of these genes. MADS-domain proteins comprise a large family of

  12. Lansoprazole Upregulates Polyubiquitination of the TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 6 and Facilitates Runx2-mediated Osteoblastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kenichi; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Bisei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2015-12-01

    The transcription factor, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of the mesenchymal stem cells to the osteochondroblast lineages. We found by the drug repositioning strategy that a proton pump inhibitor, lansoprazole, enhances nuclear accumulation of Runx2 and induces osteoblastogenesis of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Systemic administration of lansoprazole to a rat femoral fracture model increased osteoblastogenesis. Dissection of signaling pathways revealed that lansoprazole activates a noncanonical bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) activated kinase-1 (TAK1)-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. We found by in cellulo ubiquitination studies that lansoprazole enhances polyubiquitination of the TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and by in vitro ubiquitination studies that the enhanced polyubiquitination of TRAF6 is attributed to the blocking of a deubiquitination enzyme, cylindromatosis (CYLD). Structural modeling and site-directed mutagenesis of CYLD demonstrated that lansoprazole tightly fits in a pocket of CYLD where the C-terminal tail of ubiquitin lies. Lansoprazole is a potential therapeutic agent for enhancing osteoblastic differentiation.

  13. CEBPG transcription factor correlates with antioxidant and DNA repair genes in normal bronchial epithelial cells but not in individuals with bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, D'Anna N; Crawford, Erin L; Khuder, Sadik A; Hernandez, Dawn-Alita; Yoon, Youngsook; Willey, James C

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of bronchogenic carcinoma (BC), yet only 10–15% of heavy smokers develop BC and it is likely that this variation in risk is, in part, genetically determined. We previously reported a set of antioxidant genes for which transcript abundance was lower in normal bronchial epithelial cells (NBEC) of BC individuals compared to non-BC individuals. In unpublished studies of the same NBEC samples, transcript abundance values for several DNA repair genes were correlated with these antioxidant genes. From these data, we hypothesized that antioxidant and DNA repair genes are co-regulated by one or more transcription factors and that inter-individual variation in expression and/or function of one or more of these transcription factors is responsible for inter-individual variation in risk for BC. The putative transcription factor recognition sites common to six of the antioxidant genes were identified through in silico DNA sequence analysis. The transcript abundance values of these transcription factors (n = 6) and an expanded group of antioxidant and DNA repair genes (n = 16) were measured simultaneously by quantitative PCR in NBEC of 24 non-BC and 25 BC individuals. CEBPG transcription factor was significantly (p < 0.01) correlated with eight of the antioxidant or DNA repair genes in non-BC individuals but not in BC individuals. In BC individuals the correlation with CEBPG was significantly (p < 0.01) lower than that of non-BC individuals for four of the genes (XRCC1, ERCC5, GSTP1, and SOD1) and the difference was nearly significant for GPX1. The only other transcription factor correlated with any of these five target genes in non-BC individuals was E2F1. E2F1 was correlated with GSTP1 among non-BC individuals, but in contrast to CEBPG, there was no significant difference in this correlation in non-BC individuals compared to BC individuals. We conclude that CEBPG is the transcription factor primarily responsible for regulating

  14. "Avaliação do envolvimento dos genes PAX8 e rTSH no hipotireoidismo congênito em pacientes com disgenesia tireoidiana"

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Perone

    2005-01-01

    Estudamos 32 crianças com HC devido à agenesia ou ectopia tireoideana para mutações no PAX8 e 30 crianças com hipoplasia da tireóide para mutações no rTSH. Todos os exons de ambos os genes foram amplificados a partir do DNA genômico, seguido por seqüenciamento direto. Encontramos, em dois pacientes com ectopia, duas alterações no gene PAX8, uma no promotor, e outra no exon um. Os outros indivíduos estudados apresentaram as seqüências codificáveis dos genes PAX8 e rTSH normais. Em relação ao c...

  15. NAC Transcription Factors of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and their Involvement in Leaf Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    parts of the senescence process. The specific aims of this study were therefore (1) to establish and characterise the NAC transcription factors of the model cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (2) to identify and study putative barley NAC transcription factors involved in the regulation of leaf...

  16. Genetic Variants in Transcription Factors Are Associated With the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S; Yee, SW; Stocker, S; Mosley, JD; Kubo, M; Castro, R; Mefford, JA; Wen, C; Liang, X; Witte, J; Brett, C; Maeda, S; Simpson, MD; Hedderson, MM; Davis, RL; Roden, DM; Giacomini, KM; Savic, RM

    2014-01-01

    One-third of type 2 diabetes patients do not respond to metformin. Genetic variants in metformin transporters have been extensively studied as a likely contributor to this high failure rate. Here, we investigate, for the first time, the effect of genetic variants in transcription factors on metformin pharmacokinetics (PK) and response. Overall, 546 patients and healthy volunteers contributed their genome-wide, pharmacokinetic (235 subjects), and HbA1c data (440 patients) for this analysis. Five variants in specificity protein 1 (SP1), a transcription factor that modulates the expression of metformin transporters, were associated with changes in treatment HbA1c (P < 0.01) and metformin secretory clearance (P < 0.05). Population pharmacokinetic modeling further confirmed a 24% reduction in apparent clearance in homozygous carriers of one such variant, rs784888. Genetic variants in other transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-α and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α, were significantly associated with HbA1c change only. Overall, our study highlights the importance of genetic variants in transcription factors as modulators of metformin PK and response. PMID:24853734

  17. Pluripotency transcription factors and Tet1/2 maintain Brd4-independent stem cell identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Lydia W S; Vardhana, Santosha A; Carey, Bryce W; Alonso-Curbelo, Direna; Koche, Richard; Chen, Yanyang; Wen, Duancheng; King, Bryan; Radler, Megan R; Rafii, Shahin; Lowe, Scott W; Allis, C David; Thompson, Craig B

    2018-05-01

    A robust network of transcription factors and an open chromatin landscape are hallmarks of the naive pluripotent state. Recently, the acetyllysine reader Brd4 has been implicated in stem cell maintenance, but the relative contribution of Brd4 to pluripotency remains unclear. Here, we show that Brd4 is dispensable for self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). When maintained in their ground state, ESCs retain transcription factor binding and chromatin accessibility independent of Brd4 function or expression. In metastable ESCs, Brd4 independence can be achieved by increased expression of pluripotency transcription factors, including STAT3, Nanog or Klf4, so long as the DNA methylcytosine oxidases Tet1 and Tet2 are present. These data reveal that Brd4 is not essential for ESC self-renewal. Rather, the levels of pluripotency transcription factor abundance and Tet1/2 function determine the extent to which bromodomain recognition of protein acetylation contributes to the maintenance of gene expression and cell identity.

  18. Removal of copper (II) from aqueous solutions by flotation using polyaluminum chloride silicate (PAX-XL60 S) as coagulant and carbonate ion as activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, S E; Mahmoud, I A; Ragab, A H

    2006-01-01

    Flotation is a separation technology for removing toxic heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Here a simple and rapid flotation procedure is presented for the removal of copper(II) from aqueous solutions. It is based on the use of polyaluminum chloride silicate (PAX-XL60 S) as coagulant and flocculent, carbonate ion as activator and oleic acid (HOL) as surfactant. Both ion and precipitate flotation are included depending on the solution pH. Ion and precipitate flotation in the aqueous HOL-PAX-XL60 S-Cu2+-CO3(2-) system gave powerful preferential removal of Cu2+ (F -100%) over the HOL-PAX-XL60 S-Cu2+ system containing no CO3(2+) ion (F approximately 86%). The role of CO3(2-) ion is also evident from decreasing the dose of PAX-XL60 S from 700 mg l(-1) to 200 mg l(-1). The other parameters, influencing the flotation process, namely: metal ion, surfactant and PAX-XL60 S concentrations, ionic strength, temperature and foreign ions were examined. Moreover, the procedure was successfully applied to recover Cu2+ ions from different volumes up to 11 and from natural water samples.

  19. Function of the PHA-4/FOXA transcription factor during C. elegans post-embryonic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Di

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background pha-4 encodes a forkhead box (FOX A transcription factor serving as the C. elegans pharynx organ identity factor during embryogenesis. Using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE, comparison of gene expression profiles between growing stages animals and long-lived, developmentally diapaused dauer larvae revealed that pha-4 transcription is increased in the dauer stage. Results Knocking down pha-4 expression by RNAi during post-embryonic development showed that PHA-4 is essential for dauer recovery, gonad and vulva development. daf-16, which encodes a FOXO transcription factor regulated by insulin/IGF-1 signaling, shows overlapping expression patterns and a loss-of-function post-embryonic phenotype similar to that of pha-4 during dauer recovery. pha-4 RNAi and daf-16 mutations have additive effects on dauer recovery, suggesting these two regulators may function in parallel pathways. Gene expression studies using RT-PCR and GFP reporters showed that pha-4 transcription is elevated under starvation, and a conserved forkhead transcription factor binding site in the second intron of pha-4 is important for the neuronal expression. The vulval transcription of lag-2, which encodes a ligand for the LIN-12/Notch lateral signaling pathway, is inhibited by pha-4 RNAi, indicating that LAG-2 functions downstream of PHA-4 in vulva development. Conclusion Analysis of PHA-4 during post-embryonic development revealed previously unsuspected functions for this important transcriptional regulator in dauer recovery, and may help explain the network of transcriptional control integrating organogenesis with the decision between growth and developmental arrest at the dauer entry and exit stages.

  20. Nuclear factor ETF specifically stimulates transcription from promoters without a TATA box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, R; Merlino, G T; Pastan, I

    1989-09-15

    Transcription factor ETF stimulates the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene which does not have a TATA box in the promoter region. Here, we show that ETF recognizes various GC-rich sequences including stretches of deoxycytidine or deoxyguanosine residues and GC boxes with similar affinities. ETF also binds to TATA boxes but with a lower affinity. ETF stimulated in vitro transcription from several promoters without TATA boxes but had little or no effect on TATA box-containing promoters even though they had strong ETF-binding sites. These inactive ETF-binding sites became functional when placed upstream of the EGFR promoter whose own ETF-binding sites were removed. Furthermore, when a TATA box was introduced into the EGFR promoter, the responsiveness to ETF was abolished. These results indicate that ETF is a specific transcription factor for promoters which do not contain TATA elements.

  1. Survival-related profile, pathways, and transcription factors in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne P G Crijns

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis due to advanced stage at presentation and either intrinsic or acquired resistance to classic cytotoxic drugs such as platinum and taxoids. Recent large clinical trials with different combinations and sequences of classic cytotoxic drugs indicate that further significant improvement in prognosis by this type of drugs is not to be expected. Currently a large number of drugs, targeting dysregulated molecular pathways in cancer cells have been developed and are introduced in the clinic. A major challenge is to identify those patients who will benefit from drugs targeting these specific dysregulated pathways.The aims of our study were (1 to develop a gene expression profile associated with overall survival in advanced stage serous ovarian cancer, (2 to assess the association of pathways and transcription factors with overall survival, and (3 to validate our identified profile and pathways/transcription factors in an independent set of ovarian cancers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: According to a randomized design, profiling of 157 advanced stage serous ovarian cancers was performed in duplicate using approximately 35,000 70-mer oligonucleotide microarrays. A continuous predictor of overall survival was built taking into account well-known issues in microarray analysis, such as multiple testing and overfitting. A functional class scoring analysis was utilized to assess pathways/transcription factors for their association with overall survival. The prognostic value of genes that constitute our overall survival profile was validated on a fully independent, publicly available dataset of 118 well-defined primary serous ovarian cancers. Furthermore, functional class scoring analysis was also performed on this independent dataset to assess the similarities with results from our own dataset. An 86-gene overall survival profile discriminated between patients with unfavorable and favorable prognosis (median survival, 19

  2. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh

    2014-01-01

    motif on chromatin, and we suggest that this may be a general mechanism for integrating external signals on chromatin. Furthermore, we find evidence of extensive recruitment of transcription factors to hotspots through alternative mechanisms not involving their known motifs and demonstrate...

  3. A novel mutation in PAX3 associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Luo, Jianfen; Zhang, Fengguo; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Mingming; Ma, Yalin; Xu, Lei; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The novel compound heterozygous mutation in PAX3 was the key genetic reason for WS1 in this family, which was useful to the molecular diagnosis of WS1. Screening the pathogenic mutations in a four generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 4-year-old boy according to the Waardenburg syndrome Consortium criteria. The detailed family history revealed four affected members in the family. Routine clinical, audiological examination, and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on four affected and 10 healthy members in this family. The genetic analysis was conducted, including the targeted next-generation sequencing of 127 known deafness genes combined with Sanger sequencing, TA clone and bioinformatic analysis. A novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[169_170insC;172_174delAAG] (p.His57ProfsX55) was identified in PAX3, which was co-segregated with WS1 in the Chinese family. This mutation was absent in the unaffected family members and 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of Pax3 protein further confirmed that the novel compound heterozygous mutation was pathogenic.

  4. Krüppel-like factor 4, a novel transcription factor regulates microglial activation and subsequent neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sulagna

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of microglia, the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS, is the hallmark of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases and other pathological conditions associated with CNS infection. The activation of microglia is often associated with bystander neuronal death. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is one of the important transcription factors known to be associated with microglial activation which upregulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have focused on the role of Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4, one of the zinc-finger transcription factors, in mediating inflammation. However, these studies were limited to peripheral system and its role in CNS is not understood. Our studies focused on the possible role of Klf4 in mediating CNS inflammation. Methods For in vitro studies, mouse microglial BV-2 cell lines were treated with 500 ng/ml Salmonella enterica lipopolysacchride (LPS. Brain tissues were isolated from BALB/c mice administered with 5 mg/kg body weight of LPS. Expressions of Klf4, Cox-2, iNOS and pNF-κB were evaluated using western blotting, quantitative real time PCR, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs. Klf4 knockdown was carried out using SiRNA specific for Klf4 mRNA and luciferase assays and electromobility shift assay (EMSA were performed to study the interaction of Klf4 to iNOS promoter elements in vitro. Co-immunoprecipitation of Klf4 and pNF-κB was done in order to study a possible interaction between the two transcription factors. Results LPS stimulation increased Klf4 expression in microglial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of Klf4 resulted in decreased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MCP-1 and IL-6, along with a significant decrease in iNOS and Cox-2 expression. NO production also decreased as a result of Klf4 knockdown

  5. A transcription factor for cold sensation!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milbrandt Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to feel hot and cold is critical for animals and human beings to survive in the natural environment. Unlike other sensations, the physiology of cold sensation is mostly unknown. In the present study, we use genetically modified mice that do not express nerve growth factor-inducible B (NGFIB to investigate the possible role of NGFIB in cold sensation. We found that genetic deletion of NGFIB selectively affected behavioral responses to cold stimuli while behavioral responses to noxious heat or mechanical stimuli were normal. Furthermore, behavioral responses remained reduced or blocked in NGFIB knockout mice even after repetitive application of cold stimuli. Our results provide strong evidence that the first transcription factor NGFIB determines the ability of animals to respond to cold stimulation.

  6. A regulating element essential for PDGFRA transcription is recognized by neural tube defect-associated PRX homeobox transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, Paul H. L. J.; Toepoel, Mascha; van Oosterhout, Dirk; Afink, Gijs B.; van Zoelen, Everardus J. J.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that deregulated expression of the platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptor (PDGFRA) can be associated with neural tube defects (NTDs) in both men and mice. In the present study, we have investigated the transcription factors that control the up-regulation of PDGFRA

  7. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks.

  8. A Herpesviral Immediate Early Protein Promotes Transcription Elongation of Viral Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Hannah L; Dembowski, Jill A; DeLuca, Neal A

    2017-06-13

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) genes are transcribed by cellular RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II). While four viral immediate early proteins (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and ICP22) function in some capacity in viral transcription, the mechanism by which ICP22 functions remains unclear. We observed that the FACT complex (comprised of SSRP1 and Spt16) was relocalized in infected cells as a function of ICP22. ICP22 was also required for the association of FACT and the transcription elongation factors SPT5 and SPT6 with viral genomes. We further demonstrated that the FACT complex interacts with ICP22 throughout infection. We therefore hypothesized that ICP22 recruits cellular transcription elongation factors to viral genomes for efficient transcription elongation of viral genes. We reevaluated the phenotype of an ICP22 mutant virus by determining the abundance of all viral mRNAs throughout infection by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The accumulation of almost all viral mRNAs late in infection was reduced compared to the wild type, regardless of kinetic class. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), we mapped the location of RNA Pol II on viral genes and found that RNA Pol II levels on the bodies of viral genes were reduced in the ICP22 mutant compared to wild-type virus. In contrast, the association of RNA Pol II with transcription start sites in the mutant was not reduced. Taken together, our results indicate that ICP22 plays a role in recruiting elongation factors like the FACT complex to the HSV-1 genome to allow for efficient viral transcription elongation late in viral infection and ultimately infectious virion production. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 interacts with many cellular proteins throughout productive infection. Here, we demonstrate the interaction of a viral protein, ICP22, with a subset of cellular proteins known to be involved in transcription elongation. We determined that ICP22 is required to recruit the FACT complex and other transcription

  9. Regulation of sonic hedgehog-GLI1 downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, PAX6 and NKX2.2 and their epigenetic status in medulloblastoma and astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhart Charles G

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is critical for cell growth and differentiation. Impairment of this pathway can result in both birth defects and cancer. Despite its importance in cancer development, the Shh pathway has not been thoroughly investigated in tumorigenesis of brain tumors. In this study, we sought to understand the regulatory roles of GLI1, the immediate downstream activator of the Shh signaling pathway on its downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6 in medulloblastoma and astrocytic tumors. Methods We silenced GLI1 expression in medulloblastoma and astrocytic cell lines by transfection of siRNA against GLI1. Subsequently, we performed RT-PCR and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR to assay the expression of downstream target genes PTCH1, Cyclin D2, Plakoglobin, NKX2.2 and PAX6. We also attempted to correlate the pattern of expression of GLI1 and its regulated genes in 14 cell lines and 41 primary medulloblastoma and astrocytoma tumor samples. We also assessed the methylation status of the Cyclin D2 and PTCH1 promoters in these 14 cell lines and 58 primary tumor samples. Results Silencing expression of GLI1 resulted up-regulation of all target genes in the medulloblastoma cell line, while only PTCH1 was up-regulated in astrocytoma. We also observed methylation of the cyclin D2 promoter in a significant number of astrocytoma cell lines (63% and primary astrocytoma tumor samples (32%, but not at all in any medulloblastoma samples. PTCH1 promoter methylation was less frequently observed than Cyclin D2 promoter methylation in astrocytomas, and not at all in medulloblastomas. Conclusions Our results demonstrate different regulatory mechanisms of Shh-GLI1 signaling. These differences vary according to the downstream target gene affected, the origin of the tissue, as well as epigenetic regulation of some of these genes.

  10. ERK-dependent phosphorylation of the transcription initiation factor TIF-IA is required for RNA polymerase I transcription and cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jian; Yuan, Xuejun; Frödin, Morten

    2003-01-01

    -specific transcription initiation factor TIF-IA. Activation of TIF-IA and ribosomal gene transcription is sensitive to PD98059, indicating that TIF-IA is targeted by MAPK in vivo. Phosphopeptide mapping and mutational analysis reveals two serine residues (S633 and S649) that are phosphorylated by ERK and RSK kinases....... Replacement of S649 by alanine inactivates TIF-IA, inhibits pre-rRNA synthesis, and retards cell growth. The results provide a link between growth factor signaling, ribosome production, and cell growth, and may have a major impact on the mechanism of cell transformation....

  11. A mechanistic overview of herbal medicine and botanical compounds to target transcriptional factors in Breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingke; Liu, Yue

    2018-04-01

    The abnormalities of transcription factors, such as NF-κB, STAT, estrogen receptor, play a critical role in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. Due to the limitation of current treatment, transcription factors could be promising therapeutic targets, which have received close attention. In this review, we introduced herbal medicines, as well as botanical compounds that had been verified with anti-tumor properties via regulating transcription factors. Herbs, compounds, as well as formulae reported with various transcriptional targets, were summarized thoroughly, to provide implication for the future research on basic experiment and clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sucrose-induced anthocyanin accumulation in vegetative tissue of Petunia plants requires anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Trinh Ngoc; Naing, Aung Htay; Arun, Muthukrishnan; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Chang Kil

    2016-11-01

    The effects of three different sucrose concentrations on plant growth and anthocyanin accumulation were examined in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic (T 2 ) specimens of the Petunia hybrida cultivar 'Mirage rose' that carried the anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors B-Peru+mPAP1 or RsMYB1. Anthocyanin accumulation was not observed in NT plants in any treatments, whereas a range of anthocyanin accumulation was observed in transgenic plants. The anthocyanin content detected in transgenic plants expressing the anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors (B-Peru+mPAP1 or RsMYB1) was higher than that in NT plants. In addition, increasing sucrose concentration strongly enhanced anthocyanin content as shown by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, wherein increased concentrations of sucrose enhanced transcript levels of the transcription factors that are responsible for the induction of biosynthetic genes involved in anthocyanin synthesis; this pattern was not observed in NT plants. In addition, sucrose affected plant growth, although the effects were different between NT and transgenic plants. Taken together, the application of sucrose could enhance anthocyanin production in vegetative tissue of transgenic Petunia carrying anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors, and this study provides insights about interactive effects of sucrose and transcription factors in anthocyanin biosynthesis in the transgenic plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bar represses dPax2 and decapentaplegic to regulate cell fate and morphogenetic cell death in Drosophila eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongkyun Kang

    Full Text Available The coordinated regulation of cell fate and cell survival is crucial for normal pattern formation in developing organisms. In Drosophila compound eye development, crystalline arrays of hexagonal ommatidia are established by precise assembly of diverse cell types, including the photoreceptor cells, cone cells and interommatidial (IOM pigment cells. The molecular basis for controlling the number of cone and IOM pigment cells during ommatidial pattern formation is not well understood. Here we present evidence that BarH1 and BarH2 homeobox genes are essential for eye patterning by inhibiting excess cone cell differentiation and promoting programmed death of IOM cells. Specifically, we show that loss of Bar from the undifferentiated retinal precursor cells leads to ectopic expression of Prospero and dPax2, two transcription factors essential for cone cell specification, resulting in excess cone cell differentiation. We also show that loss of Bar causes ectopic expression of the TGFβ homolog Decapentaplegic (Dpp posterior to the morphogenetic furrow in the larval eye imaginal disc. The ectopic Dpp expression is not responsible for the formation of excess cone cells in Bar loss-of-function mutant eyes. Instead, it causes reduction in IOM cell death in the pupal stage by antagonizing the function of pro-apoptotic gene reaper. Taken together, this study suggests a novel regulatory mechanism in the control of developmental cell death in which the repression of Dpp by Bar in larval eye disc is essential for IOM cell death in pupal retina.

  14. Nuclear exclusion of transcription factors associated with apoptosis in developing nervous tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Linden

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death in the form of apoptosis involves a network of metabolic events and may be triggered by a variety of stimuli in distinct cells. The nervous system contains several neuron and glial cell types, and developmental events are strongly dependent on selective cell interactions. Retinal explants have been used as a model to investigate apoptosis in nervous tissue. This preparation maintains the structural complexity and cell interactions similar to the retina in situ, and contains cells in all stages of development. We review the finding of nuclear exclusion of several transcription factors during apoptosis in retinal cells. The data reviewed in this paper suggest a link between apoptosis and a failure in the nucleo-cytoplasmic partition of transcription factors. It is argued that the nuclear exclusion of transcription factors may be an integral component of apoptosis both in the nervous system and in other types of cells and tissues.

  15. Engineering synthetic TALE and CRISPR/Cas9 transcription factors for regulating gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Ami M; Gersbach, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Engineered DNA-binding proteins that can be targeted to specific sites in the genome to manipulate gene expression have enabled many advances in biomedical research. This includes generating tools to study fundamental aspects of gene regulation and the development of a new class of gene therapies that alter the expression of endogenous genes. Designed transcription factors have entered clinical trials for the treatment of human diseases and others are in preclinical development. High-throughput and user-friendly platforms for designing synthetic DNA-binding proteins present innovative methods for deciphering cell biology and designing custom synthetic gene circuits. We review two platforms for designing synthetic transcription factors for manipulating gene expression: Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and the RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system. We present an overview of each technology and a guide for designing and assembling custom TALE- and CRISPR/Cas9-based transcription factors. We also discuss characteristics of each platform that are best suited for different applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. NF-κB Transcription Factor Role in Consolidation and Reconsolidation of Persistent Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica ede la Fuente

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is an important molecular process required for long-term neural plasticity and long-term memory formation. Thus, one main interest in molecular neuroscience in the last decades has been the identification of transcription factors that are involved in memory processes. Among them, the NF-κB family of transcription factors has gained interest due to a significant body of evidence that supports a key role of these proteins in synaptic plasticity and memory. In recent years, the interest was particularly reinforced because NF-κB was characterized as an important regulator of synaptogenesis. This function may be explained by its participation in synapse to nucleus communication, as well as a possible local role at the synapse. This review provides an overview of experimental work obtained in the last years, showing the essential role of this transcription factor in memory processes in different learning tasks in mammals. We focus the review on the consolidation and reconsolidation memory phases as well as on the regulation of immediate-early and late genes by epigenetic mechanisms that determine enduring forms of memories.

  17. A systems biology perspective on the role of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Prateek; Rabara, Roel C; Rushton, Paul J

    2014-02-01

    Drought is one of the major challenges affecting crop productivity and yield. However, water stress responses are notoriously multigenic and quantitative with strong environmental effects on phenotypes. It is also clear that water stress often does not occur alone under field conditions but rather in conjunction with other abiotic stresses such as high temperature and high light intensities. A multidisciplinary approach with successful integration of a whole range of -omics technologies will not only define the system, but also provide new gene targets for both transgenic approaches and marker-assisted selection. Transcription factors are major players in water stress signaling and some constitute major hubs in the signaling webs. The main transcription factors in this network include MYB, bHLH, bZIP, ERF, NAC, and WRKY transcription factors. The role of WRKY transcription factors in abiotic stress signaling networks is just becoming apparent and systems biology approaches are starting to define their places in the signaling network. Using systems biology approaches, there are now many transcriptomic analyses and promoter analyses that concern WRKY transcription factors. In addition, reports on nuclear proteomics have identified WRKY proteins that are up-regulated at the protein level by water stress. Interactomics has started to identify different classes of WRKY-interacting proteins. What are often lacking are connections between metabolomics, WRKY transcription factors, promoters, biosynthetic pathways, fluxes and downstream responses. As more levels of the system are characterized, a more detailed understanding of the roles of WRKY transcription factors in drought responses in crops will be obtained.

  18. Pre-announcement of symbiotic guests: transcriptional reprogramming by mycorrhizal lipochitooligosaccharides shows a strict co-dependency on the GRAS transcription factors NSP1 and RAM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohnjec, Natalija; Czaja-Hasse, Lisa F; Hogekamp, Claudia; Küster, Helge

    2015-11-23

    More than 80 % of all terrestrial plant species establish an arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) symbiosis with Glomeromycota fungi. This plant-microbe interaction primarily improves phosphate uptake, but also supports nitrogen, mineral, and water aquisition. During the pre-contact stage, the AM symbiosis is controled by an exchange of diffusible factors from either partner. Amongst others, fungal signals were identified as a mix of sulfated and non-sulfated lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs), being structurally related to rhizobial nodulation (Nod)-factor LCOs that in legumes induce the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. LCO signals are transduced via a common symbiotic signaling pathway (CSSP) that activates a group of GRAS transcription factors (TFs). Using complex gene expression fingerprints as molecular phenotypes, this study primarily intended to shed light on the importance of the GRAS TFs NSP1 and RAM1 for LCO-activated gene expression during pre-symbiotic signaling. We investigated the genome-wide transcriptional responses in 5 days old primary roots of the Medicago truncatula wild type and four symbiotic mutants to a 6 h challenge with LCO signals supplied at 10(-7/-8) M. We were able to show that during the pre-symbiotic stage, sulfated Myc-, non-sulfated Myc-, and Nod-LCO-activated gene expression almost exclusively depends on the LysM receptor kinase NFP and is largely controled by the CSSP, although responses independent of this pathway exist. Our results show that downstream of the CSSP, gene expression activation by Myc-LCOs supplied at 10(-7/-8) M strictly required both the GRAS transcription factors RAM1 and NSP1, whereas those genes either co- or specifically activated by Nod-LCOs displayed a preferential NSP1-dependency. RAM1, a central regulator of root colonization by AM fungi, controled genes activated by non-sulfated Myc-LCOs during the pre-symbiotic stage that are also up-regulated in areas with early physical contact, e.g. hyphopodia and

  19. Global transcriptional regulatory network for Escherichia coli robustly connects gene expression to transcription factor activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Sastry, Anand; Mih, Nathan; Kim, Donghyuk; Tan, Justin; Lloyd, Colton J.; Gao, Ye; Yang, Laurence; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) have been studied intensely for >25 y. Yet, even for the Escherichia coli TRN—probably the best characterized TRN—several questions remain. Here, we address three questions: (i) How complete is our knowledge of the E. coli TRN; (ii) how well can we predict gene expression using this TRN; and (iii) how robust is our understanding of the TRN? First, we reconstructed a high-confidence TRN (hiTRN) consisting of 147 transcription factors (TFs) regulating 1,538 transcription units (TUs) encoding 1,764 genes. The 3,797 high-confidence regulatory interactions were collected from published, validated chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and RegulonDB. For 21 different TF knockouts, up to 63% of the differentially expressed genes in the hiTRN were traced to the knocked-out TF through regulatory cascades. Second, we trained supervised machine learning algorithms to predict the expression of 1,364 TUs given TF activities using 441 samples. The algorithms accurately predicted condition-specific expression for 86% (1,174 of 1,364) of the TUs, while 193 TUs (14%) were predicted better than random TRNs. Third, we identified 10 regulatory modules whose definitions were robust against changes to the TRN or expression compendium. Using surrogate variable analysis, we also identified three unmodeled factors that systematically influenced gene expression. Our computational workflow comprehensively characterizes the predictive capabilities and systems-level functions of an organism’s TRN from disparate data types. PMID:28874552

  20. Angiogenic activity of Synadenium umbellatum Pax latex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PR. Melo-Reis

    Full Text Available Synadenium umbellatum Pax, popularly known as "cola-nota", is a medicinal plant that grows in tropical regions. Latex of this plant is used to treat various diseases such as diabetes mellitus, Hansen´s disease, tripanosomiases, leukemia and several malignant tumors. In the present study, the angiogenic activity of S. umbellatum latex was evaluated using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay. Results showed significant increase of the vascular net (p < 0.05 compared to the negative control (H2O. The histological analysis was in accordance with the results obtained. In conclusion, our data indicate that S. umbellatum latex, under the conditions of this research, presented angiogenic effect.

  1. Transcription Factors Expressed in Lateral Organ Boundaries: Identification of Downstream Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Patricia S

    2010-07-12

    The processes of lateral organ initiation and patterning are central to the generation of mature plant form. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is essential to our understanding of plant development. Communication between the shoot apical meristem and initiating organ primordia is important both for functioning of the meristem and for proper organ patterning, and very little is known about this process. In particular, the boundary between meristem and leaf is emerging as a critical region that is important for SAM maintenance and regulation of organogenesis. The goal of this project was to characterize three boundary-expressed genes that encode predicted transcription factors. Specifically, we have studied LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB), LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1), and LATERAL ORGAN FUSION2 (LOF2). LOB encodes the founding member of the LOB-DOMAIN (LBD) plant-specific DNA binding transcription factor family and LOF1 and LOF2 encode paralogous MYB-domain transcription factors. We characterized the genetic relationship between these three genes and other boundary and meristem genes. We also used an ectopic inducible expression system to identify direct targets of LOB.

  2. Evidence for site-specific occupancy of the mitochondrial genome by nuclear transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi K Marinov

    Full Text Available Mitochondria contain their own circular genome, with mitochondria-specific transcription and replication systems and corresponding regulatory proteins. All of these proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome and are post-translationally imported into mitochondria. In addition, several nuclear transcription factors have been reported to act in mitochondria, but there has been no comprehensive mapping of their occupancy patterns and it is not clear how many other factors may also be found in mitochondria. Here we address these questions by using ChIP-seq data from the ENCODE, mouseENCODE and modENCODE consortia for 151 human, 31 mouse and 35 C. elegans factors. We identified 8 human and 3 mouse transcription factors with strong localized enrichment over the mitochondrial genome that was usually associated with the corresponding recognition sequence motif. Notably, these sites of occupancy are often the sites with highest ChIP-seq signal intensity within both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and are thus best explained as true binding events to mitochondrial DNA, which exist in high copy number in each cell. We corroborated these findings by immunocytochemical staining evidence for mitochondrial localization. However, we were unable to find clear evidence for mitochondrial binding in ENCODE and other publicly available ChIP-seq data for most factors previously reported to localize there. As the first global analysis of nuclear transcription factors binding in mitochondria, this work opens the door to future studies that probe the functional significance of the phenomenon.

  3. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo [Centro FONDAP Estudios Moleculares de la Celula, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Hidalgo, Cecilia [Centro FONDAP Estudios Moleculares de la Celula, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Lavandero, Sergio, E-mail: slavander@uchile.cl [Centro FONDAP Estudios Moleculares de la Celula, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380492 (Chile)

    2009-10-09

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal {alpha}-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  4. The transcription factor MEF2C mediates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by IGF-1 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Collao, Andres; Chiong, Mario; Maldonado, Carola; Adasme, Tatiana; Carrasco, Loreto; Ocaranza, Paula; Bravo, Roberto; Gonzalez, Leticia; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays an important role in cardiovascular development and is a key transcription factor for cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we describe MEF2C regulation by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its role in IGF-1-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We found that IGF-1 addition to cultured rat cardiomyocytes activated MEF2C, as evidenced by its increased nuclear localization and DNA binding activity. IGF-1 stimulated MEF2 dependent-gene transcription in a time-dependent manner, as indicated by increased MEF2 promoter-driven reporter gene activity; IGF-1 also induced p38-MAPK phosphorylation, while an inhibitor of p38-MAPK decreased both effects. Additionally, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcineurin prevented IGF-1-induced MEF2 transcriptional activity. Via MEF2C-dependent signaling, IGF-1 also stimulated transcription of atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal α-actin but not of fos-lux reporter genes. These novel data suggest that MEF2C activation by IGF-1 mediates the pro-hypertrophic effects of IGF-1 on cardiac gene expression.

  5. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations

  6. Using network component analysis to dissect regulatory networks mediated by transcription factors in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ye

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between genetic variation and gene expression is a central question in genetics. With the availability of data from high-throughput technologies such as ChIP-Chip, expression, and genotyping arrays, we can begin to not only identify associations but to understand how genetic variations perturb the underlying transcription regulatory networks to induce differential gene expression. In this study, we describe a simple model of transcription regulation where the expression of a gene is completely characterized by two properties: the concentrations and promoter affinities of active transcription factors. We devise a method that extends Network Component Analysis (NCA to determine how genetic variations in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs perturb these two properties. Applying our method to a segregating population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found statistically significant examples of trans-acting SNPs located in regulatory hotspots that perturb transcription factor concentrations and affinities for target promoters to cause global differential expression and cis-acting genetic variations that perturb the promoter affinities of transcription factors on a single gene to cause local differential expression. Although many genetic variations linked to gene expressions have been identified, it is not clear how they perturb the underlying regulatory networks that govern gene expression. Our work begins to fill this void by showing that many genetic variations affect the concentrations of active transcription factors in a cell and their affinities for target promoters. Understanding the effects of these perturbations can help us to paint a more complete picture of the complex landscape of transcription regulation. The software package implementing the algorithms discussed in this work is available as a MATLAB package upon request.

  7. Analysis of functional redundancies within the Arabidopsis TCP transcription factor family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danisman, S.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Bimbo, A.; Wal, van der F.; Hennig, L.; Folter, de S.; Angenent, G.C.; Immink, R.G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of the functions of TEOSINTE-LIKE1, CYCLOIDEA, and ROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR1 (TCP) transcription factors have been hampered by functional redundancy between its individual members. In general, putative functionally redundant genes are predicted based on sequence similarity and confirmed by

  8. Protein intrinsic disorder in Arabidopsis NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Mikael Kryger; Stender, Emil G.P.

    2015-01-01

    of differences in binding mechanisms. Although substitution of both hydrophobic and acidic residues of the ANAC046 MoRF region abolished binding, substitution of other residues, even with α-helix-breaking proline, was less disruptive. Together, the biophysical analyses suggest that RCD1-ANAC046 complex formation......Protein ID (intrinsic disorder) plays a significant, yet relatively unexplored role in transcription factors (TFs). In the present paper, analysis of the transcription regulatory domains (TRDs) of six phylogenetically representative, plant-specific NAC [no apical meristem, ATAF (Arabidopsis...

  9. The strategy of fusion genes construction determines efficient expression of introduced transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Tomasz; Konieczny, Paweł; Sekuła, Małgorzata; Sułkowski, Maciej; Majka, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    The main goal in gene therapy and biomedical research is an efficient transcription factors (TFs) delivery system. SNAIL, a zinc finger transcription factor, is strongly involved in tumor, what makes its signaling pathways an interesting research subject. The necessity of tracking activation of intracellular pathways has prompted fluorescent proteins usage as localization markers. Advanced molecular cloning techniques allow to generate fusion proteins from fluorescent markers and transcription factors. Depending on fusion strategy, the protein expression levels and nuclear transport ability are significantly different. The P2A self-cleavage motif through its cleavage ability allows two single proteins to be simultaneously expressed. The aim of this study was to compare two strategies for introducing a pair of genes using expression vector system. We have examined GFP and SNAI1 gene fusions by comprising common nucleotide polylinker (multiple cloning site) or P2A motif in between them, resulting in one fusion or two independent protein expressions respectively. In each case transgene expression levels and translation efficiency as well as nuclear localization of expressed protein have been analyzed. Our data showed that usage of P2A motif provides more effective nuclear transport of SNAIL transcription factor than conventional genes linker. At the same time the fluorescent marker spreads evenly in subcellular space.

  10. Transcriptional factor influence on OTA production and the quelling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the influence of some transcriptional factors on ochratoxin A production as well as investigates the quelling attributes of some designed siRNA on the OTA producing Aspergillus section Nigri using standard recommended techniques. Results obtained following comparison of the pks gene promoter ...

  11. Occupancy classification of position weight matrix-inferred transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollis Wright

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computational prediction of Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBS from sequence data alone is difficult and error-prone. Machine learning techniques utilizing additional environmental information about a predicted binding site (such as distances from the site to particular chromatin features to determine its occupancy/functionality class show promise as methods to achieve more accurate prediction of true TFBS in silico. We evaluate the Bayesian Network (BN and Support Vector Machine (SVM machine learning techniques on four distinct TFBS data sets and analyze their performance. We describe the features that are most useful for classification and contrast and compare these feature sets between the factors. RESULTS: Our results demonstrate good performance of classifiers both on TFBS for transcription factors used for initial training and for TFBS for other factors in cross-classification experiments. We find that distances to chromatin modifications (specifically, histone modification islands as well as distances between such modifications to be effective predictors of TFBS occupancy, though the impact of individual predictors is largely TF specific. In our experiments, Bayesian network classifiers outperform SVM classifiers. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate good performance of machine learning techniques on the problem of occupancy classification, and demonstrate that effective classification can be achieved using distances to chromatin features. We additionally demonstrate that cross-classification of TFBS is possible, suggesting the possibility of constructing a generalizable occupancy classifier capable of handling TFBS for many different transcription factors.

  12. Reconstitution of the yeast RNA polymerase III transcription system with all recombinant factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Cécile; Lefebvre, Olivier; Landrieux, Emilie; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Sentenac, André; Acker, Joel

    2006-04-28

    Transcription factor TFIIIC is a multisubunit complex required for promoter recognition and transcriptional activation of class III genes. We describe here the reconstitution of complete recombinant yeast TFIIIC and the molecular characterization of its two DNA-binding domains, tauA and tauB, using the baculovirus expression system. The B block-binding module, rtauB, was reconstituted with rtau138, rtau91, and rtau60 subunits. rtau131, rtau95, and rtau55 formed also a stable complex, rtauA, that displayed nonspecific DNA binding activity. Recombinant rTFIIIC was functionally equivalent to purified yeast TFIIIC, suggesting that the six recombinant subunits are necessary and sufficient to reconstitute a transcriptionally active TFIIIC complex. The formation and the properties of rTFIIIC-DNA complexes were affected by dephosphorylation treatments. The combination of complete recombinant rTFIIIC and rTFIIIB directed a low level of basal transcription, much weaker than with the crude B'' fraction, suggesting the existence of auxiliary factors that could modulate the yeast RNA polymerase III transcription system.

  13. Transcription elongation factor GreA has functional chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Jiang, Tianyi; Yu, Bo; Wang, Limin; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping; Ma, Yanhe

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial GreA is an indispensable factor in the RNA polymerase elongation complex. It plays multiple roles in transcriptional elongation, and may be implicated in resistance to various stresses. In this study, we show that Escherichia coli GreA inhibits aggregation of several substrate proteins under heat shock condition. GreA can also effectively promote the refolding of denatured proteins. These facts reveal that GreA has chaperone activity. Distinct from many molecular chaperones, GreA does not form stable complexes with unfolded substrates. GreA overexpression confers the host cells with enhanced resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, GreA expression in the greA/greB double mutant could suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and dramatically alleviate the in vivo protein aggregation. The results suggest that bacterial GreA may act as chaperone in vivo. These results suggest that GreA, in addition to its function as a transcription factor, is involved in protection of cellular proteins against aggregation.

  14. Characterization of a Novel Class I Transcription Factor A (CITFA) Subunit That Is Indispensable for Transcription by the Multifunctional RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, T. N.

    2012-10-26

    Trypanosoma brucei is the only organism known to have evolved a multifunctional RNA polymerase I (pol I) system that is used to express the parasite\\'s ribosomal RNAs, as well as its major cell surface antigens, namely, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin, which are vital for establishing successful infections in the mammalian host and the tsetse vector, respectively. Thus far, biochemical analyses of the T. brucei RNA pol I transcription machinery have elucidated the subunit structure of the enzyme and identified the class I transcription factor A (CITFA). CITFA binds to RNA pol I promoters, and its CITFA-2 subunit was shown to be absolutely essential for RNA pol I transcription in the parasite. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) of CITFA revealed the subunits CITFA-1 to -6, which are conserved only among kinetoplastid organisms, plus the dynein light chain DYNLL1. Here, by tagging CITFA-6 instead of CITFA-2, a complex was purified that contained all known CITFA subunits, as well as a novel proline-rich protein. Functional studies carried out in vivo and in vitro, as well as a colocalization study, unequivocally demonstrated that this protein is a bona fide CITFA subunit, essential for parasite viability and indispensable for RNA pol I transcription of ribosomal gene units and the active VSG expression site in the mammalian-infective life cycle stage of the parasite. Interestingly, CITFA-7 function appears to be species specific, because expression of an RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant CITFA-7 transgene from Trypanosoma cruzi could not rescue the lethal phenotype of silencing endogenous CITFA-7.

  15. Regulation of basophil and mast cell development by transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Sasaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Basophils and mast cells play important roles in host defense against parasitic infections and allergic responses. Several progenitor populations, either shared or specific, for basophils and/or mast cells have been identified, thus elucidating the developmental pathways of these cells. Multiple transcription factors essential for their development and the relationships between them have been also revealed. For example, IRF8 induces GATA2 expression to promote the generation of both basophils and mast cells. The STAT5-GATA2 axis induces C/EBPα and MITF expression, facilitating the differentiation into basophils and mast cells, respectively. In addition, C/EBPα and MITF mutually suppress each other's expression. This review provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of how transcription factors regulate the development of basophils and mast cells.

  16. In vitro fluorescence studies of transcription factor IIB-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecki, Andrzej; Figiel, Małgorzata; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    General transcription factor TFIIB is one of the basal constituents of the preinitiation complex of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, acting as a bridge between the preinitiation complex and the polymerase, and binding promoter DNA in an asymmetric manner, thereby defining the direction of the transcription. Methods of fluorescence spectroscopy together with circular dichroism spectroscopy were used to observe conformational changes in the structure of recombinant human TFIIB after binding to specific DNA sequence. To facilitate the exploration of the structural changes, several site-directed mutations have been introduced altering the fluorescence properties of the protein. Our observations showed that binding of specific DNA sequences changed the protein structure and dynamics, and TFIIB may exist in two conformational states, which can be described by a different microenvironment of W52. Fluorescence studies using both intrinsic and exogenous fluorophores showed that these changes significantly depended on the recognition sequence and concerned various regions of the protein, including those interacting with other transcription factors and RNA polymerase II. DNA binding can cause rearrangements in regions of proteins interacting with the polymerase in a manner dependent on the recognized sequences, and therefore, influence the gene expression.

  17. A human transcription factor in search mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Kevin; Essuman, Bernard; He, Yiqing; Coutsias, Evangelos; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Simmerling, Carlos

    2016-01-08

    Transcription factors (TF) can change shape to bind and recognize DNA, shifting the energy landscape from a weak binding, rapid search mode to a higher affinity recognition mode. However, the mechanism(s) driving this conformational change remains unresolved and in most cases high-resolution structures of the non-specific complexes are unavailable. Here, we investigate the conformational switch of the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor MTERF1, which has a modular, superhelical topology complementary to DNA. Our goal was to characterize the details of the non-specific search mode to complement the crystal structure of the specific binding complex, providing a basis for understanding the recognition mechanism. In the specific complex, MTERF1 binds a significantly distorted and unwound DNA structure, exhibiting a protein conformation incompatible with binding to B-form DNA. In contrast, our simulations of apo MTERF1 revealed significant flexibility, sampling structures with superhelical pitch and radius complementary to the major groove of B-DNA. Docking these structures to B-DNA followed by unrestrained MD simulations led to a stable complex in which MTERF1 was observed to undergo spontaneous diffusion on the DNA. Overall, the data support an MTERF1-DNA binding and recognition mechanism driven by intrinsic dynamics of the MTERF1 superhelical topology. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Dark matter analysis of XENON100 data and cut development utilizing the novel PAX raw data processor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittweg, Christian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The XENON100 experiment located at LNGS is aimed at the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). It utilizes an ultra-low background dual-phase xenon TPC which yields two separate scintillation signals that facilitate background discrimination and event selection. Limits on various interaction types have been published by the collaboration (Science 349 (2015) 6250, 851-854). In the analysis dark matter candidate events have to pass cuts with respect to data quality, consistency and physical features of the interaction. The former ones are implemented with regard to the used data processor's capabilities for noise discrimination and peak-finding. The Processor for Analyzing Xenon (PAX), developed for the XENON1T experiment, enhances these capabilities compared to XENON100. A greater robustness against noise and an increased peak-identification efficiency open up new opportunities for physically motivated cuts while rendering old ones obsolete. The poster will focus on the implementation of new cuts into the analysis chain. Both PAX and the xenon analysis will be introduced. A planned full-scale dark matter analysis of PAX-processed XENON100 data will be outlined.

  19. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tzyy-Choou.

    1989-01-01

    The structure and function of the transcriptional regulatory region of human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV-6) has been investigated. To investigate tissue specific gene expression, a sensitive method to detect and localize HPV-6 viral DNA, mRNA and protein in plastic-embedded tissue sections of genital and respiratory tract papillomata by using in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase assays has been developed. This method, using ultrathin sections and strand-specific 3 H labeled riboprobes, offers the advantages of superior morphological preservation and detection of viral genomes at low copy number with good resolution, and the modified immunocytochemistry provides better sensitivity. The results suggest that genital tract epithelium is more permissive for HPV-6 replication than respiratory tract epithelium. To study the tissue tropism of HPV-6 at the level of regulation of viral gene expression, the polymerase chain reaction was used to isolate the noncoding region (NCR) of HPV-6 in independent isolates. Nucleotide sequence analysis of molecularly cloned DNA identified base substitutions, deletions/insertions and tandem duplications. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the NCR were assayed in recombinant plasmids containing the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase

  20. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application......Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...... the DNA-binding preferences of individual members. Here, we present a TF-target gene identification workflow based on the integration of novel protein binding microarray data with gene expression and multi-species promoter sequence conservation to identify the DNA-binding specificities and the gene...