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Sample records for patients undergoing radiation

  1. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L E; Badawy, M K

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care. (paper)

  2. Sexuality in gynecological patients undergoing radiation therapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The gynecology patient undergoing radiation therapy treatments may experience physiological and psychological problems related to sexuality. The needs of this group must be met by the radiation oncology staff by their being informed, interested, and experienced in dealing with sexual problems created by radiation therapy treatments. Opportunities to obtain information and for discussion about how the disease and its treatments will affect sexual functioning must be provided for the patient and partner. It is important to remember that the ability to seek and preserve gratifying sexual function is of great importance to almost all women, regardless of age. The patient may feel much personal distress related to the disease, the treatments, and how they affect the way she feels as a sexual human being. Opportunities must be provided to share the feelings created by the treatment process and trained therapists should be available when intensive sexual counseling is needed

  3. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  4. Radiation dose rates from adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Forge, N.I.; Jeffries, A.; Coakley, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Adult patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations may subsequently come into close contact with members of the public and hospital staff. In order to expand the available dosimetry and derive appropriate recommendations, dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 m from 80 adult patients just before they left the nuclear medicine department after undergoing one of eight 99 Tc m studies, an 123 I thyroid, an 111 In leucocyte or a 201 Tl cardiac scan. The maximum departure dose rates at these distances of 150, 30 and 7.3 μSv h -1 were greater than those found in similar published studies of adult and paediatric patients. To limit the dose to an infant to less than 1 mSv, an 111 In leucocyte scan is the only investigation for which it may be necessary to restrict close contact between the infant and a radioactive parent, depending on the dose rate near the surface of the patient, the parent's habits and how fretful is the infant. It is unlikely that a ward nurse will receive a dose of 60 μSv in a working day if caring for just one radioactive adult patient, unless the patient is classified as totally helpless and had undergone a 99 Tc m marrow, bone or brain scan. The data and revised calculations of effective exposure times based on a total close contact time of 9 h in every 24 h period should allow worst case estimates of radiation dose to be made and recommendations to be formulated for other circumstances, including any future legislative changes in dose limits or derived levels. (author)

  5. Radiation exposure distribution in patients undergoing CT brain scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhanshan; Feng Dinghua; Chang Zichi; Li Shijun

    1989-12-01

    The distribution of surface exposures in patients undergoing single and multiple computerized tomographic brain scans with Hitachi CT-W500 was measured by LiF(Mg, Ti) thermoluminescent dosimetry. It was found that there was no significant difference in the sufrace exposures from different scanning slices. However, the exposure doses at different scanning angles around the head were different significantly. The reference point of the maximum surface exposure was at the temporal part of the head. the maximum surface exposure was at 1.65 x 10 -3 C·kg -1 while the average exposure was 1.55 x 10 -3 C·kg -1 . The ratio of the average dose resulting from nine scans to that from a single scan was 1.3, and the surface exposure contribution of scattered radiation was computed. At the same time the radiation doses to eyes, thyroid, chest and gonads of patiens at corresponding position were also measured and were compared with those from CT cranial scans in children and skull radiographic procedures respectively

  6. Vocal changes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.; Harrison, L.B.; Solomon, B.; Sessions, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective evaluation of vocal changes in patients receiving radiation therapy for T1 and T2 (AJC) glottic carcinoma was undertaken in January 1987. Vocal analysis was performed prior to radiotherapy and at specific intervals throughout the radiation treatment program. The voicing ratio was extrapolated from a sustained vowel phonation using the Visipitch interfaced with the IBM-PC. Preliminary observations suggested three distinct patterns of vocal behavior: 1. reduced voicing ratio with precipitous improvement within the course of treatment, 2. high initial voicing ratio with reduction secondary to radiation induced edema, with rapid improvement in the voicing component after the edema subsided, and 3. fluctuating voicing ratio during and following treatment. Enrollment of new patients and a 2-year follow-up of current patients was undertaken

  7. Does tadalafil prevent erectile dysfunction in patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Incrocci (Luca)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractA recently published paper addressed the interesting topic of prevention of erectile dysfunction (ED) with tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitor (PDE5i) in patients undergoing radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. [1]Tadalafil 5 mg or placebo was

  8. What Aspects of Personal Care Are Most Important to Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Kimberley A.; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Groome, Patti A.; Brundage, Michael D.; McArdle, Siobhan; Wallace, David; Peng, Yingwei; Mackillop, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overall quality of patient care is a function of the quality of both its technical and its nontechnical components. The purpose of this study was to identify the elements of nontechnical (personal) care that are most important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the literature and interviewed patients and health professionals to identify elements of personal care pertinent to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We identified 143 individual elements relating to 10 aspects of personal care. Patients undergoing radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer completed a self-administered questionnaire in which they rated the importance of each element. The overall importance of each element was measured by the percentage of respondents who rated it as “very important.” The importance of each aspect of personal care was measured by the mean importance of its elements. Results: One hundred eight patients completed the questionnaire. The percentage of patients who rated each element “very important” ranged from 7% to 95% (mean 61%). The mean importance rating of the elements of each aspect of care varied significantly: “perceived competence of caregivers,” 80%; “empathy and respectfulness of caregivers,” 67%; “adequacy of information sharing,” 67%; “patient centeredness,” 59%; “accessibility of caregivers,” 57%; “continuity of care,” 51%; “privacy,” 51%; “convenience,” 45%; “comprehensiveness of services,” 44%; and “treatment environment,” 30% (P<.0001). Neither age nor education was associated with importance ratings, but the patient's health status was associated with the rating of some elements of care. Conclusions: Many different elements of personal care are important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, but the 3 aspects of care that most believe are most important are these: the perceived

  9. What Aspects of Personal Care Are Most Important to Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Kimberley A. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Feldman-Stewart, Deb [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Groome, Patti A. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Brundage, Michael D. [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); McArdle, Siobhan [Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Wallace, David [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Peng, Yingwei [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Mackillop, William J., E-mail: William.mackillop@krcc.on.ca [Cancer Care and Epidemiology, Queen' s Cancer Research Institute, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overall quality of patient care is a function of the quality of both its technical and its nontechnical components. The purpose of this study was to identify the elements of nontechnical (personal) care that are most important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the literature and interviewed patients and health professionals to identify elements of personal care pertinent to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We identified 143 individual elements relating to 10 aspects of personal care. Patients undergoing radical radiation therapy for prostate cancer completed a self-administered questionnaire in which they rated the importance of each element. The overall importance of each element was measured by the percentage of respondents who rated it as “very important.” The importance of each aspect of personal care was measured by the mean importance of its elements. Results: One hundred eight patients completed the questionnaire. The percentage of patients who rated each element “very important” ranged from 7% to 95% (mean 61%). The mean importance rating of the elements of each aspect of care varied significantly: “perceived competence of caregivers,” 80%; “empathy and respectfulness of caregivers,” 67%; “adequacy of information sharing,” 67%; “patient centeredness,” 59%; “accessibility of caregivers,” 57%; “continuity of care,” 51%; “privacy,” 51%; “convenience,” 45%; “comprehensiveness of services,” 44%; and “treatment environment,” 30% (P<.0001). Neither age nor education was associated with importance ratings, but the patient's health status was associated with the rating of some elements of care. Conclusions: Many different elements of personal care are important to patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer, but the 3 aspects of care that most believe are most important are these: the

  10. A phase I trial of tocoferol monoglucoside in patients undergoing hemi-body radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilgol N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate Tocoferol monoglucoside (TMG, a water soluble vit. E. in a phase I trial, as a radiation protector in those undergoing hemi-body radiation for disseminated disease. Materials and Methods: Patients scheduled to receive modified hemi-body radiation were accrued for the study. Patients not only had disseminated skeletal disease but, were heavily pretreated Seven patients were accrued for the study. Patients received 1 and 2 gms of TMG. 30-40 minutes before hemibody radiation. A dose of 600 cGy was delivered on telecobalt equipment at mid plane. Immediate Toxicities were evaluated as well as response to pain. Results: All the seven patients underwent radiation uneventfully. There was no drug related toxicity. Pain relief was adequate. Conclusion: Tocoferol monoglucoside an effective antioxidant with no significant acute toxicity, when administered in a dose of 1 or 2 gms per oral route. TMG being water-soluble can have global antioxidant and radio protective effects. This needs further clinical evaluation.

  11. Radiation dose exposure in patients affected by lymphoma undergoing repeat CT examinations: how to manage the radiation dose variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Dore, Antonio; Aringhieri, Giacomo; Caramella, Davide

    2018-03-01

    To assess the variability of radiation dose exposure in patients affected by lymphoma undergoing repeat CT (computed tomography) examinations and to evaluate the influence of different scan parameters on the overall radiation dose. A series of 34 patients (12 men and 22 women with a median age of 34.4 years) with lymphoma, after the initial staging CT underwent repeat follow-up CT examinations. For each patient and each repeat examination, age, sex, use of AEC system (Automated Exposure Control, i.e. current modulation), scan length, kV value, number of acquired scans (i.e. number of phases), abdominal size diameter and dose length product (DLP) were recorded. The radiation dose of just one venous phase was singled out from the DLP of the entire examination. All scan data were retrieved by our PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) by means of a dose monitoring software. Among the variables we considered, no significant difference of radiation dose was observed among patients of different ages nor concerning tube voltage. On the contrary the dose delivered to the patients varied depending on sex, scan length and usage of AEC. No significant difference was observed depending on the behaviour of technologists, while radiologists' choices had indirectly an impact on the radiation dose due to the different number of scans requested by each of them. Our results demonstrate that patients affected by lymphoma who undergo repeat whole body CT scanning may receive unnecessary overexposure. We quantified and analyzed the most relevant variables in order to provide a useful tool to manage properly CT dose variability, estimating the amount of additional radiation dose for every single significant variable. Additional scans, incorrect scan length and incorrect usage of AEC system are the most relevant cause of patient radiation exposure.

  12. Radiation doses to Norwegian heart-transplanted patients undergoing annual coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seierstad, T.; Friberg, E. G.; Lervag, C.; Widmark, A.; Wilhelmsen, N.; Stranden, E.

    2012-01-01

    Heart-transplanted patients in Norway undergo annual coronary angiography (CA). The aims of this study were to establish a conversion factor between dose-area product and effective dose for these examinations and to use this to evaluate the accumulated radiation dose and risks associated with annual CA. An experienced cardiac interventionist performed a simulated examination on an Alderson phantom loaded with thermoluminescence dosemeters. The simulated CA examination yielded a dose-area product of 17 Gy cm 2 and an effective dose of 3.4 mSv: the conversion factor between dose-area product and effective dose was 0.20 mSv Gy cm -2 . Dose-area product values from 200 heart-transplanted patients that had undergone 906 CA examinations between 2001 and 2008 were retrieved from the institutional database. Mean dose-area product from annual CA was 25 Gy cm 2 , ranging from 2 to 140 Gy cm 2 . Mean number of CA procedure was 8 (range, 1-23). Mean accumulated effective dose for Norwegian heart-transplanted patients between 2001 and 2008 was 34 mSv (range, 5-113 mSv). Doses and radiation risks for heart-transplanted patients are generally low, because most heart transplantations are performed on middle-aged patients with limited life expectancy. Special concern should however be taken to reduce doses for young heart-transplanted patients who are committed to lifelong follow-up of their transplanted heart. (authors)

  13. Radiation doses deriving from patients undergoing 111In-DTPA-d-Phe-1-octreotide scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtaran, A.; Pfreitfellner, J.; Smith-Jones, P.; Schaffarich, P.; Niederle, B.; Raderer, M.; Virgolini, I.; Bergmann, H.; Havlik, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiation doses to nursing staff, other patients, accompanying persons and family members deriving from patients undergoing 111 In-DTPA-d-Phe-1-octreotide ( 111 In-OCT) scintigraphy. Dose rates were measured from 16 patients who had received an intravenous injection of 140±40 MBq 111 In-OCT. The measurements were performed at three different distances (0.5, 1 and 2 m) at 10-20 min, 5-7 h and 24 h (and in some cases, up to 48 h) after administration of 111 In-OCT. The effective half-lives of the biexponential decrease of the dose rates were estimated to be 2.94±0.27 h (T 1 ) and 65.17±0.58 h (T 2 ). The calculated maximum dose to other persons in the waiting area was 27.2 μSv, to family members 61.5 μSv, to nursing staff in a ward 24.1 μSv and to neighbouring patients in the ward 69.5 μSv. Our results clearly demonstrate that the calculated maximum radiation exposure to accompanying persons, personnel, family members and other patients is well below the maximum annual dose limit for non-professionally exposed persons. (orig.)

  14. Prevalence of mood disorders and utility of the PRIME-MD in patients undergoing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopold, Kenneth A.; Ahles, Tim A.; Walch, Susan; Amdur, Robert J.; Mott, Leila A.; Wiegand-Packard, Linda; Oxman, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a short, structured interview procedure that allows practicing oncologists to quickly and reliably identify mood disorders in their patients, and to estimate the prevalence and types of mood disorders in a radiation therapy patient setting, noting relationships between mood disorders and patient characteristics. Methods: Consecutive, eligible adult patients from the practices of two radiation oncologists were administered the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) by the treating physician. A subset of these patients was also evaluated with the SCID, administered by trained mental health care personnel. Agreement between the two instruments was examined using the kappa statistic. Prevalence of mood disorders was determined from the PRIME-MD. The significance of relationships between patient characteristics and mood disorders was examined by chi-square and ANOVA analysis, and subsequently by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: One hundred twenty-two patients were studied. Fifty-three of these were administered the SCID. Agreement between the two instruments was very good (kappa = 0.70). A diagnosis of a depressive or anxiety disorder by the PRIME-MD was made in 59 of the 122 patients (48%, 95% confidence interval = 39%, 58%). Multivariate analysis showed that a diagnosis of a depressive mood disorder was significantly related to pain intensity and prior history of depression. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the validity and feasibility of the PRIME-MD administered by oncologists in making diagnoses of mood disorders. The prevalence of mood disorders in our set of patients undergoing a course of RT was nearly 50%. Future studies should describe the natural history of these disorders, and determine optimal intervention strategies

  15. Radiation Dose Measurements with Direction and from Patients Undergoing Nuclear Medicine Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL-Shakhrah, I.

    2003-01-01

    Rdiologists and technologists are occasionally concerned about the radiation exposure that they may receive during the performance of routine diagnostic radiologic studies, that require close proximity to a patient who has recently had a radionuclide imaging procedure. This also impacts on other medical personnel including porters, nurses, pathologists, etc. This study was conducted in order to calculate the radiation exposure that one may anticipate receiving from a patient who has recently had a nuclear midicine procedure. Radiation dose rate (μSv/hr) was measured in 34 patients for four commonly performed nuclear medicine procedures (bone, liver/spleen, renal and thyroid) at the skin surface, 10,30,60,100, and at 150 cm from the patient, within 3 and 1hr ( 3 hrs for bone scan patients and 1 hr for the other three procedures ) postinjection, with a digital survey meter. The measurements were performed also for different sides of the patients ( anterior, posterior, left and right). For bone scans, a dose of 714.1 ± 96.2 MBq ( 19.3 ± 2.6mCi ) of technetium-99m-MDP ( 99 m Tc-MDP) resulted in a radiation exposure ( from posterior side of the patient )of ( 195±41) μSv/hr at the skin surface, (110±27) μSv/hr at 10cm, (51±10) μSv/hr at 30cm, (21±5) μSv/hr at 60cm, (10±2) μSv/hr at 1m, and (6±2) μSv/hr at 1.5m. Also for the bone, the radiation dose rate measurements obtained (from left side of the patient ) were 144±30) μSv/hr at the skin surface, ( 90±21) μSv/hr at 10cm, ( 36±8)μSv/hr at30cm, (15±3)μSv/hr at 60cm, (8±2)μSv/hr at 1 m,and ( 4±1)μSv/hr at 1.5m. It has been found that the variations in percentage (%) between posterior and left side mean measurments were 28.2, 18.2, 29.4, 25.0, 20.0 and 33.3 at the skin, 10cm,30cm,60cm, 100cm and 150 cm respectively. When we search for ''conservative'' values and concepts, concerning the radiation safety in nuclear medicine department , we believe that anterior and posterior sides values must be

  16. Radiation safety implications of 131I treatment in a patient with Grave's disease undergoing home hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J B; Godwin, G A

    2006-12-01

    The radiation safety implications following the administration of 131I for the treatment of Grave's disease to a patient undergoing home-based renal dialysis was investigated. External dose-rate measurements from the patient revealed a peak value at around day 2, post administration. The effective half-life was determined as 6.5 d. From day 3, the clearance of 131I was observed to be fairly constant and equated to 2.7% per day or 5.4% per dialysis session. From this the biological half-life was determined as 15 d. Radiation monitoring of the dialysis unit, disposables, and bed linen found no detectable contamination. For the purpose of useful protection, at a distance of 1 m from the patient, the average dose rate over the effective treatment duration was determined to be 8 microSv h(-1) and at 2 m distance, 2.6 microSv h(-1). Thus, in order to keep below a level of dose constraint of 3 mSv the total allowable time spent at 1 m would be 375 h or 15 h per day. To comply with a 1-mSv constraint, the average daily exposure allowable at 1 m would be 5 h per day. Neither of these time limits would be difficult to achieve for the majority of situations with fairly modest behavioral constraints. Initial discharge concentration rates into the waste water system are estimated at 200 MBq m(-3) and therefore might need to be considered depending upon the regulatory environment.

  17. A prospective study of quality of life in breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canhua Xiao, PhD, RN

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Radiation therapy did not worsen QOL in breast cancer patients. However, pre-radiation therapy patient characteristics including BMI and perceived stress may be used to identify women who may experience decreased physical and mental function during and up to 1 year after radiation therapy.

  18. DMF-T index in patients undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sabrina

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for head and neck cancer frequently caused severe salivary gland dysfunction. The salivary gland dysfunction possibly decreased the protective function of saliva and caused dental caries. The purpose of this study was to obtain an illustration about DMF-T index in patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Department of Radiotherapy, Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital in January-February 2007. The study was a simple descriptive. The study was conducted on 7 males and 9 females undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer. The ages of patient are between 37 years and 77 years. The severity of caries was measured by DMF-T index. DMF-T index in 16 patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital is 10.6 as the result of this study. The conclusion of this study showed that the DMF-T index in 16 patient undergoing radiation therapy with LINAC X-ray radiation for head and neck cancer at Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital had very high grade based on WHO classification, which the value was over 6.6.

  19. Overall response rates to radiation therapy for patients with painful uncomplicated bone metastases undergoing initial treatment and retreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedard, Gillian; Hoskin, Peter; Chow, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation therapy has been shown to successfully palliate bone metastases. A number of systematic reviews and large clinical trials have reported response rates for initial treatment and retreatment. Objective: To determine overall response rates of patients with painful uncomplicated bone metastases undergoing initial treatment and retreatment. Methods: Intent-to-treat and evaluable patient statistics from a systematic review of palliative radiotherapy trials for initial treatment of bone metastases and a randomized clinical trial of retreatment were pooled and analyzed to determine the overall response rates for patients receiving initial treatment and retreatment. Results: In the intent-to-treat calculation, 71–73% of patients had an overall response to radiation treatment and in the evaluable patient population; 85–87% of patients did so. Response rates varied slightly whether patients underwent single or multiple fractions in initial treatment or retreatment. Conclusions: Single and multiple fraction radiation treatment yielded very similar overall response rates. Patients treated with a single fraction for both initial and repeat radiation experience almost identical overall response to those patients treated with multiple fraction treatment. It is therefore recommended that patients with uncomplicated painful bone metastases be treated with a single 8 Gy fraction of radiation at both the initial treatment and retreatment

  20. Association of elevated radiation dose with mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, Puja B.; Prakash, Sheena; Tahir, Usman; Kort, Smadar; Gruberg, Luis; Jeremias, Allen, E-mail: allen.jeremias@stonybrook.edu

    2014-09-15

    Objectives: This study sought to identify clinical and procedural predictors of elevated radiation dose received by patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and to determine if elevated radiation dose was predictive of mortality in this population. Background: Little data exist regarding the impact of excessive radiation burden on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing PCI. Methods: The study population included 1,039 patients who underwent PCI for an AMI between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2008 at an academic tertiary care teaching hospital. Cumulative skin dose (measured in milligray [mGy]) was selected as a measurement of patient radiation burden. Clinical and procedural variables were analyzed in multiple logistic and linear regression models to determine predictors of higher skin dose, and its impact was evaluated on all-cause intermediate-term mortality at two years. Results: Median skin dose was 2120 mGy (IQR 1379–3190 mGy) in the overall population, of which 153 (20.8%) patients received an elevated skin dose (defined as a skin dose > 4,000 mGy). Independent predictors of elevated skin dose included male gender, obesity, multivessel intervention, and presentation with a non-ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI) versus an ST-elevation MI (STEMI). Increased skin dose was not predictive of intermediate-term mortality by multivariate analysis in the overall population or in either subgroup of STEMI and NSTEMI. Conclusions: In this contemporary observational study examining patients with AMI undergoing PCI, male gender, obesity, multivessel intervention, and presentation with a NSTEMI were associated with increased radiation exposure.

  1. Increased risk of breast cancer in splenectomized patients undergoing radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chung T.; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Adams, James F.; Sagerman, Robert H.; Numann, Patricia J.; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos; Duggan, David B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Second malignancies have been reported among patients who were treated by radiation therapy or chemotherapy alone or in combination. Studies have implied an increased risk of breast cancer in women who received radiotherapy as part of their treatment for Hodgkin's disease. This review was performed to determine if there is an association between splenectomy and subsequent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and thirty-six female patients with histologically proven Hodgkin's disease were seen in the Division of Radiation Oncology between 1962 and 1985. All patients received mantle or mediastinal irradiation as part of their therapy. The risk of breast cancer was assessed and multiple linear regression analysis was performed on the following variables: patient age, stage, dose and extent of radiation field, time after completing radiation therapy, splenectomy, and chemotheraphy. Results: Breast cancer was observed in 11 of 74 splenectomized patients and in none of 62 patients not splenectomized. The mean follow-up was 13 years in splenectomized patients and 16 years, 7 months in nonsplenectomized patients. Nine patients developed invasive breast cancer and two developed ductal carcinoma in situ. Splenectomy was the only variable independently associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p < 0.005) in multiple linear regression analysis; age, latency, and splenectomy considered together were also associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Our data show an increased risk of breast cancer in splenectomized patients who had treatment for Hodgkin's disease. A multiinstitutional survey may better define the influence of splenectomy relative to developing breast cancer in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease. The risk of breast cancer should be considered when recommending staging laparotomy, and we recommend close follow-up examination including routine mammograms for female patients successfully treated for

  2. Late radiation side-effects in three patients undergoing parotid irradiation for benign disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, A; Ghanna, P; O'Rielly, B; Habeshaw, T; Symonds, P

    2000-01-01

    We report three patients in whom standard radiation therapy was given and serious late radiation damage was seen. The first patient suffered recurrent parotiditis and a parotid fistula. He was treated initially with 20 Gy in ten fractions via a 300 kV field. Further irradiation was required 1 year later and 40 Gy was given in 2 Gy fractions by an oblique anterior and posterior wedged photon pair. Ten years later he developed localized temporal bone necrosis. The second patient, with pleomorphic salivary adenoma, developed localized temporal bone necrosis 6 years after 60 Gy had been given using standard fractionation and technique. The third patient received 55 Gy in 25 fractions for a pleomorphic salivary adenoma and after 3 years developed temporal bone necrosis. Sixteen years later the same patient developed cerebellar and brainstem necrosis. All patients developed chronic persistent infection during or shortly after the radiation therapy, which increased local tissue sensitivity to late radiation damage. As a result, severe bone, cerebellar and brainstem necrosis was observed at doses that are normally considered safe. We therefore strongly recommend that any infection in a proposed irradiated area should be treated aggressively, with surgical debridement if necessary, before radiotherapy is administered, or that infection developing during or after irradiation is treated promptly.

  3. Radiation dose and cancer risk among pediatric patients undergoing interventional neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Simon, Steven L.; Miller, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    During interventional neuroradiology procedures, patients can be exposed to moderate to high levels of radiation. Special considerations are required to protect children, who are generally more sensitive to the short- and long-term detrimental effects of radiation exposure. Estimates of dose to the skin of children from certain interventional procedures have been published elsewhere, but we are not aware of data on dose to the brain or on the long-term risk of cancer from brain radiation. Our goals were to estimate radiation doses to the brain in 50 pediatric patients who had undergone cerebral embolization and to assess their lifetime risks of developing radiation-related brain cancer. Entrance-peak skin dose and various assumptions on conditions of exposure were used as input for dosimetric calculations to estimate the spatial pattern of dose within the brain and the average dose to the whole brain for each child. The average dose and the age of the child at time of exposure were used to estimate the lifetime risk of developing radiation-related brain cancer. Among the 50 patients, average radiation doses to the brain were estimated to vary from 100 mGy to 1,300 mGy if exposed to non-collimated fields and from 20 mGy to 160 mGy for collimated, moving fields. The lifetime risk of developing brain cancer was estimated to be increased by 2% to 80% as a result of the exposure. Given the very small lifetime background risk of brain tumor, the excess number of cases will be small even though the relative increase might be as high as 80%. ALARA principles of collimation and dose optimization are the most effective means to minimize the risk of future radiation-related cancer. (orig.)

  4. Computation of thyroid doses and carcinogenic radiation risks to patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; Spampinato, M. V.; Tipnis, S. V.; Magill, D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how differences in patient anatomy and CT technical factors in neck CT impact on thyroid doses and the corresponding carcinogenic risks. The CTDI vol and dose-length product used in 11 consecutive neck CT studies, as well as data on automatic exposure control (AEC) tube current variation(s) from the image DICOM header, were recorded. For each CT image that included the thyroid, the mass equivalent water cylinder was estimated based on the patient cross-sectional area and average relative attenuation coefficient (Hounsfield unit, HU). Patient thyroid doses were estimated by accounting for radiation intensity at the location of the patient's thyroid, patient size and the scan length. Thyroid doses were used to estimate thyroid cancer risks as a function of patient demographics using risk factors in BEIR VII. The length of the thyroid glands ranged from 21 to 54 mm with an average length of 42±12 mm. Water cylinder diameters corresponding to the central slice through the patient thyroid ranged from 18 to 32 cm with a mean of 25±5 cm. The average CTDI vol (32-cm phantom) used to perform these scans was 26±6 mGy, but the use of an AEC increased the tube current by an average of 44 % at the thyroid mid-point. Thyroid doses ranged from 29 to 80 mGy, with an average of 55±19 mGy. A 20-y-old female receiving the highest thyroid dose of 80 mGy would have a thyroid cancer risk of nearly 0.1 %, but radiation risks decreased very rapidly with increasing patient age. The key factors that affect thyroid doses in neck CT examinations are the radiation intensity at the thyroid location and the size of the patient. The corresponding patient thyroid cancer risk is markedly influenced by patient sex and age. (authors)

  5. Development of a specialized service for patients undergoing Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome (3040)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portas, M.; Coppola, A.; De Lellis, M.C.; Giongrande, J.C.; Drago, H.; Di Giorgio, M.; Dubner, D.; Dovasio, F.; Mansilla, E.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to stress the importance of the existence of a specialized sector within the Medical Centers for treating patients who have suffered the impact that means an apparently 'mild skin injury' and due to the lack of proper diagnosis, the progression of inflammatory waves, due to exacerbation periods, cannot be stopped. The cutaneous symptoms are caused by a combination of inflammatory process and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. The symptoms follow a time course pattern that mostly depend on the received doses, radiation quality, individual radiosensitivity, volume of skin exposed and patient's co morbidities: diabetes, smoking, obesity, etc., added to ischemia-reperfusion of the dermal vessels, and causing even more damage. For this reason, we have been working since 1997 in the frame of an agreement with the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina, for the diagnosis and treatment of localized radiation induced injuries. Patients were classified according to the toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer: grades 0 to 4. Since 2000, every patients assisted were treated with an equivalent therapeutic scheme, with a long term follow-up, showing favorable evolution in most cases. This work summarized the multidisciplinary professional group required, the therapeutic protocol and adjunctive treatments applied, and the tools used for diagnosis and follow-up. (author)

  6. Development of a specialized service for patients undergoing Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome (3040)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portas, M.; Coppola, A.; De Lellis, M.C.; Giongrande, J.C.; Drago, H., E-mail: quemados_dtocirugia@buenosaires.gob.ar [Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Di Giorgio, M.; Dubner, D., E-mail: mdigiorg@cae.arn.gob.ar [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dovasio, F., E-mail: adrianacoppola2002@yahoo.com [Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mansilla, E. [C.U.C.A.I.B.A, Hospital San Martin, La Plata (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to stress the importance of the existence of a specialized sector within the Medical Centers for treating patients who have suffered the impact that means an apparently 'mild skin injury' and due to the lack of proper diagnosis, the progression of inflammatory waves, due to exacerbation periods, cannot be stopped. The cutaneous symptoms are caused by a combination of inflammatory process and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. The symptoms follow a time course pattern that mostly depend on the received doses, radiation quality, individual radiosensitivity, volume of skin exposed and patient's co morbidities: diabetes, smoking, obesity, etc., added to ischemia-reperfusion of the dermal vessels, and causing even more damage. For this reason, we have been working since 1997 in the frame of an agreement with the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina, for the diagnosis and treatment of localized radiation induced injuries. Patients were classified according to the toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer: grades 0 to 4. Since 2000, every patients assisted were treated with an equivalent therapeutic scheme, with a long term follow-up, showing favorable evolution in most cases. This work summarized the multidisciplinary professional group required, the therapeutic protocol and adjunctive treatments applied, and the tools used for diagnosis and follow-up. (author)

  7. Survey of Michigan dentists and radiation oncologists on oral care of patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yoshita; Bahlhorn, Hannah; Zafar, Saniya; Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Eisbruch, Avraham; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne

    2012-07-01

    Oral complications of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) are associated with a significant decline in oral health-related quality of life (OHQOL). The dentist, working with the radiation oncologist and the rest of the health care team, plays an important role in the prevention and management of these complications, but patients do not always receive care consistent with current guidelines. This study investigated barriers to recommended care. There is variability in knowledge and practice among dentists and radiation oncologists regarding the dental management of patients treated with head and neck radiotherapy (HNRT), and inadequate communication and collaboration between members of the patient's health care team contribute to inconsistencies in application of clinical care guidelines. There is on interest and need for continuing dental (CDE) and medical education (CME) on this topic. A questionnaire was developed to assess dentists' knowledge and practice of dental management of HNC patients and their interest in CDE on this topic. All members of the Michigan Dental Association (MDA) with email addresses were asked to complete the survey online, and a random sample of MDA members without email addresses was invited to complete a paper version of the same survey. All Michigan members of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) were invited to complete an online version of the survey modified for radiation oncologists. The response rate for dentists was 47.9% and radiation oncologists was 22.3%. Of the dentists who responded, 81% reported that a major barrier to providing dental treatment before radiotherapy was a lack of time between initial dental consultation and the start of radiation; inadequate communication between health care providers was blamed most frequently for this. Ten percent of the dentists and 25% of the radiation oncologists reported that they did not treat HNC patients because they lacked adequate training, and 55% of

  8. Prevalence of Protective Shielding Utilization for Radiation Dose Reduction in Adult Patients Undergoing Body Scanning Using Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiullah, Shoaib; Patel, Roshan; Uribe, Brittany; Spradling, Kyle; Lall, Chandana; Zhang, Lishi; Okhunov, Zhamshid; Clayman, Ralph V; Landman, Jaime

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation is implicated in nearly 2% of malignancies in the United States; radiation shields prevent unnecessary radiation exposure during medical imaging. Contemporary radiation shield utilization for adult patients in the United States is poorly defined. Therefore, we evaluated the prevalence of protective shielding utilization in adult patients undergoing CT scans in United States' hospitals. An online survey was sent to established radiology departments randomly selected from the 2015 American Hospital Association Guide. Radiology departments conducting adult CT imaging were eligible; among 370 eligible departments, 215 departments accepted the study participation request. Questions focused on shielding practices during CT imaging of the eyes, thyroid, breasts, and gonads. Prevalence data were stratified per hospital location, size, and type. Main outcomes included overall protective shielding utilization, respondents' belief and knowledge regarding radiation safety, and organ-specific shielding prevalence. Sixty-seven of 215 (31%) hospitals completed the survey; 66 (99%) reported familiarity with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle and 56 (84%) affirmed their belief that shielding is beneficial. Only 60% of hospitals employed shielding during CT imaging; among these institutions, shielding varied based on CT study: abdominopelvic CT (13, 33%), head CT (33, 83%), or chest CT (30, 75%). Among surveyed hospitals, 40% do not utilize CT shielding despite the majority acknowledging the ALARA principle and agreeing that shielding is a beneficial practice. Failure to address the low prevalence of protective shielding may lead to poor community health due to increased risk of radiation-related cancers.

  9. An Excel-Based System to Manage Radiation Safety for the Family of Patients Undergoing 131I Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Palmer G

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop spreadsheet workbooks that assist in the radiation safety counseling of 131 I therapy patients and their families, providing individualized guidelines that avoid imposing overly conservative restrictions on family members and others. Methods: The mathematic model included biphasic patient radionuclide retention. The extrathyroidal component was a cylindric volume with a diameter corresponding to the patient's size and included patient self-absorption, whereas the thyroidal component was a point source whose transmission was reduced by self-absorption. A separate model in which the thyroid, extrathyroid, and bladder compartments fed serially from one to the next was developed to depict the radionuclide levels within the patient and to estimate the activity entering the environment at each urination. Results: The system was organized into a set of 4 workbooks: the first to be used with ablation patients prepared using thyrogen, the second with ablation patients prepared by deprivation, the third with hyperthyroid patients, and the fourth with the unusual hyperthyroid patient who finds the restrictions to be oppressive and returns 5-10 d after administration for a measurement and reassessment. The workbooks evaluated the radiation field strength external to the patient and indicated restrictions based on selected dose limits. To assist physicians in suggesting contamination precautions, the workbooks also evaluated the radioactivity present within the patient and the estimated discharge into the environment as a function of time. Conclusion: The workbooks that were developed assist the radiation safety counselor in individualizing radiation protection procedures for the family of patients undergoing 131 I therapy. The workbook system avoids overly conservative assumptions while permitting selection of appropriate dose limits for each individual. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  10. Patients with Testicular Cancer Undergoing CT Surveillance Demonstrate a Pitfall of Radiation-induced Cancer Risk Estimates: The Timing Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jonathan D.; Lee, Richard J.; Gilmore, Michael E.; Turan, Ekin A.; Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Kong, Chung Yin; Gazelle, G. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a limitation of lifetime radiation-induced cancer risk metrics in the setting of testicular cancer surveillance—in particular, their failure to capture the delayed timing of radiation-induced cancers over the course of a patient’s lifetime. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for the use of computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry data in this study. Informed consent was waived. This study was HIPAA compliant. A Markov model was developed to project outcomes in patients with testicular cancer who were undergoing CT surveillance in the decade after orchiectomy. To quantify effects of early versus delayed risks, life expectancy losses and lifetime mortality risks due to testicular cancer were compared with life expectancy losses and lifetime mortality risks due to radiation-induced cancers from CT. Projections of life expectancy loss, unlike lifetime risk estimates, account for the timing of risks over the course of a lifetime, which enabled evaluation of the described limitation of lifetime risk estimates. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the uncertainty of the results. Results: As an example of evidence yielded, 33-year-old men with stage I seminoma who were undergoing CT surveillance were projected to incur a slightly higher lifetime mortality risk from testicular cancer (598 per 100 000; 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 302, 894) than from radiation-induced cancers (505 per 100 000; 95% UI: 280, 730). However, life expectancy loss attributable to testicular cancer (83 days; 95% UI: 42, 124) was more than three times greater than life expectancy loss attributable to radiation-induced cancers (24 days; 95% UI: 13, 35). Trends were consistent across modeled scenarios. Conclusion: Lifetime radiation risk estimates, when used for decision making, may overemphasize radiation-induced cancer risks relative to short-term health risks. © RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http

  11. Radiation doses of patients undergoing abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine x-ray examinations in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundare, F.O.; Uche, C.Z.; Balogun, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) have been used to measure the entrance surface doses (ESD) of patients undergoing diagnostic x-ray examinations in Pelvis, Abdomen and Lumbar Spine in Nigeria. A total of 4 randomly selected public hospitals and 240 patients were included in this investigation. Age of the patients used is from 45 years and above. Mean, median, first and third quartiles of ESDs are reported. The results showed that in most cases, for each of the examinations, the mean ESDs are higher than the published reference doses and their corresponding values from other countries. Nevertheless the ESD of each of the patients fall within the ranges of ESDs that have been reported from other countries as quoted by UNSCEAR. The distribution of the ESDs was also found to be negatively skewed. This suggests that radiographic departments need to review their radiographic practices in order to bring their doses to optimum levels. Effective doses were also calculated from the ESD values. The importance of good regulatory activities and trained personnel is stressed in this work It is therefore suggested that further dose reduction program, while still having in focus ways of optimizing the various radiological parameters in order for patient to receive least dose and the radiologist having an acceptable image, should include emphasis on good regulatory control and use of well-trained personnel. Apart from the fact that the data provided in this work will be useful for the formulation of national guidance levels, it also provides patient dosimetry information on healthcare level IV countries

  12. Radiation doses to patients undergoing barium meal and barium enema examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delichas, M. G.; Hatziioannou, K.; Papanastassiou, E.; Albanopoulou, P.; Chatzi, E.; Sioundas, A.; Psarrakos, K.

    2004-01-01

    The radiation doses received by patients during 41 barium meal (BM) and 42 barium enema (BE) examinations in two Greek hospitals are presented. Radiation dose was measured in terms of the dose area product (DAP). The effective dose and doses to certain organs were estimated using the ODS-60 software. Mean total DAP values were found to be 25 ± 11 Gy cm 2 for BM and 60 ± 35 Gy cm 2 for BE examinations, whereas the estimated mean values of effective dose were 8.6 ± 4.0 and 24 ± 16 mSv respectively. DAP to effective dose conversion coefficients were estimated to be 0.34 mSv per Gy cm 2 for BM and 0.41 mSv per Gy cm 2 for BE. (authors)

  13. Prevalence of complementary and alternative therapy use by cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Grace V; Aherne, Noel J; Horsley, Patrick J; Benjamin, Linus C; McLachlan, Craig S; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) in oncology patients is increasing in incidence, with calls to routinely screen for their use. We introduced a screening tool as part of clinical care to identify CAT use. We evaluated all patients who attended the radiation oncology outpatient clinic between December 2011 and July 2012, who had filled out the CAT screening tool, and evaluated types of CAT use, reasons for use and predictors of CAT usage. A total of 639 patients completed the CAT screening tool, which was 75% of eligible patients. There were 464 (72.6%) men and 175 (27.4%) women, with a mean age of 69.9 years (range 27-94 years). Prostate cancer was the predominant diagnosis (53.1%), followed by breast cancer (17.5%) and skin cancer (14.7%). Of these, 530 patients (82.9%) had used at least one therapy. Of the 530 patients using CAT, the most quoted reasons for use were to improve quality of life (42.6%), to boost the immune system and general health (33.6%), to increase energy levels (32.6%) and to live longer (28.9%). Of the 530 users, only 112 patients (21.1%) took CAT to help cure their cancer. Women were significantly more likely to use CAT, as were patients with breast cancer. The use of CAT in patients with cancer is prevalent and more frequent in our population than in other published studies. Few patients use CAT to improve their cancer cure, but rather use CAT for other reasons. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Radiation doses to paediatric patients and comforters undergoing chest x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Vlychou, M.; Tsougos, I.; Theodorou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumonia is an important cause of hospital admission among children in the developed world and it is estimated to be responsible for 3-18 % of all paediatric admissions. Chest X ray is an important examination for pneumonia diagnosis and for evaluation of complications. This study aims to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD), organ, effective doses and propose a local diagnostic reference level. The study was carried out at the university hospital of Larissa (Greece). Patients were divided into three groups: organ and effective doses were estimated using National Radiological Protection Board software. The ESD was determined by thermoluminescent dosemeters for 132 children and 76 comforters. The average ESD value was 55±8 μGy. The effective dose for patients was 11.2±5 μSv. The mean radiation dose for comforter is 22±3 mGy. The radiation dose to the patients is well within dose constraint, in the light of the current practice. (authors)

  15. Radiation levels and image quality in patients undergoing chest X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio; Carmo Santana, Priscila do; Sousa Lacerda, Marco Aurélio de; Silva, Teógenes Augusto da

    2017-01-01

    Patient dose monitoring for different radiographic procedures has been used as a parameter to evaluate the performance of radiology services; skin entrance absorbed dose values for each type of examination were internationally established and recommended aiming patient protection. In this work, a methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services: one with a conventional film and two with digital computerized radiography processing techniques. The x-ray beam parameters were selected and “doses” (specifically the entrance surface and incident air kerma) were evaluated based on images approved in European criteria during postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) incidences. Data were collected from 200 patients related to 200 PA and 100 LAT incidences. Results showed that doses distributions in the three diagnostic services were very different; the best relation between dose and image quality was found in the institution with the chemical film processing. This work contributed for disseminating the radiation protection culture by emphasizing the need of a continuous dose reduction without losing the quality of the diagnostic image. - Highlights: • A methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services. • The doses in patients were evaluated when the images were adequate. • Data were collected from 200 patients. • Is possible doses optimization with digital system without an image quality reduction. • The best dose and image quality was found in chemical film processing.

  16. Evaluation of radiation safety from patients with thyroid disease undergoing iodine-131 therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, K.-Y.; Li, X.F.; Liu, J.-Z.; Li, S.-J.; Hu, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: By calculating the dose equivalent of patients with thyroid disease who had received iodine-131 therapy, based on the China national criteria, we evaluate the radiation safety of the individuals other than the patients who had turned into a specific 'radiant source'. Methods: 152 outpatients and inpatients, with iodine-131 therapy had been investigated and followed-up. There were 162 treatments which included patients with hyperthyroidism (HT)-124, 35 thyroid cancers (TC), 2 toxic thyroid adenomas and 1 nontoxic nodular goiter. In addition, we had achieved the practical measures and contact instance with household members and the general public, including 37 HT (contact with 37 adults and 8 infants) and 3 TC. According to the personal condition of the patients and the time of exposure to individuals other than patients, and to calculate the exposure dose (mSv) to the individuals with formulae. Results: Based on the national criteria the total dose equivalent to the individuals other than patients may not exceed 5 mSv. For most patients, including 124 HT, 2 toxic thyroid adenomas and 16 times treatment of TC, the exposure doses to the individuals were not likely to exceed 5 mSv, but the others, including 19 treatments of TC and 1 nontoxic nodular goiter, the exposure doses were higher than 5 mSv. There was no difference between the part of HT and TC of inpatients when compared with outpatients (P>0.05, respectively). We found that occupancy factor during the preequilibrium period play an important role on the exposure doses to the individuals, especially TC patients. With the dose equivalent to the same HT patient, practical measures for accumulating doses is higher and more practical than the simplistic formula calculating ones (P 0.05). Conclusions: Most of the outpatients with iodine- 131 therapy were safe to the individuals surrounding them within 1 meter, but the part of TC patients needed to be treated in the hospital and took a dose

  17. Scoring system predictive of survival for patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kress Marie-Adele S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment option for liver tumors. This study evaluated outcomes after SBRT to identify prognostic variables and to develop a novel scoring system predictive of survival. Methods The medical records of 52 patients with a total of 85 liver lesions treated with SBRT from 2003 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-four patients had 1 lesion; 27 had 2 or more. Thirteen lesions were primary tumors; 72 were metastases. Fiducials were placed in all patients prior to SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 30 Gy (range, 16 – 50 Gy in a median of 3 fractions (range, 1–5. Results With median follow-up of 11.3 months, median overall survival (OS was 12.5 months, and 1 year OS was 50.8%. In 42 patients with radiographic follow up, 1 year local control was 74.8%. On univariate analysis, number of lesions (p = 0.0243 and active extralesional disease (p  Conclusions SBRT offers a safe and feasible treatment option for liver tumors. A prognostic scoring system based on the number of liver lesions, activity of extralesional disease, and KPS predicts survival following SBRT and can be used as a guide for prospective validation and ultimately for treatment decision-making.

  18. Radiation levels and image quality in patients undergoing chest X-ray examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio Campos; do Carmo Santana, Priscila; de Sousa Lacerda, Marco Aurélio; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2017-11-01

    Patient dose monitoring for different radiographic procedures has been used as a parameter to evaluate the performance of radiology services; skin entrance absorbed dose values for each type of examination were internationally established and recommended aiming patient protection. In this work, a methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services: one with a conventional film and two with digital computerized radiography processing techniques. The x-ray beam parameters were selected and "doses" (specifically the entrance surface and incident air kerma) were evaluated based on images approved in European criteria during postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) incidences. Data were collected from 200 patients related to 200 PA and 100 LAT incidences. Results showed that doses distributions in the three diagnostic services were very different; the best relation between dose and image quality was found in the institution with the chemical film processing. This work contributed for disseminating the radiation protection culture by emphasizing the need of a continuous dose reduction without losing the quality of the diagnostic image.

  19. Effect of psychosocial distress on outcome for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen M; Hsu, Sophia; Felix, Care; Garst, Jordan; Yoshizaki, Taeko

    2018-03-01

    To determine the impact of pretreatment psychosocial distress on compliance to radiation therapy (RT) and clinical outcomes for patients with head and neck cancer STUDY DESIGN: Self-reported responses to the mood and anxiety domains of the University of Washington Quality of Life instrument were reviewed among 133 patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer prior to initiating RT. Varying definitions were used (total number of unexpectedly missed RT days, >5 days continuous interruption of RT outside of weekends, >10 days continuous interruption of RT, and failure to complete prescribed course of RT) to analyze the effect of psychosocial disruption on compliance. Survival was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. The prevalence of pretreatment depression and anxiety was 23% and 47%, respectively. Continuous RT breaks >5 days occurred in 46%, 33%, 10%, 9%, and 0% of patients whose mood was rated as "extremely depressed," "somewhat depressed," "neither in a good mood or depressed," "generally good," and "excellent," respectively (P = .0016). The corresponding proportion of patients who did not complete their planned RT was 23%, 11%, 5%, and 3%, and 0%, respectively (P = .043). The 2-year overall survival of patients who were "extremely depressed" or "somewhat depressed" at baseline was 71% versus 86% for all others (P = .026). Depression was independently associated with decreased overall survival on logistical regression analysis. Pretreatment depression predicted for decreased RT compliance and inferior survival for head and neck cancer. Additional research to overcome potential barriers to treatment in this setting may be warranted. 4. Laryngoscope, 128:641-645, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of radiation-induced Class V dental caries in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Savadi Oskoee

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Salivary glands are very susceptible to radiation and any disturbances in their function are detrimental to the hard tissues in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate posterior class V dental caries in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy. Materials and methods. In this study, twenty seven patients undergoing conventional radiotherapy were included. Class V dental caries of posterior teeth in these patients were evaluated in three intervals: before treatment, 3 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, and at the end of the treatment. Differences of mean caries activity between intervals were evaluated using paired sample t-test. Results. There were no class V decays prior to radiotherapy. Mean percentage of class V caries three weeks after radiotherapy and at the end of radiotherapy were 28.42% ± 14.41 and 67.05% ± 19.02, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in mean values among three stages (P = 0.00025. Conclusion. The results of the present study revealed that radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancers causes class V dental caries on posterior teeth.

  1. Evaluation of Radiation-induced Class V Dental Caries in Patients with Head and Neck Cancers Undergoing Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Seyednejad, Farshad; Oskoee, Parnian Alizadeh; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeil

    2008-01-01

    Salivary glands are very susceptible to radiation and any disturbances in their function are detrimental to the hard tissues in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate posterior class V dental caries in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy. In this study, twenty seven patients undergoing conventional radiotherapy were included. Class V dental caries of posterior teeth in these patients were evaluated in three intervals: before treatment, 3 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, and at the end of the treatment. Differences of mean caries activity between intervals were evaluated using paired sample t-test. There were no class V decays prior to radiotherapy. Mean percentage of class V caries three weeks after radiotherapy and at the end of radiotherapy were 28.42% ± 14.41 and 67.05% ± 19.02, respectively. There were statistically signifi-cant differences in mean values among three stages (P = 0.00025). The results of the present study re-vealed that radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancers causes class V dental caries on posteri-or teeth.

  2. Some experiences from radiation protection of patients undergoing X-ray examinations in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngaile, J.E.; Muhogora, W.E.; Nyanda, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    A study of patient entrance surface dose (ESD) received by adult patients was undertaken in five major diagnostic facilities in Tanzania. Five selected X-ray projections for chest PA; abdomen AP; lumbar spine AP; lumbar spine LAT and pelvis AP were done in the study. The mean ESDs after introduction of dose reduction methods were 0.34 mGy, 5.41 mGy, 3.7 mGy, 4.8 mGy and 8.8 mGy for chest PA; abdomen AP; pelvis AP; lumbar spine AP and lumbar spine LAT, respectively. The variations of doses observed in the study were influenced by performance characteristic of X-ray equipment, patient shape and size, type of image receptor, radiographic techniques as well as skills employed. The results show that increasing the tube voltage reduced the ESD by 35.5%, while lowering of mAs reduced ESD in the range from 15% to 60%. The reduction of ESD by increasing the filtration ranged from 11% to 58% while increasing of speed class of film-screen combination reduced the ESD in the range from 33% to 57%. The corresponding results of image quality show that out of 1064 scores of image criteria 298,481 and 285 were rated for good, satisfactory and poor respectively. The results of this study provide an evidence of existing potential for dose reduction in the diagnostic radiology facilities and the most important factor for improvement is to increase awareness, both from reality of harm from unnecessary radiation exposure and with relative ease doses can be reduced. The study should therefore be implemented on the national scale as an approach to establish guidance levels of patient entrance surface dose for good medical practice and regular monitoring purposes. (author)

  3. Principal component analysis identifies patterns of cytokine expression in non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah G Ellsworth

    Full Text Available Radiation treatment (RT stimulates the release of many immunohumoral factors, complicating the identification of clinically significant cytokine expression patterns. This study used principal component analysis (PCA to analyze cytokines in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients undergoing RT and explore differences in changes after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and conventionally fractionated RT (CFRT without or with chemotherapy.The dataset included 141 NSCLC patients treated on prospective clinical protocols; PCA was based on the 128 patients who had complete CK values at baseline and during treatment. Patients underwent SBRT (n = 16, CFRT (n = 18, or CFRT (n = 107 with concurrent chemotherapy (ChRT. Levels of 30 cytokines were measured from prospectively collected platelet-poor plasma samples at baseline, during RT, and after RT. PCA was used to study variations in cytokine levels in patients at each time point.Median patient age was 66, and 22.7% of patients were female. PCA showed that sCD40l, fractalkine/C3, IP10, VEGF, IL-1a, IL-10, and GMCSF were responsible for most variability in baseline cytokine levels. During treatment, sCD40l, IP10, MIP-1b, fractalkine, IFN-r, and VEGF accounted for most changes in cytokine levels. In SBRT patients, the most important players were sCD40l, IP10, and MIP-1b, whereas fractalkine exhibited greater variability in CFRT alone patients. ChRT patients exhibited variability in IFN-γ and VEGF in addition to IP10, MIP-1b, and sCD40l.PCA can identify potentially significant patterns of cytokine expression after fractionated RT. Our PCA showed that inflammatory cytokines dominate post-treatment cytokine profiles, and the changes differ after SBRT versus CFRT, with vs without chemotherapy. Further studies are planned to validate these findings and determine the clinical significance of the cytokine profiles identified by PCA.

  4. The prognostic role of hemoglobin levels in patients undergoing concurrent chemo-radiation for anal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Montagnani, Francesco; Arcadipane, Francesca; Casadei, Chiara; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Martini, Stefania; Iorio, Giuseppe Carlo; Scartozzi, Mario; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Fornaro, Lorenzo; Cassoni, Paola; Cascinu, Stefano; Ricardi, Umberto; Casadei Gardini, Andrea

    2018-05-02

    Concurrent chemo-radiation (CT-RT) is a standard therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal. Different clinical and biological factors may potentially affect outcome. We investigated the prognostic role of baseline hemoglobin (Hb) in a cohort of anal cancer patients submitted to CT-RT with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Up to 161 patients with clinical stage T1-T4/N0-N3/M0 were treated. Response was assessed at 6 weeks and thereafter at 3, 6 and 12 months. Two different approaches were used:a)simultaneous integrated boost following RTOG 05-29 indications;b)first sequence of 45Gy/25 fractions to the pelvis followed by 9-14.4 Gy/5-8 fractions to the macroscopic disease. Primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). On multivariate analysis, pre-treatment Hb level had a significant correlation to OS (HR:0.53;95% CI:0.33-0.87; p = 0.001), but not to PFS (HR:0.78;95% CI:0.53-1.15; p = 0.12) Patients with pre-treatment Hb ≥ 12 g/dl had 5-year PFS and OS of 82.2%, compared to 29.3% and 32.8% for those below the threshold. The likelihood to achieve a complete remission increased by 5.6% for every single-unit (g/dl) increase in baseline Hb level over 11 g/dl. On multivariate analysis, response to treatment had a significant correlation to PFS (incomplete vs complete response - HR:5.43;95% CI:2.75-10.7; p < 0.0001) and OS (HR: 6.96;95% CI:2.96-16.5; p < 0.0001). We showed that baseline Hb level is a strong indicator for poor response to RT-CT in anal cancer patients. A close clinical monitoring for incomplete response to treatment should be advised in patients with low pre-treatment Hb. The hypothesis that the preservation of adequate Hb level during treatment may lead to a better outcome needs prospective evaluation.

  5. Restoration of the orbital aesthetic subunit with the thoracodorsal artery system of flaps in patients undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanowski, Eric J P; Casper, Keith A; Eisbruch, Avraham; Heth, Jason A; Marentette, Lawrence J; Prince, Mark E; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Chepeha, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the advantages of the thoracodorsal artery scapular tip autogenous transplant (Tdast) for patients requiring restoration of the orbital aesthetic subunit. Design Prospective case series. Setting Tertiary center. Participants Ten patients (M:F,6:4) with a mean age of 56 years (range, 21 to 78 years) underwent restoration of the orbital aesthetic subunit and radiation therapy between 2001 and 2008. Main Outcome Measures The two reconstructive advantages of the thoracodorsal artery system of flaps for orbital reconstruction are a long pedicle and the suitability of the scapula tip to meet the three-dimensional requirements of the orbit. Patients were assessed 1 year or more after treatment for cosmetic outcome, work status, and socialization. Results Eight of 10 patients benefited from the three-dimensional nature of the scapula tip bone and 7 of 10 avoided vein grafting. Four of five evaluable patients reported "frequently" socializing outside their home. Four of five evaluable patients working before undergoing their treatment were able to return to work posttreatment. Seven of nine patients with postoperative photographs had minimal or no facial contour deformity. Conclusions The Tdast can restore orbital contour without osteotomy, and the thoracodorsal artery system of flaps has a long vascular pedicle that reduces vein grafting. Patients have an acceptable cosmetic result and return to preoperative work status and socialization.

  6. Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy Are at Risk of Financial Toxicity: A Patient-based Prospective Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Joshua D; Patel, Tejash T; Eldredge-Hindy, Harriet; Keith, Scott W; Patel, Tapas; Malatesta, Theresa; DiNome, Jessie; Lowther, Anne; Ferguson, Linda; Wagenborg, Sally; Smyles, John; Babaria, Usha; Stabile, Richard; Gressen, Eric; Rudoler, Shari; Fisher, Scot A

    2018-06-01

    Little is known about the financial burden experienced by patients receiving radiation therapy. Furthermore, currently, no financial toxicity screening tools have been validated for use in radiation oncology. Physician surveys were used to gauge provider understanding of treatment costs and their willingness to adopt the use of financial toxicity screening tools. Post-treatment patient surveys were used to investigate the covariates of treatment-induced financial risk. Of the 210 radiation oncologists who completed our survey, 53% reported being "very concerned" with treatment-related costs negatively affecting their patients, and 80% believed that a financial toxicity screening tool would be useful in practice. An analysis of patient surveys using logistic regression found age and cancer site to be the most important variables associated with financial toxicity. Thirty-four patients (22%) experienced financial toxicity related to treatment. The financial toxicities experienced were loss of job (28%), loss of income (24%), difficulty paying their rent or mortgage (20%), difficulty paying for transportation (15%), and difficulty paying for meals (13%). Financial toxicity is an important measure for patients and providers and is experienced by approximately one quarter of patients. Further studies to improve models to predict financial toxicity and how financial toxicity is related to patient outcomes and quality of life are warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental management for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: comprehensive patient based planning--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Paola; Quek, Samuel; Cohen, Harold V

    2009-01-01

    Medical management of the head and neck cancer patient (HNCP) most often will include radiation therapy to the head and neck region. HNCPs with malignant disease require judicious dental treatment planning prior to radiation therapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy. RT can result in a multitude of adverse effects, both reversible and irreversible. We report a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the throat above the larynx (supraglottic), who did not adhere to dental treatment recommendations for both pre- and post radiation dental management. The focus of this case report is to create awareness within the clinician that, in addition to evaluating the patient for the disease related issues that may affect the oral cavity and dentition, a total management plan should include factors beyond the structural oral problems related to the cancer. Final treatment plans for the HNCP should include medical assessment of past dental history, oral hygiene, potential compliance, or lack of, to dental care recommendations, the emotional state of the patient, socio-economic status of the patient (lifestyle, cost of care), future quality of life, the medical and/or life prognosis of the patient.

  8. Prophylactic vesical instillations with 0.2% chondroitin sulfate may reduce symptoms of acute radiation cystitis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for gynecological malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazewinkel, M.H.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Roovers, J.P.W.R.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the feasibility and efficacy of intravesical instillations with 40 ml chondroitin sulfate 0.2% solution to prevent or reduce acute radiation cystitis in women undergoing pelvic radiotherapy. In a comparative pilot study in 20 patients, half of the patients received instillations.

  9. Patient education using virtual reality increases knowledge and positive experience for breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Yobelli A; Cumming, Steven; Wang, Wei; Stuart, Kirsty; Thwaites, David I; Lewis, Sarah J

    2018-03-13

    Improved access to technology in the radiation therapy (RT) workforce education has resulted in opportunities for innovative patient education methods. This study investigated the impact of a newly developed education tool using the Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training (VERT) system on patients' RT knowledge and anxiety. Breast cancer patients were recruited into a control group (CG) (n = 18) who underwent the standard pre-RT education package at a targeted cancer therapy centre, followed by a VERT group (VG) (n = 19). VG patients attended a VERT-based education session detailing RT immobilisation, planning and treatment. All patients completed questionnaires at four time points throughout their treatment, with survey sub-sections on RT knowledge, experience and anxiety. For both groups, anxiety levels were highest at time point 1(T1 after initial radiation oncologist consultation) (CG, 41.2; VG, 43.1), with a gradual decrease observed thereafter at time points before simulation, at the beginning of treatment and at the end of treatment (p > 0.05). The VG's RT knowledge scores were statistically significantly higher than those of the CG scores at all time points following VERT education (p education programs in improving RT knowledge and perhaps decreasing patient anxiety. Continued efforts are required to improve patients' accessibility to VERT in Australia, and to better understand the effect of VERT's unique educational features on patients' emotional and physical needs throughout their RT.

  10. Evaluation of skin entrance radiation dose in pediatric patients undergoing chest X-rays exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabardo, Farly Piantini

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate the incident air kerma of lateral (LAT) and anterior-posterior (AP) together with posterior-anterior (PA) projection chest X-ray exams in one of the largest pediatric hospitals in Brazil. Dosimetric results are accompanied with the detailed analysis of patient characteristics and radiographer strategy. The exams of 225 (119 male and 106 female) patients were studied and 389 X-ray exams (200 AP/PA projections and 189 LAT projections) of pediatric patients were acquired. Patient thickness can be restored from age, height or weight with the uncertainty of ∼20-30%. Very slight correlation between the patient dose and thickness was observed with the difference in dose for patients of the same thickness reaching 4 times. By standardization of radiological protocols, it should be possible to keep dose within the intervals 50-100 μGy for LAT projection and 40-80 μGy for AP/PA projection. The dose values are lower than those recommended by major European guidelines to good practice. (author)

  11. Nurses′ knowledge and education about oral care of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika R Pai

    2015-01-01

    Setting and design: A cross sectional descriptive survey was conducted among 158 staff nurses working in oncology related areas from 4 different hospitals of Dakshina Kannada district and Udupi district of Karnataka state, India. Statistical Analysis: descriptive and inferential statistics was used by using SPSS 16 version. Results: Majority 81 (51.3% of the staff nurses had poor knowledge of oral care in cancer patients whereas 87 (55.1% reported that knowledge acquired through basic education in oral care is not sufficient. Most of the staff nurses 115 (72.8% did not receive basic education in oral care of cancer patients. There was significant association between knowledge and variables such as designation (.005, years of work experience (.040 and years of experience in cancer wards (.000 at 0.05 levels. Conclusion: Lack of knowledge suggest the need to develop and implement continuing nursing education programs on oral care specifically for patients receiving cancer treatments, for improving knowledge of staff nurses′ in order to render comprehensive care to the patients. This study also recommends the importance of inclusion of cancer patient specific oral care in the curriculum which can enhance competency of the qualified nurses in cancer wards.

  12. Quantifying Health Utilities in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiation Treatment for Liver Metastases for Use in Future Economic Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, B; Munoz-Schuffenegger, P; Chan, K K W; Chu, W; Helou, J; Erler, D; Chung, H

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly used as an option for those with liver metastases. In order to facilitate future economic impact of health technologies, health utility scores may be used. The EuroQOL-5D-3L (EQ-5D) preference-based healthy utility instrument was used to evaluate the impact of treatment with SBRT on health utility scores. Between August 2013 and October 2014, 31 patients treated with 3-5 fractions of SBRT for liver metastases were enrolled in this study. The EQ-5D instrument was administered at baseline, during and up to 6 months post-SBRT. Mean EQ-5D score at baseline was 0.857, which remained stable across the entire study time period. Transient increases in difficulties with mobility (9.7% reported at baseline to 16.1% on the last day of treatment) and usual activities (3.2% reported at baseline to 34.5% on day two) were found during the course of treatment; these returned to baseline levels subsequently. The mean visual analogue score at baseline was 65.8 and remained unchanged throughout treatment and follow-up. The stability of health utility scores and problems reported by patients undergoing treatment indicate that SBRT for liver metastases does not impart a significant adverse effect on quality of life. These results may be used for future economic evaluation of SBRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose

  14. Diagnosis and therapy of cutaneous radiation syndrome. Individual radiosensitivity assessment in patients undergoing medical exposures presenting severe cutaneous radiation induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Vallerga, Maria B.; Perez, Maria R.; Portas, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Hospital de Quemados del Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Burn Center) is one of the reference hospitals of the Medical Radiological Emergency Response Network of Argentina. In the frame of an agreement between the Burn Center and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina, a research project for an approach based on diagnosis and therapy of cutaneous radiation induced lesions is in progress. Individual radiosensitivity assessment was conducted in patients included in this research protocol that showed acute and/or late cutaneous reactions with grades 3 and 4 of the Toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and the European organization for research and treatment of cancer (EORTC). DNA repair capacity and its kinetics were evaluated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using alkaline comet assay and micronucleus test. In this paper, two representative cases, in which the research protocol was applied, are presented. Therapeutic response and its correlation with radiosensitivity test results are described. Case 1: female patient undergoing external radiotherapy for invasive ductal breast cancer that presented acute cutaneous radiotoxicity, grade 3 (confluent moist epithelitis, )that led to treatment break. Case 2: male patient undergoing coronary angioplasty (interventional radiology), which developed late cutaneous radiotoxicity, grade 4 (ulceration at the dorsal region). Patients were treated with: topic administration of trolamine and silver sulfadiazine with lidocaine, associated with systemic administration of pentoxiphiline and anti-oxidants. The therapeutic response was evaluated through clinical follow-up, serial photographic record and complementary tests (tele thermography and high frequency ultrasonography). Case 1 response was positive (favorable) with early local recovery and complete remission of signs and symptoms after 5 months. Both MN frequencies and comet assay showed values compatible with normal radiosensitivity

  15. Disparities in staging prostate magnetic resonance imaging utilization for nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayobami Ajayi, BA

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: In this urban, academic center cohort, older patients across all risk groups and black or nonprivate insurance patients in the low risk group were less likely to undergo staging prostate MRI scans. Further research should investigate these differences to ensure equitable utilization across all demographic groups considering the burden of prostate cancer disparities.

  16. Dental consultation in patients planned for/undergoing/post radiation therapy for head and neck cancers: a questionnaire-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Apeksha; Sumanth, K N; Ongole, Ravikiran; Denny, Ceena

    2011-01-01

    Mouth and pharyngeal cancers account for approximately 6% of cancers worldwide. Radiotherapy is one of the means of treatment of head and neck cancer. Consultation with a dental team experienced in caring for patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer will improve the quality of life of such patients. To evaluate the attitude of oncologists toward dental consultation to patients planning for/prior to/undergoing/post radiation therapy for head and neck cancers and to evaluate the number of radiation oncologists who encounter oral complaints and consider worth referring to a dentist. A questionnaire-based study was carried out following mailing of covering letter and self-administered questionnaire comprising 11 items, to 25 radiation oncology centers selected in India based on convenient sampling. Out of the 25 centers, we received response from 20 centers with 60 completely filled questionnaires. Five centers did not respond for further correspondences. The study indicated a need for awareness and education among radiation oncologists regarding dental consultation in patients planned/undergoing /post radiation therapy for head and neck cancer.

  17. Outcome in elderly patients undergoing definitive surgery and radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme at a tertiary care institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Dasarahally S.; Suh, John H.; Phan, Jennifer L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Cohen, Bruce H.; Barnett, Gene H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of definitive surgery and radiation in patients aged 70 years and older with supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: We selected elderly patients (≥ 70 years) who had primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme at our tertiary care institution from 1977 through 1996. The study group (n = 102) included 58 patients treated with definitive radiation, 19 treated with palliative radiation, and 25 who received no radiation. To compare our results with published findings, we grouped our patients according to the applicable prognostic categories developed by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG): RTOG group IV (n = 6), V (n = 70), and VI (n = 26). Patients were retrospectively assigned to prognostic group IV, V, or VI based on age, performance status, extent of surgery, mental status, neurologic function, and radiation dose. Treatment included surgical resection and radiation (n 49), biopsy alone (n = 25), and biopsy followed by radiation (n = 28). Patients were also stratified according to whether they were optimally treated (gross total or subtotal resection with postoperative definitive radiation) or suboptimally treated (biopsy, biopsy + radiation, surgery alone, or surgery + palliative radiation). Patients were considered to have a favorable prognosis (n = 39) if they were optimally treated and had a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of at least 70. Results: The median survival for patients according to RTOG groups IV, V, and VI was 9.2, 6.6, and 3.1 months, respectively (log-rank, p < 0.0004). The median overall survival was 5.3 months. The definitive radiation group (n = 58) had a median survival of 7.3 months compared to 4.5 months in the palliative radiation group (n = 19) and 1.2 months in the biopsy-alone group (p < 0.0001). Optimally treated patients had a median survival of 7.4 months compared to 2.4 months in those suboptimally treated (p < 0.0001). The favorable prognosis group had an

  18. Dose to level I and II axillary lymph nodes and lung by tangential field radiation in patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation with tissue expander reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, James K; Armeson, Kent E; Rhome, Ryan; Spanos, Michele; Harper, Jennifer L

    2011-01-01

    To define the dosimetric coverage of level I/II axillary volumes and the lung volume irradiated in postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) following tissue expander placement. Twenty-three patients were identified who had undergone postmastectomy radiotherapy with tangent only fields. All patients had pre-radiation tissue expander placement and expansion. Thirteen patients had bilateral expander reconstruction. The level I/II axillary volumes were contoured using the RTOG contouring atlas. The patient-specific variables of expander volume, superior-to-inferior location of expander, distance between expanders, expander angle and axillary volume were analyzed to determine their relationship to the axillary volume and lung volume dose. The mean coverage of the level I/II axillary volume by the 95% isodose line (V D95% ) was 23.9% (range 0.3 - 65.4%). The mean Ipsilateral Lung V D50% was 8.8% (2.2-20.9). Ipsilateral and contralateral expander volume correlated to Axillary V D95% in patients with bilateral reconstruction (p = 0.01 and 0.006, respectively) but not those with ipsilateral only reconstruction (p = 0.60). Ipsilateral Lung V D50% correlated with angle of the expander from midline (p = 0.05). In patients undergoing PMRT with tissue expanders, incidental doses delivered by tangents to the axilla, as defined by the RTOG contouring atlas, do not provide adequate coverage. The posterior-superior region of level I and II is the region most commonly underdosed. Axillary volume coverage increased with increasing expander volumes in patients with bilateral reconstruction. Lung dose increased with increasing expander angle from midline. This information should be considered both when placing expanders and when designing PMRT tangent only treatment plans by contouring and targeting the axilla volume when axillary treatment is indicated

  19. A retrospective study to determine if there is a gender-related difference in weight loss in non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, L.; Hodson, I.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if male non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing radiation therapy experience greater weight loss than female patients. A secondary objective was to demonstrate that a specific gender could be targeted earlier during treatment for nutritional consultations. Weight and nutritional consultation data were retrospectively collected from 40 patient charts. The sample had an equal number of males and females with similar patient characteristics. It was found that, on average, males lost more weight than females during radiation therapy and at follow-up. An independent samples t-test showed that the difference was statistically significant. Men had more weight loss than women during radiation therapy, suggesting men are at a greater risk for nutritional problems. Furthermore, more men that women experienced their maximum weight loss before receiving a nutritional consultation. Thus, males with NSCLC should be targeted earlier for dietary consultations to help maintain their weight. (author)

  20. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Analysis of Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Undergoing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Daniel R.; Song, William Y.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Rose, Brent S.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased bowel radiation dose is associated with acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), using a previously derived normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model. Methods: Fifty patients with Stage I–III cervical cancer undergoing IMRT and concurrent weekly cisplatin were analyzed. Acute GI toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, excluding upper GI events. A logistic model was used to test correlations between acute GI toxicity and bowel dosimetric parameters. The primary objective was to test the association between Grade ≥2 GI toxicity and the volume of bowel receiving ≥45 Gy (V 45 ) using the logistic model. Results: Twenty-three patients (46%) had Grade ≥2 GI toxicity. The mean (SD) V 45 was 143 mL (99). The mean V 45 values for patients with and without Grade ≥2 GI toxicity were 176 vs. 115 mL, respectively. Twenty patients (40%) had V 45 >150 mL. The proportion of patients with Grade ≥2 GI toxicity with and without V 45 >150 mL was 65% vs. 33% (p = 0.03). Logistic model parameter estimates V50 and γ were 161 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 60–399) and 0.31 (95% CI 0.04–0.63), respectively. On multivariable logistic regression, increased V 45 was associated with an increased odds of Grade ≥2 GI toxicity (odds ratio 2.19 per 100 mL, 95% CI 1.04–4.63, p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that increasing bowel V 45 is correlated with increased GI toxicity in cervical cancer patients undergoing IMRT and concurrent cisplatin. Reducing bowel V 45 could reduce the risk of Grade ≥2 GI toxicity by approximately 50% per 100 mL of bowel spared.

  1. SU-E-I-54: Effective Dose and Radiation Cancer Risks for Scoliosis Patients Undergoing Full Spine Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259, Wen-Hwa 1st Road., Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Y [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259, Wen-Hwa 1st Road., Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan (China); Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Scoliotic patients underwent a lot of radiologic examinations during the control and treatment periods. This study used the PCXMC program to calculate the effective dose of the patients and assess the radiation cancer risks. Methods: Seventy five scoliotic patients were examined using CR or DR systems during the control and treatment periods in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The technical factors were recorded for each patient during his/her control and treatment period. The entrance surface dose was measured using thermoluminence dosimeters and derived from technical factors and irradiated geometry. The effective dose of patients and relative radiation cancer risks were calculated by the PCXMC program. All required information regarding patient age and sex, the x-ray spectra, and the tube voltage and current were registered. The radiation risk were estimated using the model developed by the BEIR VII committee (2006). Results: The effective doses of full spine radiography with anteroposterior and lateral projections were 0.626 mSv for patients using DR systems, and 0.483mSv for patients using CR systems, respectively. The dose using DR system was 29.6% higher than those using CR system. The maximum organ dose was observed in the breast for both projections in all the systems. The risk of exposure—induced cancer death (REID) of patients for DR and CR systems were 0.009% and 0.007%, respectively. Conclusion: The risk estimates were regarded with healthy skepticism, placed more emphasis on the magnitude of the risk. The effective doses estimated in this study could be served as a reference for radiologists and technologists and demonstrate the necessity to optimize patient protection for full spine radiography though the effective doses are not at the level to induce deterministic effects and not significant in the stochastic effect. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1D0421)

  2. Feasibility and radiation dose of high-pitch acquisition protocols in patients undergoing dual-source cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Wieland H; Albrecht, Edda; Bamberg, Fabian; Schenzle, Jan C; Johnson, Thorsten R; Neumaier, Klement; Reiser, Maximilian F; Nikolaou, Konstatin

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare image quality and radiation dose between high-pitch and established retrospectively and prospectively gated cardiac CT protocols using an Alderson-Rando phantom and a set of patients. An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminiscent detectors and a set of clinical patients underwent the following cardiac CT protocols: high-pitch acquisition (pitch 3.4), prospectively triggered acquisition, and retrospectively gated acquisition (pitch 0.2). For patients with sinus rhythm below 65 beats per minute (bpm), high-pitch protocol was used, whereas for patients in sinus rhythm between 65 and 100 bpm, prospective triggering was used. Patients with irregular heart rates or heart rates of ≥ 100 bpm, were examined using retrospectively gated acquisition. Evaluability of coronary artery segments was determined, and effective radiation dose was derived from the phantom study. In the phantom study, the effective radiation dose as determined with thermoluminescent detector (TLD) measurements was lowest in the high-pitch acquisition (1.21, 3.12, and 11.81 mSv, for the high-pitch, the prospectively triggered, and the retrospectively gated acquisition, respectively). There was a significant difference with respect to the percentage of motion-free coronary artery segments (99%, 87%, and 92% for high-pitch, prospectively triggered, and retrospectively gated, respectively (p pitch protocol (p pitch scans have the potential to reduce radiation dose up to 61.2% and 89.8% compared with prospectively triggered and retrospectively gated scans. High-pitch protocols lead to excellent image quality when used in patients with stable heart rates below 65 bpm.

  3. An opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy achieves a high completion rate of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kengo; Matsuura, Kazuto; Zenda, Sadamoto

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate supportive care is essential for intensive chemoradiation therapy (CRT), and pain management is an important supportive care for CRT for head and neck cancer. We developed an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients undergoing CRT, and assessed its efficacy and safety. 110 head and neck cancer patients undergoing platinum-based concomitant CRT were enrolled from 10 cancer centers or university hospitals. Their pain caused by CRT was managed with a four-step opioid-based pain control program, and adverse events and usage of opioid were analyzed. 101 suitable cases of 110 patients were analyzed. 53% of cases suffered grade 3-4 mucositis. The rate of completion of radiotherapy was 99% and the rate of unplanned breaks in radiotherapy was 13%. The usage rate of opioid was 83% and the rate of compliance with the pain control program was 92%. The median maximum quantity of morphine used per day was 35 mg. No patient had to stop the opioid program or radiotherapy due to adverse effects of opioids. An opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients undergoing CRT achieves a high completion rate of radiation. (author)

  4. Failure of lactose-restricted diets to prevent radiation-induced diarrhea in patients undergoing whole pelvis irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-four patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy into one of three dietary groups: the control group maintained a regular diet except that they drank at least 480 cc of milk daily; the lactose-restricted group was placed on a lactose-restricted diet; and the lactase group drank at least 480 cc of milk with lactase enzyme added to hydrolyze 90% of the lactose. The patients kept records of their stool frequency and the number of diphenoxylate tablets required to control their diarrhea during a 5 week course of standard whole pelvis irradiation. The data does not support the concept that one of the mechanisms of radiation-induced diarrhea associated with pelvic irradiation is a reduction the ability of the intestine to hydrolyze ingested lactose due to the effect of the radiation on the small intestine. There was not a significant difference in stool frequency or diphenoxylate usage among the dietary groups

  5. Studies on blood levels of hormones in patients undergoing surgery and radiation therapy for cervical cancer, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Motofumi

    1984-01-01

    Blood levels of LH, FSH, prolactin (PRL), progesterone (Prog), estrone (E 1 ), estradiol (E 2 ), testosterone (T), and cortisol (Cor) were determined in 5 patients treated with radiation therapy following surgical transposition of the ovaries (group A) and in 9 patients treated with surgical transposition alone (group B). Although disturbance in ovarian function was transiently observed during and after X-ray irradiation in the group A, blood levels of hormones returned to normal at 5-7 months after the completion of treatment. Cyclic changes in blood hormones were observed in 4 patients. These results indicated that ovarian function is fully conserved after X-ray irradiation. No remarkable changes in blood hormones were observed in the group B, suggesting that there is no effect of surgical procedure on ovarian function. However, because one patient receiving anticancer agents had transient disturbance in ovarian function, caution is necessary in the selection of anticancer agents. Surgical transposition of the ovaries is therefore considered to be a very simple, reasonable procedure when radiation therapy is required in patients with Ib or more advanced stages cervical cancer. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. Intraoperative boost radiation effects on early wound complications in breast cancer patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülçelik, Mehmet Ali; Doğan, Lütfi; Karaman, Niyazi; Turan, Müjdat; Kahraman, Yavuz Selim; Akgül, Gökhan Giray; Özaslan, Cihangir

    2017-08-23

    Background/aim: Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) may pose a risk for wound complications. All technical aspects of IORT regarding early wound complications were evaluated. Materials and methods: Ninety-three consecutive patients operated on with the same surgical technique and given (study group) or not given (control group) IORT were included. Wound complications were evaluated in two groups. Results: Forty-three patients were treated with boost dose IORT and 50 patients were treated with breast-conserving surgery without IORT. When both groups were compared in terms of early postoperative complications, there were 11 (25.5%) patients with seroma in the IORT group and 3 patients (6%) in the control group (P = 0.04). While 9 (21%) patients were seen to have surgical site infection (SSI) in the IORT group, there was 1 (2%) SSI in the control group (P = 0.005). There were 15 (35%) patients with delayed wound healing in the IORT group and 4 patients (8%) in the control group (P = 0.006). Conclusion: IORT could have a negative effect on seroma formation, SSI, and delayed healing. It should be kept in mind, however, that in centers with IORT implementation, the complication rate could also increase. Necessary measures for better sterilization in the operating room should be taken, while patient wound healing should be monitored closely.

  7. Resistance Exercise and Inflammation in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Radiation Therapy: Mediation Analysis From a Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Martina E.; Meynköhn, Anna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Wessels, Sabine; Klassen, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the mediating role of inflammatory parameters in the development of fatigue, pain, and potentially related depressive symptoms during radiation therapy for breast cancer and its mitigation by resistance exercise. Methods and Materials: Breast cancer patients scheduled for adjuvant radiation therapy were randomized to 12-week progressive resistance exercise training (EX) or a relaxation control group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured in serum samples collected before, at the end, and 6 weeks after radiation therapy from 103 chemotherapy-naïve participants. Fatigue was assessed with the multidimensional Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire, pain with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis of covariance models, partial correlations, Freedman-Schatzkin tests, and R"2 effect-size measures for mediation were calculated. Results: The analysis of covariance models revealed a significant intervention effect on IL-6 (P=.010) and the IL-6/IL-1ra ratio (P=.018), characterized by a marked increase during radiation therapy among controls, but no significant change in EX. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not change significantly in either group (P=.88). Increased IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra levels at the end of radiation therapy were significantly associated with increased physical fatigue and pain 6 weeks after radiation. We observed significant partial mediation by IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra of the effect of resistance exercise on physical fatigue (Freedman-Schatzkin P=.023 and P<.001) and pain (both P<.001). Hereby IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra mediated between 15% and 24% of the variance of physical fatigue and pain explained by the intervention. Conclusions: This randomized, controlled trial showed a significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine level after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast

  8. Resistance Exercise and Inflammation in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Radiation Therapy: Mediation Analysis From a Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Martina E., E-mail: m.schmidt@dkfz.de [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Meynköhn, Anna; Habermann, Nina [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiskemann, Joachim [Division of Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Wessels, Sabine [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Klassen, Oliver [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Steindorf, Karen; Ulrich, Cornelia M. [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the mediating role of inflammatory parameters in the development of fatigue, pain, and potentially related depressive symptoms during radiation therapy for breast cancer and its mitigation by resistance exercise. Methods and Materials: Breast cancer patients scheduled for adjuvant radiation therapy were randomized to 12-week progressive resistance exercise training (EX) or a relaxation control group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured in serum samples collected before, at the end, and 6 weeks after radiation therapy from 103 chemotherapy-naïve participants. Fatigue was assessed with the multidimensional Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire, pain with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis of covariance models, partial correlations, Freedman-Schatzkin tests, and R{sup 2} effect-size measures for mediation were calculated. Results: The analysis of covariance models revealed a significant intervention effect on IL-6 (P=.010) and the IL-6/IL-1ra ratio (P=.018), characterized by a marked increase during radiation therapy among controls, but no significant change in EX. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not change significantly in either group (P=.88). Increased IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra levels at the end of radiation therapy were significantly associated with increased physical fatigue and pain 6 weeks after radiation. We observed significant partial mediation by IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra of the effect of resistance exercise on physical fatigue (Freedman-Schatzkin P=.023 and P<.001) and pain (both P<.001). Hereby IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra mediated between 15% and 24% of the variance of physical fatigue and pain explained by the intervention. Conclusions: This randomized, controlled trial showed a significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine level after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast

  9. Feasibility of a Mobile Application to Enhance Swallowing Therapy for Patients Undergoing Radiation-Based Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmer, Heather M; Abrams, Rina; Webster, Kimberly; Kizner, Jennifer; Beadle, Beth; Holsinger, F Christopher; Quon, Harry; Richmon, Jeremy

    2018-04-01

    Dysphagia following treatment for head and neck cancer is one of the most significant morbidities impacting quality of life. Despite the value of prophylactic exercises to mitigate the impact of radiation on long-term swallowing function, adherence to treatment is limited. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the feasibility of a mobile health application to support patient adherence to swallowing therapy during radiation-based treatment. 36 patients undergoing radiation therapy were provided with the Vibrent™ mobile application as an adjunct to standard swallowing therapy. The application included exercise videos, written instructions, reminders, exercise logging, and educational content. 80% of participants used the app during treatment and logged an average of 102 exercise sessions over the course of treatment. 25% of participants logged at least two exercise sessions per day over the 7-week treatment period, and 53% recorded at least one session per day. Exit interviews regarding the patient experience with the Vibrent™ mobile application were largely positive, but also provided actionable strategies to improve future versions of the application. The Vibrent™ mobile application appears to be a tool that can be feasibly integrated into existing patient care practices and may assist patients in adhering to treatment recommendations and facilitate communication between patients and providers between encounters.

  10. Measurements of radiation dose to patients undergoing some common radiographic x-ray examinations in Wad Madani hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammedzein, T. S.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patient doses in most common radiographic x-ray examinations in Wad Madani hospitals of Al Gazera State. The examination parameters of 388 radiographs were used to calculate the Entrance Surface Air Kerma (ESAK) of patients undergoing skull (AP and LAT), chest (PA), pelvis (AP), abdomen (AP) and lumbar spin (AP and LAT) in six major hospitals. Hospital mean ESAKs estimated range from 0.0729-0.69 mGy for chest PA, 0.338-6.64 mGy for skull PA, 0.195-5.8 mGy for skull LAT, 0.595-3.42 mGy for pelvis AP, 0.772-6.31 mGy for lumbar spine AP, 2.1-15.2 mGy for lumbar spine LAT and 0.742-5.79 mGy for abdomen. This data will be useful for the formulation of national reference levels as recommended by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (Author)

  11. A randomized assessment of three quality of life (QOL) questionnaires for prostate cancer patients undergoing different radiation treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senter, K.K.; Hardy, M.; Flynn, C.; Lewis, L.; Wallace, M.; Boyea, G.; Mitchell, C.; Fluellen, L.; Henry, C.St.; Martinez, A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this prospective, randomized study was to assess and compare compliance of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer to completing three different validated QOL instruments pre-treatment and six months later. Materials and Methods: Between April 2000 and April 2001, 124 patients were asked to fill out only one of three randomly selected QOL questionnaires (version A, B, C). Each addressed urinary and sexual function. One also addressed patients' physical, social, family, emotional, and functional well being. Study patients received External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) or Brachytherapy (BRACHY), according to departmental policy. Exclusion criteria included current/previous hormone therapy and prostatectomy. Patients were asked to return the questionnaire at their first treatment visit. The three tools were: A The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for Prostate Patients (FACT-P), The Sexual Adjustments Questionnaire (SAQ), and The American Urological Association (AUA) Questionnaire. The Fact-P questionnaire elicits information about physical, social, family, emotional, and functional well being as they relate to prostate cancer. SAQ focuses on sexual function; the AUA on urinary symptoms. B SAQ and AUA only; identical to Version A, but does not address physical, social, family, emotional, and functional well-being. C The International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) Questionnaire, which addresses urinary symptoms and Patient Sexual Function Questionnaire, which focuses on erectile function. Additionally, patients were asked to respond yes/no to four variables designed to evaluate these questionnaires: 1) ease of understanding, 2) too personal, 3)addresses concerns regarding urinary function and sexual potency and 4) willingness to complete questionnaire in six months. These variables were examined for any trends that may exist between the different questionnaires. Results: Fifteen (12%) of the 124 patients returned incomplete questionnaires

  12. Care of patients undergoing external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, C.

    1977-01-01

    The anxiety and associated depression suffered by most patients undergoing radiotherapy is discussed and the possibilities open to the nurse to encourage and reassure patients thus facilitating physical care are considered. The general symptoms of anorexia, nausea, tiredness, skin problems, alopecia, bonemarrow depresssion and rapid tumour destruction are described and nursing care prescribed. The side-effects which may occur following radiation of the brain, head and neck region, eyes, oesophagus, lung, abdomen, pelvis, bones, skin, spine, and spinal cord are considered from the nursing standpoint. The specialised subject of radiotherapy in children is discussed briefly. (U.K.)

  13. Is whole brain radiation therapy needed for all patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Miller, David W.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Cohen, Bruce H.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Since whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) carries risks for long term survivors of brain metastases, some have advocated the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone for patients with brain metastases. We retrospectively reviewed our results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with immediate or delayed WBRT. MATERIALS/METHODS: From March 1990 to December 1996, linear accelerator-based SRS was performed on patients with Karnofsky score ≥ 70 and asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic brain metastases < 4 cm diameter. After excluding those patients with recurrent disease, 87 patients with 106 metastatic lesions (72 pts- single or solitary lesion, 13 pts- 2 lesions, 1 pt- 3 lesions, and 1 pt- 5 lesions) remained for analysis. The use of WBRT was dependent on physician preference but was given to all patients who developed local or regional failure after SRS. Survival was measured from the date of SRS until death or last follow-up using Kaplan-Meier method. Freedom from progression (FFP) was defined as no local or regional brain failure on follow-up radiographs and was measured from the date of SRS. RESULTS: Prognostic variables (age, sex, initial KPS, systemic disease, and extent of surgical resection) were similar for the 40 patients in the immediate WBRT group (iWBRT) and for the 47 patients in the delayed WBRT group (dWBRT). With a median follow-up of 5.8 months, no significant difference in median survival (6.9 months for both groups) was noted. On multivariate analysis, absence of systemic disease (p=0.008) and KPS 90-100 (p=0.001) were the only significant predictors for survival. For the 29 patients with a minimum KPS of 90 and no systemic disease, the median survival was 17.8 months. For those patients with a solitary lesion (no systemic disease), there was a trend for better median survival for the iWBRT group (22.8 months) versus the dWBRT group (9.3 months), p=0.06. FFP data was available on 78 patients (97 lesions). A significant difference was

  14. Short-term Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Improves Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kalikstein, Abraham; Kuk, Deborah; Zhang, Zhigang; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the benefit of short-term androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) receiving dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study comprised 710 intermediate-risk PC patients receiving external beam radiation therapy with doses of ≥81 Gy at a single institution from 1992 to 2005, including 357 patients receiving neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT. Prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival (PSA-RFS) and distant metastasis (DM) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. PC-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed using competing-risks analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 7.9 years. Despite being more likely to have higher PSA levels, Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7, multiple National Comprehensive Cancer Network intermediate-risk factors, and older age (P≤.001 for all comparisons), patients receiving ADT had improved PSA-RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.598; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.435-0.841; P=.003), DM (HR, 0.424; 95% CI, 0.219-0.819; P=.011), and PCSM (HR, 0.380; 95% CI, 0.157-0.921; P=.032) on univariate analysis. Using multivariate analysis, ADT was an even stronger predictor of improved PSA-RFS (adjusted HR [AHR], 0.516; 95% CI, 0.360-0.739; P<.001), DM (AHR, 0.347; 95% CI, 0.176-0.685; P=.002), and PCSM (AHR, 0.297; 95% CI, 0.128-0.685; P=.004). Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 and ≥50% positive biopsy cores were other independent predictors of PCSM. Conclusions: Short-term ADT improves PSA-RFS, DM, and PCSM in patients with intermediate-risk PC undergoing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy

  15. A Pragmatic Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Physician Data Query (PDQ)®-Based Brief Counseling on Cancer-Related Fatigue among Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauml, Joshua; Xie, Sharon X; Penn, Courtney; Desai, Krupali; Dong, Kimberly W; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Vapiwala, Neha; Mao, Jun James

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-Related Fatigue (CRF) negatively affects quality of life among cancer patients. This study seeks to evaluate the outcome and patient receptiveness of a brief counseling program based on National Cancer Institute (NCI) PDQ® information to manage CRF when integrated into Radiation Therapy (RT). Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study among patients undergoing non-palliative RT. Patients with stage I–III tumors and with Karnofsky score 60 or better were given a ten-minute behavioral counseling session during the first two weeks of RT. The Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) was administered at baseline/end of RT. Results Of 93 patients enrolled, 89% found the counseling useful and practical. By the end of RT, 59% reported increased exercise, 41.6% sought nutrition counseling, 72.7% prioritized daily activities, 74.4% took daytime naps, and 70.5% talked with other cancer patients. Regarding counseling, patients who had received chemotherapy prior to RT had no change in fatigue (−0.2), those who received RT alone had mild increase in fatigue (0.7, p=0.02), and those who received concurrent chemotherapy experienced a substantial increase in fatigue (3.0 to 5.2, p=0.05). Higher baseline fatigue and receipt of chemotherapy were predictive of worsened fatigue in a multivariate model (both p<0.01). Conclusion Our data suggests that brief behavioral counseling based on NCI guidelines is well accepted by patients showing an uptake in many activities to cope with CRF. Those who receive concurrent chemotherapy and with higher baseline fatigue are at risk for worsening fatigue despite of guideline-based therapy. PMID:29479490

  16. Predictors of Grade 3 or Higher Late Bowel Toxicity in Patients Undergoing Pelvic Radiation for Cervical Cancer: Results From a Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Supriya, E-mail: schopra@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Dora, Tapas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Chinnachamy, Anand N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Thomas, Biji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Kannan, Sadhna [Epidemiology and Clinical Trials Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates relationship between dose–volume parameters and severe bowel toxicity after postoperative radiation treatment (PORT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 to December 2012, a total of 71 patients undergoing PORT were included. Small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops were contoured 2 cm above the target volume. The volume of SB and LB that received 15 Gy, 30 Gy, and 40 Gy was calculated (V15 SB, V15 LB, V30 SB, V30 LB, V40 SB, V 40 LB). On follow-up, bowel toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. A reciever operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified volume thresholds that predicted for grade 3 or higher toxicity with highest specificity. All data was dichotomized across these identified cut-off values. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using SPSS, version 15. Results: The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-65 years). Of the 71 patients, 46 received image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, and 25 received conformal radiation (50 Gy in 25 fractions for 5 weeks). Overall, 63 of 71 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. On a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-29 months), grade 2 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 22 of 71 patients (30.9%) and grade 3 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 9 patients (12.6%). On univariate analysis, V15 SB <275 cc (P=.01), V30 SB <190 cc (P=.02), V40 SB <150 cc (P=.01), and V15 LB <250 cc (P=.03), and V40 LB <90 cc (P=.04) predicted for absence of grade 3 or higher toxicity. No other patient- or treatment-related factors were statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, only V15 SB (P=.002) and V15 LB (P=.03) were statistically significant. Conclusions: V 15 Gy SB and LB are independent predictors of late grade 3 or higher toxicity. Restricting V15 SB and V15 LB to <275 cc and <250 cc can reduce grade 3 or higher toxicity to less than 5%.

  17. Predictive and prognostic value of circulating nucleosomes and serum biomarkers in patients with metastasized colorectal cancer undergoing Selective Internal Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmueller, Yvonne Nadine; Nagel, Dorothea; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Tatsch, Klaus; Jakobs, Tobias; Stieber, Petra; Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a new and effective locoregional anticancer therapy for colorectal cancer patients with liver metastases. Markers for prediction of therapy response and prognosis are needed for the individual management of those patients undergoing SIRT. Blood samples were prospectively and consecutively taken from 49 colorectal cancer patients with extensive hepatic metastases before, three, six, 24 and 48 h after SIRT to analyze the concentrations of nucleosomes and further laboratory parameters, and to compare them with the response to therapy regularly determined 3 months after therapy and with overall survival. Circulating nucleosomes, cytokeratin-19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), C-reactive protein (CRP) and various liver markers increased already 24 h after SIRT. Pretherapeutical levels of CYFRA 21-1, CEA, cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), asparate-aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as 24 h values of nucleosomes were significantly higher in patients suffering from disease progression (N = 35) than in non-progressive patients (N = 14). Concerning overall survival, CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1, CRP, LDH, AST, choline esterase (CHE), gamma-glutamyl-transferase, alkaline phosphatase, and amylase (all 0 h, 24 h) and nucleosomes (24 h) were found to be prognostic relevant markers in univariate analyses. In multivariate Cox-Regression analysis, the best prognostic model was obtained for the combination of CRP and AST. When 24 h values were additionally included, nucleosomes (24 h) further improved the existing model. Panels of biochemical markers are helpful to stratify pretherapeutically colorectal cancer patients for SIR-therapy and to early estimate the response to SIR-therapy

  18. Management of radiation dose to paediatric patients undergoing CT examination at Korle-bu Teaching Hospital, Accra-Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedel, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work management of paediatric patients doses for Computed Tomography examinations have been studied at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital. The assessment of the management system involved: evaluation of the frequency of examinations, comparison of techniques factors used for adult and children; estimation of CTDI w , CTDI vol , DLP and effective dose; evaluation of quality assurance and quality control programmes to optimise paediatric patient doses. The frequency of CT examinations for paediatric patients accounted for 1300 out 5200 examinations (25%) of the total examinations recorded for the year 2008 which is five times that of the East European countries, indicating an overuse of CT examinations for children not taking into account paediatric patient anatomy and the section of the body being scanned. Adult CT exposure parameters such as the KV, mAs, scan length, pitch, and collimation values were being used in paediatric CT examination. Effective dose estimated for children were higher than that for adults by factors 5.1, 1.8, 3.1 and 3.9 more for head, chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations respectively. From the questionnaire administered and dosimetry results there was no established justification policy, procedures and referral criteria for CT examination requests for children. There was no Quality Assurance Committee to see to the implementation of dose management system dedicated to paediatrics patients. There was the need for the Hospital Authorities to formulate policies in the training of CT equipment operators, radiographers and radiographers and radiologist in modern CT technology as well as in the selection of appropriate parameters tailored to individual patient size that can achieve desirable diagnostic image quality at low doses. (au)

  19. Diagnosis of oral fungal infection in patients undergoing head and neck cancer radiation. Antifungal susceptibility of isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulacio, L.; Paz, M.; Ramadan, S.; Ramos, L.; Marozzi, M.L.; Sortino, M.; Escovich, L.; Lopez, C.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy adverse effects are very common, they contribute to development of opportunistic infections. Genus Candida is often associated with oral diseases in susceptible patients. The aim of this study was to study the presence of yeast in oral lesions, in patients receiving radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and to evaluate antifungal susceptibility of isolates. Swabs of oral mucosal lesions of 76 patients were studied. Antifungal susceptibility of the isolates was evaluated, with ATB Fungus-3 method, which tests 5-fluorcitosine (5-FC), amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FCA), itraconazole (ITR) and voriconazole (VRC); and allows the estimation of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Yeasts were isolated in 74% of samples, being Candida albicans, most frequent specie (53%), followed by C.tropicalis (24%), C.parapsilosis (14%), C.krusei (5%), C.dubliniensis (2%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (2%). All strains were susceptible to VRC. For other antifungals, there were resistant or dose-dependent-susceptible strains. Only C.krusei was resistant to the FCA. About AMB, 2 isolates of C. tropicalis presented a value of 2 mg/l MIC, dose with high incidence of adverse effects. These studies are important to establish early and suitable therapy, wich contribute to achieve lowers rates of disseminated forms of candidiasis, and to reduce the difficulties in food intake that carries the presence of oral lesions. (authors)

  20. Set-up errors in patients undergoing image guided radiation treatment. Relationship to body mass index and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jørgen; Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Christian Rønn

    2008-01-01

    by the relative weight change over time. Results: The SD of the translational and rotational random set-up errors during the first three sessions for H&N were 0.9 mm (Left-Right), 1.1mm (Anterior-Posterior), 0.7 mm (Cranio-Caudal) and 0.7 degrees (LR-axis), 0.5 degrees (AP-axis), and 0.7 degrees (CC......-axis). The equivalent data for lung cancer patients were 1.1 mm (LR), 1.1mm (AP), 1.5 mm (CC) and 0.5 degrees (LR-axis), 0.6 degrees (AP-axis), and 0.4 degrees (CC-axis). The median BMI for H&N and lung was 25.8 (17.6-39.7) and 23.7 (17.4-38.8), respectively. The median weekly weight change for H&N was -0.3% (-2.0 to 1...... (H&N) and 20 lung cancer patients were investigated. Patients were positioned using customized immobilization devices consisting of vacuum cushions and thermoplastic shells. Treatment was given on an Elekta Synergy accelerator. Cone-beam acquisitions were obtained according to a standardized Action...

  1. Impact of quality control radiation doses received by patients undergoing abdomen x-ray examination in ten hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghahadi, B.; Zhang, Z.; Zareh, S.; Sarkar, S.; Tayebi, P. S.

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray machines used for radiodiagnosis should meet certain quality assurance programmes. These are necessary to have good quality radiographs at reasonably low exposure to patients. Materials and Methods: Dose reduction methods in abdomen X-ray examination were carried out in 10 hospitals in Tehran. This paper presents the work, which was implemented on 200 patients and evaluated using the entrance skin dose in the Anterior-Posterior abdomen projection measured directly at the center of the X-ray field. In addition, the machine room, and dark room parameters, as well as work practices and repeat rates were studied. Results: The quality control parameters and the entrance skin dose were evaluated utilizing an anthropologic phantom to define the optimal exposure condition at all hospitals before and after quality control . Results show that after using the quality control parameters and optimization of the exposure conditions, the mean of mAs and entrance skin dose can be decreased by 62% and 65% respectively. Conclusion: The quality of the radiographs generally increased. The reported method is easily implemented in any clinical situation where optimization of abdomen radiography is necessary

  2. Specialised care in patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J.A.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the controversies in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy and determines different factors that will improve this management and thereby the postoperative outcomes. The studies were performed in both the pre-, peri- and postoperative

  3. Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. M Brand, D Bisoz. Abstract. Background. Antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is controversial. We set out to assess the current antibiotic prescribing practice among ...

  4. Aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devereaux, P J; Mrkobrada, Marko; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial variability in the perioperative administration of aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, both among patients who are already on an aspirin regimen and among those who are not. METHODS: Using a 2-by-2 factorial trial design, we randomly assigned 10......,010 patients who were preparing to undergo noncardiac surgery and were at risk for vascular complications to receive aspirin or placebo and clonidine or placebo. The results of the aspirin trial are reported here. The patients were stratified according to whether they had not been taking aspirin before...... the study (initiation stratum, with 5628 patients) or they were already on an aspirin regimen (continuation stratum, with 4382 patients). Patients started taking aspirin (at a dose of 200 mg) or placebo just before surgery and continued it daily (at a dose of 100 mg) for 30 days in the initiation stratum...

  5. Estimated Internal and External Radiation Exposure of Caregivers of Patients With Pediatric Neuroblastoma Undergoing 131I Metaiodobenzylguanidine Therapy: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangwon; Yoo, Seon Hee; Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jong Jin

    2017-04-01

    Current recommendations suggest that family members should participate in the care of children receiving in-hospital I metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) therapy for neuroblastoma. The present study aimed to measure the external radiation exposure and estimate the internal radiation exposure of caregivers during the hospital stay for I MIBG therapy. Caregivers received radiation safety instructions and a potassium iodide solution for thyroid blockade before patient admission. External radiation exposure was determined using a personal pocket dosimeter. Serial 24-hour urine samples were collected from caregivers during the hospital stay. Estimated internal radiation exposure was calculated based on the urine activity. Twelve cases (mean age, 6.2 ± 3.5 years; range, 2-13 years) were enrolled. The mean administered activity was 233.3 ± 74.9 (range, 150.0-350.0) mCi. The mean external radiation dose was 5.8 ± 7.2 (range, 0.8-19.9) mSv. Caregivers of children older than 4 years had significantly less external radiation exposure than those of children younger than 4 years (1.9 ± 1.0 vs 16.4 ± 5.0 mSv; P = 0.012). The mean estimated internal radiation dose was 11.3 ± 10.2 (range, 1.0-29.8) μSv. Caregivers receive both external and internal radiation exposure while providing in-hospital care to children receiving I MIBG therapy for neuroblastoma. However, the internal radiation exposure was negligible compared with the external radiation exposure.

  6. Radiation dose and cancer risk to children undergoing skull radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazonakis, Michael; Damilakis, John; Raissaki, Maria; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Background: Limited data exist in the literature concerning the patient-effective dose from paediatric skull radiography. No information has been provided regarding organ doses, patient dose during PA skull projection, risk of cancer induction and dose to comforters, i.e. individuals supporting children during exposure. Objective: To estimate patient-effective dose, organ doses, lifetime cancer mortality risk to children and radiation dose to comforters associated with skull radiography. Materials and methods: Data were collected from 136 paediatric examinations, including AP, PA and lateral skull radiographs. Entrance-surface dose (ESD) and dose to comforters were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Patients were divided into the following age groups: 0.5-2, 3-7, 8-12 and 13-18 years. The patient-effective dose and corresponding organ doses were calculated using data from the NRPB and Monte Carlo techniques. The risk for fatal cancer induction was assessed using appropriate risk coefficients. Results: For AP, PA and lateral skull radiography, effective dose ranges were 8.8-25.4, 8.2-27.3 and 8.4-22.7 μSv respectively, depending upon the age of the child. For each skull projection, the organs receiving doses above 10 μGy are presented. The number of fatal cancers was found to be less than or equal to 2 per 1 million children undergoing a skull radiograph. The mean radiation dose absorbed by the hands of comforters was 13.4 μGy. Conclusions: The current study provides detailed tabular and graphical data on ESD, effective dose, organ doses and lifetime cancer mortality risk to children associated with AP, PA and lateral skull projections at all patient ages. (orig.)

  7. Coagulation management in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robba, Chiara; Bertuetti, Rita; Rasulo, Frank; Bertuccio, Alessando; Matta, Basil

    2017-10-01

    Management of coagulation in neurosurgical procedures is challenging. In this contest, it is imperative to avoid further intracranial bleeding. Perioperative bleeding can be associated with a number of factors, including anticoagulant drugs and coagulation status but is also linked to the characteristic and the site of the intracranial disorder. The aim of this review will be to focus primarily on the new evidence regarding the management of coagulation in patients undergoing craniotomy for neurosurgical procedures. Antihemostatic and anticoagulant drugs have shown to be associated with perioperative bleeding. On the other hand, an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and hypercoagulative state after elective and emergency neurosurgery, in particular after brain tumor surgery, has been described in several patients. To balance the risk between thrombosis and bleeding, it is important to be familiar with the perioperative changes in coagulation and with the recent management guidelines for anticoagulated patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures, in particular for those taking new direct anticoagulants. We have considered the current clinical trials and literature regarding both safety and efficacy of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in the neurosurgical population. These were mainly trials concerning both elective surgical and intensive care patients with a poor grade intracranial bleed or multiple traumas with an associated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Coagulation management remains a major issue in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures. However, in this field of research, literature quality is poor and further studies are necessary to identify the best strategies to minimize risks in this group of patients.

  8. An Aloe Vera-Based Cosmeceutical Cream Delays and Mitigates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Curative Radiotherapy: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Suresh; Hegde, Sanath Kumar; Baliga-Rao, Manjeshwar Poonam; Palatty, Princy Louis; George, Thomas; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2017-06-24

    Background: This study was planned to evaluate the efficacy of topical application of an Aloe vera -based cream (AVC) for the prevention of ionizing radiation (X ray)-induced dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients requiring therapeutic radiation treatment (>62 Gy). Methods: From July 2012 to December 2012, a total of 60 head and neck cancer patients requiring curative radiotherapy (RT) of more than 66 Gy were prospectively enrolled and treated with AVC or a comparator Johnson's Baby Oil (JBO). Acute skin reaction was monitored and classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) four-point rating scale on a weekly basis. Results: The results indicate that there was a statistically significant delay in the incidence ( p = 0.04) of dermatitis at week three in the AVC application group. Application of AVC reduced the incidence of Grade 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis at subsequent time points, while Grade 4 dermatitis was not seen in either cohort. The other most important observation was that the continued application of AVC two weeks after the completion of RT was effective in reducing the average grade of dermatitis and was statistically significant ( p AVC-based cream is thus effective in delaying radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer.

  9. Comparison of radiation doses using weight-based protocol and dose modulation techniques for patients undergoing biphasic abdominal computed tomography examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livingstone Roshan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT of the abdomen contributes a substantial amount of man-made radiation dose to patients and use of this modality is on the increase. This study intends to compare radiation dose and image quality using dose modulation techniques and weight- based protocol exposure parameters for biphasic abdominal CT. Using a six-slice CT scanner, a prospective study of 426 patients who underwent abdominal CT examinations was performed. Constant tube potentials of 90 kV and 120 kV were used for all arterial and portal venous phase respectively. The tube current-time product for weight-based protocol was optimized according to patient′s body weight; this was automatically selected in dose modulations. The effective dose using weight-based protocol, angular and z-axis dose modulation was 11.3 mSv, 9.5 mSv and 8.2 mSv respectively for the patient′s body weight ranging from 40 to 60 kg. For patients of body weights ranging 60 to 80 kg, the effective doses were 13.2 mSv, 11.2 mSv and 10.6 mSv respectively. The use of dose modulation technique resulted in a reduction of 16 to 28% in radiation dose with acceptable diagnostic accuracy in comparison to the use of weight-based protocol settings.

  10. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae

    1994-01-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author)

  11. Systemic scleroderma diagnosed after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Kakei, Masae (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-10-01

    A case of systemic scleroderma in which the symptoms became prominent after undergoing radiation therapy for breast cancer is reported. A 68-year-old woman, who had undergone a radical mastectomy for breast carcinoma at the age of 63 and thereafter received radiotherapy at 65, 66 and 67 years of age, visited our clinic complaining of skin sclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon which she had noticed since the age of 65. The physical examination revealed not only postirradiation fibrosis and pigmentation, but also edematous sclerosis and the pigmentation of her extremities, as well as short frenulum of the tongue and digital pitting scars. She demonstrated serum anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, esophageal dysfunction and lung fibrosis. The histopathology of the forearm skin showed edema of the upper dermis as well as increased and homogenized collagen bundles in the middle and lower dermis. Since similar cases have been reported, it is considerable that radiation therapy may have thus worsened the lesions of scleroderma in this patient as well. (author).

  12. Dietetic assessment of ambulatory cancer patients: with special attention to problems of patients suffering from head-neck cancers undergoing radiation thrapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    The prime objective of nutritional surveillance of cancer patients is to set up screening criteria for those who are likely to be at risk of nutrition problems and to further assess those so identified. Interventions to improve nutritional status or comfort are called for. The single most useful item with respect to screening is careful weight measurement at every visit. Subjective reports of appetite and food intake, 24-hour recalls of dietary intake, and therapy being undergone by the patient are also useful. Assessment involves obtaining the 24-hour recall data and in some cases keeping food records, and determining the patients' food likes and dislikes. Taken together, dietary, biochemical, clinical, anthropometric, and patient history data permit us to achieve greater certainty as to the problem. Usually energy intakes are problematic, but other nutrition difficlties may also be present. Intervention with respect to diet may involve therapeutic diets, special nutrition advice, or general advice. Food assistance, help with food managemnt, and general health education may also be necessary. Constant surveillance consisting of short encounters and follow-up are mandatory. Examples of these principles as they apply to head-neck cancers are presented

  13. Speech profile of patients undergoing primary palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Katia Ignacio; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Alonso, Nivaldo; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2017-10-26

    To characterize the profile and speech characteristics of patients undergoing primary palatoplasty in a Brazilian university hospital, considering the time of intervention (early, before two years of age; late, after two years of age). Participants were 97 patients of both genders with cleft palate and/or cleft and lip palate, assigned to the Speech-language Pathology Department, who had been submitted to primary palatoplasty and presented no prior history of speech-language therapy. Patients were divided into two groups: early intervention group (EIG) - 43 patients undergoing primary palatoplasty before 2 years of age and late intervention group (LIG) - 54 patients undergoing primary palatoplasty after 2 years of age. All patients underwent speech-language pathology assessment. The following parameters were assessed: resonance classification, presence of nasal turbulence, presence of weak intraoral air pressure, presence of audible nasal air emission, speech understandability, and compensatory articulation disorder (CAD). At statistical significance level of 5% (p≤0.05), no significant difference was observed between the groups in the following parameters: resonance classification (p=0.067); level of hypernasality (p=0.113), presence of nasal turbulence (p=0.179); presence of weak intraoral air pressure (p=0.152); presence of nasal air emission (p=0.369), and speech understandability (p=0.113). The groups differed with respect to presence of compensatory articulation disorders (p=0.020), with the LIG presenting higher occurrence of altered phonemes. It was possible to assess the general profile and speech characteristics of the study participants. Patients submitted to early primary palatoplasty present better speech profile.

  14. Estimation of organ doses of patient undergoing hepatic chemoembolization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo, G.W.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Barros, V.S.M.; Andrade, G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the organ doses of patients undergoing hepatic chemoembolization procedures performed in two hospitals in the city of Recife-Brazil. Forty eight patients undergoing fifty hepatic chemoembolization procedures were investigated. For the 20 cases with PA projection only, organ and tissue absorbed doses as well as radiation risks were calculated. For this purpose organs and tissues dose to KAP conversion coefficients were calculated using the mesh-based phantom series FASH and MASH coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Clinical, dosimetric and irradiations parameters were registered for all patients. The maximum organ doses found were 1.72 Gy, 0.65Gy, 0.56 Gy and 0.33 Gy for skin, kidneys, adrenals and liver, respectively. (authors)

  15. SU-F-T-505: A Novel Approach for Sparing Critical Organs at Risk for Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiation Oncology Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavvafi, H; Pourriahi, M; Elahinia, H; Elahinia, M; Parsai, E [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A major goal of an effective radiation treatment plan is to deliver the maximum dose to the tumor while minimizing radiation exposure to the surrounding normal structures. For example, due to the radiation exposure to neighboring critical structures during prostate cancer treatment, a significant increase in cancer risk was observed for the bladder (77%) and the rectum (105%) over the following decade. Consequently, an effective treatment plan necessitates limiting the exposure to such organs which can best be achieved by physically displacing the organ at-risk. The goal of this study is to present a prototype for an organ re-positioner device designed and fabricated to physically move the rectum away from the path of radiation beam during external beam and brachytherapy treatments. This device affords patient comfort and provides a fully controlled motion to safely relocate the rectum during treatment. Methods: The NiTi shape memory alloy was designed and optimized for manufacturing a rectal re-positioner device through cooling and heating the core alloy for its shaping. This has been achieved through a prototyped custom designed electronic circuit in order to induce the reversible austenitic transformation and was tested rigorously to ensure the integrity of the actuated motion in displacement of the target anatomy. Results: The desirable NiTi shape-setting was configured for easy insertion and based on anatomical constraint. When the final prototype was evaluated, accuracy and precision of the maximum displacement and temperature changes revealed that the device could safely be used within the target anatomy. Conclusion: The organ re-positioner device is a promising tool that can be implemented in clinical setting. It provides a controlled and safe displacement of the delicate organ(s) at risk. The location of the organ being treated could also be identified using conventional onboard imaging devices or MV imaging available on-board most modern clinical

  16. Rates of Reconstruction Failure in Patients Undergoing Immediate Reconstruction With Tissue Expanders and/or Implants and Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowble, Barbara, E-mail: BFowble@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Park, Catherine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Wang, Frederick; Peled, Anne [Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Alvarado, Michael; Ewing, Cheryl; Esserman, Laura [Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center, Department of Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Foster, Robert; Sbitany, Hani [Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Hanlon, Alex [University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Mastectomy rates for breast cancer have increased, with a parallel increase in immediate reconstruction. For some women, tissue expander and implant (TE/I) reconstruction is the preferred or sole option. This retrospective study examined the rate of TE/I reconstruction failure (ie, removal of the TE or I with the inability to replace it resulting in no final reconstruction or autologous tissue reconstruction) in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2012, 99 women had skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM) or total nipple/areolar skin-sparing mastectomies (TSSM) with immediate TE/I reconstruction and PMRT for pathologic stage II to III breast cancer. Ninety-seven percent had chemotherapy (doxorubicin and taxane-based), 22% underwent targeted therapies, and 78% had endocrine therapy. Radiation consisted of 5000 cGy given in 180 to 200 cGy to the reconstructed breast with or without treatment to the supraclavicular nodes. Median follow-up was 3.8 years. Results: Total TE/I failure was 18% (12% without final reconstruction, 6% converted to autologous reconstruction). In univariate analysis, the strongest predictor of reconstruction failure (RF) was absence of total TE/I coverage (acellular dermal matrix and/or serratus muscle) at the time of radiation. RF occurred in 32.5% of patients without total coverage compared to 9% with coverage (P=.0069). For women with total coverage, the location of the mastectomy scar in the inframammary fold region was associated with higher RF (19% vs 0%, P=.0189). In multivariate analysis, weight was a significant factor for RF, with lower weight associated with a higher RF. Weight appeared to be a surrogate for the interaction of total coverage, thin skin flaps, interval to exchange, and location of the mastectomy scar. Conclusions: RFs in patients receiving PMRT were lowered with total TE/I coverage at the time of radiation by avoiding inframammary fold incisions and

  17. Constipation Risk in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Sevim; Atar, Nurdan Yalcin; Ozturk, Nilgun; Mendes, Guler; Kuytak, Figen; Bakar, Esra; Dalgiran, Duygu; Ergin, Sumeyra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Problems regarding bowel elimination are quite common in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Objectives: To determine constipation risk before the surgery, bowel elimination during postoperative period, and the factors affecting bowel elimination. Patients and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. It was conducted in a general surgery ward of a university hospital in Zonguldak, Turkey between January 2013 and May 2013. A total of 107 patients were included in the study, who were selected by convenience sampling. Constipation Risk Assessment Scale (CRAS), patient information form, medical and nursing records were used in the study. Results: The mean age of the patients was found to be 55.97 ± 15.74 (year). Most of the patients have undergone colon (37.4%) and stomach surgeries (21.5%). Open surgical intervention (83.2%) was performed on almost all patients (96.3%) under general anesthesia. Patients were at moderate risk for constipation with average scores of 11.71 before the surgery. A total of 77 patients (72%) did not have bowel elimination problem during postoperative period. The type of the surgery (P < 0.05), starting time for oral feeding after the surgery (P < 0.05), and mobilization (P < 0.05) were effective on postoperative bowel elimination. Conclusions: There is a risk for constipation after abdominal surgery. Postoperative practices are effective on the risk of constipation. PMID:26380107

  18. Dermatillomania: In patient undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatillomania is a disorder in which a person habitually picks their skin, and this is a form of self-injury. It can involve any part of the body, but usually involves the face, neck, arms and shoulders. Symptoms often follow an event that has caused severe emotional distress. A dermatillomania or compulsive skin picking episode may be a conscious response to anxiety or depression but is frequently done as an unconscious habit. In this case report, a patient undergoing orthodontic treatment was found to be suffering from dermatillomania and was treated using psychological counseling.

  19. The evolution of radiation dose over time: Measurement of a patient cohort undergoing whole-body examinations on three computer tomography generations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Roy P., E-mail: roy.marcus@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen (Germany); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Koerner, Elise [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen (Germany); Aydin, Roland C. [Institute for Computational Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Zinsser, Dominik; Finke, Tobias [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen (Germany); Cyron, Christian J. [Institute for Computational Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Notohamiprodjo, Mike [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the radiation dose and image quality of whole-body-CT (WBCT) performed on the 3rd-generation dual-source-CT (DSCT) with 2nd-generation DSCT and 64-slices-Single-Source-CT (SSCT) in a large patient cohort. Material and methods: Using a monitoring and tracking software 1451, 747 and 1861 patients scanned with a one-spiral-thorax-abdomen-pelvis-CT-examination on a 3rd-, 2nd-generation DSCT and SSCT, respectively, were extracted from the PACS server. For the intra-individual analysis, 203 patients on the 3rd-generation DSCT were identified. Out of those 203 patients, 155 had the same examination on the 2nd-generation DSCT, 91 patients had the same examination on the SSCT and 43 patients had an examination on all three CT-generations. Automatic tube current modulation was active on all three CT-generations, whereas automatic tube voltage selection was only available on both DSCT-generations. Dose was recorded by the size-specific-dose-estimate-method (SSDE); signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were calculated placing a ROI on the ascending aorta/liver and the subcutaneous adipose tissue at comparable level. Image quality of axillary and mediastinal lymph nodes and adrenal glands was assessed by two experienced radiologists. Results: Subjective image quality was excellent throughout all three CT-generations (p = 0.38–0.98). Quantitative image quality in both DSCT generations was superior to SSCT (p < 0.001). SNR and CNR in the liver parenchyma were superior in the 3rd-generation DSCT compared to the 2nd generation DSCT (p < 0.001), whereas there was no difference in the aorta. In the inter-individual analysis, CTDI{sub vol} was lower by 26.9% and 44.3% in the 3rd-generation DSCT, when compared to the 2nd-generation DSCT and SSCT, respectively; SSDE was lower by 31.5% and 51% in the 3rd-generation DSCT, when compared to the 2nd-generation DSCT and SSCT, respectively. In the intra-individual comparison CTDI

  20. Reduction of radiation risks in patients undergoing some X-ray examinations by using optimal projections: A Monte Carlo program-based mathematical calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chaparian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this paper were calculation and comparison of the effective doses, the risks of exposure-induced cancer, and dose reduction in the gonads for male and female patients in different projections of some X-ray examinations. Radiographies of lumbar spine [in the eight projections of anteroposterior (AP, posteroanterior (PA, right lateral (RLAT, left lateral (LLAT, right anterior-posterior oblique (RAO, left anterior-posterior oblique (LAO, right posterior-anterior oblique (RPO, and left posterior-anterior oblique (LPO], abdomen (in the two projections of AP and PA, and pelvis (in the two projections of AP and PA were investigated. A solid-state dosimeter was used for the measuring of the entrance skin exposure. A Monte Carlo program was used for calculation of effective doses, the risks of radiation-induced cancer, and doses to the gonads related to the different projections. Results of this study showed that PA projection of abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis radiographies caused 50%-57% lower effective doses than AP projection and 50%-60% reduction in radiation risks. Also use of LAO projection of lumbar spine X-ray examination caused 53% lower effective dose than RPO projection and 56% and 63% reduction in radiation risk for male and female, respectively, and RAO projection caused 28% lower effective dose than LPO projection and 52% and 39% reduction in radiation risk for males and females, respectively. About dose reduction in the gonads, using of the PA position rather than AP in the radiographies of the abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis can result in reduction of the ovaries doses in women, 38%, 31%, and 25%, respectively and reduction of the testicles doses in males, 76%, 86%, and 94%, respectively. Also for oblique projections of lumbar spine X-ray examination, with employment of LAO rather than RPO and also RAO rather than LPO, demonstrated 22% and 13% reductions to the ovaries doses and 66% and 54% reductions in the

  1. Isotope selection for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Christine M.; Potters, Louis; Ashley, Richard; Freeman, Katherine; Wang Xiaohong; Waldbaum, Robert; Leibel, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound-guided trans perineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) is generally performed with either 103 Pd or 125 I. The use of 125 I for low Gleason score tumors and 103 Pd for higher Gleason scores has been suggested based on isotope dose rate and cell doubling time observed in in vitro studies. While many centers follow these isotope selection criteria, other centers have elected to use only a single isotope, regardless of Gleason score. No clinical data have been published comparing these isotopes. This study was undertaken to compare outcomes between 125 I and 103 Pd in a matched pair analysis for patients undergoing prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Six hundred forty-eight consecutively treated patients with clinically confined prostate cancer underwent TIPPB between June 1992 and February 1997. Five hundred thirty-two patients underwent TIPPB alone, whereas 116 received pelvic external beam irradiation and TIPPB. Ninety-three patients received androgen deprivation therapy prior to TIPPB. The prescribed doses for TIPPB were 160 Gy for 125 I (pre-TG43) and 120 Gy for 103 Pd. Patients treated with combination therapy received 41.4 or 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) external beam irradiation followed by a 3- to 5-week break and then received either a 120-Gy 125 I or a 90-Gy 103 Pd implant. Until November 1994, all patients underwent an 125 I implant after which the isotope selection was based on either Gleason score (Gleason score 2-5: 125 I; Gleason 5-8: 103 Pd) or isotope availability. A matched pair analysis was performed to assess any difference between isotopes. Two hundred twenty-two patients were matched according to Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and stage. PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) was calculated based on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Group definition of failure. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival curves were compared to assess differences in

  2. Genetic Variants in CD44 and MAT1A Confer Susceptibility to Acute Skin Reaction in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao [Department of Radiation Biology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada [Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Saibaba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Department of Radiation Oncology, Manipal Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka (India); Suga, Tomo; Shoji, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Fumiaki; Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu, E-mail: ksatyamoorthy@yahoo.com [Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Heterogeneity in radiation therapy (RT)-induced normal tissue toxicity is observed in 10% of cancer patients, limiting the therapeutic outcomes. In addition to treatment-related factors, normal tissue adverse reactions also manifest from genetic alterations in distinct pathways majorly involving DNA damage–repair genes, inflammatory cytokine genes, cell cycle regulation, and antioxidant response. Therefore, the common sequence variants in these radioresponsive genes might modify the severity of normal tissue toxicity, and the identification of the same could have clinical relevance as a predictive biomarker. Methods and Materials: The present study was conducted in a cohort of patients with breast cancer to evaluate the possible associations between genetic variants in radioresponsive genes described previously and the risk of developing RT-induced acute skin adverse reactions. We tested 22 genetic variants reported in 18 genes (ie, NFE2L2, OGG1, NEIL3, RAD17, PTTG1, REV3L, ALAD, CD44, RAD9A, TGFβR3, MAD2L2, MAP3K7, MAT1A, RPS6KB2, ZNF830, SH3GL1, BAX, and XRCC1) using TaqMan assay-based real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the end of RT, the severity of skin damage was scored, and the subjects were dichotomized as nonoverresponders (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade <2) and overresponders (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2) for analysis. Results: Of the 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms studied, the rs8193 polymorphism lying in the micro-RNA binding site of 3′-UTR of CD44 was significantly (P=.0270) associated with RT-induced adverse skin reactions. Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed significant (P=.0107) gene–gene interactions between MAT1A and CD44. Furthermore, an increase in the total number of risk alleles was associated with increasing occurrence of overresponses (P=.0302). Conclusions: The genetic polymorphisms in radioresponsive genes act as genetic modifiers of acute normal tissue toxicity

  3. Risk of Ionizing Radiation in Women of Childbearing Age undergoing Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Gustavo Glotz de; Gomes, Daniel Garcia; Gensas, Caroline Saltz; Simão, Mariana Fernandez; Rios, Matheus N.; Pires, Leonardo Martins; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission of Radiology recommends a pregnancy screening test to all female patients of childbearing age who will undergo a radiological study. Radiation is known to be teratogenic and its effect is cumulative. The teratogenic potential starts at doses close to those used during these procedures. The prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in patients undergoing electrophysiological studies and/or catheter ablation in our midst is unknown. To evaluate the prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in female patients referred for electrophysiological study and/or radiofrequency ablation. Cross-sectional study analyzing 2,966 patients undergoing electrophysiological study and/or catheter ablation, from June 1997 to February 2013, in the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul. A total of 1490 procedures were performed in women, of whom 769 were of childbearing age. All patients were screened with a pregnancy test on the day before the procedure. Three patients tested positive, and were therefore unable to undergo the procedure. The prevalence observed was 3.9 cases per 1,000 women of childbearing age. Because of their safety and low cost, pregnancy screening tests are indicated for all women of childbearing age undergoing radiological studies, since the degree of ionizing radiation needed for these procedures is very close to the threshold for teratogenicity, especially in the first trimester, when the signs of pregnancy are not evident

  4. Risk of Ionizing Radiation in Women of Childbearing Age undergoing Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Gustavo Glotz de, E-mail: gglima.pesquisa@gmail.com; Gomes, Daniel Garcia; Gensas, Caroline Saltz; Simão, Mariana Fernandez; Rios, Matheus N.; Pires, Leonardo Martins; Kruse, Marcelo Lapa; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz [Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    The International Commission of Radiology recommends a pregnancy screening test to all female patients of childbearing age who will undergo a radiological study. Radiation is known to be teratogenic and its effect is cumulative. The teratogenic potential starts at doses close to those used during these procedures. The prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in patients undergoing electrophysiological studies and/or catheter ablation in our midst is unknown. To evaluate the prevalence of positive pregnancy tests in female patients referred for electrophysiological study and/or radiofrequency ablation. Cross-sectional study analyzing 2,966 patients undergoing electrophysiological study and/or catheter ablation, from June 1997 to February 2013, in the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul. A total of 1490 procedures were performed in women, of whom 769 were of childbearing age. All patients were screened with a pregnancy test on the day before the procedure. Three patients tested positive, and were therefore unable to undergo the procedure. The prevalence observed was 3.9 cases per 1,000 women of childbearing age. Because of their safety and low cost, pregnancy screening tests are indicated for all women of childbearing age undergoing radiological studies, since the degree of ionizing radiation needed for these procedures is very close to the threshold for teratogenicity, especially in the first trimester, when the signs of pregnancy are not evident.

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients undergoing appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, T E; Atmatzidis, K S; Papaziogas, B T; Souparis, A; Koutelidakis, I M; Papaziogas, T B

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been found in the upper gastrointestinal tract; it is incriminated as aetiological factor in various pathological conditions. This prospective study assesses the presence of this microorganism in the appendix flora and the possible role of its infection in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis. H. pylori was investigated in 46 consecutive patients undergoing emergent appendectomy for presumed acute appendicitis. Blood sample for serological test of H. pylori infection was drawn before operation. The removed appendix specimen was stained for H. pylori; confirmation was made by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis. The intensity of inflammation was determined pathologically grading from no inflammation to gangrenous appendicitis. Statistical analysis was made using the chi-square test. Seropositivity for H. pylori infection was found in 18 patients (39%), but the microbe was detected in just two appendix specimens (4%). In all seropositive patients acute appendicitis was confirmed by the pathology study; serous (33%) and purulent or gangrenous (67%). The latter incidence in the seronegative patients was 50%. There were found eight specimens (17%) negative for inflammation dealing all with seronegative patients. It seems that H. pylori colonizes the appendix in small proportion and is unlikely to be associated in direct correlation with acute appendicitis. However, seropositive patients with acute inflammation are likely to suffer from purulent or gangrenous form.

  6. Utility of an Australasian registry for children undergoing radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahern, Verity

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of an Australasian registry ('the Registry') for children undergoing radiation treatment (RT). Children under the age of 16years who received a course of radiation between January 1997 and December 2010 and were enrolled on the Registry form the subjects of this study. A total of 2232 courses of RT were delivered, predominantly with radical intent (87%). Registrations fluctuated over time, but around one-half of children diagnosed with cancer undergo a course of RT. The most prevalent age range at time of RT was 10–15years, and the most common diagnoses were central nervous system tumours (34%) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (20%). The Registry provides a reflection of the patterns of care of children undergoing RT in Australia and a mechanism for determining the resources necessary to manage children by RT (human, facilities and emerging technologies, such as proton therapy). It lacks the detail to provide information on radiotherapy quality and disease outcomes which should be the subject of separate audit studies. The utility of the Registry has been hampered by its voluntary nature and varying needs for consent. Completion of registry forms is a logical requirement for inclusion in the definition of a subspecialist in paediatric radiation oncology.

  7. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhalisa, H., E-mail: dhalisa82@gmail.com; Rafidah, Z. [Kluster Oncology Science and Radiology, Advanced Medical Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Bertam, Penang (Malaysia); Mohamad, A. S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute, No 4 Jalan P7, Presint 7, Putrajaya (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  8. Plasma fibronectin in patients undergoing major surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, M.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma fibronectin in patients undergoing major surgery had been determined before and after operation. The study was done on 15 patients and 15 normal healthy individuals. The study revealed that patients subjected to major operation, their fibronectin level was normal before operation followed by reduction one day post-operation. After one week, fibronectin level raised again nearly to the pre-operations levels. The probable mechanisms of fibronectin in healing processes were discussed. Fibronectin (FN) is a family of structurally and immunologically related high molecular weight glycoproteins that are present in many cell surfaces, in extracellular fluids, in connective tissues and in most membranes. Interaction with certain discrete extracellular substances, such as a glucosaminoglycans (e.g. heparin), fibrin and collagen and with cell surface structure seem to account for many of its biological activities, among which are regulation of adhesion, spreading and locomotion (Mosesson and amrani, 1980). The concentration of Fn in human plasma decreases after extensive destruction such as that occurs in major surgery, burns or other trauma. This decrease has been generally though to be due to increased consumption of soluble plasma Fn in opsonization of particulate and soluble debris from circulation by the reticuloendothelial (RE) system. Fn rapidly appears in injury areas, in experimentally induced blisters, wounded and epithelium tissues (Petersen et al., 1985). Fn accumulates at times of increased vascular permeability and it is produced by cell of blood vessels in response to injury

  9. Audit of radiation dose to patients during coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Chandy, Sunil; Peace, Timothy B.S.; George, Paul V.; John, Bobby; Pati, Purendra

    2007-01-01

    There is a widespread concern about radiation doses imparted to patients during cardiology procedures in the medical community. The current study intends to audit and optimize radiation dose to patients undergoing coronary angiography performed using two dedicated cardiovascular machines

  10. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Eduardo Arevalo; Rendon, Francisco Abarca; Zambrano, Trino Andrade; García, Yudoco Andrade; Viteri, Mario Ferrin; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Ramos, Manoela Galvão; Ramos, Almino Cardoso

    Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. Má-rotação intestinal é rara anomalia congênita em adultos de difícil reconhecimento devido à falta de sintomas. O diagnóstico é feito geralmente incidentalmente durante procedimentos cirúrgicos ou durante autópsia. Verificar a ocorrência e reconhecimento não eventual

  11. SU-E-T-317: The Development of a DIBH Technique for Left Sided Breast Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy Utilizing Varians RPM System in a Community Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasson, B; Young, M; Workie, D; Geraghty, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a Deep Inhalation Breath Hold program (DIBH) for treatment of patients with Left-sided breast cancer in a community hospital. Methods: All patients with left sided breast cancer underwent a screening free breathing CT. Evaluation of the conventional tangent treatment fields and the heart was conducted. If the heart would not be excluded using tangents, the patient then received DIBH breathe coaching. The patients returned for a 4D CT simulation. The patients breathing cycle was monitored using the Varian Real-Time position ManagementTM (RPM) system to assess duration of DIBH, amplitude, phase and recovery time to normal breathing. Then a DIBH CT was obtained at the desired amplitude. Duplicate plans were developed for both free breathing and DIBH on the Eclipse planning system and comparison DVH's were created. The plan that provided the prescribed treatment coverage and the least doses to the OAR (heart, Lt. Lung) was determined. Those patients selected to receive treatment with DIBH were set up for treatment, and breathing was monitored using the RPM system. Practice trials were used to confirm that the amplitude, phase and recovery were consistent with findings from simulation. Results: 10 patients have been treated using the DIBH procedure in our clinic. The DIBH patients had an average increase of 80% lung volume on DIBH, decreased lung volume receiving 50% of the dose, and decreases in the V20 dose. Significant reduction in the maximum and mean dose to the heart, as well as the dose to 1CC of the volume for the DIBH plans. Conclusion: Using the RPM system already available in the clinic, staff training, and patient coaching a simple DIBH program was setup. The use of DIBH has shown promise in reducing doses to the critical organs while maintaining PTV coverage for left sided breast treatments

  12. SU-E-T-317: The Development of a DIBH Technique for Left Sided Breast Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy Utilizing Varians RPM System in a Community Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasson, B; Young, M; Workie, D; Geraghty, C [Anne Arundel Medical Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a Deep Inhalation Breath Hold program (DIBH) for treatment of patients with Left-sided breast cancer in a community hospital. Methods: All patients with left sided breast cancer underwent a screening free breathing CT. Evaluation of the conventional tangent treatment fields and the heart was conducted. If the heart would not be excluded using tangents, the patient then received DIBH breathe coaching. The patients returned for a 4D CT simulation. The patients breathing cycle was monitored using the Varian Real-Time position ManagementTM (RPM) system to assess duration of DIBH, amplitude, phase and recovery time to normal breathing. Then a DIBH CT was obtained at the desired amplitude. Duplicate plans were developed for both free breathing and DIBH on the Eclipse planning system and comparison DVH's were created. The plan that provided the prescribed treatment coverage and the least doses to the OAR (heart, Lt. Lung) was determined. Those patients selected to receive treatment with DIBH were set up for treatment, and breathing was monitored using the RPM system. Practice trials were used to confirm that the amplitude, phase and recovery were consistent with findings from simulation. Results: 10 patients have been treated using the DIBH procedure in our clinic. The DIBH patients had an average increase of 80% lung volume on DIBH, decreased lung volume receiving 50% of the dose, and decreases in the V20 dose. Significant reduction in the maximum and mean dose to the heart, as well as the dose to 1CC of the volume for the DIBH plans. Conclusion: Using the RPM system already available in the clinic, staff training, and patient coaching a simple DIBH program was setup. The use of DIBH has shown promise in reducing doses to the critical organs while maintaining PTV coverage for left sided breast treatments.

  13. The effects of laughter therapy on mood state and self-esteem in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Hee; Kook, Jeong Ran; Kwon, Moonjung; Son, Myeong Ha; Ahn, Seung Do; Kim, Yeon Hee

    2015-04-01

    To investigate whether laughter therapy lowers total mood disturbance scores and improves self-esteem scores in patients with cancer. Randomized controlled trial in a radio-oncology outpatient setting. Sixty-two patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to the experimental group (n=33) or the wait list control group (n=29). Three laughter therapy sessions lasting 60 minutes each. Mood state and self-esteem. The intention-to-treat analysis revealed a significant main effect of group: Experimental group participants reported a 14.12-point reduction in total mood disturbance, while the wait list control group showed a 1.21-point reduction (p=0.001). The per-protocol analysis showed a significant main effect of group: The experimental group reported a 18.86-point decrease in total mood disturbance, while controls showed a 0.19-point reduction (plaughter therapy can improve mood state and self-esteem and can be a beneficial, noninvasive intervention for patients with cancer in clinical settings.

  14. Predictors for replanning in loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, DanFang; Yan, SenXiang; Wang, QiDong; Liao, XinBiao; Lu, ZhongJie; Wang, YiXiang

    2013-01-01

    Replanning in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been reported to improve quality of life and loco-regional control in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Determination of the criteria for replanning is, however, urgently needed. We conducted a prospective study to determine when and for what type of patients is replanning preferred through weekly repeat computed tomography (CT) imaging during the course of IMRT. We recruited 20 patients who were diagnosed as having loco-regionally advanced, non-metastatic stage III or IVa NPC and treated with concurrent platinum-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using IMRT. Patients received CT simulation (sim-CT) and plain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plus diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) weekly for five consecutive weeks. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated and recorded weekly based on the CT-CT fusion. The relationship between GTV/CTV reduction and clinical characteristics of the patients were assessed using Pearson correlation test. GTV and CTV decreased during the treatment by 36.03 mL (range, 10.91–98.82 mL) and 76.79 mL (range, 33.94–125.14 mL), respectively, after 25 fractions of treatment. The percentage reductions from their initial volume were 38.4% (range, 25.3–50.7%) and 11.8% (range, 6.7–18.3%), respectively. The greatest reductions in GTV and CTV were observed at the fourth week (i.e., upon completion of 20 fractions), compared to pre-treatment sim-CT. Weight loss and CTV reduction were significantly correlated with pre-treatment body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.58, P = 0.012, and r = 0.48, P = 0.046, respectively). However, no significant correlation was observed between CTV reduction and initial tumor volume. In addition, GTV reduction was not significantly correlated with pre-treatment tumor volume (P = 0.65), but negatively correlated with pre-treatment tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values (r = −0.46, P = 0.042). Our results indicate

  15. Do patients fear undergoing general anesthesia for oral surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Jasmine R; Priest, James H; Laskin, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing major surgery have more fear of the general anesthesia than the procedure. This appears to be reversed with oral surgery. Therefore, patients need to be as well informed about this aspect as the surgical operation.

  16. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomar Akhlesh; Tempe Deepak; Banerjee A; Hegde R; Cooper A; Khanna S

    2003-01-01

    Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and diff...

  17. Analysis of the testicular dose in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Ordonez Marquez, J.; Hervas Moron, A.; Alvarez Rodriguez, S.; Garcia-Galloway, E.; Sanchez Casanueva, R.; Polo Rubio, A.; Rodriguez-Patron, R.; Yanowsky, K.; Gomez Dos Santos, V.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: -Studying comparatively the doses received in testes in patients undergoing radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma with external beam radiation and brachytherapy of low rate using I-125 seeds. -Compare doses due to images of verification using Cone Beam CT (CBCT), with doses of radiotherapy treatment itself. -Determine the seminal alterations and cytogenetic after treatment with ionizing radiation (RTE or BQT) in patients diagnosed with prostate cancer and its relation with testicular dose. (Author)

  18. Prevalence of reflux esophagitis among patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Gado

    2013-10-25

    Oct 25, 2013 ... Data from Africa and the Middle East are sparse. Aim: The .... The endoscopy unit pro- vides an ... low education state of a big category of our patients, assess- ... was suspected in seven patients (2%) and histologically con-.

  19. (HIV) seropositive Nigerian patients undergoing dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most dialysis centres in Nigeria currently do not accept HIV positive patients for dialysis therapy for many reasons. The prevailing high level of stigmatization of HIV positive patients and the lack of job security for infected staff are two major reasons for the non-acceptance of HIV infected patients for dialysis by these centres.

  20. Coagulation profile in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Decker; Vad, Henrik; Pedersen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    -, and the first two days postoperatively by standard coagulation blood test, thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) and thrombin generation. Results: Patients undergoing potential curative surgery for lung cancer were not hypercoagulable preoperatively. There was no statistically significant difference in the majority......Background: Knowledge about the impact of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin (LMWH) on the coagulation system in patients undergoing minimal invasive lung cancer surgery is sparse. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LMWH on the coagulation system in patients undergoing Video......-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) lobectomy for primary lung cancer. Methods: Sixty-three patients diagnosed with primary lung cancer undergoing VATS lobectomy were randomized to either subcutaneous injection with dalteparin (Fragmin®) 5000 IE once daily or no intervention. Coagulation was assessed pre-, peri...

  1. Experiense with remineraling means in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanova Ye.A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment using bracket-technology a high risk of caries development. The algorithm of preventive interventions for the prevention of hair demineralization of enamel of the teeth

  2. Preoperative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia ... Preoperative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: a cumulative ... Future investigation should focus on the clinical implications of these data and the ...

  3. Daily Sodium Butyrate Enema for the Prevention of Radiation Proctitis in Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Radical Radiation Therapy: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Placebo-Controlled Dose-Finding Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, Angelo, E-mail: maggio.angelo@gmail.com [Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Magli, Alessandro [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale S. Maria della Misericordia, Udine (Italy); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Cancer Programme, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Fiorino, Claudio [Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Valvo, Francesca [Division of Radiation Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Fellin, Giovanni [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [University of Turin, Department of Oncology, Torino (Italy); Munoz, Fernando [Radiotherapy Unit, AO Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino (Italy); Cosentino, Dorian; Cazzaniga, Luigi Franco [Ospedale S. Anna, Como (Italy); Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Cancer Programme, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Division of Radiation Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of sodium butyrate enemas (NABUREN) in prostate cancer radiation therapy (RT) in reducing the incidence, severity, and duration of acute RT-induced proctitis. Methods and Materials: 166 patients, randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups (rectal sodium butyrate 1 g, 2 g, or 4 g daily or placebo), were treated with NABUREN during and 2 weeks after RT. The grade of proctitis was registered in a daily diary. The correlation between NABUREN and proctitis was investigated through χ{sup 2} statistics. The toxicity endpoints considered were as follows: total number of days with grade ≥1 proctitis (≥G1); total number of days with grade ≥2 proctitis (≥G2); ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis lasting at least 3 and 5 consecutive days starting from week 4 (≥G1+3d, ≥G2+3d); damaging effects of RT on rectal mucosa as measured by endoscopy. The relationship between endpoints and pretreatment morbidities, hormonal therapy, presence of diabetes or hypertension, abdominal surgery, or hemorrhoids was investigated by univariate analysis. Results: The patients were randomly allocated to the 4 arms. No difference in the distribution of comorbidities among the arms was observed (P>.09). The mean ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis were 7.8 and 4.9 for placebo and 8.9 and 4.7 for the NABUREN group, respectively. No favorable trend in reduction of incidence, severity, and duration of ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis was observed with NABUREN use. In univariate analysis, ≥G1+3d toxicity was found to be related to hemorrhoids (P=.008), and a slight correlation was found between ≥G2 proctitis and hormonal therapy (P=.06). The RT effects on rectal mucosa as based on endoscopic assessment were mainly related to diabetes (P<.01). Endoscopy data at 6 week showed no significant difference between the placebo and butyrate arms. The other investigated endpoints were not correlated with any of the clinical risk factors analyzed. Conclusion: There was no evidence of efficacy

  4. Daily Sodium Butyrate Enema for the Prevention of Radiation Proctitis in Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Radical Radiation Therapy: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Placebo-Controlled Dose-Finding Phase 2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggio, Angelo; Magli, Alessandro; Rancati, Tiziana; Fiorino, Claudio; Valvo, Francesca; Fellin, Giovanni; Ricardi, Umberto; Munoz, Fernando; Cosentino, Dorian; Cazzaniga, Luigi Franco; Valdagni, Riccardo; Vavassori, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of sodium butyrate enemas (NABUREN) in prostate cancer radiation therapy (RT) in reducing the incidence, severity, and duration of acute RT-induced proctitis. Methods and Materials: 166 patients, randomly allocated to 1 of 4 groups (rectal sodium butyrate 1 g, 2 g, or 4 g daily or placebo), were treated with NABUREN during and 2 weeks after RT. The grade of proctitis was registered in a daily diary. The correlation between NABUREN and proctitis was investigated through χ 2 statistics. The toxicity endpoints considered were as follows: total number of days with grade ≥1 proctitis (≥G1); total number of days with grade ≥2 proctitis (≥G2); ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis lasting at least 3 and 5 consecutive days starting from week 4 (≥G1+3d, ≥G2+3d); damaging effects of RT on rectal mucosa as measured by endoscopy. The relationship between endpoints and pretreatment morbidities, hormonal therapy, presence of diabetes or hypertension, abdominal surgery, or hemorrhoids was investigated by univariate analysis. Results: The patients were randomly allocated to the 4 arms. No difference in the distribution of comorbidities among the arms was observed (P>.09). The mean ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis were 7.8 and 4.9 for placebo and 8.9 and 4.7 for the NABUREN group, respectively. No favorable trend in reduction of incidence, severity, and duration of ≥G1 and ≥G2 proctitis was observed with NABUREN use. In univariate analysis, ≥G1+3d toxicity was found to be related to hemorrhoids (P=.008), and a slight correlation was found between ≥G2 proctitis and hormonal therapy (P=.06). The RT effects on rectal mucosa as based on endoscopic assessment were mainly related to diabetes (P<.01). Endoscopy data at 6 week showed no significant difference between the placebo and butyrate arms. The other investigated endpoints were not correlated with any of the clinical risk factors analyzed. Conclusion: There was no evidence of efficacy of

  5. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Procedure‑related and patient‑related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants to a major extent. Hence, we aimed to evaluate and analyze various systemic factors in patients receiving dental implants. Materials and Methods: Fifty‑one patients were included in the study, in which a total of 110 dental ...

  6. Non-invasive anesthesia for children undergoing proton radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owusu-Agyemang, Pascal; Grosshans, David; Arunkumar, Radha; Rebello, Elizabeth; Popovich, Shannon; Zavala, Acsa; Williams, Cynthia; Ruiz, Javier; Hernandez, Mike; Mahajan, Anita; Porche, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy is a newer modality of radiotherapy during which anesthesiologists face specific challenges related to the setup and duration of treatment sessions. Purpose: Describe our anesthesia practice for children treated in a standalone proton therapy center, and report on complications encountered during anesthesia. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of anesthetic records for patients ⩽18 years of age treated with proton therapy at our institution between January 2006 and April 2013 was performed. Results: A total of 9328 anesthetics were administered to 340 children with a median age of 3.6 years (range, 0.4–14.2). The median daily anesthesia time was 47 min (range, 15–79). The average time between start of anesthesia to the start of radiotherapy was 7.2 min (range, 1–83 min). All patients received Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) with spontaneous ventilation, with 96.7% receiving supplemental oxygen by non-invasive methods. None required daily endotracheal intubation. Two episodes of bradycardia, and one episode each of; seizure, laryngospasm and bronchospasm were identified for a cumulative incidence of 0.05%. Conclusions: In this large series of children undergoing proton therapy at a freestanding center, TIVA without daily endotracheal intubation provided a safe, efficient, and less invasive option of anesthetic care

  7. Modelling hypothermia in patients undergoing surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severens, N.M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Anesthesia causes substantial perturbation in the human heat balance. Nearly all patients administered anesthesia become hypothermic. Under normal physiological conditions, the core-to-peripheral temperature gradient is maintained by tonic vasoconstriction. By the induction of anesthesia,

  8. Experiences of patients undergoing chemotherapy - a qualitative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Using a qualitative descriptive design, seven in-patients with varying cancer diagnoses at the Uganda Cancer. Institute were ... tance of focusing research on persons with cancer in ... variety of cancer types were included.

  9. Weight changes in euthyroid patients undergoing thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Nsouli-Maktabi, Hala

    2011-12-01

    Thyroidectomized patients frequently report weight gain resistant to weight loss efforts, identifying their thyroidectomy as the event precipitating subsequent weight gain. We wished to determine whether recently thyroidectomized euthyroid patients gained more weight over 1 year than matched euthyroid patients with preexisting hypothyroidism. We performed a retrospective chart review of subjects receiving medical care at an academic medical center. One hundred twenty patients had their weight and thyroid status documented after thyroidectomy and achievement of euthyroidism on thyroid hormone replacement, and one year later. Three additional groups of 120 patients with preexisting hypothyroidism, no thyroid disease, and thyroid cancer were matched for age, gender, menopausal status, height, and weight. Anthropometric data were documented at two time points 1 year apart. We compared the weight changes and body mass index changes occurring over a 1-year period in the four groups. Patients with recent postsurgical hypothyroidism gained 3.1 kg during the year, whereas matched patients with preexisting hypothyroidism gained 2.2 kg. The patients without thyroid disease and those with iatrogenic hyperthyroidism gained 1.3 and 1.2 kg, respectively. The weight gain in the thyroidectomized group was significantly greater than that in the matched hypothyroid group (p-value 0.004), the group without thyroid disease (p-value 0.001), and the patients with iatrogenic hyperthyroidism (p-value 0.001). Within the thyroidectomized group, the weight gain in menopausal women was greater than in either premenopausal women (4.4 vs. 2.3 kg, p-value 0.007) or men (4.4 vs. 2.5 kg, p-value 0.013). Patients who had undergone thyroidectomy in the previous year did, in fact, gain more weight than their matched counterparts with preexisting hypothyroidism. In addition, all patients with hypothyroidism, even though treated to achieve euthyroidism, experienced more weight gain than both

  10. Gastritis in patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath-Wolfson, Lea; Varona, Roy; Bubis, Golan; Tatarov, Alexander; Koren, Rumelia; Ram, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a therapeutic option in severely obese patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) gastritis and non-Helicobacter gastritis in the gastrectomy specimens, and its association to other variables. One hundred six sleeve gastrectomy specimens were examined histopathologically for the presence of gastritis and its relation to other factors like ethnicity, glycemic control, and postoperative complications. Twelve patients had HP gastritis, 39 had non-HP gastritis, and 55 had normal mucosa. There was a statistical difference between the Arab and Jewish Israeli patients in our study. Twenty-eight of the Arab patients had HP gastritis and 48% had non-HP gastritis. In the Jewish population 6% had HP gastritis and 34% had non-HP gastritis. The preoperative glycemic control was worse in the gastritis group with a mean HbA1c of 8.344% while in the normal mucosa group the mean HbA1c was 6.55. After operation the glycemic control reverted to normal in most the diabetic patients. There were few postoperative complications however, they were not related to HP. There is a high incidence of gastritis in obese patients. The incidence of gastritis in the Arab population in our study was higher than that in the Jewish population. The glycemic control before surgery was worse in patients with gastritis than in the normal mucosa group. HP bares no risk for postoperative complications after LSG and does not affect weight loss. However a larger cohort of patients must be studied to arrive at conclusive results. PMID:28422853

  11. Patients direct costs to undergo TB diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cuevas, Rachel M Anderson; Lawson, Lovett; Al-Sonboli, Najla; Al-Aghbari, Nasher; Arbide, Isabel; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Nnamdi, Emenyonu E; Aseffa, Abraham; Yassin, Mohammed A; Abdurrahman, Saddiq T; Obasanya, Joshua; Olanrewaju, Oladimeji; Datiko, Daniel; Theobald, Sally J; Ramsay, Andrew; Squire, S Bertel; Cuevas, Luis E

    2016-03-24

    A major impediment to the treatment of TB is a diagnostic process that requires multiple visits. Descriptions of patient costs associated with diagnosis use different protocols and are not comparable. We aimed to describe the direct costs incurred by adults attending TB diagnostic centres in four countries and factors associated with expenditure for diagnosis. Surveys of 2225 adults attending smear-microscopy centres in Nigeria, Nepal, Ethiopia and Yemen. Adults >18 years with cough >2 weeks were enrolled prospectively. Direct costs were quantified using structured questionnaires. Patients with costs >75(th) quartile were considered to have high expenditure (cases) and compared with patients with costs <75(th) quartile to identify factors associated with high expenditure. The most significant expenses were due to clinic fees and transport. Most participants attended the centres with companions. High expenditure was associated with attending with company, residing in rural areas/other towns and illiteracy. The costs incurred by patients are substantial and share common patterns across countries. Removing user fees, transparent charging policies and reimbursing clinic expenses would reduce the poverty-inducing effects of direct diagnostic costs. In locations with limited resources, support could be prioritised for those most at risk of high expenditure; those who are illiterate, attend the service with company and rural residents.

  12. Stevens Johnson Syndrome in a patient undergoing gynaecological brachytherapy: An association or an incident?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M. R.; Amado, A.; Jorge, M.; Grillo, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Stevens Johnson Syndrome and Erythema Multiforme are hypersensitivity skin reactions generally arising in the context of multiple causes. Radiation therapy is considered to be one of these causes, although most reports are hindered by concomitant medications. Aim: The aim of this paper was to present a case of Stevens Johnson Syndrome arising in a patient undergoing gynaecological brachytherapy with an unusual presentation. Case:We describe a case of a 56-year-old woman with endometrial cancer undergoing adjuvant gynaecological radiotherapy. While undergoing a gynaecological brachytherapy boost, she developed bilateral conjunctivitis that progressed to oral mucositis and pruritic erythema with sloughing of the skin on her arms and legs but not the torso or irradiated fields (namely the vaginal mucosa). Conclusion: This case illustrates the association of RT/SJS; however, it also raises the question of patients undergoing RT being more susceptible to SJS as opposed to a direct cause of the disease. (authors)

  13. Medical Crowdfunding for Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joseph R; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-01-01

    Crowdfunding for medical expenses is growing in popularity. Through several websites, patients create public campaign profiles to which donors can contribute. Research on medical crowdfunding is limited, and there have been no studies of crowdfunding in orthopedics. Active medical crowdfunding campaigns for orthopedic trauma, total joint arthroplasty, and spine surgery were queried from a crowdfunding website. The characteristics and outcomes of crowdfunding campaigns were abstracted and analyzed. For this study, 444 campaigns were analyzed, raising a total of $1,443,528. Among the campaigns that received a donation, mean amount raised was $4414 (SE, $611). Multivariate analysis showed that campaigns with unspecified location (odds ratio, 0.26; P=.0008 vs West) and those for total joint arthroplasty (odds ratio, 0.35; P=.0003 vs trauma) had significantly lower odds of receipt of any donation. Description length was associated with higher odds of donation receipt (odds ratio, 1.13 per +100 characters; Pcrowdfunding may be disproportionately available to patients with specific diagnoses, those from specific regions, those who are able to craft a lengthy descriptive narrative, and those with access to robust digital social networks. Clinicians are likely to see a greater proportion of patients turning to crowdfunding as it grows in popularity. Patients may ask physicians for information about crowdfunding or request testimonials to support campaigns. Surgeons should consider their response to such requests individually. These findings shed light on the dynamics of medical crowdfunding and support robust personal and professional deliberation. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(1):e58-e63.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. The obese patient undergoing nonbariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluth, Thomas; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2016-06-01

    This article provides the reader with recent findings on the pathophysiology of comorbidities in the obese, as well as evidence-based treatment options to deal with perioperative respiratory challenges. Our understanding of obesity-associated asthma, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome is still expanding. Routine screening for obstructive sleep apnea using the STOP-Bang score might identify high-risk patients that benefit from perioperative continuous positive airway pressure and close postoperative monitoring. Measures to most effectively support respiratory function during induction of and emergence from anesthesia include optimal patient positioning and use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. Appropriate mechanical ventilation settings are under investigation, so that only the use of protective low tidal volumes could be currently recommended. A multimodal approach consisting of adjuvants, as well as regional anesthesia/analgesia techniques reduces the need for systemic opioids and related respiratory complications. Anesthesia of obese patients for nonbariatric surgical procedures requires knowledge of typical comorbidities and their respective treatment options. Apart from cardiovascular diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome, awareness of any pulmonary dysfunction is of paramount. A multimodal analgesia approach may be useful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications.

  15. post-operative morbidity of the obese patient undergoing posterior

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    urinary tract infection, neurological injury and dural tears. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients undergoing ... muscle mass in the human body, in which weight in kilograms is divided by height in meters2). The current .... complications with the exception of one dural tear occurred in the obese patient group. Table 3.

  16. Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting quality of life in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. ... Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the QoL in cancer patients with solid tumors and at the different chemotherapy cycles (CT). ... Results: A significant relationship between the cancer type, pain intensity, and fatigue was found.

  17. Electroacupuncture for Bladder Function Recovery in Patients Undergoing Spinal Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yinqiu; Zhou, Xinyao; Dong, Xichen; Jia, Qing; Xie, Shen; Pang, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of electroacupuncture on recovering postanesthetic bladder function. Materials and Methods. Sixty-one patients undergoing spinal anaesthesia were recruited and allocated into electroacupuncture or control group randomly. Patients in electroacupuncture group received electroacupuncture therapy whereas ones in control group were not given any intervention. Primary endpoint was incidence of bladder overdistension and postoperative urinary retention. Secondary ...

  18. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency......, clinical presentation, diagnostic/therapeutic work-up, and endoscopic appearance of small-bowel tumors in a large population of patients undergoing VCE. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Identification by a questionnaire of patients with VCE findings suggesting small-bowel tumors and histological confirmation...... of the neoplasm seen in 29 centers of 10 European Countries. RESULTS: Of 5129 patients undergoing VCE, 124 (2.4%) had small-bowel tumors (112 primary, 12 metastatic). Among these patients, indications for VCE were: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (108 patients), abdominal pain (9), search for primary neoplasm...

  19. Predicting blood transfusion in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Crispin; Boddy, Alex P; Fukuta, Junaid; Groom, William D; Streets, Christopher G

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate predictors of allogenic blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing minimal invasive oesophagectomy at a tertiary high volume centre for oesophago-gastric surgery. Retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing minimal access oesophagectomy in our department between January 2010 and December 2011. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they required a blood transfusion at any time during their index admission. Factors that have been shown to influence perioperative blood transfusion requirements in major surgery were included in the analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of patient and perioperative characteristics on transfusion requirements during the index admission. A total of 80 patients underwent minimal access oesophagectomy, of which 61 patients had a laparoscopic assisted oesophagectomy and 19 patients had a minimal invasive oesophagectomy. Perioperative blood transfusion was required in 28 patients at any time during hospital admission. On binary logistic regression analysis, a lower preoperative haemoglobin concentration (p blood transfusion requirements. It has been reported that requirement for blood transfusion can affect long-term outcomes in oesophageal cancer resection. Two factors which could be addressed preoperatively; haemoglobin concentration and type of oesophageal resection, may be valuable in predicting blood transfusions in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy. Our analysis revealed that preoperative haemoglobin concentration, occurrence of significant complications and type of minimal access oesophagectomy predicted blood transfusion requirements in the patient population examined. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. General Anaesthesia Protocols for Patients Undergoing Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Aravind; Lal, Chandar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to review general anaesthesia protocols for patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at a tertiary care hospital in Oman, particularly with regards to clinical profile, potential drug interactions and patient outcomes. Methods This retrospective study took place at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. The electronic medical records of patients undergoing ECT at SQUH between January 2010 and December 2014 were reviewed for demographic characteristics and therapy details. Results A total of 504 modified ECT sessions were performed on 57 patients during the study period. All of the patients underwent a uniform general anaesthetic regimen consisting of propofol and succinylcholine; however, they received different doses between sessions, as determined by the treating anaesthesiologist. Variations in drug doses between sessions in the same patient could not be attributed to any particular factor. Self-limiting tachycardia and hypertension were periprocedural complications noted among all patients. One patient developed aspiration pneumonitis (1.8%). Conclusion All patients undergoing ECT received a general anaesthetic regimen including propofol and succinylcholine. However, the interplay of anaesthetic drugs with ECT efficacy could not be established due to a lack of comprehensive data, particularly with respect to seizure duration. In addition, the impact of concurrent antipsychotic therapy on anaesthetic dose and subsequent complications could not be determined. PMID:28417028

  1. Clostridium difficile colitis in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Silvestre, Jason; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective database analysis. To investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after lumbar spine surgery. C. difficile colitis is reportedly increasing in hospitalized patients and can have a negative impact on patient outcomes. No data exist on estimates of C. difficile infection rates and its consequences on patient outcomes and health care resources among patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was examined from 2002 to 2011. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, procedural codes for lumbar spine surgery for degenerative diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined and multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. The incidence of C. difficile infection in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery is 0.11%. At baseline, patients infected with C. difficile were significantly older (65.4 yr vs. 58.9 yr, Pinfection. Small hospital size was associated with decreased odds (odds ratio [OR], 0.5; Pinfection. Uninsured (OR, 1.62; Pinfection. C. difficile increased hospital length of stay by 8 days (Pdifficile infection after lumbar spine surgery carries a 36.4-fold increase in mortality and costs approximately $10,658,646 per year to manage. These data suggest that great care should be taken to avoid C. difficile colitis in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery because it is associated with longer hospital stays, greater overall costs, and increased inpatient mortality. 3.

  2. Influence of radiation dose on positive surgical margins in women undergoing breast conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiBiase, Steven J.; Komarnicky, Lydia T.; Heron, Dwight E.; Schwartz, Gordon F.; Mansfield, Carl M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Positive surgical margins adversely influence local tumor control in breast conservation therapy (BCT). However, reports have conflicted regarding whether an increased radiation dose can overcome this poor prognostic factor. In this study, we evaluated the influence of an increased radiation dose on tumor control in women with positive surgical margins undergoing BCT. Methods and Materials: Between 1978 and 1994, 733 women with pathologic Stage I-II breast cancer and known surgical margin status were treated at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with BCT. Of these 733 patients, 641 women had a minimal tumor bed dose of 60 Gy and had documentation of their margin status; 509 had negative surgical margins, and 132 had positive surgical margins before definitive radiotherapy. Complete gross excision of the tumor and axillary lymph node sampling was obtained in all patients. The median radiation dose to the primary site was 65.0 Gy (range 60-76). Of the women with positive margins (n=132), the influence of higher doses of radiotherapy was evaluated. The median follow-up time was 52 months. Results: The local tumor control rate for patients with negative margins at 5 and 10 years was 94% and 88%, respectively, compared with 85% and 67%, respectively, for those women with positive margins (p=0.001). The disease-free survival rate for the negative margin group at 5 and 10 years was 91% and 82%, respectively, compared with 76% and 71%, respectively, for the positive margin group (p = 0.001). The overall survival rate of women with negative margins at 5 and 10 years was 95% and 90%, respectively. By comparison, for women with positive surgical margins, the overall survival rate at 5 and 10 years was 86% and 79%, respectively (p=0.008). A comparison of the positive and negative margin groups revealed that an increased radiation dose (whether entered as a dichotomous or a continuous variable) >65.0 Gy did not improve local tumor control (p=0.776). On Cox

  3. Rosuvastatin and cardiovascular events in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellström, Bengt C; Jardine, Alan G; Schmieder, Roland E

    2009-01-01

    . Secondary end points included death from all causes and individual cardiac and vascular events. RESULTS: After 3 months, the mean reduction in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels was 43% in patients receiving rosuvastatin, from a mean baseline level of 100 mg per deciliter (2.6 mmol per liter......BACKGROUND: Statins reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients at high cardiovascular risk. However, a benefit of statins in such patients who are undergoing hemodialysis has not been proved. METHODS: We conducted an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, prospective...... trial involving 2776 patients, 50 to 80 years of age, who were undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. We randomly assigned patients to receive rosuvastatin, 10 mg daily, or placebo. The combined primary end point was death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke...

  4. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients on statins undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The efficacy of perioperative statin therapy in decreasing postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing valve replacements and repairs is unknown. The aim of our study was to determine whether or not the literature supports the hypothesis that statins decrease postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF), and hence ...

  5. Multiple maxillofacial fractures in a patient undergoing orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A multi-disciplinary team approach for the management of maxillofacial fractures in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is suggested. Orthodontic treatment with surgical involvement has been found to improve both facial aesthetics and occlusal function. Key words: Maxillofacial, trauma, ...

  6. Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical effect of Fuzheng quyu therapy in patients undergoing radiotherapy after cervical carcinoma surgery. ... The clinical effects and the incidence of adverse events were compared between the groups. Results: The plasma prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time improved after treatment in the study ...

  7. Post-operative morbidity of the obese patient undergoing posterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome measures: Post-operative morbidity measures – infection, seroma, pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, neurological injury and dural tears. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients undergoing posterior lumbar spine surgery were enrolled in the study. Three fellowship trained attending orthopaedic ...

  8. Quality of Life in End Stage Renal Failure Patients Undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We assessed the quality of life of 45 patients with end stage renal failure undergoing dialysis in Mauritius using the standard United Kingdom version of the Short Form 36 Items Health Survey (SF36) questionnaire. Our findings showed that gender, level of social and emotional support, marital status, and travel time were ...

  9. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Clayton B.; Thompson, Holly M.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Wong, Kenneth; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Chen, Allen M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning—a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of “gentle IGRT.”

  10. Exposure Risks Among Children Undergoing Radiation Therapy: Considerations in the Era of Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Clayton B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Thompson, Holly M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Benedict, Stanley H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Seibert, J. Anthony [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Wong, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Vaughan, Andrew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Recent improvements in toxicity profiles of pediatric oncology patients are attributable, in part, to advances in the field of radiation oncology such as intensity modulated radiation (IMRT) and proton therapy (IMPT). While IMRT and IMPT deliver highly conformal dose to targeted volumes, they commonly demand the addition of 2- or 3-dimensional imaging for precise positioning—a technique known as image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this manuscript we address strategies to further minimize exposure risk in children by reducing effective IGRT dose. Portal X rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are commonly used to verify patient position during IGRT and, because their relative radiation exposure is far less than the radiation absorbed from therapeutic treatment beams, their sometimes significant contribution to cumulative risk can be easily overlooked. Optimizing the conformality of IMRT/IMPT while simultaneously ignoring IGRT dose may result in organs at risk being exposed to a greater proportion of radiation from IGRT than from therapeutic beams. Over a treatment course, cumulative central-axis CBCT effective dose can approach or supersede the amount of radiation absorbed from a single treatment fraction, a theoretical increase of 3% to 5% in mutagenic risk. In select scenarios, this may result in the underprediction of acute and late toxicity risk (such as azoospermia, ovarian dysfunction, or increased lifetime mutagenic risk) in radiation-sensitive organs and patients. Although dependent on variables such as patient age, gender, weight, body habitus, anatomic location, and dose-toxicity thresholds, modifying IGRT use and acquisition parameters such as frequency, imaging modality, beam energy, current, voltage, rotational degree, collimation, field size, reconstruction algorithm, and documentation can reduce exposure, avoid unnecessary toxicity, and achieve doses as low as reasonably achievable, promoting a culture and practice of “gentle IGRT.”.

  11. Local anesthesia with ropivacaine for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Yin; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Lin, Chih-Chung; Chao, Tzu-Chieh; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Jan, Yi-Yin

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of pain relief after infusion of ropivacaine at port sites at the end of surgery. METHODS: From October 2006 to September 2007, 72 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) were randomized into two groups of 36 patients. One group received ropivacaine infusion at the port sites at the end of LC and the other received normal saline. A visual analog scale was used to assess postoperative pain when the patient awakened in the operating room, 6 and 24 h after surgery, and before discharge. The amount of analgesics use was also recorded. The demographics, laboratory data, hospital stay, and perioperative complications were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: There was no difference between the two groups preoperatively in terms of demographic and laboratory data. After surgery, similar operation time, blood loss, and no postoperative morbidity and mortality were observed in the two groups. However, a significantly lower pain score was observed in the patients undergoing LC with local anesthesia infusion at 1 h after LC and at discharge. Regarding analgesic use, the amount of meperidine used 1 h after LC and the total used during admission were lower in patients undergoing LC with local anesthesia infusion. This group also had a shorter hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Local anesthesia with ropivacaine at the port site in LC patients significantly decreased postoperative pain immediately. This explains the lower meperidine use and earlier discharge for these patients. PMID:19452582

  12. Evaluation of radiophoby phenomenon among patients undergoing radioisotope therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepien, M.; Stepien, A.; Pawlus, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the radiophoby symptoms among 81 patients with different type hyperthyroidism undergoing 1-131 (450-600 MBq) treatment. The state anxiety as well as the trait anxiety levels using Spielberger's scale have been evaluated. Its values were 1 - 6 points (average 3) and 3 - 7 points (average 6) respectively for state anxiety and trait one. These results indicated that radioisotope therapy causes increase of patient's anxiety level. (author)

  13. Nursing Care of Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Desensitization: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Patricia; Carsten, Cynthia; Carino, Arvie; Braskett, Melinda

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy desensitization protocols are safe, but labor-intensive, processes that allow patients with cancer to receive medications even if they initially experienced severe hypersensitivity reactions. Part I of this column discussed the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and described the development of desensitization protocols in oncology settings. Part II incorporates the experiences of an academic medical center and provides a practical guide for the nursing care of patients undergoing chemotherapy desensitization.
.

  14. Carotid disease in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Abid, A.R.; Dar, M.A.; Noeman, A.; Amin, S.; Azhar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the severity of carotid artery disease in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: From January to June 2008, 379 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery were preoperatively evaluated for the presence of carotid stenoses by duplex scanning. Patients were divided into two groups, Group I, 156 (41.2%) diabetic patients and Group II, 223 (58.8%) non-diabetic patients. Results: There were 314 (82.8%) males and 65 (17.2%) females with a mean age of 57.2+-9.1 years. In diabetic group there were 125 (80.1%) males and 31 (19.9%) females with a mean age of 56.3+-8.9 years. Left main stem stenosis was present in 59 (37.8%) diabetics and 45 (20.2%) non-diabetics (p 70% stenosis was present in 20 (5.3%) with 13 (8.3%) diabetics and 7 (3.1%) non-diabetics (p<0.025). Stenosis of 50-70% was observed in 30 (7.9%) of which 17 (10.9%) were diabetics and 13 (5.8%) were non-diabetics. Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with diffuse coronary artery disease and significant carotid artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. (author)

  15. Mortality Among Patients with Pleural Effusion Undergoing Thoracentesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBiasi, Erin M.; Pisani, Margaret A.; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy; Kookoolis, Anna; Argento, A Christine; Puchalski, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Of the 1.5 million people diagnosed with pleural effusion annually in the U.S., approximately 178,000 undergo thoracentesis. While it is known that malignant pleural effusion portends a poor prognosis, mortality of patients with nonmalignant effusions has not been well studied. Methods This prospective cohort study evaluated 308 patients undergoing thoracentesis. Chart review was performed to obtain baseline characteristics. The etiology of the effusions was determined using standardized criteria. Mortality was determined at 30-days and 1-year. Results 247 unilateral and 61 bilateral thoracenteses were performed. Malignant effusion had the highest 30-day (37%) and 1 year (77%) mortality. There was substantial patient 30-day and 1-year mortality with effusions due to multiple benign etiologies (29% and 55%), CHF (22% and 53%), and renal failure (14% and 57%). Patients with bilateral pleural effusion, relative to unilateral, were associated with higher risk of death at 30 days and 1 year (17% versus 47%; HR 2.58 CI [1.44–4.63] and 36% versus 69%; HR 2.32 CI [1.55–3.48]). Conclusions Patients undergoing thoracentesis for pleural effusion have high short and long-term mortality. Patients with malignant effusion had the highest mortality followed by multiple benign etiologies, CHF and renal failure. Bilateral pleural effusion is distinctly associated with high mortality. PMID:25837039

  16. Coexisting lumbar spondylosis in patients undergoing TKA: how common and how serious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chong Bum; Park, Kun Woo; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2014-02-01

    Information on the coexistence of lumbar spondylosis and its influence on overall levels of pain and function in patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) would be valuable for patient consultation and management. The purposes of this study were to document the prevalence and severity of coexisting lumbar spondylosis in patients with advanced knee OA undergoing TKA and to determine whether the coexisting lumbar spondylosis at the time of TKA adversely affects clinical scores in affected patients before and 2 years after TKA. Radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptoms including lower back pain, radiating pain at rest, and radiating pain with activity were assessed in 225 patients undergoing TKA. In addition, the WOMAC score and the SF-36 scores were evaluated before and 2 years after TKA. Potential associations of radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptom severities with pre- and postoperative WOMAC subscales and SF-36 scores were examined. All 225 patients had radiographic degeneration of the lumbar spine, and the large majority (89% [200 of 225]) had either moderate or severe spondylosis (72% and 17%, respectively). A total of 114 patients (51%) had at least one moderate or severe lumbar spine symptom. No association was found between radiographic severity of lumbar spine degeneration and pre- and postoperative clinical scores. In terms of lumbar spine symptoms, more severe symptoms were likely to adversely affect the preoperative WOMAC and SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) scores, but most of these adverse effects improved by 2 years after TKA with the exception of the association between severe radiating pain during activity and a poorer postoperative SF-36 PCS score (regression coefficient = -5.41, p = 0.015). Radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptoms are common among patients with advanced knee OA undergoing TKA. Severe lumbar spine symptoms

  17. Effect of internet on Chinese patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiequn; Hong, Tao; Li, Binglu; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    It is a growing trend that patients seek health information on the internet to self-educate and self-diagnose, which impacts their health decisions. The aim of the study was to investigate how Chinese patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) sought information about their disease and treatment, how they preferred the information to be presented, and how it influenced them. A descriptive, cross-sectional-designed questionnaire was employed to obtain information from 248 Chinese patients undergoing elective LC in Peking Union Medical College Hospital. A total of 223 patients (89.9 %) sought health information from the internet. Patients searching the internet for information about LC were younger than those who did not. It varied with employment status, educational level, and household average income. Among patients searching the internet for LC information, 35.4 % felt more worried and 37.2 % felt more assured; 15.2 % went to visit other doctors and 8.5 % considered changing their treatment because of internet use. A significant proportion of patients used the internet to obtain information about their disease. Age, employment status, educational level, and household average monthly income had an effect on internet usage for LC information. The use of the internet could cause mixed emotional outcomes among patients. Physicians should guide Chinese patients to professional websites of high quality and take time to discuss the information with patients during their visits and consultations.

  18. Radiation hazards from horses undergoing scintigraphy using technetium -{sup 99m}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitelock, R.G. [Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the extent of the radiation hazard to personnel from horses undergoing scintigraphy using technetium{sup 99m} methylene diphosphonate ({sup 99m}Tc{sup m}-MDP). From the data produced it is possible to derive safe working protocols which are comfortably within the legislated limits for whole body doses as set out in the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985. Measurements were made of the surface and environmental activities which result from individuals undergoing scintigraphic evaluation and also from urine contaminated bedding. The use of both high and low activities in the assessment of the radiation hazard to personnel and owners is considered. (author).

  19. Salivary function in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, M.; Cermik, T.F.; Uestuen, F.; Sen, S.; Berkarda, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in salivary gland function in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) undergoing hemodialysis. The group consisted of 23 patients with CRF (13 female, 10 male; mean age: 40±13 yr) and 14 healthy control subjects (mean age: 40±13 yr). All underwent dynamic salivary gland scintigraphy with gustatory stimulation. After intravenous administration of 99m Tc pertechnetate, first, perfusion images at 2 seconds per frame were acquired for 1 minute, then dynamic images at 1 minute per frame were acquired for 45 minutes. At 30 minutes after injection , 10 ml lemon juice was given for 15 minutes as a gustatory stimulus. We obtained time-activity curves derived from regions of interest centered over the four major salivary glands. The following functional indices were calculated for each gland: the time of maximum radioactivity (T max ) for the prestimulated period, the time of minimum radioactivity (T min ), as an indicator of velocity of secretion after stimulation, and the Lem E 5 % value as an indicator of the secretion function. When the patients with CRF undergoing hemodialysis were compared to the controls, there were statistically significant differences in T max , T min and Lem E 5 % values for bilateral parotid glands, and T min values for bilateral submandibular glands (p max and Lem E 5 % values for bilateral submandibular glands. There were also significant differences in T max and Lem E 5 % values for bilateral parotid glands between mild oral problems and severe oral problems in patients with CRF (undergoing hemodialysis). In this study, prolonged T max and T min values, and decreased Lem E 5 % values for parotid glands and prolonged T min values for submandibular glands on salivary scintigraphy pointed out decreased parenchymatous and excretory function in patients with CRF undergoing hemodialysis. (author)

  20. Pulmonary hypertenstion ad leading factor in patients undergoing dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, I.U.; Sumera, A.; Idrees, M.K.; Tanweer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and leading factors of pulmonary hypertension among chronic hemodialysis patients. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Hemodialysis Unit, Department of Nephrology, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation, Karachi, from September 2011 to March 2012. Methodology: Patients of either gender aged between 16 to 60 years of age undergoing hemodialysis for at least 3 months not having pre-existing valvular heart disease, chronic lung disease or connective tissue disorder were included. Pulmonary hypertension was prospectively estimated by Doppler echocardiogram on patients undergoing dialysis. Pulmonary artery pressure was calculated on the post-dialysis day and leading factors were compared between patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Results: A total of 178 patients were included in study with male to female ratio120/58 (2.06:1). The mean age was 33.84 +- 11.9 years. The mean duration of hemodialysis was 23.85 +- 22.48 months. Pulmonary hypertension was found in 76 (42.7%) patients. Out of the studied factors, low serum albumin ( 3.4 mg/dl, p = 0.01) was found to be statistically significant in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: Pulmonary hypertension was frequently present in dialysis population (42.7%). This subset of patients had significantly lower albumin levels in serum. More research is needed in its pathogenesis to arrest its course. (author)

  1. Cerebroprotective effect of piracetam in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinski, Sebastian; Claus, Benjamin; Alaaraj, Nour; Dohmen, Pascal Maria; Neumann, Konrad; Uebelhack, Ralf; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of cognitive function is a possible side effect after the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during cardiac surgery. Since it has been proven that piracetam is cerebroprotective in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery, we investigated the effects of piracetam on the cognitive performance of patients undergoing open heart surgery. Patients scheduled for elective open heart surgery were randomized to the piracetam or placebo group in a double-blind study. Patients received 12 g of piracetam or placebo at the beginning of the operation. Six neuropsychological subtests from the Syndrom Kurz Test and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale were performed preoperatively and on day 3, postoperatively. To assess the overall cognitive function and the degree of cognitive decline across all tests after the surgery, we combined the six test-scores by principal component analysis. A total of 88 patients with a mean age of 67 years were enrolled into the study. The mean duration of CPB was 110 minutes. Preoperative clinical parameters and overall cognitive functions were not significantly different between the groups. The postoperative combined score of the neuropsychological tests showed deterioration of cognitive function in both groups (piracetam: preoperative 0.19 ± 0.97 vs. postoperative -0.97 ± 1.38, p piracetam did not perform better than those taking placebo, and both groups had the same decline of overall cognitive function (p = 0.955). Piracetam had no cerebroprotective effect in patients undergoing open heart surgery. Unlike the patients who underwent coronary surgery, piracetam did not reduce the early postoperative decline of neuropsychological abilities in heart valve patients.

  2. Radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging among patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-03-01

    There are concerns about levels of radiation exposure among patients who undergo diagnostic imaging for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We quantified imaging studies and estimated the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation received by patients with organic and functional GI disorders. We also identified factors and diagnoses associated with high CEDs.

  3. Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2017-07-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, in collaboration with the American Dental Association, has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications of patients with orthopaedic implants presenting for dental procedures, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The 64 patient scenarios and 1 treatment were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  4. Cerebroprotective effect of piracetam in patients undergoing coronary bypass burgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinski, Sebastian; Claus, Benjamin; Alaaraj, Nour; Dohmen, Pascal Maria; Kirilova, Kremena; Neumann, Konrad; Uebelhack, Ralf; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2008-11-01

    Reduction of cognitive function is a possible side effect after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. We investigated the cerebroprotective effect of piracetam on cognitive performance in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients scheduled for elective, primary and isolated coronary bypass surgery were randomised either to piracetam or placebo group. The study was performed in a double blind fashion. Patients received either 12 g piracetam or placebo at the beginning of the operation. Six neuropsychological subtests from the Syndrom Kurz Test and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale were performed preoperatively and on the third postoperative day. To assess the overall cognitive function and the degree of cognitive decline across all tests after surgery we combined the six test-scores by principal component analysis. A total number of 120 patients were enrolled into the study. Preoperative overall cognitive function were not significantly different between the groups. The postoperative combined score of the neuropsychological tests showed a deterioration of cognitive function in both groups (placebo-pre: -0.06+/-0.99 vs placebo-post: -1.38+/-1.11; ppiracetam-pre: 0.06+/-1.02 vs piracetam-post: -0.65+/-0.93; ppiracetam patients performed significantly better compared to the placebo patients after the operation and had a less decline of overall cognitive function (pPiracetam has a cerebroprotective effect in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. It reduces an early postoperative substantial decline of neuropsychological abilities.

  5. Managing direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing dentoalveolar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J P; Woolcombe, S A; Patel, R K; Obisesan, O; Roberts, L N; Bryant, C; Arya, R

    2017-02-24

    Our objective was to describe our experience of managing a cohort of adult patients prescribed direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) undergoing dentoalveolar procedures between November 2012 and May 2016. Prior to conducting a procedure a formal assessment was made of each patient's anticoagulation treatment. A specific plan was then formulated, balancing the risk of bleeding with the risk of thrombosis. Patients received a telephone consultation one week following treatment to assess any post-operative bleeding. Eighty-two patients underwent 111 oral surgical procedures, the majority of which were dental extractions. In the case of 35 (32%) procedures, advice was given to omit the DOAC, either before or after treatment. There was no bleeding following the majority of procedures. Persistent bleeding followed 15 (13.5%) procedures, of which 7 (6.3%) procedures required specific intervention. The majority of patients prescribed DOACs can undergo dentoalveolar procedures safely. Important considerations when planning treatment are: (i) when the patient usually takes their dose of DOAC, (ii) the time the procedure is performed and, (iii) when the DOAC is taken post-procedure. In our experience, if these factors are considered carefully, omission of DOAC doses is unlikely to be required for most patients.

  6. Fospropofol Disodium for Sedation in Elderly Patients Undergoing Flexible Bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Gerard A; Vincent, Brad D; Wahidi, Momen M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fospropofol disodium is a water-soluble prodrug of propofol. A subset analysis was undertaken of elderly patients (≥65 y) undergoing flexible bronchoscopy, who were part of a larger multicenter, randomized, double-blind study. METHODS: Patients received fentanyl citrate (50 mcg) followed by fospropofol at initial (4.88mg/kg) and supplemental (1.63mg/kg) doses. The primary end point was sedation success (3 consecutive Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scores of ≤4 and procedure completion without alternative sedative or assisted ventilation). Treatment success, time to fully alert, patient and physician satisfaction, and safety/tolerability were also evaluated. RESULTS: In the elderly patients subset (n=61), sedation success was 92%, the mean time to fully alert was 8.0±10.9 min, and memory retention was 72% during recovery, and these were comparable with the younger patients subgroup (age, Sedation-related adverse events occurred in 23% of the elderly and 18% of the younger patients (age, sedation, rapid time to fully alert, and high satisfaction in this elderly subset undergoing flexible bronchoscopy, which was comparable with outcomes in younger patients.

  7. Tranexamic Acid in Patients Undergoing Coronary-Artery Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Paul S; Smith, Julian A; Forbes, Andrew; Silbert, Brendan; Jayarajah, Mohandas; Painter, Thomas; Cooper, D James; Marasco, Silvana; McNeil, John; Bussières, Jean S; McGuinness, Shay; Byrne, Kelly; Chan, Matthew T V; Landoni, Giovanni; Wallace, Sophie

    2017-01-12

    Tranexamic acid reduces the risk of bleeding among patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but it is unclear whether this leads to improved outcomes. Furthermore, there are concerns that tranexamic acid may have prothrombotic and proconvulsant effects. In a trial with a 2-by-2 factorial design, we randomly assigned patients who were scheduled to undergo coronary-artery surgery and were at risk for perioperative complications to receive aspirin or placebo and tranexamic acid or placebo. The results of the tranexamic acid comparison are reported here. The primary outcome was a composite of death and thrombotic complications (nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, pulmonary embolism, renal failure, or bowel infarction) within 30 days after surgery. Of the 4662 patients who were enrolled and provided consent, 4631 underwent surgery and had available outcomes data; 2311 were assigned to the tranexamic acid group and 2320 to the placebo group. A primary outcome event occurred in 386 patients (16.7%) in the tranexamic acid group and in 420 patients (18.1%) in the placebo group (relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.05; P=0.22). The total number of units of blood products that were transfused during hospitalization was 4331 in the tranexamic acid group and 7994 in the placebo group (Ptranexamic acid group and in 2.8% of the patients in the placebo group (P=0.001), and seizures occurred in 0.7% and 0.1%, respectively (P=0.002 by Fisher's exact test). Among patients undergoing coronary-artery surgery, tranexamic acid was associated with a lower risk of bleeding than was placebo, without a higher risk of death or thrombotic complications within 30 days after surgery. Tranexamic acid was associated with a higher risk of postoperative seizures. (Funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and others; ATACAS Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN12605000557639 .).

  8. Frequency of renal artery stenosis in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashari, M.N.; Ahmed, R.; Soomro, K.; Ishaq, M.

    2009-01-01

    Due to scarcity of local data regarding frequency of Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS), it is important to perform simultaneous renal arteriography in Patients undergoing coronary arterteriography for suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), in order to recognize all potential candidates for renal artery stenosis. It is cross sectional study. Three hundred patients, 157 male and 143 female with average age of 56+-8 Years and 55+-7 years respectively underwent simultaneous coronary and renal arteriography. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) was identified in 23.6% patients. Significant RAS (>50%) was present in 15% of patients. Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, smoking and diabetes mellitus were present in 88%, 80%, 50% and 49% respectively. Three vessel, two vessel and single vessel disease were seen in 58 %, 36% and 6% of patients. It is important to do simultaneous coronary and renal arteriography especially in patient having multiple risk factors and multi vessel coronary artery disease. (author)

  9. Frequency of renal artery stenosis in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashari, M N; Ahmed, R; Soomro, K; Ishaq, M [Civil Hospital, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2009-07-15

    Due to scarcity of local data regarding frequency of Renal Artery Stenosis (RAS), it is important to perform simultaneous renal arteriography in Patients undergoing coronary arterteriography for suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), in order to recognize all potential candidates for renal artery stenosis. It is cross sectional study. Three hundred patients, 157 male and 143 female with average age of 56+-8 Years and 55+-7 years respectively underwent simultaneous coronary and renal arteriography. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) was identified in 23.6% patients. Significant RAS (>50%) was present in 15% of patients. Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, smoking and diabetes mellitus were present in 88%, 80%, 50% and 49% respectively. Three vessel, two vessel and single vessel disease were seen in 58 %, 36% and 6% of patients. It is important to do simultaneous coronary and renal arteriography especially in patient having multiple risk factors and multi vessel coronary artery disease. (author)

  10. Ejnell surgery under nasal flexible fiber for a patient who is unable to undergo direct laryngoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Natsuki; Umezaki, Toshiro; Adachi, Kazuo; Toh, Satoshi; Kiyohara, Hideyuki; Komune, Shizuo

    2012-01-01

    The Ejnell method used to treat bilateral vocal cord paralysis without damaging the laryngeal framework. It is the first-line option for laterofixation of the vocal fold, because it is reversible and requires no tracheotomy. The Ejnell method normally requires direct laryngoscopy. It was applied without direct laryngoscopy in one patient, because a patient had difficulty extending the neck after radiation therapy. Nasal ENDO CLOSE TM was effective under flexible fiberscopy. Therefore, this could be an effective method a patient cannot undergo direct laryngoscopy. (author)

  11. The HRQoL of Chinese patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-Dan; Petrini, Marcia A

    2010-03-01

    With the transition from infectious disease and acute illness to chronic disease and degenerative illness as leading causes of death, health-related quality of life has become an important aspect in assessing the burden of chronic disease. The quality of life of haemodialysis patients has been studied extensively; however, very limited research using exploratory descriptive design has been carried out in this area in China. The aim of this study was to explore health-related quality of life of end-stage renal disease patients undergoing haemodialysis in China. This study used the qualitative research design approach. A semi-structured, in-depth interview was conducted with 16 haemodialysis patients in two hospitals using Colaizzi's phenomenological method to transcribe and analyse the data. The results of this study showed that dialysis patients show improvement in physical competence, but they also experienced emotional instability and psychological distress, financial burdens, inadequate disease knowledge and less social support which influenced their quality of life. To optimise the patients undergoing dialysis health-related quality of life, support of psycho-social-economical aspects should be enhanced. Health care providers should give haemodialysis patients thorough health education, individualised psychological and emotional intervention and adequate social support to optimise health-related quality of life.

  12. Dental Health of Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis (A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this study was to determine the oral manifestations of patients undergoing dialysis. Two subgroups of the population were studied: (1 Those who have been on dialysis for less than one year, (2 those who have been on dialysis for more than one year. Two dental indices–periodontal index and decayed, missing, filled index were used to identify periodontal status, dental canes activity. Data were compiled and analyzed by using the unpaired t-test. Results suggested that 100% (n = 26 of the patients undergoing dialysis presented with some form of periodontal disease (mean value = 2.24, standard deviation = 1.33. Majority of the patients displayed either established periodontal disease (57.6% or the beginning of periodontal disease (38 4%. Approximately, 70% of the patients had high decayed, missing, filled index (mean value = 6.19, standard deviation = 6.40. Findings led to the conclusion that patients on dialysis need comprehensive professional oral care and self-care instructions. The source of infection in oral cavity can cause variety of systemic diseases, causing morbidity and mortality in these immune-suppressed patients.

  13. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David [Veterans Affairs, New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Rineer, Justin [University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  14. Clinical and biochemical outcomes of men undergoing radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, David; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Safdieh, Joseph; Weiner, Joseph; Rotman, Marvin; Schwartz, David; Rineer, Justin

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed outcomes of patients with prostate cancer undergoing either radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) +/- salvage radiation or definitive radiation therapy (RT) +/- androgen deprivation. From 2003-2010 there were 251 patients who underwent RRP and 469 patients who received RT (> or =7,560 cGy) for prostate cancer. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed with the log-rank test to compare biochemical control (bCR), distant metastatic-free survival (DMPFS), and prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS) between the two groups. The median follow-up was 70 months and 61.3% of the men were African American. For low risk disease the 6-year bCR were 90.3% for RT and 85.6% for RRP (p = 0.23) and the 6-year post-salvage bCR were 90.3% vs. 90.9%, respectively (p = 0.84). For intermediate risk disease the 6-year bCR were 82.6% for RT and 59.7% for RRP (p < 0.001) and 82.6% vs. 74.0%, respectively, after including those salvaged with RT (p = 0.06). For high risk disease, the 6-year bCR were 67.4% for RT and 41.3% for RRP (p < 0.001) and after including those salvaged with RT was 67.4% vs. 43.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to DMPFS or PCSS. Treatment approaches utilizing RRP +/- salvage radiation or RT +/- androgen deprivation yielded equivalent DMPFS and PCSS outcomes. Biochemical control rates, using their respective definitions, appeared equivalent or better in those who received treatment with RT.

  15. CyberKnife Boost for Patients with Cervical Cancer Unable to Undergo Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Jonathan Andrew; Witten, Matthew R.; Clancey, Owen; Episcopia, Karen; Accordino, Diane; Chalas, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Standard radiation therapy for patients undergoing primary chemosensitized radiation for carcinomas of the cervix usually consists of external beam radiation followed by an intracavitary brachytherapy boost. On occasion, the brachytherapy boost cannot be performed due to unfavorable anatomy or because of coexisting medical conditions. We examined the safety and efficacy of using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a boost to the cervix after external beam radiation in those patients unable to have brachytherapy to give a more effective dose to the cervix than with conventional external beam radiation alone. Six consecutive patients with anatomic or medical conditions precluding a tandem and ovoid boost were treated with combined external beam radiation and CyberKnife boost to the cervix. Five patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis with serial intensity-modulated radiation therapy boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 61.2 Gy. These five patients received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 20 Gy in five fractions of 4 Gy each. One patient was treated to the pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy with an external beam boost to the uterus and cervix to a dose of 50.4 Gy. This patient received an SBRT boost to the cervix to a dose of 19.5 Gy in three fractions of 6.5 Gy. Five percent volumes of the bladder and rectum were kept to ≤75 Gy in all patients (i.e., V75 Gy ≤ 5%). All of the patients remain locally controlled with no evidence of disease following treatment. Grade 1 diarrhea occurred in 4/6 patients during the conventional external beam radiation. There has been no grade 3 or 4 rectal or bladder toxicity. There were no toxicities observed following SBRT boost. At a median follow-up of 14 months, CyberKnife radiosurgical boost is well tolerated and efficacious in providing a boost to patients with cervix cancer who are unable to undergo brachytherapy boost. Further follow-up is required to see if these results remain durable.

  16. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Akhlesh S; Tempe, Deepak K; Banerjee, Amit; Hegde, Radhesh; Cooper, Andrea; Khanna, S K

    2003-07-01

    Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and difficulty in achieving the haemostasis and in patients with negative blood group and emergency operations, the availability of sufficient blood can be a problem. Harvesting the autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) can be a useful method of blood conservation in these patients. The above four categories of patients were prospectively studied, using either autologous whole blood donation or autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) harvest in the immediate pre-bypass period. Forty two patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two equal groups of 21 each, control group (Group I) in which one unit of whole blood was withdrawn, and PRP group (Group II) where autologous plateletpheresis was utilised. After reversal of heparin, autologous whole blood was transfused in the control group and autologous PRP was transfused in the PRP group. The chest tube drainage and the requirement of homologous blood and blood products were recorded. Average PRP harvest was 643.33 +/- 133.51 mL in PRP group and the mean whole blood donation was 333.75 +/- 79.58 mL in the control group. Demographic, preoperative and intra operative data showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The PRP group patients drained 26.44% less (pblood products (pconservation in terms of better haemostasis, and less requirement of blood and blood products in the postoperative period as compared with the autologous whole blood donation. This technique can be especially useful in the

  17. Evaluation of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress markers in prostate cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phebe L. Abdel-Messeih

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. The present study was carried out to investigate the radiation response of serum cytokines and oxidative markers to find out if these novel biomarkers have significant applications regarding radiation outcome in prostate cancer patients. Significant elevations of prostatic specific antigen (PSA, asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA and nitric oxide (NO were recorded in cancer prostate patients at the time of diagnosis compared to controls. Patients were subjected to radiotherapy post prostatectomy with a total dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions (5 sessions/week for 7 weeks. At the end of the seventh week post radiotherapy, ADMA levels were accentuated while the levels of PSA and NO were lower than before therapy. The level of inflammatory cytokines (interleukins IL-4, IL-5 and interferon-gamma in post radiation therapy patients were significantly elevated compared to both controls and prostate cancer patients. A significant inverse correlation was observed in prostate cancer patients between ADMA and NO. Moreover, a significant inverse correlation in post radiation therapy patients was observed between IL-5 and PSA. These results are highly suggestive that there is a specific cytokine response in patients undergoing curative radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  18. Quantification of radiation absorbed dose and DNA damages in subjects undergoing computer tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanagaraj, Karthik; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Tamizh Selvan, G.; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Jose, M.T.; Ozhimuthu, Annalakshmi; Panneer Selvam, S.; Pattan, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    X-rays are extensively used in medical field for imaging, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy. Irrespective of the application, the procedures deliver a significant amount of dose to the subject, while undergoing the procedure, which vary from imaging (low dose in the order mGy) and therapy (high doses in the order of several Gy). Of the various imaging modalities, the computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to diagnose many health alignments, in all age groups. Though the personals involved in performing the procedures are monitored for the levels of exposure, it is uncommon to monitor the patient after the examination, as the benefits outweigh the risk. However an enhanced concern on the risk associated due to the exposure of low dose X-radiation in CT has been reported. Therefore, we aim to quantify the absorbed dose to the eye, thyroid and forehead using thermo luminescence dosimeter of Lithium Manganese Borate doped with Terbium (LMB:Tb) in subjects undergoing CT examination (n= 27), as a methodology to investigate the effects of low dose ionizing radiation. Further, the DNA damages was measured using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) assay, from the blood samples obtained from the study subjects before and after the procedures. The overall measured organ dose ranged between 1.92 and 520.14 mGy for eye, 0.84 and 210.33 mGy for forehead and 1.79-185 mGy for thyroid, with an average of 128.86 1 137.16, 78.25 1 69.02 and 48.86 1 63.60 respectively. The DNA damages measured using CA and MN assay, showed an extreme statistically significant (p<0.0001) increase in CA and significant increase (p<0.001) in MN frequency in post exposure when compared to that of unexposed control. The significance of the estimated dose and the DNA damages will be discussed. (author)

  19. Prophylaxis of acute radiation dermatitis with an innovative FDA-approved two-step skin care system in a patient with head and neck cancer undergoing a platin-based radiochemotherapy: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, M F; Fetzner, L; Hassel, J C; Debus, J; Potthoff, K

    2013-01-01

    Radiodermatitis is a very common side effect in cancer treatment often leading to therapy delays and diminution of the patients' health state and quality of life. Despite a wide range of supportive strategies, radiodermatitis is still a major problem necessitating further improvements in prevention and treatment. Lactokine is a milk-based protein shown to assist in the reduction of skin redness. The treatment is a unique FDA-approved skin care system (R1 and R2). In this case presentation we describe the prophylactic use of R1 and R2 in a 63-year-old, female patient with a squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx undergoing a platin-based chemoradiation. The application was feasible and safe and the patient developed only a slight radiodermatitis. To our knowledge this is the first report in the literature on the prophylactic use of R1 and R2. Further evidence will be provided by a prospective, clinical trial we have launched (CREAM-1; study registration in ISRCTN Registry: ISRCTN87302591). We also review the literature to give an overview about common strategies in the management of radiodermatitis.

  20. X-rays sensing properties of MEH-PPV, Alq₃ and additive components: a new organic dosimeter as a candidate for minimizing the risk of accidents of patients undergoing radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimitberger, T; Ferreira, G R; Akcelrud, L C; Saraiva, M F; Bianchi, R F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report our experimental design in searching a smart and easy-to-read dosimeter used to detect 6 MV X-rays for improving patient safety in radiation oncology. The device was based on an organic emissive solutions of poly(2-methoxy-5(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV), aluminum-tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq₃) and additive components which were characterized by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence and CIE color coordinate diagram. The optical properties of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions have been examined as function of radiation dose over the range of 0-100 Gy. It has shown that MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions are specifically sensitive to X-rays, since the effect of radiation on this organic system is strongly correlated with the efficient spectral overlap between Alq₃ emission and the absorption of degraded MEH-PPV, which alters the color and photoemission of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ mixtures from red to yellow, and then to green. The rate of this change is more sensitive when MEH-PPV/Alq₃ is irradiated in the presence of benzoyl peroxide than when in the presence of hindered phenolic stabilizers, respectively, an accelerator and an inhibitor to activate or inhibit free radical formation. This gives rise to optimize the response curve of the dosimeter. It is clear from the experimental results that organic emissive semiconductors have potential to be used as dedicated and low-cost dosimeters to provide an independent check of beam output of a linear accelerator and therefore to give patients the opportunity to have information on the dose prescription or equipment-related problems a few minutes before being exposed to radiation. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Liquid discharges from patients undergoing {sup 131}I treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barquero, R. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: rbarquero@hurh.sacyl.es; Basurto, F. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain); Nunez, C. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, FJD, E-82001 Madrid (Spain); Esteban, R. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Clinico Universitario, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2008-10-15

    This work discusses the production and management of liquid radioactive wastes as excretas from patients undergoing therapy procedures with {sup 131}I radiopharmaceuticals in Spain. The activity in the sewage has been estimated with and without waste radioactive decay tanks. Two common therapy procedures have been considered, the thyroid cancer (4.14 GBq administered per treatment), and the hyperthyroidism (414 MBq administered per treatment). The calculations were based on measurements of external exposure around the 244 hyperthyroidism patients and 23 thyroid cancer patients. The estimated direct activity discharged to the sewage for two thyroid carcinomas and three hyperthyroidisms was 14.57 GBq and 1.27 GBq, respectively, per week; the annual doses received by the most exposed individual (sewage worker) were 164 {mu}Sv and 13 {mu}Sv, respectively. General equations to calculate the activity as a function of the number of patient treated each week were also obtained.

  2. Changes in preoperative characteristics in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Martin Andreas; Brasso, Klaus; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2014-01-01

    of a shift in attitude with increasing opportunistic PSA testing. This had led to an increasing number of RPs being performed in Denmark. The objective of this study was to analyze changes in preoperative characteristics over time for the complete cohort of 6489 men who underwent RP between 1995 and 2011....... Our hypothesis was that an increasing amount of men undergo RP for lower risk PCa. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients operated from 1995 to 2011 were identified via patient files and registries. Changes over time in age at surgery, preoperative PSA, clinical T-category, biopsy Gleason score (GS......, especially after 2005. Biopsy GS = 7 was found in 20.2% of the patients in 2005 compared to 57.1% in 2011. The proportion of T1 disease increased from 32% to 56%. Significant changes in percentage of patients according to the D'Amico classification were found. After 2005 the proportion of intermediate...

  3. [Psychosocial adjustment in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Aguilar, Salvador; Guerra-Cruz, Hilda Griselda; Cupil-Rodríguez, Aura Lizbet; Calderillo-Ruiz, Germán; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial adaptation is a measurement that represents the patient's adjustment to those changes involved in their illness. We undertook this study to search for individual characteristics and clinical aspects associated with successful psychosocial adjustment in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) undergoing (CT) chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Seventy-five patients with CRC treated with CT or CRT in a cancer center were included. Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale Self-Reporting (PAIS-SR) questionnaire was used as a measurement of psychosocial adjustment. Psychosocial adaptation was successful in 18 patients (24%) and unsuccessful in 57 patients (76%). Young patients, married patients and males showed lower psychosocial adaptation to disease. This is associated with the decrease in sexual relations, economic resources and psychological symptoms. Patients complained that they were unsatisfied due to the lack of disease and treatment information offered by the heath care team. In the process of adaptation, clinical features such as tumor location and treatment scheme are considered basic, as well as age, education, marital status. Areas such as sexuality, interpersonal and family relationships, economic status and emotional state of patients affected by the disease and treatments provide a deep complexity in the study of the psychosocial adaptation process in patients with CRC.

  4. Formal education of patients about to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Vaughan, Jessica; Davidson, Brian R

    2014-02-28

    Generally, before being operated on, patients will be given informal information by the healthcare providers involved in the care of the patients (doctors, nurses, ward clerks, or healthcare assistants). This information can also be provided formally in different formats including written information, formal lectures, or audio-visual recorded information. To compare the benefits and harms of formal preoperative patient education for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2013), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded to March 2013. We included only randomised clinical trials irrespective of language and publication status. Two review authors independently extracted the data. We planned to calculate the risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% CI for continuous outcomes based on intention-to-treat analyses when data were available. A total of 431 participants undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised to formal patient education (215 participants) versus standard care (216 participants) in four trials. The patient education included verbal education, multimedia DVD programme, computer-based multimedia programme, and Power Point presentation in the four trials. All the trials were of high risk of bias. One trial including 212 patients reported mortality. There was no mortality in either group in this trial. None of the trials reported surgery-related morbidity, quality of life, proportion of patients discharged as day-procedure laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the length of hospital stay, return to work, or the number of unplanned visits to the doctor. There were insufficient details to calculate the mean difference and 95% CI for the difference in pain scores at 9 to 24 hours (1 trial; 93 patients); and we did not identify clear evidence of

  5. Performance of PROMIS for Healthy Patients Undergoing Meniscal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Kyle J; Glass, Natalie; Anthony, Chris A; Hettrich, Carolyn M; Albright, John; Amendola, Annunziato; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew

    2017-06-07

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed as an extensive question bank with multiple health domains that could be utilized for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). In the present study, we investigated the use of the PROMIS Physical Function CAT (PROMIS PF CAT) in an otherwise healthy population scheduled to undergo surgery for meniscal injury with the hypotheses that (1) the PROMIS PF CAT would correlate strongly with patient-reported outcome instruments that measure physical function and would not correlate strongly with those that measure other health domains, (2) there would be no ceiling effects, and (3) the test burden would be significantly less than that of the traditional measures. Patients scheduled to undergo meniscal surgery completed the PROMIS PF CAT, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Marx Knee Activity Rating Scale, Short Form-36 (SF-36), and EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaires. Correlations were defined as high (≥0.7), high-moderate (0.61 to 0.69), moderate (0.4 to 0.6), moderate-weak (0.31 to 0.39), or weak (≤0.3). If ≥15% respondents to a patient-reported outcome measure obtained the highest or lowest possible score, the instrument was determined to have a significant ceiling or floor effect. A total of 107 participants were analyzed. The PROMIS PF CAT had a high correlation with the SF-36 Physical Functioning (PF) (r = 0.82, p ceiling effects, with 0% of the participants achieving the lowest and highest score, respectively. The PROMIS PF CAT correlates strongly with currently used patient-reported outcome measures of physical function and demonstrates no ceiling effects for patients with meniscal injury requiring surgery. It may be a reasonable alternative to more burdensome patient-reported outcome measures.

  6. Aspirin in the Management of Patients with Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascan, Bianca; Marignol, Laure

    2018-04-01

    Aspirin has cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2)-mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties that may confer a positive effect in preventing and limiting the progression of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer has been shown to have poor treatment outcomes due to therapeutic resistance; therefore, COX2 inhibition caused by aspirin could represent an opportunity to augment current therapies. This is particularly of interest to patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) where inflammation is a common side-effect. This review discusses the evidence for the potential role of aspirin in the management of patients with prostate cancer undergoing RT. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. PSYCHOSOCIAL MORBIDITY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING MASTECTOMY FOR BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Konnakkaparambil Ramakrishnan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Breast Cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide and carries significant psychosocial morbidity. The diagnosis of the disease and the treatment modalities like surgery and chemotherapy contribute to the morbidity. The recognition of the psychosocial morbidity associated with mastectomy can help us formulate effective counselling strategies. The objectives of this study were- to assess the psychosocial morbidity in patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma breast, to identify the preoperative variables that predict the morbidity and to find out the correlation between degree of neuroticism of the individual and morbidity. MATERIALS AND METHODS 35 female patients who had mastectomy for breast cancer were evaluated at three time-points, preoperatively, immediately after surgery and 2 months after surgery. Anxiety and depression was assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, psychological distress was measured using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 and neuroticism was assessed by Eysenck Personality Inventory Neuroticism subscale (EPI-N. RESULTS There was a high level of anxiety, depression and GHQ scores preoperatively with a further worsening of these over the three interviews. Age, marital status and menopausal status were factors which had an influence on psychosocial morbidity. Preoperative EPI-N scores positively correlated with psychosocial morbidity. CONCLUSION There is a high level of psychosocial morbidity in patients undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer and mastectomy seems to worsen it in the first two months after surgery. Our study shows that psychosocial morbidity is affected by age, marital status, menopausal status and level of neuroticism.

  8. Quality of Life in Elderly Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavdaniti, Maria; Zyga, Sofia; Vlachou, Eugenia; Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina

    2017-01-01

    As life expectancy increases, it is expected that 60% of all cases of cancer will be detected in elderly patients in the next two decades. Cancer treatment for older persons is complicated by a number of factors, thus negatively affecting patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to investigate quality of life in elderly cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This study was descriptive and non-experimental. It was conducted in one large hospital in a major city of Northern Greece. The sample was convenience comprising 53 elderly cancer patients undergoing cycle 3 chemotherapy. The data was collected using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale and included questions related to demographic and clinical characteristics. The majority of participants were men (n = 27, 50.9%) who were married (n = 32, 79.5%). Their mean age was 70.07 ± 3.60. Almost half of the sample (n = 30, 56.6%) had colon cancer. There was a statistical significant difference between men and women pertaining to physical wellbeing (p = 0.004) and overall quality of life (p family wellbeing (p = 0.029), functional wellbeing (p = 0.09) and overall quality of life (p family wellbeing (p = 0.029). These findings call attention to quality of life and its related factors in elderly cancer patients. It is highly recommended to envisage measures for improving quality of life in this group of cancer patients.

  9. Evaluation of the frequency and accuracy of gonad shield placement in patients undergoing pelvic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, V.; Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Sarikhani, S. [Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Gonad shielding has been advocated to reduce radiation exposure in patients undergoing pelvic radiography. The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and accuracy of gonad shield placement in patients undergoing pelvic radiography. A retrospective study was performed on 1230 anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs of 939 children under 16 years old. All the radiographs were reviewed to determine the frequency of gonad shielding and to evaluate whether gonad shields were correctly positioned when they are used. The gonad shield was present in 82 radiographs (30 girls and 52 boys) and was completely disregarded in 1148 radiographs. From 82 images which shield was present, the gonad shields adequately positioned in 28 radiographs (3 girls and 25 boys) and in the remaining 54 radiographs, the shield did not adequately protected the gonads due to incorrect placement of the shield. The inaccuracy placement and absence of gonad shields were more common in girls than boys (P-value < 0.05). More care should be taken to correctly positioning of the gonad shields in boys and its usage should be encouraged. However, the practice of ovarian shielding is not an effective way to reduce radiation exposure in girls undergoing pelvis radiography. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the frequency and accuracy of gonad shield placement in patients undergoing pelvic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, V.; Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Sarikhani, S.

    2016-01-01

    Gonad shielding has been advocated to reduce radiation exposure in patients undergoing pelvic radiography. The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and accuracy of gonad shield placement in patients undergoing pelvic radiography. A retrospective study was performed on 1230 anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs of 939 children under 16 years old. All the radiographs were reviewed to determine the frequency of gonad shielding and to evaluate whether gonad shields were correctly positioned when they are used. The gonad shield was present in 82 radiographs (30 girls and 52 boys) and was completely disregarded in 1148 radiographs. From 82 images which shield was present, the gonad shields adequately positioned in 28 radiographs (3 girls and 25 boys) and in the remaining 54 radiographs, the shield did not adequately protected the gonads due to incorrect placement of the shield. The inaccuracy placement and absence of gonad shields were more common in girls than boys (P-value < 0.05). More care should be taken to correctly positioning of the gonad shields in boys and its usage should be encouraged. However, the practice of ovarian shielding is not an effective way to reduce radiation exposure in girls undergoing pelvis radiography. (author)

  11. 131I treatment in patients undergoing renal dialysis: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobarra, Bonifacio; Campos, Pedro A.; Gonzalez Lopez, Antonio; Palma, Juan D.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation Protection issues concerning patients, public and staff must be considered carefully in hemodialysis for chronic renal failure patients scheduled for 131 I high dose therapy. In order to assess the risks related to this medical procedure, hemodialysis clearance of 131 I and contamination measurements were carried out. We have studied 12 hemodialysis procedures corresponding to 2 cases of hyperthyroidism disease (555MBq of 131 I administered) and 3 patients with carcinoma of the thyroid (5550 MBq of 131 I administered). The arterio-venous difference of 131 I across the artificial kidney and dose rate reduction at one meter of patient were measured. Contamination levels of the dialyser machine, filters and tubes were measured after dialysis with a contamination monitor. Direct read-out dosimeters were used to assess the radiation doses to nursery staff involved. The result obtained for mean 131 I clearance in blood was 75±11%. The mean dose rate reduction at one meter of the patient was 58±18%. We also checked that contamination levels for the dialyser machine, filters, tubes and accessories were lower than 10Bq/cm 2 . For the nursery staff the radiation dose was found to be lower than 0.1mSv. (author)

  12. Incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotic patients undergoing upper endoscopic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Sendino, Oriol; Araujo, Isis; Pellisé, Maria; Almela, Manel; González-Suárez, Begoña; López-Cerón, María; Córdova, Henry; Sanabria, Erwin; Uchima, Hugo; Llach, Josep; Ginès, Àngels

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bacteremia after endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) or EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is between 0% and 4%, but there are no data on this topic in cirrhotic patients. To prospectively assess the incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotic patients undergoing EUS and EUS-FNA. We enrolled 41 cirrhotic patients. Of these, 16 (39%) also underwent EUS-FNA. Blood cultures were obtained before and at 5 and 30 min after the procedure. When EUS-FNA was used, an extra blood culture was obtained after the conclusion of radial EUS and before the introduction of the sectorial echoendoscope. All patients were clinically followed up for 7 days for signs of infection. Blood cultures were positive in 16 patients. In 10 patients, blood cultures grew coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium species, Propionibacterium species or Acinetobacterium Lwoffii, which were considered contaminants (contamination rate 9.8%, 95% CI: 5.7-16%). The remaining 6 patients had true positive blood cultures and were considered to have had true bacteremia (15%, 95% CI: 4-26%). Blood cultures were positive after diagnostic EUS in five patients but were positive after EUS-FNA in only one patient. Thus, the frequency of bacteremia after EUS and EUS-FNA was 12% and 6%, respectively (95% CI: 2-22% and 0.2-30%, respectively). Only one of the patients who developed bacteremia after EUS had a self-limiting fever with no other signs of infection. Asymptomatic Gram-positive bacteremia developed in cirrhotic patients after EUS and EUS-FNA at a rate higher than in non-cirrhotic patients. However, this finding was not associated with any clinically significant infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  13. Blood Transfusion Strategies in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Soo Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is frequently associated with bleeding and coagulopathy complications, which may lead to the need for transfusion of multiple blood products. However, blood transfusions are known to increase morbidity and mortality, as well as hospital cost, in critically ill patients. In current practice, patients on ECMO receive a transfusion, on average, of 1-5 packed red blood cells (RBCs/day, with platelet transfusion accounting for the largest portion of transfusion volume. Generally, adult patients require more transfusions than neonates or children, and patients receiving venovenous ECMO for respiratory failure tend to need smaller transfusion volumes compared to those receiving venoarterial ECMO for cardiac failure. Observation studies have reported that a higher transfusion volume was associated with increased mortality. To date, the evidence for transfusion in patients undergoing ECMO is limited; most knowledge on transfusion strategies was extrapolated from studies in critically ill patients. However, current data support a restrictive blood transfusion strategy for ECMO patients, and a low transfusion trigger seems to be safe and reasonable.

  14. Plasma magnesium concentration in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Makara-Studzinska, Marta; Czajkowski, Marek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Stadnik, Adam; Pilat, Jacek; Rybojad, Beata; Dabrowski, Wojciech

    2017-05-11

    [b]Introduction[/b]. Magnesium (Mg) plays a crucial role in cell physiology and its deficiency may cause many disorders which often require intensive treatment. The aim of this study was to analyse some factors affecting preoperative plasma Mg concentration in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). [b]Materials and method[/b]. Adult patients scheduled for elective CABG with cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) under general anaesthesia were studied. Plasma Mg concentration was analysed before surgery in accordance with age, domicile, profession, tobacco smoking and preoperative Mg supplementation. Blood samples were obtained from the radial artery just before the administration of anaesthesia. [b]Results. [/b]150 patients were studied. Mean preoperative plasma Mg concentration was 0.93 ± 0.17 mmol/L; mean concentration in patients - 1.02 ± 0.16; preoperative Mg supplementation was significantly higher than in patients without such supplementation. Moreover, intellectual workers supplemented Mg more frequently and had higher plasma Mg concentration than physical workers. Plasma Mg concentration decreases in elderly patients. Patients living in cities, on average, had the highest plasma Mg concentration. Smokers had significantly lower plasma Mg concentration than non-smokers. [b]Conclusions. [/b]1. Preoperative magnesium supplementation increases its plasma concentration. 2. Intellectual workers frequently supplement magnesium. 3. Smoking cigarettes decreases plasma magnesium concentration.

  15. Change of anxiety in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zuo; Wu Zonggui; Wang Yongmei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of anxiety in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods: The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was carried out in hundred and forty five patients, 104 men, 41 women, mean age (63 ± 9) years, before and after the coronary angiography procedure respectively. Results: The state anxiety score after the procedure was significantly decreased from 35.8 ± 10.2 to 31.7 ± 9.9 (P<0.01). The trait anxiety score after the procedure was slighytly lowered from 35.7 ± 8.8 to 34.4 ± 9.4 (P=0.019). Sub- group analysis showed that the state anxiety score in 55 patients with normal coronary artery was markedly decreased from 37.5 ± 10.5 to 28.8 ± 8.2 (P<0.01) while the state anxiety score in 90 patients with abnormal coronary artery was unchanged. The score in those patients with abnormal coronary artery was much higher than that of patients with normal coronary artery (33.5 ± 10.4 vs 28.8 ± 8.2, P<0.01). The trait anxiety scores in both group were not changed. Conclusion: Good news about normal coronary artery after angiography may reduce the anxiety in patients suspected of coronary heart disease. (authors)

  16. Clinical outcomes of patients with hypothyroidism undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Sara, Jaskanwal D.S.; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Gharib, Hossein; Bell, Malcolm R.; Gulati, Rajiv; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebral events (MACCE) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results Two thousand four hundred and thirty patients who underwent PCI were included. Subjects were divided into two groups: hypothyroidism ( n = 686) defined either as a history of hypothyroidism or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) ≥5.0 mU/mL, and euthyroidism ( n = 1744) defined as no history of hypothyroidism and/or 0.3 mU/mL ≤ TSH hypothyroidism were further categorized as untreated ( n = 193), or those taking thyroid replacement therapy (TRT) with adequate replacement (0.3 mU/mL ≤ TSH hypothyroidism compared with those with euthyroidism (MACCE: HR: 1.28, P = 0.0001; myocardial infarction (MI): HR: 1.25, P = 0.037; heart failure: HR: 1.46, P = 0.004; revascularization: HR: 1.26, P = 0.0008; stroke: HR: 1.62, P = 0.04). Compared with untreated patients or those with inadequate replacement, adequately treated hypothyroid patients had a lower risk of MACCE (HR: 0.69, P = 0.005; HR: 0.78, P = 0.045), cardiac death (HR: 0.43, P = 0.008), MI (HR: 0.50, P = 0.0004; HR: 0.60, P = 0.02), and heart failure (HR: 0.50, P = 0.02; HR: 0.52, P = 0.017). Conclusion Hypothyroidism is associated with a higher incidence of MACCE compared with euthyroidism in patients undergoing PCI. Maintaining adequate control on TRT is beneficial in preventing MACCE. PMID:26757789

  17. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar Akhlesh

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and difficulty in achieving the haemostasis and in patients with negative blood group and emergency operations, the availability of sufficient blood can be a problem. Harvesting the autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP can be a useful method of blood conservation in these patients. The above four categories of patients were prospectively studied, using either autologous whole blood donation or autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP harvest in the immediate pre-bypass period. Forty two patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two equal groups of 21 each, control group (Group I in which one unit of whole blood was withdrawn, and PRP group (Group II where autologous plateletpheresis was utilised. After reversal of heparin, autologous whole blood was transfused in the control group and autologous PRP was transfused in the PRP group. The chest tube drainage and the requirement of homologous blood and blood products were recorded. Average PRP harvest was 643.33 +/- 133.51 mL in PRP group and the mean whole blood donation was 333.75 +/- 79.58 mL in the control group. Demographic, preoperative and intra operative data showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The PRP group patients drained 26.44% less (p<0.001 and required 38.5% less homologous blood and blood products (p<0.05, in the postoperative period. Haemoglobin levels on day zero (day of operation and day three were statistically not different between the two groups. We

  18. Nasogastric intubation causes gastroesophageal reflux in patients undergoing elective laparotomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The routine use of nasogastric tubes in patients undergoing elective abdominal operation is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative fever, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that nasogastric tubes have no significant effect on the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux or on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that nasogastric intubation in patients undergoing laparotomy reduces lower esophageal sphincter pressure and promotes gastroesophageal reflux in the perioperative period. METHODS: A prospective randomized case-control study was undertaken in which 15 consenting patients, admitted electively for bowel surgery, were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 underwent nasogastric intubation after induction of anesthesia, and Group 2 did not. All patients had manometry and pH probes placed with the aid of endoscopic vision at the lower esophageal sphincter and distal esophagus, respectively. Nasogastric tubes, where present, were left on free drainage, and sphincter pressures and pH were recorded continuously during a 24-hour period. Data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: The mean number of reflux episodes (defined as pH < 4) in the nasogastric tube group was 137 compared with a median of 8 episodes in the group managed without nasogastric tubes (P =.006). The median duration of the longest episode of reflux was 132 minutes in Group 1 and 1 minute in Group 2 (P =.001). A mean of 13.3 episodes of reflux lasted longer than 5 minutes in Group 1, with pH less than 4 for 37.4% of the 24 hours. This was in contrast to Group 2 where a mean of 0.13 episodes lasted longer than 5 minutes (P =.001) and pH less than 4 for 0.2% of total time (P =.001). The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressures were lower in Group 1. CONCLUSIONS. These findings demonstrate that patients undergoing elective laparotomy with routine nasogastric tube placement have significant gastroesophageal

  19. The Meaning and Experience of Patients Undergoing Rectal High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Samara; Néron, Sylvain; Benc, Renata; Rosberger, Zeev; Vuong, Té

    2016-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a precise form of radiation therapy that targets cancerous tumors by directly applying the radiation source at the site or directly next to the tumor. Patients often experience but underreport pain and anxiety related to cancer treatments. At present, there is no research available concerning the pervasiveness and intensity of patients' pain and anxiety during rectal brachytherapy. The aim of this study was to examine patients' thoughts, emotions, coping strategies, physical sensations, and needs during rectal HDR brachytherapy treatment. Twenty-five patients with rectal cancer were interviewed using a semi-structured qualitative interview following the completion of their brachytherapy treatment delivered at a Montreal-based hospital in Quebec, Canada. The experiences of pain and discomfort varied greatly between patients and were linked to the meaning patients attributed to the treatment itself, sense of time, the body's lithotomic position, insertion of the treatment applicator, and the patients' sense of agency and empowerment during the procedure. Patients drew upon a variety of internal and external resources to help them cope with discomfort. Staff need to know about the variation in the physical and emotional experiences of patients undergoing this treatment. Clinical teams can tailor their procedural behavior (eg, using certain language, psychosocial interventions) according to patients' needs to increase patients' comfort and ultimately improve their experience of HDR rectal brachytherapy.

  20. Opportunistic microorganisms in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Rodrigues Querido

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial therapy may cause changes in the resident oral microbiota, with the increase of opportunistic pathogens. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of Candida, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity of fifty patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and systemically healthy controls. Oral rinsing and subgingival samples were obtained, plated in Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, mannitol agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated for 48 h at 37ºC. Candida spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified by phenotypic tests, C. dubliniensis, by multiplex PCR, and coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp., by the API systems. The number of Candida spp. was significantly higher in tuberculosis patients, and C. albicans was the most prevalent specie. No significant differences in the prevalence of other microorganisms were observed. In conclusion, the antimicrobial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis induced significant increase only in the amounts of Candida spp.

  1. Emotional distress in patients undergoing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozzolillo, R.; Ercolani, P.; Giovagnoni, A.; Denigris, E.; Barbini, N.; Mariani, L.; Nardi, B.; Cotani, P.; Marchesi, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    MR imaging, like other imaging techniques, can cause emotional and psychological reactions in the patients. Although reversible, these reactions sometimes lead the patient to absolutely refuse the examination or to make it impossible to carry it through. To investigate the patients' emotional distress, a study group pf 28 subjects was examinated. They were heterogeneous in sex, age, and pathologic condition. The main psycological reactions were analyzed, and anxiety-both of state and of trait. The anxiety parameter was evaluated as a specific index in the psycho-behavioral modifications induced by MR examination. The influence was also considered of the 'fantasies' related to examination results on the patients' psyche. Talks and STAI X1 and STAI X2 were employed to this purpose, to identifi possible disturbing elements related to both patients' character and examination situations. Our results point to anxiety as the mayor reaction observed in the subjects undergoing MR examination; it seems to be related to different parameters, which are difficult to identify. Claustrophobia, pathophobia, and the fear of an unknown examination play a mayor role. Talking to the patients and informing them of the characteristics of the examination proved useful to significantly reduce their emotional distress

  2. Controlled invasive mechanical ventilation strategies in obese patients undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Silva, Pedro Leme; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2017-06-01

    The obesity prevalence is increasing in surgical population. As the number of obese surgical patients increases, so does the demand for mechanical ventilation. Nevertheless, ventilatory strategies in this population are challenging, since obesity results in pathophysiological changes in respiratory function. Areas covered: We reviewed the impact of obesity on respiratory system and the effects of controlled invasive mechanical ventilation strategies in obese patients undergoing surgery. To date, there is no consensus regarding the optimal invasive mechanical ventilation strategy for obese surgical patients, and no evidence that possible intraoperative beneficial effects on oxygenation and mechanics translate into better postoperative pulmonary function or improved outcomes. Expert commentary: Before determining the ideal intraoperative ventilation strategy, it is important to analyze the pathophysiology and comorbidities of each obese patient. Protective ventilation with low tidal volume, driving pressure, energy, and mechanical power should be employed during surgery; however, further studies are required to clarify the most effective ventilation strategies, such as the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure and whether recruitment maneuvers minimize lung injury. In this context, an ongoing trial of intraoperative ventilation in obese patients (PROBESE) should help determine the mechanical ventilation strategy that best improves clinical outcome in patients with body mass index≥35kg/m 2 .

  3. Dose audit for patients undergoing two common radiography examinations with digital radiology systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnal, Tolga; Ataç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing general examinations using computed or digital radiography systems in Turkey. MATERIALS AND METHODS Radiographs of 20 patients undergoing posteroanterior chest X-ray and of 20 patients undergoing anteroposterior kidney-ureter-bladder radiography were evaluated in five X-ray rooms at four local hospitals in the Ankara region. Currently, almost all radiology departments in Turkey have switched from conventional radiography systems to computed radiography or digital radiography systems. Patient dose was measured for both systems. The results were compared with published diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency. RESULTS The average entrance surface doses (ESDs) for chest examinations exceeded established international DRLs at two of the X-ray rooms in a hospital with computed radiography. All of the other ESD measurements were approximately equal to or below the DRLs for both examinations in all of the remaining hospitals. Improper adjustment of the exposure parameters, uncalibrated automatic exposure control systems, and failure of the technologists to choose exposure parameters properly were problems we noticed during the study. CONCLUSION This study is an initial attempt at establishing local DRL values for digital radiography systems, and will provide a benchmark so that the authorities can establish reference dose levels for diagnostic radiology in Turkey. PMID:24317331

  4. Dose audit for patients undergoing two common radiography examinations with digital radiology systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnal, Tolga; Ataç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing general examinations using computed or digital radiography systems in Turkey. Radiographs of 20 patients undergoing posteroanterior chest X-ray and of 20 patients undergoing anteroposterior kidney-ureter-bladder radiography were evaluated in five X-ray rooms at four local hospitals in the Ankara region. Currently, almost all radiology departments in Turkey have switched from conventional radiography systems to computed radiography or digital radiography systems. Patient dose was measured for both systems. The results were compared with published diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency. The average entrance surface doses (ESDs) for chest examinations exceeded established international DRLs at two of the X-ray rooms in a hospital with computed radiography. All of the other ESD measurements were approximately equal to or below the DRLs for both examinations in all of the remaining hospitals. Improper adjustment of the exposure parameters, uncalibrated automatic exposure control systems, and failure of the technologists to choose exposure parameters properly were problems we noticed during the study. This study is an initial attempt at establishing local DRL values for digital radiography systems, and will provide a benchmark so that the authorities can establish reference dose levels for diagnostic radiology in Turkey.

  5. Survival benefit needed to undergo chemotherapy: Patient and physician preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Luis, Ines; O'Neill, Anne; Sepucha, Karen; Miller, Kathy D; Baker, Emily; Dang, Chau T; Northfelt, Donald W; Winer, Eric P; Sledge, George W; Schneider, Bryan; Partridge, Ann H

    2017-08-01

    Published studies have suggested that most patients with early stage breast cancer are willing, for modest survival benefits, to receive 6 months of adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil, an older regimen that is used infrequently today. We examined preferences regarding the survival benefit needed to justify 6 months of a contemporary chemotherapy regimen. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Protocol 5103 was a phase 3 trial that randomized breast cancer patients to receive standard adjuvant doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel with either bevacizumab or placebo. Serial surveys to assess quality of life were administered to patients enrolled between January 1, 2010, and June 8, 2010. Survival benefit needed to justify 6 months of chemotherapy by patients was collected at the 18-month assessment. A parallel survey was sent to physicians who had enrolled patients in the study. Of 519 patients who had not withdrawn at a time point earlier than 18 months, 87.8% responded to this survey. A total of 175 physicians participated. We found considerable variation in patient preferences, particularly for modest survival benefits: for 2 months of benefit, 57% would consider 6 months of chemotherapy, whereas 96% of patients would consider 6 months of chemotherapy for 24 months. Race and education were associated with the choices. Physicians who responded were less likely to accept chemotherapy for modest benefit. Among patients who received contemporary adjuvant chemotherapy in a randomized controlled trial, we found substantial variation in preferences regarding benefits that justified undergoing chemotherapy. Differences between patients' and physicians' choices were also apparent. Eliciting preferences regarding risks and benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy is critical. Cancer 2017;123:2821-28. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Changes in cell-mediated immunity in patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafla, S.; Yang, S.J.; Meleka, F.

    1978-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune status of 147 patients who received radiotherapy was evaluated using in vitro tests (PHA, E-rosette, and spontaneous blastogenesis) both before and 6 weeks after the end of radiation. All patients have verified malignancies, involving the bronchus in 29 cases, breast in 28, female genital system in 26, head and neck in 20 and bladder in 15. Patients suffering from bronchogenic carcinomas or malignancies of the head and neck showed a relative high degree of immune suppression. Our findings indicate a trend towards some improvement in PHA reactivity, as well as in the percentage of E-rosette-forming cells after treatment, which is more noticeable in patients with pelvic or breast tumors. A relationship seems to exist between the tumor load and the immune status, which reverts to a normal pattern when the former is extinguished. Moreover, patients with poor clinical response display a profoundly depressed level of immune status without any improvement after treatment

  7. Oral hygiene in patients with oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation: protocol proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapone, B; Nardi, G M; DI Venere, D; Pettini, F; Grassi, F R; Corsalini, M

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the effectiveness and the importance of an oral hygiene (OH) protocol in patients undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation, in order to reduce or minimize oral complications. This study was carried out at the Department of Dental Science, at the University of Bari-Italy from December 2012 to December 2015 on 34 selected patients with primary oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation. They were divided into 2 groups according to their age, sex and cancer therapy. Seventeen patients were assigned to the control group and seventeen in the experimental one. In the experimental group (Table 1), patients underwent an oral hygiene protocol whereas in the control group (Table 2) patients received the usual care provided within the clinical setting. All the patients gave written informed consent. It has been asked and obtained the authorisation from the Ethics Committee of the Dental Science and Surgery Department. Results show that in patients undergoing the oral hygiene protocol, the complications and the risks of infection and permanent dental problems have been minimized. Indeed, of the seventeen patients undergoing the OH protocol, 70% obtained positive results and were satisfied with the program outcome. The role of the health care providers is essential to educate patients to adhere to the prescribed treatments and reinforce their motivation in oral hygiene. The oral hygiene procedures prevent and ameliorate oral complications due to the radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  8. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, John T., E-mail: jolucas@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Colmer, Hentry G.; White, Lance [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Fitzgerald, Nora; Isom, Scott [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, John D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Laxton, Adrian W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes.

  9. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, John T.; Colmer, Hentry G.; White, Lance; Fitzgerald, Nora; Isom, Scott; Bourland, John D.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Chan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes

  10. Psychosocial predictors of affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñacoba, Cecilia; González, M José; Santos, Noelia; Romero, Martín

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we propose to study the role of psychosocial variables in affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, considering that affect is a key variable in treatment adherence. Seventy-four patients (average age 33,24 ± 10,56) with metal multibracket-fixed orthodontic treatment were included. Patients were assessed twice. The first stage, at the beginning of treatment, included assessment of dental impact (Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire), trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), self-esteem (Rosenberg's self-esteem scale), and self-efficacy (General Self-efficacy Scale). In the second stage, 6 months later, positive and negative affect towards treatment was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. Dental social impact differentiates between patients with high and low negative affect, while self-efficacy differentiates between patients with high and low positive affect. Trait anxiety and self-esteem differentiate between both types of affect (positive and negative). Trait anxiety and self-esteem (when trait anxiety weight is controlled) are significant predictor variables of affective balance. These results have important practical implications, because it seems essential to adopt a bio-psychosocial model incorporating assessment methods focusing on day-to-day changes in mood and well-being.

  11. Analysis of corneal esthesia in patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Torres Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To quantitatively analyze corneal esthesia in patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy (PRK surgery. Methods: Forty-five patients selected for PRK in one eye underwent corneal esthesia using a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer preoperatively and 30 and 90 days postoperatively. Patients with a refractive diopter error of 4 or greater received intraoperative 0.02% mitomycin C for 20 s. Results: Twenty-four (53.3% of the 45 eyes received intraoperative 0.02% mitomycin. Decreased sensitivity was observed on postoperative day 30. By postoperative day 90, corneal esthesia had normalized but remained 14.9% lower than preoperative levels. In the mitomycin group, no recovery of corneal esthesia to normal sensitivity levels was observed. The mean esthesiometer level was 39.2 mm on postoperative day 90 (P<0.001. Conclusions: The results of the present study demonstrate recovery of corneal esthesia to normal levels at 90 days postoperatively in patients who did not receive mitomycin C. In patients administered mitomycin C, a 23.59% reduction in the corneal touch threshold was observed compared with preoperative levels indicating a failure of recovery to normal levels.

  12. Antibody development in pediatric sickle cell patients undergoing erythrocytapheresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Gwendolyn J; Lockwood, William; Kong, Maiying; Bertolone, Salvatore; Raj, Ashok

    2010-12-01

    Erythrocytapheresis, or red blood cell exchange transfusion (RBCX), with donor red blood cell (RBC) units is now increasingly used in the treatment of acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). As in all transfusions, RCBX carries a risk of immunization against foreign antigen on transfused cells. However, by selecting donor units with RBC phenotypes similar to the patient, the risk of allo- and autoimmunization can be reduced. The formation of RBC alloantibodies and/or autoantibodies in 32 multitransfused pediatric SCD patients undergoing monthly RBCX over a 11-year period (12/1998 to 12/2009) was evaluated utilizing a retrospective patient chart review at Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. After starting C, E, K antigen-matched RBCX, the rate of clinically significant allo-immunization decreased from 0.189/100 to 0.053/100 U, with a relative risk of 27.9%. Likewise, the rate of autoimmunization decreased from 0.063/100 to 0.035/100 U, with a relative risk of 55.9%. After controlling for clinically insignificant antibodies, our auto- and alloimmunization rate was much less than previously reported values. In addition, the incidence of clinically significant allo- and autoimmunization decreased in our patient population after starting minor antigen-matched RBCX. These results suggest that by matching selected RBC phenotypes, there may be an association in the risk of allo- and autoimmunization of multi-transfused SCD patients.

  13. Irradiated fields spared Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient undergoing radiotherapy for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musio, D.; Parisi, E.; Dionisi, F.

    2009-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are two of the most severe, rare, and life-threatening adverse reactions to medications. Their incidence is approximately two patients per million population per year. Several cases have been reported in the literature in which SJS and TEN have occurred in patients with a neoplasm undergoing radiation therapy and who are taking an anticonvulsant. We report a case of SJS-TEN that developed in a 51-year-old woman with nonresectable non-small-cell lung cancer during treatment with phenobarbital plus radiation therapy for bone metastases but in whom the irradiated areas did not exhibit the SJS skin reaction. To our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature. (author)

  14. Emotional state and coping style among gynecologic patients undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Toshiko; Murata, Hinako; Matsushima, Eisuke; Sakata, Yu; Miyasaka, Naoyuki; Aso, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in emotional state and the relationship between emotional state and demographic/clinical factors and coping style among gynecologic patients undergoing surgery. Using the Japanese version of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), 90 patients (benign disease: 32, malignancy: 58) were examined on three occasions: before surgery, before discharge, and 3 months after discharge. They were also examined using the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) on one occasion before discharge. The scores for the subscales depression, anger, and confusion were the highest after discharge while those for anxiety were the highest before surgery. The average scores of the POMS subscales for all subjects were within the normal range. With regard to the relationship between these emotional states and other factors, multiple regressions showed that the principal determinants of anxiety before surgery were religious belief, psychological symptoms during hospitalization and emotion-oriented (E) coping style; further, it was found that depression after discharge could be explained by chemotherapy, duration of hospitalization, and E coping style. The principal determinants of anger after discharge and vigor before surgery were length of education and E coping style, and severity of disease, chemotherapy, E coping style and task-oriented coping style, respectively. Those of post-discharge fatigue and confusion were length of education, psychological symptoms, and E coping style. In summary it is suggested that the following should be taken into account in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery: anxiety before surgery, depression, anger, and confusion after surgery, including coping styles.

  15. Controlling radiation exposure during interventional procedures in childhood cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racadio, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Many pediatric cancer patients undergo multiple diagnostic and therapeutic radiologic procedures over the course of their illnesses and are therefore at high risk for radiation exposure. There are a variety of measures that radiologists can employ to reduce this risk. These include limiting the use of radiation whenever possible, using specific strategies to reduce radiation exposure during interventional procedures, using quality assurance programs to ensure compliance, and maintaining continuing staff radiation safety educational programs. Some of the diagnostic and therapeutic interventional radiologic procedures that are performed in pediatric oncology patients are discussed here, along with specific tips for managing radiation exposure. (orig.)

  16. Patient radiation exposure in computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, V [Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1980-01-01

    Radiation exposure to patients undergoing axial computerized tomography as a tool of neurological X-ray diagnostics was studied. Doses thereby delivered were compared with those from routine head films at X-ray tube parameters 200 W, 70 kV, and 70 cm target-to-patient distance. Radiation exposures were analyzed with a view to improving shielding and procedural techniques. Comparisons were made using LiF TLD measurements with an Alderson phantom (standard for axial computer tomography). Skin and intracranial space doses were compared using two computers, Siretom I and Siretom 2000, for various positionings: frontal, fronto-lateral, temporal, temporo-occipital, and occipital. In addition, patient body doses with or without shielding and doses to subjects attending sick children or restless adults were examined. Achievable protection was estimated for lead shields of 0.5 mm lead equivalent. It was concluded that radiation doses delivered to neurologic patients undergoing axial computer tomography are smaller than those resulting from conventional X-ray examinations.

  17. Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Ming Yen [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hong Kong (China); Karimzad, Yasser; Menezes, Ravi J.; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Li, Qin; Forero, Julian; Paul, Narinder S.; Nguyen, Elsie T. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. (orig.)

  18. Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Ming Yen; Karimzad, Yasser; Menezes, Ravi J.; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Li, Qin; Forero, Julian; Paul, Narinder S.; Nguyen, Elsie T.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. (orig.)

  19. Levosimendan in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rajendra H; Leimberger, Jeffrey D; van Diepen, Sean; Meza, James; Wang, Alice; Jankowich, Rachael; Harrison, Robert W; Hay, Douglas; Fremes, Stephen; Duncan, Andra; Soltesz, Edward G; Luber, John; Park, Soon; Argenziano, Michael; Murphy, Edward; Marcel, Randy; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Nagpal, Dave; Bozinovski, John; Toller, Wolfgang; Heringlake, Matthias; Goodman, Shaun G; Levy, Jerrold H; Harrington, Robert A; Anstrom, Kevin J; Alexander, John H

    2017-05-25

    Levosimendan is an inotropic agent that has been shown in small studies to prevent or treat the low cardiac output syndrome after cardiac surgery. In a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of levosimendan in patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% or less who were undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous levosimendan (at a dose of 0.2 μg per kilogram of body weight per minute for 1 hour, followed by a dose of 0.1 μg per kilogram per minute for 23 hours) or placebo, with the infusion started before surgery. The two primary end points were a four-component composite of death through day 30, renal-replacement therapy through day 30, perioperative myocardial infarction through day 5, or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device through day 5; and a two-component composite of death through day 30 or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device through day 5. A total of 882 patients underwent randomization, 849 of whom received levosimendan or placebo and were included in the modified intention-to-treat population. The four-component primary end point occurred in 105 of 428 patients (24.5%) assigned to receive levosimendan and in 103 of 421 (24.5%) assigned to receive placebo (adjusted odds ratio, 1.00; 99% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 1.54; P=0.98). The two-component primary end point occurred in 56 patients (13.1%) assigned to receive levosimendan and in 48 (11.4%) assigned to receive placebo (adjusted odds ratio, 1.18; 96% CI, 0.76 to 1.82; P=0.45). The rate of adverse events did not differ significantly between the two groups. Prophylactic levosimendan did not result in a rate of the short-term composite end point of death, renal-replacement therapy, perioperative myocardial infarction, or use of a mechanical cardiac assist device that was lower than the rate with placebo among patients with a

  20. The Meaning of Touch to Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Katherine E; Kalman, Melanie

    2015-09-01

    To explore the experience of being touched in people diagnosed with cancer and undergoing IV chemotherapy.
 Qualitative, phenomenologic.
 Central New York and northern Pennsylvania, both in the northeastern United States
. 11 Caucasian, English-speaking adults.
. Individual interviews used open-ended questions to explore the meaning of being touched to each participant. Meanings of significant statements, which pertained to the phenomenon under investigation, were formulated hermeneutically. Themes were derived from immersion in the data and extraction of similar and divergent concepts among all interviews, yielding a multidimensional understanding of the meaning of being touched in this sample of participants
. Participants verbalized awareness of and sensitivity to the regard of others who were touching them, including healthcare providers, family, and friends. Patients do not classify a provider's touch as either task or comfort oriented. Meanings evolved in the context of three primary themes. The experience of being touched encompasses the quality of presence of providers, family, or friends. For touch to be regarded as positive, patients must be regarded as inherently whole and equal. The quality of how touch is received is secondary to and flows from the relationship established between patient and provider
. This study adds to the literature in its finding that the fundamental quality of the relationship between patient and provider establishes the perceived quality of touch. Previous studies have primarily divided touch into two categories.

  1. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  2. Cardiovascular impact in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis: Clinical management considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirakarnjanakorn, Srisakul; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Francis, Gary S; Tang, W H Wilson

    2017-04-01

    Patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis develop both structural and functional cardiovascular abnormalities. Despite improvement of dialysis technology, cardiovascular mortality of this population remains high. The pathophysiological mechanisms of these changes are complex and not well understood. It has been postulated that several non-traditional, uremic-related risk factors, especially the long-term uremic state, which may affect the cardiovascular system. There are many cardiovascular changes that occur in chronic kidney disease including left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial fibrosis, microvascular disease, accelerated atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. These structural and functional changes in patients receiving chronic dialysis make them more susceptible to myocardial ischemia. Hemodialysis itself may adversely affect the cardiovascular system due to non-physiologic fluid removal, leading to hemodynamic instability and initiation of systemic inflammation. In the past decade there has been growing awareness that pathophysiological mechanisms cause cardiovascular dysfunction in patients on chronic dialysis, and there are now pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies that may improve the poor quality of life and high mortality rate that these patients experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. PLASMA CYTOKINES LEVELS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING LONG-TERM HAEMODIALYSIS

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    D. S. Polyakov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Аbstract.  Patients  with  end-stage  renal  disease  need  their  kidney  functions  to  be  replaced.  Chronic haemodialysis represents a most common method of such substitution treatment. This procedure results in successful survival of such patients for years. Chronic haemodialysis is accompanied by a complication which is known as β2-microglobulin amyloidosis. In this case, amyloid substance consisting of β2-microglobulin (β2-MG accumulates in bones, ligaments and joints. Biological causes of β2-MG amyloidosis are still not established. To elucidate the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of β2-MG amyloidosis, the levels of  IL-2,  IL-4,  IL-6,  IL-8,  IL-10,  GM-CSF,  IFNγ, TNFα were quantified in plasma of patients undergoing  long-term haemodialysis. Mean amounts of all the mentioned cytokines in haemodialysis patients proved to be significantly higher than in control group consisting of healthy subjects. When comparing a group receiving standard  dialysis  procedure  versus  a  subgroup  receiving  haemodiafiltration,  a  single  reliable  difference  was revealed for GM-CSF levels (p < 0.04, without any differences shown for other cytokines. With increasing terms of chronic haemodialysis, the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, GM-CSF, IFNγ, TNFα were increased, or, at least, they did not decrease. After three years of dialysis, IL-10 concentrations were statistically indistinguishable from normal levels. In patients undergoing haemodiafiltration, plasma levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-8, GM-CSF, IFNγ, TNFα did not drop with increasing terms of dialysis. The levels of IL-6 and IL-10 decreased after three years of dialysis, to near-normal levels.In general, these results suggest that IL-10 and IL-6 may be regarded as candidates for further studies as potential markers of β2-microglobulin amyloidosis. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 2-3, pp 211-218

  4. SERUM ELECTROLYTES AND OUTCOME IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ENDOSCOPIC GASTROSTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana VIEIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is a gold standard for long term enteral feeding. Neurologic dysphagia and head/neck cancer are the most common indications for PEG as they can lead to protein-energy malnutrition and serum electrolyte abnormalities, with potential negative impact on metabolic balance. Refeeding syndrome may also be related with severe electrolyte changes in PEG-fed patients and contribute to poor prognosis. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the changes in serum concentrations of the main electrolytes and its possible association with the outcome. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients followed in our Artificial Nutrition Clinic, submitted to PEG from 2010 to 2016, having head/neck cancer or neurologic dysphagia, who died under PEG feeding. Serum electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chlorine, magnesium, calcium and phosphorus were evaluated immediately before the gastrostomy procedure. Survival after PEG until death was recorded in months. RESULTS: We evaluated 101 patients, 59 with electrolyte alterations at the moment of the gastrostomy. Sodium was altered in 32 (31.7%, magnesium in 21 (20.8%, chlorine in 21 (20.8%, potassium in 14 (13.8%, calcium in 11 (10.9 % and phosphorus in 11 (10.9%. The survival of patients with low sodium (<135 mmol/L was significantly lower when compared to patients with normal/high values, 2.76 months vs 7.80 months, respectively (P=0.007. CONCLUSION: Changes in serum electrolytes of patients undergoing PEG were very common. More than half showed at least one abnormality, at the time of the procedure. The most frequent was hyponatremia, which was associated with significantly shorter survival, probably reflecting severe systemic metabolic distress.

  5. Dosimetry for Patients undergoing Radiographic Examinations in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halato, M.A.; Kafi, S.T.; Ahmed, A.M.; Sid Ahamed, F.A.; Ibrahim, Z.; Suliman, M.F.; Suliman, I.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we estimated the entrance skin doses ESDs for patients undergoing selected diagnostic X -ray examinations in two large public hospitals in Khartoum state, Sudan. The study included the examinations of the chest posterior-anterior (PA) , skull antero-posterior (AP), skull Lateral (LAT) , Lumber spine AP/LAT, abdomen Intravenous urogram (IVU) and Pelvis AP. Totally, 241 patients were included in this study. ESDs were estimated from patients specific exposure parameters using established relation between output (μ Gy/mAs) and tube voltage (kVp). The estimated ESDs ranged from 0.18 - 1.05 mGy for chest PA, 0.98 - 3.48 mGy for Skull (AP), 0.66 - 2.75 mGy for skull (LAT), 1.22 - 4.35 mGy for abdomen (IVU), 1.18 - 5.75 mGy for Pelvis, 1.52 - 5.01 mGy Lumbar spine AP and 2.48 - 10.41 mGy for Lumbar spine (LAT). These values compare well with the international reference dose levels. This study provides additional data that can help the regulatory authority to establish reference dose level for diagnostic radiology in Sudan

  6. Contrast-Induced Nephropathy in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Shoukat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN is a feared complication of numerous radiological procedures that expose patients to contrast media. The most notorious of these procedures is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Not only is this a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, but it also adds to increased costs in high risk patients undergoing PCI. It is thought to result from direct cytotoxicity and hemodynamic challenge to renal tissue. CIN is defined as an increase in serum creatinine by either ≥0.5 mg/dL or by ≥25% from baseline within the first 2-3 days after contrast administration, after other causes of renal impairment have been excluded. The incidence is considerably higher in diabetics, elderly and patients with pre-existing renal disease when compared to the general population. The nephrotoxic potential of various contrast agents must be evaluated completely, with prevention as the mainstay of focus as no effective treatment exists. The purpose of this article is to examine the pathophysiology, risk factors, and clinical course of CIN, as well as the most recent studies dealing with its prevention and potential therapeutic interventions, especially during PCI. The role of gadolinium as an alternative to iodinated contrast is also discussed.

  7. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis Necessary in Patients Undergoing Ureterolithotripsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Pasha Meysamie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Transurethral Ureterolithotripsy (TUL is a frequently used procedure in urology departments. Many urologists perform TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis; however the use of chemoprophylaxis before TUL remains a controversial issue in urology. Thisstudy was carried out to assess the safety of omitting antibiotic prophylaxis prior to TUL. In a prospective randomized clinical trial from January 2005 to December 2007, 114 patients with ureteral stones were enrolled; Fifty seven had preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis administered before TUL and fifty seven patients underwent TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis. The rate of postoperative infectious complications (fever, positive blood culture, significant bactriuria, the length of hospital stay and overall stone free rate were compared between the two groups. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups in the operation time, length of hospital stay, postoperative bacteriuria, positive urine culture, postoperative fever and overall success rate of TUL. It appears that the incidence of infectious complications does not increase in patients undergoing TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis if they have negative pre-operative urine culture and antiseptic technique have been performed thorough the procedure.

  8. Radiation protection of the patient during medical uses of ionizing radiation in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, D.

    1987-01-01

    Section 18 of the new Radiation Protection Ordinance of the GDR defines basic principles for the radiation protection of patients undergoing diagnostic examinations or treatments with ionizing radiation, including, for example, the requirements that necessary exposures should be justifiable in terms of the benefit to be expected and that doses administered should be limited to as low an amount as possible. An outline is given of these principles, their importance and enforcement. (author)

  9. Outcomes in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Orbital Atherectomy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Shlofmitz, Evan; Nguyen, Heajung; Shlofmitz, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the angiographic and clinical outcomes of orbital atherectomy to treat severely calcified coronary lesions in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Diabetics have increased risk for death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization after percutaneous coronary intervention. Severely calcified coronary lesions are associated with increased cardiac events. Orbital atherectomy facilitates stent delivery and optimizes stent expansion by modifying severely calcified plaque. Outcomes in diabetic patients who undergo orbital atherectomy have not been reported. Our retrospective multicenter registry included 458 consecutive real-world patients with severely calcified coronary arteries who underwent orbital atherectomy. The primary safety endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events at 30 days. Diabetics represented 42.1% (193/458) of the entire cohort. The primary endpoint was similar in diabetics and non-diabetics (1.0% vs. 3.0%%, P = 0.20), as were 30-day rates of death (0.5% vs. 1.9%, P = 0.41), myocardial infarction (0.5% vs. 1.5%, P = 0.40), target vessel revascularization (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and stroke (0% vs. 0.4%, P > 0.9). Angiographic complications and stent thrombosis rate were low and did not differ between the 2 groups. Diabetics represented a sizeable portion of patients who underwent orbital atherectomy. Diabetics who had severely calcified coronary arteries and underwent orbital atherectomy had low event rates that were similar to non-diabetics. Orbital atherectomy appears to be a viable treatment strategy for diabetic patients. Randomized trials with longer-term follow-up are needed to determine the ideal treatment strategy for diabetics. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Adenoma detection in patients undergoing a comprehensive colonoscopy screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, Gottumukkala S; Vadyala, Vikram; Slack, Rebecca; Krishna, Somashekar G; Ross, William A; Lynch, Patrick M; Bresalier, Robert S; Hawk, Ernest; Stroehlein, John R

    2013-01-01

    Measures shown to improve the adenoma detection during colonoscopy (excellent bowel preparation, cecal intubation, cap fitted colonoscope to examine behind folds, patient position change to optimize colon distention, trained endoscopy team focusing on detection of subtle flat lesions, and incorporation of optimum endoscopic examination with adequate withdrawal time) are applicable to clinical practice and, if incorporated are projected to facilitate comprehensive colonoscopy screening program for colon cancer prevention. To determine adenoma and serrated polyp detection rate under conditions designed to optimize quality parameters for comprehensive screening colonoscopy. Retrospective analysis of data obtained from a comprehensive colon cancer screening program designed to optimize quality parameters. Academic medical center. Three hundred and forty-three patients between the ages of 50 years and 75 years who underwent first screening colonoscopy between 2009 and 2011 among 535 consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy. Comprehensive colonoscopy screening program was utilized to screen all patients. Cecal intubation was successful in 98.8% of patients. The Boston Bowel Preparation Scale for quality of colonoscopy was 8.97 (95% confidence interval [CI]; 8.94, 9.00). The rate of adenoma detection was 60% and serrated lesion (defined as serrated adenomas or hyperplastic polyps proximal to the splenic flexure) detection was 23%. The rate of precancerous lesion detection (adenomas and serrated lesions) was 66%. The mean number of adenomas per screening procedure was 1.4 (1.2, 1.6) and the mean number of precancerous lesions (adenomas or serrated lesions) per screening procedure was 1.6 (1.4, 1.8). Retrospective study and single endoscopist experience. A comprehensive colonoscopy screening program results in high-quality screening with high detection of adenomas, advanced adenomas, serrated adenomas, and multiple adenomas

  11. [Influencing factors of reproduction status of patients undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-hui; Zhang, Song-ying; Li, Bai-jia; Wei, Wei; Huang, Dong; Lin, Xiao-na; Lou, Hong-ying

    2013-09-17

    To explore the influencing factors of reproduction status in women undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy (LM). A total of 278 LM patients were recruited.We retrospectively reviewed the reproduction status of 87 pregnant cases after LM. The correlations of their pregnancy outcomes and such clinical profiles as age, operative techniques, biological characteristics of fibroids (number, type, size and location) were analyzed.No uterine rupture occurred during the gestation period. None of them switched to open surgery due to laparoscopic difficulties. However, one patient had a laparoscopic suture for secondary bleeding of uterine incision. At 3 months post-operation, sonography showed no heterogeneous echo, effusion and hematoma in uterine incision.Incision through uterine cavity occurred intraoperatively in 8 cases, but no intrauterine adhesion was found on hysteroscopy 3 months later. And 87 women became pregnant and the postoperative fertilization time was from 2 months to 5 years. Age influenced the postoperative pregnancy rate.Other factors such as location, number and size of fibroid had no impact on fertility. For achieving a high conception rate and guaranteeing the safety of pregnant women, a clinician should select reasonable surgical approaches, perform accurate anatomical restoration, apply strict hemostasis and choose a right time of conception.

  12. Functional capacity and mental state of patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Corrêa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are a serious public health problem in Brazil. Myocardial revascularization surgery (MRS as well as cardiac valve replacement and repair are procedures indicated to treat them. Thus, extracorporeal circulation (ECC is still widely used in these surgeries, in which patients with long ECC times may have greater neurological deficits. Neurological damage resulting from MRS can have devastating consequences such as loss of independence and worsening of quality of life. Objective: To assess the effect of cardiac surgery on a patient’s mental state and functional capacity in both the pre- and postoperative periods. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with convenience sampling of subjects undergoing MRS and valve replacement. Participants were administered the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE and the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI in the pre- and postoperative periods, as well as before their hospital discharge. Results: This study assessed nine patients (eight males aged 62.4 ± 6.3 years with a BMI of 29.5 ± 2.3 kg/m2. There was a significant decrease in DASI scores and VO2 from preoperative to postoperative status (p = 0.003 and p = 0.003, respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed a loss of cognitive and exercise capacity after cardiac surgery. A larger sample however is needed to consolidate these findings.

  13. Patient treatment in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanum, G.; Bruland, Oe.S.; Hjelle, D.; Reitan, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Accidental human injury due to ionizing radiation is rare. Industrial accidents are comparatively the most common. Life saving procedures should always have priority to any concern about radiation injury or contamination. The personal risks for emergency medial personnel is negligible when simple measures are taken. Repeated clinical examinations and blood lymphocyte counts should be performed on all patients with suspected radiation injury to allow a diagnosis. The radiation syndrome develops within days or weeks depending on total radiation dose, dose rate and dose distribution. Damage to the bone marrow and gut are the most important. Local radiation injuries to the hands are common in industrial accidents. The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority should always be called when a potential ionizing radiation accident takes place within Norway

  14. Acute secondary effects in the esophagus in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarenhas, F.; Silvestre, M.E.; Sa da Costa, M.; Grima, N.; Campos, C.; Chaves, P.

    1989-02-01

    The incidence and nature of acute secondary irradiation esophagitis was studied in a series of 38 patients undergoing 60Co teletherapy for carcinoma of the lung. Thirty-four patients were male and four female, with ages ranging from 38 to 78 years. The mediastinum being irradiated in the process, all the patients underwent endoscopy for signs of esophagitis and/or gastritis after a dose of 30-40 Gy was delivered to the esophagus. Eighteen patients complained of dysphagia, but only in 12 of them did endoscopy show esophagitis. Of the remaining patients without complaints five had endoscopic signs of esophagitis. Gastritis was found in 18 cases and confirmed histologically in 14. In 17 cases, esophagitis and/or gastritis were confirmed histologically. It is believed that there is a fairly close correlation among clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings to support the claim that esophagitis in these patients is radiation induced. However, the cause of gastritis is not well understood. Data in the literature suggest that nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents can act as prophylactic means of preventing radiation esophagitis.

  15. Acute secondary effects in the esophagus in patients undergoing radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, F.; Silvestre, M.E.; Sa da Costa, M.; Grima, N.; Campos, C.; Chaves, P.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence and nature of acute secondary irradiation esophagitis was studied in a series of 38 patients undergoing 60Co teletherapy for carcinoma of the lung. Thirty-four patients were male and four female, with ages ranging from 38 to 78 years. The mediastinum being irradiated in the process, all the patients underwent endoscopy for signs of esophagitis and/or gastritis after a dose of 30-40 Gy was delivered to the esophagus. Eighteen patients complained of dysphagia, but only in 12 of them did endoscopy show esophagitis. Of the remaining patients without complaints five had endoscopic signs of esophagitis. Gastritis was found in 18 cases and confirmed histologically in 14. In 17 cases, esophagitis and/or gastritis were confirmed histologically. It is believed that there is a fairly close correlation among clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings to support the claim that esophagitis in these patients is radiation induced. However, the cause of gastritis is not well understood. Data in the literature suggest that nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agents can act as prophylactic means of preventing radiation esophagitis

  16. The Effects of Partial Turbinectomy on Patients Undergoing Rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Gandomi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A reduction or cessation of the ability to breathe through the nose can affect a person's overall health. Nasal passage blockage can also result in snoring. Difficulty in breathing through the nose after rhinoplasty is a serious problem and patient dissatisfaction can be significant even when cosmetic results are excellent. Long-term impacts on the quality of life and contributions to the pathophysiology of sleep-related breathing disorders have both been documented. This study compares nasal obstruction and other prevalent respiratory side effects of rhinoplasty in the presence and absence of partial turbinectomy. Methods and Materials: This is an experimental case study conducted in 2007 on patients undergoing rhinoplastic surgery in Shahid Dastgheyb Hospital of Shiraz, Iran. Sampling was done on all admitted patients during this year in the mentioned hospital. For the first group, rhinoplasty plus partial turbinectomy was performed while taking into consideration the Helsinki criteria septorhinoplasty without partial turbinectomy was performed on the second group. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference between the case and control group in terms of their mean age and gender distribution. Respiratory mean scores before and after rhinoplasty in both groups were significantly different in some issues of Nasal Scale (i.e.: Nasal blockage or obstruction, trouble sleeping, inability to get enough air through the nose during exercise or exertion, trouble breathing through nose.  Conclusion: Achieving cosmetic goals while preserving such necessary functions is a great concern for rhinologists and this makes different complexes. To create a balance between the maximum physiologic function and the best cosmetic feature is an art.

  17. Nutritional Interventions in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Bossola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review aimed to define the role of nutritional interventions in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in HNC patients undergoing CRT as well as their impact on CRT-related toxicity and survival. Head and neck cancer patients are frequently malnourished at the time of diagnosis and prior to the beginning of treatment. In addition, chemo-radiotherapy (CRT causes or exacerbates symptoms, such as alteration or loss of taste, mucositis, xerostomia, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, with consequent worsening of malnutrition. Nutritional counseling (NC and oral nutritional supplements (ONS should be used to increase dietary intake and to prevent therapy-associated weight loss and interruption of radiation therapy. If obstructing cancer and/or mucositis interfere with swallowing, enteral nutrition should be delivered by tube. However, it seems that there is not sufficient evidence to determine the optimal method of enteral feeding. Prophylactic feeding through nasogastric tube or percutaneous gastrostomy to prevent weight loss, reduce dehydration and hospitalizations, and avoid treatment breaks has become relatively common. Compared to reactive feeding (patients are supported with oral nutritional supplements and when it is impossible to maintain nutritional requirements enteral feeding via a NGT or PEG is started, prophylactic feeding does not offer advantages in terms of nutritional outcomes, interruptions of radiotherapy and survival. Overall, it seems that further adequate prospective, randomized studies are needed to define the better nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy.

  18. Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ming Yen; Karimzad, Yasser; Menezes, Ravi J; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Li, Qin; Forero, Julian; Paul, Narinder S; Nguyen, Elsie T

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. • Relaxation music does not reduce heart rate in cardiac CT • Relaxation music does not reduce beta-blocker use in cardiac CT • Relaxation music has no effect on cardiac CT image quality • Low levels of anxiety are present in patients prior to cardiac CT • Patients enjoyed the relaxation music and this results in improved patient experience.

  19. Dose assessment in patients undergoing lung examinations by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga, Natalia B.; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Magalhaes, Marcos J.

    2011-01-01

    In the last fifteen years, the use of computed tomography (CT) has increased alongside other radiology technologies technologies. Its contribution has already achieved 34% in terms of doses undergone by patients. Radiation protection of patients submitted to CT examinations is based on the knowledge of internationally defined dosimetric quantities as the CT air kerma-length product (P K,L ) and weighted CT air kerma index (C w ). In Brazil, those dosimetric quantities are not routinely used and the optimization criteria are based only upon the MSAD - the average dose in multislices. In this work, the dosimetric quantities P K,L and C w were assessed by the CT Expo program for seven protocols used daily for lung examinations in adults with the use of Siemens and Philips scanners in Belo Horizonte. Results showed that P K,L values varied from 163 to 558 mGy.cm and the C w from 9.6 to 17.5 mGy. All results were found to be lower than the reference values internationally recommended by ICRP 87 and the European Community 16262 (30 mGy and 650 mGy.cm). The large dose ranges suggest that optimization of patient dose reduction is still possible without losses in the image quality and new reference dose levels could be recommended after a large survey to be carried out in the region. (author)

  20. Assessment of absorbed dose to the ovaries of patients undergoing pelvic CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakoli, H.M.B. [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: Although Computed Tomography (CT) procedures constitute about 5% of the total diagnostic radiology procedures but are responsible for about 40% of the total ionizing radiation dose to the general population. As the dose is high especially in the CT of female pelvis, genetic radiation risk is also considerable. Materials and Methods: Radiation doses to the ovaries of the patients undergoing CT examination of the pelvis were measured from 9 different CT scanners available in Isfahan city. For each CT scanner 20 patients were selected. Measurement of organ dose was performed using TLD method. Results and Discussions: Mean and S.D. of absorbed dose to the ovaries from Shimadzo 2500 were 56.6 2.8; from GE Max 640 were 36.8 1.7; from GE Sytec 3000 were 36.6 1.8; from GE Sytec 4000 were 36.6 2.6; from Piker were 38.4 2.1; from Shimadzo 4500 were 36.4 1.2 and from Shimadzo 7800TE 28.2 1.5. Associated risks due to the measured dose are discussed. (author)

  1. A national survey of supportive practices for patients undergoing radiotherapy for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, Joanne; Doolan, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia and mucositis are two of the main radiation induced toxicities experienced by patients undergoing radiotherapy to the oral cavity. These toxicities can lead to significant weight loss with the potential to cause complications with radiotherapy treatment. Literature has shown that nutritional intervention can help to minimise these side effects. The aim of the survey was to explore current practice across the UK in nutritional intervention for these patients. Method: Postal questionnaires were sent to all 63 radiotherapy departments in the UK in November 2009. Results: 29 responses (43%) were received. 90% (n = 26) of the departments used 3D-Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) as the main technique for treatment of these patients, with 48% (n = 14) of departments having implemented Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). All departments referred their patients to a dietician. 93% (n = 27) of departments placed percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or radiologically-inserted gastrostomy tubes. 55% (n = 16) departments administered nasogastric tubes. Conclusion: This survey verified many common practices regarding dietary care and advice, some variation was evident in the use of feeding tubes. All responding centres referred patients to a dietician with the aim to maintain nutritional status and prevent weight loss that could contribute to uncertainty in treatment setup. This survey also demonstrated that since Macknelly and Day's (2009) study, a greater number of centres have implemented IMRT for patients undergoing radiotherapy to the head and neck. Although IMRT has been shown to reduce xerostomia, this audit found no changes in the dietary care and advice given to these patients

  2. Impact of imaging approach on radiation dose and associated cancer risk in children undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kevin D; Wang, Chu; Einstein, Andrew J; Januzis, Natalie; Nguyen, Giao; Li, Jennifer S; Fleming, Gregory A; Yoshizumi, Terry K

    2017-04-01

    To quantify the impact of image optimization on absorbed radiation dose and associated risk in children undergoing cardiac catheterization. Various imaging and fluoroscopy system technical parameters including camera magnification, source-to-image distance, collimation, antiscatter grids, beam quality, and pulse rates, all affect radiation dose but have not been well studied in younger children. We used anthropomorphic phantoms (ages: newborn and 5 years old) to measure surface radiation exposure from various imaging approaches and estimated absorbed organ doses and effective doses (ED) using Monte Carlo simulations. Models developed in the National Academies' Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report were used to compare an imaging protocol optimized for dose reduction versus suboptimal imaging (+20 cm source-to-image-distance, +1 magnification setting, no collimation) on lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer. For the newborn and 5-year-old phantoms, respectively ED changes were as follows: +157% and +232% for an increase from 6-inch to 10-inch camera magnification; +61% and +59% for a 20 cm increase in source-to-image-distance; -42% and -48% with addition of 1-inch periphery collimation; -31% and -46% with removal of the antiscatter grid. Compared with an optimized protocol, suboptimal imaging increased ED by 2.75-fold (newborn) and fourfold (5 years old). Estimated cancer LAR from 30-min of posteroanterior fluoroscopy using optimized versus suboptimal imaging, respectively was 0.42% versus 1.23% (newborn female), 0.20% versus 0.53% (newborn male), 0.47% versus 1.70% (5-year-old female) and 0.16% versus 0.69% (5-year-old male). Radiation-related risks to children undergoing cardiac catheterization can be substantial but are markedly reduced with an optimized imaging approach. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Knee injury and obesity in patients undergoing total knee replacement: a retrospective study in 115 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Hjorth; Rofail, S

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and previous knee injury was assessed in a retrospective study of 115 patients under-going total knee replacement due to osteoarthritis. Obesity was considered a contributing factor in the development of osteoarthritis in 37% of the patients, and 33% of the patients had...... had an injury to the knee in question. Unilateral osteoarthritis was significantly more frequent than bilateral osteoarthritis among patients with a history of previous knee injury. The association of previous injury to the knee and unilateral osteoarthritis was stronger in men than women. Aggressive...... treatment of patients with knee injuries seems warranted....

  4. Gonad Shielding for Patients Undergoing Conventional Radiological Examinations: Is There Cause for Concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Gonad shielding is one of the fundamental methods by which to protect reproductive organs in patients undergoing conventional radiological examinations. A lack of or inadequate shielding of the gonads may increase the exposure of these organs and result in malignancies future generations. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of gonad shielding in patients undergoing conventional radiological examinations and the availability of gonad shields and gonad shielding protocols in radiology departments. Materials and Methods A retrospective, observational cross-sectional study on the application of gonad shielding, the availability of gonad shields and the existence of gonad shielding protocols in radiology departments was performed in five different hospitals in Ahvaz, Iran. Results The highest application of gonad shielding was 6.6% for the pediatric hospital. The prevalence of gonad shielding was less than 0.2%. In 64.3% of the radiography rooms, at least one flat-contact gonad shield of a large size was available. Only large-sized gonad shields were available. Curved-contact and shadow gonad shields did not exist. Gonad shielding protocols were not existence in any of the fourteen radiography rooms investigated. Conclusions Comprehensive protection programs with on-the-job training courses for staff members are strongly recommended, as well as, the provision of radiological shields and gonad shielding protocols in radiology departments to reduce the patient’s radiation dose during radiological examinations.

  5. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, Anna N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Aherne, Noel J., E-mail: noel.aherne@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Shakespeare, Thomas P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  6. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, Anna N.; Aherne, Noel J.; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery

  7. Decision regret in men undergoing dose-escalated radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Anna N; Aherne, Noel J; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2013-07-15

    Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of dosimetric quantities applied to patient undergoing routine chest examinations by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga, Natalia Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    The radiological protection system has established a standard to protect persons against the harmful effects caused by ionizing radiation that is based on the justification, optimization and dose limitation principles. The increasing use of radiation in medicine and the related risks have stressed the discussion on patient radiation protection. The computed tomography (CT) is the diagnostic radiology technique that most contributes to patient doses and it requires optimization efforts. Diagnostic reference levels (DRL) has been established in many countries in terms of CT dosimetric quantities; in Brazil, the DRLs are still under investigation since the culture of patient protection is not very strong yet. The objective of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and protection quantities related to patients undergoing CT routine chest examinations. The ImPACT CT, CT Expo and ImpactDose softwares were used for calculations of the weight and volumetric air-kerma indexes (CW and CVOL), the air kerma - length product (P K,L ), organ equivalent dose (H T ) and the effective dose (E) for CT routine chest protocols in 19 tomographs in Belo Horizonte city. The CT Expo was selected to be validated against experimental measurements in three hospitals with thermoluminescent dosimeters and CT pencil ionization chamber in anthropomorphic and standard CT body phantoms. Experimental and calculated results indicated differences up to 97% for H T and E and acceptable agreement for C W ,C VOL and P K,L . All data from 19 tomographs showed that local DRLs for CT routine chest examinations may be chosen smaller than DRLs adopted in other countries; this would contribute to increase the radiological protection of patients. (author)

  9. The efficacy of a smoking cessation programme in patients undergoing elective surgery - a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azodi, O. Sadr; Lindstrom, D.; Adami, J.

    2009-01-01

    It is known that smokers constitute an important risk group of patients undergoing surgery. It is unknown how smoking cessation intervention initiated 4 weeks prior to elective surgery affects the probability of permanent cessation. We randomly assigned 117 patients, scheduled to undergo elective...

  10. Gonad Shielding for Patients Undergoing Conventional Radiological Examinations: Is There Cause for Concern?

    OpenAIRE

    Karami; Zabihzadeh; Gholami

    2016-01-01

    Background Gonad shielding is one of the fundamental methods by which to protect reproductive organs in patients undergoing conventional radiological examinations. A lack of or inadequate shielding of the gonads may increase the exposure of these organs and result in malignancies future generations. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of gonad shielding in patients undergoing conventional radiological...

  11. The transversus abdominis plane block provides effective postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carney, John

    2008-12-01

    Patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy suffer significant postoperative pain. The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a recently described approach to providing analgesia to the anterior abdominal wall. We evaluated the analgesic efficacy of the TAP block in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy via a transverse lower abdominal wall incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  12. Additional effective dose by patients undergoing NAI-131 capsules therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlic, M.; Jovanovic, M.; Spasic Jokic, V.; Cuknic, O.; Ilic, Z.; Vranjes Djuric, S. [VINCA - Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2006-07-01

    Capsules or solutions containing Na{sup 131}I are indicated for the therapy of some thyroid carcinomas such as functioning metastatic papillary or follicular carcinoma of the thyroid; and for the treatment of hyperthyroidism (diffuse toxic goiter and single or multiple toxic nodular goiter). The recommended dosage ranges of Na{sup 131}I capsules or solution for the therapy of the average patient (70 kg) are: (3.7-5.55) GBq for ablation of normal thyroid tissue; (3.7-7.4) GBq for subsequent treatments; a (148-370) MBq for hyperthyroidism. The purpose of this paper is to calculate effective dose as a result of iodine-131 capsules remaining in stomach before absorption starts. This result can determine the disadvantage of capsule versus solution containing sodium iodine-131 (Na{sup 131}I) in radionuclide therapy application from radiation protection point of view. The Monte Carlo code MCNP4b was used to model transport of gamma and beta particles emitted by radionuclide {sup 131}I treated as a point source at the bottom of stomach. Absorbed energy per unit transformation in stomach and surrounding organs has been calculated. (authors)

  13. Effect of exercise on the caloric intake of breast cancer patients undergoing treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Battaglini

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an exercise intervention on the total caloric intake (TCI of breast cancer patients undergoing treatment. A secondary purpose was to determine whether or not a relationship existed between changes in TCI, body fat composition (%BF, and fatigue during the study, which lasted 6 months. Twenty females recently diagnosed with breast cancer, scheduled to undergo chemotherapy or radiation, were assigned randomly to an experimental (N = 10 or control group (N = 10. Outcome measures included TCI (3-day food diary, %BF (skinfolds, and fatigue (revised Piper Fatigue Scale. Each exercise session was conducted as follows: initial cardiovascular activity (6-12 min, followed by stretching (5-10 min, resistance training (15-30 min, and a cool-down (approximately 8 min. Significant changes in TCI were observed among groups (F1,18 = 8.582; P = 0.009, at treatments 2 and 3, and at the end of the study [experimental (1973 ± 419, control (1488 ± 418; experimental (1946 ± 437, control (1436 ± 429; experimental (2315 ± 455, control (1474 ± 294, respectively]. A significant negative correlation was found (Spearman rho(18 = -0.759; P < 0.001 between TCI and %BF and between TCI and fatigue levels (Spearman rho(18 = -0.541; P = 0.014 at the end of the study. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that an exercise intervention administered to breast cancer patients undergoing medical treatment may assist in the mitigation of some treatment side effects, including decreased TCI, increased fatigue, and negative changes in body composition.

  14. Dose to the liver and spleen in pediatric patients undergoing technetium-99m sulfur colloid scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R.; Purdom, R.C.; Kereiakes, J.G.; Gelfand, M.J.; Maxon, H.R.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative conjugate view external counting techniques were applied to determine radiation dose to the liver and spleen in pediatric patients undergoing /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (Tc-SC) liver scans. The effective half-life of /sup99m/Tc-SC was 5.8 +- 0.23 hours and 5.2 +- 0.68 hours in the liver and spleen, respectively. Dose per administered activity ranged from 0.34 to 0.63 rad/mCi (92 to 170 μGy/MBq) for the liver and 0.35 to 1.96 rad/mCi (95.0 to 530.0 μGy/MBq) for the spleen. The spleen to liver dose ratio ranged from 1.0 to 4.9. These values are compared with results extrapolated from published adult data to the pediatric population

  15. Dose study in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac procedures in a digital system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez Marquez, J.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Luquero Llopis, N.; Vano Carruana, E.; Corredoira, S.; Huerga Cabrerizo, C.; Plaza Aparicio, R.; Tellez-Cepeda Ruiz, M.

    2011-01-01

    In La Paz Hospital in Madrid has recently installed a biplane x-ray equipment in the Department of Pediatric Cardiology. It is a digital system equipped with two amorphous silicon detectors. There has been a characterization of the equipment prior to commissioning for clinical use. It was later followed up on the dose delivered to pediatric patients undergoing various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Yet the absence of reference values for interventional cardiology child dose, the values obtained were used to establish baseline dose by age group that will serve as initial references and allow our radiation dose compared with those of other centers and check that the skin dose are in most cases below the thresholds for deterministic effects.

  16. Coronary risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbalch, Rasmus Bo; Engstrøm, Thomas; Pries-Heje, Mia; Heitmann, Merete; Pedersen, Frants; Schou, Morten; Mickley, Hans; Elming, Hanne; Steffensen, Rolf; Køber, Lars; Iversen, Kasper

    2017-01-15

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive, less expensive, low-radiation alternative to coronary angiography (CAG) prior to valvular heart surgery. MSCT has a high negative predictive value for coronary artery disease (CAD) but previous studies of patients with valvular disease have shown that MSCT, as the primary evaluation technique, lead to re-evaluation with CAG in about a third of cases and it is therefore not recommended. If a subgroup of patients with low- to intermediate risk of CAD could be identified and examined with MSCT, it could be cost-effective, reduce radiation and the risk of complications associated with CAG. The study cohort was derived from a national registry of patients undergoing CAG prior to valvular heart surgery. Using logistic regression, we identified significant risk factors for CAD and developed a risk score (CT-valve score). The score was validated on a similar cohort of patients from another registry. The study cohort consisted of 2221 patients, 521 (23.5%) had CAD. The validation cohort consisted of 2575 patients, 771 (29.9%) had CAD. The identified risk factors were male sex, age, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, aortic valve disease, extracardiac arteriopathy, ejection fraction <30% and diabetes mellitus. CT-valve score could identify a third of the population with a risk about 10%. A score based on risk factors of CAD can identify patients that might benefit from using MSCT as a gatekeeper to CAG prior to heart valve surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of skin entrance radiation dose in pediatric patients undergoing chest X-rays exams; Avaliacao da dose de entrada na pele em pacientes pediatricos submetidos a exames radiograficos do torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabardo, Farly Piantini

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate the incident air kerma of lateral (LAT) and anterior-posterior (AP) together with posterior-anterior (PA) projection chest X-ray exams in one of the largest pediatric hospitals in Brazil. Dosimetric results are accompanied with the detailed analysis of patient characteristics and radiographer strategy. The exams of 225 (119 male and 106 female) patients were studied and 389 X-ray exams (200 AP/PA projections and 189 LAT projections) of pediatric patients were acquired. Patient thickness can be restored from age, height or weight with the uncertainty of ∼20-30%. Very slight correlation between the patient dose and thickness was observed with the difference in dose for patients of the same thickness reaching 4 times. By standardization of radiological protocols, it should be possible to keep dose within the intervals 50-100 μGy for LAT projection and 40-80 μGy for AP/PA projection. The dose values are lower than those recommended by major European guidelines to good practice. (author)

  18. Pseudo-outbreak of pseudomonas aeruginosa in HIV-infected patients undergoing fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Lerche, A; Kristoffersen, Kirsten Lydia

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from 8 consecutive patients undergoing bronchoscopy at an infectious diseases unit. None of the patients developed signs of respiratory tract infection that could be ascribed to the organism. The source of contamination...

  19. Evaluation of pulmonary function in renal transplant recipients and chronic renal failure patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. Abdalla

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: There is impairment of lung function in patients with CRF undergoing hemodialysis. The main changes are small airway obstruction, reduction in carbon monoxide transfer and diminished 6MWT that were not completely improved in the kidney transplant patients.

  20. Perioperative glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab A. Wahby

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Tight glycemic control improved perioperative outcome in diabetic CABG patients. Maintaining perioperative blood glucose level between 110 and 149 mg/dl is safe and should be recommended as a routine practice in diabetic patients undergoing CABG surgery.

  1. Investigating the motives of patients with knee OA undergoing a TKR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traumer, Line; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Kusk, Kathrine Hoffmann

    2018-01-01

    , a qualitatively assessment of what actually affects the patient's decision to undergo TKR would be important. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the motives of patients with knee OA choosing to undergo TKR and to explore the factors considered important during their decision?making process...... was a legitimate argument among patients. The prospect of avoiding taking high doses of pain?relieving medication and hearing positive experiences of others who had undergone TKR motivated patients to undergo TKR. However, negative experiences of others were neglected. Conclusions Patients' decision?making process...... revealed that the interaction between doctor and patient emerged as a factor highly influential on patients' decision?making process with patients choosing the treatment option suggested by the doctor. Using x?rays, revealing no cartilage between the bones, as a reason for choosing to undergo TKR...

  2. Radiation therapy for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mileikowsky, C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for irradiating a patient comprising: a source of a radiation beam directed along a radiation axis; means mounting the source for pivotal movement about a first horizontal axis which intersects the source, is stationary with respect to the apparatus, and extends in a direction substantially normal to the radiation axis, whereby the beam is capable of an angular scan in a vertical plane; table means adapted to support a patient to be irradiated; and suspension means mounted the table means for arcuate movement to any positions angularly spaced about the first horizontal axis and for pivoting movement about a second horizontal axis displacement from and substantially parallel to the first horizontal axis. The suspension means maintain the second horizontal axis in substantially intersecting relation to the radiation axis in each of the positions while maintaining a fixed angular position of the table means with respect to the environment

  3. Assessment of leakage dose in vivo in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peta Lonski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Accurate quantification of the relatively small radiation doses delivered to untargeted regions during breast irradiation in patients with breast cancer is of increasing clinical interest for the purpose of estimating long-term radiation-related risks. Out-of-field dose calculations from commercial planning systems however may be inaccurate which can impact estimates for long-term risks associated with treatment. This work compares calculated and measured dose out-of-field and explores the application of a correction for leakage radiation. Materials and methods: Dose calculations of a Boltzmann transport equation solver, pencil beam-type, and superposition-type algorithms from a commercial treatment planning system (TPS were compared with in vivo thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD measurements conducted out-of-field on the contralateral chest at points corresponding to the thyroid, axilla and contralateral breast of eleven patients undergoing tangential beam radiotherapy for breast cancer. Results: Overall, the TPS was found to under-estimate doses at points distal to the radiation field edge with a modern linear Boltzmann transport equation solver providing the best estimates. Application of an additive correction for leakage (0.04% of central axis dose improved correlation between the measured and calculated doses at points greater than 15 cm from the field edge. Conclusions: Application of a correction for leakage doses within peripheral regions is feasible and could improve accuracy of TPS in estimating out-of-field doses in breast radiotherapy. Keywords: Breast radiotherapy, TLD, Leakage dose, Dose calculation algorithm

  4. Radiation protection of the patient radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, J.; Tarakanath, M.S.

    1976-01-01

    Systematic studies of gonadal doses to patients undergoing therapy on 60 Co and X-ray machines were carried out using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Phantom and in vivo measurements were performed for various field sizes and for different positions of the centre of the field on the patient's body with the exception of fields including the gonads during radiotherapeutic treatment. It was shown that there is no effect of various SSD and that most radiation reaching gonads is transmitted axially through the body and therefore, it is impossible to reduce this dose with a simple shielding. The figures presented allow prediction of gonadal doses at various conditions. The efficiency of lung, mouth etc. shielding during radiotherapy was also investigated. (orig.) [de

  5. Thyroid doses and risk to paediatric patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Tipnis, Sameer; Huda, Walter [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Tavernier, Joshua [Medical University of South Carolina, College of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-07-15

    To estimate thyroid doses and cancer risk for paediatric patients undergoing neck computed tomography (CT). We used average CTDI{sub vol} (mGy) values from 75 paediatric neck CT examinations to estimate thyroid dose in a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom (ImPACT Patient CT Dosimetry Calculator). Patient dose was estimated by modelling the neck as mass equivalent water cylinder. A patient size correction factor was obtained using published relative dose data as a function of water cylinder size. Additional correction factors included scan length and radiation intensity variation secondary to tube-current modulation. The mean water cylinder diameter that modelled the neck was 14 ± 3.5 cm. The mathematical anthropomorphic phantom has a 16.5-cm neck, and for a constant CT exposure, would have thyroid doses that are 13-17 % lower than the average paediatric patient. CTDI{sub vol} was independent of age and sex. The average thyroid doses were 31 ± 18 mGy (males) and 34 ± 15 mGy (females). Thyroid cancer incidence risk was highest for infant females (0.2 %), lowest for teenage males (0.01 %). Estimated absorbed thyroid doses in paediatric neck CT did not significantly vary with age and gender. However, the corresponding thyroid cancer risk is determined by gender and age. (orig.)

  6. Radiation absorbed-dose estimates for the liver, spleen, and metaphyseal growth complexes in children undergoing gallium-67 citrate scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R.; Gelfand, M.J.; Burns, G.S.; Purdom, R.C.; Kereiakes, J.G.; Maxon, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative conjugate-view external counting techniques were applied to estimate the radiation dose to the liver, spleen, and metaphyseal growth complexes (distal femur and proximal tibia) for ten pediatric patients undergoing gallium-67 scanning procedures. The effective half-life of Ga 67 in these organs was approximately 78 hours. The dose per unit of administered activity for the liver and spleen was between 0.3 and 4.0 rad/mCi (0.08 to 1.08 Gy/GBq) and 0.5 and 7.0 rad/mCi (0.13 to 1.89 Gy/GBq), respectively. For the metaphyseal growth plates, the range was 2.3 to 14.3 rad/mCi (0.62 to 3.86 Gy/GBq)

  7. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare patient reported outcomes from before surgery to 52 weeks after surgery between individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic meniscal tears and those for degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Comparative prospective cohort study. SETTING: Four public......-55, and undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (defined by a combination of age and symptom onset). INTERVENTIONS: Both participant groups underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a meniscal tear, with operating surgeons recording relevant information......% women) with a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (n=141, mean age 38.7 years (standard deviation 10.9); n=256, 46.6 years (6.4); respectively) were included in the main analysis. At 52 weeks after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, 55 (14%) patients were lost to follow-up. Statistically...

  8. Evaluation of patients skin dose undergoing interventional cardiology procedure using radiochromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mauro W. Oliveira da; Canevaro, Lucia V.; Rodrigues, Barbara B. Dias

    2011-01-01

    In interventional cardiology (IC), coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures are the most frequent ones. Since the 1990s, the number of IC procedures has increased rapidly. It is also known that these procedures are associated with high radiation doses due to long fluoroscopy time (FT) and large number of cine-frames (CF) acquired to document the procedure. Mapping skin doses in IC is useful to find the probability of skin injuries, to detect areas of overlapping field, and to get a permanent record of the most exposed areas of skin. The purpose of this study was to estimate the maximum skin dose (MSD) in patients undergoing CA and PTCA, and to compare these values with the reference levels proposed in the literature. Patients' dose measurements were carried out on a sample of 38 patients at the hemodynamic department, in four local hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, using Gafchromic XR-RV2 films. In PTCA procedures, the median and third quartile values of MSD were estimated at 2.5 and 5.3 Gy, respectively. For the CA procedures, the median and third quartile values of MSD were estimated at 0.5 and 0.7 Gy, respectively. In this paper, we used the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and we found a fairly strong correlation between FT and MSD (r=0.8334, p<0.0001), for CA procedures. The 1 Gy threshold for deterministic effects was exceeded in nine patients. The use of Gafchromic XR-RV2 films was shown to be an effective method to measure MSD and the dose distribution map. The method is effective to identify the distribution of radiation fields, thus allowing the follow-up of the patient to investigate the appearance of skin injuries. (author)

  9. Risk Management for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Elderly Patients: Questionnaire for Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Umegaki, Eiji; Abe, Shinya; Tokioka, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Nozomi; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Yoda, Yukiko; Murano, Mitsuyuki; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2009-01-01

    More elderly patients now undergo gastrointestinal endoscopy following recent advances in endoscopic techniques. In this study, we conducted a high-risk survey of endoscopies in Japan, using a questionnaire administered prior to upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (UGITE), and identified anticholinergic agents and glucagon preparations as high-risk premedication. We also evaluated the cardiovascular effects of anticholinergic agents and glucagon through measurements of plasma levels of hum...

  10. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DoorenbosBot, ACC; Geerlings, W; Houtman, IA

    Four patients are discussed who underwent hemodialysis and developed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION). Three patients had been treated by hemodialysis for several years. One patient developed bilateral optic neuropathy after the first hemodialysis session, So far, only four hemodialysis

  11. Hypovitaminosis D in patients undergoing kidney transplant: the importance of sunlight exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane F. Vilarta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have shown a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D, defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level less than 30 ng/ml, in both healthy populations and patients with chronic kidney disease. Patients undergoing kidney transplant are at an increased risk of skin cancer and are advised to avoid sunlight exposure. Therefore, these patients might share two major risk factors for hypovitaminosis D: chronic kidney disease and low sunlight exposure. This paper describes the prevalence and clinical characteristics of hypovitaminosis D among patients undergoing kidney transplant. METHODS: We evaluated 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels in a representative sample of patients undergoing kidney transplant. We sought to determine the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D, compare these patients with a control group, and identify factors associated with hypovitaminosis D (e.g., sunlight exposure and dietary habits. RESULTS: Hypovitaminosis D was found in 79% of patients undergoing kidney transplant, and the major associated factor was low sunlight exposure. These patients had higher creatinine and intact parathyroid hormone serum levels, with 25-hydroxyvitamin D being inversely correlated with intact parathyroid hormone serum levels. Compared with the control group, patients undergoing kidney transplant presented a higher prevalence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and lower serum calcium, phosphate and albumin but higher creatinine and intact parathyroid hormone levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirmed the high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients undergoing kidney transplant. Therapeutic strategies such as moderate sunlight exposure and vitamin D supplementation should be seriously considered for this population.

  12. The position of the cancer patient undergoing radiotherapy -psychological and physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischenschlager, O.; Hohenberg, G.; Handl-Zeller, L.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the psychological strains experienced by patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as their somatic complaints and the possible connection between these two aspects. The sample consisted of 87 cancer patients, 64 female, 23 male. We used two standardized clinical instruments, one Zerssen's list of somatic complaints ('Beschwerdeliste' in German) and Zerssen's questionnaire of wellbeing ('Befindlichkeitsskala' in German). These two research instruments were implemented four times: at the beginning, in the middle and at the end of radiation, and three month afterwards. Results: Both the psychological state of well-being and somatic complaints remained at approximately the same level during the whole course of therapy. The state of well-being increased significantly after therapy, which is indicated by the decrease in the number of psychological impairments, whereas the score for somatic complaints remained the same. We observed a general tendency on the part of the patients to play down their situation. Sex differences were not observed. The discussion of the results includes their implication on the doctor-patient relationship. (Author)

  13. Impact of smoking on early clinical outcomes in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Qiang; Zhao, Hang; Mei, YunQing; Shi, YunQing; Ma, RunHua; Ding, WenJun

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the impact of persistent smoking versus smoking cessation over one month prior to surgery on early clinical outcomes in Chinese patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery in a retrospective study. Methods The peri-operative data of consecutive well-documented patients undergoing isolated CABG surgery from January 2007 to December 2013 were investigated and retrospectively analyzed. All included patients were divided into either a non-smo...

  14. Patient satisfaction in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissiadis, Y.; Provis, A.; Dhaliwal, S.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this current economic climate where the costs of providing a good medical service are escalating, patients are demanding a higher level of service from the Radiation Oncology providers. This coupled with the rising level of patients' expectations make it absolutely paramount for Radiation Oncology providers to offer the best possible service to their patients. In order to do this, it is essential to assess the present level of patient satisfaction prior to deciding which aspects of the current service need to be changed. In this pilot study, we assess the level of patient satisfaction with aspects of the radiotherapy service and the level of patient anxiety both prior to and following radiotherapy at the Perth Radiation Oncology Centre. A questionnaire was created using a combination of the Information Satisfaction Questionnaire-1 (ISQ-1), the Very Short Questionnaire 9 (VSQ 9) and the State Trait Anxiety Index (STAI). One hundred new patients were studied, all of whom were to have radiotherapy with curative intent. The results of this study are reviewed in this presentation

  15. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L. Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA...... and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18...... established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear....

  16. Breast cancer: a study of the psychosocial issues faced by women undergoing radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnie, C. [Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine the psychosocial issues faced by post lumpectomy women with early stage breast cancer undergoing radical radiation to the affected breast. Twenty-five women in their second to fifth week of treatment were given the survey to determine these issues. Responses were then grouped by age category and results compiled. Regardless of age, a majority of women felt that they and their spouses had become closer since their diagnosis and described their spouses as being supportive. Scheduling appointment times around childcare was important for some women. Almost half of the women experienced a change in employment status as a result of their diagnosis. Appointment times and work schedules were important for some women still working. In all age groups, women experienced fatigue at least sometimes. (author)

  17. Breast cancer: a study of the psychosocial issues faced by women undergoing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnie, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the psychosocial issues faced by post lumpectomy women with early stage breast cancer undergoing radical radiation to the affected breast. Twenty-five women in their second to fifth week of treatment were given the survey to determine these issues. Responses were then grouped by age category and results compiled. Regardless of age, a majority of women felt that they and their spouses had become closer since their diagnosis and described their spouses as being supportive. Scheduling appointment times around childcare was important for some women. Almost half of the women experienced a change in employment status as a result of their diagnosis. Appointment times and work schedules were important for some women still working. In all age groups, women experienced fatigue at least sometimes. (author)

  18. Fast-Track Management of Patients Undergoing Proximal Pancreatic Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, JJ; Mansfield, SD; Jaques, K; Jaques, BC; Manas, DM; Charnley, RM

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION To avoid the risk of complications of biliary drainage, a feasibility study was carried out to determine whether it might be possible to fast-track surgical treatment, with resection before biliary drainage, in jaundiced patients with proximal pancreatic/peri-ampullary malignancy. PATIENTS AND METHODS Over an 18-month period, based on their presenting bilirubin levels and other logistical factors, all jaundiced patients who might be suitable for fast-track management were identified. Data on complications and hospital stay were compared with those patients in whom a conventional pathway (with biliary drainage) was used during the same time period. Data were also compared with a group of patients from the preceding 6 months. RESULTS Nine patients were fast-tracked and 49 patients treated in the conventional pathway. Fast-track patients mean (SD) serum bilirubin level was 265 μmol/l (81.6) at the time of the operation compared to 43 μmol/l (51.3; P ≥ 0.0001) in conventional patients. Mean (SD) of time from referral to operation, 14 days (9) versus 59 days (36.9), was significantly shorter in fast-track patients than conventional patients (P ≤ 0.0001). Length of hospital stay mean (SD) at 17 (6) days versus 22 days (19.6; P = 0.2114), surgical complications and mortality in fast-track patients were similar to conventional patients. Prior to surgery, the 49 conventional patients underwent a total of 73 biliary drainage procedures resulting in seven major complications. Comparison with the group of patients from the previous 6 months indicated that the conventional group were not disadvantaged. CONCLUSIONS Fast-track management by resection without biliary drainage of selected patients with distal biliary strictures is safe and has the potential to reduce the waiting time to surgery, overall numbers of biliary drainage procedures and the complications thereof. PMID:19220943

  19. Effective doses to patients undergoing thoracic computed tomography examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, W; Scalzetti, E M; Roskopf, M

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how x-ray technique factors and effective doses vary with patient size in chest CT examinations. Technique factors (kVp, mAs, section thickness, and number of sections) were recorded for 44 patients who underwent a routine chest CT examination. Patient weights were recorded together with dimensions and mean Hounsfield unit values obtained from representative axial CT images. The total mass of directly irradiated patient was modeled as a cylinder of water to permit the computation of the mean patient dose and total energy imparted for each chest CT examination. Computed values of energy imparted during the chest CT examination were converted into effective doses taking into account the patient weight. Patient weights ranged from 4.5 to 127 kg, and half the patients in this study were children under 18 years of age. All scans were performed at 120 kVp with a 1 s scan time. The selected tube current showed no correlation with patient weight (r2=0.06), indicating that chest CT examination protocols do not take into account for the size of the patient. Energy imparted increased with increasing patient weight, with values of energy imparted for 10 and 70 kg patients being 85 and 310 mJ, respectively. The effective dose showed an inverse correlation with increasing patient weight, however, with values of effective dose for 10 and 70 kg patients being 9.6 and 5.4 mSv, respectively. Current CT technique factors (kVp/mAs) used to perform chest CT examinations result in relatively high patient doses, which could be reduced by adjusting technique factors based on patient size.

  20. Extramedullary Relapse Following Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Tsai, Nicole [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu, An [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen J. [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Approximately 5% to 20% of patients who undergo total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can develop extramedullary (EM) relapse. Whereas total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) provides a more conformally targeted radiation therapy for patients, organ sparing has the potential to place the patient at a higher risk for EM relapse than TBI. This study evaluated EM relapse in patients treated with TMLI at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for analysis had been enrolled in 1 of 3 prospective TMLI trials between 2006 and 2012. The TMLI targeted bones, major lymph node chains, liver, spleen, testes, and brain, using image-guided tomotherapy with total dose ranging from 12 to 15 Gy. Results: A total of 101 patients with a median age of 47 years were studied. The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Incidence of EM relapse and bone marrow (BM) relapse were 12.9% and 25.7%, respectively. Of the 13 patients who had EM relapse, 4 also had BM relapse, and 7 had EM disease prior to HCT. There were a total of 19 EM relapse sites as the site of initial recurrence: 11 soft tissue, 6 lymph node, 2 skin. Nine of these sites were within the target region and received ≥12 Gy. Ten initial EM relapse sites were outside of the target region: 5 sites received 10.1 to 11.4 Gy while 5 sites received <10 Gy. Pretransplantation EM was the only significant predictor of subsequent EM relapse. The cumulative incidence of EM relapse was 4% at 1 year and 11.4% at 2 years. Conclusions: EM relapse incidence was as frequent in regions receiving ≥10 Gy as those receiving <10 Gy. EM relapse rates following TMLI that included HCT regimens were comparable to published results with regimens including TBI and suggest that TMLI is not associated with an increased EM relapse risk.

  1. Extramedullary Relapse Following Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Stein, Anthony; Tsai, Nicole; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Palmer, Joycelynne; Liu, An; Rosenthal, Joseph; Forman, Stephen J.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 5% to 20% of patients who undergo total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can develop extramedullary (EM) relapse. Whereas total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) provides a more conformally targeted radiation therapy for patients, organ sparing has the potential to place the patient at a higher risk for EM relapse than TBI. This study evaluated EM relapse in patients treated with TMLI at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for analysis had been enrolled in 1 of 3 prospective TMLI trials between 2006 and 2012. The TMLI targeted bones, major lymph node chains, liver, spleen, testes, and brain, using image-guided tomotherapy with total dose ranging from 12 to 15 Gy. Results: A total of 101 patients with a median age of 47 years were studied. The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Incidence of EM relapse and bone marrow (BM) relapse were 12.9% and 25.7%, respectively. Of the 13 patients who had EM relapse, 4 also had BM relapse, and 7 had EM disease prior to HCT. There were a total of 19 EM relapse sites as the site of initial recurrence: 11 soft tissue, 6 lymph node, 2 skin. Nine of these sites were within the target region and received ≥12 Gy. Ten initial EM relapse sites were outside of the target region: 5 sites received 10.1 to 11.4 Gy while 5 sites received <10 Gy. Pretransplantation EM was the only significant predictor of subsequent EM relapse. The cumulative incidence of EM relapse was 4% at 1 year and 11.4% at 2 years. Conclusions: EM relapse incidence was as frequent in regions receiving ≥10 Gy as those receiving <10 Gy. EM relapse rates following TMLI that included HCT regimens were comparable to published results with regimens including TBI and suggest that TMLI is not associated with an increased EM relapse risk

  2. Fear and anxiety in patients undergoing minor oral surgery | Saheeb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was carried out to determine the causes of fear and anxiety in consecutive patients who attended the University of Benin Teaching Hospital for minor oral surgical treatment. Method: All consenting consecutive patients referred for minor oral surgery were studied. Information on all the patients was ...

  3. Stress reduction through music in patients undergoing cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, N.; Becker, H. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hannover Medical School (Germany); Schedlowski, M. [Dept. of Clinical Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School (Germany); Schuermeyer, T.H. [Dept. of Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    We studied the influence of music on stress reaction of patients during cerebral angiography. We randomised 30 patients to a music or a control group. We measured stress hormones, blood pressure, heart rate and psychological parameters. Patients examined without music showed rising levels of cortisol in plasma, indicating high stress levels, while cortisol in patients examined with music remained stable. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower listening to music. Patients with a high level of fear did appear to benefit particularly from the music. (orig.)

  4. Stress reduction through music in patients undergoing cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, N.; Becker, H.; Schedlowski, M.; Schuermeyer, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the influence of music on stress reaction of patients during cerebral angiography. We randomised 30 patients to a music or a control group. We measured stress hormones, blood pressure, heart rate and psychological parameters. Patients examined without music showed rising levels of cortisol in plasma, indicating high stress levels, while cortisol in patients examined with music remained stable. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower listening to music. Patients with a high level of fear did appear to benefit particularly from the music. (orig.)

  5. Radiation therapy in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdux, C.; Boisserie, T.; Gisselbrecht, M.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that predominantly occurs in older patients who represent a quarter of the population in western countries. Numerous types of cancer are observed in elderly people. Radiotherapy is one of the most powerful treatment against cancer. Most of published studies have demonstrated feasibility of radiotherapy in curative or palliative intent whatever cancer types are considered. Complete geriatric assessment and a multidisciplinary approach are the key points. The purpose of this review is to highlight sights of radiation oncology specifically related to aging. Particular emphasis is placed on logistic and technical aspects of radiation, as dose, irradiated volume and fractionation. (authors)

  6. Increased morbidity in patients undergoing abdominoplasty after laparoscopic gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Line Bro; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen; Matzen, Steen Henrik

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 30-40% of the adult population in Denmark are overweight and 10-13% are obese. The number of bariatric operations reached 3,000 in 2009, and it is expected that a third or more of the patients need corrective plastic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical charts of all patients who...... had abdominoplasty performed during a 2.5-year period. We included 72 patients of whom 21 had lost weight after bariatric surgery and 51 patients had lost weight through diet and exercise or had not been overweight. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was 21% (43% of the post-bariatric patients...... a significantly higher maximum weight, weight at the time of abdominoplasty and had lost more BMI units. CONCLUSION: Our data show that post-bariatric patients who have an abdominoplasty performed suffer a high complication rate which appears to be higher than that of patients who do not have bariatric surgery...

  7. Mid-term outcomes of patients undergoing adjustable pulmonary artery banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Talwar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Patients undergoing APAB fulfilled the desired objectives of the pulmonary artery banding (PAB with minimum PA complications in the mid-term. This added to the early postoperative benefits, makes the APAB an attractive alternative to the CPAB.

  8. Anaesthesia in patients undergoing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy for suspected bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helsø, Ida; Risom, Martin; Vestergaard, Therese Risom

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common emergency. Currently, there are no agreed guidelines on the level of anaesthetic support required in patients undergoing acute esophago-gastro-duodendoscopy (EGD). METHODS: An online questionnaire comprising 19 questions...

  9. Can shared care deliver better outcomes for patients undergoing total hip replacement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendal, H.; Beekum, W.T. van; Nijhof, P.; Witte, L.P. de; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether shared care for patients undergoing total hip replacement delivers better outcomes compared to care as usual. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Two regions in the Netherlands where different organisational health care models have been

  10. More patients should undergo surgery after sigmoid volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifversen, Anne Kathrine Wewer; Kjaer, Daniel Willy

    2014-12-28

    To assess the outcome of patients treated conservatively vs surgically during their first admission for sigmoid volvulus. We conducted a retrospective study of 61 patients admitted to Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark between 1996 and 2011 for their first incidence of sigmoid volvulus. The condition was diagnosed by radiography, sigmoidoscopy or surgery. Patients treated with surgery underwent either a sigmoid resection or a percutaneous endoscopic colostomy (PEC). Conservatively treated patients were managed without surgery. Data was recorded into a Microsoft Access database and calculations were performed with Microsoft Excel. Kaplan-Meier plotting and Mantel-Cox (log-rank) testing were performed using GraphPad Prism software. Mortality was defined as death within 30 d after intervention or surgery. Among the total 61 patients, 4 underwent emergency surgery, 55 underwent endoscopy, 1 experienced resolution of the volvulus after contrast enema, and 1 died without treatment because of large bowel perforation. Following emergency treatment, 28 patients underwent sigmoid resection (semi-elective n = 18; elective n = 10). Two patients who were unfit for surgery underwent PEC and both died, 1 after 36 d and the other after 9 mo, respectively. The remaining 26 patients were managed conservatively without sigmoid resection. Patients treated conservatively on their first admission had a poorer survival rate than patients treated surgically on their first admission (95%CI: 3.67-14.37, P = 0.036). Sixty-three percent of the 26 conservatively treated patients had not experienced a recurrence 3 mo after treatment, but that number dropped to 24% 2 years after treatment. Eight of the 14 patients with recurrence after conservative treatment had surgery with no 30-d mortality. Surgically-treated sigmoid volvulus patients had a higher long-term survival rate than conservatively managed patients, indicating a benefit of surgical resection or PEC insertion if feasible.

  11. Anaesthesia in patients undergoing esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy for suspected bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helsø, Ida; Risom, Martin; Vestergaard, Therese Risom

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common emergency. Currently, there are no agreed guidelines on the level of anaesthetic support required in patients undergoing acute esophago-gastro-duodendoscopy (EGD). METHODS: An online questionnaire comprising 19 questions was distrib......INTRODUCTION: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common emergency. Currently, there are no agreed guidelines on the level of anaesthetic support required in patients undergoing acute esophago-gastro-duodendoscopy (EGD). METHODS: An online questionnaire comprising 19 questions...

  12. Multidisciplinary perioperative protocol in patients undergoing acute high-risk abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tengberg, L. T.; Bay-Nielsen, M.; Bisgaard, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute high-risk abdominal (AHA) surgery carries a very high risk of morbidity and mortality and represents a massive healthcare burden. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a standardized multidisciplinary perioperative protocol in patients undergoing AHA surgery...... = 0·004). Conclusion: The introduction of a multidisciplinary perioperative protocol was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative mortality in patients undergoing AHA surgery. NCT01899885 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov)....

  13. Measuring pain in patients undergoing hemodialysis: a review of pain assessment tools

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyay, Chandani; Cameron, Karen; Murphy, Laura; Battistella, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing hemodialysis frequently report pain with multifactorial causes, not limited to that experienced directly from hemodialysis treatment. Their pain may be nociceptive, neuropathic, somatic or visceral in nature. Despite this, pain in this population remains under-recognized and under-treated. Although several tools have been used to measure pain in patients undergoing hemodialysis as reported in the literature, none of them have been validated specifically in this ...

  14. Mycoplasma in urine and blood following catheterisation of patients undergoing vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Eiberg, J; Skov Jensen, J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if mycoplasmas enter the bloodstream after urinary tract catheterisation in patients undergoing vascular surgery in order to evaluate the efficiency of the routine prophylactic antibiotic treatment.......The purpose of this investigation was to determine if mycoplasmas enter the bloodstream after urinary tract catheterisation in patients undergoing vascular surgery in order to evaluate the efficiency of the routine prophylactic antibiotic treatment....

  15. Mobility and verbal communication patients undergoing awake craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Sapountzis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The surgical treatment of gliomas in traffic areas, speech is aimed at the maximum ablation, with minimal postoperative neurological deficit. The election procedure is craniectomy with the patient conscious (awake craniotomy. The conscious craniotomy with intraoperative mapping of the cerebral cortex, superior to conventional craniotomy microsurgery in resection rates during hospitalization and recovery time of the operated patients with lesions in speech and movement area. Purpose: The aim of the research was to study cases with brain gliomas in rolandeio area and literary centers, the investigation and study of preoperative neurological status and imaging findings of patients and end their correlation with the postoperative course and outcome of patients. Methods: This is a study population of 43 patients of Neurosurgery Clinic of General Hospital «G. Gennimatas» with gliomas in the movement and speech area treated surgically within four years. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS15. Preoperative and postoperative classification based on the examination of muscle strength and speech became into four groups: I – without focal motor, II – mild motor, III – moderate kinetic, IV – heavy motor deficit and finally two groups regarding disorders word: a- undisturbed and B with speech disorders . Macroscopically complete removal of over 95%, defined as the absence hearth space-occupying lesion in the postoperative CT scan . Results: The age of patients ranged from 26-69 years with a mean of 43.7 years. Among patients who underwent craniectomy, complete removal was achieved in 36 patients (83.75% and partly in 7 patients (16.3%. Postoperatively 6 patients (18.6% showed improvement of motor deficit, 23 patients (53.49% experienced unchanging muscle strength, 12 patients (27.91% showed a kinetic deterioration in 9 patients (20.93% first observed – emfanizomenes speech disorders, referred to as complications. Conclusions

  16. Clinical Effect of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer Undergoing Primary Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 1,010 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy between 1993 and 2000 were eligible for this study. The HPV genotypes were determined by a genechip, which detects 38 types of HPV. The patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were analyzed using the Cox regression hazard model and classification and regression tree decision tree method. Results: A total of 25 genotypes of HPV were detected in 992 specimens (98.2%). The leading 8 types were HPV16, 58, 18, 33, 52, 39, 31, and 45. These types belong to two high-risk HPV species: alpha-7 (HPV18, 39, 45) and alpha-9 (HPV16, 31, 33, 52, 58). Three HPV-based risk groups, which were independent of established prognostic factors, such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, pathologic features, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and lymph node metastasis, were associated with the survival outcomes. The high-risk group consisted of the patients without HPV infection or the ones infected with the alpha-7 species only. Patients co-infected with the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species belonged to the medium-risk group, and the others were included in the low-risk group. Conclusion: The results of the present study have confirmed the prognostic value of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy. The different effect of the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species on the radiation response deserves additional exploration.

  17. Lymphatic mapping and sentinel node identification in patients with cervix cancer undergoing radical hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, O.; Lago, G.; Juri, C.; Touya, E.; Arribeltz, G.; Dabezies, L.; Sotero, G.; Martinez, J.; Alvarez, C.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: One of the most important prognostic features of early cervix cancer is the involvement of regional lymph nodes (LN). Although not fully studied, the sentinel node (SN) strategy has the potential of preventing unnecessary extensive LN dissections in these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of SN identification by means of preoperative lymphoscintigraphy (PL) and intraoperative gamma probe detection (IGPD) in patients undergoing radical hysterectomy and pelvic/para-aortic lymphadenectomy for the treatment of early cervix carcinoma. Material and Methods: Patients underwent PL with 148-185 MBq of filtered 99mTc-colloidal (Re) sulphide injected into four quadrants of the cervix, 15-17 hours before surgery. Five-minute consecutive planar images of the pelvis were acquired immediately after in a LFOV camera equipped with a LEHR collimator. A sterilized piece of lead foil (1.0 mm thick) was used to shield radiation from the cervix during intraoperative detection of pelvic SN's. An individual LN was considered SN if radioactive counts were 10 times greater than background counts. Results: Complete data are available from 18 patients. The median age was 37 years (range 22-65), 2/18 were staged IA2, 9/18 were staged IB1-2 and 7/18 stage IIA. PL identified one or more SN in 14/18 (78%) of patients, whereas IGPD was successful in 17/18 (94%) patients. A total of 20 SN were harvested, located in the pelvis (n=14), the common iliac vein (n 4) and para-aortic region (n=2). The histopathological report revealed a negative SN in 14/17 patients, and a positive LN in 3/17 cases. One false-negative result was observed in a patient with a negative SN and three positive non-sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusion: Although technically challenging, IGPD with cervix radiation shielding is a sensitive and feasible procedure for SN identification with the potential of changing the surgical treatment of early stage cervix cancer

  18. Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Role of Radiotherapy is treatment modalities for cancer which is generally assumed that 50 to 60% of cancer patients will benefit from radiotherapy. It constitutes a peaceful application of ionizing radiation and an essential part of cancer management. The two aims of radiation protection Prevention is of deterministic effect and Reduction of the probability of stochastic effects. The Shielding fundamentals is to limit radiation exposure of staff, patients, visitors and the public to acceptable levels it also optimize protection of patients, staff and the public. Diagnosis is important for target design and the dose required for cure or palliation while Simulator is often used twice in the radiotherapy process where Patient data acquisition - target localization, contours, outlines and Verification. The Prescription is the responsibility of individual clinicians, depending on the patient’s condition, equipment available, experience and training. An ultimate check of the actual treatment given can only be made by using in vivo dosimetry. Treatment records must be kept of all relevant aspects of the treatment – including Session and Summary Record information, Records all treatment parameters, Dose Calculations and Dose Measurements

  19. Red blood cell storage duration and long-term mortality in patients undergoing cardiac intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, D; Pedersen, F; Engstrøm, T

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of red blood cell (RBC) storage duration on long-term mortality in patients undergoing cardiac intervention. BACKGROUND: RBCs undergo numerous structural and functional changes during storage. Observational studies have assessed the association between RBC storage...... duration and patient outcomes with conflicting results. METHODS: Between January 2006 and December 2014, 82 408 patients underwent coronary angiography. Of these, 1856 patients received one to four RBC units within 30 days after this procedure. Patients were allocated according to length of RBC storage...

  20. Compression fractures in patients undergoing spinal manipulative therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haldeman, S.; Rubinstein, S M

    Increasing numbers of elderly patients are currently seeking chiropractic care. One condition commonly seen in the elderly is osteoporosis of the spine, which carries with it the risk of compression fractures. We present four cases in which patients were noted to have compression fractures following

  1. Effect of cinacalcet on cardiovascular disease in patients undergoing dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chertow, Glenn M; Block, Geoffrey A; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Disorders of mineral metabolism, including secondary hyperparathyroidism, are thought to contribute to extraskeletal (including vascular) calcification among patients with chronic kidney disease. It has been hypothesized that treatment with the calcimimetic agent cinacalcet might reduce the risk...... of death or nonfatal cardiovascular events in such patients....

  2. Anaesthesia for the patient with dementia undergoing outpatient surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2009-01-01

    , as documented in elderly patients. Neuromuscular blocking agents, and especially rocuronium, display an increased variability in the duration of action, but the new drug sugammadex may reverse the neuromuscular block in a few minutes. Postoperative cognitive decline is more frequent in elderly patients...

  3. Age as a prognostic variable in patients undergoing transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J; Jensen, J S; Iversen, H G

    1993-01-01

    In a retrospective study the outcome of transurethral prostatectomy (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in patients more than 80 years old was compared to a control group of patients with a mean age ten years younger. The elderly had significantly more tissue resected and presented...

  4. Reversible primary hypothyroidism in Japanese patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanai, T; Inoue, T; Okamura, K; Sato, K; Yamamoto, K; Abe, T; Node, K; Tsuruya, K; Iida, M

    2008-02-01

    The presence or absence of hypothyroidism was assessed in 152 consecutive Japanese patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Eight patients who had undergone treatment for thyroid disease before starting hemodialysis therapy, and 3 patients with amyloidosis due to rheumatoid arthritis were excluded. Of the remaining 141 hemodialysis patients, 14 (9.9%) (9 males and 5 females, aged 69.1 A+/- 8.8 years with a mean duration of hemodialysis of 69 A+/- 51 months) were in a hypothyroid state, defined as a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level > 5 mU/l. Antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were positive in only 1 of the 14 patients, while antithyroglobulin antibodies were negative in all of these patients. After iodide restriction, the serum TSH level decreased in all the patients from a mean of 16.49 A+/- 22.80 to 4.44 A+/- 3.35 mU/l after 1 month, 4.25 A+/- 2.24 mU/l after 2 months and 3.97 A+/- 2.22 mU/l after 3 months. The 3 months of iodide restriction were also associated with decreases in systolic blood pressure (142 A+/- 19 to 125 A+/- 16 mmHg, p patients on hemodialysis. Retention of excess iodide may be the mechanism responsible for reversible hypothyroidism rather than immunological perturbations. It is, therefore, recommended to attempt iodide restriction before starting l-thyroxine replacement therapy.

  5. Atrial electromechanical delay in patients undergoing heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bulut, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Inter-AEMD and intra-AEMD were prolonged in patients who underwent heart transplantation as compared to a control population. This may explain the increased atrial fibrillation and other atrial arrhythmia incidences associated with the biatrial anastomosis heart transplantation technique and may contribute to the treatment of atrial fibrillation in this special patient group.

  6. Analysis on personality traits in patients undergoing LASIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze personality traits in preoperative patients who undergolaser in situ keratomileusis(LASIKand to provide psychological basis for the selection of refractive surgery.METHODS: Eligible patientswere seeking customized LASIK(group A n=53, conventional LASIK(group B n=75and non-operation patients with ametropia(group C n=71, who completed 16 personality factor questionnaires(16PF. Statistical analyses were performed with one-way ANOVA by SPSS11.0 software package.RESULTS: Compared to group C, patients in group A scored high on dominance and tension levels, and low on emotional stability level(PPPCONCLUSION: The data indicates that personality profiles of LASIK patients with refractive error influence their decision for correction. Patients need suitable psychological assessment before surgery who actively chose customized LASIK seem to be more assertive and suspicious.

  7. Sedations and analgesia in patients undergoing percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatzidakis, A.A.; Charonitakis, E.; Athanasiou, A.; Tsetis, D.; Chlouverakis, G.; Papamastorakis, G.; Roussopoulou, G.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.C.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To present our experience using intravenous sedoanalgesia for percutaneous biliary drainage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study comprised 100 patients, all of whom were continuously monitored [electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, pulse oxymetry] and received an initial dose of 2 mg midazolam followed by 0.02 mg fentanyl. Before every anticipated painful procedure, a maintenance dose of 0.01 mg fentanyl was administered. If the procedure continued and the patient became aware, another 1 mg midazolam was given. This was repeated if patients felt pain. A total dose of 0.08 mg fentanyl and 7 mg midazolam was never exceeded. Immediately after the procedure, the nurse was asked to evaluate patients' pain score. The patients were asked 3 h later to complete a visual 10-degree pain score scale. RESULTS: The average dose of fentanyl and midazolam was 0.042 mg (0.03-0.08 mg) and 4.28 mg (2-7 mg), respectively. Only one patient recorded the procedure as painful. The scores given by the attending nurse (1-7 points, mean 2.9) correlated well with those given by the patients (1-6 points, mean 2.72). No complications were noted. CONCLUSION: According to our experience, interventional radiologists practising biliary procedures can administer low doses of midazolam and minimize the doses of fentanyl, without loss of adequate sedation and analgesia. Hatzidakis, A. A. et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 121-127

  8. Prior oral conditions in patients undergoing heart valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Francisco-Javier; Gil-Raga, Irene; Martinez-Herrera, Mayte; Lauritano, Dorina; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier

    2017-11-01

    Patients scheduled for heart valve surgery should be free of any oral infectious disorders that might pose a risk in the postoperative period. Few studies have been made on the dental conditions of such patients prior to surgery. The present study describes the most frequent prior oral diseases in this population group. A prospective, observational case-control study was designed involving 60 patients (30 with heart valve disease and 30 controls, with a mean age of 71 years in both groups). A dental exploration was carried out, with calculation of the DMFT (decayed, missing and filled teeth) index and recording of the periodontal parameters (plaque index, gingival bleeding index, periodontal pocket depth, and attachment loss). The oral mucosa was also examined, and panoramic X-rays were used to identify possible intrabony lesions. Significant differences in bacterial plaque index were observed between the two groups ( p <0.05), with higher scores in the patients with valve disease. Probing depth and the presence of moderate pockets were also greater in the patients with valve disease than among the controls ( p <0.01). Sixty percent of the patients with valve disease presented periodontitis. Patients scheduled for heart valve surgery should be examined for possible active periodontitis before the operation. Those individuals found to have periodontal disease should receive adequate periodontal treatment before heart surgery. Key words: Valve disease, aortic, mitral, heart surgery, periodontitis.

  9. Sedations and analgesia in patients undergoing percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzidakis, A.A.; Charonitakis, E.; Athanasiou, A.; Tsetis, D.; Chlouverakis, G.; Papamastorakis, G.; Roussopoulou, G.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.C

    2003-02-01

    AIM: To present our experience using intravenous sedoanalgesia for percutaneous biliary drainage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study comprised 100 patients, all of whom were continuously monitored [electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, pulse oxymetry] and received an initial dose of 2 mg midazolam followed by 0.02 mg fentanyl. Before every anticipated painful procedure, a maintenance dose of 0.01 mg fentanyl was administered. If the procedure continued and the patient became aware, another 1 mg midazolam was given. This was repeated if patients felt pain. A total dose of 0.08 mg fentanyl and 7 mg midazolam was never exceeded. Immediately after the procedure, the nurse was asked to evaluate patients' pain score. The patients were asked 3 h later to complete a visual 10-degree pain score scale. RESULTS: The average dose of fentanyl and midazolam was 0.042 mg (0.03-0.08 mg) and 4.28 mg (2-7 mg), respectively. Only one patient recorded the procedure as painful. The scores given by the attending nurse (1-7 points, mean 2.9) correlated well with those given by the patients (1-6 points, mean 2.72). No complications were noted. CONCLUSION: According to our experience, interventional radiologists practising biliary procedures can administer low doses of midazolam and minimize the doses of fentanyl, without loss of adequate sedation and analgesia. Hatzidakis, A. A. et al. (2003). Clinical Radiology58, 121-127.

  10. Electrocardiographic Abnormalities and QTc Interval in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Nie

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the primary causes of mortality in chronic hemodialysis (HD patients. Prolonged QTc interval is associated with increased rate of sudden cardiac death. The aim of this article is to assess the abnormalities found in electrocardiograms (ECGs, and to explore factors that can influence the QTc interval.A total of 141 conventional HD patients were enrolled in this study. ECG tests were conducted on each patient before a single dialysis session and 15 minutes before the end of dialysis session (at peak stress. Echocardiography tests were conducted before dialysis session began. Blood samples were drawn by phlebotomy immediately before and after the dialysis session.Before dialysis, 93.62% of the patients were in sinus rhythm, and approximately 65% of the patients showed a prolonged QTc interval (i.e., a QTc interval above 440 ms in males and above 460ms in females. A comparison of ECG parameters before dialysis and at peak stress showed increases in heart rate (77.45±11.92 vs. 80.38±14.65 bpm, p = 0.001 and QTc interval (460.05±24.53 ms vs. 470.93±24.92 ms, p<0.001. After dividing patients into two groups according to the QTc interval, lower pre-dialysis serum concentrations of potassium (K+, calcium (Ca2+, phosphorus, calcium* phosphorus (Ca*P, and higher concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP were found in the group with prolonged QTc intervals. Patients in this group also had a larger left atrial diameter (LAD and a thicker interventricular septum, and they tended to be older than patients in the other group. Then patients were divided into two groups according to ΔQTc (ΔQTc = QTc peak-stress- QTc pre-HD. When analyzing the patients whose QTc intervals were longer at peak stress than before HD, we found that they had higher concentrations of Ca2+ and P5+ and lower concentrations of K+, ferritin, UA, and BNP. They were also more likely to be female. In addition, more cardiac construction

  11. Two-dimensional mapping of underdosed areas using radiochromic film for patients undergoing total skin electron beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, Lisa M.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Jones, Glenn W.; Hayward, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the viability of radiochromic film as an in vivo, two-dimensional dosimeter for the measurement of underdosed areas in patients undergoing total skin electron beam (TSEB) radiotherapy. The results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements. Methods and Materials: Dosimetry results are reported for an inframammary fold of 2 patients treated using a modified version of the Stanford six-position (i.e., six-field and dual-beam) TSEB technique. The results are presented as contour plots of film optical density and percentage of dose. A linear dose profile measured from film was compared with the thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements. Results: The results showed that the percentage doses as measured by film are in good agreement with those measured by the thermoluminescent dosimeters. The isodose contour plots provided by film can be used as a two-dimensional dose map for a patient when determining the size of the supplemental patch fields. Conclusion: Radiochromic film is a viable dosimetry tool that the radiation oncologist can use to understand the surface dose heterogeneity better across complex concave regions of skin to help establish more appropriate margins to patch underdosed areas. Film could be used for patients undergoing TSEB for disorders such as mycosis fungoides or undergoing TSEB or regional skin electron beam for widespread skin metastases from breast cancer and other malignancies

  12. Use of lead shielding on pregnant patients undergoing CT scans: Results of an international survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iball, Gareth R., E-mail: gri@medphysics.leeds.ac.u [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Old Medical School, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, W. Yorkshire LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Brettle, David S. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Old Medical School, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, W. Yorkshire LS1 3EX (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Aim: An online survey has been used to assess the use of abdominal lead shielding on pregnant patients undergoing CT scans. The aim of the study was to identify potential geographical variations in the use of such shielding as well as the opinions of the users in terms of the weight, manoeuvrability and ergonomics of the lead shields. Materials and methods: The online questionnaire was distributed to CT Radiographers in the UK, Europe, North America and Australia and responses were gathered electronically over a six month period. All completed responses were downloaded and subsequently analysed for each geographical region. Results: In total, 390 completed questionnaires were received with over 100 from each of the UK, North America and Australia. The use of lead shielding was found to vary significantly across the globe with the highest usage in North America (94.5%) and the lowest usage in Europe (46.3%). Approximately 20% of all respondents said that they experienced occupationally related back pain and 25% of all respondents said that patients complained about the weight of the shielding. Conclusion: Significant geographical variations in both the use of lead shielding for foetal radiation protection and the users' opinions of the shielding devices that are used have been identified and it has become clear that existing shielding solutions are not optimised for this task.

  13. The prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanbhai, M; Dubb, S; Patel, K; Ahmed, A; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    As bariatric surgery rates continue to climb, anaemia will become an increasing concern. We assessed the prevalence of anaemia and length of hospital stay in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Prospective data (anaemia [haemoglobin bariatric surgery. Results from a prospective database of 1530 patients undergoing elective general surgery were used as a baseline. Fifty-seven patients (14%) were anaemic pre-operatively, of which 98% were females. Median MCV (fL) and overall median ferritin (μg/L) was lower in anaemic patients (83 vs. 86, p=0.001) and (28 vs. 61, psurgery patients, prevalence of anaemia was similar (14% vs. 16%) but absolute iron deficiency was more common in those undergoing bariatric surgery; microcytosis pbariatric surgery. In bariatric patients with anaemia there was an overall increased length of hospital stay. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of Preoperative Nutritional Status with Prognosis in Patients with Esophageal Cancer Undergoing Salvage Esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Makoto; Sohda, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Tomonori; Kumakura, Yuji; Honjo, Hiroaki; Hara, Keigo; Ozawa, Daigo; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Tanaka, Naritaka; Yokobori, Takehiko; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2018-02-01

    To investigate whether malnutrition is associated with poor prognosis of patients who undergo salvage esophagectomy. We examined the association between the preoperative prognostic nutritional index (PNI) and prognosis of patients who undergo salvage esophagectomy. We conducted a single-center retrospective study and reviewed hospital patient records for tumor characteristics and patient outcomes. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were carried out using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Thirty-two patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) who underwent salvage esophagectomy between 1998 and 2015 at our Institute were included in this study. Univariate analysis revealed that clinical response (p=0.045), preoperative PNI (pnutritional status is associated with the prognosis of patients undergoing salvage esophagectomy. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Perioperative evaluation of patients who are due to undergo surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    backgrounds). Does preoperative evaluation of patients improve surgical out comes? ... They then recommend interventions for these conditions[1,2] and ... and leadership; and (x) the development and validation of a risk stratification tool for ...

  16. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co‐detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  17. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia in patient with Byssinosis undergoing nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kiran; Salgaonkar, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Byssinosis is an occupational disease occurring commonly in cotton mill workers; it usually presents with features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The management of patients with COPD presents a significant challenges to the anesthetist. Regional anesthesia is preferred in most of these patients to avoid perioperative and postoperative complications related to general anesthesia. We report a known case of Byssinosis who underwent nephrectomy under segmental spinal anesthesia at the low thoracic level.

  18. Segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia in patient with Byssinosis undergoing nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Kiran; Salgaonkar, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Byssinosis is an occupational disease occurring commonly in cotton mill workers; it usually presents with features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The management of patients with COPD presents a significant challenges to the anesthetist. Regional anesthesia is preferred in most of these patients to avoid perioperative and postoperative complications related to general anesthesia. We report a known case of Byssinosis who underwent nephrectomy under segmental spinal anesthesia ...

  19. Use of PROMIS for Patients Undergoing Primary Total Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, S Blake; Glass, Natalie; Anthony, Chris A; Hettrich, Carolyn M

    2017-09-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) consists of question banks for health domains through computer adaptive testing (CAT). For patients with glenohumeral arthritis, (1) there would be high correlation between traditional patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures and the PROMIS upper extremity item bank (PROMIS UE) and PROMIS physical function CAT (PROMIS PF CAT), and (2) PROMIS PF CAT would not demonstrate ceiling effects. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Sixty-one patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis were included. Each patient completed the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) assessment form, Marx Shoulder Activity Scale, Short Form-36 physical function scale (SF-36 PF), EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire, Western Ontario Osteoarthritis Shoulder (WOOS) index, PROMIS PF CAT, and the PROMIS UE. Correlation was defined as high (>0.7), moderate (0.4-0.6), or weak (0.2-0.3). Significant floor and ceiling effects were present if more than 15% of individuals scored the lowest or highest possible total score on any PRO. The PROMIS PF demonstrated excellent correlation with the SF-36 PF ( r = 0.81, P ceiling or floor effects observed. The mean number of items administered by the PROMIS PRO was 4. These data suggest that for a patient population with operative shoulder osteoarthritis, PROMIS UE and PROMIS PF CAT may be valid alternative PROs. Additionally, PROMIS PF CAT offers a decreased question burden with no ceiling effects.

  20. Use of PROMIS for Patients Undergoing Primary Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, S. Blake; Glass, Natalie; Anthony, Chris A.; Hettrich, Carolyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) consists of question banks for health domains through computer adaptive testing (CAT). Hypothesis: For patients with glenohumeral arthritis, (1) there would be high correlation between traditional patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures and the PROMIS upper extremity item bank (PROMIS UE) and PROMIS physical function CAT (PROMIS PF CAT), and (2) PROMIS PF CAT would not demonstrate ceiling effects. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Sixty-one patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis were included. Each patient completed the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) assessment form, Marx Shoulder Activity Scale, Short Form–36 physical function scale (SF-36 PF), EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire, Western Ontario Osteoarthritis Shoulder (WOOS) index, PROMIS PF CAT, and the PROMIS UE. Correlation was defined as high (>0.7), moderate (0.4-0.6), or weak (0.2-0.3). Significant floor and ceiling effects were present if more than 15% of individuals scored the lowest or highest possible total score on any PRO. Results: The PROMIS PF demonstrated excellent correlation with the SF-36 PF (r = 0.81, P ceiling or floor effects observed. The mean number of items administered by the PROMIS PRO was 4. Conclusion: These data suggest that for a patient population with operative shoulder osteoarthritis, PROMIS UE and PROMIS PF CAT may be valid alternative PROs. Additionally, PROMIS PF CAT offers a decreased question burden with no ceiling effects. PMID:28944248

  1. Scatter Dose in Patients in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W. F. O.

    2003-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy are often treated with high energy radiation (bremsstrahlung) which causes scatter doses in the patients from various sources as photon scatter coming from collimator, gantry, patient, patient table or room (walls, floor, air) or particle doses resulting from gamma-particle reactions in the atomic nucleus if the photon energies are above 8 MeV. In the last years new treatment techniques like IMRT (esp the step-and-shoot- or the MIMIC-techniques) have increased interest in these topics again. In the lecture an overview about recent measurements on scatter doses resulting from gantry, table and room shall be given. Scatter doses resulting from the volume treated in the patient to other critical parts of the body like eyes, ovarii etc. have been measured in two diploma works in our institute and are compared with a program (PERIDOSE; van der Giessen, Netherlands) to estimate them. In some cases these scatter doses have led to changes of treatment modalities. Also an overview and estimation of doses resulting from photon-particle interactions is given according to a publication from Gudowska et al.(Gudowska I, Brahme A, Andreo P, Gudowski W, Kierkegaard J. Calculation of absorbed dose and biological effectiveness from photonuclear reactions in a bremsstrahlung beam of end point 50 MeV. Phys Med Biol 1999; 44(9):2099-2125.). Energy dose has been calculated with Monte Carlo-methods and is compared with analytical methods for 50 MV bremsstrahlung. From these data biologically effective doses from particles in different depths of the body can be estimated also for energies used in normal radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Understanding changes in the motivation of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickrell, M.; Bongers, B.; van den Hoven, E.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke patient motivation can fluctuate during rehabilitation due to a range of factors. This study reports on qualitative research, consisting of observations of stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation and interviews with patients about the changes in motivation they identified during their time

  3. Recovery of older patients undergoing ambulatory anaesthesia with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahajan, V A

    2007-06-01

    Delayed recovery of cognitive function is a well-recognized phenomenon in older patients. The potential for the volatile anaesthetic used to contribute to alterations in postoperative cognitive function in older patients following minor surgical procedures has not been determined. We compared emergence from isoflurane and sevoflurane anaesthesia in older surgical patients undergoing urological procedures of short duration.

  4. Increased concentrations of L-lactate in the rectal lumen in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Jørgensen, V L; Poulsen, T D

    2005-01-01

    Gut ischaemia may contribute to morbidity in patients after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), but little is known about the metabolic state of the large bowel in such patients. Therefore we estimated the concentrations of L-lactate and Pco(2) in rectal mucosa in patients undergoing cardiac surgery...

  5. Cardiac implantable electronic device and associated risk of infective endocarditis in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lauge; Valeur, Nana; Bundgaard, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) are at increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) as are patients with a cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED). However, few data exist on the IE risk after AVR surgery in patients with a CIED. Methods and results: Using the Danish...

  6. Communication skills training for radiation therapists: preparing patients for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkett, Georgia; O'Connor, Moira; Aranda, Sanchia; Jefford, Michael; Merchant, Susan; York, Debra; Miller, Lisa; Schofield, Penelope

    2016-12-01

    Patients sometimes present for radiation therapy with high levels of anxiety. Communication skills training may assist radiation therapists to conduct more effective consultations with patients prior to treatment planning and treatment commencement. The overall aim of our research is to examine the effectiveness of a preparatory programme 'RT Prepare' delivered by radiation therapists to reduce patient psychological distress. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe the communication skills workshops developed for radiation therapists and evaluate participants' feedback. Radiation therapists were invited to participate in two communication skills workshops run on the same day: (1) Consultation skills in radiation therapy and (2) Eliciting and responding to patients' emotional cues. Evaluation forms were completed. Radiation therapists' consultations with patients were then audio-recorded and evaluated prior to providing a follow-up workshop with participants. Nine full day workshops were held. Sixty radiation therapists participated. Positive feedback was received for both workshops with 88% or more participants agreeing or strongly agreeing with all the statements about the different components of the two workshops. Radiation therapists highlighted participating in role play with an actor, discussing issues; receiving feedback; acquiring new skills and knowledge; watching others role play and practicing with checklist were their favourite aspects of the initial workshop. The follow-up workshops provided radiation therapists with feedback on how they identified and addressed patients' psychological concerns; time spent with patients during consultations and the importance of finding private space for consultations. Communication skills training consisting of preparing patients for radiation therapy and eliciting and responding to emotional cues with follow-up workshops has the potential to improve radiation therapists' interactions with patients undergoing

  7. Trough Concentrations of Vancomycin in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Jin Park

    Full Text Available To investigate the appropriateness of the current vancomycin dosing strategy in adult patients with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, between March 2013 and November 2013, patients who were treated with vancomycin while on ECMO were enrolled. Control group consisted of 60 patients on vancomycin without ECMO, stayed in medical intensive care unit during the same study period and with the same exclusion criteria. Early trough levels were obtained within the fourth dosing, and maintenance levels were measured at steady state. A total of 20 patients were included in the analysis in ECMO group. Sixteen patients received an initial intravenous dose of 1.0 g vancomycin followed by 1.0 g every 12 hours. The non-steady state trough level of vancomycin after starting administration was subtherapeutic in 19 patients (95.00% in ECMO group as compared with 40 patients (66.67% in the control group (p = 0.013. Vancomycin clearance was 1.27±0.51 mL/min/kg, vancomycin clearance/creatinine clearance ratio was 0.90 ± 0.37, and elimination rate constant was 0.12 ± 0.04 h-1. Vancomycin dosingfrequency and total daily dose were significantly increased after clinical pharmacokinetic services of the pharmacist based on calculated pharmacokinetic parameters (from 2.10 ± 0.72 to 2.90 ± 0.97 times/day, p = 0.002 and from 32.54 ± 8.43 to 42.24 ± 14.62mg/kg, p = 0.014 in ECMO group in contrast with those (from 2.11 ± 0.69 to 2.37 ± 0.86 times/day, p = 0.071 and from 33.91 ± 11.85 to 31.61 ± 17.50 mg/kg, p = 0.350 in the control group.Although the elimination rate for vancomycin was similar with population parameter of non ECMO patients, the current dosing strategy of our institution for vancomycinin our ICU was not sufficient to achieve the target trough in the initial period in most patients receiving ECMO.

  8. Use of Proktis-M suppositories in patients undergoing neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrone, S; Gonnelli, A; Cantarella, M; Sainato, A

    2015-12-01

    Generally speaking, the negative side of radiation treatment of the pelvic district is the toxicity that may compromise the patient's quality of life and lead to temporary suspension of treatment with possible negative effects on its effectiveness. In neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), the toxicity that is most frequently observed is proctitis, usually treated with topical corticosteroids or mesalazine. Hyaluronic acid's function is to restore the regular trophism and elasticity of the connective tissues leading to faster repair of the damage, and this could represent a viable option for the control of actinic proctitis. Since March 2012, a neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy protocol has been active at the Pisa Universitary Hospital for patients with LARC; 23 patients have been enrolled up to the present. Treatment involves an induction chemotherapy phase according to the FOLFOXIRI + Bevacizumab regimen for 6 cycles, followed by chemotherapy (capecitabina + Bevacizumab) concomitant with radiotherapy (5040 cGy in 28 fractions). Surgery is scheduled 6-8 weeks after the end of RTCT. During the course of associated treatment (RTCT), 12/23 patients received topical therapy with hyaluronic acid (Proktis-M suppositories) for the prevention of proctitis. All 23 patients enrolled in the study completed the induction chemotherapy phase. In the first 11 enrolled patients who did not receive prior Proktis-M suppositories, intense rectal toxicity was observed. Proctalgia of grade G1-2 and G3-4 presented respectively in 64% and 36% of cases, with consequent interruption of treatment which, in 45% of patients, lasted longer than 10 days. In the remaining 12 patients who underwent prior treatment with Proktis-M suppositories, the percentage of rectal toxicity was lower. In those cases where it did present, onset was later and its intensity and duration lower. 25% of patients did not develop proctalgia, 33% developed proctalgia of grade G1 and 42

  9. [Adherence to pharmacological treatment in adult patients undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgnaolin, Vanessa; Figueiredo, Ana Elizabeth Prado Lima

    2012-06-01

    Adherence to treatment in patients on hemodialysis is not a simple process. Strategies to promote adherence will meet the need for improvements in the process of orientation concerning the disease and its pharmacological treatment. To identify compliance with pharmacological treatment of patients on hemodialysis and the main factors related to it we used the Adherence Scale. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. Interviews were conducted to collect socioeconomic, pharmacological data, as well as those regarding self-reported adherence to drug. Out of the 65 participants, 55.4% showed non-compliance. The mean number of drugs used was 4.1 ± 2.5 (self-report) and 6.2 ± 3.0 (prescription). Statistical analysis showed significant differences concerning compliance at different ages (> 60 years are more adherent). A significant proportion of patients have difficulty to comply with treatment and the main factor was forgetfulness. Regarding age, elderly patients are more adherent to treatment. The low level of knowledge about the used drugs may be one of the reasons for the lack of adherence, and the patient's orientation process by a team of multiprofessionals involved in assisting is a strategy to promote adherence.

  10. Evaluation of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Mohammad; Sami, Ramin; Behzad, Fariba

    2008-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy is a complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that present in low and high turnover patterns. This disorder has a key role in the disability of CKD patients in whom early diagnosis and treatment can result in better outcome. We studied hyperparathyroidism prevalence and its relationship with renal osteodystrophy in our advanced CKD population. We included 80 patients (of whom 44 (55%) were diabetic) during 6 months period. The patients answered a questionnaire about symptoms related to bone disease and blood levels of parathormone (PTH), calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase were obtained, in addition to hand and skull radiographs in all the study patients. Prevalence of clinically evident hyperparathyroidism in our patients was 45%. Hyperparathyroidism had significant relationship with alkaline phosphatase and radiological findings, but did not have a significant relationship with dialysis duration, age, sex, familial history, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension. We conclude that secondary hyperparathyroidism is prevalent in our dialysis population and has high correlation with serum alkaline phosphatase levels and radiological changes.

  11. Age as a prognostic variable in patients undergoing transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, J; Jensen, J S; Iversen, H G

    1993-01-01

    In a retrospective study the outcome of transurethral prostatectomy (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in patients more than 80 years old was compared to a control group of patients with a mean age ten years younger. The elderly had significantly more tissue resected and presented...... with a higher rate of preoperative urinary tract infection. More urological complications were seen among the elderly but these were generally short lived and had no influence on the morbidity, mortality and symptomatic outcome. The perioperative mortality was 3.2% among elderly and 0% in the younger age group....... A cardiorespiratory risk score could not predict patients at risk. In conclusion the age per se had no major influence on the outcome of TURP....

  12. Maximum physical capacity testing in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutsen, L.; Quist, M; Midtgaard, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in the field of physical exercise in rehabilitation of cancer patients, leading to requirements for objective maximum physical capacity measurement (maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and one-repetition maximum (1RM)) to determin...... early in the treatment process. However, the patients were self-referred and thus highly motivated and as such are not necessarily representative of the whole population of cancer patients treated with chemotherapy....... in performing maximum physical capacity tests as these motivated them through self-perceived competitiveness and set a standard that served to encourage peak performance. CONCLUSION: The positive attitudes in this sample towards maximum physical capacity open the possibility of introducing physical testing...

  13. Management of antithrombotic agents in patients undergoing flexible bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Abuqayyas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding is one of the most feared complications of flexible bronchoscopy. Although infrequent, it can be catastrophic and result in fatal outcomes. Compared to other endoscopic procedures, the risk of morbidity and mortality from the bleeding is increased, as even a small amount of blood can fill the tracheobronchial tree and lead to respiratory failure. Patients using antithrombotic agents (ATAs have higher bleeding risk. A thorough understanding of the different ATAs is critical to manage patients during the peri-procedural period. A decision to stop an ATA before bronchoscopy should take into account a variety of factors, including indication for its use and the type of procedure. This article serves as a detailed review on the different ATAs, their pharmacokinetics and the pre- and post-bronchoscopy management of patients receiving these medications.

  14. Retreatment Rates Among Endometriosis Patients Undergoing Hysterectomy or Laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ahmed M; Du, Ella Xiaoyan; Yang, Hongbo; Wu, Eric Q; Haley, Jane C

    2017-06-01

    Hysterectomy and laparoscopy are the two most common surgical options used to treat women with endometriosis, yet the disease may still recur. This study aimed to determine the long-term retreatment rates among endometriosis patients in the United States who received either hysterectomy or laparoscopy. Patients aged 18-49 years with endometriosis who underwent hysterectomy or laparoscopy were identified in the Truven Health MarketScan claims database (2004-2013). The retreatment rate up to 8 years after the initial surgery was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The relative risk of retreatment among patients with hysterectomy versus laparoscopy was assessed using a Cox proportional hazard model. A total of 24,915 patients with endometriosis who underwent hysterectomy and 37,308 patients with endometriosis who underwent laparoscopy were identified. The estimated retreatment rates were 3.3%, 4.7%, and 5.4% in the 2nd, 5th, and 8th year following hysterectomy, respectively, while the rates following laparoscopy were 15.8%, 27.5%, and 35.2%, respectively. The hazard ratio of retreatment was 0.157 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.146-0.169) comparing hysterectomy to laparoscopy. In the sensitivity analysis, which expanded the definition of retreatment by including medical treatments, the retreatment rate increased by a factor of 11-14 for the hysterectomy cohort and by a factor of 2-4 for the laparoscopy cohort, and the hazard ratio of retreatment rate for hysterectomy versus laparoscopy was 0.490 (95% CI: 0.477-0.502). Our study results indicated that the disease retreatment rate after laparoscopy is high among patients with endometriosis; even hysterectomy does not guarantee freedom from retreatment.

  15. Compensatory renal hypertrophia in patients undergoing unilateral nephrectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, P; Munck, O; Tonnesen, K H

    1977-01-01

    Estimations of the residual glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were made from renography and GFR measurements before unilateral nephrectomy in 28 patients aged 42-77 years. The GFR was measured one week and three months after the operation and comparisons were made between the function of the remai......Estimations of the residual glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were made from renography and GFR measurements before unilateral nephrectomy in 28 patients aged 42-77 years. The GFR was measured one week and three months after the operation and comparisons were made between the function...

  16. Prevention and treatment of CCV in patients undergoing cataract phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Yazykova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was hold on the basis of LLC «Eye Microsurgery» in Astrakhan.Purpose: clinical evaluation the influence of Systane Balance (Alcon the condition of the «ocular surface comfort» at patients with phaco.Materials and methods. 60 patients took part in the study. 30 men and 30 women aged from 68 to 80 years. After the first survey the patients were divided into two groups by means of random choice (15 men and 15 women in each group. Three days before the surgery Both groups of patients received antibiotics (Vigamox (Alcon and NSAIDs (Nevanac, Alcon according to the standard scheme for preoperative preparation (during 3 days before operation. These drugs were also recommended in the postoperative period. Systane Balance (1 drop 2‑3 times a day was prescribed for the first group in 2 weeks before phaco. The second group didn’t get any artificial tears. Systane Balance had been chosen as an artificial tears as its composition is very close to the natural tear film, compensates the deficiency of the lipid layer that is broken when meibomean gland dysfunction (MGD thus it prevents from increasing tear film osmolarity and its rupture.Results: In 60% (36 people SSG was due to dysfunction of the meibomian glands, and 40% (24 people had a different genesis (endocrine pathology, receiving β-blockers for local and systemic effects, long-term use of drugs containing the preservative benzalkonium chloride, menopause. One week after phacoemulsification all patients of group 1, treated with the drug Sisteyn Balance dramatically decreased the severity of complaints of dry eye, foreign body sensation, burning, lacrimation, blurred vision in comparison with the group without artificial tears One month after surgery, these complaints were even less pronounced. At the same time, subjective complaints in patients of the second group observed significantly more frequently than before surgery.Conclusions. The patients who belong to the

  17. Effect of marital status on the outcome of patients undergoing elective or urgent coronary revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Israel M; Gaglia, Michael A; Torguson, Rebecca; Minha, Sa'ar; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2013-10-01

    Marriage confers various health advantages in the general population. However, the added value of marriage among patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) beyond the standard cardiovascular risk factors is not clear. This study aimed to assess the effects of marital status on outcomes of patients undergoing elective or urgent PCI. Clinical observational analysis of consecutive patients undergoing elective or urgent PCI from 1993 to 2011 was performed. Patients were stratified by marital status, comparing married to unmarried patients. Clinical outcome up to 12 months was obtained by telephone contact or office visit. A total of 11,216 patients were included in the present analysis; 55% were married and 45% unmarried. Significant differences in baseline characteristics were noted, including a lower prevalence of hypertension (86% vs 88%), diabetes (34% vs 38%), and smoking (19% vs 25%) among married vs unmarried patients, respectively (P married patients had a higher prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and family history of coronary artery disease. Early and late major adverse cardiac event rates were significantly lower for married vs unmarried patients up to 1 year (13.3% vs 8.2%, P Married status was independently associated with improved outcome in multivariable analysis (hazard ratio 0.7, 95% CI 0.6-0.9). Married patients who undergo urgent or elective PCI have superior short- and long-term outcomes up to 1 year when compared with unmarried patients. These benefits persist after adjustment for multiple traditional cardiovascular risk factors. © 2013.

  18. Spiritual well-being and quality of life in Iranian women with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Najmeh; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Zamani, Ahmadreza; Bahrami, Fatemeh; Emami, Hamid; Loghmani, Amir

    2013-05-01

    Psychological distress and morbidity are common consequences of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and associated with poor quality of life (QOL). Spiritual well-being is an important aspect of QOL, but little is known about the spiritual well-being and its relationship with QOL in patients of different cultures such as Iranian Muslim patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of QOL and spirituality among patients with breast cancer undergoing radiation therapy. This was a cross-sectional study which was conducted in the Breast Cancer Research Center of St. S. Al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. Spiritual well-being was measured using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being Scale (FACIT-Sp12). The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (EORTC QLQ-C30) and its supplementary breast cancer questionnaire (QLQ-BR23) were used to assess the quality of life of patients. Descriptive analysis, Pearson's correlation, and multiple regression analysis were performed for statistical assessment. In all, 68 patients fulfilled the study's inclusion criteria and were interviewed. The mean global QOL was 41.42 (SD = 18.02), and the mean spiritual well-being was 28.41 (SD = 6.95). There was a significant positive correlation between general QOL and total spiritual well-being scores. Also, spiritual well-being, social functioning, pain, and arm symptoms were significant predictors of global QOL. The results of this study provide evidence that breast cancer survivors in Iran experience a poor quality of life across a broad spectrum of health domains, particularly social, emotional, and spiritual, indicating that psychosocial-spiritual support should be considered in caring for patients with breast cancer.

  19. Endotracheal tube cufi pressures in adult patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obstructing tracheal mucosal blood flow but high enough to form an effective seal when delivering PPV. Tracheal ... the capillary blood pressure supplying the trachea and is followed by ischaemia with inflammation. ... The aim of this study was to determine the ETT cuff pressures of patients receiving general anaesthesia at ...

  20. Health-related quality of life in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljanović Gora

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chronic renal disease is one of the growing problems all over the world. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL is an important indicator for those with a chronic disease, such as chronic renal disease, because it may serve as predictor of mortality and hospitalization. The aim of this study was to assess HRQoL in patients on chronic maintenance hemodialysis (HD, and compare it with patients suffering from hypertension (HTA, and normal controls of the same age and gender (C. Methods. The study enrolled 224 males and females older than 18 years: 67 in the HD group, 78 in the HTA group, and 79 in the C group. HRQoL was assessed in all groups using 15-D questionnaire. Results. Significantly higher level of education was recorded in the HD group compared to other two groups. In the HD group there were significantly less employed persons (9% and significantly more retired (67.2%. All groups were similar regarding an average monthly income and marital status. We found significantly lower total HRQoL score in patients in the HD group, compared to normal controls (0.78 ± 0.16 vs. 0.89 ± 0.10 in the HTA and 0.95 ± 0.06 in the C group as well as specific scores in almost all investigated domains, except in speech, eating and mental functions. Patients in the HD and HTA groups had similar self-reported quality of life in additional 3 domains: hearing, elimination and distress, while the HD group reported significantly lower scores in remaining 9 domains: mobility, vision, breathing, sleeping, usual activities, discomfort and symptoms, depression, vitality and sexual activity. Patients in the HTA group had significantly lower scores than normal controls in 8 domains (hearing, sleeping, elimination, usual activities, discomfort and symptoms, depression, distress and vitality as well as in total quality of life, while in remaining 4 domains there was no significant difference (mobility, vision, breathing, sexual activity. Conclusion. Both

  1. Nursing Care of Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Desensitization: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Patricia; Carsten, Cynthia; Braskett, Melinda; Carino, Arvie

    2016-02-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to chemotherapeutic agents can cause the discontinuation of first-line therapies. Chemotherapy desensitization is a safe, but labor-intensive, process to administer these important medications. A desensitization protocol can enable a patient to receive the entire target dose of a medication, even if the patient has a history of severe infusion reactions. In this article, the authors explain the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity reactions and describe the recent development of desensitization protocols in oncology. In part II of this article, which will appear in the April 2016 issue of the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing, the authors will give a detailed account of how a desensitization protocol is performed at an academic medical center.
.

  2. The anal canal as a risk organ in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyunsoo; Baek, Jong Geun; Jo, Sunmi

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with cervical cancer undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. However, patients with hemorrhoids may be troubled with low radiation dose. We tried to analyze the dose-volume statistics of the anal canal in patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. The records of 31 patients with cervical cancer who received definite or postoperative radiotherapy at one institution were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were evaluated from radiotherapy start to 1 month after radiotherapy completion. Various clinical and dosimetric factors were analyzed to characterize relations with acute anal complications. The anal verge was located an average of 1.2 cm (range -0.6~3.9) below the lower border of the ischial tuberosity and an average of 2.7 cm (range -0.6~5.7) behind the sacral promontory level. The presence of hemorrhoids before radiotherapy was found to be significantly associated with acute radiation-induced anal symptoms (p = 0.001), and the mean induction dose for anal symptoms was 36.9 Gy. No patient without hemorrhoids developed an anal symptom during radiotherapy. Dosimetric analyses of V30 and V40 showed marginal correlations with anal symptoms (p = 0.07). The present study suggests a relation between acute anal symptoms following radiotherapy and acute hemorrhoid aggravation. Furthermore, the location of the anal verge was found to be variable, and consequently doses administered to the anal canal also varied substantially. Our results caution careful radiation treatment planning for whole pelvic radiotherapy, and that proper clinical management be afforded patients with hemorrhoids during radiotherapy.

  3. Nursing problems of patients undergoing venous-venous ECMO therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Krupa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ECMO (Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation is an extracorporeal gas exchange method that, despite many, carries the risk of many complications. ECMO is a modern intensive care method which in many cases is the last resort for the patient. Care and supervision are provided by a multidisciplinary team of specialists: physicians, perfusionists, nurses. The aim of the article was to present ECMO nursing care and the principles of care and care during and after ECMO therapy

  4. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  5. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Matthew A; Mauck, Karen F; Daniels, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due to an understanding of the frequency and seriousness of these complications, bariatric surgery patients typically receive some method of VTE prophylaxis with lower extremity compression, pharmacologic prophylaxis, or both. However, the optimal approach in these patients is unclear, with multiple open questions. In particular, strategies of adjusted-dose heparins, postdischarge anticoagulant prophylaxis, and the role of vena cava filters have been evaluated, but only to a limited extent. In contrast to other types of operations, the literature regarding VTE prophylaxis in bariatric surgery is notable for a dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials, and current professional guidelines reflect the uncertainties in this literature. Herein, we summarize the available evidence after systematic review of the literature regarding approaches to VTE prevention in bariatric surgery. Identification of risk factors for VTE in the bariatric surgery population, analysis of the effectiveness of methods used for prophylaxis, and an overview of published guidelines are presented. PMID:26316771

  6. Radiographic sarcopenia predicts postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kosei; Yoshida, Ryuichi; Yagi, Takahito; Umeda, Yuzo; Nobuoka, Daisuke; Kuise, Takashi; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2017-05-26

    Recently, skeletal muscle depletion (sarcopenia) has been reported to influence postoperative outcomes after certain procedures. This study investigated the impact of sarcopenia on postoperative outcomes following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We performed a retrospective study of consecutive patients (n = 219) who underwent PD at our institution between January 2007 and May 2013. Sarcopenia was evaluated using preoperative computed tomography. We evaluated postoperative outcomes and the influence of sarcopenia on short-term outcomes, especially infectious complications. Subsequently, multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of prognostic factors (including sarcopenia) on postoperative infections. The mortality, major complication, and infectious complication rates for all patients were 1.4%, 16.4%, and 47.0%, respectively. Fifty-five patients met the criteria for sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was significantly associated with a higher incidence of in-hospital mortality (P = 0.004) and infectious complications (P sarcopenia (odds ratio = 3.43; P Sarcopenia is an independent preoperative predictor of infectious complications after PD. Clinical assessment combined with sarcopenia may be helpful for understanding the risk of postoperative outcomes and determining perioperative management strategies.

  7. Treatment of Hepatitis C in Patients Undergoing Immunosuppressive Drug Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kohtaro Ooka; Joseph K.Lim

    2016-01-01

    With 185 million people chronically infected globally,hepatitis C is a leading bloodborne infection.All-oral regimens of direct acting agents have superior efficacy compared to the historical interferon-based regimens and are significantly more tolerable.However,trials of both types of regimens have often excluded patients on immunosuppressive medications for reasons other than organ transplantation.Yet,these patients-most often suffering from malignancy or autoimmune diseases-could stand to benefit from these treatments.In this study,we systematically review the literature on the treatment of hepatitis C in these neglected populations.Research on patients with organ transplants is more robust and this literature is reviewed here non-systematically.Our systematic review produced 2273 unique works,of which 56 met our inclusion criteria and were used in our review.The quality of data was low;only 3 of the 56 studies were randomized controlled trials.Sustained virologic response was reported sporadically.Interferon-containing regimens achieved this end-point at rates comparable to that in immunocompetent individuals.Severe adverse effects and death were rare.Data on all-oral regimens were sparse,but in the most robust study,rates of sustained virologic response were again comparable to immunocompetent individuals (40/41).Efficacy and safety of interferoncontaining regimens and all-oral regimens were similar to rates in immunocompetent individuals;however,there were few interventional trials.The large number of case reports and case series makes conclusions vulnerable to publication bias.While firm conclusions are challenging,given the dearth of high-quality studies,our results demonstrate that antiviral therapy can be safe and effective.The advent of all-oral regimens offers patients and clinicians greatly increased chances of cure and fewer side effects.Preliminary data reveal that these regimens may confer such benefits in immunosuppressed individuals as well

  8. Radiation protection in BNCT patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaumann, Hernan R.; Scharnichia, E.; Levanon, I.; Fernandez, C.; Facchini, Guillermo; Longhino, J.; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Pereira, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a technique that selectively targets cancer cells while sparing normal tissues by virtue of the differential uptake of a 10 B carrier compound in tumor. The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and the Oncology Institute 'Angel H. Roffo' (IOAR) began a BNCT programme in 2003 for treating cutaneous skin melanomas in extremities. The neutron beam used is the hyperthermal one developed at the RA-6 Reactor of the Bariloche Atomic Centre (CAB). The prescribed dose is delivered in one fraction and therefore patient positioning and knowledge of the dose received by normal tissue are crucial. 10 irradiations have been done since 2003, all of them in legs and feet and the dose prescription was determined by the maximum tolerable skin dose. Due to the characteristics of this treatment the patient body might be exposed not only to the primary beam but also to the secondary photon beam produced by neutron capture at the target itself. Thus a patient radiation-monitoring plan was implemented in order to evaluate the gamma dose delivered to sensible organs of each patient. An acrylic water-filled whole body phantom was used for preliminary gamma dose and thermal neutron flux measurements at positions related to patient's body sensible organs considering tentative patient positions. The beam port shielding was, in this way, optimized. TLD-700 and Manganese foils were used for gamma and thermal neutron detection. The TLD-700 thermal neutron response was previously evaluated by using the in-phantom beam dosimetry characterization. In-vivo dosimetry with TLD is routinely implemented in order to evaluate gamma dose to sensible organs of each patient. These organs are chosen depending on its distance from the zone to be irradiated and its radio-sensibility. All TLDs have been positioned well outside the irradiation field. Maximum gamma dose received outside the radiation field in healthy tissues was well below tolerance dose for

  9. [Infectious complications in patients undergoing a heart transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, E; Muñoz, P

    1995-01-01

    Infectious complications are, with rejection, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in heart transplantation recipients. Adequate management of these patients requires an adequate knowledge of risk factors, of most common infectious syndromes and of relevant microorganism, as long as of their resistance pattern. Among the first group, we may mention lower respiratory tract infections, mediastinitis and meningitis, and among the microorganisms, Citomegalovirus, Aspergillus and Toxoplasma gondii. The impressive development of diagnostical techniques and of prophylactic and therapeutical possibilities suggest the convenience of a multidisciplinar approach to these complications.

  10. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, M J; Abreu-Luis, J; Hernandez-Armas, J [Servicio de Fisica Medica, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Prada-Martinez, E [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm{sup 2} in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  11. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Roman, M.J.; Abreu-Luis, J.; Hernandez-Armas, J.; Prada-Martinez, E.

    2001-01-01

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm 2 in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  12. Definition of Readmission in 3,041 Patients Undergoing Hepatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvik, Kristoffer W; Mise, Yoshihiro; Conrad, Claudius; Zimmitti, Giuseppe; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background Readmission rates of 9.7%–15.5% after hepatectomy have been reported. These rates are difficult to interpret due to variability in the time interval used to monitor readmission. The aim of this study was to refine the definition of readmission after hepatectomy. Study Design A prospectively maintained database of 3041 patients who underwent hepatectomy from 1998 through 2013 was merged with the hospital registry to identify readmissions. Area under the curve (AUC) analysis was used to determine the time interval that best captured unplanned readmission. Results Readmission rates at 30 days, 90 days, and 1 year after discharge were 10.7% (n = 326), 17.3% (n = 526), and 31.9% (n = 971) respectively. The time interval that best accounted for unplanned readmissions was 45 days after discharge (AUC, 0.956; p readmissions. Multivariate analysis revealed the following risk factors for unplanned readmission: diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 1.6; p = 0.024), right hepatectomy (OR, 2.1; p = 0.034), bile duct resection (OR, 1.9; p = 0.034), abdominal complication (OR, 1.8; p = 0.010), and a major postoperative complication (OR, 2.4; p 7 days nor postoperative hepatobiliary complications were independently associated with readmission. Conclusions To accurately assess readmission after hepatectomy, patients should be monitored 45 days after discharge. PMID:26047760

  13. EVALUATION OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE ON HEMODYNAMICS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penchalaiah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dexmedetomidine a newer generation highly selective alpha - 2 adrenergic agonist are well known to inhibit catecholamine release. The present study compares the effects of intravenously administered dexmedetomidine to attenuate hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum to laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anaesthesia. METHODOLOGY: 60 patients ASA Physical status I and II, aged between 18 and 50 years of either sex, scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecy stectomy were randomized in to 2 groups ( group D and S inn a double blind fashion to receive either Dexmedetomidine ( 1microgram/kg in 100ml of 0.9% normal saline or only 0.9%plain normal saline respectively. It is given 30 min prior to induction. Patient vitals like HR, SBP, DBP, MAP were monitored during the study at various time intervals. RESULTS: Following intubation and pneumoperitoneum there significant rise in HR, MAP, SBP, DBP in group S but no significant rise in Group D. CONCLUSION: Dexmedetomid ine given in a dose of 1microgram/kg as a premedication is e ffective in attenuating the hemodynamic responses in laparoscopic surgery

  14. Orthostatic hypotension during postoperative continuous thoracic epidural bupivacaine-morphine in patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crawford, M E; Møiniche, S; Orbæk, Janne

    1996-01-01

    Fifty patients undergoing colonic surgery received combined thoracic epidural and general anesthesia followed by continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.25% and morphine 0.05 mg/mL, 4 mL/h, for 96 h postoperatively plus oral tenoxicam 20 mg daily. Heart rate (HR) and arterial blood pressure (BP) were...... hypotension. The results suggest that patients undergoing abdominal surgery and treated with continuous small-dose thoracic epidural bupivacaine-morphine are subjected to a decrease of BP at rest and during mobilization, but not to an extent that seriously impairs ambulation in most patients....

  15. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  16. Hemodynamic, ventilator, and ECG changes in pediatric patients undergoing extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y K Sanadhya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental treatment induces pain anxiety and fear. This study was conducted to assess the changes in hemodynamic, ventilator, and electrocardiograph changes during extraction procedure among 12-15-year-old children and compare these changes with anxiety, fear, and pain. Materials and Methods: A purposive sample of 60 patients selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria underwent study procedure in the dental OPD of a medical college and hospital. The anxiety, fear, and pain were recorded by dental anxiety scale, dental fear scale, and visual analogue scale, respectively, before the start of the procedure. The systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and electrocardiogram changes were monitored during the extraction procedure. The recording was taken four times (preinjection phase, injection, extraction, and postextraction and was analyzed. Results: At the preinjection phase the mean vales were systolic blood pressure (128 ± 11.2, diastolic blood pressure (85.7 ± 6.3, heart rate (79.7 ± 9.3, and oxygen saturation (97.9 ± 5.8. These values increased in injection phases and decreased in extraction phase and the least values were found after 10 min of procedure and this relation was significant for all parameters except oxygen saturation (P = 0.48, NS. ECG abnormalities were seen among 22 patients and were significant before and after injection of Local anesthetic (P = 0.0001, S. Conclusions: Anxiety, fear, and pain have an effect on hemodynamic, ventilator, and cardiovascular parameters during the extraction procedure and hence behavioral management has to be emphasized among children in dental clinics.

  17. Management of patients with hematological malignancies undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Borde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with a previously diagnosed malignancy who need cardiac surgery is increasing. Patients with hematological malignancies represent only 0.38% of all patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The literature in this subset of patients is limited to only a few retrospective case series, with limited number of patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. We describe three cases with hematological malignancies namely chronic myelogenous leukemia, acute promyelocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia presenting for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Two patients were taken up for emergency CABG in view of ongoing ischemia, one of them was on preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump support. No mortality was observed. Two patients needed transfusion of blood products which was guided by thromboelastography. One patient developed superficial sternal wound infection requiring antibiotic therapy.

  18. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Samir; Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade ≤ 1) and short duration (≤1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction

  19. Smoking behaviour and attitudes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The Radboud experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saksens, N.T.M.; Noyez, L.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in smoking behaviour and attitudes of 2642 patients, undergoing cardiac surgery, between January 2000 and July 2008 were studied. All patients completed a preoperative questionnaire concerning smoking behaviour and attitude. Study endpoints are behaviour and attitude in relation to tobacco

  20. Aluminum concentrations in serum, dialysate, urine and bone among patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, P; Olsen, F; Heaf, J G

    1989-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) concentration in serum, urine, and dialysate was estimated in 21 patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). In 12 of the patients bone Al concentration was measured as well. Mean serum Al level was 32.4 +/- 21.0 micrograms/l. The Al concentrations in the d...

  1. Preoperative Thyroid Ultrasound Is Indicated in Patients Undergoing Parathyroidectomy for Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cletus A. Arciero, Zita S. Shiue, Jeremy D. Gates, George E. Peoples, Alan P. B. Dackiw, Ralph P. Tufano, Steven K. Libutti, Martha A. Zeiger, Alexander Stojadinovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary hyperaparathyroidism (pHPT is often accompanied by underlying thyroid pathology that can confound preoperative parathyroid localization studies and complicate intra-operative decision making. The aim of this study was to examine the utility of preoperative thyroid ultrasonography (US in patients prior to undergoing parathyroidectomy for pHPT.Methods: An Institutional Review Board approved prospective study was undertaken from January 2005 through July 2008. All patients with pHPT meeting inclusion criteria (n=94 underwent preoperative thyroid ultrasound in addition to standard 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy for parathyroid localization. Demographics, operative management and final pathology were examined in all cases.Results: Fifty-four of the 94 patients (57% were noted to have a thyroid nodule on preoperative US, of which 30 (56% underwent further examination with fine needle aspiration biopsy. Alteration of the operative plan attributable to underlying thyroid pathology occurred in 16 patients (17%, with patients undergoing either total thyroidectomy (n=9 or thyroid lobectomy (n=7. Thyroid cancer was noted in 33% of patients undergoing thyroid resection, and 6% of all patients with HPT.Conclusions: The routine utilization of preoperative thyroid ultrasound in patients prior to undergoing parathyroid surgery for pHPT is indicated. The added information from this non-invasive modality facilitates timely management of co-incidental, and sometimes malignant, thyroid pathology.

  2. The daily life of informal caregivers of patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ortelani de Toledo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to discuss the daily life of Informal Caregivers (ICG of cancer patients assisted in an outpatient chemotherapy unit of a university hospital in Campinas, São Paulo state. This study is part of a broader investigation. It was approved by a Research Ethics Committee under protocol n. 0288/10, and all ethical principles were adopted in accordance with the recommendations of Resolution 196/96. It is a descriptive, quantitative and qualitative study with literature and field research. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 ICGs for data collection. The data were analyzed based on the goals of the study and the theory and practice pertaining to the Theory of Social Representation. The results showed that (92.8% of the ICGs are female (57.1%, married, between 41 and 60 years old (78.5%, living in the same household of the sickened family members at the following degrees of relatedness: (35.7% mother-daughter, followed by (21.4% husband-wife. In the Informal Caregivers’ perception, their role interfered with their daily activities, bringing restrictions to leisure activities, self-care and work. The study expanded the understanding of the impacts that the function of caring brings to their everyday activities, helping to foster discussions about the need to implement actions and interventions of occupational therapy strategies that facilitate the daily lives of ICGs.

  3. Do patients undergo prostate examination while having a colonoscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammett, Tess; Hookey, Lawrence C; Kawakami, Jun

    2009-01-01

    To determine the rate at which physicians report performing a digital rectal examination and comment on the prostate gland before performing colonoscopy in men 50 to 70 years of age. A retrospective chart review of all men 50 to 70 years of age who had a colonoscopy in Kingston, Ontario, in 2005 was completed. It was noted whether each physician described performing a digital rectal examination before the colonoscopy, and if so, whether he or she commented on the prostate. In 2005, 846 eligible colonoscopies were performed by 17 physicians in Kingston, Ontario. In 29.2% of cases, the physician made no comment about having performed a digital rectal examination; in 55.8% of cases, the physician commented on having completed a digital rectal examination but said nothing about the prostate; and in 15.0% of cases, the physician made a comment regarding the prostate. No physician consistently commented on the prostate for all patients, and in no circumstances was direct referral to another physician or follow-up suggested. A colonoscopy presents an ideal opportunity for physicians to use a digital rectal examination to assess for prostate cancer. Physicians performing colonoscopies in men 50 to 70 years of age should pay special attention to the prostate while performing a digital rectal examination before colonoscopy. This novel concept may help maximize resources for cancer screening and could potentially increase the detection rate of clinically palpable prostate cancer.

  4. Determinants of polyp Size in patients undergoing screening colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisonneuve Patrick

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-existing polyps, especially large polyps, are known to be the major source for colorectal cancer, but there is limited available information about factors that are associated with polyp size and polyp growth. We aim to determine factors associated with polyp size in different age groups. Methods Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from 67 adult gastrointestinal practice sites in the United States between 2002 and 2007 using a computer-generated endoscopic report form. Data were transmitted to and stored in a central data repository, where all asymptomatic white (n = 78352 and black (n = 4289 patients who had a polyp finding on screening colonoscopy were identified. Univariate and multivariate analysis of age, gender, performance site, race, polyp location, number of polyps, and family history as risk factors associated with the size of the largest polyp detected at colonoscopy. Results In both genders, size of the largest polyp increased progressively with age in all age groups (P P Conclusions In both genders there is a significant increase in polyp size detected during screening colonoscopy with increasing age. Important additional risk factors associated with increasing polyp size are gender, race, polyp location, and number of polyps, with polyp multiplicity being the strongest risk factor. Previous family history of bowel cancer was not a risk factor.

  5. Predictors of Pericardial Effusion in Patients Undergoing Pulmonary Artery Banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Mio; Matsubara, Muneaki; Tokunaga, Chiho; Nakajima, Tomomi; Mathis, Bryan James; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2018-03-01

    Although pulmonary artery banding (PAB) is a common palliative procedure for pediatric heart malformation, there are concerns of pressure overload and concomitant immune reactions in the right ventricle causing postsurgical complications such as pericardial effusion. At this time, no clear guidelines as to potential risk factors or procedural contraindications have been widely disseminated. Therefore, a study was undertaken to examine wide-ranging factors to find potential biomarkers for postsurgical pericardial effusion formation risk. A retrospective study was conducted on all cardiac surgeries performed over an eight-year period, and the main inclusion criterion was pericardial effusion development after PAB that required surgical drainage. Nine cases were then analyzed against a control group of 45 cases with respect to body measurements, concomitant surgeries, genetic screens, laboratory tests results, and cardiac function parameters. Trisomy 21 was strongly associated with the development of severe pericardial effusion after PAB, and postoperative serum albumin levels in patients with trisomy 21 were associated with pericardial effusion development. Other parameters showed no significant correlation with pericardial effusion development. Our data indicate a strong association between trisomy 21 and pericardial effusion requiring drainage after PAB, which is in line with translational research findings. Pressure overload from PAB may play a role in the formation of severe pericardial effusion that is exacerbated by cardiac structural defects commonly associated with trisomy 21. Surgical teams should therefore use caution and plan to implement drainage in PAB cases, and postoperative serum albumin may serve as a useful biomarker for pericardial effusion formation.

  6. The Society for Translational Medicine: clinical practice guidelines for mechanical ventilation management for patients undergoing lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shugeng; Zhang, Zhongheng; Brunelli, Alessandro; Chen, Chang; Chen, Chun; Chen, Gang; Chen, Haiquan; Chen, Jin-Shing; Cassivi, Stephen; Chai, Ying; Downs, John B; Fang, Wentao; Fu, Xiangning; Garutti, Martínez I; He, Jianxing; He, Jie; Hu, Jian; Huang, Yunchao; Jiang, Gening; Jiang, Hongjing; Jiang, Zhongmin; Li, Danqing; Li, Gaofeng; Li, Hui; Li, Qiang; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Yin; Li, Zhijun; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Liu, Deruo; Liu, Lunxu; Liu, Yongyi; Ma, Haitao; Mao, Weimin; Mao, Yousheng; Mou, Juwei; Ng, Calvin Sze Hang; Petersen, René H; Qiao, Guibin; Rocco, Gaetano; Ruffini, Erico; Tan, Lijie; Tan, Qunyou; Tong, Tang; Wang, Haidong; Wang, Qun; Wang, Ruwen; Wang, Shumin; Xie, Deyao; Xue, Qi; Xue, Tao; Xu, Lin; Xu, Shidong; Xu, Songtao; Yan, Tiansheng; Yu, Fenglei; Yu, Zhentao; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Lanjun; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xun; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhao, Xuewei; Zhi, Xiuyi; Zhou, Qinghua

    2017-09-01

    Patients undergoing lobectomy are at significantly increased risk of lung injury. One-lung ventilation is the most commonly used technique to maintain ventilation and oxygenation during the operation. It is a challenge to choose an appropriate mechanical ventilation strategy to minimize the lung injury and other adverse clinical outcomes. In order to understand the available evidence, a systematic review was conducted including the following topics: (I) protective ventilation (PV); (II) mode of mechanical ventilation [e.g., volume controlled (VCV) versus pressure controlled (PCV)]; (III) use of therapeutic hypercapnia; (IV) use of alveolar recruitment (open-lung) strategy; (V) pre-and post-operative application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP); (VI) Inspired Oxygen concentration; (VII) Non-intubated thoracoscopic lobectomy; and (VIII) adjuvant pharmacologic options. The recommendations of class II are non-intubated thoracoscopic lobectomy may be an alternative to conventional one-lung ventilation in selected patients. The recommendations of class IIa are: (I) Therapeutic hypercapnia to maintain a partial pressure of carbon dioxide at 50-70 mmHg is reasonable for patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy with one-lung ventilation; (II) PV with a tidal volume of 6 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cmH 2 O are reasonable methods, based on current evidence; (III) alveolar recruitment [open lung ventilation (OLV)] may be beneficial in patients undergoing lobectomy with one-lung ventilation; (IV) PCV is recommended over VCV for patients undergoing lung resection; (V) pre- and post-operative CPAP can improve short-term oxygenation in patients undergoing lobectomy with one-lung ventilation; (VI) controlled mechanical ventilation with I:E ratio of 1:1 is reasonable in patients undergoing one-lung ventilation; (VII) use of lowest inspired oxygen concentration to maintain satisfactory arterial oxygen saturation is reasonable based on physiologic principles; (VIII) Adjuvant drugs

  7. The Society for Translational Medicine: clinical practice guidelines for mechanical ventilation management for patients undergoing lobectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Brunelli, Alessandro; Chen, Chang; Chen, Chun; Chen, Gang; Chen, Haiquan; Chen, Jin-Shing; Cassivi, Stephen; Chai, Ying; Downs, John B.; Fang, Wentao; Fu, Xiangning; Garutti, Martínez I.; He, Jianxing; Hu, Jian; Huang, Yunchao; Jiang, Gening; Jiang, Hongjing; Jiang, Zhongmin; Li, Danqing; Li, Gaofeng; Li, Hui; Li, Qiang; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Yin; Li, Zhijun; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Liu, Deruo; Liu, Lunxu; Liu, Yongyi; Ma, Haitao; Mao, Weimin; Mao, Yousheng; Mou, Juwei; Ng, Calvin Sze Hang; Petersen, René H.; Qiao, Guibin; Rocco, Gaetano; Ruffini, Erico; Tan, Lijie; Tan, Qunyou; Tong, Tang; Wang, Haidong; Wang, Qun; Wang, Ruwen; Wang, Shumin; Xie, Deyao; Xue, Qi; Xue, Tao; Xu, Lin; Xu, Shidong; Xu, Songtao; Yan, Tiansheng; Yu, Fenglei; Yu, Zhentao; Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Lanjun; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xun; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhao, Xuewei; Zhi, Xiuyi; Zhou, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Patients undergoing lobectomy are at significantly increased risk of lung injury. One-lung ventilation is the most commonly used technique to maintain ventilation and oxygenation during the operation. It is a challenge to choose an appropriate mechanical ventilation strategy to minimize the lung injury and other adverse clinical outcomes. In order to understand the available evidence, a systematic review was conducted including the following topics: (I) protective ventilation (PV); (II) mode of mechanical ventilation [e.g., volume controlled (VCV) versus pressure controlled (PCV)]; (III) use of therapeutic hypercapnia; (IV) use of alveolar recruitment (open-lung) strategy; (V) pre-and post-operative application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP); (VI) Inspired Oxygen concentration; (VII) Non-intubated thoracoscopic lobectomy; and (VIII) adjuvant pharmacologic options. The recommendations of class II are non-intubated thoracoscopic lobectomy may be an alternative to conventional one-lung ventilation in selected patients. The recommendations of class IIa are: (I) Therapeutic hypercapnia to maintain a partial pressure of carbon dioxide at 50–70 mmHg is reasonable for patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy with one-lung ventilation; (II) PV with a tidal volume of 6 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cmH2O are reasonable methods, based on current evidence; (III) alveolar recruitment [open lung ventilation (OLV)] may be beneficial in patients undergoing lobectomy with one-lung ventilation; (IV) PCV is recommended over VCV for patients undergoing lung resection; (V) pre- and post-operative CPAP can improve short-term oxygenation in patients undergoing lobectomy with one-lung ventilation; (VI) controlled mechanical ventilation with I:E ratio of 1:1 is reasonable in patients undergoing one-lung ventilation; (VII) use of lowest inspired oxygen concentration to maintain satisfactory arterial oxygen saturation is reasonable based on physiologic principles; (VIII) Adjuvant drugs

  8. Surgical Site Infection in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, U. I.; Khan, A.; Nawaz, A.; Mansoor, R.; Malik, A. A.; Sher, F.; Ayyaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of surgical site infections in patients with type II diabetes undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy as compared with non-diabetic patients. Study Design: Cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit 2, Services Hospital, Lahore, from May to October 2012. Methodology: Patients were divided into two groups of 60 each, undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Group A comprised non-diabetic patients and group B comprised type II diabetic patients. Patients were followed postoperatively upto one month for the development of SSIs. Proportion of patients with surgical site infections or otherwise was compared between the groups using chi-square test with significance of p < 0.05. Results: In group A, 35 patients were above the age of 40 years. In group B, 38 patients were above the age of 40 years. Four patients in group A developed a surgical site infection. Seven patients in group B developed SSIs (p = 0.07). Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus did not significantly affect the onset of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. (author)

  9. Surgical RF ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing mitral valve repair for Barlow disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostagno, Carlo; Droandi, G; Gelsomino, S; Carone, E; Gensini, G F; Stefàno, P L

    2013-01-01

    At present, limited experience exists on the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients undergoing mitral valve repair (MVR) for Barlow disease. The aim of this investigation was to prospectively evaluate the radiofrequency ablation of AF in patients undergoing MVR for severe regurgitation due to Barlow disease. From January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010, out of 85 consecutive patients with Barlow disease, 27 with AF underwent RF ablation associated with MVR. They were examined every 4 months in the first year after surgery and thereafter twice yearly. At follow-up, AF was observed in 4/25 (16.0%). NYHA (New York Heart Association) functional class improved significantly, with no patients in class III or IV (before surgery, 81.5% had been). Otherwise, among 58 patients in sinus rhythm, 6 (11%) developed AF during follow-up. No clinical or echocardiographic predictive factor was found in this subgroup. Results from our investigation suggest that radiofrequency ablation of AF in patients with Barlow disease undergoing MVR for severe regurgitation is effective and should be considered in every patient with Barlow disease and AF undergoing valve surgical repair. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Prevalence of unrecognized diabetes, prediabetes and metabolic syndrome in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Revathi; Berger, Jeffrey S; Tully, Lisa; Vani, Anish; Shah, Binita; Burdowski, Joseph; Fisher, Edward; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Sedlis, Steven; Weintraub, Howard; Underberg, James A; Danoff, Ann; Slater, James A; Gianos, Eugenia

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome are important targets for secondary prevention in cardiovascular disease. However, the prevalence in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention is not well defined. We aimed to analyse the prevalence and characteristics of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with previously unrecognized prediabetes, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Data were collected from 740 patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention between November 2010 and March 2013 at a tertiary referral center. Prevalence of DM and prediabetes was evaluated using Haemoglobin A1c (A1c ≥ 6.5% for DM, A1c 5.7-6.4% for prediabetes). A modified definition was used for metabolic syndrome [three or more of the following criteria: body mass index ≥30 kg/m2; triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dL; high density lipoprotein prediabetes at time of percutaneous coronary intervention. Overall, 54.9% met criteria for metabolic syndrome (69.2% of patients with DM and 45.8% of patients without DM). Among patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, a substantial number were identified with a new DM, prediabetes, and/or metabolic syndrome. Routine screening for an abnormal glucometabolic state at the time of revascularization may be useful for identifying patients who may benefit from additional targeting of modifiable risk factors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Myenteric plexitis: A frequent feature in patients undergoing surgery for colonic diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassotti, Gabrio; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Sidoni, Angelo; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Dore, Maria P; Binda, Gian A; Bandelloni, Roberto; Salemme, Marianna; Del Sordo, Rachele; Cadei, Moris; Manca, Alessandra; Bernardini, Nunzia; Maurer, Christoph A; Cathomas, Gieri

    2015-12-01

    Diverticular disease of the colon is frequent in clinical practice, and a large number of patients each year undergo surgical procedures worldwide for their symptoms. Thus, there is a need for better knowledge of the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms of this disease entity. Because patients with colonic diverticular disease have been shown to display abnormalities of the enteric nervous system, we assessed the frequency of myenteric plexitis (i.e. the infiltration of myenteric ganglions by inflammatory cells) in patients undergoing surgery for this condition. We analyzed archival resection samples from the proximal resection margins of 165 patients undergoing left hemicolectomy (60 emergency and 105 elective surgeries) for colonic diverticulitis, by histology and immunochemistry. Overall, plexitis was present in almost 40% of patients. It was subdivided into an eosinophilic (48%) and a lymphocytic (52%) subtype. Plexitis was more frequent in younger patients; and it was more frequent in those undergoing emergency surgery (50%), compared to elective (28%) surgery (p = 0.007). All the severe cases of plexitis displayed the lymphocytic subtype. In conclusion, myenteric plexitis is frequent in patients with colonic diverticular disease needing surgery, and it might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  12. Perception of radiation awareness among patients in Karnataka - a qualitative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukumar, Suresh; Kotian, Rahul P.; Rajagopal, K.V.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing concern has recently been expressed in the literature that the patients undergoing diagnostic Computer Tomography imaging and X-ray examinations have inadequate knowledge and awareness about radiation. The frequent use of Computed tomography and routine X-ray examinations for unnecessary indications is the most vital cause of increase in medical radiation exposure. Dose reduction techniques and radiation protection measures is a topic of public concern in which government should play a very important role. Radiologists and patients undergoing any radiological procedure involving ionizing radiation are becoming highly sensitized to the issue of radiation exposure from these diagnostic procedures. The attitudes and perceptions of these patients undergoing diagnostic imaging procedures that use ionizing radiation vary widely. Patients perception about radiation awareness strongly influence their consent or acceptance of any diagnostic imaging procedure. In this study we review the perceptions of radiation risk by laypersons i.e patients who have very little knowledge and awareness about the diagnostic procedure and X-ray examination for which they have been referred. Although the benefit vs risk ratio will outweigh the radiation risk involved in these X-ray and CT examinations but the patients awareness about radiation is a major concern in today's society. The purpose of this study is to understand the perception of radiation awareness among patients in the Karnataka population. Very less qualitative research work has been taken up in this field, as a result such study will gain impetus in the near future. The study was carried out in Karnataka. Qualitative case study was conducted based on Non-Probability purposive sampling and in-depth interview was conducted at the Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal among ten patients who were referred for X-ray and CT examinations. An in-depth interview among patients in

  13. Effect of preoperative multimedia information on perioperative anxiety in patients undergoing procedures under regional anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jlala, H A; French, J L; Foxall, G L; Hardman, J G; Bedforth, N M

    2010-03-01

    Provision of preoperative information can alleviate patients' anxiety. However, the ideal method of delivering this information is unknown. Video information has been shown to reduce patients' anxiety, although little is known regarding the effect of preoperative multimedia information on anxiety in patients undergoing regional anaesthesia. We randomized 110 patients undergoing upper or lower limb surgery under regional anaesthesia into the study and control groups. The study group watched a short film (created by the authors) depicting the patient's in-hospital journey including either a spinal anaesthetic or a brachial plexus block. Patients' anxiety was assessed before and after the film and 1 h before and within 8 h after their operation, using the Spielberger state trait anxiety inventory and a visual analogue scale. There was no difference in state and trait anxiety between the two groups at enrollment. Women had higher baseline state and trait anxiety than men (P=0.02). Patients in the control group experienced an increase in state anxiety immediately before surgery (P<0.001), and patients in the film group were less anxious before operation than those in the control group (P=0.04). After operation, there was a decrease in state anxiety from baseline in both groups, but patients in the film group were less anxious than the control group (P=0.005). Preoperative multimedia information reduces the anxiety of patients undergoing surgery under regional anaesthesia. This type of information is easily delivered and can benefit many patients.

  14. Development of Postoperative Diabetes Mellitus in Patients Undergoing Distal Pancreatectomy versus Whipple Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Adrienne; Demirjian, Aram; Yamamoto, Maki; Hollenbach, Kathryn; Imagawa, David K

    2017-10-01

    Because the islets of Langerhans are more prevalent in the body and tail of the pancreas, distal pancreatectomy (DP) is believed to increase the likelihood of developing new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM). To determine whether the development of postoperative diabetes was more prevalent in patients undergoing DP or Whipple procedure, 472 patients undergoing either a DP (n = 122) or Whipple (n = 350), regardless of underlying pathology, were analyzed at one month postoperatively. Insulin or oral hypoglycemic requirements were assessed and patients were stratified into preoperative diabetic status: NODM or preexisting diabetes. A retrospective chart review of the 472 patients between 1996 and 2014 showed that the total rate of NODM after Whipple procedure was 43 per cent, which was not different from patients undergoing DP (45%). The incidence of preoperative diabetes was 12 per cent in patients undergoing the Whipple procedure and 17 per cent in the DP cohort. Thus, the overall incidence of diabetes after Whipple procedure was 54 and 49 per cent in the DP group. The development of diabetes was unrelated to the type of resection performed. Age more than 65 and Caucasian ethnicity were associated with postoperative diabetes regardless of the type of resection performed.

  15. Efficacy and safety of tacrolimus treatment for rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Misuzu; Natsumeda, Masamitsu; Takasugi, Koji; Ueno, Akiko; Ezawa, Kayo; Ezawa, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive joint destruction that requires aggressive treatment using appropriate disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). RA patients with renal failure, however, are intolerant to most DMARDs due to the potential toxicity. In Japan, tacrolimus was approved for the treatment of RA in 2005. Based on its pharmacokinetics, tacrolimus may be administered to the patients undergoing hemodialysis. We report two cases of RA patients on hemodialysis treated effectively and safely with tacrolimus.

  16. Erectile Dysfunction Among HIV Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: Dyslipidemia as a Main Risk Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Romero‐Velez, MD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: ED is highly prevalent in HIV patients. Dyslipidemia should be considered as a risk factor for ED in HIV patients. Romero‐Velez G, Lisker‐Cervantes A, Villeda‐Sandoval CI, Sotomayor de Zavaleta M, Olvera‐Posada D, Sierra‐Madero JG, Arreguin‐Camacho LO, and Castillejos‐Molina RA. Erectile dysfunction among HIV patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy: Dyslipidemia as a main risk factor. Sex Med 2014;2:24–30.

  17. Liver enzymes in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Ramos de Oliveira Liberato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to analyze the serum levels of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and the hematocrit in patients with chronic kidney disease who were undergoing peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty patients on peritoneal dialysis and 40 on hemodialysis were assessed, and the patients were matched according to the length of time that they had been on dialysis. Blood samples were collected (both before and after the session for those on hemodialysis to measure the enzymes and the hematocrit. RESULTS: In the samples from the patients who were undergoing peritoneal dialysis, the aspartate and alanine aminotransferase levels were slightly higher compared with the samples collected from the patients before the hemodialysis session and slightly lower compared with the samples collected after the hemodialysis session. The levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase in the hemodialysis patients were slightly higher than the levels in the patients who were undergoing peritoneal dialysis. In addition, the levels of aminotransferases and gamma-glutamyl transferase that were collected before the hemodialysis session were significantly lower than the values collected after the session. The hematocrit levels were significantly lower in the patients who were on peritoneal dialysis compared with the patients on hemodialysis (both before and after the hemodialysis session, and the levels were also significantly lower before hemodialysis compared with after hemodialysis. CONCLUSION: The aminotransferase levels in the patients who were undergoing peritoneal dialysis were slightly higher compared with the samples collected before the hemodialysis session, whereas the aminotransferase levels were slightly lower compared with the samples collected after the session. The hematocrits and the aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels of the samples collected after the

  18. Evaluation of self-esteem in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Aparecida Carvalho Leite

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the self-esteem of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Method: descriptive analytical cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. Around 156 patients that attended an oncology unit of a mid-sized hospital participated in the study. Results: we found a higher frequency of patients with high self-esteem, but some of them showed average or low self-esteem. The scale showed a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.746, by considering its acceptable internal consistency for the evaluated items. No independent variables showed significant associations with self-esteem. Conclusion: the cancer patients evaluated have presented high self-esteem; thus, it becomes crucial for nursing to plan the assistance of patients undergoing chemotherapy treatments, which enables actions and strategies that meet their physical and psychosocial conditions, aiming to maintain and rehabilitate these people's emotional aspects.

  19. Spinal anesthesia reduces postoperative delirium in opium dependent patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaie, O; Matin, N; Heidari, A; Tabatabaie, A; Hadaegh, A; Yazdanynejad, S; Tabatabaie, K

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of high spinal anesthesia on postoperative delirium in opium dependent patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The study was conducted in a tertiary referral university hospital on a population of 60 opium dependent patients undergoing CABG surgery. Patients were divided into two groups based on anesthesia protocol. One group were given general anesthesia (GA Group), the other group additionally received intrathecal morphine and bupivacaine (SGA Group). Postoperative delirium (POD) was defined as the main outcome of interest. Incidence of POD was significantly higher in patients of GA Group as compared with those in SGA Group (47% and 17% for GA and SGA respectively; P-value = 0.01). Time to extubation was on average 2.2 h shorter in SGA than in GA (7.1 h and 9.3 h respectively, P-value opium dependent patients.

  20. Recurrent Pseudomembranous Colitis in an Ovarian Cancer Patient Undergoing Carboplatin Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A. Allen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diarrhea is a common problem in ovarian cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and Clostridium difficile infection has been identified as a cause. The proper diagnosis and treatment of diarrhea are critical to patient care, especially to prevent the serious complications from a severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI. Case. We present a heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patient who developed recurrent pseudomembranous colitis while receiving carboplatin chemotherapy. Despite treatment with oral metronidazole for fourteen days, the patient’s diarrhea relapsed and colonoscopy revealed extensive pseudomembranous colitis. The infection eventually resolved with the combination of oral vancomycin and metronidazole. Conclusions. Diarrhea is a common problem in patients undergoing chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Management requires obtaining the proper diagnosis. Clostridium difficile associated pseudomembranous colitis must be part of the differential diagnosis. Treatment must be sufficient to prevent relapses of the Clostridium difficile infection to prevent serious consequences in an already vulnerable patient population.

  1. Prevention of pressure ulcers in patients undergoing sub-acute rehabilitation after severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sachs, Marianne Brostrup; Wolffbrandt, Mia Moth; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to uncover efforts made by healthcare professionals to prevent pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with severe brain injury undergoing treatment at a sub-acute rehabilitation department. BACKGROUND: PUs is a major burden for patients and also generate considerable...... healthcare costs. PUs are, nevertheless, prevalent in both secondary and primary care. DESIGN: In this qualitative study, we performed 24-hour observation on four patients undergoing rehabilitation for severe brain injury. An observation guide was developed inspired by the Braden Scale and Spradley's theory...... that patients' rehabilitation days be planned in such a manner that activities, mobilisation and training are conducted throughout the day and evening. We also recommend that professional staff are encouraged to seek information about the former life of patients with severe brain injury. This article...

  2. Initial experience with ketamine-based analgesia in patients undergoing robotic radical cystectomy and diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsohn, Kenneth; Davis, Tanya D; El-Arabi, Ahmad M; Tlachac, Jonathan; Langenstroer, Peter; O'Connor, R Corey; Guralnick, Michael L; See, William A; Schlosser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We instituted a ketamine-predominant analgesic regimen in the peri- and postoperative periods to limit the effects of narcotic analgesia on bowel function in patients undergoing radical cystectomy. The primary end points of interest were time to return of bowel function, time to discharge, and efficacy of the analgesic regimen. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy (RARC) with urinary diversion by a single surgeon at our institution from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012. Patients receiving the opioid-minimizing ketamine protocol were compared to a cohort of patients undergoing RARC with an opioid-predominant analgesic regimen. In total, 15 patients (Group A) were included in the ketamine-predominant regimen and 25 patients (Group B) in the opioid-predominant control group. Three patients (19%) in Group A discontinued the protocol due to ketamine side effects. The mean time to bowel movement and length of stay in Group A versus Group B was 3 versus 6 days (p return of bowel function and length of hospitalization after RARC. Our study has its limitations as a retrospective, single surgeon, single institution study and the non-randomization of patients. Notwithstanding these limitations, this study was not designed to show inferiority of one approach, but instead to show that our protocol is safe and efficacious, warranting further study in a prospective fashion.

  3. Preoperative renin-angiotensin system inhibitors protect renal function in aging patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barodka, Viachaslau; Silvestry, Scott; Zhao, Ning; Jiao, Xiangyin; Whellan, David J; Diehl, James; Sun, Jian-Zhong

    2011-05-15

    Renal failure (RF) represents a major postoperative complication for elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This observational cohort study examines effects of preoperative use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors on postoperative renal failure in aging patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of 1287 patients who underwent cardiac surgery at this institution (2003-2007). The patients included were ≥65 years old, scheduled for elective cardiac surgery, and without preexisting RF (defined by the criteria of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons as described in Method). Of all patients evaluated, 346 patients met the inclusion criteria and were divided into two groups: using (n = 122) or not using (n = 224) preoperative RAS inhibitors. A comparison of the two groups showed no significant differences in baseline parameters, including creatinine clearance, body mass index, history of diabetes and smoking, preoperative medicines (except that more patients with RAS inhibitors had a history of hypertension or congestive heart failure, fewer RAS inhibitor patients had chronic lung disease), in intraoperative perfusion and aortic cross-clamp time, and in postoperative complications and 30-d mortality. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated, however, that preoperative RAS inhibitors significantly and independently reduced the incidence of postoperative RF in the patients undergoing cardiac surgery compared with those not taking RAS inhibitors: 1.6% versus 7.6%, yielding an odds ratio of 0.19 (95 % CI 0.04-0.84, P = 0.029). Preoperative RAS inhibitors may have significant renoprotective effects for aging patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thematic course: patient radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    The ratio benefit/risk of radiological examinations, especially with the multislice scanner cannot be ensured only if the principles of justification and optimization are rigorously respected. The justification relies on the reference to the guide of the appropriate use of imaging examinations and compliance with the Public Health Code which requires a written information exchange between the applicant and who will realizes the examination. The optimization relies on the dosimetry evaluation of our practice and the comparison with the diagnosis reference levels, to realize the examinations at the radiation lowest cost. the stakes are the insurance does not harm our patients, the rehabilitation of the radiologist in his role of consultant rather than performer and the protection against eventual legal consequences. (N.C.)

  5. VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF THE SPIRITUAL COPING STRATEGIES SCALE ARABIC VERSION IN SAUDI PATIENTS UNDERGOING HAEMODIALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonas P; Baldacchino, Donia R; Alquwez, Nahed

    2016-06-01

    Patients often resort to religious and spiritual activities to cope with physical and mental challenges. The effect of spiritual coping on overall health, adaptation and health-related quality of life among patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD) is well documented. Thus, it is essential to establish a valid and reliable instrument that can assess both the religious and non-religious coping methods in patients undergoing HD. This study aimed to assess the validity and reliability of the Spiritual Coping Strategies Scale Arabic version (SCS-A) in Saudi patients undergoing HD. A convenience sample of 60 Saudi patients undergoing HD was recruited for this descriptive, cross-sectional study. Data were collected between May and June 2015. Forward-backward translation was used to formulate the SCS-A. The SCS-A, Muslim Religiosity Scale and the Quality of Life Index Dialysis Version III were used to procure the data. Internal consistency reliability, stability reliability, factor analysis and construct validity tests were performed. Analyses were set at the 0.05 level of significance. The SCS-A showed an acceptable internal consistency and strong stability reliability over time. The EFA produced two factors (non-religious and religious coping). Satisfactory construct validity was established by the convergent and divergent validity and known-groups method. The SCS-A is a reliable and valid tool that can be used to measure the religious and non-religious coping strategies of patients undergoing HD in Saudi Arabia and other Muslim and Arabic-speaking countries. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  6. Radiation dose evaluation in patients submitted to conventional radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly Junior, Joao G.

    1997-01-01

    This work presents the results of the evaluation of radiation dose delivered to the patients undergoing conventional radiological procedures. Based in the realized measurement some indicators are settled to quantitative appraisal of the radiological protection conditions offered to the population. Data assessment was done in the county of Curitiba, in Parana State, Brazil, from 12/95 to 04/96, in ten rooms of three different institutions, under 101 patients, adults with 70 ± 10 kg, during real examinations of chest PA, chest LAT and abdomen AP. (author)

  7. Hematoimmunological state of patients with inoperable cervical cancer undergoing multimodality treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforova, N.A.; Sorochan, P.P.; Revenkova, S.Yi.; Moskalenko, Yi.P.

    2005-01-01

    Hematological parameters and immunity state were studied in 53 patients with inoperable cervical cancer undergoing radiochemotherapy. It is reasonable use prolonged 5-FU infusions during chemoradiation treatment from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. with the purpose to minimize the complications in the homeostasis system

  8. The effects of indomethacin on intracranial pressure and cerebral haemodynamics in patients undergoing craniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads; Tankisi, A; Cold, G E

    2004-01-01

    We compared the effects of indomethacin (bolus of 0.2 mg.kg-1 followed by an infusion of 0.2 mg.kg-1.h-1) and placebo on intracranial pressure and cerebral haemodynamics in 30 patients undergoing craniotomy for supratentorial brain tumours under propofol and fentanyl anaesthesia. Indomethacin...

  9. Coagulation profile in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy: A randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Decker Christensen

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the impact of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin (LMWH on the coagulation system in patients undergoing minimal invasive lung cancer surgery is sparse. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LMWH on the coagulation system in patients undergoing Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS lobectomy for primary lung cancer.Sixty-three patients diagnosed with primary lung cancer undergoing VATS lobectomy were randomized to either subcutaneous injection with dalteparin (Fragmin® 5000 IE once daily or no intervention. Coagulation was assessed pre-, peri-, and the first two days postoperatively by standard coagulation blood test, thromboelastometry (ROTEM® and thrombin generation.Patients undergoing potential curative surgery for lung cancer were not hypercoagulable preoperatively. There was no statistically significant difference in the majority of the assessed coagulation parameters after LMWH, except that the no intervention group had a higher peak thrombin and a shorter INTEM clotting time on the first postoperative day and a lower fibrinogen level on the second postoperative day. A lower level of fibrin d-dimer in the LMWH group was found on the 1. and 2.postoperative day, although not statistical significant. No differences were found between the two groups in the amount of bleeding or number of thromboembolic events.Use of LMWH administered once daily as thromboprophylaxis did not alter the coagulation profile per se. As the present study primarily evaluated biochemical endpoints, further studies using clinical endpoints are needed in regards of an optimized thromboprophylaxis approach.

  10. Predicting Resilience via Social Support and Illness Perceptions Among Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihane Hajmohammadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives Chronic renal disease is a threatening condition for the health, economic, and social status of the affected person and his/her family. Patients undergoing hemodialysis encounter mental and health problems; the current study aimed at predicting resilience via social support and illness perceptions among patients undergoing hemodialysis. Methods The current descriptive-correlational study had a statistical population including 308 patients undergoing hemodialysis in Kerman, Iran, in 2017. Based on the Krejcie-Morgan table, the minimum required sample size was 169. The sample was selected using a convenience sampling method. Data collection tools were the Connor-Davidson resilience scale, the medical outcome study (MOS social support survey developed by Sherbourne and Stewart, and the brief illness perception questionnaire developed by Broadbent et al. Data were analyzed using a Pearson correlation coefficient and a stepwise regression analysis via SPSS version 19. Results Results indicated that resilience was significantly and positively related to social support (r = 0.318, P < 0.05 and illness perceptions (r = 0.165, P < 0.05. Among the subscales of social support, emotional support, tangible support, and social interaction could predict resilience, and among the subscales of illness perceptions, only cognitive representation could predict resilience. Conclusions The obtained results demonstrated that resilience was significantly and positively related to social support and illness perceptions. Additionally, the subscales of social support and illness perceptions could predict resilience among the patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  11. NIRS and IVUS for characterization of atherosclerosis in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugaletta, Salvatore; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M.; Serruys, Patrick W.; de Boer, Sanneke; Ligthart, Jurgen; Gomez-Lara, Josep; Witberg, Karen; Diletti, Roberto; Wykrzykowska, Joanna; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Schultz, Carl; Regar, Evelyn; Duckers, Henricus J.; van Mieghem, Nicolas; de Jaegere, Peter; Madden, Sean P.; Muller, James E.; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van der Giessen, Wim J.; Boersma, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the findings of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) virtual histology (VH), and grayscale IVUS obtained in matched coronary vessel segments of patients undergoing coronary angiography. Intravascular ultrasound VH has been developed

  12. Cauda equina syndrome in patients undergoing manipulation of the lumbar spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haldeman, S.; Rubinstein, S M

    1992-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome has been implicated as a potential complication of spinal manipulation. A review of the literature from 1911 to 1989 revealed ten reported cases of cauda equina syndrome in patients undergoing manipulation without anesthesia. This article presents three new cases where a

  13. Entrance skin dose on patients undergoing X-ray examinations at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    survey was conducted on the Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) in patients undergoing X-ray examinations [Skull Postero-Anterior (PA), Skull Lateral (LAT), Chest Postero-Anterior (PA), Chest Lateral (LAT), Abdomen Antero-Posterior (AP) and Pelvis Antero-Posterior (AP)] in five hospitals/Xray centres in Yaba, Lagos State, Nigeria ...

  14. Postoperative loss of skeletal muscle mass, complications and quality of life in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Venrooij, Lenny M. W.; Verberne, Hein J.; de Vos, Rien; Borgmeijer-Hoelen, Mieke M. M. J.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe postoperative undernutrition in terms of postoperative losses of appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASMM) with respect to complications, quality of life, readmission, and 1-y mortality after cardiac surgery. Methods: Patients undergoing cardiac

  15. Comparison of fentanyl, sufentanil, and alfentanil anesthesia in patients undergoing valvular heart surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovill, J. G.; Warren, P. J.; Schuller, J. L.; van Wezel, H. B.; Hoeneveld, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The hemodynamic responses to anesthesia and surgery were studied in three groups of 20 patients undergoing valve replacement surgery. Anesthesia was induced with either fentanyl (75 micrograms/kg), sufentanil (15 micrograms/kg), or alfentanil (125 micrograms/kg). Pancuronium (8 mg) was given for

  16. Radiation doses and risks to neonates undergoing common radiographic examinations in the neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, B.J.; Lee, R.

    1996-01-01

    Neonates in the-Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) can receive large numbers of radiographs owing to the clinical conditions they may present. More neonatal radiation dosimetry data are required for three fundamental reasons: (1.) to aid in the establishment of reference dose levels for interinstitutional comparisons; (2.) to improve childhood cancer risk estimates following neonatal exposure; and (3.) to indicate appropriate directions for dose reduction. This paper describes an investigation of two different NICU radiological techniques with significantly different neonate doses. While patient-matched images taken with both techniques were assessed in a blind review, this component of the study is beyond the scope of this paper and is not discussed here. (author)

  17. Effect of nutritional status on mortality in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Muhammed; İpek, Göktük; Aldağ, Mustafa; Altay, Servet; Hayıroğlu, Mert İlker; Börklü, Edibe Betül; İnan, Duygu; Kozan, Ömer

    2018-04-01

    The prognostic effects of poor nutritional status and cardiac cachexia on coronary artery disease (CAD) are not clearly understood. A well-accepted nutritional status parameter, the prognostic nutritional index (PNI), which was first demonstrated to be valuable in patients with cancer and those undergoing gastrointestinal surgery, was introduced to patients requiring coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of PNI in patients with CAD undergoing CABG. We evaluated the in-hospital and long-term (3-y) prognostic effect of PNI on 644 patients with CAD undergoing CABG. Baseline characteristics and outcomes were compared among the patients by PNI and categorized accordingly: Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4. Patients with lower PNI had significantly higher in-hospital and long-term mortality. Patients with lower PNI levels (Q1) had higher in-hospital mortality and had 12 times higher mortality rates than those with higher PNI levels (Q4). The higher PNI group had the lower rates and was used as the reference. Long-term mortality was higher in patients with lower PNI (Q1)-4.9 times higher than in the higher PNI group (Q4). In-hospital and long-term mortality rates were similar in the non-lower PNI groups (Q2-4). The present study demonstrated that PNI, calculated based on serum albumin level and lymphocyte count, is an independent prognostic factor for mortality in patients undergoing CABG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonselective carotid artery ultrasound screening in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: Is it necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masabni, Khalil; Sabik, Joseph F.; Raza, Sajjad; Carnes, Theresa; Koduri, Hemantha; Idrees, Jay J.; Beach, Jocelyn; Riaz, Haris; Shishehbor, Mehdi H.; Gornik, Heather L.; Blackstone, Eugene H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether nonselective preoperative carotid artery ultrasound screening alters management of patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and whether such screening affects neurologic outcomes. Methods From March 2011 to September 2013, preoperative carotid artery ultrasound screening was performed on 1236 of 1382 patients (89%) scheduled to undergo CABG. Carotid artery stenosis (CAS) was classified as none or mild (any type 0%–59% stenosis), moderate (unilateral 60%-79% stenosis), or severe (bilateral 60%-79% stenosis or unilateral 80%–100% stenosis). Results A total of 1069 (86%) hadpatients with patients with ≥moderate CAS, 1 of 19 (5.3%) undergoing CABG + CEA and 3 of 148 (2.0%) undergoing CABG alone experienced stroke (P = .4). In patients with moderate CAS, stroke occurred in 1 of 11 (9.1%) off-pump and 1 of 79 (1.3%) on-pump patients (P = .2). In patients with severe CAS, stroke occurred in 1 of 6 (17%) off-pump and 1 of 71 (1.4%) on-pump patients (P = .15). Conclusions Routine preoperative carotid artery evaluation altered the management of a minority of patients undergoing CABG; this did not translate into perioperative stroke risk. Hence, a more targeted approach for preoperative carotid artery evaluation should be adopted. PMID:26586360

  19. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing intermittent androgen-deprivation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammadali Mohammadzadeh; Rezaei, Mohammadhadi Mohammadzadeh; Ghoreifi, Alireza; Kerigh, Behzad Feyzzadeh

    2016-01-01

    The presence of metabolic syndrome in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), especially intermittent type, has not been completely evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate metabolic syndrome in men with PCa undergoing intermittent ADT. In this longitudinal study, we studied the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in 190 patients who were undergoing intermittent ADT. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. All metabolic parameters, including lipid profile, blood glucose, blood pressures, and waist circumferences of the patients were measured six and 12 months after treatment. Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 6.74 years. The incidence of metabolic syndrome after six and 12 months was 6.8% and 14.7%, respectively. Analysis of various components of the metabolic syndrome revealed that patients had significantly higher overall prevalence of hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia in their six- and 12-month followups, but blood pressure has not been changed in the same period except for diastolic blood pressure after six months. Although there was an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving intermittent ADT, it was lower than other studies that treated the same patients with continuous ADT. Also it seems that intermittent ADT has less metabolic complications than continuous ADT and could be used as a safe alternative in patients with advanced and metastatic PCa.

  20. Effects of video information on anxiety, stress and depression of patients undergoing coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamshidi, N.; Abbaszadeh, A.; Kalyani, M.N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Anxiety and stress are common in patients undergoing invasive procedures. Coronary angiography is a definitive diagnostic evaluation for coronary artery disease and valvular disease. It is necessary to give information to the patients in order to minimize levels of anxiety and stress to this invasive procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of patients education by video on levels of anxiety, stress and depression of patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methodology: In a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, 128 patients were randomly assigned to either control or experimental group. Control group received verbal routine education by nurses and experimental group received an informative video about coronary angiography procedure as well as pre and post angiography interventions. Using Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS-21) levels of these variables were measured before and after education. Results: Seventy eight (60.9%) males and fifty (39.1%) females participated in the study. There was a statistically significant reduction in the Anxiety, stress and depression levels of experimental group after video information (P = .000). There was a statistically significant correlation between sex with anxiety (P = .000) and stress (P = .04). Conclusions: The use of patients education by informative video is a useful method for decreasing psychological parameters of patients undergoing coronary angiography procedure. Results of the study confirm the usefulness of video information prior to an Invasive angiography procedure. (author)

  1. Celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients undergoing renal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Rakel; Metso, Martti; Pörsti, Ilkka; Niemelä, Onni; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka; Kaukinen, Katri; Mäkelä, Satu

    2018-01-01

    An association between celiac disease and renal diseases has been suggested, but the results are controversial. To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity among individuals undergoing renal biopsies and to evaluate whether co-existent celiac autoimmunity influences the clinical outcome of the renal disease. The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity (previous diagnosis of celiac disease or positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies) was determined in 827 consecutive patients undergoing kidney biopsies due to clinical indications. Up to 15 years' follow-up data on kidney function and co-morbidities were obtained. Celiac autoimmunity was found in 45 (5.4%) patients. Among the IgA nephropathy patients, 8.2% of had celiac autoimmunity. At the time of kidney biopsy and after a median follow-up of 5 to 6 years, renal function measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was inferior in IgA nephropathy patients with celiac autoimmunity compared to those without it (P=0.048 and P=0.022, respectively). The prevalence of celiac autoimmunity seems to be high in patients undergoing renal biopsies, especially in patients with IgA nephropathy. Such autoimmunity may be associated with worse renal function in IgA nephropathy. Hence the co-existence of celiac disease should be taken into consideration when treating patients with renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glomerular Filtration Rate in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation and Treated With Cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; Gastélum-Cano, Jose M; Méndez-Huerta, Mariana A; Rodríguez-Gallegos, Alma B; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2018-06-15

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is partially impaired in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). When given chemotherapy before receiving hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, GFR might be further deteriorated. To measure the effect of cyclophosphamide on GFR in patients with MS who undergo chemotherapy. We estimated GFR based on creatinine and cystatin C plasma concentrations in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation to treat their MS. Baseline GFR values were lower in the 28 patients with MS than in the 20 healthy individuals. Also, according to the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaborative Group (CKD-EPI) 2012 Creat-CysC equation criteria, 4 of 28 patients were classified as having chronic kidney disease (CKD) before receiving the chemotherapy drugs. After receiving 4 × 50 mg per kg body weight cyclophosphamide, abnormal GFR results were recorded in 12 of 28 patients. Renal function must be monitored in patients with MS undergoing autologous stem-cell transplantation. Also, chemotherapy should be constrained as much as possible to prevent further deterioration of renal function.

  3. Hormone profiles and their relation with menstrual cycles in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Cemgil Arıkan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the etiology of menstrual disorders among patients undergoing hemodialysis due to chronic renal failure by assessing menstrual history, serum hormone levels, and other biochemical factors. Material and methods: Thirty patients undergoing hemodialysis and 30 healthy women at reproductive age were enrolled in our study. Demographic characteristics, hormonal and biochemical data, and sonographically measured endometrial thickness values of the subjects were compared. In addition, the present and the pre-hemodialysis menstrual pattern of the patients undergoing hemodialysis were recorded. The hormonal, hematological, and biochemical data of the patients were compared according to their menstrual patterns. Results: No statistical significance was seen between age, BMI, gravida, parity, abortion, and curettage among groups (p>0.05. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were significantly lower in the hemodialysis group than in the control (p0.05. Mean serum LH and prolactin levels were significantly higher in the hemodialysis group compared to the control (p0.05. Serum LH and prolactin levels were higher, and serum FSH, estradiol and TSH levels were lower in patients who developed amenorrhea after hemodialysis treatment when compared to non-amenorrheic subjects. However, these differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05. Discussion: The most important factor in the etiology of menstrual disorders seen in chronic renal failure patients was high serum LH and prolactin levels. Hemodialysis is a successful treatment that extends life expectancy and ameliorates the hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian axis in chronic renal failure patients.

  4. Feasibility, physical capacity, and health benefits of a multidimensional exercise program for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Midtgaard, Julie; Rorth, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience considerable loss of physical capacity and general wellbeing when diagnosed and treated for their disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, physical capacity, and health benefits of a multidimensional exercise program for cancer patients...... during advanced stages of disease who are undergoing adjuvant or high-dose chemotherapy. The supervised program included high- and low-intensity activities (physical exercise, relaxation, massage, and body-awareness training). A total of 23 patients between 18 and 65 years of age (median 40 years...... significance. It is concluded that an exercise program, which combines high- and low-intensity physical activities, may be used to prevent and/or minimize physical inactivity, fatigue, muscle wasting and energy loss in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy....

  5. Prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm in flat panel computed tomography - evaluation in patients undergoing transarterial hepatic radioembolisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamie, Qeumars Mustafa; Kobe, Adrian Raoul; Mietzsch, Leif; Manhart, Michael; Puippe, Gilbert Dominique; Pfammatter, Thomas; Guggenberger, Roman

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effect of an on-site prototype metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm in cone-beam CT-catheter-arteriography (CBCT-CA) in patients undergoing transarterial radioembolisation (RE) of hepatic masses. Ethical board approved retrospective study of 29 patients (mean 63.7±13.7 years, 11 female), including 16 patients with arterial metallic coils, undergoing CBCT-CA (8s scan, 200 degrees rotation, 397 projections). Image reconstructions with and without prototype MAR algorithm were evaluated quantitatively (streak-artefact attenuation changes) and qualitatively (visibility of hepatic parenchyma and vessels) in near- (3cm) of artefact sources (metallic coils and catheters). Quantitative and qualitative measurements of uncorrected and MAR corrected images and different artefact sources were compared RESULTS: Quantitative evaluation showed significant reduction of near- and far-field streak-artefacts with MAR for both artefact sources (p0.05). Inhomogeneities of attenuation values were significantly higher for metallic coils compared to catheters (pprototype MAR algorithm improves image quality in proximity of metallic coil and catheter artefacts. • Metal objects cause artefacts in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. • These artefacts can be corrected by metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithms. • Corrected images show significantly better visibility of nearby hepatic vessels and tissue. • Better visibility may facilitate image interpretation, save time and radiation exposure.

  6. Mitral valve disease in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkala, Meghana R; Schaff, Hartzell V; Li, Zhuo; Volguina, Irina; Dietz, Harry C; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S; Connolly, Heidi

    2013-09-10

    Cardiac manifestations of Marfan syndrome include aortic root dilation and mitral valve prolapse (MVP). Only scant data exist describing MVP in patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root replacement. We retrospectively analyzed data from 166 MFS patients with MVP who were enrolled in a prospective multicenter registry of patients who underwent aortic root aneurysm repair. Of these 166 patients, 9% had mitral regurgitation (MR) grade >2, and 10% had MR grade 2. The severity of MVP and MR was evaluated by echocardiography preoperatively and ≤ 3 years postoperatively. Forty-one patients (25%) underwent composite graft aortic valve replacement, and 125 patients (75%) underwent aortic valve-sparing procedures; both groups had similar prevalences of MR grade >2 (P=0.7). Thirty-three patients (20%) underwent concomitant mitral valve (MV) intervention (repair, n=29; replacement, n=4), including all 15 patients with MR grade >2. Only 1 patient required MV reintervention during follow-up (mean clinical follow-up, 31 ± 10 months). Echocardiography performed 21 ± 13 months postoperatively revealed MR >2 in only 3 patients (2%). One early death and 2 late deaths occurred. Although the majority of patients with Marfan syndrome who undergo elective aortic root replacement have MVP, only 20% have concomitant MV procedures. These concomitant procedures do not seem to increase operative risk. In patients with MR grade ≤ 2 who do not undergo a concomitant MV procedure, the short-term incidence of progressive MR is low; however, more follow-up is needed to determine whether patients with MVP and MR grade ≤ 2 would benefit from prophylactic MV intervention.

  7. The role of radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of patients with malignant tumors. Radiation pathological stand point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Estimations suggest that about 60% of all cancer patients will require some form of radiation therapy during their lifetime. Although 40 to 50% of cancer patients in Europe and the United States receive radiation therapy, only about 20% of patients with cancer in Japan undergo such treatment. This is largely due to the lack of understanding of the role of radiation therapy by many medical personnel in Japan, as well as to ''''radiation allergy'''' among many of the general population in Japan, a country that has been undergone atomic bombing. From our perspective as specialists in radiation therapy, the chronic shortage of radiation oncologist also poses a serious problem. Although there are approximately 700 hospitals throughout Japan where radiation therapy is available, no more than half this number of medical facilities have a full-time radiation oncologist. Perhaps the reason for this is that radiation therapy is perceived as unnecessary in Japan. However, it is absolutely essential. In our experience, the 5-year relative survival rate of patients with malignant tumors who have undergone radiation therapy in our clinic is 65 percent. Thus, radiation therapy has proven very useful in the treatment of malignant tumors. Moreover, better estimates of prognosis of cancer patients treated with radiation therapy are becoming possible. This article discusses the role of radiation therapy, from a radiation pathological perspective, in a multidisciplinary approach to treatment of cancer patients. I also emphasize the critical importance of training radiation oncologists who can function as part of multidisciplinary teams that care for patients with malignant tumors. (author). 50 refs

  8. Arsenic speciation in saliva of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients undergoing arsenic trioxide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Fenglin; Yuan, Chungang; Lu, Xiufen; Shen, Shengwen; Zhou, Jin; Le, X. Chris

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been successfully used as a therapeutic in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Detailed monitoring of the therapeutic arsenic and its metabolites in various accessible specimens of APL patients can contribute to improving treatment efficacy and minimizing arsenic-induced side effects. This article focuses on the determination of arsenic species in saliva samples from APL patients undergoing arsenic treatment. Saliva samples were collected from nine APL pa...

  9. Determinants of outcome for patients undergoing lumbar discectomy: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Oonagh T

    2010-08-01

    One-third of patients who undergo lumbar discectomy continue to suffer from persistent pain postoperatively. Greater preoperative warmth thresholds and greater preoperative cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of stable serum nitric oxide metabolites are associated with a worse outcome. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between patient outcome (defined using the Modified Stauffer-Coventry evaluating criteria) and preoperative pain perception threshold to an electrical stimulus.

  10. Hope and spirituality among patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis: a correlational study

    OpenAIRE

    Ottaviani, Ana Carolina; Souza, Érica Nestor; Drago, Natália de Camargo; Mendiondo, Marisa Silvana Zazzetta de; Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost; Orlandi, Fabiana de Souza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the relationship between the hope and spirituality of patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis.METHOD: this is a cross-sectional, correlational study. The sample was composed of 127 patients of a Renal Replacement Unit. Data were collected through individual interviews guided by the following instruments: participant characterization, Herth Hope Index (HHI), and Pinto Pais-Ribeiro Spirituality Scale (PP-RSS).RESULTS: the average HHI score was 38.06 (±...

  11. Successful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    McPartlin, Andrew; Grimaldo, Claudia; Lyons, Jeanette; Burke, Daniel; Mitra, Sandip; Choudhury, Ananya

    2014-01-01

    We report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m2 of carboplatin and 50 mg/m2 of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of ov...

  12. Radiation doses and risks to neonates undergoing radiographic examinations in intensive care units in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Bouaoun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic radiography in order to derive the local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs for optimisation purposes.Methods: This study was carried out in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU of  two hospitals in Tunis. 134 babies, with weights ranging from 635 g to 6680 g, performed chest-abdomen X-ray examinations. Neonates were categorized into groups of birth weight. For each X-ray examination, patient data and exposure parameters were recorded. Dose area product (DAP was measured and entrance surface dose (ESD was estimated. Effective dose was calculated from the Monte Carlo simulation software PCXMC.Results: DAP values increased with neonatal weight and demonstrated a wide variation (5.0 - 43.0 mGy.cm2, mean 23.4 mGy.cm2 for patient weight from 600 g to 4000 g. A wide variation was also observed for ESD (14 - 93 μGy, mean 55.2 μGy. The LDRLs expressed in term of DAP were estimated to be 17.6 mGy.cm2 and 29.1 mGy.cm2 for the first and the second NICU, respectively. In terms of effective dose, the average value was about 31.6 μSv per single radiological examination. The results show the necessity to use a standardized protocol with high voltage technique combined to lower current time product (mAs values and an adapted collimation which could lead to further reductions in the neonatal doses. Conclusion: This study presents the LDRLs and the effective doses for neonates in two NICUs and demonstrates the necessity to optimize patient protection for this category of patient.

  13. The Relationship between Self-Esteem and Coping Styles in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Rezaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a report of a study of The Relationship between Self-Esteem and Coping Styles in patients undergoing hemodialysis in Iran. Hemodialysis patients face with multiple physical and psychological stressful factors; they use coping styles in order to cope with the challenges. A descriptive-correlation study was conducted based on the data collected from patients undergoing hemodialysis by census method in the city of Kerman using the Endler and Parker coping style, Self-esteem and demographic information questionnaires. The mean age of patients was 56.21 ± 1.45 years and 58.5% were male. The statistically positive relationship between self-esteem and problem-oriented coping style (p=0.05 and inverse relationship between self-esteem and emotion-oriented style (p<0.001. The patients with higher and lower self-esteem used problem-oriented and emotion-oriented styles, respectively. According to the results, it is necessary for nurses to enhance their role in promoting self-esteem and help patients undergoing hemodialysis while using problem-oriented style.

  14. Music and ambient operating room noise in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Chakib M; Rizk, Laudi B; Yaacoub, Chadi I; Gaal, Dorothy; Kain, Zeev N

    2005-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that music decreases intraoperative sedative requirements in patients undergoing surgical procedures under regional anesthesia. In this study we sought to determine whether this decrease in sedative requirements results from music or from eliminating operating room (OR) noise. A secondary aim of the study was to examine the relationship of response to intraoperative music and participants' culture (i.e., American versus Lebanese). Eighty adults (36 American and 54 Lebanese) undergoing urological procedures with spinal anesthesia and patient-controlled IV propofol sedation were randomly assigned to intraoperative music, white noise, or OR noise. We found that, controlling for ambient OR noise, intraoperative music decreases propofol requirements (0.004 +/- 0.002 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.014 +/- 0.004 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.012 +/- 0.002 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1); P = 0.026). We also found that, regardless of group assignment, Lebanese patients used less propofol as compared with American patients (0.005 +/- 0.001 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.017 +/- 0.003 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1); P = 0.001) and that, in both sites, patients in the music group required less propofol (P noise, intraoperative music decreases propofol requirements of both Lebanese and American patients who undergo urological surgery under spinal anesthesia.

  15. Perioperative Endocrine Therapy for Patients with Cushing's Syndrome Undergoing Retroperitoneal Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Cui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the efficacy and safety of perioperative endocrine therapy (PET for patients with Cushing’s syndrome (CS undergoing retroperitoneal laparoscopic adrenalectomy (RLA. Methods. The novel, simplified PET modality of 82 patients who underwent RLA procedures for CS were studied. Clinical manifestations were observed for all patients on days 1 and 5 postoperatively, and clinical data, such as blood pressure (BP, levels of serum cortisol, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH, blood glucose, and electrolytes, were acquired and analyzed. Results. Supraphysiological doses of glucocorticoid were administered during the perioperative period, and the dosage was reduced gradually. In all 82 cases, the RLAs were performed successfully without any perioperative complication, such as steroid withdrawal symptoms. The patient’s symptoms and signs were improved quickly and safely during the hospital days. The serum cortisol and potassium levels were rather stable on days 1 and 5 postoperatively, and most were within the normal range. The clinical manifestations, serum levels of cortisol, ACTH, and potassium in most patients restored to normal gradually after several months (mean, 6.7 ± 1.2 months, except for one patient undergoing bilateral adrenalectomy. Conclusions. This perioperative endocrine therapy for patients with Cushing’s syndrome (mainly for adrenocortical adenoma undergoing retro-laparoscopic adrenalectomy is both effective and safe.

  16. Personality, function and satisfaction in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaesh, Rishikesan; Jenkins, Paul; Lane, Judith V; Knight, Sara; Macdonald, Deborah; Howie, Colin

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between personality and joint-specific function, general physical and general mental health in patients undergoing total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA). One hundred and eighty-four patients undergoing THA and 205 undergoing TKA were assessed using the Eysneck Personality Questionnaire, brief version (EPQ-BV). General physical and mental health was measured using the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire and the EuroQol (EQ-5D). Joint-specific function was measured using the Oxford hip or knee score. The "unstable introvert" personality type was associated with poorer pre-operative function and health in patients with hip arthrosis. In patients with knee arthrosis, there was poorer general health in those with "stable extrovert" and "unstable introvert" types. Personality was not an independent predictor of outcome following TKA or THA. The main predictor was pre-operative function and health. Comorbidity was an important covariate of both pre-operative and postoperative function. Personality may play a role in the interaction of these disease processes with function and health perception. It may also affect the response and interpretation of psychometric and patient-reported outcome measures. It may be important to characterise and identify these traits in potential arthroplasty patients as it may help deliver targeted education and management to improve outcomes in certain groups.

  17. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease among patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad A; Quinlan, Amy; Heck-Kanellidis, Jennifer; Calderon, Dawn; Patel, Tejas; Gandhi, Bhavika; Patel, Shrinil; Hetavi, Mahida; Costanzo, Eric J; Cosentino, James; Patel, Chirag; Dewan, Asa; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Salman, Loay; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2018-03-01

    While transradial approach to conduct percutaneous coronary interventions offers multiple advantages, the procedure can cause radial artery damage and occlusion. Because radial artery is the preferred site for the creation of an arteriovenous fistula to provide dialysis, patients with chronic kidney disease are particularly dependent on radial artery for their long-term survival. In this retrospective study, we investigated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease in patients undergoing coronary interventions via radial artery. Stage of chronic kidney disease was based on estimated glomerular filtration rate and National Kidney Foundation - Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines. A total of 497 patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions were included. Over 70.4% (350/497) of the patients had chronic kidney disease. Stage II chronic kidney disease was observed in 243 (69%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 76.0 ± 8.4 mL/min). Stage III was observed in 93 (27%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 49 ± 7.5 mL/min). Stage IV chronic kidney disease was observed in 5 (1%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 25.6 ± 4.3 mL/min) and Stage V chronic kidney disease was observed in 9 (3%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 9.3 ± 3.5 mL/min). Overall, 107 of 350 patients (30%) had advanced chronic kidney disease, that is, stage III-V chronic kidney disease. Importantly, 14 of the 107 (13%) patients had either stage IV or V chronic kidney disease. This study finds that nearly one-third of the patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions have advanced chronic kidney disease. Because many of these patients may require dialysis, the use of radial artery to conduct percutaneous coronary interventions must be carefully considered in chronic kidney disease population.

  18. Should patients with Björk-Shiley valves undergo prophylactic replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmeyer, J D; Marrin, C A; O'Connor, G T

    1992-08-29

    About 85,000 patients have undergone replacement of diseased heart valves with prosthetic Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (CC) valves. These valves are prone to fracture of the outlet strut, which leads to acute valve failure that is usually fatal. Should patients with these valves undergo prophylactic replacement to avoid fracture? The incidence of strut fracture varies between 0% and 1.5% per year, depending on valve opening angle (60 degrees or 70 degrees), diameter (less than 29 mm or greater than or equal to 29 mm), and location (aortic or mitral). Other factors include the patient's life expectancy and the expected morbidity and mortality associated with reoperation. We have used decision analysis to identify the patients most likely to benefit from prophylactic reoperation. The incidence of outlet strut fracture was estimated from the data of three large studies on CC valves, and stratified by opening angle, diameter, and location. A Markov decision analysis model was used to estimate life expectancy for patients undergoing prophylactic valve replacement and for those not undergoing reoperation. Prophylactic valve replacement does not benefit patients with CC valves that have low strut fracture risks (60 degrees aortic valves and less than 29 mm, 60 degrees mitral valves). For most patients with CC valves that have high strut fracture risks (greater than or equal to 29 mm, 70 degrees CC), prophylactic valve replacement increases life expectancy. However, elderly patients with such valves benefit from prophylactic reoperation only if the risk of operative mortality is low. Patient age and operative risk are most important in recommendations for patients with CC valves that have intermediate strut fracture risks (less than 29 mm, 70 degrees valves and greater than or equal to 29 mm, 60 degrees mitral valves). For all patients and their doctors facing the difficult decision on whether to replace CC valves, individual estimates of operative mortality risk that

  19. Impact of Liver Indicators on Clinical Outcome in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Daniel; Kahlert, Philipp; Canbay, Ali; Knipp, Stephan; Thoenes, Martin; Cremer, Gordina; Al-Rashid, Fadi; Jánosi, Rolf-Alexander; El-Chilali, Karim; Kamler, Markus; El Gabry, Mohamed; Marx, Philipp; Dohle, Daniel Sebastian; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Benedik, Jaroslav; Gerken, Guido; Rassaf, Tienush; Jakob, Heinz; Thielmann, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    Liver dysfunction increases death and morbidity after cardiac operations. There are currently no data evaluating liver function in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We aimed therefore to evaluate our TAVR results in regard to liver function. A total of 640 consecutive TAVR patients were evaluated. Of those, 11 patients presented with chronic liver disease before TAVR. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was used to measure liver function in these patients. The primary study end point was 30-day mortality in patients presenting with liver dysfunction. Secondary study end point was liver enzymes after TAVR. The mean Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score in patients with chronic liver disease was 16.8 ± 6.2 (median, 18; range, 7 to 26). The 30-day mortality was 9.1% (57 of 629) in patients presenting without liver disease and 9.1% (1 of 11) in patients with liver disease (p = 1.00). Patients with chronic liver disease showed significantly higher preoperative levels of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (p < 0.001). After TAVR, we observed a significant increase in alanine aminotransferase on postoperative day 3 compared with preoperative values (p < 0.001), accompanied by a decrease in albumin (p < 0.001). Liver cirrhosis per se is not considered as a contraindication for cardiac operations. In the present study, we did not observe a higher 30-day mortality rate in liver cirrhotic patients undergoing TAVR, suggesting TAVR as a feasible alternative with acceptable outcomes in patients with chronic liver disease. Moreover, the present study is the first to evaluate liver variables in patients undergoing TAVR. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The safety of dipyridamole in patients undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy prior to lung volume reduction surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, M.R.; Angelides, S.; Parker, M.K.; Silva, I. da; Freeman, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    Patients with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) are at high risk of peri-operative cardiac complications, and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is commonly used for risk stratification. This study prospectively assessed the safety of dipyridamole in these patients and compared the incidence of side-effects (particularly dyspnoea) with that in patients undergoing dipyridamole MPS prior to elective non-cardiothoracic surgery. Fifty patients were enrolled: 25 in the LVRS cohort (13 males, 12 females), with a mean age of 65 years and a mean FEV 1 of 0.79 l, and 25 (with no history of asthma or COPD) in the control cohort (14 males, 11 females), with a mean age of 66 years. Fourteen patients (56%) in each group developed side-effects. Dyspnoea was reported by five patients (20%) in the LVRS and two patients (8%) in the control cohort (P=NS). One patient in each cohort developed severe hypotension and bradycardia. Eight (32%) other patients developed minor side-effects in the LVRS cohort compared with 11 (44%) in the control group. All side-effects responded promptly to intravenous aminophylline. In summary, there was a statistically non-significant increase in the incidence of dyspnoea in patients with end-stage COPD and all side-effects responded to aminophylline. Thus, dipyridamole can be used safely in these patients. (orig.)

  1. Renal Impairment and Prognosis of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Coronary Intervention - The AFCAS Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli M Lahtela

    Full Text Available Renal impairment is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular complications, but the effect of different stages of renal impairment on thrombotic/thromboembolic and bleeding complications in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI remains largely unknown. We sought to evaluate the incidence and clinical impact of four stages of renal impairment in patients with AF undergoing PCI.We assessed renal function by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and outcomes in 781 AF patients undergoing PCI by using the data from a prospective European multicenter registry. End-points included all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE and bleeding events at 12 months.A total of 195 (25% patients had normal renal function (eGFR ≥90 mL/min, 290 (37% mild renal impairment (eGFR 60-89, 263 (34% moderate renal impairment (eGFR 30-59 and 33 (4% severe renal impairment (eGFR <30. Degree of renal impairment remained an independent predictor of mortality and MACCE in an adjusted a Cox regression model. Even patients with mild renal impairment had a higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR 2.25, 95%CI 1.02-4.98, p=0.04 and borderline risk for MACCE (HR 1.56, 95%CI 0.98- 2.50, p=0.06 compared to those with normal renal function.Renal impairment is common in patients with AF undergoing PCI and even mild renal impairment has an adverse prognostic effect in these patients requiring multiple antithrombotic medications.

  2. Individual quality of life in patients undergoing radiotherapy. A longitudinal survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenskus, Julia Katharina

    2015-01-01

    The way that Quality of Life (QoL) is perceived has crucially changed over the last few decades. As a consequence of demographic change and ongoing technical progress, QoL gained in importance and became established as a major outcome parameter in clinical trials. Scientists in the field of QoL differentiate between three categories: health-related, global and individual QoL. For the assessment of individual QoL, Becker et al. (2014) and Merk (2011) developed and validated an easily applicable and economical questionnaire; the SEIQoL-Q. The purpose of our study was to modify the SEIQoL-Q based on Merk's approach (2011) and apply the revised version in a longitudinal survey of different patient populations in the Clinic for Radiotherapy of the University Hospital of Freiburg. Apart from that, other crucial factors, which might affect the evaluation of one's QoL, were gathered by use of a newly established questionnaire. 132 patients undergoing radiotherapy and having been diagnosed with breast cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC), bone metastasis (BM) or a benign disease (B) were included in our study. The participants were interviewed at four definitive times in their treatment (1. before the radiotherapy had started, 2. after 50 % of the total radiation dose had been given, 3. at the end of the therapy, 4. during the aftercare). A total of 419 interviews were carried out. While the highest possible score was 100, the average individual QoL was 60.48 (BC: 56.55; PC: 64.13; BM: 59.27; B: 58.85). Significant differences of the individual QoL were revealed between the diagnosis groups (BC vs. PC, PC vs. B, PC vs. BM), the age (< 66 years: 55.39; = 66 years: 62.27) and the gender (women: 57.11; men: 62.88). Additionally, the expectations and the mood influenced the assessment of the individual QoL. Furthermore, it could be shown that there were correlations between the individual QoL and personality, depressive tendencies, ego strength, optimism, self-concept, faith and

  3. Factors influencing local control and survival for patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Sohn, Jason W.; Fernandez-Vicioso, Eduardo; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify factors affecting local control and survival for patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for intracranial metastases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 3/90-10/95, 99 patients (median age 58, range 29-83; 44 women, 55 men) with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic intracranial metastases measuring < 4 cm in diameter and ≥ 1 cm from optic chiasm and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) ≥ 70 underwent modified linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Patients characteristics included 20 with recurrent disease, 66 with solitary lesions, and 42 with systemic disease. Forty six patients underwent surgical resection prior to SRS (16 biopsy, 3 subtotal resection (STR), and 21 gross total resection (GTR)). Eighty of 99 patients underwent whole brain radiation treatments (median 4005 cGy/15 fx, range 2200-6000 cGy). A total of 154 lesions were treated with 143 being evaluable on follow-up CT or MRI scans. Radiosurgery parameters (median) were the following: volume 2.8 cc (range 0.1-38 cc) and a peripheral dose of 1700 cGy (range 500-2400 cGy) with normalization to the 80% line (range 50-90%). Survival was measured from the date of SRS. Local control was defined as stabilization or decrease in size of the intracranial lesion(s). RESULTS: The following factors were analyzed with respect to local control and survival: 1) solitary vs. multiple lesions, 2) Age < or ≥ 60, 3) sex, 4) radiosensitive vs. radioresistant (renal cell and melanoma) histologies, 5) recurrent vs. newly diagnosed lesions, 6) KPS (70-80 vs. 90-100), 7) extent of surgery (biopsy vs. STR/GTR), 8) use of whole brain radiation treatments, 9) absence or presence of systemic disease, 10) dose (< or ≥ 1500 cGy) and 11) volume (< or ≥ 3 cc). On univariate analysis, survival was significantly influenced by female sex, presence of solitary lesion, absence of systemic disease, and extent of surgery. On multivariate analysis, female sex (p=0.0037), absence of systemic disease

  4. Frequency of fungal infection in the nasal polyposis patients undergoing polypectomy in a tertiary care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawad, A.; Nisar, Y.B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of fungal infection in nasal polyposis patients undergoing polypectomy in a tertiary care ENT unit. Methodology: This cross sectional study was conducted in the department of ENT, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. A total of 60 patients with nasal polyposis were enrolled. Patients who did not give consent, with sinonasal malignancy, diabetes, and pregnant or lactating women were excluded from study. All the patients were operated and specimens of polypectomies were sent to the Department of Pathology for fungal culture, direct microscopy and histopathology. Data was entered and analysed using SPSS version 20. (author)

  5. Successful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartlin, Andrew; Grimaldo, Claudia; Lyons, Jeanette; Burke, Daniel; Mitra, Sandip; Choudhury, Ananya

    2014-12-01

    We report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m(2) of carboplatin and 50 mg/m(2) of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of over 12 months post-treatment the patient shows no clinical evidence of recurrent disease. This case provides evidence to encourage the use of chemotherapy in otherwise potentially undertreated haemodialysed patients.

  6. Report from a quality assurance program on patients undergoing the MILD procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Brian; Romeiser, Jamie; Shroyer, A Laurie W; Schiller, Robin; Bae, Jin; Davis, Raphael P; Peyster, Robert; Benveniste, Helene

    2013-05-01

    To characterize trends in pain and functional outcomes and identify risk factors in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and neurogenic claudication undergoing the "Minimally Invasive Lumbar Decompression" (MILD) procedure. Retrospective observational cohort study. Academic multidisciplinary pain center at Stony Brook Medicine. Patients undergoing the MILD procedure from October 2010 to November 2012. De-identified perioperative, pain and function related data for 50 patients undergoing MILD were extracted from the Center for Pain Management's quality assessment database. Data included numerical rating scale (NRS), symptom severity and physical function (Zurich Claudication Questionnaire), functional status (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), pain interference scores (National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System [PROMIS]), and patients' self-reported low back and lower extremity pain distribution. No MILD patient incurred procedure-related complications. Average NRS scores decreased postoperatively and 64.3% of patients reported less pain at 3 months. Clinically meaningful functional ODI improvements of at least 20% from baseline were present in 25% of the patients at 6 months. Preliminary analysis of changes in PROMIS scores at 3 months revealed that pre-MILD "severe" lumbar canal stenosis may be associated with high risk of "no improvement." No such impact was observed for NRS or ODI outcomes. Overall, pain is reduced and functional status improved in LSS patients following the MILD procedure at 3 and 6 months. Given the small sample size, it is not yet possible to identify patient subgroups at risk for "no improvement." Continued follow-up of longer-term outcomes appears warranted to develop evidence-based patient selection criteria. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Prognostic implications of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidov, Aiden; Hachamovitch, Rory; Rozanski, Alan; Hayes, Sean W; Santos, Marcia M; Sciammarella, Maria G; Cohen, Ishac; Gerlach, James; Friedman, John D; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this research was to determine whether presence of atrial fibrillation (AF) provides incremental prognostic information relative to myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) with respect to risk of cardiac death (CD). The prognostic significance of AF in patients undergoing MPS is not known. A total of 16,048 consecutive patients undergoing MPS were followed-up for a mean of 2.21 +/- 1.15 years for the development of CD. Of those, 384 patients (2.4%) had AF. Cox proportional hazards method was used to compare clinical and perfusion data for the prediction of CD in patients with and without AF. Atrial fibrillation was a significant predictor of CD in patients with normal (1.6% per year vs. 0.4% per year in non-AF patients), mildly abnormal (6.3% per year vs. 1.2% per year), and severely abnormal MPS (6.4% per year vs. 3.7% per year) (p < 0.001 for all). By multivariable analysis, AF patients had worse survival (p = 0.001) even after adjustment for the variables most predictive of CD: age, diabetes, shortness of breath, use of vasodilator stress, rest heart rate, and the nuclear variables. In the 4,239 patients with left ventricular ejection fraction evaluated by gated MPS, AF demonstrated incremental prognostic value not only over clinical and nuclear variables, but also over left ventricular ejection in predicting CD (p = 0.014). The presence of AF independently increases the risk of cardiac events over perfusion and function variables in patients undergoing MPS. Patients with AF have a high risk of CD, even when MPS is only mildly abnormal. Whether patients with AF and mildly abnormal MPS constitute a group more deserving of early referral to cardiac catheterization is a question warranting further study.

  8. Dipyridamole-thallium scanning in patients undergoing vascular surgery. Optimizing preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagle, K.A.; Singer, D.E.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Mulley, A.G.; Boucher, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dipyridamole-thallium imaging has been suggested as a method of preoperatively assessing cardiac risk in patients undergoing major surgery. To define more clearly its proper role in preoperative assessment, we prospectively evaluated 111 patients undergoing vascular surgery. In the first set of 61 patients, our data confirmed the value of preoperative dipyridamole-thallium scanning in identifying the patients who suffered postoperative ischemic events. Events occurred in eight of 18 patients with reversible defects on preoperative imaging, compared with no events in 43 patients with no thallium redistribution (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.624, 0.256). The results also suggested that clinical factors might allow identification of a low-risk subset of patients. To test the hypothesis that patients with no evidence of congestive heart failure, angina, prior myocardial infarction, or diabetes do not require further preoperative testing, we evaluated an additional 50 patients having vascular procedures. None of the 23 without the clinical markers had untoward outcomes, while ten of 27 patients with one or more of these clinical markers suffered postoperative ischemic events (confidence interval for the risk difference: 0.592, 0.148). In the clinical high-risk subset, further risk stratification is achieved with dipyridamole-thallium scanning

  9. Risk of severe and refractory postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing diep flap breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan, Michele A; Basdag, Basak; Kalmar, Christopher L; Shridharani, Sachin M; Magarakis, Michael; Jacobs, Lisa K; Thomsen, Robert W; Rosson, Gedge D

    2014-02-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are commonly feared after general anesthesia and can impact results. The primary aim of our study was to examine incidence and severity of PONV by investigating complete response, or absence of PONV, to prophylaxis used in patients undergoing DIEP flaps. Our secondary aims were definition of the magnitude of risk, state of the art of interventions, clinical sequelae of PONV, and interaction between these variables, specifically for DIEP patients. A retrospective chart review occurred for 29 patients undergoing DIEP flap breast reconstruction from September 2007 to February 2008. We assessed known patient and procedure-specific risks for PONV after DIEPs, prophylactic antiemetic regimens, incidence, and severity of PONV, postoperative antiemetic rescues, and effects of risks and treatments on symptoms. Three or more established risks existed in all patients, with up to seven risks per patient. Although 90% of patients received diverse prophylaxis, 76% of patients experienced PONV, and 66% experienced its severe form, emesis. Early PONV (73%) was frequent; symptoms were long lasting (average 20 hours for nausea and emesis); and multiple rescue medications were frequently required (55% for nausea, 58% for emesis). Length of surgery and nonsmoking statistically significantly impacted PONV. We identify previously undocumented high risks for PONV in DIEP patients. High frequency, severity, and refractoriness of PONV occur despite standard prophylaxis. Plastic surgeons and anesthesiologists should further investigate methods to optimize PONV prophylaxis and treatment in DIEP flap patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Positron emission tomography in patients with aggressive fibromatosis/desmoid tumours undergoing therapy with imatinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, Bernd; Hohenberger, Peter [University of Heidelberg, Sarcoma Unit, ITM - Interdisciplinary Tumor Center Mannheim, Mannheim University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Strauss, Ludwig G. [German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    We used {sup 18}F-FDG PET to evaluate the FDG uptake in patients with aggressive fibromatosis (AF, also known as desmoid tumours) undergoing therapy with imatinib (imatinib mesylate, Glivec). The pilot study included nine patients with progressive AF receiving oral treatment with imatinib at a daily dose of 800 mg. Patients were examined using PET prior to the start of therapy and during imatinib treatment. Restaging according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) was performed in parallel using CT and/or MRI and served as reference. The clinical outcomes in nine evaluable patients were as follows: seven patients with stable disease, and two patients with progressive disease. A 27% decrease in the median average standardized uptake value (SUV) of the sequential PET examinations was demonstrated in all evaluable patients with three patients (33%) showing a decrease in SUV of more than 40% (48%, 52% and 54%, respectively); no patient showed a substantial increase in SUV. To our knowledge, this is the first series of AF patients undergoing treatment with imatinib and monitored using sequential PET imaging, that allows detection of SUV changes after imatinib induction, thus helping to decide whether treatment should be continued or not. (orig.)

  11. Kinetics of salivary pH after acidic beverage intake by patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Silva, Carolina S; Bridi, Enrico C; Amaral, Flavia Lb; Franca, Fabiana Mg; Basting, Roberta T

    2015-01-01

    The saliva of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances can potentially present a delay in the diluting, clearing, and buffering of dietary acids due to an increased number of retention areas. The aim of this clinical trial was to compare salivary pH kinetics of patients with and without orthodontic treatment, following the intake of an acidic beverage. Twenty participants undergoing orthodontic treatment and 20 control counterparts had their saliva assessed for flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity. There was no significant difference between salivary parameters in participants with or without an orthodontic appliance. Salivary pH recovery following acidic beverage intake was slower in the orthodontic subjects compared to controls. Patients with fixed orthodontic appliances, therefore, seem to be at higher risk of dental erosion, suggesting that dietary advice and preventive care need to be implemented during orthodontic treatment.

  12. High-intensity resistance and cardiovascular training improve physical capacity in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Rørth, Mikael Rahbek; Zacho, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a supervised high- and low-intensity structured training program in cancer patients concurrently undergoing chemotherapy. Seventy patients, in different stages of the disease and with different diagnoses (48 females, 22 males), between 18...... and 65 years of age (mean age 42.8) participated in a 9-h weekly training program over 6 weeks. The intervention involved physical exercise, relaxation, massage, and body-awareness training. Physical capacity (one-repetition maximum tests (1RM), VO2max) and body composition (weight, skin-fold) were......-term study support the theory that exercise is a beneficial intervention strategy for increasing muscle strength and aerobic fitness during antineoplastic chemotherapy. This type of exercise program can be an important component of complementary treatment for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy....

  13. PREVALENCE AND PREDICTORS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN SEVERE AORTIC STENOSIS PATIENTS UNDERGOING SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanapilai Jayaprasad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present study is to find out the prevalence of CAD in severe Aortic Stenosis (AS patients undergoing aortic valve replacement and the relation between the conventional risk factors and CAD in them. Calcific aortic stenosis is associated with the same risk factors as coronary artery disease. Studies on calcific aortic stenosis and CAD are rarely reported from India. The aim of the study is to find out the predictive value of angina for presence of CAD in severe aortic stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS All cases of isolated severe aortic stenosis undergoing CAG before aortic valve replacement were included in the study. Data regarding various risk factors, symptoms, echocardiographic parameters and angiographic profile were collected. RESULTS Among a total of 94 patients who have undergone aortic valve replacement for severe AS 40 (42.6% had CAD. Risk factors like advanced age, hypertension, diabetes and smoking were more in patients with CAD compared to isolate AS. Mean gradient was more in the AS + CAD group compared with AS group. Presence of angina had a sensitivity of 82.5% and specificity of 51.85% for predicting coexisting CAD. CONCLUSION Among severe aortic stenosis, patients undergoing AVR 42.6% of patients had significant obstructive CAD. The conventional risk factors predict presence of coronary artery disease. Angina has got a fairly good sensitivity, but moderate specificity for CAD.

  14. NSQIP as a Predictor of Length of Stay in Patients Undergoing Free Flap Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Riley MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP calculator was created to improve outcomes and guide cost-effective care in surgery. Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC undergo ablative and free flap reconstructive surgery with prolonged postoperative courses. Methods A case series with chart review was performed on 50 consecutive patients with HNC undergoing ablative and reconstructive free flap surgery from October 2014 to March 2016 at a tertiary care center. Comorbidities and intraoperative and postoperative variables were collected. Predicted length of stay was tabulated with the NSQIP calculator. Results Thirty-five patients (70% were male. The mean (SD age was 67.2 (13.4 years. The mean (SD length of stay (LOS was 13.5 (10.3 days. The mean (SD NSQIP-predicted LOS was 10.3 (2.2 days ( P = .027. Discussion The NSQIP calculator may be an inadequate predictor for LOS in patients with HNC undergoing free flap surgery. Additional study is necessary to determine the accuracy of this tool in this patient population. Implications for Practice: Head and neck surgeons performing free flap reconstructive surgery following tumor ablation may find that the NSQIP risk calculator underestimates the LOS in this population.

  15. Relationship between cobalamin deficiency and delirium in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevuk U

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Utkan Sevuk,1 Erkan Baysal,2 Nurettin Ay,3 Yakup Altas,2 Rojhat Altindag,2 Baris Yaylak,2 Vahhac Alp,3 Ertan Demirtas4 1Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Diyarbakir Gazi Yasargil Education and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, 2Department of Cardiology, Diyarbakir Gazi Yasargil Education and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, 3Department of General Surgery, Diyarbakir Gazi Yasargil Education and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir, 4Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Liv Hospital, Ankara, Turkey Background: Delirium is common after cardiac surgery and is independently associated with increased morbidity, mortality, prolonged hospital stays, and higher costs. Cobalamin (vitamin B12 deficiency is a common cause of neuropsychiatric symptoms and affects up to 40% of elderly people. The relationship between cobalamin deficiency and the occurrence of delirium after cardiac surgery has not been examined in previous studies. We examined the relationship between cobalamin deficiency and delirium in elderly patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG surgery.Material and methods: A total of 100 patients with cobalamin deficiency undergoing CABG were enrolled in this retrospective study. Control group comprised 100 patients without cobalamin deficiency undergoing CABG. Patients aged 65 years or over were included. Diagnosis of delirium was made using Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist. Delirium severity was measured using the Delirium Rating Scale-revised-98.Results: Patients with cobalamin deficiency had a significantly higher incidence of delirium (42% vs 26%; P=0.017 and higher delirium severity scores (16.5±2.9 vs 15.03±2.48; P=0.034 than patients without cobalamin deficiency. Cobalamin levels were significantly lower in patients with delirium than patients without delirium (P=0.004. Delirium severity score showed a moderate correlation with cobalamin levels (Ρ=-0.27; P=0.024. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that

  16. Structural pathology is not related to patient-reported pain and function in patients undergoing meniscal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Simon Tornbjerg; Nissen, Nis; Englund, Martin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between meniscal tears and other joint pathologies with patient-reported symptoms is not clear. We investigated associations between structural knee pathologies identified at surgery with preoperative knee pain and function in patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscal...... of meniscal tears questionnaire, supplemented with information extracted from surgery reports. Following hypothesis-driven preselection of candidate variables, backward elimination regressions were performed to investigate associations between patient-reported outcomes and structural knee pathologies. RESULTS...... surgery. METHODS: This study included 443 patients from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS), a prospective cohort following patients 18 years or older undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery at 4 hospitals between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2014. Patient-reported outcomes, including...

  17. Complications and Mortality in Chronic Renal Failure Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Comparison Between Dialysis and Renal Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Priscilla K; Chen, Antonia F; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Post, Zachary D; Orozco, Fabio R; Ong, Alvin C

    2016-02-01

    In total joint arthroplasty (TJA) literature, there is a paucity of large cohort studies comparing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vs non-CKD/ESRD patients. Thus, the purposes of this study were (1) to identify inhospital complications and mortality in CKD/ESRD and non-CKD/ESRD patients and (2) compare inhospital complications and mortality between dialysis and renal transplantation patients undergoing TJA. We queried the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database for patients with and without diagnosis of CKD/ESRD and those with a renal transplant or on dialysis undergoing primary or revision total knee or hip arthroplasty from 2007 to 2011. Patient comorbidities were identified using the Elixhauser comorbidity index. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes were used to identify postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs), wound complications, deep vein thrombosis, and transfusions. Chronic kidney disease/ESRD was associated with greater risk of SSIs (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; Prenal transplant patients. Chronic kidney disease/ESRD patients had a greater risk of SSIs and wound complications compared to those without renal disease, and the risk of these complications was even greater in CKD/ESRD patients receiving dialysis. These findings emphasize the importance of counseling CKD patients about higher potential complications after TJA, and dialysis patients may be encouraged to undergo renal transplantation before TJA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of music therapy under general anesthesia in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahloul, Mohamed; Mhamdi, Salah; Nakhli, Mohamed Said; Sfeyhi, Ahmed Nadhir; Azzaza, Mohamed; Chaouch, Ajmi; Naija, Walid

    2017-12-01

    Music therapy, an innovative approach that has proven effectiveness in many medical conditions, seems beneficial also in managing surgical patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate its effects, under general anesthesia, on perioperative patient satisfaction, stress, pain, and awareness. This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind study conducted in the operating theatre of visceral surgery at Sahloul Teaching Hospital over a period of 4 months. Patients aged more than 18 undergoing a scheduled surgery under general anesthesia were included. Patients undergoing urgent surgery or presenting hearing or cognitive disorders were excluded. Before induction, patients wore headphones linked to an MP3 player. They were randomly allocated into 2 groups: Group M (with music during surgery) and group C (without music). Hemodynamic parameters, quality of arousal, pain experienced, patient's satisfaction, and awareness incidence during anesthesia were recorded. One hundred and forty patients were included and allocated into 2 groups that were comparable in demographic characteristics, surgical intervention type and anesthesia duration. Comparison of these two groups regarding the hemodynamic profile found more stability in group M for systolic arterial blood pressure. A calm recovery was more often noted in group M (77.1% versus 44%, p Music therapy is a non-pharmacological, inexpensive, and non-invasive technique that can significantly enhance patient satisfaction and decrease patients' embarrassing experiences related to perioperative stress, pain, and awareness.

  19. Lack of motivation: a new modifiable risk factor for peritonitis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Klara; Namagondlu, Girish; Samad, Nasreen; McKitty, Khadija; Fan, Stanley L

    2015-03-01

    Can we identify modifiable risk factors for peritonitis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD)? We aimed to determine whether housing standard, PD exchange technique or patient motivation might be modifiable risks for peritonitis. We also explored the relationship between lack of motivation and depression. Nurse home visits assessed PD exchange technique, environment and patient motivation. Motivation scores were correlated separately with an Apathy Evaluation Score and a depression score using PHQ-9 questionnaires. Home hygiene, exchange technique and motivation were above average in 53%, 56% and 60%, respectively in 104 patients undergoing PD. After 15 months, 25.9% patients developed peritonitis but nurses' ratings of homes and exchange techniques were not predictive. Low patient motivation was predictive. Patients rated to have above or below median motivation had significantly different Apathy Scores (p = 0.0002). Unmotivated depressed patients were significantly more likely to develop peritonitis compared to motivated depressed patients. Lack of motivation predicted peritonitis particularly if associated with depression. Further studies are required focusing on specific motivation scoring schemes and the psychosocial support that might lead to better outcomes. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  20. Gender differences in health-related quality of life in patients undergoing coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsberts, Crystel M; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Hoefer, Imo E; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Nathoe, Hendrik; Appelman, Yolande E; de Kleijn, Dominique P V; den Ruijter, Hester M

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) reflects the general well-being of individuals. In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), HRQOL is compromised. Female patients with CAD have been reported to have lower HRQOL. In this study, we investigate gender differences in HRQOL and in associations of patient characteristics with HRQOL in patients with coronary angiography (CAG). We cross-sectionally analysed patients from the Utrecht Coronary Biobank undergoing CAG. All patients filled in an HRQOL questionnaire (RAND-36 and EuroQoL) on inclusion. RAND-36 and EuroQoL HRQOL measures were compared between the genders across indications for CAG, CAD severity and treatment of CAD. RAND-36 HRQOL measures were compared with the general Dutch population. Additionally, we assessed interactions of gender with patient characteristics in their association with HRQOL (EuroQoL). We included 1421 patients (1020 men and 401 women) with a mean age of 65 in our analysis. Women reported lower HRQOL measures than men (mean EuroQoL self-rated health grade 6.84±1.49 in men, 6.46±1.40 in women, pgender differences were found in determinants of HRQOL in patients undergoing CAG, which deserve attention in future research. NCT02304744 (clinicaltrials.gov).

  1. Awareness of dysgeusia and gustatory tests in patients undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuba, Sayaka; Fujiyama, Rie; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Morita, Michi; Sakimura, Chika; Hatachi, Toshiko; Matsumoto, Megumi; Yano, Hiroshi; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Hayashida, Naomi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2018-05-12

    We analyzed the prevalence of gustatory test abnormalities in breast cancer (BC) patients undergoing chemotherapy. We enrolled 43 BC patients undergoing chemotherapy and 38 BC patients who had never undergone chemotherapy (control group). Two gustatory tests were conducted: an instillation method examining the threshold for four basic taste stimuli and an electrogustometry method measuring the threshold for perception with electric stimulation at the front two-thirds of the tongue (cranial nerve VII) and at the back third of the tongue (cranial nerve IX). The results of the two gustatory tests and clinicopathological factors were compared between the chemotherapy and control groups and between patients with and without awareness of dysgeusia in the chemotherapy group. In the chemotherapy group, 19 (44%) patients were aware of dysgeusia and 8 (19%) had hypogeusia using the instillation method. Although more patients had parageusia in the chemotherapy than control group, no significant differences in the results of the two gustatory tests were observed. Patients with dysgeusia awareness had a higher threshold at cranial nerve IX using the electrogustometry method than those without dysgeusia awareness; no significant differences in hypogeusia were observed using the instillation method. In fact, 74% (14/19) of patients with dysgeusia awareness could identify the four tastes accurately using the instillation method. Similar results were observed for the instillation and electrogustometry methods at cranial nerve VII. While approximately half of the chemotherapy patients were aware of dysgeusia, 81% (35/43) of them could accurately identify the four basic tastes using the instillation method.

  2. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, William R.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled ''Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action''. The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  3. [Preoperatory sonography efficiency in paediatric patients with cholelithiasis undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riñón, C; de Mingo, L; Cortés, M J; Ollero, J C; Alvarez, M; Espinosa, R; Rollán, V

    2009-01-01

    Biliary lithiasis is not much frequent in paediatric patients. The manegement of cholelithiasis in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy is still controversial. We propose the preoperatory echographic study of the biliary tree 24-48 h before surgery, as the first choice, instead of the intraoperatory cholangiography. We made a retrospective study of 42 patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to symptomatic biliary lithiasis during the last 15 years, with ages between 18 months and 17-years-old (mean age 9,6-years-old) and weight between 11 and 70 kg (mean weight 42 kg) at the moment of surgery. Six of them had haematological illnesses, 17 came to the hospital because of acute abdominal pain, 10 had been studied because of recurrent abdominal pain and 9 had casual diagnoses. Abdominal sonography was performed in all patients 24-48 hours before surgery. Four children were diagnosed of biliary duct lithiasis: two choledocolithiasis and two stones in the cystic duct. One of the cystic stones was extracted in the operating room and the rest resolved spontaneously. One patient presented dilatation of choledocal duct after surgery, without any stones' evidence. Also this patient resolved spontaneously. We had no complications. Biliary lithiasis is not frequent in children, even if it seems to be increasing. A few of these patients will suffer of choledocolithiasis. The intraoperatory exploration of the biliary tree during laparoscopic surgery is technically difficult due the small size of paediatric patients. Cholangiography is not always successful and can produce some important complications as pancreatitis. Preoperative sonography 24-48 hours before surgery is a safe and efficient method for the diagnosis and follow-up of paediatric patients with biliary lithiasis undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. It is safe enough to be performed without intraoperatory cholangiography.

  4. The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Pain and Fatigue of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghabati, Nahid; Pour Esmaiel, Zahra

    2010-01-01

    Despite major advances in pain management, cancer pain is managed poorly in 80% of the patients with cancer. Due to deleterious side effects of pharmacology therapy in these people, there is an urgent need for clinical trials of non-pharmacological interventions. To examine the effect of therapeutic touch (TT) on the pain and fatigue of the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, a randomized and three-groups experimental study—experimental (TT), placebo (placebo TT), and control (usual care)—was carried out. Ninety patients undergoing chemotherapy, exhibiting pain and fatigue of cancer, were randomized into one of the three groups in the Cancer Center of Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Pain and fatigue were measured and recorded by participants before and after the intervention for 5 days (once a day). The intervention consisted of 30 min TT given once a day for 5 days between 10:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of pain and the Rhoten Fatigue Scale (RFS) were completed for 5 days before and after the intervention by the subjects. The TT (significant) was more effective in decreasing pain and fatigue of the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy than the usual care group, while the placebo group indicated a decreasing trend in pain and fatigue scores compared with the usual care group. PMID:18955319

  5. Comparison of propofol versus sevoflurane on thermoregulation in patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumul Chowdhury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: General anesthesia causes inhibition of thermoregulatory mechanisms. Propofol has been reported to cause more temperature fall, but in case of deliberate mild hypothermia, both sevoflurane and propofol were comparable. Thermoregulation is found to be disturbed in cases of pituitary tumors. We aimed to investigate which of the two agents, sevoflurane or propofol, results in better preservation of thermoregulation in patients undergoing transsphenoidal excision of pituitary tumors. Methods: Twenty-six patients scheduled to undergo transsphenoidal removal of pituitary adenomas were randomly allocated to receive propofol or sevoflurane anesthesia. Baseline esophageal temperature was noted. Times for temperature to fall by 1°C or 35°C and to return to baseline were also comparable ( P>0.05. After that warmer was started at 43°C and time to rise to baseline was noted. Duration of surgery, total blood loss, and total fluid intake were also noted. If any, side effects such as delayed arousal and recovery from muscle relaxant were noted. Results: The demographics of the patients were comparable. Duration of surgery and total blood loss were comparable in the two groups. The time for temperature to fall by 1°C or 35°C and time to return to baseline was also comparable ( P>0.05. No side effects related to body temperature were noted. Conclusion: Both propofol and sevoflurane show similar effects in maintaining thermal homeostasis in patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

  6. Effect of virtual reality distraction on pain among patients with hand injury undergoing dressing change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunlan; Deng, Hongyan; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of virtual reality distraction on pain among patients with a hand injury undergoing a dressing change. Virtual reality distraction can effectively alleviate pain among patients undergoing a dressing change. Clinical research has not addressed pain control during a dressing change. A randomised controlled trial was performed. In the first dressing change sequence, 98 patients were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group, with 49 cases in each group. Pain levels were compared between the two groups before and after the dressing change using a visual analog scale. The sense of involvement in virtual environments was measured using the Pearson correlation coefficient analysis, which determined the relationship between the sense of involvement and pain level. The difference in visual analog scale scores between the two groups before the dressing change was not statistically significant (t = 0·196, p > 0·05), but the scores became statistically significant after the dressing change (t = -30·792, p virtual environment and pain level during the dressing was statistically significant (R(2) = 0·5538, p Virtual reality distraction can effectively alleviate pain among patients with a hand injury undergoing a dressing change. Better results can be obtained by increasing the sense of involvement in a virtual environment. Virtual reality distraction can effectively relieve pain without side effects and is not reliant on a doctor's prescription. This tool is convenient for nurses to use, especially when analgesics are unavailable. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Intravenous clonidine administration and its ability to reduce pulmonary arterial pressure in patients undergoing heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Barbosa João

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the ability of clonidine to reduce pulmonary arterial pressure in patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing heart surgery, either by red