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Sample records for patients required hospitalization

  1. Patients with worsening chronic heart failure who present to a hospital emergency department require hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafazand Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure (CHF is a major public health problem characterised by progressive deterioration with disabling symptoms and frequent hospital admissions. To influence hospitalisation rates it is crucial to identify precipitating factors. To characterise patients with CHF who seek an emergency department (ED because of worsening symptoms and signs and to explore the reasons why they are admitted to hospital. Method Patients (n = 2,648 seeking care for dyspnoea were identified at the ED, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra. Out of 2,648 patients, 1,127 had a previous diagnosis of CHF, and of these, 786 were included in the present study with at least one sign and one symptom of worsening CHF. Results Although several of the patients wanted to go home after acute treatment in the ED, only 2% could be sent home. These patients were enrolled in an interventional study, which evaluated the acute care at home compared to the conventional, in hospital care. The remaining patients were admitted to hospital because of serious condition, including pneumonia/respiratory disease, myocardial infarction, pulmonary oedema, anaemia, the need to monitor cardiac rhythm, pathological blood chemistry and difficulties to communicate. Conclusion The vast majority of patients with worsening CHF seeking the ED required hospital care, predominantly because of co-morbidities. Patients with CHF with symptomatic deterioration may be admitted to hospital without additional emergency room investigations.

  2. Meeting the nutritional requirements of hospitalized patients: an interdisciplinary approach to hospital catering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iff, S; Leuenberger, M; Rösch, S; Knecht, G; Tanner, B; Stanga, Z

    2008-12-01

    The study served to assure the quality of our catering, to locate problems, and to define further optimization measures at the Bern University Hospital. The main objective was to investigate whether the macronutrient and energy content of the hospital food complies with the nutritional value calculated from recipes as well as with the recommendations issued by the German Nutrition Society (DGE). Prospective, randomized, single-center quality study. Complete standard meals were analyzed over seven consecutive days for each seasonal menu plan in one year. The quantitative and qualitative chemical content of a randomly chosen menu was determined by an external laboratory. Sixty meals were analyzed. The amount of food served and the ratio of macronutrients contained in the food satisfactorily reflected all recipes. Not surprisingly, the energy and carbohydrate content of our meals was lower than in the German recommendations, because the report of the DGE is based on the sum of meals, snacks and beverages consumed over the whole day and not only on the main meals, as we analyzed. Periodic quality control is essential in order to meet recommendations and patients' expectations in hospital catering. Members of the catering service should undergo regularly repeated skills training, and continuous efforts should be made to ensure portion size for all delivered meals. Food provision in the hospital setting needs to be tailored to meet the demands of the different patient groups, to optimize nutritional support, and to minimize food waste.

  3. Clinical audit of COPD patients requiring hospital admissions in Spain: AUDIPOC study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pozo-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS: AUDIPOC is a nationwide clinical audit that describes the characteristics, interventions and outcomes of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD, assessing the compliance of these parameters with current international guidelines. The present study describes hospital resources, hospital factors related to case recruitment variability, patients' characteristics, and adherence to guidelines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An organisational database was completed by all participant hospitals recording resources and organisation. Over an 8-week period 11,564 consecutive ECOPD admissions to 129 Spanish hospitals covering 70% of the Spanish population were prospectively identified. At hospital discharge, 5,178 patients (45% of eligible were finally included, and thus constituted the audited population. Audited patients were reassessed 90 days after admission for survival and readmission rates. A wide variability was observed in relation to most variables, hospital adherence to guidelines, and readmissions and death. Median inpatient mortality was 5% (across-hospital range 0-35%. Among discharged patients, 37% required readmission (0-62% and 6.5% died (0-35%. The overall mortality rate was 11.6% (0-50%. Hospital size and complexity and aspects related to hospital COPD awareness were significantly associated with case recruitment. Clinical management most often complied with diagnosis and treatment recommendations but rarely (<50% addressed guidance on healthy life-styles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The AUDIPOC study highlights the large across-hospital variability in resources and organization of hospitals, patient characteristics, process of care, and outcomes. The study also identifies resources and organizational characteristics associated with the admission of COPD cases, as well as aspects of daily clinical care amenable to improvement.

  4. Does a new steam meal catering system meet patient requirements in hospital?

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    Hickson, M; Fearnley, L; Thomas, J; Evans, S

    2007-10-01

    It has been consistently observed that a significant proportion of hospital inpatients are malnourished and many actually develop malnutrition in hospital. The NHS provides over 300 million meals each year at a cost of pound 500 million, yet there is relatively little research evaluating how well different catering systems provide for the needs of hospital inpatients. The aim of the study was to: (i) evaluate whether a new steam meal catering system (Steamplicity) enables patients in theory to meet their energy requirements in hospital and (ii) compare energy and protein intake using Steamplicity with a traditional bulk cook-chill system. Patients not at nutritional risk had their food intake at one lunchtime assessed. Energy intake was compared with the patients' energy requirements and energy and protein intake were compared with previous data from a bulk system. Fifty-seven patients had a median daily energy requirement of 7648 kJ (1821 kcal) [inter-quartile range (IQR): 6854-9164 kJ]. Assuming 30% [2293 kJ (546 kcal)] should be supplied by the lunch meal the average intake of 1369 kJ (326 kcal) fell short by 40%. Patients served meals from Steamplicity ate less energy [1369 kJ versus 1562 kJ (326 kcal versus 372 kcal) P = 0.04] but similar protein (18 g versus 19 g P = 0.34) to the bulk system. The largest difference was the energy provided by the dessert since the bulk system served more hot high-calorie desserts. Patient intakes did not meet their estimated requirements. The patients in this study were eating well and not at nutritional risk, thus patients with a poor appetite will be even less likely to meet their nutritional requirements. Steamplicity meals result in a lower energy intake than meals from a bulk cook-chill system, but similar protein intakes.

  5. Comparing nutritional requirements, provision and intakes among patients prescribed therapeutic diets in hospital: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Megan; Desbrow, Ben; Roberts, Shelley

    Nutrition is an important part of recovery for hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional adequacy of meals provided to and consumed by patients prescribed a therapeutic diet. Patients (N = 110) prescribed a therapeutic diet (texture-modified, low-fiber, oral fluid, or food allergy or intolerance diets) for medical or nutritional reasons were recruited from six wards of a tertiary hospital. Complete (24-h) dietary provisions and intakes were directly observed and analyzed for energy (kJ) and protein (g) content. A chart audit gathered demographic, clinical, and nutrition-related information to calculate each patient's disease-specific estimated energy and protein requirements. Provisions and intake were considered adequate if they met ≥75% of the patient's estimated requirements. Mean energy and protein provided to patients (5844 ± 2319 kJ, 53 ± 30 g) were significantly lower than their mean estimated requirements (8786 ± 1641 kJ, 86 ± 18 g). Consequently, mean nutrition intake (4088 ± 2423 kJ, 37 ± 28 g) were significantly lower than estimated requirements. Only 37% (41) of patients were provided with and 18% (20) consumed adequate nutrition to meet their estimated requirements. No therapeutic diet provided adequate food to meet the energy and protein requirements of all recipients. Patients on oral fluid diets had the highest estimated requirements (9497 ± 1455 kJ, 93 ± 16 g) and the lowest nutrient provision (3497 ± 1388 kJ, 25 ± 19 g) and intake (2156 ± 1394 kJ, 14 ± 14 g). Hospitalized patients prescribed therapeutic diets (particularly fluid-only diets) are at risk for malnutrition. Further research is required to determine the most effective strategies to improve nutritional provision and intake among patients prescribed therapeutic diets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Insulin requirements in non-critically ill hospitalized patients with diabetes and steroid-induced hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanakis, Elias K; Shah, Nina; Malhotra, Keya; Kemmerer, Terri; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2014-04-01

    Steroid-induced hyperglycemia is common in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus. Guidelines for glucose management in this setting are lacking. We conducted a retrospective chart review of non-critically ill patients with diabetes receiving steroids, hospitalized from January 2009 to October 2012. Fifty-eight patients were identified from 247 consults. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess median daily insulin requirements of normoglycemic patients compared with hyperglycemic patients. Of the 58 total patients included in our study, 20 achieved normoglycemia during admission (patient-day weighted mean blood glucose [PDWMBG] level = 154 ± 16 mg/dL) and 38 remained hyperglycemic (PDWMBG level = 243 ± 39 mg/dL; P < 0.001). There were no differences between the 2 patient groups in age, sex, race, body weight, renal function, HbA1c level, glucose-altering medications, diabetes type, or disease duration. Following multivariable adjustment, compared with hyperglycemic patients, normoglycemic patients required similar units of basal insulin (median interquartile range [IQR])(23.6 [17.9, 31.2] vs 20.1 [16.5, 24.4]; P = 0.35); higher units of nutritional insulin (45.5 [34.2, 60.4] vs 20.1 [16.4, 24.5]; P < 0.001]; and lower units of correctional insulin (5.8 [4.1, 8.1] vs 13.0 [10.2, 16.5]; P < 0.001]). Patients achieving normoglycemia required a significantly lower percentage of correction insulin (total daily dose [TDD]: 7.4% vs 23.4%; P < 0.001) and a higher percentage of nutritional insulin (TDD: 58.1% vs 36.2%; P <0.001) than hyperglycemic patients. There was no difference in the TDD per kilogram, TDD per milligram hydrocortisone dose, or TDD per milligram hydrocortisone dose per kilogram weight between the 2 groups. The data suggest that non-critically ill patients with hyperglycemia receiving steroids require a higher percentage of TDD insulin therapy as nutritional insulin to achieve normoglycemia.

  7. Complications Requiring Hospital Admission and Causes of In-Hospital Death over Time in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Cirrhosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Yeon; Kim, Chang Wook; Choi, Jong Young; Lee, Chang Don; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Moon Young; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Wo, Hyun Young

    2016-01-01

    Data on the epidemiology of alcoholic cirrhosis, especially in Asian countries, are limited. We compared the temporal evolution of patterns of alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis over the last decade. We retrospectively examined the inpatient datasets of five referral centers during 2002 and 2011. The study included patients who were admitted due to specific complications of liver cirrhosis. We compared the causes of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths between patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Among the included 2,799 hospitalizations (2,165 patients), 1,496 (1,143 patients) were from 2002, and 1,303 (1,022 patients) were from 2011. Over time, there was a reduction in the rate of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) as a cause of hospitalization and an increase in the rate of hepatocellular carcinoma. Deaths that were attributable to HE or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) significantly decreased, whereas those due to hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) significantly increased over time in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. However, in patients with nonalcoholic cirrhosis, hepatic failure and HRS remained the principal causes of in-hospital death during both time periods. The major causes of in-hospital deaths have evolved from acute cirrhotic complications, including HE or SBP to HRS in alcoholic cirrhosis, whereas those have remained unchanged in nonalcoholic cirrhosis during the last decade.

  8. Transfusion requirements in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding: a study in a Blood Unit at a referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garrido

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1. To study transfusion requirements in the Department of Gastroenterology of a Tertiary Referral Hospital, and their evolution over the last seven years. 2. To analyze risk factors associated with greater erythrocyte transfusion requirements. Patients and methods: erythrocyte transfusion requirements were compared for patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology at Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, from 1999 to 2005. Clinical data of interest have been analyzed in order to determine factors associated with greater transfusion requirements. Results: 1,611 patients with a mean age of 60.45 years (59.7-61.2 were included in this study; 76.41% were males. Gastric ulcers were the cause of bleeding in 18.4% of cases (with 69% requiring transfusions; duodenal ulcers caused 22.2% of cases (with 52.9% requiring transfusions, and portal hypertension caused 33.6% of cases (with 90.2% requiring transfusions. Upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown origin requires transfusions in 88.9 and 96.2% of cases, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that clinical presentations such as hematemesis (odds ratio = 3.12, hematochezia (odds ratio = 33.17, gastrointestinal hemorrhage of unknown origin (odds ratio = 6.57, and hemorrhage as a result of portal hypertension (odds ratio = 3.43 were associated with greater transfusion requirements for erythrocyte concentrates. No significant differences were observed between the percentages of patients who received transfusions from 1999 to 2005. Conclusions: 1. No differences have been observed between the percentages of patients who received transfusions over the last seven years at our Department of Gastroenterology. 2. Patients presenting with hematemesis or hematochezia, in addition to those with bleeding of unknown origin or from portal hypertension, are prone to have greater transfusion requirements.

  9. Comparison Between Premixed and Compounded Parenteral Nutrition Solutions in Hospitalized Patients Requiring Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Colleen; Allard, Johane; Raman, Maitreyi

    2016-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) may be provided through compounded or premixed solutions. To determine the proportion of stable custom-compounded PN prescriptions that would fit within a 20% deviance of an existing premixed PN solution. A retrospective study design was used. Inpatients who received PN in non-critical care units in the preceding year were screened for eligibility. Results are reported descriptively as means (95% confidence intervals) and proportions. We reviewed 97 PN prescriptions that met inclusion criteria. Stable hospital PN prescriptions compared with the reference premixed prescription provided 1838 (1777-1898) vs 1843 (1781-1905) kcal/d, P = .43; dextrose, 266 (254-277) vs 225 (216-234) g/d, P magnesium, 5.4 (4.8-5.4) vs 7.6 (7.4-7.9) mmol/L. Calories and protein were remarkably similar, but dextrose, lipid, and electrolytes differed between hospital PN and the reference premixed prescription. We believe that there may be a role for premixed solutions in quaternary centers in stable non-critically ill patients. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  10. Acute sports injuries requiring hospital care.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandelin, J

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation reports 138 consecutive patients injured in sports, who needed treatment as in-patients in a one year period. More injuries were sustained in soccer than in other sports. The lower extremity was the site of most injuries, fractures and dislocations being the most common type of injury. At follow-up 50% of the patients complained of discomfort. The average stay in hospital after a sports injury requiring hospital care was 6 days. In 52% of the patients the duration of...

  11. The longitudinal BMI pattern and body composition of patients with anorexia nervosa who require urgent hospitalization: A case control study.

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    Kawai, Keisuke; Yamashita, Sakino; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Gondo, Motoharu; Morita, Chihiro; Nozaki, Takehiro; Takakura, Shu; Hata, Tomokazu; Yamada, Yu; Matsubayashi, Sunao; Takii, Masato; Kubo, Chiharu; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2011-12-05

    The prevention of serious physical complications in anorexia nervosa (AN) patients is important. The purpose of this study is to clarify which physical and social factors are related to the necessity for urgent hospitalization of anorexia nervosa (AN) patients in a long-term starvation state. We hypothesized that the change of longitudinal BMI, body composition and social background would be useful as an index of the necessity for urgent hospitalization. AN patients were classified into; urgent hospitalization, due to disturbance of consciousness or difficulty walking(n = 17); planned admission (n = 96); and outpatient treatment only groups (n = 136). The longitudinal BMI pattern and the clinical features of these groups were examined. In the hospitalization groups, comparison was done of body composition variation and the social background, including the educational level and advice from family members. After adjusting for age and duration of illness, the BMI of the urgent hospitalization group was lower than that of the other groups at one year before hospitalization (P < 0.01) and decreased more rapidly (P < 0.01). Urgent hospitalization was associated with the fat free mass (FFM) (P < 0.01). Between the groups, no considerable difference in social factors was found. The longitudinal pattern of BMI and FFM may be useful for understanding the severity in AN from the viewpoint of failure of the homeostasis system.

  12. The longitudinal BMI pattern and body composition of patients with anorexia nervosa who require urgent hospitalization: A case control study

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    Kawai Keisuke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention of serious physical complications in anorexia nervosa (AN patients is important. The purpose of this study is to clarify which physical and social factors are related to the necessity for urgent hospitalization of anorexia nervosa (AN patients in a long-term starvation state. We hypothesized that the change of longitudinal BMI, body composition and social background would be useful as an index of the necessity for urgent hospitalization. Methods AN patients were classified into; urgent hospitalization, due to disturbance of consciousness or difficulty walking(n = 17; planned admission (n = 96; and outpatient treatment only groups (n = 136. The longitudinal BMI pattern and the clinical features of these groups were examined. In the hospitalization groups, comparison was done of body composition variation and the social background, including the educational level and advice from family members. Results After adjusting for age and duration of illness, the BMI of the urgent hospitalization group was lower than that of the other groups at one year before hospitalization (P Conclusions The longitudinal pattern of BMI and FFM may be useful for understanding the severity in AN from the viewpoint of failure of the homeostasis system.

  13. Patient life in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid

    Patient life in hospital.A qualitative study of informal relationships between hospitalised patients Introduction Within a patientology framework, this PhD dissertation is about an empirical study on patient life that provides insight into the nature of informal relationships between patients...... are created through stories about three roughly framed aspects of hospitalisation: A. Being together with fellow patients entails a constant dilemma, B. Relationships between patients are restricted and extended and C. Shifting perspectives in solidarity. Conclusion Patients' hospitalisation is strongly...

  14. Effects of aspiration pneumonia on the intensive care requirements and in-hospital mortality of hospitalised patients with acute cerebrovascular disease.

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    Güngen, Adil Can; Aydemir, Yusuf; Güngen, Belma Dogan; Yazar, Esra Ertan; Yağız, Orhan; Aras, Yeşim Güzey; Gümüş, Hatice; Erkorkmaz, Ünal

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of the development of aspiration pneumonia (AP) on the intensive care unit (ICU) requirements and in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalised in the neurology ward due to an acute cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Five hundred and three patients hospitalised in the neurology ward following an acute CVA were retrospectively analysed. The patients were divided into two groups: those with AP (group 1) and those without AP (group 2). Demographic characteristics and physical and radiological findings, including the localisation, lateralisation and aetiology of the infarction, in addition to ICU requirements and mortality, were evaluated. Aspiration pneumonia was detected in 80 (15.9%) patients during the in-hospital stay. Transfer to the ICU for any reason was required in 37.5% of the patients in group 1 and 4.7% of those in group 2 ( p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality occurred in 7.5% and 1.4% of the patients in group 1 and group 2, respectively ( p = 0.006). The incidence of AP was highest in patients with an infarction of the medial cerebral artery (MCA) ( p < 0.001). The AP was associated with older age ( p < 0.001), hypertension ( p = 0.007), echocardiography findings ( p = 0.032) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ( p < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the requirement rate for transfer to the ICU and the mortality rate appear to be significantly higher in patients with a diagnosis of AP. Precautions should be taken, starting from the first day of hospitalisation, to decrease the incidence of AP in patients with acute CVA, focusing especially on older patients and those with a severe mRS score.

  15. The ED-inpatient dashboard: Uniting emergency and inpatient clinicians to improve the efficiency and quality of care for patients requiring emergency admission to hospital.

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    Staib, Andrew; Sullivan, Clair; Jones, Matt; Griffin, Bronwyn; Bell, Anthony; Scott, Ian

    2017-06-01

    Patients who require emergency admission to hospital require complex care that can be fragmented, occurring in the ED, across the ED-inpatient interface (EDii) and subsequently, in their destination inpatient ward. Our hospital had poor process efficiency with slow transit times for patients requiring emergency care. ED clinicians alone were able to improve the processes and length of stay for the patients discharged directly from the ED. However, improving the efficiency of care for patients requiring emergency admission to true inpatient wards required collaboration with reluctant inpatient clinicians. The inpatient teams were uninterested in improving time-based measures of care in isolation, but they were motivated by improving patient outcomes. We developed a dashboard showing process measures such as 4 h rule compliance rate coupled with clinically important outcome measures such as inpatient mortality. The EDii dashboard helped unite both ED and inpatient teams in clinical redesign to improve both efficiencies of care and patient outcomes. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  16. Influence of socioeconomic status on community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in elderly patients requiring hospitalization: a multicenter observational study

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    Carratalà Jordi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The associations between socioeconomic status and community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in adults have been studied although studies did not always document a relationship. The aim of this multicenter observational study was to determine the association between socioeconomic status and community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in the elderly, in the context of a public health system providing universal free care to the whole population. Methods A total of 651 patients aged ≥65 years hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia through the emergency departments of five Spanish public hospitals were recruited and followed up between May 2005 and January 2007. The primary outcomes studied were: length of stay, intensive care unit admission, overall mortality and readmission. Socioeconomic status was measured using both individual and community data: occupation [categorized in six social groups (I, II, III, IVa, IVb and V], educational level (≤ primary level or ≥ secondary level and disposable family income of the municipality or district of residence [>12,500 € (high municipality family income and ≤12,500 € (low municipality family income]. The six social groups were further categorized as upper/middle social class (groups I-IVb and lower class (group V. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. OR and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. All statistical tests were two tailed and statistical significance was established as p Results 17.7% of patients lived in a municipality or district with a high municipality family income and 63.6% were upper/middle social class (I-IVb. Only 15.7% of patients had a secondary education. The adjusted analysis showed no association between pneumonia outcomes and social class, educational level or municipality family income. However, length of stay increased significantly in patients in whom the factors, living alone and being a smoker or ex-smoker coincided (p

  17. Medicare Hospital Spending Per Patient - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The "Medicare hospital spending per patient (Medicare Spending per Beneficiary)" measure shows whether Medicare spends more, less or about the same per Medicare...

  18. Transfusion requirements in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding: a study in a Blood Unit at a referral hospital Requerimientos transfusionales en pacientes con hemorragia digestiva: estudio en una Unidad de Sangrantes de un hospital de referencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garrido

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: 1. To study transfusion requirements in the Department of Gastroenterology of a Tertiary Referral Hospital, and their evolution over the last seven years. 2. To analyze risk factors associated with greater erythrocyte transfusion requirements. Patients and methods: erythrocyte transfusion requirements were compared for patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology at Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, from 1999 to 2005. Clinical data of interest have been analyzed in order to determine factors associated with greater transfusion requirements. Results: 1,611 patients with a mean age of 60.45 years (59.7-61.2 were included in this study; 76.41% were males. Gastric ulcers were the cause of bleeding in 18.4% of cases (with 69% requiring transfusions; duodenal ulcers caused 22.2% of cases (with 52.9% requiring transfusions, and portal hypertension caused 33.6% of cases (with 90.2% requiring transfusions. Upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown origin requires transfusions in 88.9 and 96.2% of cases, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that clinical presentations such as hematemesis (odds ratio = 3.12, hematochezia (odds ratio = 33.17, gastrointestinal hemorrhage of unknown origin (odds ratio = 6.57, and hemorrhage as a result of portal hypertension (odds ratio = 3.43 were associated with greater transfusion requirements for erythrocyte concentrates. No significant differences were observed between the percentages of patients who received transfusions from 1999 to 2005. Conclusions: 1. No differences have been observed between the percentages of patients who received transfusions over the last seven years at our Department of Gastroenterology. 2. Patients presenting with hematemesis or hematochezia, in addition to those with bleeding of unknown origin or from portal hypertension, are prone to have greater transfusion requirements.

  19. Clinical Profile and Outcome of Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Hemodialysis: Two Years’ Experience at a Tertiary Hospital in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Igiraneza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute kidney injury (AKI requiring renal replacement therapy is associated with high mortality. The study assessed the impact of the introduction of hemodialysis (HD on outcomes of patients with AKI in Rwanda. Methods. A single center retrospective study that evaluated the clinical profile and survival outcomes of patients with AKI requiring HD [AKI-D] at a tertiary hospital in Rwanda. Data was collected on patients who received HD for AKI from September 2014 to December 2016. Patient demographics, comorbidities, clinical presentation, laboratory tests, and mortality were reviewed and analyzed. Predictors of mortality were assessed using age and gender adjusted multivariate analyses. Results. Of the 82 eligible patients, median age was 38 years (IQR 28–57 years. Males comprised 51% of the cohort. Infectious diseases including malaria, pneumonia, and sepsis (35.1% and pregnancy-related conditions (26.9% were the most frequent comorbidities. Pulmonary oedema (54.9% and uremic encephalopathy (50% were top indications for HD. Mortality was 34.1%. On multivariate analysis, receipt of <5 sessions of HD (OR = 4.01, 95% CI 1.185–13.61, P=0.026 and hyperkalemia (OR = 3.23, 95% CI 1.040–10.065, P=0.043 were associated with mortality. Conclusion. The availability of acute hemodialysis in Rwanda has resulted in improved patient survival and persistent hyperkalemia predicted higher mortality.

  20. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2013. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes that were applied to the LTCH PPS by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these updates and statutory changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or have revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program and the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program. In addition, we are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the

  1. Improving outcomes for hospital patients with critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: the Australian and New Zealand Massive Transfusion Registry study methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, J C; Venardos, K M; Aoki, N J; Zatta, A J; McQuilten, Z K; Phillips, L E; Andrianopoulos, N; Cooper, D J; Cameron, P A; Isbister, J P; Wood, E M

    2016-10-06

    The Australian and New Zealand (ANZ) Massive Transfusion (MT) Registry (MTR) has been established to improve the quality of care of patients with critical bleeding (CB) requiring MT (≥ 5 units red blood cells (RBC) over 4 h). The MTR is providing data to: (1) improve the evidence base for transfusion practice by systematically collecting data on transfusion practice and clinical outcomes; (2) monitor variations in practice and provide an opportunity for benchmarking, and feedback on practice/blood product use; (3) inform blood supply planning, inventory management and development of future clinical trials; and (4) measure and enhance translation of evidence into policy and patient blood management guidelines. The MTR commenced in 2011. At each participating site, all eligible patients aged ≥18 years with CB from any clinical context receiving MT are included using a waived consent model. Patient information and clinical coding, transfusion history, and laboratory test results are extracted for each patient's hospital admission at the episode level. Thirty-two hospitals have enrolled and 3566 MT patients have been identified across Australia and New Zealand between 2011 and 2015. The majority of CB contexts are surgical, followed by trauma and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Validation studies have verified that the definition of MT used in the registry correctly identifies 94 % of CB events, and that the median time of transfusion for the majority of fresh products is the 'product event issue time' from the hospital blood bank plus 20 min. Data linkage between the MTR and mortality databases in Australia and New Zealand will allow comparisons of risk-adjusted mortality estimates across different bleeding contexts, and between countries. Data extracts will be examined to determine if there are differences in patient outcomes according to transfusion practice. The ratios of blood components (e.g. FFP:RBC) used in different types of critical bleeding will also

  2. Brief hospitalizations of elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Sofie; Rasmussen, Søren Wistisen; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crowded departments are a common problem in Danish hospitals, especially in departments of internal medicine, where a large proportion of the patients are elderly. We therefore chose to investigate the number and character of hospitalizations of elderly patients with a duration of less...

  3. Latex allergies - for hospital patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000499.htm Latex allergies - for hospital patients To use the sharing features on this page, ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  4. Telehealth-based model of care redesign to facilitate local fitting and management of patients with a spinal fracture requiring a thoracic lumbar sacral orthosis in rural hospitals in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ryan; Giles, Michelle; Morison, Jane; Henderson, Judith

    2018-03-23

    To develop and implement a telehealth-based model of care for spinal fractures requiring management with thoracic lumbar sacral orthoses that eliminates the need for transfer to a metropolitan tertiary referral hospital. Pre-post design observational study evaluating model of care implementation. Rural referral hospitals in a large NSW region covering metropolitan, rural and remote hospitals. Patients presenting with a thoracic or lumbar spine fracture requiring thoracic lumbar sacral orthoses management and rural clinicians caring for them. Number of patients managed in rural hospitals without transfer to a metropolitan tertiary referral hospital; length of stay and related cost efficiencies; clinicians' perceived skills, knowledge and confidence levels. Model of care was implemented with clinical and system governance processes; and educational workshops across eight rural hospitals. A total of 81 patients managed in rural hospitals under this model between July 2013 and June 2016 without transfer were included in this study. Mean length of stay reduced from nine to four days. Hospital transfers were eliminated from the patient journey, totalling 24 324 km. Workshops were attended by 71 clinicians from nine rural hospitals and survey findings indicated a significant increase in staff knowledge, skill and confidence post education. Cost efficiencies were gained by eliminating 162 inter-hospital transfers and 405 patient bed days. This model has streamlined patient journeys and reduced transfers and travel, enabling rural clinicians to provide specialised services in local communities and facilitating timely evidence-based care in local communities without any adverse events. © 2018 National Rural Health Alliance Ltd.

  5. [Should hospitalization be required after the emergency discharge of patients with borderline personality disorder who have attempted suicide (FRENCH CRISIS cohort)?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailhol, L; Riedi, G; Mathur, A; Czapla, P; Charpentier, S; Genestal, M; Birmes, P

    2014-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by a pervasive pattern of instability and impulsivity. There is a high prevalence of BPD patients among those admitted to the emergency department for suicide attempts. However, little empirical research exists to assist clinicians in deciding whether to hospitalize a suicidal patient. Some authors have argued that hospitalization does not prevent suicide and could actually harm these patients, thereby leading to psychosocial regression. Parasuicidal behaviors could be reinforced by the attention given during hospitalization. Our purpose was to determine whether the hospitalization of suicidal patients who have a high risk of BPD after discharge from the emergency department is associated with a recurrence of suicidal behavior at 6months. We designed a prospective study, acquiring patients from three emergency hospitals. The participants were suicidal subjects admitted for voluntary drug intoxication and were 18years of age or older. The participants completed the Personality Disorder Questionnaire (PDQ-4+) to assess BPD symptomatology. Information on the recurrence of suicidal behavior at 6months was obtained by interview of patients and the review of the charts from the 3 hospitals involved in the study. Other assessments included the BDI-13 (severity of depression), the Hopelessness Scale (hopelessness), the TAS-20 (alexythymia), the AUDIT (alcohol disorder) and the MINI (axis I disorders). A total of 606 subjects admitted for a suicide attempt participated in this study. A total of 320 (52.8 %) of the subjects completed the PDQ-4+. The sample was divided into three groups: participants at high risk of having at least one BPD (n=197), a group at high risk of having at least one non-BPD PD (n=84) and a group with low risk of having a PD (n=39). Hospitalization following an emergency was not associated with a recurrence of suicide attempts at 6months among patients at high risk of BPD. A logistical

  6. [Nutritional assessment for hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez Martínez, T; Armero Fuster, M

    1991-01-01

    A review of the following points was performed: Factors favouring the development and presence of malnutrition among hospitalized patients. Useful parameters in nutritional evaluation. Types of malnutrition. The Chang nutritional evaluation protocol is used in our Hospital, which is simple, inexpensive, reliable, specific and easily reproduced. This is based on five variables (three anthropometric and two biochemical), randomized and based on reference tables and values. A study was made on data corresponding to 70 patients, in whom a prevalence of malnutrition was observed in critical patients. The patients were classified based on three different definitive possibilities (Marasmo, Kwashiorkor and combined), and three grades of malnutrition (slight, moderate and severe).

  7. Resource Requirements Planning for Hospitals Treating Serious Infectious Disease Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vugrin, Eric D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verzi, Stephen Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Finley, Patrick D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turnquist, Mark A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Wyte-Lake, Tamar [Veterans Emergency Management Evaluation Center; Griffin, Ann R. [Veterans Emergency Management Evaluation Center; Ricci, Karen J. [Veterans Emergency Management Evaluation Center; Plotinsky, Rachel [Providence Health and Services, Renton, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report presents a mathematical model of the way in which a hospital uses a variety of resources, utilities and consumables to provide care to a set of in-patients, and how that hospital might adapt to provide treatment to a few patients with a serious infectious disease, like the Ebola virus. The intended purpose of the model is to support requirements planning studies, so that hospitals may be better prepared for situations that are likely to strain their available resources. The current model is a prototype designed to present the basic structural elements of a requirements planning analysis. Some simple illustrati ve experiments establish the mo del's general capabilities. With additional inve stment in model enhancement a nd calibration, this prototype could be developed into a useful planning tool for ho spital administrators and health care policy makers.

  8. Recruiting former melanoma patients via hospitals in comparison to office-based dermatologists in a register-based cohort study that required indirect contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Zeissig

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are detailed reviews about different recruitment strategies, but not with regard to differences between recruitment of hospital-based versus office-based physicians. Within this study, the two different recruitment schemes are compared. Advantages and disadvantages of different ways of recruitment in registry-based studies are discussed. Methods In a cross-sectional cancer-registry-based study, long-term melanoma patients were contacted by dermatologists rather than directly by the registry on the basis of the legal situation. Logistic regression models and generalized estimating equations were used to assess effects of various patient and physician characteristics on participation and data quality. Especially differences between hospital-based versus office-based dermatologists are evaluated. Results Seventy two out of 112 contacted dermatologists took part in the study (64.3%. The cooperation proportion was 52.2% (689 participants/1320 contacted patients. Participants and non-participants differed regarding age and sex, but not regarding other social demographic factors and cancer stage. We did not observe a difference in patient participation between hospital-based versus office-based dermatologists (OR 1.08 [CI 0.84–1.39]; p = 0.57. However, medical data provided by the cancer registry were better for participants registered and recruited by hospitals. Conclusions In cohort studies with epidemiological cancer registries, recruitment via physicians has potential disadvantages and is more complex. If this indirect way of contact is mandatory, we recommend recruitment procedures including hospital-based rather than office-based physicians. However, physician characteristics were not associated with outcome.

  9. Assessment of jaundice in the hospitalized patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, Priya; Ahn, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Jaundice in the hospitalized patient is not an uncommon consultation for the general gastroenterologist. It is essential to explore the underlying cause of jaundice because management is largely aimed at addressing these causes rather than the jaundice itself. Although the diagnostic evaluation for jaundice can be broad, clinical judgment must be used to prioritize between various laboratory tests and imaging studies. Most importantly, clinicians must understand which conditions are emergent and/or require evaluation for liver transplantation. Further studies need to be performed to better understand the outcomes of hospitalized patients who develop jaundice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PTSD in post-road traffic accident patients requiring hospitalization in Indian subcontinent: A review on magnitude of the problem and management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undavalli, Chaitanya; Das, Piyush; Dutt, Taru; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kashyap, Rahul

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic events after a road traffic accident (RTA) can be physical and/or psychological. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the major psychological conditions which affect accident victims. Psychological issues may not be addressed in the emergency department(ED) immediately. There have been reports about a mismatch between the timely referrals from ED to occupational or primary care services for these issues. If left untreated, there may be adverse effects on quality of life (QOL) and work productivity. Hospital expenses, loss of income, and loss of work could create a never ending cycle for financial difficulties and burden in trauma victims. The aim of our review is to address the magnitude of PTSD in post-RTA hospitalized patients in Indian subcontinent population. We also attempted to emphasis on few management guidelines. A comprehensive search was conducted on major databases with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) term 'PTSD or post-traumatic stress' and Emergency department and vehicle or road or highway or automobile or car or truck or trauma and India. Out of 120 studies, a total of six studies met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Our interpretation of the problem is that; hospital expenditure due to trauma, time away from work during hospitalization, and reduction in work performance, are three major hits that can lead RTA victims to financial crisis. Proposed management guidelines are; establish a coordinated triage, implementing a screening tool in the ED, and provide psychological counseling.

  11. PTSD in post-road traffic accident patients requiring hospitalization in Indian subcontinent: A review on magnitude of the problem and management guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Undavalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic events after a road traffic accident (RTA can be physical and/or psychological. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is one of the major psychological conditions which affect accident victims. Psychological issues may not be addressed in the emergency department(ED immediately. There have been reports about a mismatch between the timely referrals from ED to occupational or primary care services for these issues. If left untreated, there may be adverse effects on quality of life (QOL and work productivity. Hospital expenses, loss of income, and loss of work could create a never ending cycle for financial difficulties and burden in trauma victims. The aim of our review is to address the magnitude of PTSD in post-RTA hospitalized patients in Indian subcontinent population. We also attempted to emphasis on few management guidelines. A comprehensive search was conducted on major databases with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH term ′PTSD or post-traumatic stress′ and Emergency department and vehicle or road or highway or automobile or car or truck or trauma and India. Out of 120 studies, a total of six studies met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Our interpretation of the problem is that; hospital expenditure due to trauma, time away from work during hospitalization, and reduction in work performance, are three major hits that can lead RTA victims to financial crisis. Proposed management guidelines are; establish a coordinated triage, implementing a screening tool in the ED, and provide psychological counseling.

  12. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  13. Identifying patient risks during hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Ferreira Lima

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the risks reported at a public institution andto know the main patient risks from the nursing staff point of view.Methods: A retrospective, descriptive and exploratory study. Thesurvey was developed at a hospital in the city of Taboão da Serra, SãoPaulo, Brazil. The study included all nurses working in care areas whoagreed to participate in the study. At the same time, sentinel eventsoccurring in the period from July 2006 to July 2007 were identified.Results: There were 440 sentinel events reported, and the main risksincluded patient falls, medication errors and pressure ulcers. Sixty-fivenurses were interviewed. They also reported patient falls, medicationerrors and pressure ulcers as the main risks. Conclusions: Riskassessment and implementation of effective preventive actions arenecessary to ensure patient’s safety. Involvement of a multidisciplinaryteam is one of the steps for a successful process.

  14. Application requirements for Robotic Nursing Assistants in hospital environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Sven; Doelling, Kris; Lundberg, Cody L.; McNair, Mike; Shin, Jeongsik; Popa, Dan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report on analysis toward identifying design requirements for an Adaptive Robotic Nursing Assistant (ARNA). Specifically, the paper focuses on application requirements for ARNA, envisioned as a mobile assistive robot that can navigate hospital environments to perform chores in roles such as patient sitter and patient walker. The role of a sitter is primarily related to patient observation from a distance, and fetching objects at the patient's request, while a walker provides physical assistance for ambulation and rehabilitation. The robot will be expected to not only understand nurse and patient intent but also close the decision loop by automating several routine tasks. As a result, the robot will be equipped with sensors such as distributed pressure sensitive skins, 3D range sensors, and so on. Modular sensor and actuator hardware configured in the form of several multi-degree-of-freedom manipulators, and a mobile base are expected to be deployed in reconfigurable platforms for physical assistance tasks. Furthermore, adaptive human-machine interfaces are expected to play a key role, as they directly impact the ability of robots to assist nurses in a dynamic and unstructured environment. This paper discusses required tasks for the ARNA robot, as well as sensors and software infrastructure to carry out those tasks in the aspects of technical resource availability, gaps, and needed experimental studies.

  15. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  16. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  17. Dental trauma that require fixation in a children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Timothy; Perinpanayagam, Hiran

    2008-02-01

    Children and adolescents who suffer traumatic injuries often seek emergency treatment at a Children's Hospital. Complex injuries to permanent teeth and their periodontium require immediate repositioning and stabilization. Many of these emergencies are treated by pediatric dental residents at the Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. The purpose of this study was to characterize these complex injuries of permanent teeth that require emergency treatment in a Children's Hospital. All of the cases of dental trauma which had involved permanent teeth and which had been treated with a splint in 2001 and 2002 were reviewed. There were 79 patients that were between 5 and 19 years of age with twice as many males (54) as females (25). The number of males increased from childhood (5-10 years) to early adolescence (11-15 years) and then decreased rapidly in late adolescence (16-19 years), whereas the number of females decreased steadily with age. Most of the incidents occurred during the summer months (72%), particularly in June and July (42%), and Fridays and Saturdays were the busiest days of the week. Most of the injuries were caused by organized and recreational sporting activities (39%) and accidental falls (33%), followed by interpersonal violence (15%) and a few motor vehicle accidents (7%). The 173 permanent tooth injuries were mostly luxations (62%) or avulsions (20%), with only a few fractures of the alveolar bone (5%) or tooth root (1%). Most of the displacements were lateral luxations (40%) or extrusions (18%) with only a few intrusions (3%). These injuries most commonly afflicted the maxillary central incisors (54%), followed by the maxillary laterals (18%) and mandibular centrals (17%). The emergency treatment that was provided at the Children's Hospital included replantation and repositioning, and the placement of a semi-rigid or flexible splint.

  18. Using case-mix information in strategic hospital marketing. Deriving market research from patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, A

    1992-01-01

    Hospital survival requires adaptation, adaptation requires understanding, and understanding requires information. These are the basic equations behind hospital strategic marketing, and one of the answers may lie in hospitals' own patient-data systems. Marketers' and administrators' enlightened application of case-mix information could become one more hospital survival tool.

  19. Patients who fall in hospital - Contributing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Bright

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective study of the factors which contributed to accidental injuries sustained by those patients who fell in a White provincial hospital in die period 1 January to 30 June 1982. The research study was undertaken by Diploma in Nursing Administration students during their 3-week hospital practice at a White provincial hospital.

  20. INPATIENTS NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS INDICATOR AT ARMY HOSPITAL DR. SOEPRAOEN MALANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumboyono Kumboyono

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient acceptance to diet in fl uences patient intake during the hospitalization. Patient acceptance on meals provided by the hospital can be seen from the left over. Whilst factors which in fl uences patient motivation to finish their meals including addtional food, taste, and adaptation level to the hospital, the aim of this research was to identify factors that related to patient acceptance on meals provided by the hospital in class three ward dr. Soepraoen Hospital, Malang. Method: Descriptive analitic was used as research design with cross-sectional approach. As many as 51 samples were chosen with purposive sampling. Data was analyzed with chi square with 95%signi fi cance. Results: The results showed a signi fi cant relation between additional food and the leftover (p-Value = 0,018. There is signi fi cant relation on the taste and the leftover (p-Value = 0.032 and adaptation level and leftover (p-Value = 0.026. Discussion: It can be concluded that additional food, taste, and adaptation level to the hospital have signi fi cant relation with hospitalized patient acceptance on their diet. It is suggested that nurse pay more attention on these factors to fulfi ll patient nutrition needs during hospitalization.

  1. Nurses' perceptions of patient safety culture in Jordanian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, W A; Akhu-Zaheya, L M; Al-Mahasneh, S I; Khater, R

    2015-03-01

    Patients' safety culture is a key aspect in determining healthcare organizations' ability to address and reduce risks of patients. Nurses play a major role in patients' safety because they are accountable for direct and continuous patient care. There is little known information about patients' safety culture in Jordanian hospitals, particularly from the perspective of healthcare providers. The study aimed to assess patient safety culture in Jordanian hospitals from nurses' perspective. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was utilized. A total number of 658 nurses participated in the current study. Data were collected using an Arabic version of the hospital survey of patients' safety culture. Teamwork within unit dimensions had a high positive response, and was perceived by nurses to be the only strong suit in Jordanian hospitals. Areas that required improvement, as perceived by nurses, are as follows: communication openness, staffing, handoff and transition, non-punitive responses to errors, and teamwork across units. Regression analysis revealed factors, from nurses' perspectives, that influenced patients' safety culture in Jordanian hospital. Factors included age, total years of experience, working in university hospitals, utilizing evidence-based practice and working in hospitals that consider patient safety to be a priority. Participants in this study were limited to nurses. Therefore, there is a need to assess patient safety culture from other healthcare providers' perspectives. Moreover, the use of a self-reported questionnaire introduced the social desirability biases. The current study provides insight into how nurses perceive patient safety culture. Results of this study have revealed that there is a need to replace the traditional culture of shame/blame with a non-punitive culture. Study results implied that improving patient safety culture requires a fundamental transformation of nurses' work environment. New policies to improve collaboration between

  2. Candiduria in hospitalized patients in teaching hospitals of Ahvaz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei-Mahmoudabadi, A; Zarrin, M; Ghanatir, F; Vazirianzadeh, B

    2012-12-01

    Nosocomial infections are usually acquired during hospitalization. Fungal infection of the urinary tract is increasing due to predisposing factors such as; antibacterial agents, indwelling urinary catheters, diabetes mellitus, long hospitalization, immunosuppressive agents, use of IV catheters, radiation therapy, malignancy. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of candiduria and urinary tract infection in patients admitted in Golestan and Emam Khomeini hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran. During 14 months, a total of 744 urine samples were collected and transferred to medical mycology laboratory immediately. Ten µl of uncentrifuged sample was cultured on CHROM agar Candida plates and incubated at 37°C for 24-48h aerobically. Candida species were identified based on colony morphology on CHROM agar Candida, germ tube production and micro-morphology on corn meal agar including 1% Tween 80. In the present study, 744 hospitalized patients were sampled (49.5%, female; 50.5%, male). The prevalence of candiduria in subjects was 16.5% that included 65.1% female and 34.9% male. The most common isolates were C. albicans (53.3%), followed by C. glabrata (24.4%), C. tropicalis (3.7%), C. krusei (2.2%), and Geotrichum spp. (0.7%) Urine cultures yielded more than 10,000 yeast colonies in 34.1% of cases, and the major predisposing factor associated with candiduria was antibiotic therapy (69.1%). Candiduria is relatively common in hospitalized patients in educational hospitals of Ahvaz. In addition, there is a strong correlation between the incidence of candiduria in hospitalized patients and broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy.

  3. Patients' perceptions of interactions with hospital staff are associated with hospital readmissions: a national survey of 4535 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lianping; Liu, Chaojie; Huang, Cunrui; Mukamel, Dana B

    2018-01-29

    Reducing 30-day hospital readmissions has become a focus of the current national payment policies. Medicare requires that hospitals collect and report patients' experience with their care as a condition of payment. However, the extent to which patients' experience with hospital care is related to hospital readmission is unknown. We established multivariate regression models in which 30-day risk-adjusted readmission rates were the dependent variables and patients' perceptions of the responsiveness of the hospital staff and communication (as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores) were the independent variables of interest. We selected six different clinical conditions for analyses, including acute myocardial infarction (AMI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure, hip/knee surgery, pneumonia, and stroke. Data included all acute care hospitals reporting in Hospital Compare in 2014. The number of hospitals with reported readmissions ranged from 2234 hospitals for AMI to 3758 hospitals for pneumonia. The average 30-day readmission rates ranged from 5.19% for knee/hip surgery to 22.7% for COPD. Patient experience of hospital-staff responsiveness as "top-box" ranged from 64% to 67% across the six clinical conditions, communication with nurses ranged from 77% to 79% and communication with doctors ranged from 80% to 81% (higher numbers are better). Our finding suggests that hospitals with better staff responsiveness were significantly more likely to have lower 30-day readmissions for all conditions. The effect size depended on the baseline readmission rates, with the largest effect on hospitals in the upper 75th quartile. A ten-percentage-point increase in staff responsiveness led to a 0.03-0.18 percentage point decrease in readmission rates. We found that neither communication with physicians nor communication with nurses was significantly associated with hospital readmissions. Our findings

  4. Steering patients to safer hospitals? The effect of a tiered hospital network on hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Lindrooth, Richard C; Christianson, Jon B

    2008-10-01

    To determine if a tiered hospital benefit and safety incentive shifted the distribution of admissions toward safer hospitals. A large manufacturing company instituted the hospital safety incentive (HSI) for union employees. The HSI gave union patients a financial incentive to choose hospitals that met the Leapfrog Group's three patient safety "leaps." The analysis merges data from four sources: claims and enrollment data from the company, the American Hospital Association, the AHRQ HCUP-SID, and a state Office of the Insurance Commissioner. Changes in hospital admissions' patterns for union and nonunion employees using a difference-in-difference design. We estimate the probability of choosing a specific hospital from a set of available alternatives using conditional logistic regression. Patients affiliated with the engineers' union and admitted for a medical diagnosis were 2.92 times more likely to select a hospital designated as safer in the postperiod than in the preperiod, while salaried nonunion (SNU) patients (not subject to the financial incentive) were 0.64 times as likely to choose a compliant hospital in the post- versus preperiod. The difference-in-difference estimate, which is based on the predictions of the conditional logit model, is 0.20. However, the machinists' union was also exposed to the incentive and they were no more likely to choose a safer hospital than the SNU patients. The incentive did not have an effect on patients admitted for a surgical diagnosis, regardless of union status. All patients were averse to travel time, but those union patients selecting an incentive hospital were less averse to travel time. Patient price incentives and quality/safety information may influence hospital selection decisions, particularly for medical admissions, though the optimal incentive level for financial return to the plan sponsor is not clear.

  5. Hospital simulated patient programme: a guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jenny; Hodgson, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Many university courses employ simulated patients to work with students in the development of communication skills. Our challenge was to build a sustainable programme that could be adapted for medical, nursing and allied health staff, and groups of students, on our hospital campus. In recognition of the need to provide practice opportunities for junior medical staff to hone their capacity to communicate effectively with parents, we employed professional actors who are also qualified teachers. Junior doctors have multiple opportunities over their training time to work one-to-one with an actor-tutor in the role of simulated parent. The simulated parents are skilled in helping the trainees reflect on the conversation, and the trainees are given a recording of their sessions for further reflection and feedback from a colleague. This model has been adapted to meet the 'topic' needs and scheduling requirements of other staff and hospital-based student groups. In adapting the original medical staff programme, we came to appreciate not only the logistical but also the ethical considerations inherent in a simulated parent/patient programme. Our guide highlights the importance of safeguarding the educational integrity of the design, maintaining the fidelity of the simulations and ensuring the safety of all involved. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  6. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zapatero Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. Methods We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization. Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. Results A total of 1127 (0.057% admittances were coded with an in-hospital hip fracture. In hospital mortality rate was 27.9% vs 9.4%; p  Conclusions In-hospital hip fracture notably increased mortality during hospitalization, doubling the mean length of stay and mean cost of admission. These are reasons enough to stress the importance of designing and applying multidisciplinary plans focused on reducing the incidence of hip fractures in hospitalized patients.

  7. Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder: Illness and Hospital Course in Patients Hospitalized for Nutritional Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandjord, Sarah E; Sieke, Erin H; Richmond, Miranda; Rome, Ellen S

    2015-12-01

    Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), a recently defined Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 eating disorder diagnosis, has not been extensively studied in the inpatient population. This study compares hospitalized ARFID and anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, including differences in presentation, treatment response, and 1-year outcomes. We conducted a retrospective chart review of ARFID and AN patients hospitalized between 2008 and 2014 for acute medical stabilization at an academic medical center. Data, including characteristics on admission, during hospitalization, and 1 year after discharge, were recorded for each patient and compared between ARFID and AN patients. On presentation, ARFID patients (n = 41) were younger with fewer traditional eating disorder behaviors and less weight loss, comorbidity, and bradycardia than AN patients (n = 203). During hospitalization, although ARFID and AN patients had similar caloric intake, ARFID patients relied on more enteral nutrition and required longer hospitalizations than AN patients (8 vs. 5 days; p = .0006). One year after discharge, around half of ARFID and AN patients met criteria for remission (62% vs. 46%; p = .18), and less than one-quarter required readmission (21% vs. 24%; p = .65). The findings from this study reveal several differences in hospitalized eating disorder patients and emphasize the need for further research on ARFID patients, including research on markers of illness severity and optimal approaches to refeeding. Similar remission and readmission rates among ARFID and AN patients highlight both the success and the continued need for improvement in eating disorder treatment regardless of diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Patient (customer) expectations in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Sedat; Acuner, Taner; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2007-06-01

    The expectations of patient are one of the determining factors of healthcare service. The purpose of this study is to measure the Patients' Expectations, based on Patient's Rights. This study was done with Likert-Survey in Trabzon population. The analyses showed that the level of the expectations of the patient was high on the factor of receiving information and at an acceptable level on the other factors. Statistical meaningfulness was determined between age, sex, education, health insurance, and the income of the family and the expectations of the patients (pstudy, the current legal regulations have higher standards than the expectations of the patients. The reason that the satisfaction of the patients high level is interpreted due to the fact that the level of the expectation is low. It is suggested that the educational and public awareness studies on the patients' rights must be done in order to increase the expectations of the patients.

  9. Medicare Hospital Spending Per Patient - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The "Medicare hospital spending per patient (Medicare Spending per Beneficiary)" measure shows whether Medicare spends more, less or about the same per Medicare...

  10. Medicare Hospital Spending Per Patient - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The "Medicare hospital spending per patient (Medicare Spending per Beneficiary)" measure shows whether Medicare spends more, less or about the same per Medicare...

  11. Inadequate Nutritional Status of Hospitalized Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alkan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In oncology practice, nutrition and also metabolic activity are essential to support the nutritional status and prevent malignant cachexia. It is important to evaluate the patients and plan the maneuvers at the start of the therapy. The primary objective of the study is to define the nutritional status of hospitalized patients and the factors affecting it in order to define the most susceptible patients and maneuvers for better nutritional support. Methods: Patients hospitalized in oncology clinic for therapy were evaluated for food intake and nutritional status through structured interviews. The clinical properties, medical therapies, elements of nutritional support were noted and predictors of inadequate nutritional status (INS were analyzed. Results: Four hundred twenty three patients, between 16-82 years old (median: 52 were evaluated. Nearly half of the patients (185, 43% reported a better appetite at home than in hospital and declared that hospitalization is an important cause of loss of appetite (140/185, 75.6%. Presence of nausea/vomiting (N/V, depression, age less than 65 and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were associated with increased risk of INS in hospitalized cancer patients. On the contrary, steroid medication showed a positive impact on nutritional status of cancer patients. Conclusion: N/V, younger age, presence of depression and NSAIDs medication were associated with INS in hospitalized cancer patients. Clinicians should pay more attention to this group of patients. In addition, unnecessary hospitalizations and medications that may disturb oral intake must be avoided. Corticosteroids are important tools for managing anorexia and INS.

  12. Oncology patients hospitalized in the Clinicas Hospital Dr. Manuel Quintela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arostegui, M.; Borba, M.; Caldarelli, D.; Eguiia, A.; Fernandez, E.; Peleteiro, M.; Pereira, C.; Vico, M.

    2004-01-01

    This work was carried out by a nursery licensed group in the Clinicas Hospital - Dr. Manuel Quintela.The nature and functioning of Services and the allocation of resources, are essential for the analysis of the Survey of the hospitalized oncology patients in the Institution. To develop a model of care that constitutes a health care as well as teaching and research in the country regarding the quality of care was defined the following topics: lower risks for the patient, safer care, personal trained and specialized to promote relationship between the offering and the person receiving the service. The assessment and management performance of the services involved in the operation are the result of the degree of user satisfaction. Objective: To determine the human and material necessary for the care of cancer resources users, considering their number, treatment, complications and nursing care derived from each pathology and stage of disease. Methodology: A comparative descriptive study of the same population was conducted in two transverse sections in relation to two different times which are based on the design of a form that allowed hospitalized to collect information on users 6/12/03 and 6/16/04. Other instruments used were the clinical history and the daily census staff Patients and Nursing Division. Results and conclusions: A comparative descriptive analysis already mentioned are: increased internships and cancer patients; between 50 and 64 is the highest number of patients; diagnoses Face and Neck and maintain the Digestive System more cases; the number of patients doubles and Hematology Neurological from one to another period. Chemotherapy is the treatment choice and there is a decrease in the surgical and medical; more patients in the study; in the origin, Montevideo has the largest number of patients followed by Canelones. Line of nursing intervention will be carried out in short, medium and long term

  13. Hospitalized Patients' Responses to Offers of Prayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Kathy; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2018-02-01

    Most Americans pray; many pray about their health. When they are hospitalized, however, do patients want an offer of prayer from a healthcare provider? This project allowed for the measurement of hospitalized patient's responses to massage therapists' offers of a colloquial prayer after a massage. After the intervention, 78 patients completed questionnaires that elicited quantitative data that were analyzed using uni- and bivariate statistical analyses. In this sample, 88% accepted the offer of prayer, 85% found it helpful, and 51% wanted prayer daily. Patients may welcome prayer, as long as the clinician shows "genuine kindness and respect."

  14. Nutritional requirements of the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel L

    2004-02-01

    The presence or development of malnutrition during critical illness has been unequivocally associated with increased morbidity and mortality in people. Recognition that malnutrition may similarly affect veterinary patients emphasizes the need to properly address the nutritional requirements of hospitalized dogs and cats. Because of a lack in veterinary studies evaluating the nutritional requirements of critically ill small animals, current recommendations for nutritional support of veterinary patients are based largely on sound clinical judgment and the best information available, including data from experimental animal models and human studies. This, however, should not discourage the veterinary practitioner from implementing nutritional support in critically ill patients. Similar to many supportive measures of critically ill patients, nutritional interventions can have a significant impact on patient morbidity and may even improve survival. The first step of nutritional support is to identify patients most likely to benefit from nutritional intervention. Careful assessment of the patient and appraisal of its nutritional needs provide the basis for a nutritional plan, which includes choosing the optimal route of nutritional support, determining the number of calories to provide, and determining the composition of the diet. Ultimately, the success of the nutritional management of critically ill dogs and cats will depend on close monitoring and frequent reassessment.

  15. Incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin requiring neck irradiation and/or mediastinum in the Hospital Mexico in the year 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monestel Umana, Rigoberto

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of lymphoma, both Hodgkin as non-Hodgkin, has had irradiation as part of management. The neck and/or mediastinum is irradiated and occurs, inevitably, partial or total irradiation of the thyroid gland. The evaluation that the effect may have on the function of the gland has been the purpose of this study. The risk of hypothyroidism in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin should receive radiation therapy to the head, neck and/or mediastinum was studied. This has represented a first report of a follow-up study, of 2 years, analytical, longitudinal, observational, prospective. This is a first report of a follow-up study, of 2 years, analytical, longitudinal, observational, prospective. Design of cases, controls and a sample of 32 patients were studied; of these 31.25% have developed subclinical hypothyroidism. The subgroup with hypothyroidism was studied and an association was found between thyroid failure and dose, including the possibility of reversion of disorders. Association with the type of lymphoma and received chemotherapy was found, while with age, sex, lymphoma staging and dose received by the lymphoma is found without association. The onset of subclinical hypothyroidism generated by irradiation of the neck and/or mediastinum is associated with the radiation dose received by the thyroid. A relationship, unclear, has existed between the type of lymphoma and chemotherapy indicated as a treatment and should be explored further, a routine basis indicating the evaluation of the thyroid function in all these patients to avoid the development of unmonitored disorders. (author) [es

  16. Patient choice modelling: how do patients choose their hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Honora; Currie, Christine; Chaiwuttisak, Pornpimol; Kyprianou, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    As an aid to predicting future hospital admissions, we compare use of the Multinomial Logit and the Utility Maximising Nested Logit models to describe how patients choose their hospitals. The models are fitted to real data from Derbyshire, United Kingdom, which lists the postcodes of more than 200,000 admissions to six different local hospitals. Both elective and emergency admissions are analysed for this mixed urban/rural area. For characteristics that may affect a patient's choice of hospital, we consider the distance of the patient from the hospital, the number of beds at the hospital and the number of car parking spaces available at the hospital, as well as several statistics publicly available on National Health Service (NHS) websites: an average waiting time, the patient survey score for ward cleanliness, the patient safety score and the inpatient survey score for overall care. The Multinomial Logit model is successfully fitted to the data. Results obtained with the Utility Maximising Nested Logit model show that nesting according to city or town may be invalid for these data; in other words, the choice of hospital does not appear to be preceded by choice of city. In all of the analysis carried out, distance appears to be one of the main influences on a patient's choice of hospital rather than statistics available on the Internet.

  17. Interior design criteria for successful hospital patient rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Bilir, Seda

    1997-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design and Institute of Fine Arts of Bilkent University, 1997. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1997. Includes bibliographical references leaves 94-99 In this study, the design requirements of hospital acute-care patient rooms, which support the recovery and well-being of the patients, are examined. Patients' psycho-spatial needs which may be complementary to the healing effects of the medical treatme...

  18. Children's Hospitals' Solutions for Patient Safety Collaborative Impact on Hospital-Acquired Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyren, Anne; Brilli, Richard J; Zieker, Karen; Marino, Miguel; Muething, Stephen; Sharek, Paul J

    2017-09-01

    To determine if an improvement collaborative of 33 children's hospitals focused on reliable best practice implementation and culture of safety improvements can reduce hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) and serious safety events (SSEs). A 3-year prospective cohort study design with a 12-month historical control population was completed by the Children's Hospitals' Solutions for Patient Safety collaborative. Identification and dissemination of best practices related to 9 HACs and SSE reduction focused on key process and culture of safety improvements. Individual hospital improvement teams leveraged the resources of a large, structured children's hospital collaborative using electronic, virtual, and in-person interactions. Thirty-three children's hospitals from across the United States volunteered to be part of the Children's Hospitals' Solutions for Patient Safety collaborative. Thirty-two met all the data submission eligibility requirements for the HAC improvement objective of this study, and 21 participated in the high-reliability culture work aimed at reducing SSEs. Significant harm reduction occurred in 8 of 9 common HACs (range 9%-71%; P collaborative dedicated to implementing HAC-related best-practice prevention bundles and culture of safety interventions designed to increase the use of high-reliability organization practices resulted in significant HAC and SSE reductions. Structured collaboration and rapid sharing of evidence-based practices and tools are effective approaches to decreasing hospital-acquired harm. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Reducing Hospital Toxicity: Impact on Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Richard V; Bober, Robert M; Lavie, Carl J; Wilt, Jonathan K; Milani, Alexander R; White, Christopher J

    2018-05-02

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-hour oscillations in biologic processes that drive nearly all physiologic and behavioral functions. Disruption in circadian rhythms can adversely impact short and long-term health outcomes. Routine hospital care often causes significant disruption in sleep-wake patterns that is further compounded by loss of personal control of health information and health decisions. We wished to evaluate measures directed at improving circadian rhythm and access to daily health information on hospital outcomes. We evaluated 3,425 consecutive patients admitted to a medical-surgical unit comprised of an intervention wing (n=1,185) or standard control wing (n=2,240) over a 2.5-year period. Intervention patients received measures to improve sleep that included reduction of nighttime noise, delay of routine morning phlebotomy, passive vital sign monitoring, and use of red-enriched lighting after sunset, as well as access to daily health information utilizing an inpatient portal. Intervention patients accessed the inpatient portal frequently during hospitalization seeking personal health and care team information. Measures impacting the quality and quantity of sleep were significantly improved. LOS was 8.6 hours less (p=0.04), 30 and 90-day readmission rates were 16% and 12% lower, respectively (both p≤ 0.02), and self-rated emotional/mental health was higher (69.2% vs. 52.4%; p=0.03) in the intervention group compared to controls. Modest changes in routine hospital care can improve the hospital environment impacting sleep and access to health knowledge, leading to improvements in hospital outcomes. Sleep-wake patterns of hospitalized patients represent a potential avenue for further enhancing hospital quality and safety. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapatero, Antonio; Barba, Raquel; Canora, Jesús; Losa, Juan E; Plaza, Susana; San Roman, Jesús; Marco, Javier

    2013-01-08

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization.Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. A total of 1127 (0.057%) admittances were coded with an in-hospital hip fracture. In hospital mortality rate was 27.9% vs 9.4%; p patients with a hip fracture (20.7 days vs 9.8 days; p hip-fracture patients (6927€ per hospitalization vs 3730€ in non fracture patients). Risk factors related to fracture were: increasing age by 10 years increments (OR 2.32 95% CI 2.11-2.56), female gender (OR 1.22 95% CI 1.08-1.37), admission from nursing home (OR 1.65 95% CI 1.27-2.12), dementia (1.55 OR 95% CI1.30-1.84), malnutrition (OR 2.50 95% CI 1.88-3.32), delirium (OR 1.57 95% CI 1.16-2.14), and anemia (OR 1.30 95%CI 1.12-1.49). In-hospital hip fracture notably increased mortality during hospitalization, doubling the mean length of stay and mean cost of admission. These are reasons enough to stress the importance of designing and applying multidisciplinary plans focused on reducing the incidence of hip fractures in hospitalized patients.

  1. Qualities of Inpatient Hospital Rooms: Patients' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Ann Sloan; Andrade, Cláudia Campos; Carvalho, Diana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate what design features of hospital rooms are valued by inpatients. Little research has explored how patients evaluate the physical environment of their hospital rooms. Most responses are captured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, which includes only two questions about the physical environment. Two hundred thirty-six orthopedic patients (78 in the United States and 158 in Portugal) listed three features of their hospital room that influenced their level of satisfaction with their hospital stay, indicating whether the feature was positive or negative. The comments were more positive (71.4%) than negative (28.6%). Using the framework of supportive design from Ulrich, over half the comments (64.31%) could be categorized in one of the three dimensions: 33.2% (positive distraction), 22.4% (perceived control), and 6.0% (social support). This total includes Internet (2.7%), which could be categorized as either social support or positive distraction. Comments called "other aspects" focused on overall environmental appraisals, cleanliness, and functionality and maintenance. The majority of comments could be accommodated by Ulrich's theory, but it is noteworthy that other aspects emerge from patients' comments and affect their experience. Cross-cultural differences pointed to the greater role of light and sun for Portuguese patients and health status whiteboard for U.S. Qualitative research can add significantly to our understanding of the healthcare experience and may inform design decisions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. [Nutritional status recording in hospitalized patient notes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, L; Teixeira, M A; Henriques, A; Tavares, M M; Alvares, L; Antunes, A; Amaral, Teresa F

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of disease-related malnutrition (DRM) is described to be of 30-60% on admission to hospital, and of 10% in the community. It has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, namely higher morbidity and mortality as well as higher frequency of health care and its associated costs. The lack of screening and monitoring of nutritional status have been said to be risk factors for the increased prevalence of DRM during hospital stay. The aims of this study were to evaluate the importance given by health care professionals to certain aspects related with nutritional status (weight, food intake) of hospital patients and to see if there were any differences between the under and non undernourished ones. A systematic sample of patients from six hospitals was collected. Pregnancy, paediatric age and critical illness were exclusion criteria as well as incapacity to fulfil nutritional risk screening protocol and length-of-stay less than 24h. Socio-demographic, anthropometric data and clinical notes (e.g. weight, food/nutrient intake) from medical records were collected and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 protocol was applied. A total of 1152 patients were included in this study. The prevalence of nutritional risk varied between 28.5% and 47.3% while undernutrition classified by anthropometrical parameters was considerably lower (6.3% to 14.9%). Two thirds of the patients had their food intake monitored and registered in medical records but only one third were weighted. Undernourished patients had their food intake more frequently monitored but their weight was less frequently measured, than the well-nourished ones. DRM prevalence amongst hospital patients on admission is significantly high. Clinical notes regarding nutritional status is rather infrequent on medical records. This study showed that urges the need to empower health care providers of the importance of the screening and monitoring of weight and food intake, on admission and during hospital stay.

  3. Relationship of Services Utility with Patients Tending to Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Nasiripour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & purpose: In the health sector, in addition to the important consequence of treatment, health system should meet the expectations regarding the desirability of services. Expectations and perceptions of patients about the desirability of services play an important role in selecting hospitals, their loyalty to the organization & replanning to purchase. Thus the present study has been done with the aim to determine the relationship between services desirability and patients’ tendency to public or private hospitals in Sari. Materials & Methods: This study is a descriptive and analytical type done in 2012 in four private and public hospitals located in Sari. The study population consists of hospitalized patients that have been subjected to inquiry by using 361stratified random samples. The survey tool was questionnaire that its validity was judged and approved by the teachers and its reliability was obtained by alpha Cronbach as 0.972. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS software, independent t-test, t-sample test and descriptive statistics. Results: Findings show that in services cost indexes, there are not any significant differences between public and private hospitals while in the other services desirability indexes such as accessibility, availability, speed, quality, and complete package of services and …, there is a significant difference between public and private hospitals. Conclusion: In patients’ tendency to hospitals, utility service indicators satisfy a significant impact. So, codified planning to improve these indexes in order to absorb more patients by authorities is required.

  4. Patient flow based allocation of hospital resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, J M

    1995-01-01

    The current practice of allocating resources within a hospital introduces peaks and troughs in the workloads of departments and leads therefore to loss of capacity. This happens when requirements for capacity coordination are not adequately taken into account in the decision making process of allocating resources to specialties. The first part of this research involved an analysis of the hospital's production system on dependencies between resources, resulting in a number of capacity coordination requirements that need to be fulfilled for optimized resource utilization. The second, modelling, part of the study involved the development of a framework for resource management decision making, of a set of computer models to support hospital managerial decision making on resource allocation issues in various parts of the hospital, and of an implementation strategy for the application of the models to concrete hospital settings. The third part of the study was devoted to a number of case-studies, illustrating the use of the models when applied in various resource management projects, such as a reorganization of an operating theatre timetable, or the development of a master plan for activities of a group of general surgeons serving two locations of a merged hospital system. The paper summarizes the main findings of the study and concludes with a discussion of results obtained with the new allocation procedure and with recommendations for future research.

  5. Clinical outcome in measles patients hospitalized with complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.U.; Saeed, T.

    2008-01-01

    Measles is a highly communicable viral illness and is common cause of childhood mortality and morbidity. Keeping in view the high prevalence of measles in the developing world, we carried out this study to look into the complicated measles cases and clinical outcome in patients admitted in children ward of Ayub Teaching Hospital. Detailed history and physical examination of all the hospitalized patients with complication of measles were recorded in a proforma. Immunization and nutritional status of each admitted patient was assessed and the clinical outcome of measles was compared with demographic profile. one hundred thirty six hospitalized patients with complications of measles were studied. There was 60.3% male and 57.3% of patients were vaccinated against measles. Malnourished patients were 71.35% and had longer hospital stay (>5 days). Pneumonia (39.7%) and diarrhoea (38.2%) were the commonest complications. Seven children died and encephalitis (57.1%) was the commonest cause of death. The most common complications of measles are pneumonia and diarrhoea with dehydration requiring admission. Malnutrition results in more complications and longer hospital stay. Mortality is significantly associated with encephalitis. (author)

  6. Constipation in the acutely hospitalized older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, Fabrizio; Minicuci, Nadia; Droghi, Annapaola Teggia; Inelmen, Emine Meral; Sergi, Giuseppe; Terranova, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish the factors that determine the onset of constipation in acutely hospitalized older patients with a view to contributing towards an evidence-based identification of which patients warrant early, specific preventive measures. To evade the problem posed by the definition of constipation, we have considered parameters that are part of the daily routine in the hospital ward, such as the prescription of laxatives, also paying attention to how the co-operative older person subjectively interpret this condition. One thirds of the 192 hospitalized older patients needed a laxative at least once every 3 days. Multivariate analysis identified the use of laxatives at home as the only risk factor for objective constipation while in hospital (odds ratio (OR)=3.0). A significant risk of being dissatisfied with their bowel emptying emerged among patients who were bedridden for more than 2 weeks (OR=6.0), and in those who experienced cerebrovascular events (OR=3.1). The use of laxatives at home and awareness that satisfaction with bowel movements drops in patients obliged to stay in bed for lengthy periods of time and in those who have suffered cerebrovascular damage, should provide the grounds for a screening program to establish rational guidelines on bowel movement therapy. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  8. Patient Survey (PCH - HCAHPS) PPS-exempt Cancer Hospital - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  9. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the hospital should be regarded as the ideal setting for the care of these individuals. Before starting any dental intervention, a correct patient evaluation is needed, based on a correct anamnesis, medical records and interconsultation reports, and with due assessment of the medical risks involved. The hospital setting offers the advantage of access to electronic medical records and to data referred to any complementary tests that may have been made, and we moreover have the possibility of performing treatments under general anesthesia. In this context, ambulatory major surgery is the best approach when considering general anesthesia in patients of this kind. Key words:Hospital dentistry, special patients, medically compromised patients. PMID:24121921

  10. Hypokalaemia and subsequent hyperkalaemia in hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Crop (Meindert); E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); J. Lindemans (Jan); R. Zietse (Bob)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The objective was to study the epidemiology of hypokalaemia [serum potassium concentration (SK) <3.5 mmol/l] in a general hospital population, specifically focusing on how often and why patients develop subsequent hyperkalaemia (SK<5.0 mmol/l). Methods. In a 3-month

  11. Hospital patient loyalty: causes and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacStravic, R S

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to test whether factors associated with customer and employee loyalty are linked to hospital loyalty, and to measure the relative strength of the associations between traditional patient satisfaction factors and loyalty as compared to non-traditional factors.

  12. [Respect of patient's dignity in the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, A-M

    2010-12-01

    Every code of ethics of health professionals in France considers the respect of dignity as a fundamental duty. The French 2002 Law on patient rights says that the person has the right to respect of dignity and of private life. After a presentation of the articles of ethics codes regarding dignity, this paper presents recommendations to deliver medical care in situations where dignity might be endangered such as for patients hospitalized in psychiatric services without consent, or for medical examination of prisoners or medical care to vulnerable patients unable to express their will, especially in palliative care or at the end of life. Respect of dignity after death is illustrated by the reflection conducted by the Espace Ethique de l'AP-HP (Paris area hospitals) and in the Chart of the mortuary yard. A survey of the patients' letters of complaint received by the emergency service of the Toulouse University Hospital showed that, in five years, there were 188 letters and 18 pointed out infringements to the dignity of the person. The health professional team is now aware of this obligation, and in the accreditation of the hospitals, the respect of dignity is one of the indicators of the quality of medical care.

  13. Paralytic ileus requiring hospitalization secondary to high-dose antipsychotic polypharmacy and benztropine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Mercedes; Denka, Zachary D; White, Christopher C

    2011-01-01

    Ileus can result from the combined activity of antipsychotic and anticholinergic medications. Despite frequent use, case reports in the literature are sparse. We present a patient who developed a paralytic ileus requiring extended hospitalization. Providers should minimize antipsychotic and concurrent anticholinergic medications, consider prophylactic bowel regimens and monitor for constipation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of cimetidine in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopala, L

    1984-01-01

    Cimetidine is the most commonly prescribed drug in North America. A clinical review was conducted to identify physicians' prescribing habits. From September 1, 1981 to March 31, 1982, the charts were reviewed of 50 patients receiving cimetidine in an isolated coastal community hospital in British Columbia. It was discovered that physicians prescribed the drug for reasons approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only 14% of the time. The FDA guidelines approve cimetidine for duodenal ulcer, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and other hypersecretory states. A literature review was conducted, and guidelines on prescribing cimetidine were given to all members of the hospital's medical staff.

  15. Patient Satisfaction At The Muhimbili National Hospital In Dar Es ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient Satisfaction At The Muhimbili National Hospital In Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania. ... staffpatient relationship ethos, in which the patient is a viewed as a customer. Keywords: patient satisfaction, reform, Muhimbili National Hospital, referral ...

  16. Diagnostic accuracy, incremental yield and prognostic value of Determine TB-LAM for routine diagnostic testing for tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients requiring acute hospital admission in South Africa: a prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Stephen D; Kerkhoff, Andrew D; Burton, Rosie; Schutz, Charlotte; Boulle, Andrew; Vogt, Monica; Gupta-Wright, Ankur; Nicol, Mark P; Meintjes, Graeme

    2017-03-21

    We previously reported that one-third of HIV-positive adults requiring medical admission to a South African district hospital had laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) and that almost two-thirds of cases could be rapidly diagnosed using Xpert MTB/RIF-testing of concentrated urine samples obtained on the first day of admission. Implementation of urine-based, routine, point-of-care TB screening is an attractive intervention that might be facilitated by use of a simple, low-cost diagnostic tool, such as the Determine TB-LAM lateral-flow rapid test for HIV-associated TB. Sputum, urine and blood samples were systematically obtained from unselected HIV-positive adults within 24 hours of admission to a South African township hospital. Additional clinical samples were obtained during hospitalization as clinically indicated. TB was defined by the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in any sample using Xpert MTB/RIF or liquid culture. The diagnostic yield, accuracy and prognostic value of urine-lipoarabinomannan (LAM) testing were determined, but urine-LAM results did not inform treatment decisions. Consecutive HIV-positive adult acute medical admissions not already receiving TB treatment (n = 427) were enrolled regardless of clinical presentation or symptoms. TB was diagnosed in 139 patients (TB prevalence 32.6%; median CD4 count 80 cells/μL). In the first 24 hours of admission, sputum (spot and/or induced) samples were obtained from 37.0% of patients and urine samples from 99.5% of patients (P < 0.001). The diagnostic yields from these specimens were 19.4% (n = 27/139) for sputum-microscopy, 26.6% (n = 37/139) for sputum-Xpert, 38.1% (n = 53/139) for urine-LAM and 52.5% (n = 73/139) for sputum-Xpert/urine-LAM combined (P < 0.01). Corresponding yields among patients with CD4 counts <100 cells/μL were 18.9%, 24.3%, 55.4% and 63.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). The diagnostic yield of urine-LAM was unrelated to respiratory symptoms, and

  17. [Identification and treatment of malnutrition in a hospital patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orell-Kotikangas, Helena; Antikainen, Anne; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition associated with a disease remains often undiagnosed despite of having a frequency 20 to 60% in the developed countries. Malnutrition delays the recovery from diseases and operations, and increases complications and mortality. In Europe, the costs caused by malnutrition are two times higher than those due to overweight. Good clinical nutritional therapy requires immediate identification of patients having or being at risk of malnutrition. Approximately one out of three hospital patients is a high-risk patient. Attempts should be made to start the clinical nutritional therapy for these patients as early as possible.

  18. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  19. Laryngopharyngeal abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Gregory N; McGuirt, W Frederick; Butler, Susan G; Rees, Catherine J; Crandall, Heather L; Tansavatdi, Kristina

    2007-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal (LP) abnormalities in hospitalized patients with dysphagia referred for flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Retrospective, blinded review by two otolaryngologists of 100 consecutive FEES studies performed and video-recorded by a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Two otolaryngologists reviewed videos of 100 consecutive FEES studies on hospitalized patients with dysphagia for the presence of abnormal LP findings. Sixty-one male and 38 female patients comprised the hospital dysphagia cohort. The mean age was 62. One subject could not be evaluated because of the severity of the retained secretions, leaving 99 subjects in the cohort. Seventy-six percent had been previously intubated, with a mean intubation duration of 13 days. The overall prevalence of abnormal LP findings was 79%. Forty-five percent of the patients presented with two or more findings, which included arytenoid edema (33%), granuloma (31%), vocal fold paresis (24%), mucosal lesions (17%), vocal fold bowing (14%), diffuse edema (11%), airway stenosis (3%), and ulcer (6%). There was a significant difference in LP findings between those individuals who had or had not been intubated. Hospitalized patients with dysphagia are at high risk for LP abnormalities, particularly if they have been intubated, and may benefit from either 1) an initial joint examination by the SLP and otolaryngologist or 2) an otolaryngologist's review of the recorded examination conducted by the SLP. Such otolaryngology involvement could identify airway stenosis patients at an earlier stage, initiate granuloma treatment sooner, enable earlier biopsy of unexpected lesions, and allow follow-up of mucosal and neuromuscular findings that do not respond to medical management.

  20. Serum CCL-18 level is a risk factor for COPD exacerbations requiring hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilektasli, Asli Gorek; Demirdogen Cetinoglu, Ezgi; Uzaslan, Esra; Budak, Ferah; Coskun, Funda; Ursavas, Ahmet; Ercan, Ilker; Ege, Ercument

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 18 (CCL-18) has been shown to be elevated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. This study primarily aimed to evaluate whether the serum CCL-18 level differentiates the frequent exacerbator COPD phenotype from infrequent exacerbators. The secondary aim was to investigate whether serum CCL-18 level is a risk factor for exacerbations requiring hospitalization. Materials and methods Clinically stable COPD patients and participants with smoking history but normal spirometry (NSp) were recruited for the study. Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, COPD Assessment Test, spirometry, and 6-min walking test were performed. Serum CCL-18 levels were measured with a commercial ELISA Kit. Results Sixty COPD patients and 20 NSp patients were recruited. Serum CCL-18 levels were higher in COPD patients than those in NSp patients (169 vs 94 ng/mL, PCOPD (168 vs 196 ng/mL) subgroups did not achieve statistical significance (P=0.09). Serum CCL-18 levels were significantly higher in COPD patients who had experienced at least one exacerbation during the previous 12 months. Overall, ROC analysis revealed that a serum CCL-18 level of 181.71 ng/mL could differentiate COPD patients with hospitalized exacerbations from those who were not hospitalized with a 88% sensitivity and 88.2% specificity (area under curve: 0.92). Serum CCL-18 level had a strong correlation with the frequency of exacerbations requiring hospitalization (r=0.68, PCOPD, as it is associated with frequency of exacerbations, particularly with severe COPD exacerbations requiring hospitalization, as well as with functional parameters and symptom scores. PMID:28115842

  1. Weekend versus weekday hospital deaths: Analysis of in‑patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-15

    patients of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a 10‑year retrospective survey conducted at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching. Hospital in which the death records of the hospital were accessed from ...

  2. Community-associated urinary infections requiring hospitalization: risk factors, microbiological characteristics and patterns of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Polo, J; Guerrero-Ramos, F; Pérez-Cadavid, S; Arrébola-Pajares, A; Sopeña-Sutil, R; Benítez-Sala, R; Jiménez-Alcaide, E; García-González, L; Alonso-Isa, M; Lara-Isla, A; Passas-Martínez, J B; Tejido-Sánchez, Á

    2015-03-01

    Although patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) are usually managed as outpatients, a percentage of them requires hospitalization. To review risk factors and microbiological characteristics of community-associated UTIs (CAUTIs) requiring hospitalization has been our objective. A prospective observational study was carried out from November 2011 to December 2013. Incidence, microbiological characteristics and antibiotic resistance patterns in patients with CAUTIs that required hospitalization were analyzed. Risk factors (including diabetes mellitus, urolithiasis, urinary catheterization) and resistance rates of each pathogen were also analyzed. Four hundred and fifty seven patients were hospitalized in our department with CAUTI. The mean age was 56.2±19.85 years. Of them, 52.1% patients were women, 19.7% had urinary indwelling catheter and 11.4% have had a previous UTI. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Escherichia coli (60.6%), followed by Klebsiella (9.2%), Enterococcus (8.4%) and Pseudomonas (7.2%). Enterobacteriaceae other than E.coli were more prevalent in male and older patients. On the other side the most frequently isolated pathogen in patients with a previous UTI and a urinary catheter was Entercoccus. The resistance rates E. coli against ampicillin/amoxicillin + β lactamase inhibitor was 23.5%, against third-generation cephalosporins 16.6%, against fluoroquinolones 31.3% and 16.7% against aminoglycosides. 11.4% E. coli strains were producers of extended-spectrum Beta-lactamases (ESBL). Finally, the resistance rates of Enterococcus and Pseudomonas against quinolones were of 50.0% and 61.5%, respectively. CAUTIs that require hospitalization are most frequent in older age, male gender, and presence of urinary catheter, with urolithiasis and with previous episodes of UTI. These factors are also related to isolation of pathogens other than E. coli and higher resistance rates. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All

  3. Acute Hospitalization of the Older Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Pedersen, Mette Merete; Petersen, Janne

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Acute hospitalization of older patients may be associated with loss of muscle strength and functional performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hospitalization as a result of medical disease on muscle strength and functional performance in older medical...... patients. DESIGN: Isometric knee-extension strength; handgrip strength; and functional performance, that is, the Timed Up and Go test, were assessed at admission, at discharge, and 30 days after discharge. Twenty-four-hour mobility was measured during hospitalization. RESULTS: The mean (SD) age was 82.7 (8...... hospitalization, from 17.3 secs at admission to 13.3 secs at discharge (P = 0.003), but with no improvement at the 30-day follow-up (12.4 secs, P = 0.064). The median times spent in lying, sitting, and standing/walking were 17.4 hrs per day, 4.8 hrs per day, and 0.8 hrs per day, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle...

  4. Changing patient classification system for hospital reimbursement in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Ciprian-Paul; Chiriac, Delia Nona; Vladescu, Cristian

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of the change in the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system on patient morbidity and hospital financial performance in the Romanian public health care system. Three variables were assessed before and after the classification switch in July 2007: clinical outcomes, the case mix index, and hospital budgets, using the database of the National School of Public Health and Health Services Management, which contains data regularly received from hospitals reimbursed through the Romanian DRG scheme (291 in 2009). The lack of a Romanian system for the calculation of cost-weights imposed the necessity to use an imported system, which was criticized by some clinicians for not accurately reflecting resource consumption in Romanian hospitals. The new DRG classification system allowed a more accurate clinical classification. However, it also exposed a lack of physicians' knowledge on diagnosing and coding procedures, which led to incorrect coding. Consequently, the reported hospital morbidity changed after the DRG switch, reflecting an increase in the national case-mix index of 25% in 2009 (compared with 2007). Since hospitals received the same reimbursement over the first two years after the classification switch, the new DRG system led them sometimes to change patients' diagnoses in order to receive more funding. Lack of oversight of hospital coding and reporting to the national reimbursement scheme allowed the increase in the case-mix index. The complexity of the new classification system requires more resources (human and financial), better monitoring and evaluation, and improved legislation in order to achieve better hospital resource allocation and more efficient patient care.

  5. Patient's medicines brought to hospital: an overlooked resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, G J

    1993-10-27

    To quantify potential cost advantages and identify practical safeguards required for utilising patients own medicines while in hospital, and returning them on discharge. All medicines brought in by patients in two wards of a geriatric assessment and rehabilitation unit at Auckland Hospital were examined by the pharmacist, and their suitability for re-issue assessed. Medicines were regarded as suitable for use where they could be positively identified, had been dispensed within 3 months of admission, or if packed in foil, provided the expiry date and manufacturer identification were on the foil. Medicines (260 items) totalling $2,976, assessed over a 6 month period, were regarded as suitable for use by the patient, with a mean value of $11.36 per patient. Patients own medicines used within the hospital with a unit-of-issue distribution system, and taken home by them on discharge, would provide appreciable savings for the hospital medicine budget and reduction in waste of the overall health dollar.

  6. Appropriateness of hospitalization for CAP-affected pediatric patients: report from a Southern Italy General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonelli Fabio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a common disease, responsible for significant healthcare expenditures, mostly because of hospitalization. Many practice guidelines on CAP have been developed, including admission criteria, but a few on appropriate hospitalization in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate appropriate hospital admission for CAP in a pediatric population. Methods We evaluated appropriate admission to a Pediatric Unit performing a retrospective analysis on CAP admitted pediatric patients from a Southern Italy area. Diagnosis was made based on clinical and radiological signs. Appropriate hospital admission was evaluated following clinical and non-clinical international criteria. Family ability to care children was assessed by evaluating social deprivation status. Results In 2 winter seasons 120 pediatric patients aged 1-129 months were admitted because of CAP. Median age was 28.7 months. Raised body temperature was scored in 68.3% of patients, cough was present in 100% of cases, and abdominal pain was rarely evidenced. Inflammatory indices (ESR and CRP were found elevated in 33.3% of cases. Anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies were found positive in 20.4%. Trans-cutaneous (TC SaO2 was found lower than 92% in 14.6%. Dyspnoea was present in 43.3%. Dehydration requiring i.v. fluid supplementation was scored in 13.3%. Evaluation of familial ability to care their children revealed that 76% of families (derived from socially depressed areas were "at social risk", thus not able to appropriately care their children. Furthermore, analysis of CAP patients revealed that "at social risk" people accessed E.D. and were hospitalized more frequently than "not at risk" patients (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI: 1,15 to 11,12; p = 0.01, and that admitted "at social risk" people presented without clinical signs of severity (namely dyspnoea, and/or SaO2 ≤ 92%, and/or dehydration more frequently than "not at risk" population

  7. Patient experience shows little relationship with hospital quality management strategies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groene, O.; Arah, O.A.; Klazinga, N.S.; Wagner, C.; Bartels, P.D.; Kristensen, S.; Saillour, F.; Thompson, C.A.; Pfaff, H.; DerSarkissian, M.; Suñol, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes

  8. Costs of the Patients Hospitalized with Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Yıldırım

    2015-12-01

    , noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV requirement were existing factors that didn’t increase the cost of patients (p>0.05. Only the use of antibiotics was detected as independent factors that increase the total cost (95% CI 0.487 to 12.984, p=0.030. Conclusion: Acute exacerbation of COPD continues to be an important cause of mortality and economic burden in the hospitalized COPD patients in pulmonary clinics.

  9. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Tharani; Lee, Way-Seah; Lee, Kok-Foo; Jit, Mark; Ng, Chiu-Wan

    2015-01-01

    While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking. We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia. A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur) and rural (Kuala Terengganu) setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained. Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38%) were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; pMalaysia.

  10. [Evaluations by hospital-ward physicians of patient care management quality for patients hospitalized after an emergency department admission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartiaux, M; Mols, P

    2017-01-01

    patient management in the acute and sub-acute setting of an Emergency Department is challenging. An assessment of the quality of provided care enables an evaluation of failings. It contributes to the identification of areas for improvement. to obtain an analysis, by hospital-ward physicians, of adult patient care management quality, as well as of the correctness of diagnosis made during emergency admissions. To evaluate the consequences of inadequate patient care management on morbidity, mortality and cost and duration of hospitalization. prospective data analysis obtained between the 1/12/2009 and the 21/12/2009 from physicians using a questionnaire on adult-patient emergency admissions and subsequent hospitalization. questionnaires were completed for 332 patients. Inadequate management of patient care were reported for 73/332 (22 %) cases. Incorrect diagnoses were reported for 20/332 (6 %) cases. 35 cases of inadequate care management (10.5 % overall) were associated with morbidity (34 cases) or mortality (1 case), including 4 cases (1.2 % ) that required emergency intensive-care or surgical interventions. this quality study analyzed the percentage of patient management cases and incorrect diagnoses in the emergency department. The data for serious outcome and wrong diagnosis are comparable with current literature. To improve performance, we consider the process for establishing a diagnosis and therapeutic care.

  11. Suicide in high security hospital patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roland M; Hales, Heidi; Butwell, Martin; Ferriter, Mike; Taylor, Pamela J

    2011-08-01

    People with mental disorder and people who are violent are separately recognised as being at high risk of suicide. People detained in high security hospitals are recognised for their violence to others, but perhaps less so for their suicide potential. We aimed to investigate suicide rates among such patients during and after their high security hospital residency, and to establish risk factors for suicide. We extracted data from the Special Hospitals' Case Register on each person resident at any time between 1 January 1972 and 31 December 2000. Suicide rates were calculated for the whole period. We compared rates to the general population using standardised mortality ratios (SMRs). We used poisson regression to estimate the effects of gender, legal category of detention, offending history and length of admission on the suicide rate. Of the 5,955 individuals, 218 completed suicide. The suicide rate was nearly 7 times higher among resident men (SMR 662, 95% CI 478-845) and over 40 times higher in resident women (SMR 4,012, 95% CI 2,526-5,498) than in the general population; it was 23 times higher (SMR 2,325, 95% CI 1,901-2,751) and 45 times higher (SMR 4,486, 95% CI 2,727-6,245) among post-discharge men and women, respectively. The suicide rate was significantly higher among women than men inside high security but not after discharge. The suicide rate among high security hospital patients was significantly higher than in the general population. Women were especially at risk while resident, whereas for men, the risk was higher after discharge.

  12. Patient Safety Outcomes in Small Urban and Small Rural Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M.; Vaughn, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patient safety outcomes in small urban and small rural hospitals and to examine the relationship of hospital and patient factors to patient safety outcomes. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. To increase comparability, the study sample was…

  13. Bedding, not boarding. Psychiatric patients boarded in hospital EDs create crisis for patient care and hospital finances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-11-18

    As the supply of psychiatric beds dwindles, hospitals are devising innovative ways handle psych patients who come through the emergency department. Some collaborate with other hospitals, use separate pysch EDs or refer patients to residential treatment centers.

  14. Pre-hospitalization, hospitalization, and post-hospitalization costs of patients with neurocysticercosis treated at the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN in Mexico City, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Bhattarai

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to estimate the direct costs associated with the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis (NCC during pre-hospitalization, hospitalization, and post-hospitalization periods for 108 NCC patients treated at the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN in Mexico City, Mexico. Information on clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests, hospitalizations, surgical procedures, prescription medication, and other treatments was collected via medical chart reviews. Uncertain values for costs and frequency of treatments were imputed using bootstrap techniques. The average per-patient pre-hospitalization and hospitalization costs were US$ 257 (95% CI: 185 – 329 and US$ 2,576 (95% CI: 2,244 – 2,908, respectively. Post-hospitalization costs tended to decrease over time, with estimates for the first five years post-hospitalization of US$ 475 (95% CI: 423 – 527, US$ 228 (95% CI: 167 – 288, US$ 157 (95% CI: 111 – 202, US$ 150 (95% CI: 106 – 204, and US$ 91 (95% CI: 27 – 154, respectively. NCC results in a significant economic burden for patients requiring hospitalization, with this burden continuing years post-hospitalization.

  15. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya de Azambuja Berti-Couto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years. Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom, chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. RESULTS: Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9% presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p <0.05. Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life.

  16. Symptomatic subsyndromal depression in hospitalized hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Iannucci, Gino; Paroli, Marino; Salviati, Massimo; Caredda, Maria; Pasquini, Massimo; Biondi, Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Clinicians generally agree on the association between depression and hypertension. Less clear is if the nature of the link is direct or indirect and if this should be considered confined only to syndromal forms or if it concerns also subsyndromal affective presentations. This study investigated the nature of the association between hypertension and subsyndromal depression in hospitalized hypertensive patients. 196 hypertensive and 96 non hypertensive inpatients underwent a SCID interview, to exclude patients positive for any Axis I or Axis II diagnosis. Symptomatic Subsyndromal Depression (SSD) was identified according to criteria proposed by Judd. Psychopathological assessment was performed with Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) and Hopkins Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90). Clinical assessments included blood pressure measurement, evaluation of general health conditions and screening cardiovascular risk factors (smoke, alcohol, body weight, sedentary life style). Hypertensives met more frequently criteria for SSD. They also scored higher on ASI and SCL-90. However, those with more severe physical conditions, if compared with more healthy patients, did not show increased psychopathological severity. Similarly, psychopathological symptom severity did not differ among hypertensives positive for other cardiovascular risk factors, commonly more frequent among depressed subjects. Further analyses are needed to explore the potential advantage obtained on blood pressure control by treating SSD. Hospitalized hypertensives, more frequently satisfied criteria for Symptomatic Subsyndromal Depression. These milder affective forms are probably directly linked to the presence of hypertension, rather than being indirectly associated to physical impairment or to higher prevalence of other cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Hospital mergers and acquisitions: does market consolidation harm patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, V; Hamilton, B H

    2000-09-01

    Debate continues on whether consolidation in health care markets enhances efficiency or instead facilitates market power, possibly damaging quality. We compare the quality of hospital care before and after mergers and acquisitions in California between 1992 and 1995. We analyze inpatient mortality for heart attack and stroke patients, 90-day readmission for heart attack patients, and discharge within 48 h for normal newborn babies. Recent mergers and acquisitions have not had a measurable impact on inpatient mortality, although the associated standard errors are large. Readmission rates and early discharge increased in some cases. The adverse consequences of increased market power on the quality of care require further substantiation.

  18. Patient Accounting Systems: Are They Fit with the Users' Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Nazemi, Zahra; Haghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A patient accounting system is a subsystem of a hospital information system. This system like other information systems should be carefully designed to be able to meet users' requirements. The main aim of this research was to investigate users' requirements and to determine whether current patient accounting systems meet users' needs or not. This was a survey study, and the participants were the users of six patient accounting systems used in 24 teaching hospitals. A stratified sampling method was used to select the participants (n = 216). The research instruments were a questionnaire and a checklist. The mean value of ≥3 showed the importance of each data element and the capability of the system. Generally, the findings showed that the current patient accounting systems had some weaknesses and were able to meet between 70% and 80% of users' requirements. The current patient accounting systems need to be improved to be able to meet users' requirements. This approach can also help to provide hospitals with more usable and reliable financial information.

  19. Patient Accounting Systems: Are They Fit with the Users' Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Haleh; Nazemi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A patient accounting system is a subsystem of a hospital information system. This system like other information systems should be carefully designed to be able to meet users' requirements. The main aim of this research was to investigate users' requirements and to determine whether current patient accounting systems meet users' needs or not. Methods This was a survey study, and the participants were the users of six patient accounting systems used in 24 teaching hospitals. A stratified sampling method was used to select the participants (n = 216). The research instruments were a questionnaire and a checklist. The mean value of ≥3 showed the importance of each data element and the capability of the system. Results Generally, the findings showed that the current patient accounting systems had some weaknesses and were able to meet between 70% and 80% of users' requirements. Conclusions The current patient accounting systems need to be improved to be able to meet users' requirements. This approach can also help to provide hospitals with more usable and reliable financial information. PMID:26893945

  20. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... other than psychiatric hospitals. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... other than psychiatric hospitals. (a) Content of certification and recertification. Medicare Part A pays for inpatient hospital services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals only if a physician...

  1. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves.

  2. A Strategic Framework for Improving the Patient Experience in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkelien, Natalie L

    Hospitals are taking new approaches to satisfy consumers and deliver on customer expectations by enhancing their patients' comprehensive experience. The HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey and value-based purchasing initiatives have tied reimbursement to patient satisfaction scores, bringing patient perspectives on care to the forefront of hospitals' strategic priorities. This essay reviews the patient experience literature and argues that hospitals should adopt an expanded approach beyond HCAHPS measures to enhance the patient experience. Such an approach allows providers to deliver quality outcomes that satisfy patients' wants and needs.

  3. Cost effectiveness of adopted quality requirements in hospital laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Alneil; Ahmed-Abakur, Eltayib; Abugroun, Elsir; Bakhit, Siham; Holi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed in quasi-experiment to assess adoption of the essential clauses of particular clinical laboratory quality management requirements based on international organization for standardization (ISO 15189) in hospital laboratories and to evaluate the cost effectiveness of compliance to ISO 15189. The quality management intervention based on ISO 15189 was conceded through three phases; pre - intervention phase, Intervention phase and Post-intervention phase. In pre-intervention phase the compliance to ISO 15189 was 49% for study group vs. 47% for control group with P value 0.48, while the post intervention results displayed 54% vs. 79% for study group and control group respectively in compliance to ISO 15189 and statistically significant difference (P value 0.00) with effect size (Cohen's d) of (0.00) in pre-intervention phase and (0.99) in post - intervention phase. The annual average cost per-test for the study group and control group was 1.80 ± 0.25 vs. 1.97 ± 0.39, respectively with P value 0.39 whereas the post-intervention results showed that the annual average total costs per-test for study group and control group was 1.57 ± 0.23 vs 2.08 ± 0.38, P value 0.019 respectively, with cost-effectiveness ratio of (0.88) in pre -intervention phase and (0.52) in post-intervention phase. The planned adoption of quality management requirements (QMS) in clinical laboratories had great effect to increase the compliance percent with quality management system requirement, raise the average total cost effectiveness, and improve the analytical process capability of the testing procedure.

  4. Creating a Culture of Patient Safety through Innovative Hospital Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reiling, John G

    2005-01-01

    When SynergyHealth, St. Joseph's Hospital of West Bend, Wisconsin, decided to relocate and build an 82-bed acute care facility, they recognized the opportunity to design a hospital that focused on patient safety...

  5. Improving stroke care for patients at Cavan hospital [poster

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murugasu, G Dr.

    2013-07-01

    Under the Quality and Continuing Care Directorate (QCCD) in stroke care Cavan General Hospital was identified as a hospital that received a large number of stroke and TIA patients. A programme was established to improve services to this population.

  6. Study of cardiovascular diseases in hospitalized AECOPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El-Shabrawy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD in patients hospitalized for COPD in Zagazig University Hospital was high. Age, sex and CVD trends, as well as life style changes, should be considered when prevention and control strategies are formulated.

  7. Assessing motivation to smoking cessation in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Sánchez, Juana María; Canca-Sánchez, José Carlos; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Martín-García, Mónica; Lorente Márquez, Celia; Timonet-Andreu, Eva María

    To assess motivation to quit smoking in patients admitted to an acute care hospital, determine predictors of readiness to change, and identify a risk group that requires targeted motivational interviewing. A cross-sectional descriptive study. A retrospective study was performed on the medical records of 248 patients aged >18 years with smoking habits admitted to the medical and surgery units of a district hospital between May 2014 and April 2015. The data collected included sociodemographic data, data on respiratory function, number of cigarettes smoked per day, motivation to quit smoking, patient-reported readiness to quit, history of respiratory diseases and previous admissions. The Richmond test revealed that 54% of patients (n=134) were poorly motivated to quit smoking vs. 11.74% (n=29) who reported to be highly motivated. The group of patients who reported to be willing to receive support (n=77) was prevailingly composed of men (p=.009) admitted to a medical care unit (p=.026) -mainly the Unit of Cardiology (51%)- who smoked 11/29 cigarettes/day (p=.015). Dyspnoea at admission, a history of respiratory disease and previous admissions for respiratory problems were not predictors of readiness to quit. This study identifies a risk group of patients with respiratory disease, low motivation to quit smoking and poor readiness to receive smoke cessation support, that should be the target of motivational approaches to behavior change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Are comparisons of patient experiences across hospitals fair? A study in Veterans Health Administration hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Paul D; Meterko, Mark; Wright, Steven M; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2014-07-01

    Surveys are increasingly used to assess patient experiences with health care. Comparisons of hospital scores based on patient experience surveys should be adjusted for patient characteristics that might affect survey results. Such characteristics are commonly drawn from patient surveys that collect little, if any, clinical information. Consequently some hospitals, especially those treating particularly complex patients, have been concerned that standard adjustment methods do not adequately reflect the challenges of treating their patients. To compare scores for different types of hospitals after making adjustments using only survey-reported patient characteristics and using more complete clinical and hospital information. We used clinical and survey data from a national sample of 1858 veterans hospitalized for an initial acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. We used VA administrative data to characterize hospitals. The survey asked patients about their experiences with hospital care. The clinical data included 14 measures abstracted from medical records that are predictive of survival after an AMI. Comparisons of scores across hospitals adjusted only for patient-reported health status and sociodemographic characteristics were similar to those that also adjusted for patient clinical characteristics; the Spearman rank-order correlations between the 2 sets of adjusted scores were >0.97 across 9 dimensions of inpatient experience. This study did not support concerns that measures of patient care experiences are unfair because commonly used models do not adjust adequately for potentially confounding patient clinical characteristics.

  9. Comparing safety climate in naval aviation and hospitals: implications for improving patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Rosen, Amy; Zhao, Shibei; Ciavarelli, Anthony P; Gaba, David M

    2010-01-01

    with naval aviation. Major interventions to bolster hospital safety climate continue to be required to improve patient safety.

  10. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  11. 42 CFR 482.62 - Condition of participation: Special staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.62 Section 482.62 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... staff requirements for psychiatric hospitals. The hospital must have adequate numbers of qualified...) Standard: Director of inpatient psychiatric services; medical staff. Inpatient psychiatric services must be...

  12. Bilateral effects of hospital patient-safety procedures on nurses' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Karima, R; Harada, K

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how hospital patient-safety procedures affect the job satisfaction of hospital nurses. Additionally, we investigated the association between perceived autonomy and hospital patient-safety procedures and job satisfaction. Recently, measures for patient safety have been recognized as an essential requirement in hospitals. Hospital patient-safety procedures may enhance the job satisfaction of nurses by improving the quality of their work. However, such procedures may also decrease their job satisfaction by imposing excessive stress on nurses because they cannot make mistakes. The participants included 537 nurses at 10 private hospitals in Japan (The surveys were collected from March to July 2012). Factors related to hospital patient-safety procedures were demonstrated using factor analysis, and the associations between these factors and nurses' self-perceived autonomy and job satisfaction were examined using structural equation modelling. Five factors regarding hospital patient-safety procedures were extracted. Additionally, structural equation modelling revealed statistically significant associations between these factors and the nurses' self-perceived autonomy and job satisfaction. The findings showed that nurses' perceived autonomy of the workplace enhanced their job satisfaction and that their perceptions of hospital patient-safety procedures promoted their job satisfaction. However, some styles of chief nurses' leadership regarding patient safety restrict nurses' independent and autonomous decision-making and actions, resulting in a lowering of job satisfaction. This study demonstrated that hospital patient-safety procedures have ambiguous effects on nurses' job satisfaction. In particular, chief nurses' leadership relating to patient safety can have a positive or negative effect on nurses' job satisfaction. The findings indicated that hospital managers should demonstrate positive attitudes to improve patient safety for

  13. Assessment of Antibiotics prescription in Hospitalized Patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the pattern of antibiotics usage in medical wards at Elobeid teaching hospital, West Sudan. Patients and method: This is a descriptive hospital-based study. The data were retrospectively collected from the patient's records. Systemic random sampling was used to select 427 patient's ...

  14. Risk factors for falls of hospitalized stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutuarima, J. A.; van der Meulen, J. H.; de Haan, R. J.; van Straten, A.; Limburg, M.

    1997-01-01

    Patients with stroke are at a high risk for falling. We assessed the fall incidence and risk factors for patients hospitalized as the result of an acute stroke. We studied a cohort of 720 stroke patients from 23 hospitals in The Netherlands. The data were abstracted from the medical and nursing

  15. Quitline Tobacco Interventions in Hospitalized Patients: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, David O; Nolan, Margaret B; Kadimpati, Sandeep; Burke, Michael V; Hanson, Andrew C; Schroeder, Darrell R

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalization provides an opportunity for smokers to quit, but tobacco interventions can require specialized services that are not available to many hospitals. This study tests the hypothesis that a brief intervention to facilitate the use of telephone quitline services for both initial and follow-up counseling is effective in helping patients achieve sustained abstinence. This was a population-based RCT. Participants were Olmsted County, MN residents who reported current smoking and were admitted to Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester, MN between May 2012 and August 2014. A control group received brief (~5-minute) cessation advice; an intervention group received a brief (~5-minute) quitline facilitation intervention, with either warm handoff or faxed referral to a national quitline provider. All were offered a 2-week supply of nicotine patches at discharge. Outcomes included self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 6 months after hospitalization and quitline utilization. Data analysis was performed from September 2014 to March 2015. Of the 1,409 eligible patients who were approached, 600 (47%) were randomized. The quitline intake call was completed by 195 subjects (65% of the intervention group). Of these, 128 (66%) completed the first coaching call. Self-reported abstinence rates at 6 months after discharge were identical in both groups (24%). The quitline facilitation intervention did not improve self-reported abstinence rates compared with a standard brief stop-smoking intervention. These results do not support the effectiveness of quitlines in providing tobacco use interventions to a general population of hospitalized smokers. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Voting pattern of mental patients in a community state hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M M; Grossman, S A

    1967-06-01

    The voting pattern of mental patients in a community-based state hospital was studied. Patients were polled on the New York City mayoralty race. A comparison to the vote of the general population revealed that the hospital sample vote resembled most closely the election results of the hospital district. The results highlight the advantage of community-centered mental health facilities, which undertake the treatment and rehabilitation of mental patients under conditions that maintain ties with family and community.

  17. The burden of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes in Native Hawaiian and Asian American hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.L. Sentell

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Hospitalized Native Hawaiians (41% and Asian subgroups had significantly higher overall diabetes burdens compared to Whites (23%. Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was associated with poor outcomes. Hospitalized patients, irrespective of race/ethnicity, may require more effective inpatient identification and management of previously undiagnosed diabetes to improve clinical outcomes.

  18. The use of patient classification systems for production control of hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de G.G.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Vries, de G.

    2000-01-01

    Production control is an important issue for hospital management. Hospitals are faced with a growing demand for care and higher expectations for improved service delivery. For production control purposes information is required on different levels of aggregation: process resources and patient flows.

  19. Hospital networks and the dispersal of hospital-acquired pathogens by patient transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    Full Text Available Hospital-acquired infections (HAI are often seen as preventable incidents that result from unsafe practices or poor hospital hygiene. This however ignores the fact that transmissibility is not only a property of the causative organisms but also of the hosts who can translocate bacteria when moving between hospitals. In an epidemiological sense, hospitals become connected through the patients they share. We here postulate that the degree of hospital connectedness crucially influences the rates of infections caused by hospital-acquired bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we mapped the movement of patients based on the UK-NHS Hospital Episode Statistics and observed that the proportion of patients admitted to a hospital after a recent episode in another hospital correlates with the hospital-specific incidence rate of MRSA bacteraemia as recorded by mandatory reporting. We observed a positive correlation between hospital connectedness and MRSA bacteraemia incidence rate that is significant for all financial years since 2001 except for 2008-09. All years combined, this correlation is positive and significantly different from zero (partial correlation coefficient r = 0.33 (0.28 to 0.38. When comparing the referral pattern for English hospitals with referral patterns observed in the Netherlands, we predict that English hospitals more likely see a swifter and more sustained spread of HAIs. Our results indicate that hospitals cannot be viewed as individual units but rather should be viewed as connected elements of larger modular networks. Our findings stress the importance of cooperative effects that will have a bearing on the planning of health care systems, patient management and hospital infection control.

  20. Drug interactions in hospitalized elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Locatelli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of drug interactions in elderlyinpatients and to describe the most prevalent interactions. Methods:A retrospective study was conducted in 155 elderly inpatients enrolledin the Clinical Pharmacy program at the elderly-care unit of theHospital Israelita Albert Einstein from January 2006 to January 2007.Interactions were classified according to severity using Micromedex®.Results: A total of 705 potential drug interactions were found, withapproximately 4 interactions per patient. According to severity, 201(28% were major severities and 504 (72% were of moderate severity.Among these 705 interactions, 444 were selected according to theirresulting effect including 161 (36% had increased risk of bleeding, 78(18% hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, 50 (11% cardiotoxicity, 46(10% digitalis toxicity, 40 (9% phenytoin toxicity, 31 (7% additiverespiratory depression, 20 (5% hyperkalemia, 18 (4% decreasedlevothyroxine absorption. Conclusion: The high drug interactionrate found in this study shows the relevance of this issue amongelderly inpatients and the need to assess and monitor drug therapyin the elderly to prevent and reduce consequences of potential druginteraction effects.

  1. Determining Disturbing Factors of Sleep Quality among Hospitalized Elderly Patients in Kashan Hospitals, Iran 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kafaei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sleep is an effective factor in the recovery processes. Many variables affect on the sleep quality of hospitalized elderly people. This study was conducted to determine the factors disturbing sleep quality among hospitalized older adult patients in Kashan hospitals. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on a sample of 390 elderly hospitalized patients in Kashan hospitals. The study data was gathered via Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI Questionnaire. A global total score of 5 or greater indicated a “poor" quality of sleep. The data were analyzed using Chi square, t- test and binary logistic regression at multivariate model. Results: The total quality of sleep was poor in hospitalized elderly patients (7/2±4/8. Sex, marital status, level of education, type of ward, previous hospitalization experience, use of hypnotics at home and hospital, and previous sleep disorders were statistically associated with quality of sleep; however, there was not significant relationship between quality of sleep and age, length of hospitalization, and daytime napping. In the final regression model, marital status (OR=4.6, level of education (OR=1.9, length of hospitalization (OR=1.1, Previous hospitalization experience (OR=0.4, use of hypnotics in hospital (OR=0.27 and previous sleep disorder (OR=0.01 were the most important determinants of sleep quality. Conclusion: Quality of sleep was poor in hospitalized elderly due to a wide range of sleep disturbing factors. The most important factors involved marital status, level of education, previous hospitalization experience, previous sleep disorder and use of hypnotics in hospital.

  2. Loyalty of hospital patients: a vital marketing objective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacStravic, R S

    1987-01-01

    Hospitals must strive for patient loyalty as a top priority objective in their marketing strategies. Loyal patients are sources of repeat business, potential users of new services, and positive spokespersons in word-of-mouth advertising.

  3. Length of stay and hospital costs among high-risk patients with hospital-origin Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Rebecca; Dean, Bonnie; Nathanson, Brian; Haidar, Tracy; Strauss, Marcie; Thomas, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (HO-CDAD) has been associated with longer length of stay (LOS) and higher hospital costs among patients in general. The burden of HO-CDAD is unknown among patients who may be at particular risk of poor outcomes: older patients, those with complex or chronic conditions (renal disease, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]), and those with concomitant antibiotic (CAbx) use during treatment for CDAD. A retrospective analysis (2005-2011) of the Health Facts® database (Cerner Corp., Kansas City, MO) containing comprehensive clinical records from 186 US hospitals identified hospitalized adult patients with HO-CDAD based on a positive C. difficile toxin collected >48 h after admission. Control patients were required to have total hospital LOS ≥2 days. Separate logistic regression models to estimate propensities were developed for each study group, with HO-CDAD vs controls as the outcome. Differences in LOS and costs were calculated between cases and controls for each group. A total of 4521 patients with HO-CDAD were identified. Mean age was 70 years, 54% were female, and 13% died. After matching, LOS was significantly greater among HO-CDAD patients (vs controls) in each group except IBD. The significant difference in LOS ranged from 3.0 (95% CI = 1.4-4.6) additional days in older patients to 7.8 (95% CI = 5.7-9.9) days in patients with CAbx exposure. HO-CDAD was associated with significantly higher costs among older patients (p cost data and potential misclassification of colonized patients as infected. Renal impairment, advanced age, cancer, and CAbx use are associated with significantly longer LOS among HO-CDAD patients, with CAbx users being the most resource intensive. Early identification and aggressive treatment of HO-CDAD in these groups may be warranted.

  4. Hiponatremia como factor de riesgo de muerte en pacientes internados por neumonía adquirida en la comunidad Hyponatremia as a risk factor of death in patients with community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo E. Barcia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigamos si la hiponatremia es un factor de riesgo de muerte en pacientes internados por neumonía adquirida en la comunidad (NAC y estimamos el peso relativo de otros factores de riesgo de muerte por NAC, en un estudio de cohorte, prospectivo, multicéntrico, en 5 Servicios de Clínica Médica del Area Metropolitana de Buenos Aires. Evaluamos adultos con NAC ingresados entre 21 de marzo de 2000 y 21 de diciembre del mismo año. Los factores de riesgo que mostraron asociación con evolución por análisis univariado, fueron sometidos a análisis de regresión logística, con un nivel de significación de a de 0.05. En 9 meses se internaron 238 pacientes con NAC: 150 (63% varones y 88 (36% mujeres, con edades medias 52.99 (±20.35 y 55.06 (±20.94 años, respectivamente. Fallecieron 25/238 (10.5%. En análisis multivariado, se asociaron significativamente con evolución: enfermedad vascular encefálica (EVE (B: 2.614, pWe investigated whether hyponatremia is a risk factor of death in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and estimated the relative risk of death by CAP of other risk factors. The design was prospective multicentre cohort study. In 5 centers in Buenos Aires, Argentina, we studied adults hospitalized with CAP between March 21, 2000 and December 21, 2000. Using stepwise logistic regression, we analyzed risk factors that showed a univariate association with mortality; a significance level was 0.05. During a 9-month period, 238 patients were admitted with CAP: 150 (63% male and 88 (36% female, mean age 52.99 (±20.35 and 55.06 (±20.94, respectively. Mortality was 10.5% (25/238. By multivariate analysis, the following variables were statistically associated with evolution: cerebrovascular disease (CD (B: 2.614, p<0.001, RRE: 13.6, IC 95%: 3.7-49.6; hyponatremia at admission or during hospitalization (B: 1.994, p<0.001, RRE: 7.3, IC 95%: 2.5-20.8; and elevated blood urea (B: 0.016, p= 0.003, RRE: 1.016, IC 95

  5. Assessing patient safety culture in hospitals across countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Smits, M.; Sorra, J.; Huang, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. It is believed that in order to reduce the number of adverse events, hospitals have to stimulate a more open culture and reflective attitude towards errors and patient safety. The objective is to examine similarities and differences in hospital patient safety culture in three countries:

  6. Assessing patient safety culture in hospitals across countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Smits, M.; Sorra, J.; Huang, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: It is believed that in order to reduce the number of adverse events, hospitals have to stimulate a more open culture and reflective attitude towards errors and patient safety. The objective is to examine similarities and differences in hospital patient safety culture in three countries:

  7. Assessing patient safety culture in hospitals across countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Smits, M.; Sorra, J.; Huang, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is believed that in order to reduce the number of adverse events, hospitals have to stimulate a more open culture and reflective attitude towards errors and patient safety. The objective is to examine similarities and differences in hospital patient safety culture in three countries:

  8. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; Dersarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for

  9. Superficial mycoses among psychiatric patients in Mathari hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terbinafin was the most effective antifungal while ketoconazole was the least effective. Conclusion: All patients admitted at Mathari hospital should be screened for fungal infection and treated. Terbinafin can be used as first line treatment of dermatomycosis after screening all psychiatric patients in Mathari Mental hospital.

  10. Ethnic inequalities in patient safety in Dutch hospital care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rosse, F.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis shows the first results of Dutch studies on the relation between ethnicity and patient safety. We used mixed methods to identify patient safety outcomes and patient safety risks in a cohort study in 4 urban hospitals among 763 Dutch patients and 576 ethnic minority patients. In a record

  11. Factors Affecting Mortality in Elderly Patients Hospitalized for Nonmalignant Reasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslime Ayaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elderly population is hospitalized more frequently than young people, and they suffer from more severe diseases that are difficult to diagnose and treat. The present study aimed to investigate the factors affecting mortality in elderly patients hospitalized for nonmalignant reasons. Demographic data, reason for hospitalization, comorbidities, duration of hospital stay, and results of routine blood testing at the time of first hospitalization were obtained from the hospital records of the patients, who were over 65 years of age and hospitalized primarily for nonmalignant reasons. The mean age of 1012 patients included in the study was 77.8 ± 7.6. The most common reason for hospitalization was diabetes mellitus (18.3%. Of the patients, 90.3% had at least a single comorbidity. Whilst 927 (91.6% of the hospitalized patients were discharged, 85 (8.4% died. Comparison of the characteristics of the discharged and dead groups revealed that the dead group was older and had higher rates of poor general status and comorbidity. Differences were observed between the discharged and dead groups in most of the laboratory parameters. Hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypopotassemia, hypernatremia, hyperuricemia, and high TSH level were the predictors of mortality. In order to meet the health necessities of the elderly population, it is necessary to well define the patient profiles and to identify the risk factors.

  12. Prognostic Factors in Tuberculosis Related Mortalities in Hospitalized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazal Haque

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The study was undertaken at the Department of Pulmonology at a public, tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Objectives. To evaluate factors concerned with in-hospital deaths in patients admitted with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB. Design. A retrospective case-control audit was performed for 120 patients hospitalised with pulmonary TB. Sixty of those discharged after treatment were compared to sixty who did not survive. Radiological findings, clinical indicators, and laboratory values were compared between the two groups to identify factors related to poor prognosis. Results. Factors concerned with in-hospital mortality listed late presentation of disease (P<0.01, noncompliance to antituberculosis therapy (P<0.01, smoking (P<0.01, longer duration of illness prior to treatment (P<0.01, and low body weight (P<0.01. Most deaths occurred during the first week of admission (P<0.01 indicating late referrals as significant. Immunocompromised status and multi-drug resistance were not implicated in higher mortality. Conclusions. Poor prognosis was associated with noncompliance to therapy resulting in longer duration of illness, late patient referrals to care centres, and development of complications. Early diagnosis, timely referrals, and monitored compliance may help reduce mortality. Adherence to a more radically effective treatment regimen is required to eliminate TB early during disease onset.

  13. Energy Requirements in Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    During the management of critical illness, optimal nutritional support is an important key for achieving positive clinical outcomes. Compared to healthy people, critically ill patients have higher energy expenditure, thereby their energy requirements and risk of malnutrition being increased. Assessing individual nutritional requirement is essential for a successful nutritional support, including the adequate energy supply. Methods to assess energy requirements include indirect calorimetry (IC) which is considered as a reference method, and the predictive equations which are commonly used due to the difficulty of using IC in certain conditions. In this study, a literature review was conducted on the energy metabolic changes in critically ill patients, and the implications for the estimation of energy requirements in this population. In addition, the issue of optimal caloric goal during nutrition support is discussed, as well as the accuracy of selected resting energy expenditure predictive equations, commonly used in critically ill patients.

  14. Energy Requirements in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndahimana, Didace; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2018-04-01

    During the management of critical illness, optimal nutritional support is an important key for achieving positive clinical outcomes. Compared to healthy people, critically ill patients have higher energy expenditure, thereby their energy requirements and risk of malnutrition being increased. Assessing individual nutritional requirement is essential for a successful nutritional support, including the adequate energy supply. Methods to assess energy requirements include indirect calorimetry (IC) which is considered as a reference method, and the predictive equations which are commonly used due to the difficulty of using IC in certain conditions. In this study, a literature review was conducted on the energy metabolic changes in critically ill patients, and the implications for the estimation of energy requirements in this population. In addition, the issue of optimal caloric goal during nutrition support is discussed, as well as the accuracy of selected resting energy expenditure predictive equations, commonly used in critically ill patients.

  15. Exploring relationships between patient safety culture and patients' assessments of hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorra, Joann; Khanna, Kabir; Dyer, Naomi; Mardon, Russ; Famolaro, Theresa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships among 2 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality measures of hospital patient safety and quality, which reflect different perspectives on hospital performance: the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (Hospital SOPS)--a hospital employee patient safety culture survey--and the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Hospital Survey (CAHPS Hospital Survey)--a survey of the experiences of adult inpatients with hospital care and services. Our hypothesis was that these 2 measures would be positively related. We performed multiple regressions to examine the relationships between the Hospital SOPS measures and CAHPS Hospital Survey measures, controlling for hospital bed size and ownership. Analyses were conducted at the hospital level with each survey's measures using data from 73 hospitals that administered both surveys during similar periods. Higher overall Hospital SOPS composite average scores were associated with higher overall CAHPS Hospital Survey composite average scores (r = 0.41, P G 0.01). Twelve of 15 Hospital SOPS measures were positively related to the CAHPS Hospital Survey composite average score after controlling for bed size and ownership, with significant standardized regression coefficients ranging from 0.25 to 0.38. None of the Hospital SOPS measures were significantly correlated with either of the two single-item CAHPS Hospital Survey measures (hospital rating and willingness to recommend). This study found that hospitals where staff have more positive perceptions of patient safety culture tend to have more positive assessments of care from patients. This finding helps validate both surveys and suggests that improvements in patient safety culture may lead to improved patient experience with care. Further research is needed to determine the generalizability of these results to larger sets of hospitals, to hospital units, and to other settings of care.

  16. Demographic Factors and Hospital Size Predict Patient Satisfaction Variance- Implications for Hospital Value-Based Purchasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C.; Ornstein, Katherine; Holcombe, Randall F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) incentivizes quality performance based healthcare by linking payments directly to patient satisfaction scores obtained from Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Lower HCAHPS scores appear to cluster in heterogeneous population dense areas and could bias CMS reimbursement. Objective Assess nonrandom variation in patient satisfaction as determined by HCAHPS. Design Multivariate regression modeling was performed for individual dimensions of HCAHPS and aggregate scores. Standardized partial regression coefficients assessed strengths of predictors. Weighted Individual (hospital) Patient Satisfaction Adjusted Score (WIPSAS) utilized four highly predictive variables and hospitals were re-ranked accordingly. Setting 3,907 HVBP-participating hospitals. Patients 934,800 patient surveys, by most conservative estimate. Measurements 3,144 county demographics (U.S. Census), and HCAHPS. Results Hospital size and primary language (‘non-English speaking’) most strongly predicted unfavorable HCAHPS scores while education and white ethnicity most strongly predicted favorable HCAHPS scores. The average adjusted patient satisfaction scores calculated by WIPSAS approximated the national average of HCAHPS scores. However, WIPSAS changed hospital rankings by variable amounts depending on the strength of the predictive variables in the hospitals’ locations. Structural and demographic characteristics that predict lower scores were accounted for by WIPSAS that also improved rankings of many safety-net hospitals and academic medical centers in diverse areas. Conclusions Demographic and structural factors (e.g., hospital beds) predict patient satisfaction scores even after CMS adjustments. CMS should consider WIPSAS or a similar adjustment to account for the severity of patient satisfaction inequities that hospitals could strive to correct. PMID:25940305

  17. Patient Satisfaction at America’s Lowest Performing Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotra, Saket; Cram, Peter; Popescu, Ioana

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous studies have identified hospitals with poor performance on cardiac process measures. How these hospitals fare in other domains such as patient satisfaction remains unknown. METHODS We used Hospital Compare data to identify hospitals that reported acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure (HF) process measures for 2006–2008 and calculated respective composite performance scores. Using these scores, we classified hospitals as low-performing (bottom decile for all three years), top-performing (top decile for all three years), and intermediate (all others). We used Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems 2008 data to compare overall satisfaction between low, intermediate, and top-performing hospitals. RESULTS Low-performing hospitals had fewer beds, fewer nurses per-patient, and were more likely rural, safety-net hospitals located in the South, compared to intermediate and top-performing hospitals (Ppatient satisfaction (kappa statisticpatient satisfaction on average suggesting that these hospitals have overall poor quality of care. However, there is discordance between the two measures in profiling hospital quality. PMID:22496113

  18. Hospital variation in sphincter preservation for elderly rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgion, Christopher M; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-09-01

    The primary goal of an operation for rectal cancer is to cure cancer and, where possible, preserve continence. A wide range of sphincter preservation rates have been reported. This study evaluated hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE), and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of elderly rectal cancer patients. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked data, we identified 4959 patients older than 65 y with stage I-III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000-2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly patients with rectal cancer. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which combined explained 31% of procedure variation. Receipt of LE is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Implementation of patient safety strategies in European hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñol, R; Vallejo, P; Groene, O; Escaramis, G; Thompson, A; Kutryba, B; Garel, P

    2009-02-01

    This study is part of the Methods of Assessing Response to Quality Improvement Strategies (MARQuIS) research project on cross-border care, investigating quality improvement strategies in healthcare systems across the European Union (EU). To explore to what extent a sample of acute care European hospitals have implemented patient safety strategies and mechanisms and whether the implementation is related to the type of hospital. Data were collected on patient safety structures and mechanisms in 389 acute care hospitals in eight EU countries using a web-based questionnaire. Subsequently, an on-site audit was carried out by independent surveyors in 89 of these hospitals to assess patient safety outputs. This paper presents univariate and bivariate statistics on the implementation and explores the associations between implementation of patient safety strategies and hospital type using the chi(2) test and Fisher exact test. Structures and plans for safety (including responsibilities regarding patient safety management) are well developed in most of the hospitals that participated in this study. The study found greater variation regarding the implementation of mechanisms or activities to promote patient safety, such as electronic drug prescription systems, guidelines for prevention of wrong patient, wrong site and wrong surgical procedure, and adverse events reporting systems. In the sample of hospitals that underwent audit, a considerable proportion do not comply with basic patient safety strategies--for example, using bracelets for adult patient identification and correct labelling of medication.

  20. AN EFFICIENT PATIENT INFLOW PREDICTION MODEL FOR HOSPITAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottalanka Srikanth

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing demand in improving service provisioning in hospital resources management. Hospital industries work with strict budget constraint at the same time assures quality care. To achieve quality care with budget constraint an efficient prediction model is required. Recently there has been various time series based prediction model has been proposed to manage hospital resources such ambulance monitoring, emergency care and so on. These models are not efficient as they do not consider the nature of scenario such climate condition etc. To address this artificial intelligence is adopted. The issues with existing prediction are that the training suffers from local optima error. This induces overhead and affects the accuracy in prediction. To overcome the local minima error, this work presents a patient inflow prediction model by adopting resilient backpropagation neural network. Experiment are conducted to evaluate the performance of proposed model inter of RMSE and MAPE. The outcome shows the proposed model reduces RMSE and MAPE over existing back propagation based artificial neural network. The overall outcomes show the proposed prediction model improves the accuracy of prediction which aid in improving the quality of health care management.

  1. [Customer and patient satisfaction. An appropriate management tool in hospitals?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawils, S; Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Bleich, C

    2012-09-01

    Recently, the concept of patient satisfaction has been established as an essential part of the quality management of hospitals. Despite the concept's lack of theoretical and methodological foundations, patient surveys on subjective hospital experiences contribute immensely to the improvement of hospitals. What needs to be considered critically in this context is the concept of customer satisfaction for patients, the theoretical integration of empirical results, the reduction of false satisfaction indications and the application of risk-adjusted versus naïve benchmarking of data. This paper aims to contribute to the theoretical discussion of the topic and to build a basis for planning methodologically sound patient surveys.

  2. Malnutrition upon Hospital Admission in Geriatric Patients: Why Assess It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Orlandoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo assess the prevalence of malnutrition according to the new ESPEN definition in a population of geriatric hospital patients and to determine how malnutrition affects the length of hospital stay (LOS and hospital mortality.DesignA retrospective analysis of data gathered during nutritional screening surveys carried out three consecutive years, from 2012 to 2014, in an Italian geriatric research hospital (INRCA, Ancona was performed. On the day of the study, demographic data, data on clinical conditions and the nutritional status of newly admitted patients were collected. Patients were screened for malnutrition risk using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST. Subsequently, malnutrition was diagnosed, for subjects at high risk, following the criteria suggested by the European Association for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism [body mass index (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 or different combinations of unintentional weight loss over time and BMI values]. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of MUST compared to ESPEN criteria were assessed. The characteristics of patients with a diagnosis of malnutrition were compared to those of non-malnourished patients. The impact of malnutrition on LOS and hospital mortality was investigated through logistic and linear regression models.SettingThe study was performed in an Italian geriatric research hospital (INRCA, Ancona.SubjectsTwo hundred eighty-four newly hospitalized geriatric patients from acute care wards (mean age 82.8 ± 8.7 years, who gave their written consent to participate in the study, were enrolled.ResultsAccording to the MUST, high risk of malnutrition at hospitalization was found in 28.2% of patients. Malnutrition was diagnosed in 24.6% of subjects. The malnutrition was an independent predictor of both the LOS and hospital mortality. The multivariate analyses—linear and logistic regression—were performed considering different potential

  3. Guidelines for the Treatment of Smoking in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Ruiz, Carlos A; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Pascual Lledó, Jose Francisco; Garcia Rueda, Marcos; Lorza Blasco, Jose Javier; Signes Costa-Miñana, Jaime; Valencia Azcona, Borja; Villar Laguna, Cristina; Cristóbal Fernández, Maribel

    2017-07-01

    Between 15 and 27% of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals are smokers. Hospitalization is an ideal time for a smoker to decide to quit. We performed a MEDLINE search of controlled, randomized or observational studies associated with helping hospitalized patients quit smoking, published between January 1, 2002 and September 30, 2015. On the basis of the results of those studies, we have issued some recommendations for the treatment of smoking in hospitalized patients. The recommendations were drawn up according to the GRADE system. Offering the smoker psychological counselling and prolonging follow-up for at least 4 weeks after discharge is the most effective recommendation for helping hospitalized patients to quit. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Myocardial Revascularization in Dyalitic Patients: In-Hospital Period Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Matheus; Hossne, Nelson Américo Jr.; Branco, João Nelson Rodrigues; Vargas, Guilherme Flora; Fonseca, José Honório de Almeida Palma da; Pestana, José Osmar Medina de Abreu; Juliano, Yara; Buffolo, Enio

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting currently is the best treatment for dialytic patients with multivessel coronary disease, but hospital morbidity and mortality related to procedure is still high. Evaluate results and in-hospital outcomes of coronary artery bypass grafting in dialytic patients. Retrospective unicentric study including 50 consecutive and not selected dialytic patients, who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting in a tertiary university hospital from 2007 to 2012. High prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was observed (100% hypertensive, 68% diabetic and 40% dyslipidemic). There was no intra-operative death and 60% of the procedures were performed off-pump. There were seven (14%) in-hospital deaths. Postoperative infection, previous heart failure, cardiopulmonary bypass, abnormal ventricular function and surgical re-exploration were associated with increased mortality. Coronary artery bypass grafting is feasible to dialytic patients although high in-hospital morbidity and mortality. It is necessary better understanding about metabolic aspects to plan adequate interventions

  5. Myocardial Revascularization in Dyalitic Patients: In-Hospital Period Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Matheus, E-mail: matheus10miranda@gmail.com; Hossne, Nelson Américo Jr.; Branco, João Nelson Rodrigues; Vargas, Guilherme Flora; Fonseca, José Honório de Almeida Palma da; Pestana, José Osmar Medina de Abreu [Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM), Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Juliano, Yara [Universidade de Santo Amaro, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Buffolo, Enio [Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM), Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Coronary artery bypass grafting currently is the best treatment for dialytic patients with multivessel coronary disease, but hospital morbidity and mortality related to procedure is still high. Evaluate results and in-hospital outcomes of coronary artery bypass grafting in dialytic patients. Retrospective unicentric study including 50 consecutive and not selected dialytic patients, who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting in a tertiary university hospital from 2007 to 2012. High prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was observed (100% hypertensive, 68% diabetic and 40% dyslipidemic). There was no intra-operative death and 60% of the procedures were performed off-pump. There were seven (14%) in-hospital deaths. Postoperative infection, previous heart failure, cardiopulmonary bypass, abnormal ventricular function and surgical re-exploration were associated with increased mortality. Coronary artery bypass grafting is feasible to dialytic patients although high in-hospital morbidity and mortality. It is necessary better understanding about metabolic aspects to plan adequate interventions.

  6. How do patients define "good" and "bad" doctors? - Qualitative approach to the representations of hospital patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luthy, C; Cedraschi, C; Perrin, E; Allaz, AF

    2005-01-01

    Questions under study: Knowledge of hospital patients' perceptions of doctors' qualities is limited. The purpose of this study was to explore hospital patients' definitions of "good" and "bad" doctors. Methods: Semi-structured interviews conducted with 68 consecutive hospital patients. The questions

  7. [Communication between the primary care physician, hospital staff and the patient during hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menahem, Sasson; Roitgarz, Ina; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2011-04-01

    HospitaL admission is a crisis for the patient and his family and can interfere with the continuity of care. It may lead to mistakes due to communication problems between the primary care physician and the hospital medical staff. To explore the communication between the primary care physician, the hospital medical staff, the patient and his family during hospitalization. A total of 269 questionnaires were sent to all Clalit Health Services-South District, primary care physicians; 119 of these questionnaires (44.2%) were completed. Half of the primary care physicians thought that they should, always or almost always, have contact with the admitting ward in cases of internal medicine, oncology, surgery or pediatric admissions. However, the actual contact rate, according to their report, was only in a third of the cases. A telephone contact was more common than an actual visit of the patient in the ward. Computer communication between the hospital physicians and the primary care physicians is still insufficiently developed, although 96.6% of the primary care physicians check, with the aid of computer software, for information on their hospitalized patients. The main reasons to visit the hospitalized patient were severe medical conditions or uncertainty about the diagnosis; 79% of the physicians thought that visiting their patients strengthened the level of trust between them and their patients. There are sometimes communication difficulties and barriers between the primary care physicians and the ward's physicians due to partial information delivery and rejection from the hospital physicians. The main barriers for visiting admitted patients were workload and lack of pre-allocated time on the work schedule. No statistically significant differences were found between communication variables and primary care physician's personal and demographic characteristics. The communication between the primary care physician and the hospital physicians should be improved through

  8. Patients' Hand Washing and Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverstick, Stacy; Goodrich, Cara; Freeman, Regi; James, Shandra; Kullar, Rajkiran; Ahrens, Melissa

    2017-06-01

    Hand hygiene is important to prevent hospital-acquired infections. Patients' hand hygiene is just as important as hospital workers' hand hygiene. Hospital-acquired infection rates remain a concern across health centers. To improve patients' hand hygiene through the promotion and use of hand washing with soap and water, hand sanitizer, or both and improve patients' education to reduce hospital-acquired infections. In August 2013, patients in a cardiothoracic postsurgical step-down unit were provided with individual bottles of hand sanitizer. Nurses and nursing technicians provided hand hygiene education to each patient. Patients completed a 6-question survey before the intervention, at hospital discharge and 1, 2, and 3 months after the intervention. Hospital-acquired infection data were tracked monthly by infection prevention staff. Significant correlations were found between hand hygiene and rates of infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci ( P = .003) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( P = .01) after the intervention. After the implementation of hand hygiene interventions, rates of both infections declined significantly and patients reported more staff offering opportunities for and encouraging hand hygiene. This quality improvement project demonstrates that increased hand hygiene compliance by patients can influence infection rates in an adult cardiothoracic step-down unit. The decreased infection rates and increased compliance with hand hygiene among the patients may be attributed to the implementation of patient education and the increased accessibility and use of hand sanitizer. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  9. Variability of patient safety culture in Belgian acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Schrooten, Ward; Wami, Welcome; Aerts, Marc; Barrado, Leandro Garcia; Claes, Neree; Hellings, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to measure differences in safety culture perceptions within Belgian acute hospitals and to examine variability based on language, work area, staff position, and work experience. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed to hospitals participating in the national quality and safety program (2007-2009). Hospitals were invited to participate in a comparative study. Data of 47,136 respondents from 89 acute hospitals were used for quantitative analysis. Percentages of positive response were calculated on 12 dimensions. Generalized estimating equations models were fitted to explore differences in safety culture. Handoffs and transitions, staffing, and management support for patient safety were considered as major problem areas. Dutch-speaking hospitals had higher odds of positive perceptions for most dimensions in comparison with French-speaking hospitals. Safety culture scores were more positive for respondents working in pediatrics, psychiatry, and rehabilitation compared with the emergency department, operating theater, and multiple hospital units. We found an important gap in safety culture perceptions between leaders and assistants within disciplines. Administration and middle management had lower perceptions toward patient safety. Respondents working less than 1 year in the current hospital had more positive safety culture perceptions in comparison with all other respondents. Large comparative databases provide the opportunity to identify distinct high and low scoring groups. In our study, language, work area, and profession were identified as important safety culture predictors. Years of experience in the hospital had only a small effect on safety culture perceptions.

  10. Ingestive Skill Difficulties are Frequent Among Acutely-Hospitalized Frail Elderly Patients, and Predict Hospital Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Lambert, Heather; Faber, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Purpose : To examine the relationship between ingestive skill performance while eating and drinking and frailty status in acutely-hospitalized elderly patients and to examine whether there is a relationship between the proportion of ingestive skill difficulties and Length of Hospital Stay (LOS) a...

  11. Patient experience and hospital profitability: Is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jason P; Muhlestein, David B

    Patient experience has had a direct financial impact on hospitals since value-based purchasing was instituted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in 2013 as a method to reward or punish hospitals based on performance on various measures, including patient experience. Although other industries have shown an indirect impact of customer experience on overall profitability, that link has not been well established in the health care industry. Return-to-provider rate and perceptions of health quality have been associated with profitability in the health care industry. Our aims were to assess whether, independent of a direct financial impact, a more positive patient experience is associated with increased profitability and whether a more negative patient experience is associated with decreased profitability. We used a sample of 19,792 observations from 3767 hospitals over the 6-year period 2007-2012. The data were sourced from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. Using generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures, we fit four separate models for three dependent variables: net patient revenue, net income, and operating margin. Each model included one of the following independent variables of interest: percentage of patients who definitely recommend the hospital, percentage of patients who definitely would not recommend the hospital, percentage of patients who rated the hospital 9 or 10, and percentage of patients who rated the hospital 6 or lower. We identified that a positive patient experience is associated with increased profitability and a negative patient experience is even more strongly associated with decreased profitability. Management should have greater justification for incurring costs associated with bolstering patient experience programs. Improvements in training, technology, and staffing can be justified as a way to improve not only quality but now

  12. Factors Influencing Depression among Elderly Patients in Geriatric Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Jee, Young Ju; Lee, Yun Bok

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among elderly patients and identify the factors influencing depression in a geriatric hospital in Korea. [Subjects] A self-report questionnaire was administered to the patients in community geriatric hospitals. Participants were 195 elderly patients. [Methods] The instruments utilized in this study were the Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form Korea (GDSSF-K), an activity of daily living scale, a self-esteem ...

  13. [Patients' diet in "Town" and "City" hospitals in Belgrade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Svetlana; Jovanović-Simić, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    The roots of hospital foundation in Serbs date from the 12th century, when the hospitals in the monasteries Hilandar (1199) and Studenica (1207) were established. The "Town" Hospital of Belgrade was founded in 1841, which had the status of town and regional hospital until 1881. After that, it was transformed into a general state-owned hospital based on the Law of National Health Protection. The inhabitants of Belgrade obtained a municipal hospital again in 1935, when the "City" Hospital was founded in Zvezdara municipality, named at that period Bulbulder. By researching and observing hospital diet development of municipal hospitals in Belgrade, it was concluded that from the very beginning of the "Town" Hospital functioning there was awareness about its significance, place and role in the overall treatment of patients. Hospital diet, regardless of existing knowledge as the part of medical doctrines of particular time-periods, was often conditioned by limited hospital budgets and under the influence of different social movements and wartime periods

  14. Patient satisfaction and quality of surgical care in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Thomas C; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between patient satisfaction and surgical quality is unclear for US hospitals. Using national data, we examined if hospitals with high patient satisfaction have lower levels of performance on accepted measures of the quality and efficiency of surgical care. Federal policymakers have made patient satisfaction a core measure for the way hospitals are evaluated and paid through the value-based purchasing program. There is broad concern that performance on patient satisfaction may have little or even a negative correlation with the quality of surgical care, leading to potential trade-offs in efforts to improve patient experience with other surgical quality measures. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey data from 2010 and 2011 to assess performance on patient experience. We used national Medicare data on 6 common surgical procedures to calculate measures of surgical efficiency and quality: risk-adjusted length of stay, process score, risk-adjusted mortality rate, risk-adjusted readmission rate, and a composite z score across all 4 metrics. Multivariate models adjusting for hospital characteristics were used to assess the independent relationships between patient satisfaction and measures of surgical efficiency and quality. Of the 2953 US hospitals that perform one of these 6 procedures, the median patient satisfaction score was 69.5% (interquartile range, 63%-75.5%). Length of stay was shorter in hospitals with the highest levels of patient satisfaction (7.1 days vs 7.7 days, P patient satisfaction had the higher process of care performance (96.5 vs 95.5, P patient satisfaction also had a higher composite score for quality across all measures (P patient satisfaction provided more efficient care and were associated with higher surgical quality. Our findings suggest there need not be a trade-off between good quality of care for surgical patients and ensuring a positive patient experience.

  15. Patient satisfaction in Turkey: differences between public and private hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengilimoglu, D; Kisa, A; Dziegielewski, S F

    1999-02-01

    This article reports the results of a patient-satisfaction survey administered by interview to 2045 adults discharged from several major public and private hospitals in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient-satisfaction is a new phenomenon for this country. An instrument was designed similar to those available in the United States and administered during exit interviews. Two primary areas of analyses were determined in comparing services provided by these public and private hospitals: demographic factors with regard to accessibility and consumer perceptions of the quality of service provided. Relationships and percentages within and among the five public and two private hospitals are reported. Several statistically significant differences were found between the hospitals, with the private hospitals achieving the greatest satisfaction on most of the quality of services issues examined. Future recommendations outline the need to take into account the public's perception of these hospitals and enhancing customer satisfaction as a means of increasing service utilization.

  16. Building patient-centeredness: hospital design as an interpretive act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Hospital designs reflect the sociocultural, economic, professional, and aesthetic priorities prevalent at a given time. As such, hospital buildings concretize assumptions about illness, care and healing, patienthood, and medical providers' roles. Trends in hospital design have been attributed to the increasing influence of consumerism on healthcare, the influx of business-oriented managers, and technological changes. This paper describes the impact of the concept of patient-centeredness on the design of a new hospital in the USA. Data come from 35 interviews with planners, administrators, and designers of the new hospital, as well as from public documents about the hospital design. Thematic content analysis was used to identify salient design principles and intents. For these designers, administrators, and planners, an interpretation of patient-centeredness served as a heuristic, guiding the most basic decisions about space, people, and processes in the hospital. I detail the particular interpretation of patient-centeredness used to build and manage the new hospital space and the roles and responsibilities of providers working within it. Three strategies were central to the implementation of patient-centeredness: an onstage/offstage layout; a concierge approach to patients; and the scripting of communication. I discuss that this interpretation of patient-centeredness may challenge medical professionals' roles, may construct medical care as a product that should sate the patient's desire, and may distance patients from the realities of medical care. By describing the ways in which hospital designs reflect and reinforce contemporary concepts of patienthood and caring, this paper raises questions about the implementation of patient-centeredness that deserve further empirical study by medical social scientists. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. THE FACTORS AFFECTING SATISFACTION LEVELS IN HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS: AN APPLICATION IN PUBLIC HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neşe ACAR

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the factors that affect the level of satisfaction of services provided by public hospitals. Patients' satisfaction levels were measured by interviewing 156 patients in a public hospital. Factor analysis of the data obtained from the research resulted in five factors called nurses 'behaviors, physical conditions, doctors' behavior, technical staff behaviors, food and beverage. MANOVA analysis was conducted to determine the differences in the perception of factors with respect to the demographic characteristics of the patients and differences were found in terms of profession. It has been seen that it is important that public hospitals have specialist doctors and modern equipment and that they have qualities such as the quality of the health personnel in preferring patients to public hospitals.

  18. Pediatric Patients' Malnutrition and Its Relation to Hospitalization Times and Causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarey, Luis M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Relates the nutritional status of 1,378 hospitalized pediatric patients to length of hospitalization and definitive hospitalization diagnosis. Findings indicated the length of hospitalization time increased markedly with malnutrition, especially for patients with diarrhea. (BJD)

  19. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zapatero Antonio; Barba Raquel; Canora Jesús; Losa Juan E; Plaza Susana; San Roman Jesús; Marco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. Methods We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization. Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. Results A total of 1127 (0.057%) admittances were coded with an in-hosp...

  20. Monitoring adverse events in hospitals: how safe are hospitals for patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baines, R.J.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis aims to assess trends in adverse event and preventable adverse event rates in hospitals in the Netherlands through the time period 2004 –2012. Furthermore patient safety for specific care processes and patient groups are assessed. Patient safety has been high on the international agenda

  1. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Peng, Timothy R.; Zhu, Carolyn W.; Feldman, Penny H.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure–related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. PMID:26180045

  2. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H; Peng, Timothy R; Zhu, Carolyn W; Feldman, Penny H

    2016-02-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure-related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Hospital variation in 30-day mortality after colorectal cancer surgery in denmark: the contribution of hospital volume and patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Borglykke, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals.......This study examines variation between hospitals in 30-day mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals....

  4. A new casemix adjustment index for hospital mortality among patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanczyk, C A; Rohde, L E; Philbin, E A; Di Salvo, T G

    1998-10-01

    Comparative analysis of hospital outcomes requires reliable adjustment for casemix. Although congestive heart failure is one of the most common indications for hospitalization, congestive heart failure casemix adjustment has not been widely studied. The purposes of this study were (1) to describe and validate a new congestive heart failure-specific casemix adjustment index to predict in-hospital mortality and (2) to compare its performance to the Charlson comorbidity index. Data from all 4,608 admissions to the Massachusetts General Hospital from January 1990 to July 1996 with a principal ICD-9-CM discharge diagnosis of congestive heart failure were evaluated. Massachusetts General Hospital patients were randomly divided in a derivation and a validation set. By logistic regression, odds ratios for in-hospital death were computed and weights were assigned to construct a new predictive index in the derivation set. The performance of the index was tested in an internal Massachusetts General Hospital validation set and in a non-Massachusetts General Hospital external validation set incorporating data from all 1995 New York state hospital discharges with a primary discharge diagnosis of congestive heart failure. Overall in-hospital mortality was 6.4%. Based on the new index, patients were assigned to six categories with incrementally increasing hospital mortality rates ranging from 0.5% to 31%. By logistic regression, "c" statistics of the congestive heart failure-specific index (0.83 and 0.78, derivation and validation set) were significantly superior to the Charlson index (0.66). Similar incrementally increasing hospital mortality rates were observed in the New York database with the congestive heart failure-specific index ("c" statistics 0.75). In an administrative database, this congestive heart failure-specific index may be a more adequate casemix adjustment tool to predict hospital mortality in patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure.

  5. Older hospitalized patients' experiences of dialogue with healthcare providers in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte; Larsen, Karen Lyng; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective is to identify and synthesize findings from qualitative studies of older (over 65 years) hospitalized patients' experiences of the barriers and facilitators to their dialogues with healthcare providers (HCPs) concerning their health and well-being.Specifi......REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective is to identify and synthesize findings from qualitative studies of older (over 65 years) hospitalized patients' experiences of the barriers and facilitators to their dialogues with healthcare providers (HCPs) concerning their health and well...

  6. Malnutrition in hospitalized patients: results from La Rioja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Palmero, Ángela; Serrano Pérez, Andra; Chinchetru Ranedo, Mª José; Cámara Balda, Alejandro; Martínez de Salinas Santamarí, Mª Ángeles; Villar García, Gonzalo; Marín Lizárraga, Mª Del Mar

    2017-03-30

    There is a high malnutrition prevalence in hospitalized patients. To determine the malnutrition prevalence in hospitalized patients of La Rioja Community (Spain) when evaluated with different screening/ evaluation tools and its relationship with hospital stay and mortality. Cross sectional observational study of hospitalized adult patients (age > 18 years old) from medical and surgical departments that underwent within 72 h of their admission a nutritional screening with Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002, Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) y Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). 384 patients (273 medical and 111 surgical) were evaluated. Almost fifty percent of them were considered malnourished independently of the screening/assessment tool used. High concordance was found between SGA and NRS-2002 (k = 0.758). Malnourished patients had a longer hospital stay than those well-nourished (9.29 vs. 7.10 days; p = 0.002), used a greater number of medicines (9.2 vs. 7.4; p = 0.001) and underwent a higher number of diagnostic tests (16.4 vs. 12.5; p = 0,002). Half of the hospitalized patients in the medical and surgical department of La Rioja are malnourished. This is associated with a longer hospital stay, higher use of medicines, diagnostics tests and greater mortality. Malnutrition could be detected with easy screening tools to treat it appropriately.

  7. Hospital-Level Variation in Practice Patterns and Patient Outcomes for Pediatric Patients Hospitalized With Functional Constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librizzi, Jamie; Flores, Samuel; Morse, Keith; Kelleher, Kelly; Carter, Jodi; Bode, Ryan

    2017-06-01

    Constipation is a common pediatric condition with a prevalence of 3% to 5% in children aged 4 to 17 years. Currently, there are no evidence-based guidelines for the management of pediatric patients hospitalized with constipation. The primary objective was to evaluate practice patterns and patient outcomes for the hospital management of functional constipation in US children's hospitals. We conducted a multicenter, retrospective cohort study of children aged 0 to 18 years hospitalized for functional constipation from 2012 to 2014 by using the Pediatric Health Information System. Patients were included by using constipation and other related diagnoses as classified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision . Patients with complex chronic conditions were excluded. Outcome measures included percentage of hospitalizations due to functional constipation, therapies used, length of stay, and 90-day readmission rates. Statistical analysis included means with 95% confidence intervals for individual hospital outcomes. A total of 14 243 hospitalizations were included, representing 12 804 unique patients. The overall percentage of hospitalizations due to functional constipation was 0.65% (range: 0.19%-1.41%, P hospitalization included: electrolyte laxatives: 40% to 96%; sodium phosphate enema: 0% to 64%; mineral oil enema: 0% to 61%; glycerin suppository: 0% to 37%; bisacodyl 0% to 47%; senna: 0% to 23%; and docusate 0% to 11%. Mean length of stay was 1.97 days (range: 1.31-2.73 days, P hospitalized with functional constipation across US children's hospitals. Collaborative initiatives to adopt evidence-based best practices guidelines could help standardize the hospital management of pediatric functional constipation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. What Keeps Postpulmonary Resection Patients in Hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Bardell

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prolonged air leak (longer than three days was hypothesized to be the primary cause of extended hospital stays following pulmonary resection. Its effect on length of stay (LOS was compared with that of suboptimal pain control, nausea and vomiting, and other causes. Predictors of prolonged LOS and of prolonged air leaks were investigated.

  9. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  10. Identification of older hospitalized patients at risk for functional decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerduijn, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Between 30% and 60% of older patients experience functional decline after hospitalization, resulting in a decline in health-related quality of life and autonomy. This is associated with increased risk of readmission, nursing home placement and mortality, increased length of hospital stay and

  11. Integrative practices in hospitals and their impact on patient flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drupsteen, J.; van der Vaart, T.; van Donk, D.P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to investigate which integrative planning and control practices are used in hospitals and what their effects are on patient flow. Design/methodology/approach - The study is based on a three-hospital multi-case study carried out in The Netherlands. The main findings

  12. One year survey of hospitalized psoriatic patients and their treatment in Razi Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaghi F

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available During one year survey, 77 psoriatic patients were hospitalized in the dermatology department of Razi Hospital. This comprised 19% of admitted patients in this period. 29% (n=22 of psoriatic patients had previous history of hospitalization. On admission, the mean age of patients was 32.8 years, the mean and peak age of disease onset were 26.46 and between 11-20 years, respectively. 14% (n=10 of the patients had a family history of psoriasis and 70% (n=7 of those with a positive family history had their age of onset under 20 years. Involvement of different regions was as follows: Scalp: 88% (n=68, nails: 53% (n=41 and joints (arthritis: 10% (n=8. Psoriasis was associated with scrotal tongue in 19% (n=13 and with geographic tongue in 10% (n=8 of patients. Regarding the medical treatment, the drugs which were used most frequently were tigason in 34% (n=41 and ditranol in 22% (n=26 of the cases. The mean duration of hospitalization was 39.29 days and most patients were discharged from the hospital in a good condition without any serious complication. During this period 9% of patients had a relapse of their disease.

  13. What happens to stroke patients after hospital discharge?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Noone, I

    2001-05-01

    Of 231 stroke patients discharged from hospital, 34 patients (14.7%) had died when reviewed 6 months later. Of 195 survivors, 115 (58%) were independent and living in the community. The remaining 80 (42%) patients were dependent. The majority of dependent patients were in institutional care but 29 (36%) were residing in the community of whom a substantial number were not receiving physiotherapy, occupational therapy or day care. Patients who were dependent in nursing homes were less likely to have received physiotherapy (48% versus 70%) or occupational therapy (28% versus 60%) compared to disabled patients in hospital based extended nursing care. 45 patients (24%) had been re-admitted to hospital although only 48% of patients had been reviewed in hospital outpatients since discharge. 64% of patients were on anti-thrombotic treatment. This survey suggests that 6 months after hospital discharge, most stroke patients are still alive and living in the community. Many of the dependent survivors have ongoing unmet medical and rehabilitation needs.

  14. Patient-controlled hospital admission for patients with severe mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christoffer Torgaard; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Hastrup, Lene Halling

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patient-controlled hospital admission for individuals with severe mental disorders is a novel approach in mental healthcare. Patients can admit themselves to a hospital unit for a short stay without being assessed by a psychiatrist or contacting the emergency department. Previous...... studies assessing the outcomes of patient-controlled hospital admission found trends towards reduction in the use of coercive measures and length of hospital stay; however, these studies have methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Larger studies are needed to estimate the effect of patient-controlled...... hospital admission on the use of coercion and of healthcare services. DESIGN AND METHODS: We aim to recruit at least 315 patients who are offered a contract for patient-controlled hospital admissions in eight different hospitals in Denmark. Patients will be followed-up for at least 1 year to compare...

  15. Queueing network model for obstetric patient flow in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideaki; Kanai, Yuta; Misue, Kazuo

    2016-03-03

    A queueing network is used to model the flow of patients in a hospital using the observed admission rate of patients and the histogram for the length of stay for patients in each ward. A complete log of orders for every movement of all patients from room to room covering two years was provided to us by the Medical Information Department of the University of Tsukuba Hospital in Japan. We focused on obstetric patients, who are generally hospitalized at random times throughout the year, and we analyzed the patient flow probabilistically. On admission, each obstetric patient is assigned to a bed in one of the two wards: one for normal delivery and the other for high-risk delivery. Then, the patient may be transferred between the two wards before discharge. We confirm Little's law of queueing theory for the patient flow in each ward. Next, we propose a new network model of M/G/ ∞ and M/M/ m queues to represent the flow of these patients, which is used to predict the probability distribution for the number of patients staying in each ward at the nightly census time. Although our model is a very rough and simplistic approximation of the real patient flow, the predicted probability distribution shows good agreement with the observed data. The proposed method can be used for capacity planning of hospital wards to predict future patient load in each ward.

  16. Recurrent spine surgery patients in hospital administrative database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sami Walid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital patient databases are typically used by administrative staff to estimate loss-profit ratios and to help with the allocation of hospital resources. These databases can also be very useful in following rehospitalization. This paper studies the recurrence of spine surgery patients in our hospital population based on administrative data analysis. Methods: Hospital data on 4,958 spine surgery patients operated between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. After sorting the cohort per ascending discharge date, the patient official name, consisting of first, middle and last names, was used as the variable determining duplicate cases in the SPSS statistical program, designating the first case in each group as primary. Yearly recurrence rate and change in procedure distribution were studied. In addition, hospital charges and length of stay were compared using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 4,958 spine surgery patients 364 (7.3% were categorized as duplicate cases by SPSS. The number of primary cases from which duplicate cases emerged was 327 meaning that some patients had more than two spine surgeries. Among primary patients (N=327 the percentage of excision of intervertebral disk procedures was 33.3% and decreased to 15.1% in recurrent admissions of the same patients (N=364. This decrease was compensated by an increase in lumbar fusion procedures. On the other hand, the rate of cervical fusion remained the same. The difference in hospital charges between primary and duplicate patients was $2,234 for diskectomy, $6,319 for anterior cervical fusion, $8,942 for lumbar fusion – lateral technique, and $12,525 for lumbar fusion – posterior technique. Recurrent patients also stayed longer in hospital, up to 0.9 day in lumbar fusion – posterior technique patients. Conclusion: Spine surgery is associated with an increasing possibility of additional spine surgery with rising invasiveness and cost.

  17. How to Improve Patient Safety Culture in Croatian Hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šklebar, Ivan; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Šklebar, Duška; Cesarik, Marijan; Milošević, Milan; Brborović, Hana; Šporčić, Krunoslav; Petrić, Petar; Husedžinović, Ino

    2016-09-01

    Patient safety culture (PCS) has a crucial impact on the safety practices of healthcare delivery systems. The purpose of this study was to assess the state of PSC in Croatian hospitals and compare it with hospitals in the United States. The study was conducted in three public general hospitals in Croatia using the Croatian translation of the Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC). A comparison of the results from Croatian and American hospitals was performed using a T-square test. We found statistically significant differences in all 12 PSC dimensions. Croatian responses were more positive in the two dimensions of Handoff s and Transitions and Overall Perceptions of Patient Safety. In the remaining ten dimensions, Croatian responses were less positive than in US hospitals, with the most prominent areas being Nonpunitive Response to Error, Frequency of Events Reported, Communication Openness, Teamwork within Units, Feedback & Communication about Error, Management Support for Patient Safety, and Staffing. Our findings show that PSC is significantly lower in Croatian than in American hospitals, particularly in the areas of Nonpunitive Response to Error, Leadership, Teamwork, Communication Openness and Staffing. This suggests that a more comprehensive system for the improvement of patient safety within the framework of the Croatian healthcare system needs to be developed. Our findings also help confirm that HSOPSC is a useful and appropriate tool for the assessment of PSC. HSOPSC highlights the PSC components in need of improvement and should be considered for use in national and international benchmarking.

  18. Funds for Treatment of Hospitalized Patients: Evidence from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Farhana; Hossain, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to explore sources of funds for health expenditure of patients if they are hospitalized. We have included 379 patients of 3 private and 7 public hospitals to estimate total expenditure. Of them, 229 (60.4%) were from public and 150 (39.6%) from private hospitals. Mean expenditure was Tk 60,613.3 and 8,262.7, and duration of hospital stay was 10.7 and 11.8 days in private and public hospitals respectively. More than half (55%) of the patients from middle class were treated in private hospitals. Of them, 278 (74.0%) were funded by themselves, 48 (12.8%) by loan with interest rate of 100% to 180%, 23 (6.1%) by loan without interest, 17 (4.5%) by losing their fixed asset, and 4 (1.1%) by begging in the street. Most of the patients did bear expenditure by themselves, followed by loan with high interest rate. ‘Distress’ selling of property was also a source. Middle-class patients could be comfortable with expenditure if they were in public hospitals. PMID:25395909

  19. Funds for treatment of hospitalized patients: evidence from Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Farhana; Alam, Shahinul; Hossain, Akmal

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to explore sources of funds for health expenditure of patients if they are hospitalized. We have included 379 patients of 3 private and 7 public hospitals to estimate total expenditure. Of them, 229 (60.4%) were from public and 150 (39.6%) from private hospitals. Mean expenditure was Tk 60,613.3 and 8,262.7, and duration of hospital stay was 10.7 and 11.8 days in private and public hospitals respectively. More than half (55%) of the patients from middle class were treated in private hospitals. Of them, 278 (74.0%) were funded by themselves, 48 (12.8%) by loan with interest rate of 100% to 180%, 23 (6.1%) by loan without interest, 17 (4.5%) by losing their fixed asset, and 4 (1.1%) by begging in the street. Most of the patients did bear expenditure by themselves, followed by loan with high interest rate. 'Distress' selling of property was also a source. Middle-class patients could be comfortable with expenditure if they were in public hospitals.

  20. Mineral inadequacy of oral diets offered to patients in a Brazilian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, D C F; de Sá, J S M; Cerqueira, I B; Oliveira, A P F; Morgano, M A; Amaya-Farfan, J; Quintaes, K D

    2012-01-01

    While enteral diets for hospitalized patients normally follow nutrient composition guidelines, more than 90% of hospitalized patients receive oral diets with unknown mineral composition. To evaluate the mineral contents and adequacy of three types of oral diets (regular, blend and soft) and complementary snacks offered to patients of a Brazilian hospital. The amount of minerals was determined in two non-consecutive days in duplicate samples of breakfast, collation, lunch, snack, dinner, supper and a complementary snack meal. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) were used to determine the adequacy of the daily amounts served to patients. The regular diet met the RDA (Recommended Dietary Allowances) requirements only for Mn, P and Se, while the blend diet was deficient in Ca, K and Mg, and the soft diet met RDA requirements only for P and Zn. Iron was below the RDA requirement in all diets for women in fertile age, and Na was above the safe limit of intake (UL) in all the diets. The use of complementary snack was effective in meeting RDA requirements for Cu in the regular diet, and Mn and Se in the soft diet, but promoted overconsumption of Na. Evident nutritional imbalances have been detected at a key interphase between nutrition and public health services, but a solution does not appear to be insurmountable. A permanent nutritional evaluation of hospital oral diets should be an integral part of routine health care in order to speed the recovery of the hospitalized patient and dispel eventual risks due to critical mineral imbalances.

  1. Multi-modal intervention improved oral intake in hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, M; Beermann, T; Mortensen, M N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good nutritional practice (GNP) includes screening, nutrition plan and monitoring, and is mandatory for targeted treatment of malnourished patients in hospital. AIMS: To optimize energy- and protein-intake in patients at nutritional risk and to improve GNP in a hospital setting. METHODS......: A 12-months observational multi-modal intervention study was done, using the top-down and bottom-up principle. All hospitalized patients (>3 days) were included. Setting: A university hospital with 758 beds and all specialities. Measurements: Record audit of GNP, energy- and protein-intake by 24-h...... recall, patient interviews and staff questionnaire before and after the intervention. Interventions: Based on pre-measurements, nutrition support teams in each department made targeted action plans, supervised by an expert team. Education, diagnose-specific nutrition plans, improved menus and eating...

  2. Hospital Admissions for Malnutrition and Dehydration in Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Katherine A; Burson, Rosanne; Gall, Kristyn; Saunders, Mitzi M

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration and malnutrition are commonly experienced by patients with dementia and can result in hospitalizations and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe retrospectively, the incidence and correlations of variables that may precede hospitalizations for dehydration/malnutrition in the community-dwelling patient with dementia. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) Start of Care (SOC) on 44 patients served by a Michigan home care agency were retrieved for analysis. This study did not reveal any single or collection of variables that would predict risk for hospitalization for dehydration/malnutrition. With the lack of specific predictors of hospitalization related to dehydration and malnutrition, clinicians need to place high priority on risk-lowering strategies and preventive education for patients, family, and caregivers.

  3. Incidence and hospital mortality of vascular surgery patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Central Hospital (IALCH) intensive care unit (ICU) following vascular surgery between 1 January ... patients have a perioperative myocardial infarction (PMI) and 4.6 .... Emergency surgery was performed in 17.8% of the ..... area is needed.

  4. HAC-POA Policy Effects on Hospitals, Patients and Other...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in HAC-POA Policy Effects on Hospitals, Patients, and Other Payers, published in Volume 4, Issue 3 of the Medicare and Medicaid...

  5. Cancer patients and positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Birkelund, Regner

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how cancer patients experience the meaning of positive sensory impressions in the hospital environment such as architecture, decoration and the interior. Data were obtained at a general hospital in Denmark by interviewing six cancer patients at two different wards. The analysis...... process was guided by the hermeneutical–phenomenological theory of interpretation as presented by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur. Two main themes were identified: to preserve identity and positive thoughts and feelings. The participants experienced that positive sensory impressions in the hospital...... to recall some of their feelings of identity. This paper adds knowledge about how cancer patients experience sensory impressions in the hospital environment. An environment that provides homeliness and offers a view to nature seems to help some patients to preserve their identity. Furthermore, positive...

  6. Operational antecedents of integrated patient planning in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drupsteen, Justin; van der Vaart, T.; van Donk, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - Hospitals struggle to integrate the planning from different departments; resulting in unacceptable waiting times for patients. The literature mainly addresses general, organizational factors inhibiting or enabling integration and omits important factors stemming from the care delivery

  7. Utilization and Predictors of Electrical Cardioversion in Patients Hospitalized for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita M. Rochlani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a common arrhythmia in adults associated with thromboembolic complications. External electrical cardioversion (DCCV is a safe procedure used to convert AF to normal sinus rhythm. We sought to study factors that affect utilization of DCCV in hospitalized patients with AF. The study sample was drawn from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project in the United States. Patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of AF that received DCCV during hospitalization in the years 2000–2010 were included. An estimated 2,810,530 patients with a primary diagnosis of AF were hospitalized between 2001 and 2010, of which 1,19,840 (4.26% received DCCV. The likelihood of receiving DCCV was higher in patients who were males, whites, privately insured, and aged < 40 years and those with fewer comorbid conditions. Higher CHADS2 score was found to have an inverse association with DCCV use. In-hospital stroke, in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and cost for hospitalization were significantly lower for patients undergoing DCCV during AF related hospitalization. Further research is required to study the contribution of other disease and patient related factors affecting the use of this procedure as well as postprocedure outcomes.

  8. [Screening for malnutrition among hospitalized patients in a Colombian University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Viviana; Bernal, Laura; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Ruiz, Álvaro J

    2017-04-01

    On admission, 30 to 50% of hospitalized patients have some degree of malnutrition, which is associated with longer length of stay, higher rates of complications, mortality and greater costs. To determine the frequency of screening for risk of malnutrition in medical records and assess the usefulness of the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST). In a cross-sectional study, we searched for malnutrition screening in medical records, and we applied the MST tool to hospitalized patients at the Internal Medicine Wards of San Ignacio University Hospital. Of 295 patients included, none had been screened for malnutrition since hospital admission. Sixty one percent were at nutritional risk, with a higher prevalence among patients with HIV (85.7%), cancer (77.5%) and pneumonia. A positive MST result was associated with a 3.2 days increase in length of hospital stay (p = 0.024). The prevalence of malnutrition risk in hospitalized patients is high, but its screening is inadequate and it is underdiagnosed. The MST tool is simple, fast, low-cost, and has a good diagnostic performance.

  9. Financial analysis of diabetic patients hospitalizations submitted to lower limb amputation in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Santos Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is a documental descriptive analysis which aimed to verify the cost established in 2006, in relation to the hospitalization of 21 diabetic patients submitted to the lower limb amputation in a public hospital and the value transferred by the Unified Health System (SUS regarding this procedure. Among the studied patients, 57.14% were female and 42.86% male, aged 40 to 90 years. The time of diagnosis varied from 5 to 25 years. The average of hospitalization was 14 days per patient. The cost to the hospital was R$ 99,455.74, average cost per patient was R$ 4,735.98. The total amount transferred by SUS to the hospital was R$ 27,740.15, a cost 3.6 times lower than the hospital costs. The SUS transferring is in accordance with the predetermined values for its table of procedure. Prevention is the only alternative to reduce the rate of amputation and improve survival of diabetes patients. It is necessary an early diagnosis and better control of diabetes mellitus with appropriate government and institutional policies.

  10. Hospital-admitted COPD patients treated at home using telemedicine technology in The Virtual Hospital Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Anna Svarre; Laursen, Lars C; Østergaard, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Recent reviews suggest that telemedicine solutions for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may prevent hospital readmissions and emergency room visits and improve health-related quality of life. However, the studies are few and only involve COPD patients who are in a stable...... phase or in-patients who are ready for discharge. COPD patients hospitalized with an acute exacerbation may also benefit from telemedicine solutions. The overall aim is to investigate a telemedicine-based treatment solution for patients with acute exacerbation of COPD at home as compared to conventional...... hospital treatment measured according to first treatment failure, which is defined as readmission due to COPD within 30 days after discharge....

  11. Helping Patients With Physical Illness Cope With Hospitalization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helping Patients With Physical Illness Cope With Hospitalization: Implication For The Nurses And Medical Social Workers In Meeting The Physical And ... their illness, allaying the fear and anxiety of the patients about outcomes of medical treatments (surgical operation and death), providing support for patients' ...

  12. Relationship Between Hospital Performance on a Patient Satisfaction Survey and Surgical Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Greg D; Lawson, Elise H; Dawes, Aaron J; Russell, Marcia M; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda; Zingmond, David S; Ko, Clifford Y

    2015-09-01

    and either major complication or hospital readmission. Using a national sample of hospitals, we demonstrated a significant association between patient satisfaction scores and several objective measures of surgical quality. Our findings suggest that payment policies that incentivize better patient experience do not require hospitals to sacrifice performance on other quality measures.

  13. Hospital Resource Utilisation by Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, S

    2017-09-01

    Little data is available on the resource utilisation of patients admitted with Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in Ireland. A retrospective review of 50 randomly-selected patients admitted to Beaumont Hospital with CAP was undertaken. The mean length of stay of patients with CAP was 12 days (+\\/- 16 days). All patients were emergency admissions, all had a chest x-ray, a C-reactive protein blood test, and occupied a public bed at some point during admission. Common antimicrobial therapies were intravenous (IV) amoxicillin\\/clavulanic acid and oral clarithromycin; 60% received physiotherapy. The estimated mean cost of CAP per patient was €14,802.17. Costs arising from admission to hospital with CAP are substantial, but efforts can be undertaken to ensure that resources are used efficiently to improve patient care such as discharge planning and fewer in-hospital ward transfers

  14. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: An ethnographic fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients’ (aged 74 years and older experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients’ experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer.

  15. The role of expectations in patients' hospital assessments: a Turkish university hospital example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Coskun; Akgün, H Seval; Al Assaf, A F

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to conduct a preliminary assessment of patient attitudes regarding important aspects of service dimensions using SERVQUAL. The SERVQUAL scale is routinely used at the Baskent University Hospitals Network, Turkey. The study consisted of 550 randomly chosen patients who presented to any member of the hospital network during January and February 2006 and received treatment as inpatients or outpatients at those healthcare facilities. The patients' perceived scores were higher than expected for an ordinary hospital but lower than expected for a high-quality hospital. Young patients had a high-expected service score gap and a low adequate service score difference. Highly educated patients had a high-expected service score difference. Uninsured patients had a low adequate service score difference. Baskent University multidisciplinary healthcare teams have performed periodic patient satisfaction surveys in order to identify strengths and problem areas, formulate the quality improvement objectives and monitor progress towards achieving these objectives. However, patient satisfaction survey results are often highly positive. In these cases, improving care is not easy because measures are not sensitive enough to changes. Therefore a more sensitive measurement tool based on the SERVQUAL scale was developed. The authors believe that patient opinions are extremely important because they provide information that is not necessarily emphasized by managers or health care professionals, resulting in a more complete assessment of past performance and a clearer road map for future action.

  16. Quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of black patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Carthon, J Margo; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Sloane, Douglas M; Cimiotti, Jeannie P; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-09-01

    To examine the influence of nursing-specifically nurse staffing and the nurse work environment-on quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with varying concentrations of Black patients. Cross-sectional secondary analysis of 2006-2007 nurse survey data collected across four states (Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and California), the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, and administrative data. Global analysis of variance and linear regression models were used to examine the association between the concentration of Black patients on quality measures (readiness for discharge, patient or family complaints, health care-associated infections) and patient satisfaction, before and after accounting for nursing and hospital characteristics. Nurses working in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks reported poorer confidence in patients' readiness for discharge and more frequent complaints and infections. Patients treated in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks were less satisfied with their care. In the fully adjusted regression models for quality and patient satisfaction outcomes, the effects associated with the concentration of Blacks were explained in part by nursing and structural hospital characteristics. This study demonstrates a relationship between nursing, structural hospital characteristics, quality of care, and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of Black patients. Consideration of nursing factors, in addition to other important hospital characteristics, is critical to understanding and improving quality of care and patient satisfaction in minority-serving hospitals. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Are medical students accepted by patients in teaching hospitals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Marwan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, patients are the cornerstone of bedside teaching of medical students. In this study, the authors aimed to assess patients’ acceptability toward medical students in teaching hospitals of the Faculty of Medicine of Kuwait University. Methods: Ninehundred and ninety five patients were approached in 14 teaching hospitals; 932 patients agreed to participate (refusal rate is 6.3%. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Results: In general, higher acceptance of students by patients was found when there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g., reading patients’ files, presenting in outpatient clinic, observing doctors performing examination or procedures compared to other situations (e.g., performing physical examination or procedures. Pediatrics patients showed higher acceptance of students compared to patients in other specialties, while Obstetrics/Gynecology patients showed the highest refusal of students. Gender of patients (especially females and students appeared to affect the degree of acceptance of medical students by patients. Majority of the patients (436; 46.8% believed that the presence of medical students in hospitals improves the quality of health care. Conclusion: Patients are an important factor of bedside teaching. Clinical tutors must take advantage of patients who accept medical students. Clinical tutors and medical students should master essential communication skills to convince patients in accepting students, thus improving bedside teaching. Also, using simulation and standardization should be considered to address scenarios that most patients are unwilling to allow students to participate.

  18. How do patients actually experience and use art in hospitals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Maria Louring; Fich, Lars Brorson; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to understand patient wellbeing and satisfaction and to qualify the current guidelines for the application of art in hospitals. Employing anthropological methods, we focus on the interactional aspects of art in health interventions. A user-oriented study ranked 20 paintings......, maintain a connection to the world outside the hospital and support their identity. We conclude that the presence of visual art in hospitals contributes to health outcomes by improving patient satisfaction as an extended form of health care. The article draws attention to further research perspectives...

  19. Hospital based patient coordination for ethnic minority patients - a health technology assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    A cross diciplinary, cross specialty, cross sectoral hospital based approach to cultural management of ethnic minority patients is effective in creating more approprite patient flows, better quality of care and increases functional level of patients. Surprisingly the aggregated effect saves...... especially on public medicine expenses and social services. Ethnic minority patients can achieve increased empowerment & Equity in type and quality of hospital care through cross dicplinary cross specialty cultural case management & support between hospital departments and primary sectors...

  20. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Silvestre, Francisco J.; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the ho...

  1. Health and the need for health promotion in hospital patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppedal, Kristian; Nesvåg, Sverre; Pedersen, Bolette

    2010-01-01

    of waist and weight), self-reported physical inactivity, daily smoking and hazardous drinking. We used logistic regression to describe the associations between health risk factors and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Out of 10 included patients, 9 (N = 1522) had one or more health risk factors......BACKGROUND: Integrated health promotion improves clinical outcomes after hospital treatment. The first step towards implementing evidence-based health promotion in hospitals is to estimate the need for health promoting activities directed at hospital patients. The aim of this study was to identify...... the distribution and association of individual health risk factors in a Norwegian hospital population and to estimate the need for health promotion in this population. METHODS: We used a validated documentation model (HPH-DATA Model) to identify the prevalence of patients with nutritional risk (measurements...

  2. Health and the need for health promotion in hospital patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppedal, Kristian; Nesvåg, Sverre; Pedersen, Bolette

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Integrated health promotion improves clinical outcomes after hospital treatment. The first step towards implementing evidence-based health promotion in hospitals is to estimate the need for health promoting activities directed at hospital patients. The aim of this study was to identify...... the distribution and association of individual health risk factors in a Norwegian hospital population and to estimate the need for health promotion in this population. METHODS: We used a validated documentation model (HPH-DATA Model) to identify the prevalence of patients with nutritional risk (measurements...... drinking and smoking was sustained. CONCLUSION: Nearly all patients included in this study had one or more health risk factors that could aggravate clinical outcomes. There is a significant need, and potential, for health-promoting interventions. Multi-factorial interventions may be frequently indicated...

  3. Patient-perceived hospital service quality: an empirical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T; Pai, Rashmi Yogesh

    2018-02-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to appraise Pai and Chary's (2016) conceptual framework for measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality (HSQ). Design/methodology/approach A structured questionnaire was used to obtain data from teaching, public and corporate hospital patients. Several tests were conducted to assess the instrument's reliability and validity. Pai and Chary's (2016) nine dimensions for measuring HSQ were examined in this paper. Findings The tests confirm that Pai and Chary's (2016) conceptual framework is reliable and valid. The study also establishes that the nine dimensions measure HSQ. Practical implications The framework empowers managers to assess service quality in any hospital settings, corporate, public and teaching, using an approach that is superior to the existing HSQ scales. Originality/value This paper helps researchers and practitioners to assess HSQ from patient perspectives in any hospital setting.

  4. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient's trust is the service quality. This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient's trust. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient's trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

  5. Patient Awareness and Expectations of Pharmacist Services During Hospital Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Philip K; Martin, Steven J; Betka, Eric M

    2017-10-01

    There are insufficient data in the United States regarding patient awareness and expectations of hospital pharmacist availability and services. The objective of this research is to assess patient awareness and expectations of hospital pharmacist services and to determine whether a marketing campaign for pharmacist services increases patient awareness and expectations. Eligible inpatients were surveyed before and after implementation of a hospital-wide pharmacist services marketing campaign (12 items; Likert scale of 1 [strongly disagree] to 4 [strongly agree]; maximum total score of 48) regarding awareness of pharmacist services. The primary outcome was the change in median total survey scores from baseline. Other outcomes included the frequency of patient requests for pharmacists. Similar numbers of patients completed the survey before and after the campaign (intervention, n = 140, vs control, n = 147). Awareness of pharmacist availability and services was increased (41 [interquartile ranges, IQRs: 36-46] vs 37 [IQR 31-43]; P marketing campaign implementation. Awareness among inpatients of pharmacist services is low. Marketing pharmacist availability and services to patients in the hospital improves awareness and expectations for pharmacist-provided care and increases the frequency of patient-initiated interaction between pharmacists and patients. This could improve patient outcomes as pharmacists become more integrally involved in direct patient care.

  6. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Acting like "well-oiled machines," multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include "staff" from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses' aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the "silo effect" by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of "teamwork" for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient "staff" satisfaction. Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a "team sport." The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers' performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their "well-oiled machines" enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling "staff" to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction.

  7. Service quality of private hospitals: the Iranian patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Asghar; Arab, Mohammad; Froushani, Abbas Rahimi; Rashidian, Arash; Ghazi Tabatabaei, S Mahmoud

    2012-02-02

    Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients.

  8. Transmission of Pneumocystis carinii from patients to hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Elvin, K; Rothman, L P

    1997-01-01

    rooms in departments of infectious diseases managing patients with P carinii pneumonia (PCP), suggesting the airborne route of transmission. Exposure of staff to P carinii may occur in hospital departments treating patients with PCP. METHODS: Exposure to P carinii was detected by serological responses...... to human P carinii by ELISA, Western blotting, and indirect immunofluorescence in 64 hospital staff with and 79 staff without exposure to patients with PCP from Denmark and Sweden. DNA amplification of oropharyngeal washings was performed on 20 Danish staff with and 20 staff without exposure to patients...... with PCP. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the frequency or level of antibodies to P carinii between staff exposed and those unexposed to patients with PCP. None of the hospital staff had detectable P carinii DNA in oropharyngeal washings. CONCLUSIONS: There is no difference in antibodies...

  9. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharani Loganathan

    Full Text Available While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking.We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur and rural (Kuala Terengganu setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained.Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38% were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; p<0.001. The mean direct and indirect costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis consisted 20% of monthly household income in Kuala Lumpur, as compared with only 5% in Kuala Terengganu. Direct medical costs paid out-of-pocket caused 141 (33% households in Kuala Lumpur to experience catastrophic expenditure and 11 (3% households to incur poverty. However in Kuala Terengganu, only one household (0.5% experienced catastrophic healthcare expenditure and none were impoverished. The lowest income quintile in Kuala Lumpur was more likely to experience catastrophic payments compared to the highest quintile (87% vs 8%. The concentration index for out-of-pocket healthcare payments was closer to zero at Kuala Lumpur (0.03 than at Kuala Terengganu (0.24.While urban households were wealthier, healthcare expenditure due to gastroenteritis had more catastrophic and poverty impact on the urban poor. Universal rotavirus vaccination would reduce both disease burden and health

  10. Bed blocking by elderly patients in general-hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S G; Davies, G H

    1975-08-01

    A point prevalence survey, using a questionnaire, was performed in three general hospitals to investigate the problem of elderly patients blocking acute-hospital beds. A total of 1010 occupied general beds were surveyed and all patients, over the age of 60 years, who had been in hospital more than four weeks, and who, in the opinion of medical and nursing staff, were no longer in need of the facilities of a general hospital, were investigated. Forty-eight patients (4.8 per cent of the total) were found to be genuinely in bed inappropriate to their needs. Rehabilitation, together with assessment of these patients, appeared disorganized and lacked consistency, and decisions regarding suitable 'disposal' appeared to be made without sufficient consultation and conformed to no detectable pattern. The main reason for the continuing bed occupancy of the patients was the length of the waiting lists for alternative residential accommodation and the main single medical factor preventing discharge home or to a hostel was the problem of mobility. By interviewing staff and patients and scrutinizing the questionnaires, it was found that 23 patients (48 per cent) were only suitable for transfer to a long-stay hospital. Of these, however, 15 (31 per cent) could be placed in specialized accommodation if some degree of nursing care, at present not available, was provided.

  11. Cost of Treatment of Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes in Prenda Hospital Medicine Service, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Zangulo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes has a major impact on morbidity and mortality today. It is estimated that by 2040, about 642 million people are affected worldwide, of which, 34.2 million are from sub-Saharan countries. The direct annual cost of diabetes health care worldwide is estimated at about 153 billion dollars. These patients represent 30% to 40% of all admissions to emergency services, leading to high values of hospital expenditure. We aim to evaluate the cost of treatment of patients with diabetes admitted to Prenda Hospital Medicine Service in 2012. Methods: Retrospective analytical observational study, with data collected from the clinical processes of medical service (age and gender, length of hospitalization, resources consumed, cost of treatment per patient and discharge. Results: Out of 121 patients, the majority was female (n = 70, 57.9%. The age group of 36 to 45 years old was the most frequent among these patients (n = 26, 21.5%. November was the month that recorded the largest number of admissions (n = 17, 14%. About 45.5% were hospitalized during five to eight days, on average for nine days. The majority (76.9% was discharged due to health condition improvement. The price of materials used for treatment of the disease had high variation, and 31 550.15 kwanzas was spent to acquire them. The direct cost per patient per day was 4170.11 kwanzas and the estimated annual cost of care of diabetic patients admitted to Prenda Hospital was 45 525 490.9 kwanzas in 2012. Discussion and Conclusion: These results are in accordance with other studies, indicating a relevant cost of treatment of diabetic patients admitted to Prenda Hospital Medicine Service in 2012.

  12. Review of thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients attending Cork University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Stephen; Weaver, Daniel Timothy

    2013-06-01

    Although preventable, venous thromboembolism remains a common cause of hospital acquired morbidity and mortality. Guidelines, such as the one produced by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), are aimed at reducing hospital associated venous thromboemboli. Unfortunately the majority of studies have revealed inadequate adherence to these guidelines. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis at Cork University Hospital. Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. Data from the patient's chart, drug kardex and laboratory results were recorded during April 2010. A Caprini score, a venous thromboembolism risk factor assessment tool, was subsequently calculated for each patient based on data collected. Appropriate prophylaxis was determined after examining data collected, Caprini score and prophylactic regime according to the ACCP 8th edition guidelines. Primary outcome was to analyse adherence to VTE prophylaxis guidelines. A total of 394 patients met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed, of which, 60% (n = 236) were medical and 37% (n = 146) were surgical patients. In total 63% of patients received some form of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Furthermore, 54% of medical and 76% of surgical patients received prophylaxis. However only 37% of the patients studied received appropriate thromboprophylaxis according to the ACCP 8th edition guidelines (Geerts et al. in chest 133(6 Suppl):381S-453S, 2008). Additionally 51% of surgical and 27% of medical patients received appropriate prophylaxis. Data collected from Cork University Hospital revealed poor adherence to international venous thromboembolism prophylaxis guidelines. As stated in the ACCP 8th edition guidelines, every hospital should develop a formal strategy for venous thromboembolism prevention (Geerts et al. in chest 133(6 Suppl):381S-453S, 2008). In order to improve adherence to guidelines, Cork University Hospital should develop, implement and

  13. Psychometric properties of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Yvonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a management perspective, it is necessary to examine how a hospital's top management assess the patient safety culture in their organisation. This study examines whether the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M has the same psychometric properties as the HSOPS for hospital employees does. Methods In 2008, a questionnaire survey including the HSOPS_M was conducted with 1,224 medical directors from German hospitals. When assessing the psychometric properties, we performed a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. Additionally, we proved construct validity and internal consistency. Results A total of 551 medical directors returned the questionnaire. The results of the CFA suggested a satisfactory global data fit. The indices of local fit indicated a good, but not satisfactory convergent validity. Analyses of construct validity indicated that not all safety culture dimensions were readily distinguishable. However, Cronbach's alpha indicated that the dimensions had an acceptable level of reliability. Conclusion The analyses of the psychometric properties of the HSOPS_M resulted in reasonably good levels of property values. Although the set of dimensions within the HSOPS_M needs further scale refinement, the questionnaire covers a broad range of sub-dimensions and supplies important information on safety culture. The HSOPS_M, therefore, is eligible to measure safety culture from the hospital management's points of view and could be used in nationwide hospital surveys to make inter-organisational comparisons.

  14. Nutritional Assessment in Elderly Hospitalized Patients in Qazvin Teaching Hospitals in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Ghorbani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nutritional status in the elderly is an important issue in developing countries has been little attention to it. It results from complex interaction between personal and environmental factors that have a considerable effect on mortality, morbidity and quality of life of elderly people especially the hospitalized ones. The aim of this study was to investigate nutritional status in elderly hospitalized patients in Qazvin Teaching Hospitals and know Influential factors to plan appropriate programs for improving their health. Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional study 233 elderly (151 women and 171 men aging more than 60 years, hospitalized in two hospitals in Qazvin city were studied. Nutritional status were evaluated using Mini Nutritional Assessment, The nutritional status was classified into: malnourished, risk of malnutrition and without malnutrition (adequate. Results: Among the assessed elderly 29.8% were well nourish, 13.4% malnourished and 42.95 at risk of malnutrition. There was more malnutrition in females compared to males (25.8% vs 7.2 P=23(62.5% vs. 12.6% P<0.001, Statistical analysis of the studied variables showed that nutritional status were significantly associated with Age, BMI, WC and WHR Conclusion: This study confirms a high prevalence of malnutrition risk in hospitalized elderly patients. The assessment of nutritional status with MNA that can facilitate evaluation of the nutritional status of elderly individuals in hospitals

  15. Inpatient Portals for Hospitalized Patients and Caregivers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michelle M; Coller, Ryan J; Hoonakker, Peter Lt

    2018-06-01

    Patient portals, web-based personal health records linked to electronic health records (EHRs), provide patients access to their healthcare information and facilitate communication with providers. Growing evidence supports portal use in ambulatory settings; however, only recently have portals been used with hospitalized patients. Our objective was to review the literature evaluating the design, use, and impact of inpatient portals, which are patient portals designed to give hospitalized patients and caregivers inpatient EHR clinical information for the purpose of engaging them in hospital care. Literature was reviewed from 2006 to 2017 in PubMed, Web of Science, CINALPlus, Cochrane, and Scopus to identify English language studies evaluating patient portals, engagement, and inpatient care. Data were analyzed considering the following 3 themes: inpatient portal design, use and usability, and impact. Of 731 studies, 17 were included, 9 of which were published after 2015. Most studies were qualitative with small samples focusing on inpatient portal design; 1 nonrandomized trial was identified. Studies described hospitalized patients' and caregivers' information needs and design recommendations. Most patient and caregiver participants in included studies were interested in using an inpatient portal, used it when offered, and found it easy to use and/or useful. Evidence supporting the role of inpatient portals in improving patient and caregiver engagement, knowledge, communication, and care quality and safety is limited. Included studies indicated providers had concerns about using inpatient portals; however, the extent to which these concerns have been realized remains unclear. Inpatient portal research is emerging. Further investigation is needed to optimally design inpatient portals to maximize potential benefits for hospitalized patients and caregivers while minimizing unintended consequences for healthcare teams. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Giving Medicine Through Intravenous Towards Incident of Phlebitis to Hospitalized Patient in Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Iradiyanti, Winda Pratama; Kurnia, Erlin

    2013-01-01

    Phlebitis incident is a reflection of the character of health care. The sign of phlebitis include an increase of skin temperature on the veins, pain, and some cases of redness in the site of insertion or along the vein line. The purpose of this research to study the phlebitis caused. The design used was cross sectional. Population of this research was all patients hospitalized at inpatient ward Kediri Baptist Hospital and all the nurses who provided medication through an intravenous tube a...

  17. Depressive Affect and Hospitalization Risk in Incident Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Lisa; Li, Nien-Chen; Mooney, Ann; Maddux, Franklin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Recent studies demonstrated an association between depressive affect and higher mortality risk in incident hemodialysis patients. This study sought to determine whether an association also exists with hospitalization risk. Design, setting, participants, & measurements All 8776 adult incident hemodialysis patients with Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 survey results treated in Fresenius Medical Care North America facilities in 2006 were followed for 1 year from the date of survey, and all hospitalization events lasting >24 hours were tracked. A depressive affect score was derived from responses to two Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 questions (“down in the dumps” and “downhearted and blue”). A high depressive affect score corresponded with an average response of “some of the time” or more frequent occurrence. Cox and Poisson models were constructed to determine associations of depressive affect scores with risk for time to first hospitalization and risk for hospitalization events, as well as total days spent in the hospital, respectively. Results Incident patients with high depressive affect score made up 41% of the cohort and had a median (interquartile range) hospitalization event rate of one (0, 3) and 4 (0, 15) total hospital days; the values for patients with low depressive affect scores were one (0, 2) event and 2 (0, 11) days, respectively. For high-scoring patients, the adjusted hazard ratio for first hospitalization was 1.12 (1.04, 1.20). When multiple hospital events were considered, the adjusted risk ratio was 1.13 (1.02, 1.25) and the corresponding risk ratio for total hospital days was 1.20 (1.07, 1.35). High depressive affect score was generally associated with lower physical and mental component scores, but these covariates were adjusted for in the models. Conclusions Depressive affect in incident hemodialysis patients was associated with higher risk of hospitalization and more hospital days. Future

  18. The role of unfinished root canal treatment in odontogenic maxillofacial infections requiring hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönholm, L; Lemberg, K K; Tjäderhane, L; Lauhio, A; Lindqvist, C; Rautemaa-Richardson, R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological findings and the role of periapical infection and antecedent dental treatment of infected focus teeth in odontogenic maxillofacial abscesses requiring hospital care. In this retrospective cohort study, we evaluated medical records and panoramic radiographs during the hospital stay of patients (n = 60) admitted due to odontogenic maxillofacial infection originating from periapical periodontitis. Twenty-three (38 %) patients had received endodontic treatment and ten (17 %) other acute dental treatment. Twenty-seven (45 %) had not visited the dentist in the near past. Median age of the patients was 45 (range 20-88) years and 60 % were males. Unfinished root canal treatment (RCT) was the major risk factor for hospitalisation in 16 (27 %) of the 60 cases (p = .0065). Completed RCT was the source only in 7 (12 %) of the 60 cases. Two of these RCTs were adequate and five inadequate. The initiation of inadequate or incomplete primary RCT of acute periapical periodontitis appears to open a risk window for locally invasive spread of infection with local abscess formation and systemic symptoms. Thereafter, the quality of the completed RCT appears to have minor impact. However, a considerable proportion of the patients had not received any dental treatment confirming the importance of good dental health. Thus, thorough canal debridement during the first session is essential for minimising the risk for spread of infection in addition to incision and drainage of the abscess. If this cannot be achieved, tooth extraction should be considered. Incomplete or inadequate canal debridement and drainage of the abscess may increase the risk for spread of endodontic infection.

  19. Risk factors associated with malnutrition in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Flores Marquezini FRAGAS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To identify factors associated with malnutrition in patients hospitalized in general public hospitals of the city of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Methods This cross-sectional study included 397 patients of both sexes aged more than 18 years, staying at three public hospitals in Manaus, Amazonas. The patients were submitted to anthropometric and subjective global assessments, the latter being the main diagnostic method. For association analyses between malnutrition (dependent variable and other covariates, we used contingency table for variable selection and multiple logistic regression for independent effect test between exposure and outcome. The strength of association between the variables was expressed as odds ratio, with a 95% confidence interval. The analyses were performed by Epi Info 7.0. Results Among the risk factors associated with hospital malnutrition, hospital stays longer than 15 days, when analyzed alone, nearly tripled the odds of malnutrition. However, in the final model, the variables that remained associated were: persistent change in diet, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms, recent weight loss, weight loss in the last six months, cancer, and age higher than 60 years. Conclusion Malnutrition is recurrent in hospitals, and the factors associated with malnutrition can be identified on admission, allowing adequate monitoring during hospital stay. Therefore, a more effective performance of nutritional screening and monitoring programs is critical.

  20. The impact of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection on outcomes of hospitalized patients with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagu, Tara; Stefan, Mihaela S; Haessler, Sarah; Higgins, Thomas L; Rothberg, Michael B; Nathanson, Brian H; Hannon, Nicholas S; Steingrub, Jay S; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2014-07-01

    To examine the impact of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection (HOCDI) on the outcomes of patients with sepsis. Most prior studies that have addressed this issue lacked adequate matching to controls, suffered from small sample size, or failed to consider time to infection. Retrospective cohort study. We identified adults with a principal or secondary diagnosis of sepsis who received care at 1 of the institutions that participated in a large multihospital database between July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2010. Among eligible patients with sepsis, we identified patients who developed HOCDI during their hospital stay. We used propensity matching and date of diagnosis to match cases to patients without Clostridium difficile infections and compared outcomes between the 2 groups. Of 218,915 sepsis patients, 2368 (1.08%) developed HOCDI. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in HOCDI patients than controls (25% vs 10%, P Clostridium difficile infections was 5.1 days longer than controls (95% confidence interval: 4.4-5.8) and the median-adjusted cost increase was $4916 (P Clostridium difficile infection was associated with increased mortality, LOS, and cost. Our results can be used to assess the cost-effectiveness of prevention programs and suggest that efforts directed toward high-risk patient populations are needed. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. Zolpidem prescribing and adverse drug reactions in hospitalized general medicine patients at a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane E; Webb, Melissa J; Gray, Shelly L

    2004-03-01

    Zolpidem is prescribed for sleep disruption in hospitalized patients, but data on the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are based largely on outpatient studies. Thus, the incidence of ADRs in hospitalized patients may be much higher. The goal of this study was to describe prescribing patterns of zolpidem for hospitalized medical patients aged 50 years, the incidence of ADRs possibly and probably associated with its use, and the factors associated with central nervous system (CNS) ADRs. This case series was conducted in 4 general medicine wards at a Veterans Affairs hospital and was a consecutive sample of patients aged 50 years who were hospitalized between 1993 and 1997 and received zolpidem as a hypnotic during hospitalization, but had not received it in the previous 3 months. Chart review was conducted by 2 evaluators. Data extracted from the medical records included admission demographic characteristics, medications, comorbidities, and levels of function in performing basic and instrumental activities of daily living. The main outcome measure was ADRs possibly or probably related to zolpidem use. The association between zolpidem and the occurrence of CNS ADRs (eg, confusion, dizziness, daytime somnolence) was analyzed separately. The review included 119 medical patients aged > or =50 years who had newly received zolpidem for sleep disruption during hospitalization. The median age of the population was 70 years; 86 (72.3%) patients were aged 65 years. The initial zolpidem dose was 5 mg in 42 patients (35.3%) and 10 mg in 77 patients (64.7%). Twenty-three patients had a respective 16 and 10 ADRs possibly and probably related to zolpidem use (19.3% incidence). Of a total of 26 ADRs, 21 (80.8%) were CNS ADRs, occurring with both zolpidem 5 mg (10.8% of users) and 10 mg (18.3% of users). On univariate analyses, the only factor significantly associated with a CNS ADR was functional impairment at baseline (P = 0.003). Zolpidem was discontinued in 38.8% of

  2. A Patient Navigator Intervention to Reduce Hospital Readmissions among High-Risk Safety-Net Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Richard B; Galbraith, Alison A; Burns, Marguerite E; Vialle-Valentin, Catherine E; Larochelle, Marc R; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2015-07-01

    Evidence-based interventions to reduce hospital readmissions may not generalize to resource-constrained safety-net hospitals. To determine if an intervention by patient navigators (PNs), hospital-based Community Health Workers, reduces readmissions among high risk, low socioeconomic status patients. Randomized controlled trial. General medicine inpatients having at least one of the following readmission risk factors: (1) age ≥60 years, (2) any in-network inpatient admission within the past 6 months, (3) length of stay ≥3 days, (4) admission diagnosis of heart failure, or (5) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The analytic sample included 585 intervention patients and 925 controls. PNs provided coaching and assistance in navigating the transition from hospital to home through hospital visits and weekly telephone outreach, supporting patients for 30 days post-discharge with discharge preparation, medication management, scheduling of follow-up appointments, communication with primary care, and symptom management. The primary outcome was in-network 30-day hospital readmissions. Secondary outcomes included rates of outpatient follow-up. We evaluated outcomes for the entire cohort and stratified by patient age >60 years (425 intervention/584 controls) and ≤60 years (160 intervention/341 controls). Overall, 30-day readmission rates did not differ between intervention and control patients. However, the two age groups demonstrated marked differences. Intervention patients >60 years showed a statistically significant adjusted absolute 4.1% decrease [95% CI: -8.0%, -0.2%] in readmission with an increase in 30-day outpatient follow-up. Intervention patients ≤60 years showed a statistically significant adjusted absolute 11.8% increase [95% CI: 4.4%, 19.0%] in readmission with no change in 30-day outpatient follow-up. A patient navigator intervention among high risk, safety-net patients decreased readmission among older patients while increasing readmissions

  3. Chronic diseases requiring hospitalization and risk of non-melanoma skin cancers-A population based study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Ø; Olesen, Anne B; Dethlefsen, Claus

    2008-01-01

    We examined the associations between chronic diseases requiring hospitalization and the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) in a population-based case-control study of 4,187 patients diagnosed with a first primary NMSC in 1995 in Denmark. From the National Patient Registry covering all Danish.......99-15)), and skin diseases (IRR 5.28 (95% CI: 1.95-14)). Our study supports the presence of an association between certain chronic diseases and NMSC, and further suggests that these results unlikely are due to bias.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 4 October 2007; doi:10.1038/sj...... hospitals, we obtained data on hospitalizations with chronic diseases, recorded before the date of NMSC diagnosis. Using incidence density sampling, we selected 10 age-, gender-, and residence-matched controls from the Danish Civil Registration System. We used conditional logistic regression to compute...

  4. Hypogonadism in aged hospitalized male patients: prevalence and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, P; Prado, F; Macías, M C; Guerrero, M T; Muñoz, A; Ridruejo, E; Tajada, P; García-Arévalo, C; Díez, J J

    2014-02-01

    Male hypogonadism is common in the elderly and has been associated with increased risk of mortality. Our objective has been to assess the prevalence of primary and central hypogonadism in elderly male patients admitted to the hospital because of acute illness. We also evaluated the relationships between gonadal dysfunction and in-hospital mortality. 150 patients, aged ≥65 years, admitted during 2010 and 2011 in our geriatric unit, were studied. Serum concentrations total, bioavailable and free testosterone, as well as of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were quantified in every patient. Hypogonadism was defined by the presence of serum testosterone levels lower than 200 ng/dl. Hypogonadism was found in 80 patients (53.3 %). Serum gonadotropin concentrations were elevated in 43.7 % of these patients, whereas 41.3 % of hypogonadic patients showed normal and 15 % low gonadotropin concentrations. Respiratory tract infection and congestive heart failure were the main causes of hospitalization in hypogonadal men, whereas acute cerebrovascular disease was the main reason for admission in eugonadal patients. Of the 13 patients who died during hospitalization, 12 were hypogonadic. Patients who died showed significantly lower serum levels of total, free and bioavailable testosterone than those found in patients who survived. Our results show that about half of patients admitted for acute illness have hypogonadism, mainly of non-hypergonadotropic type. Gonadal hypofunction is significantly related with in-hospital mortality. A low value of serum testosterone may be a predictor for mortality in elderly male patients.

  5. Predictors of Hospitalization in Patients with Syncope Assisted in Specialized Cardiology Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Leonardo Marques; Dutra, João Pedro Passos [Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Mantovani, Augusto [UFCSPA - Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lima, Gustavo Glotz de [Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); UFCSPA - Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz, E-mail: drleiria@cardiol.br [Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    Risk stratification of a syncopal episode is necessary to better differentiate patients needing hospitalization of those who can be safely sent home from the emergency department. Currently there are no strict guidelines from our Brazilian medical societies to guide the cardiologist that evaluate patients in an emergency setting. To analyze the criteria adopted for defining the need for hospitalization and compare them with the predictors of high risk for adverse outcome defined by the OESIL score that is already validated in the medical literature for assessing syncope. A cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with syncope during emergency department evaluation at our institution in the year 2011. Of the 46,476 emergency visits made in that year, 216 were due to syncope. Of the 216 patients analyzed, 39% were hospitalized. The variables associated with the need of hospital admission were - having health care insurance, previous known cardiovascular disease, no history of prior stroke, previous syncope and abnormal electrocardiograms during the presentation. Patients classified in OESIL scores of 0-1 had a greater chance of emergency discharge; 2-3 scores showed greater association with the need of hospitalization. A score ≥ 2 OESIL provided an odds ratio 7.8 times higher for hospitalization compared to score 0 (p <0.001, 95% CI:4,03-15,11). In approximately 39% no etiological cause for syncope was found and in 18% cardiac cause was identified. Factors such as cardiovascular disease, prior history of syncope, health insurance, no previous stroke and abnormal electrocardiograms, were the criteria used by doctors to indicate hospital admission. There was a good correlation between the clinical judgment and the OESIL criteria for high risk described in literature.

  6. Predictors of Hospitalization in Patients with Syncope Assisted in Specialized Cardiology Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Leonardo Marques; Dutra, João Pedro Passos; Mantovani, Augusto; Lima, Gustavo Glotz de; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz

    2013-01-01

    Risk stratification of a syncopal episode is necessary to better differentiate patients needing hospitalization of those who can be safely sent home from the emergency department. Currently there are no strict guidelines from our Brazilian medical societies to guide the cardiologist that evaluate patients in an emergency setting. To analyze the criteria adopted for defining the need for hospitalization and compare them with the predictors of high risk for adverse outcome defined by the OESIL score that is already validated in the medical literature for assessing syncope. A cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with syncope during emergency department evaluation at our institution in the year 2011. Of the 46,476 emergency visits made in that year, 216 were due to syncope. Of the 216 patients analyzed, 39% were hospitalized. The variables associated with the need of hospital admission were - having health care insurance, previous known cardiovascular disease, no history of prior stroke, previous syncope and abnormal electrocardiograms during the presentation. Patients classified in OESIL scores of 0-1 had a greater chance of emergency discharge; 2-3 scores showed greater association with the need of hospitalization. A score ≥ 2 OESIL provided an odds ratio 7.8 times higher for hospitalization compared to score 0 (p <0.001, 95% CI:4,03-15,11). In approximately 39% no etiological cause for syncope was found and in 18% cardiac cause was identified. Factors such as cardiovascular disease, prior history of syncope, health insurance, no previous stroke and abnormal electrocardiograms, were the criteria used by doctors to indicate hospital admission. There was a good correlation between the clinical judgment and the OESIL criteria for high risk described in literature

  7. Patient evaluation of the hotel function of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, M C; Zikria, J; Mutrie, C; Slater, J P; Scott, C; Lehman, S; Connolly, M W; Asher, D T; Ting, W; Namerow, P B

    2001-01-01

    A means of measuring patient satisfaction is essential in the effort to improve the quality of health care delivered in our nation's hospitals. Accurate feedback allows employers to better meet patients' needs and allows hospital administrators to improve service delivery. Patients are empowered by having a voice in the manner in which their health care is delivered. Moreover, improving the efficiency of the health care delivery system decreases health care costs. Hospital comparisons can be made readily available to a large audience through the Internet, resulting in empowerment of the patient and a universal improvement in hospital care. This is the first multi-institutional analysis of patient satisfaction among New York City and northern New Jersey area tertiary care hospitals. In this study, we evaluated the patient-assessed hotel function of hospitals in a single geographic region to determine whether clinically and statistically significant differences would be revealed that could provide beneficial information to stakeholders in the healthcare system. Patients (n = 261) who had spent a night during the past year in one of eleven hospitals within 60 miles of New York City were chosen at random from doctors' waiting rooms. On average, 24 patients from each hospital were surveyed. They were asked to complete a questionnaire that rated the various departments in the hospital on qualities such as courtesy, promptness, and cleanliness. The questionnaire also rated important characteristics of the patient experience, such as the ease of parking and the taste of the food. Each item on the survey was coded on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most positive response. The 26 specific questions were divided into 14 domains. Averages in each domain were compared by gender, age, and hospital identity, attractiveness, and setting. All statistical calculations were performed using SPSS/PC, and means were compared using t-tests. Analysis designed to evaluate outcomes

  8. Factors associated with readmission to the hospital within 30 days in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetano, John N.; Rubin, Jonah N.; Cohen, Russell D.; Sakuraba, Atsushi; Rubin, David T.; Pekow, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Background Management of inpatients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) requires increasing resources. We aimed to identify factors associated with hospital readmissions among individuals with IBD. Materials & methods We collected data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Readmissions Database 2013. We identified individuals with index hospitalizations for IBD. Patient-specific factors, comorbidities and hospitalization characteristics were extracted for the index hospitalization. We performed logistic regression modeling to create adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for 30-day hospital readmission. Subgroup analysis was performed based on disease type and performance of surgery. Results We analyzed a total of 55,942 index hospital discharges; 3037 patients (7.0%) were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. Increasing patient age (> 65: OR: 0.45; 95% CI 0.39–0.53) was associated with a decreased risk of readmission, while a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease (OR: 1.09; 95% CI 1.00–1.18) and male sex (OR: 1.16; 95% CI 1.07–1.25) were associated with an increased risk of readmission. The comorbidities of smoking (OR: 1.09; 95% CI 1.00–1.19), anxiety (OR: 1.17; 95% CI 1.01–1.36) and opioid dependence (OR: 1.40; 95% CI 1.06–1.86) were associated with an increased risk of 30-day readmission. Individual hospitalization characteristics and disease complications were significantly associated with readmission. Performance of a surgery during the index admission was associated with a decreased risk of readmission (OR: 0.57; 95% CI 0.33–0.96). Conclusion Analyzing data from a US publicly available all-payer inpatient healthcare database, we identified patient and hospitalization risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Identifying patients at high risk for readmission may allow for interventions during or after the index hospitalization to decrease this risk. PMID:28837634

  9. Factors associated with readmission to the hospital within 30 days in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Micic

    Full Text Available Management of inpatients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD requires increasing resources. We aimed to identify factors associated with hospital readmissions among individuals with IBD.We collected data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Readmissions Database 2013. We identified individuals with index hospitalizations for IBD. Patient-specific factors, comorbidities and hospitalization characteristics were extracted for the index hospitalization. We performed logistic regression modeling to create adjusted odds ratios (ORs for 30-day hospital readmission. Subgroup analysis was performed based on disease type and performance of surgery.We analyzed a total of 55,942 index hospital discharges; 3037 patients (7.0% were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. Increasing patient age (> 65: OR: 0.45; 95% CI 0.39-0.53 was associated with a decreased risk of readmission, while a diagnosis of Crohn's disease (OR: 1.09; 95% CI 1.00-1.18 and male sex (OR: 1.16; 95% CI 1.07-1.25 were associated with an increased risk of readmission. The comorbidities of smoking (OR: 1.09; 95% CI 1.00-1.19, anxiety (OR: 1.17; 95% CI 1.01-1.36 and opioid dependence (OR: 1.40; 95% CI 1.06-1.86 were associated with an increased risk of 30-day readmission. Individual hospitalization characteristics and disease complications were significantly associated with readmission. Performance of a surgery during the index admission was associated with a decreased risk of readmission (OR: 0.57; 95% CI 0.33-0.96.Analyzing data from a US publicly available all-payer inpatient healthcare database, we identified patient and hospitalization risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Identifying patients at high risk for readmission may allow for interventions during or after the index hospitalization to decrease this risk.

  10. Adherence to treatment and hospitalization risk in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiciuniene, Ruta; Kuzminskis, Vytautas; Ziginskiene, Edita; Skarupskiene, Inga; Bumblyte, Inga A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adherence to treatment is associated with hospitalization risk in hemodialysis patients. We completed a cohort analysis of risk factors during 1 census month (November) and 1 year of follow-up during 5 consecutive years (2002-2006) in all end-stage renal disease patients hemodialyzed in the Kaunas region. During the census month, we collected data on noncompliance defined as (i) skipping of a hemodialysis (HD) session, (ii) shortening of 1 or more HD sessions, (iii) presence of hyperkalemia, (iv) presence of hyperphosphatemia, or (v) interdialytic weight gain (IDWG). In addition, data on age, sex, disability status, comorbidities, anemia control, malnutrition and inflammation, calcium-phosphorus metabolism and hospitalization rate were collected. Relative risk of hospitalization was estimated using Cox regression evaluating time to first hospitalization. We analyzed 559 patients for a total of 1,163 patient-years during the 5 years of the study. On multivariate analysis, adjusting for ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, higher number of comorbid conditions, higher systolic blood pressure before dialysis, worse disability status, lower hemoglobin, albumin and urea before dialysis, the relative risk for hospitalization increased by 1.1 for every additional percentage point of IDWG and by 1.19 with each 1 mmol/L rise of serum phosphorus level. Skipping or shortening of hemodialysis sessions and serum potassium level were not associated with hospitalization. Higher IDWG and higher serum levels of phosphorus independently increased the relative risk of hospitalizations in hemodialysis patients. With skipped and shortened dialysis sessions, higher serum potassium level was not associated with hospitalization risk.

  11. Temporal Patterns of In-Hospital Falls of Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Soto, Pablo J; Smolensky, Michael H; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Borrego, María A; Manfredini, Roberto; Pelati, Cristiano; Fabbian, Fabio

    A potentially important factor yet to receive adequate study is the time when hospital falls occur. A prior study conducted before the system-wide introduction of preventive measures revealed a biphasic 24-hour pattern of hospital falls with major peak in the morning. The purpose was to identify the temporal patterning of falls among elderly patients in hospitals with comprehensive fall prevention programs in place. A 4-year observational study was conducted by the local health authority in the five nonteaching public hospitals located in the province of Ferrara, Italy. Fall records involving patients of ages ≥65 years hospitalized in the general medical departments were used. Single- and multiple-component cosinor (time series) analyses were used to explore 24-hour, weekly, and annual patterns of falls. A total of 763 falls were experienced by 709 different elderly hospitalized patients. Falls typically took place in the patient's hospital room (72%) and bathroom (23%). Major causes were patient instability (32%) and accident (13%), and most occurred when not wearing footwear (45%) or wearing inappropriate sling-back open-toe shoes (39%). Falls happened while standing (39%), while seated (21%), and while getting into, out of, or laying in bed (32%)-either with the bed rails raised or lowered. Fall outcome usually involved no injury (58%) or slight injury (35%), but some (7%) were disabling. Fall occurrence was higher during the night (46%) compared to either the morning (30%) or afternoon (24%) shift. Patterns across 24 hours were characterized by a single major and one or more minor peaks that seemed to be associated with a variety of scheduled patient, hospital, and nursing activities. Multiple-component cosinor analysis identified significant (p footwear. Falls were more frequent, but not significantly so, on Fridays, Sundays, and Mondays compared with Tuesdays, and were more frequent in winter and spring (p = .003). Documentation by cause and circumstance of

  12. Perception of patients attending a tertiary hospital in Nigeria about ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-02

    Jan 2, 2013 ... and 15 patients through separate focus group discussion using a question ... Oral educative posters should be on the walls. The receptionist ... Spacious adequate cubicles with no congestion/crowding of people .... [19] also found that patient image of ... across many hospitals in Nigeria will consider a large.

  13. Multi-agent Pareto appointment exchanging in hospital patient scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.B. Vermeulen (Ivan); S.M. Bohte (Sander); D.J.A. Somefun (Koye); J.A. La Poutré (Han)

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractWe present a dynamic and distributed approach to the hospital patient scheduling problem, in which patients can have multiple appointments that have to be scheduled to different resources. To efficiently solve this problem we develop a multi-agent Pareto-improvement appointment

  14. Multi-agent Pareto appointment exchanging in hospital patient scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, I.B.; Bohté, S.M.; Somefun, D.J.A.; Poutré, La J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a dynamic and distributed approach to the hospital patient scheduling problem, in which patients can have multiple appointments that have to be scheduled to different resources. To efficiently solve this problem we develop a multi-agent Pareto-improvement appointment exchanging algorithm:

  15. Incidence of Diarrhea in Hospitalized Patients with Standard Enteral Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabbu Ahmadi bonakdar

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Evaluation of patients receiving Milatech standard formula showed that diarrhea wasn’t seen in hospitalized patients. Diarrhea was reported by the nurses may refer to other diarrhea genic causes including of long length of stay, entral duration or medical side effects or infections.

  16. Hospital Slang for Patients: Crocks, Gomers, Gorks, and Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David Paul

    1983-01-01

    Slang terms for hospital patients fall into four categories, three characterizing types of patients who claim more attention for their conditions than is warranted, and one made up of positive or neutral descriptive terms. The slang serves social as well as expressive functions, promoting group rapport while maintaining individual distance. (MSE)

  17. Classification of Mistakes in Patient Care in a Nigerian Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study shows that there are wide variations within and between professional health groups in the classification of errors in patient care. The implications of the absence of a classificatory scheme for errors in patient care for service improvement and organisational learning in the hospital environment are discussed.

  18. Prevalence of Cigarette Smoking in Schizophrenic Patients Compared to Other Hospital Admitted Psychiatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ziaaddini, Hassan; Kheradmand, Ali; Vahabi, Mostafa

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of cigarette smoking and some of the related factors among schizophrenic and other hospitalized psychiatric patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study on 120 patients hospitalized in Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kerman in 2005. Patients were equally devided in two groups of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Sampling was based on statistical census and data were collected using a questionnaire including 27 questions o...

  19. [Consumer surveys among hospitalized patients with lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humborstad, O T; Omenaas, E; Gulsvik, A

    2001-03-30

    The aim of our survey was to record the experiences of hospitalised patients with respiratory diseases in order to create a more patient-friendly department. Our study included 609 patients (response rate 70%) with a median age of 64 years (range 13-91) who were discharged from the Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital in October 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996. 268 patients had obstructive lung disease, 82 had lung cancer. They answered a questionnaire with 24 questions. Patient reception to the ward and staff knowledge of the patients' illnesses, were for the physicians rated as good or better by 92% and 79% and for the nurses by 94% and 70% respectively. 16% of the patients experienced insecurity, 17% anxiety, 12% helplessness, 9% loneliness and 12% little say in the decision making process. Trend factors for these emotional experiences were female sex, old age, obstructive lung disease and long stay in hospital. Patients aged 50 to 69 years and patients with lung cancer had the lowest rate of negative emotional experiences. Despite staff awareness of the prevalence and of the patients' emotional experiences and the risk factors involved, there was no clear reduction of negative experiences in the later surveys compared to the first survey. Patients in a university hospital with respiratory diseases showed unchanged experiences of health care and personal emotions in repeated surveys over a period of five years.

  20. Prevalence of dental caries in hospitalized patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Vladan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. It is considered that over 450 million people worldwide suffer from some form of mental disorder. Previous studies in other countries have shown that schizophrenia is among the most frequent. Oral health is significant for general health and should not be separated from mental health. Studies in other countries have shown an increased incidence of carious and extracted teeth, and less incidence of filled teeth in this group of psychiatric patients. The aim of this study was to establish condition of the existing teeth, to determine the prevalence of caries and to consider possible risk factors that contribute to the current oral health status of hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. Methods. The study comprised 190 patients with schizophrenia, hospitalized at the Clinic for Psychiatric Disorders “Dr. Laza Lazarević” in Belgrade, and 190 mentally healthy patients at the Clinic for Periodontology and Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dental Medicine in Belgrade. The decayed, missing, filled (DMF index, sociodemographic and economic characteristics were registered in both groups, as well as characteristics of the primary disease of hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. Results. The value of DMF index (representing the sum of carious, extracted and filled teeth, in the hospitalized patients with schizophrenia was 18.57 ± 7.07 and 12.47 ± 5.64 in the healthy group (p = 0.000. The structure of the DMF index in the study group showed that caries and extracted teeth dominated with 88.1%; in the control group, filled teeth dominated with 55.6%, which was a statistically significant difference for all the three observed variables. Conclusion. Hospitalized patients with schizophrenia had twice as many caries and extracted teeth, and five time less filled teeth than healthy people. The patient’s age and taking antiparkinsonics were established as predictors of the increased DMF index in hospitalized patients with schizophrenia.

  1. Pre-hospital and hospital delay in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes in tertiary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Youssef

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Pre-hospital delay was mainly patient-related. Hospital delay was mainly related to healthcare resources. Governmental measures to promote ambulance emergency services may reduce the pre-hospital delay, while improving the utilization of healthcare resources may reduce hospital delay.

  2. A comparison of alcohol positive and alcohol negative trauma patients requiring an emergency laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Cedric; Weinberg, Janice; Narsule, Chaitan K; Brahmbhatt, Tejal S

    2018-07-01

    The effect of alcohol exposure on patients undergoing a laparotomy for trauma is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes of morbidity and mortality between alcohol positive and alcohol negative trauma patients who required emergent laparotomies using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB). A retrospective database analysis was performed using 28,354 NTDB incident trauma cases, from 2007 through 2012, who had been tested for alcohol and who required abdominal operations (using ICD-9-CM procedure codes) within 24h of presentation. Variables used: age, gender, admission year, alcohol presence, ISS, GCS, injury type & mechanism, discharge status, hospital LOS, ICU stay, ventilator use, and hospital complications. In adjusted analyses, there were no statistically significant differences between the alcohol positive and alcohol negative cohorts when evaluating in-hospital mortality (OR, 0.93; 95% CI: 0.84-1.03), likelihood of earlier hospital discharge (HR, 1.02; 95% CI: 0.99-1.05), and the all-inclusive category of in-hospital complications (OR, 1.04; 95% CI: 0.97-1.12). After adjusting for age, gender, admission year, ISS, GCS, and injury mechanism, there were no major differences between the alcohol positive and alcohol negative cohorts when it came to in-hospital mortality, likelihood of earlier hospital discharge, and most of the in-hospital complications measured among adult trauma patients requiring emergency laparotomies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Implications for hospitals, health workers, and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banta, H.D.

    1993-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is one of the great innovations of health care in the 20th century. It promises to revolutionise surgery by allowing many more operations to be performed with minimal hospitalisation. Pressure from patients has caused many techniques to spread rapidly before they have been

  4. Prevalence of Pressure Injury of Bedridden Patients, Hospitalized in a Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Marina Gonçalves Bezerra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the prevalence of pressure injury in bedridden patients, hospitalized in a public hospital. Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in the city of Teresina, state of Piauí. The sample consisted of 27 bedridden patients, with pressure injuries. Results: The injury prevalence was 31,4%. From the 27 patients studied, 59.3% were elderly, 77.8% were male, 48.1% had circulatory system diseases, 22.2% had respiratory system diseases and 59.3% of the pressure injuries were located in the sacral region. Conclusion: The prevalence of pressure injury was high among bedridden patients, which shows the need of preventive measures, such as protocol implantation, use of scale of risk assessment, appropriate supporting surface, repositioning in bed, adequacy of dressings and instructions for patient discharge. Keywords: Pressure ulcer. Prevalence. Nursing.

  5. Outcome among patients suffering from in-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trpković Sladjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In relation to pre-hospital treatment of patients with cardiac arrest (CA in the field where resuscitation is often started by nonprofessionals, resuscitation in hospital is most commonly performed by well-trained personnel. Objective. The aim was to define the factors associated with an improved outcome among patients suffering from the inhospital CA (IHCA. Methods. The prospective study included a total of 100 patients in the Emergency Center over two-year period. The patterns by the Utstein-Style guidelines recorded the following: age, sex, reason for hospital admission, comorbidity, cause and origin of CA, continuous monitoring, time of arrival of the medical emergency team and time of delivery of the first defibrillation shock (DC. Results. Most patients (61% had cardiac etiology. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC was achieved in 58% of patients. ROSC was more frequently achieved in younger patients (57.69±11.37, (p<0.05, non-surgical patients (76.1%, (p<0.01 and in patients who were in continuous monitoring (66.7% (p<0.05. The outcome of CPR was significantly better in patients who received advanced life support (ALS (76.6% (p<0.01. Time until the delivery of the first DC shock was significantly shorter in patients who achieved ROSC (1.67±1.13 min, (p<0.01. A total of 5% of IHCA patients survived to hospital discharge. Conclusion. In our study, the outcome of CPR was better in patients who were younger and with non-surgical diseases, which are prognostic factors that we cannot control. Factors associated with better outcome of IHCA patients were: continuous monitoring, shorter time until the delivery of the first DC and ALS. This means that better education of medical staff, better organization and up-to-dated technical equipment are needed.

  6. Outcomes of interprofessional collaboration for hospitalized cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martin-Rodriguez, Leticia; D'Amour, Danielle; Leduc, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of the intensity of interprofessional collaboration on hospitalized cancer patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 312 patients to examine the effects of intensity of interprofessional collaboration (low vs high intensity collaboration) on patient satisfaction, uncertainty, pain management, and length of stay. Data on the intensity of interprofessional collaboration, patient satisfaction, and uncertainty were collected from professionals and patients using valid and reliable instruments. Administrative and clinical records were used to calculate the index of pain management and length of hospital stay. The analysis revealed the existence of significant differences between patients who are cared for by teams operating with a high intensity of collaboration and those who are cared for by teams operating with a low intensity of collaboration, as measured by the mean satisfaction (P management (P = .047). The analysis also found no significant difference (P = .217) in their length of hospital stay. The findings suggest that intensity of interprofessional collaboration has a positive effect on patient satisfaction, reduces uncertainty, and improves pain management, yet they also suggest that the degree of collaboration does not influence the length of hospital stay.

  7. Knee osteoarthritis prevalence in hospitalized elderly patients: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke Qiang; Li, Chuan Silvia; Lin, Zhong Qiu; Feng, Guo Fei; Wang, Xiao Hui; Fu, Wen Zhe; Xie, Zhi Quan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence rate of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and the risk factors for OA in hospitalized elderly patients. We conducted this retrospective study in elderly patients (aged 65 years and older) who were hospitalized in the Geriatric Ward of General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command of the People's Liberation Army between January 2011 and June 2013, including general condition, present history, past history, physical examination, X-ray results, and disease diagnosis. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment rates of knee OA in hospitalized elderly patients were calculated. Risk factors were computed using multiple logistic regression analysis. Of a total of 267 (17.4%) hospitalized elderly patients diagnosed with knee OA, the prevalence rate of OA was 9.95% in males and 37.76% in females. The rate of awareness among those with OA was 51.68%; the rate of treatment was 83.33%; and the rate of control was 77.39%. The medical expenses for both females (1143±315 yuan month-1) and males (1192±357 yuan month-1) in knee OA patients are higher than that of the non-knee OA group (989±274 yuan month-1, 1038±295 yuan month-1). The risk factors for knee OA include gender (OR=2.448), age (OR=1.124), transportation mode (OR= 8.972), exercise (OR=7.374), bowel evacuation position (OR=5.767), family history of knee OA (OR=2.195), and body mass index (OR=2.469). The prevalence of knee OA is unexpectedly high in hospitalized elderly patients, and the rates of awareness and treatment are less than desirable. Prevention and control measures should be taken in patients with concomitant risk factors.

  8. Group of family companions of hospitalized patients: an occupational therapy intervention strategy in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ferreira Dahdah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a consensus in the literature that the company of a family member during the hospitalization period increases patient recovery. However, this can have some negative effects on the caregiver’s health. With the purpose of reducing these negatives effects, it is useful to let family members express themselves. The State Hospital of Ribeirão Preto created a Group of Family Companions coordinated by the Occupational Therapy and Social Service. This study focuses on the assistance offered in a general hospital to families that undergo the whole illness and hospitalization process of their family member, suffering the impacts of this process in their daily lives, and on the intervention of Occupational Therapy in these cases.

  9. Performance of activities of daily living among hospitalized cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Line; Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    and characterize ADL task performance problems among a group of adult disabled hospitalized cancer patients using interview and questionnaire data. METHODS: Cross-sectional study on prevalence of ADL task performance problems experienced by disabled hospitalized cancer patients using the Activities of Daily Living...... Questionnaire (ADL-Q) (n = 118) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) (n = 55). RESULTS: All 118 patients reported problems with ADL task performance. Based on the ADL-Q patients reported more problems within instrumental (I-)ADL than personal (P-)ADL. In both I-ADL and P-ADL the results......BACKGROUND: Many cancer patients report unmet rehabilitation needs. Rehabilitation may include activities of daily living (ADL) tasks, but little is known about how cancer patients perform these tasks and how they prioritize their daily activities. Hence, this study aims to identify...

  10. Emergency patients receiving anaesthesiologist-based pre-hospital treatment and subsequently released at the scene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, S G; Sørensen, L P; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Mobile Emergency Care Unit in Odense, Denmark consists of a rapid response car, manned with an anaesthesiologist and an emergency medical technician. Eleven per cent of the patients are released at the scene following treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate which...... investigated. In each patient, diagnosis as well as any renewed contact with the Mobile Emergency Care Unit or the hospital within 24 h was registered. RESULTS: ONE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED NINE: patients were released at the scene. Diagnoses within the category 'examination and investigation' [International...... with the Mobile Emergency Care Unit within 24 h. Of the 143 victims of traffic accidents, 19 (13%) required renewed contact with the emergency department and one required admission to hospital (0.7%). Of all 1609 patients, four died within 24 h of contact (0.2%). CONCLUSION: Patients treated and released...

  11. Is routine measurement of TSH in hospitalized patients necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Bashkin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available TSH routine testing in hospitalized patients has low efficacy, but may be beneficial in a selected subgroup of patients. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of routine thyroid function tests among patients admitted to internal medicine departments. It is a retrospective study. A randomly selected cohort of hospitalized patients with abnormal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH blood tests drawn as part of admission protocol. Patient data were collected from the electronic medical files and analyzed for its efficacy. TSH as a screening test was proven unnecessary in 75% (174 of the study population. Leading causes were non-thyroidal illness syndrome, drugs affecting the test results and subclinical disorders. TSH testing was found to be clinically helpful in only 9 patients; however, all of them had other clinical need for TSH testing. We found a clinically abnormal TSH in 20 patients, hypothyroidism in 11 patients and thyrotoxicosis in 9 patients. Low efficacy ascribed to TSH screening test by this study correlates with recent recommendations that indicate TSH screening in admitted patients only with accompanying clinical suspicion. Most probably, the majority of patients found by screening to have thyrotoxicosis have non-thyroidal illness or drug effects so the threshold for FT4 to diagnose overt thyrotoxicosis should be higher than that in ambulatory patients. In elderly patients, clinically relevant TSH disturbances are more frequent and are harder to diagnose, therefore, TSH screening in this group of patients might be beneficial.

  12. Implementation of patient safety and patient-centeredness strategies in Iranian hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Aghaei Hashjin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the extent of implementation for patient safety (PS and patient-centeredness (PC strategies and their association with hospital characteristics (type, ownership, teaching status, annual evaluation grade in Iran. METHODS: A cross-sectional study through an adapted version of the MARQuIS questionnaire, eliciting information from hospital and nursing managers in 84 Iranian hospitals on the implementation of PS and PC strategies in 2009-2010. RESULTS: The majority of hospitals reported to have implemented 84% of the PS and 72% of the PC strategies. In general, implementation of PS strategies was unrelated to the type of hospital, with the exception of health promotion reports, which were more common in the Social Security Organization (SSO, and MRSA testing, which was reported more often in nonprofit hospitals. MRSA testing was also more common among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals. The higher grade hospitals reported PS strategies significantly more frequently than lower grade hospitals. Overall, there was no significant difference in the reported implementation of PC strategies across general and specialized hospitals; except for the provision of information in different languages and recording of patient's diet which were reported significantly more often by general than specialized hospitals. Moreover, patient hotel services were more common in private compared to public hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Despite substantial reporting of PS and PC strategies, there is still room for strengthening standard setting on safety, patient services and patient-centered information strategies in Iranian hospitals. To assure effective implementation of PS and PC strategies, enforcing standards, creating a PS and PC culture, increasing organizational responsiveness, and partnering with patients and their families need more attention.

  13. Implementation of patient safety and patient-centeredness strategies in Iranian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne S; Manoochehri, Jila; Ravaghi, Hamid; Klazinga, Niek S

    2014-01-01

    To examine the extent of implementation for patient safety (PS) and patient-centeredness (PC) strategies and their association with hospital characteristics (type, ownership, teaching status, annual evaluation grade) in Iran. A cross-sectional study through an adapted version of the MARQuIS questionnaire, eliciting information from hospital and nursing managers in 84 Iranian hospitals on the implementation of PS and PC strategies in 2009-2010. The majority of hospitals reported to have implemented 84% of the PS and 72% of the PC strategies. In general, implementation of PS strategies was unrelated to the type of hospital, with the exception of health promotion reports, which were more common in the Social Security Organization (SSO), and MRSA testing, which was reported more often in nonprofit hospitals. MRSA testing was also more common among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals. The higher grade hospitals reported PS strategies significantly more frequently than lower grade hospitals. Overall, there was no significant difference in the reported implementation of PC strategies across general and specialized hospitals; except for the provision of information in different languages and recording of patient's diet which were reported significantly more often by general than specialized hospitals. Moreover, patient hotel services were more common in private compared to public hospitals. Despite substantial reporting of PS and PC strategies, there is still room for strengthening standard setting on safety, patient services and patient-centered information strategies in Iranian hospitals. To assure effective implementation of PS and PC strategies, enforcing standards, creating a PS and PC culture, increasing organizational responsiveness, and partnering with patients and their families need more attention.

  14. Effciency of HIV-infected patients detection in neurological hospitals of large industrial center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmelev V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim of the study: to evaluate the effciency of detection for HIV-infection in patients of neurological departments of Saratov. Materials and methods. We retrospectively analyzed 25 250 medical histories of patients hospitalized into neurological departments of Saratov hospitals between January 2007 and April 2012. Results. Blood samples of 2010 patients (7,96 % were tested for the presence of HIV-antibodies. 37 patients were HIV-positive (1,84 % of examined patients and 0,15 % of the total number of patients. Conclusion. Increasing popularity and variety of clinical manifestations of HIV-infection requires the expansion of neurological patients whom serum test for antibodies against HIV is needed.

  15. The use of irradiated food for immunosuppressed hospital patients in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryke, D.C.; Taylor, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    Irradiation has been recommended as a method for preparing foods for hospital patients requiring sterile diets as a result of intensive therapy or disease that has resulted in suppression of the immune system. It has a number of advantages over other methods and in recognition of this, in the United Kingdom, the use of irradiated foods for hospital patients has been specifically exempted from regulatory control. Due to a number of factors there is a move away from keeping patients in a sterile environment; however, irradiation may still have a role to play for vulnerable and high-risk patients. This paper summarizes the use of radiation-sterilized foods in hospitals in the United Kingdom and discusses the future potential for both radiation-sterilized and ‘radiation-pasturized’ foods

  16. Nurses' views of patient handoffs in Japanese hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Andersen, Henning Boje; Madsen, Marlene Dyrløv

    2012-01-01

    Staff perceptions of risks associated with patient handoffs were investigated in a survey of nurses in 6 Japanese hospitals. A total of 1462 valid responses were collected from nurses with an overall response rate of 74%. Respondents are moderately satisfied with the transfer of information and r...... and responsibility during handoffs. However, the handoff system was identified as immature. Hospital, work setting, and work experience affected nurses' views of handoff quality. Strategies for improving patient handoffs in Japan are proposed.......Staff perceptions of risks associated with patient handoffs were investigated in a survey of nurses in 6 Japanese hospitals. A total of 1462 valid responses were collected from nurses with an overall response rate of 74%. Respondents are moderately satisfied with the transfer of information...

  17. Hospital costs for patients with lower extremity cellulitis: a retrospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challener, Douglas; Marcelin, Jasmine; Visscher, Sue; Baddour, Larry

    2017-12-01

    Hospital admissions for non-purulent lower extremity cellulitis (NLEC) are common and can be prolonged and costly. Newer treatment options and preventive strategies are expected to result in cost savings before implementation, but few studies have quantified the cost of conventional treatment. Using the Rochester Epidemiology Project, the incidence of NLEC in Olmsted County, MN in 2013 was 176.6 per 100,000 persons. The subset of patients who required hospitalization for NLEC in 2013 was determined. Hospital admissions were analyzed retrospectively using standardized cost analysis within several relevant categories. Thirty-four patients had an average hospital length of stay of 4.7 days. The median total inpatient cost was $7,341. The median cost per day was $2,087, with 49% due to room and board. Antibiotics administered for treatment of NLEC contributed a median cost of $75 per day of hospitalization, and laboratory and imaging test costs were $73 and $44, respectively, per day of hospitalization. Hospitalizations for NLEC can be costly and prolonged with room and board accounting for much of the cost. Therefore, newer management strategies should seek to reduce hospital length of stay and/or avoid inpatient admission to reduce cost.

  18. Hospital-at-Home Programs for Patients With Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    state characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. This airflow limitation is usually both progressive and associated with an abnormal inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles or gases. The natural history of COPD involves periods of acute-onset worsening of symptoms, particularly increased breathlessness, cough, and/or sputum, that go beyond normal day-to-day variations; these are known as acute exacerbations. Two-thirds of COPD exacerbations are caused by an infection of the tracheobronchial tree or by air pollution; the cause in the remaining cases is unknown. On average, patients with moderate to severe COPD experience 2 or 3 exacerbations each year. Exacerbations have an important impact on patients and on the health care system. For the patient, exacerbations result in decreased quality of life, potentially permanent losses of lung function, and an increased risk of mortality. For the health care system, exacerbations of COPD are a leading cause of ED visits and hospitalizations, particularly in winter. Technology Hospital-at-home programs offer an alternative for patients who present to the ED with an exacerbation of COPD and require hospital admission for their treatment. Hospital-at-home programs provide patients with visits in their home by medical professionals (typically specialist nurses) who monitor the patients, alter patients’ treatment plans if needed, and in some programs, provide additional care such as pulmonary rehabilitation, patient and caregiver education, and smoking cessation counselling. There are 2 types of hospital-at-home programs: admission avoidance and early discharge hospital-at-home. In the former, admission avoidance hospital-at-home, after patients are assessed in the ED, they are prescribed the necessary medications and additional care needed (e.g., oxygen therapy) and then sent home where they receive regular visits from a medical professional. In early discharge hospital-at-home, after being

  19. Impact of supply problems of preservative-free glaucoma medications on patients and hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shima; Theodossiades, Julia; Chapman, Kristin; Murdoch, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic ocular disease, which is usually managed with long-term daily medical therapy, in the form of eye drops. Patients who are intolerant to preservatives in topical medicines require preservative-free versions. From early 2011 patients attending Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK, started to report recurring problems with the supply of the following preservative-free glaucoma medications: Timolol 0.25% (Timoptol 0.25%, MSD UK); Dorzolamide (Trusopt, MSD UK); Dorzolamide and Timolol 0.5% (Cosopt, MSD UK). This study investigates the impact of the supply problems of these medications at Moorfields Eye Hospital from a patient, administrative and clinical perspective. Information was sought by interviewing both patients and hospital staff, and by a retrospective case note review between April 2010 and May 2013. Many hospital roles, both administrative and clinical, were involved in attempting to resolve the impact of the supply problems. All staff reported a considerable increase in their workload. At the peak of the problem, the glaucoma secretaries received about 150 enquiries per week. A review of 83 sets of patient notes, retrieved from a random sample of 125 patients, showed that 22% encountered a supply problem. Of these, more than one-third attended Moorfields Eye Hospital Accident & Emergency (A&E) for repeat supplies and 89% eventually had their medication changed. In telephone interviews with 39 of a random sample of 50 patients (a subset of the 83 notes retrieved), 59% of the interviewees reported a supply problem. Of these, one-third attended Moorfields Eye Hospital A&E for repeat supplies and half eventually required an alternative medication. Some patients reported going to considerable lengths to obtain ongoing supplies in the community. This study shows that medication supply problems can have a major impact on patients and hospital services. Supply problems occur across many fields of medicine and with increasing frequency. The

  20. Patient mix optimisation in hospital admission planning: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Admissions planning decides on the number of patients admitted for a specialty each day, but also on the mix of patients admitted. Within a specialty different categories of patients can be distinguished on behalf of their requirement of resources. The type of resources required for an admission may

  1. Patient mix optimisation in hospital admission planning : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Admissions planning decides on the number of patients admitted for a specialty each day, but also on the mix of patients admitted. Within a specialty different categories of patients can be distinguished on behalf of their requirement of resources. The type of resources required for an admission may

  2. [Medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals: essential for safe patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, M J M

    2008-12-06

    The Netherlands Health Care Inspectorate investigated the quality of medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals. By and large the laboratories fulfilled the requirements for appropriate care, although some processes were unsatisfactory and some were insufficiently formalised. In the Netherlands, laboratories for medical microbiology are integrated within hospitals and medical microbiologists are responsible for the diagnostic processes as well as for co-treatment of patients, infection prevention and research. This integrated model contrasts to the more industrialised model in many other countries, where such laboratories are physically distinct from hospitals with a strong focus on diagnostics. The Inspectorate also concludes that the current position of medical microbiology in Dutch hospitals is necessary for patient safety and that outsourcing of these facilities is considered unacceptable.

  3. Methods and Models for Capacity and Patient Flow Analysis in Hospital Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlowski, Dawid

    at a private hospital in Denmark or at a hospital abroad if the public healthcare system is unable to provide treatment within the stated maximum waiting time guarantee. A queue modelling approach is used to analyse the potential negative consequences of the policy on the utilization of public hospital......This thesis is concerned about the novel applications of operations research methods for capacity and flow analysis within hospital sector. The first part of the thesis presents a detailed Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) model that has been developed as an analytical tool designed to facilitate...... by an improved patient flow. The specially developed structure of the model facilitates its reuse at different units, with no advanced modelling skills required in day-to-day use. This feature amplifies the usefulness of DES in conducting comprehensive patient flow analyses at any department with emergency...

  4. The Burden of Diagnosed and Undiagnosed Diabetes in Native Hawaiian and Asian American Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentell, T L; Cheng, Y; Saito, E; Seto, T B; Miyamura, J; Mau, M; Juarez, D T

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about diabetes in hospitalized Native Hawaiians and Asian Americans. We determined the burden of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) among hospitalized Native Hawaiian, Asian (Filipino, Chinese, Japanese), and White patients. Diagnosed diabetes was determined from discharge data from a major medical center in Hawai'i during 2007-2008. Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was determined by Hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5% or glucose ≥200 mg/dl values for those without diagnosed diabetes. Multivariable log-binomial models predicted diabetes (potentially undiagnosed and diagnosed, separately) controlling for socio-demographic factors. Of 17,828 hospitalized patients, 3.4% had potentially undiagnosed diabetes and 30.5% had diagnosed diabetes. In multivariable models compared to Whites, Native Hawaiian and all Asian subgroups had significantly higher percentages of diagnosed diabetes, but not of potentially undiagnosed diabetes. Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was associated with significantly more hospitalizations during the study period compared to both those without diabetes and those with diagnosed diabetes. In all racial/ethnic groups, those with potentially undiagnosed diabetes also had the longest length of stay and were more likely to die during the hospitalization. Hospitalized Native Hawaiians (41%) and Asian subgroups had significantly higher overall diabetes burdens compared to Whites (23%). Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was associated with poor outcomes. Hospitalized patients, irrespective of race/ethnicity, may require more effective inpatient identification and management of previously undiagnosed diabetes to improve clinical outcomes.

  5. The effect of hospital volume on mortality in patients admitted with severe sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Shahul

    Full Text Available IMPORTANCE: The association between hospital volume and inpatient mortality for severe sepsis is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of severe sepsis case volume and inpatient mortality. DESIGN SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Retrospective cohort study from 646,988 patient discharges with severe sepsis from 3,487 hospitals in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2011. EXPOSURES: The exposure of interest was the mean yearly sepsis case volume per hospital divided into tertiles. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Inpatient mortality. RESULTS: Compared with the highest tertile of severe sepsis volume (>60 cases per year, the odds ratio for inpatient mortality among persons admitted to hospitals in the lowest tertile (≤10 severe sepsis cases per year was 1.188 (95% CI: 1.074-1.315, while the odds ratio was 1.090 (95% CI: 1.031-1.152 for patients admitted to hospitals in the middle tertile. Similarly, improved survival was seen across the tertiles with an adjusted inpatient mortality incidence of 35.81 (95% CI: 33.64-38.03 for hospitals with the lowest volume of severe sepsis cases and a drop to 32.07 (95% CI: 31.51-32.64 for hospitals with the highest volume. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: We demonstrate an association between a higher severe sepsis case volume and decreased mortality. The need for a systems-based approach for improved outcomes may require a high volume of severely septic patients.

  6. Implementation of Patient Safety and Patient-Centeredness Strategies in Iranian Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne S.; Manoochehri, Jila; Ravaghi, Hamid; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the extent of implementation for patient safety (PS) and patient-centeredness (PC) strategies and their association with hospital characteristics (type, ownership, teaching status, annual evaluation grade) in Iran. Methods A cross-sectional study through an adapted version of the MARQuIS questionnaire, eliciting information from hospital and nursing managers in 84 Iranian hospitals on the implementation of PS and PC strategies in 2009–2010. Results The majority of hospitals reported to have implemented 84% of the PS and 72% of the PC strategies. In general, implementation of PS strategies was unrelated to the type of hospital, with the exception of health promotion reports, which were more common in the Social Security Organization (SSO), and MRSA testing, which was reported more often in nonprofit hospitals. MRSA testing was also more common among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals. The higher grade hospitals reported PS strategies significantly more frequently than lower grade hospitals. Overall, there was no significant difference in the reported implementation of PC strategies across general and specialized hospitals; except for the provision of information in different languages and recording of patient’s diet which were reported significantly more often by general than specialized hospitals. Moreover, patient hotel services were more common in private compared to public hospitals. Conclusions Despite substantial reporting of PS and PC strategies, there is still room for strengthening standard setting on safety, patient services and patient-centered information strategies in Iranian hospitals. To assure effective implementation of PS and PC strategies, enforcing standards, creating a PS and PC culture, increasing organizational responsiveness, and partnering with patients and their families need more attention. PMID:25268797

  7. Polypharmacy and Unplanned Hospitalizations in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkova, Maria; Carvalho, João; Norton, Sam; Scott, David; Mant, Tim; Molokhia, Mariam; Cope, Andrew; Galloway, James

    2017-12-01

    Polypharmacy (PP), the prescribing of multiple drugs for an individual, is rising in prevalence. PP associates with an increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and hospital admissions. We investigated the relationship between PP, characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the risk of unplanned hospital admissions. Patients from a hospital RA cohort were retrospectively analyzed. Information was collected from electronic medical records. Cox proportional hazards were used to compare hospitalization risk according to levels of PP. Admissions were adjudicated to determine whether an ADR was implicated. The study included 1101 patients; the mean number of all medications was 5. PP correlated with increasing age, disease duration, disease activity, and disability. At least 1 unplanned admission occurred for 16% of patients. Patients taking ≥ 10 medications had an adjusted HR for hospitalization of 3.1 (95% CI 2.1-4.5), compared to those taking 0-5 medications. Corticosteroid use associated with a doubling in adjusted risk of admission of 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4). The most common reason for hospitalization was infection (28%). While in half of all admissions an ADR was a possible contributing factor, only 2% of admissions were found to directly result from an ADR. PP is common in RA and is a prognostic marker associated with increased risk of acute hospitalizations. Our data suggest that PP may be an indicator of comorbidity burden rather than a contributing cause of a drug-related toxicity. PP should be monitored to minimize inappropriate combination of prescribed medications. PP may be a useful predictor of clinical outcomes in epidemiologic studies.

  8. [Patient safety culture in hospitals: experiences in planning, organising and conducting a survey among hospital staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vegten, Amanda; Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Giuliani, Francesca; Manser, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the first hospital-wide survey on patient safety climate, involving all staff (medical and non-medical), in the German-speaking area. Its aim is to share our experiences with planning, organising and conducting this survey. The study was performed at the university hospital in Zurich and had a response rate of 46.8% (2,897 valid questionnaires). The survey instrument ("Patientensicherheitsklimainventar") was based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (AHRQ). Primarily it allowed for assessing the current patient safety climate as well as identifying specific areas for improvement and creating a hospital-wide awareness and acceptance for patient safety issues and interventions (e.g., the introduction of a Critical Incident Reporting System [CIRS]). We discuss the basic principles and the feedback concept guiding the organisation of the overall project. Critical to the success of this project were the guaranteed anonymity of the respondents, adequate communication through well-established channels within the organisation and the commitment of the management across all project phases. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Venous Thromboembolism (VTE): Risk Assessment in Hospitalized Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soomro, Q.; Bhutto, A. A.; Memon, A. A.; Yousaf, N.; Abro, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the number of hospitalized patients at risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) / deep vein thrombosis (DVT), identifying the most common risk factor and to document the use of thromboprophylaxis. Study Design: Observational and cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Chandka Medical College Hospital, Larkana, from October to December 2011. Methodology: A total of 170 patients underwent this study and these included 51 (30%) from general medical, and 119 (70%) from surgical units. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and data was collected on printed format. VTE risk assessment was done according to Caprini Model and criteria defined by the American College of Chest Physicians- ACCP. Results: Out of 170 patients, 91 were male and 79 female with mean age of 39 +- 16 years. According to ACCP criteria for VTE risk assessment, 20% (n=34) patients were identified to be at low risk, 20% (n=34) at moderate risk, 47.65% (n=81) at high risk and 12.35% (n=21) at very high risk of developing VTE. The commonest risk factor significantly identified was immobility (54.7%, p < 0.005), followed by advancing age (41.17%, p < 0.005) and obesity (18.23%). The most common risk factor in all types of surgical patients was anaesthesia for more than 45 minutes 82.35% (n=98/119) and in medical patients advancing age 45% (n=23/51). Only 6 (3.5%) patients received thromboprophylaxis, all were surgical patients of very high-risk category. Conclusion: Majority of studied hospitalized patients were at high risk of developing VTE. Immobility was the commonest risk factor for developing VTE, followed by advancing age and obesity. Very few hospitalized patients actually received thromboprophylaxis. (author)

  10. An integrative review of patient safety in studies on the care and safety of patients with communication disabilities in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Georgiou, Andrew; Hill, Sophie; Rollo, Megan; Steel, Joanne; Balandin, Susan

    2016-04-01

    To review the research literature on the experiences of patients with communication disabilities in hospital according to the Generic Model of patient safety. In 2014 and 2015, we searched four scientific databases for studies with an aim or result relevant to safety of hospital patients with communication disabilities. The review included 27 studies. A range of adverse event types were outlined in qualitative research. Little detail was provided about contributing or protective factors for safety incidents in hospital for these patients or the impact of the incidents on the patient or organisations involved. Further research addressing the safety of patients with communication disabilities is needed. Sufficient detail is required to identify the nature, timing, and detection of incidents; factors that contribute to or prevent adverse events; and detail the impact of the adverse events. In order to provide safe and effective care to people with communication disabilities in hospital, a priority for health and disability services must be the design and evaluation of ecologically appropriate and evidence-based interventions to improve patient care, communication, and reduce the risk of costly and harmful patient safety incidents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Blindness causes analysis of 1854 hospitalized patients in Xinjiang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Zuo Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the blindness causes of 1854 cases in our hospital hospitalized patients, and explore the strategy and direction of blindness prevention according to the different treatment efficacy.METHODS: Cluster sampling was used to select from September 2010 to August 2013 in our hospital department of ophthalmology patients 5 473 cases, in which total of 1 854 cases of blind patients, accounting for 33.88% of hospitalized patients. According to the WHO's criteria of blindness. The BCVA enacted RESULTS: In 1 854 cases of blind patients, including 728 people right-eye blinding, 767 people left-eyes blinding, 359 people total blinding, adding up to 2 213 eyes, aged from 60~80 years old were in the majority. The top three diseases resulting blindness were cataract, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. In 2 213 blind eyes, the eyes treated were 2 172, of which 1 762 eyes(81.12%were succeeded, 410 eyes(18.88%failed. In the failed cases, the first three diseases were diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and retinal detachment. CONCLUSION: In recent years, disease etiology of blinding eye has changed, but cataracts, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma are still high incidence of blindness due, so the treatment of diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and retinal detachment should be the emphasis for blindness prevention and treatment in the future.

  12. Causes and predictors of mortality in hospitalized lupus patient in Sarawak General Hospital, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, C L; Ling, G R

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a serious autoimmune disease that can be life threatening and fatal if left untreated. Causes and prognostic indicators of death in SLE have been well studied in developed countries but lacking in developing countries. We aimed to investigate the causes of mortality in hospitalized patients with SLE and determine the prognostic indicators of mortality during hospitalization in our center. All SLE patients who were admitted to Sarawak General Hospital from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010, were followed up in a prospective study using a standard protocol. Demographic data, clinical features, disease activities and damage indices were collected. Logistic regression and Cox regression analysis were used to determine the prognostic indicators of mortality in our patients. There were a total of 251 patients in our study, with the female to male ratio 10 to 1. Our study patients were of multiethnic origins. They had a mean age of 30.5 ± 12.2 years and a mean duration of illness of 36.5 ± 51.6 months. The main involvements were hematologic (73.3%), renal (70.9%) and mucocutaneous (67.3%). There were 26 deaths (10.4%), with the main causes being: infection and flare (50%), infection alone (19%), flare alone (19%) and others (12%). Independent predictors of mortality in our cohort of SLE patients were the presence of both infection and flare of disease (hazard ratio (HR) 5.56) and high damage indices at the time of admission (HR 1.91). Infection and flare were the main causes of death in hospitalized Asian patients with SLE. The presence of infection with flare and high damage indices at the time of admission were independent prognostic indicators of mortality.

  13. A survey on postanesthetic patient satisfaction in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Ali Alshehri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction after anesthesia is an important outcome of hospital care. The aim is to evaluate the postoperative patient satisfaction during the patient stay at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: Three hundred and fifty-three patients who underwent surgery under general/regional anesthesia were surveyed. They were interviewed face to face on the first postoperative day. We recorded pain and pain controls in addition to some common complication of anesthesia like nausea and vomiting (postoperative nausea and vomiting as a parameter to assess the rate of patient′s satisfaction. Results: The overall level of satisfaction was high (95.2%; 17 (4.8% patients were dissatisfied with their anesthetic care. There was a strong relation between patient dissatisfaction and: (i Patients with poor postoperative pain control 13 (12.4%, (ii patients with moderate nausea 8 (11.1% and (iii patients with static and dynamic severe pain 6 (21.4. Several factors were associated with dissatisfaction can be prevented, or better treated. Conclusion: We concluded that the patient satisfaction was high. Postoperative visit should be routinely performed in order to assess the quality and severity of postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting and the other side-effects postoperatively.

  14. Patient referral patterns and the spread of hospital-acquired infections through national health care networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjibbe Donker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Rates of hospital-acquired infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, are increasingly used as quality indicators for hospital hygiene. Alternatively, these rates may vary between hospitals, because hospitals differ in admission and referral of potentially colonized patients. We assessed if different referral patterns between hospitals in health care networks can influence rates of hospital-acquired infections like MRSA. We used the Dutch medical registration of 2004 to measure the connectedness between hospitals. This allowed us to reconstruct the network of hospitals in the Netherlands. We used mathematical models to assess the effect of different patient referral patterns on the potential spread of hospital-acquired infections between hospitals, and between categories of hospitals (University medical centers, top clinical hospitals and general hospitals. University hospitals have a higher number of shared patients than teaching or general hospitals, and are therefore more likely to be among the first to receive colonized patients. Moreover, as the network is directional towards university hospitals, they have a higher prevalence, even when infection control measures are equally effective in all hospitals. Patient referral patterns have a profound effect on the spread of health care-associated infections like hospital-acquired MRSA. The MRSA prevalence therefore differs between hospitals with the position of each hospital within the health care network. Any comparison of MRSA rates between hospitals, as a benchmark for hospital hygiene, should therefore take the position of a hospital within the network into account.

  15. Use of the Flugelman index for identifying patients who are difficult to discharge from the hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bozzano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To evaluate the use of multidimensional assessment based on the Fluegelman Index (FI to identify internal medicine patients who are likely to be difficult to discharge from the hospital. Materials and methods: Have been evaluated all patients admitted to the medical wards of the District General Hospital of Arezzo from September 1 to October 31, 2007. We collected data on age, sex, socioeconomic condition, cause of admission, comorbidity score preadmission functional status (Barthel Index, incontinence, feeding problems, length of hospitalization, condition at discharge, and type of discharge. The FI cut off for difficult discharge was > 17. Results: Of the 413 patients (mean age 80 + 11.37 years; percentage of women, 56.1% included in the study, 109 (26.39% had Flugelman Index > 17. These patients were significantly older than the patients with lower FIs (85 + 9.35 vs 78 + 11.58 years, p < 0.001, more likely to be admitted for pneumonia (22% vs. 4.9% of those with lower FIs; p < 0,001. They also had more comorbidity, loss of autonomy, cognitive impairment, social frailty, and nursing care needs. The subgroup with FIs>17 had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (30.28% vs 6.25%, p < 0.001, longer hospital stay (13 vs. 10 days, p < 0.05, and higher rates of discharge to nursing homes. Conclusions: Evaluation of internal medicine patients with the Flugelman Index may be helpful for identifying more critical patients likely to require longer hospitalization and to detect factors affecting the hospital stay. This information can be useful for more effective discharge planning.

  16. Risk Factors for Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Among Hospitalized Patients at a Malaysian Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd, N.M.D.; Nurnajwa, M.H.; Lay, J.; Teoh, J.C.; Syafinaz, A.N.; Niazlin, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted based on medical cases of 100 hospitalized patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa-isolation at a Malaysian hospital. Cases with 50 multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa MDRPA and 50 non-multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa (NMDRPA) were randomly included and compared with socio-demographic and clinical data of the patients, using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests as the statistical tool. Analysis found no significant association between MDRPA with ages, gender and ethnicity of patients (p>0.050). Other risk factors being investigated were invasive procedure, immunosuppression, bedridden and clinical diagnosis such as central nervous- and respiratory-system disorder, as well as antibiotic exposure during hospitalization and duration of hospital stay with only the last two were found to have significant association (p=0.035 and 0.019, respectively). Some other studies also reported a similar association indicating that the two factors could serve as an important predictive tool for isolation of MDRPA. More studies involving a larger sampling size are warranted to establish the association. (author)

  17. Quality of sleep for hospitalized patients in Rasoul-Akram hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Makvandi, Alena; Pazouki, Abdolreza

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances have negative effects on medical conditions, mental health and cognitive performance. It was shown that about 60% of inpatients suffer from sleep problems. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between sleep quality and other factors in the inpatients of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital. In this cross-sectional study, all the hospitalized patients in twelve wards of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital during September 2012, were examined. Sleeping habits of 209 inpatients of different wards were assessed through the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire (PSQI). A self-designed 18- question questionnaire was conducted for all patients in order to assess their attitude to interior and atmosphere of wards. Content validity and test retest reliability were evaluated. The pain level was also measured by the visual analog scale (VAS) and scores analyzed by the statistical methods of frequency, percentage, chi-square and logistic regression. The mean of the total scores in PSQI was 8.8±4.8 and 70.8% of the patients were 'poor sleepers' (global PSQI> 5). Age and gender had no effect on the PSQI total score, but the number of roommates, type of the ward, hospitalization period, presence and severity of pain, taking sleep medication and attitude toward the overall atmosphere and interior of wards have caused deviation in scores. Sleep problems are quite frequent in medical inpatients. Pain management and modification of the ward interior and atmosphere can impact inpatients sleep quality.

  18. Etiologic Agents of Central Nervous System Infections among Febrile Hospitalized Patients in the Country of Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Akhvlediani, Tamar; Bautista, Christian T.; Shakarishvili, Roman; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Imnadze, Paata; Tatishvili, Nana; Davitashvili, Tamar; Samkharadze, Tamar; Chlikadze, Rusudan; Dvali, Natia; Dzigua, Lela; Karchava, Mariam; Gatserelia, Lana; Macharashvili, Nino; Kvirkvelia, Nana

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is a large spectrum of viral, bacterial, fungal, and prion pathogens that cause central nervous system (CNS) infections. As such, identification of the etiological agent requires multiple laboratory tests and accurate diagnosis requires clinical and epidemiological information. This hospital-based study aimed to determine the main causes of acute meningitis and encephalitis and enhance laboratory capacity for CNS infection diagnosis. METHODS: Children and adults patients cli...

  19. Predictors of in-hospital mortality among older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago J. A. Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine predictors of in-hospital mortality among older patients admitted to a geriatric care unit. INTRODUCTION: The growing number of older individuals among hospitalized patients demands a thorough investigation of the factors that contribute to their mortality. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study implemented from February 2004 to October 2007 in a tertiary university hospital. A consecutive sample of 922 patients was evaluated for possible inclusion in this study. Patients hospitalized for palliative care, those who declined to participate, and those with incomplete data were excluded, resulting in a group of 856 patients aged 60 to 104 years. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine associations between in-patient mortality and gender, age, length of stay, number of prescribed medications and diagnoses at admission, history of heart failure, neoplastic disease, immobility syndrome, delirium, infectious disease, and laboratory tests at admission (serum albumin and creatinine. RESULTS: The overall mortality rate was 16.4%. The following factors were associated with higher in-hospital mortality: delirium (OR=4.13, CI=2.65-6.44, P1.3mg/dL (OR=2.39, CI=1.53-3.72, P<.001, history of heart failure (OR=1.97, CI=1.20-3.22, P=.007, immobility (OR=1.84, CI=1.16-2.92, P =.009, and advanced age (OR=1.03, CI=1.01-1.06, P=.019. CONCLUSIONS: This study strengthens the perception of delirium as a mortality predictor among older inpatients. Cancer, immobility, low albumin levels, elevated creatinine levels, history of heart failure and advanced age were also related to higher mortality rates in this population.

  20. Cumulative radiation dose of multiple trauma patients during their hospitalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhikang; Sun Jianzhong; Zhao Zudan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the cumulative radiation dose of multiple trauma patients during their hospitalization and to analyze the dose influence factors. Methods: The DLP for CT and DR were retrospectively collected from the patients during June, 2009 and April, 2011 at a university affiliated hospital. The cumulative radiation doses were calculated by summing typical effective doses of the anatomic regions scanned. Results: The cumulative radiation doses of 113 patients were collected. The maximum,minimum and the mean values of cumulative effective doses were 153.3, 16.48 mSv and (52.3 ± 26.6) mSv. Conclusions: Multiple trauma patients have high cumulative radiation exposure. Therefore, the management of cumulative radiation doses should be enhanced. To establish the individualized radiation exposure archives will be helpful for the clinicians and technicians to make decision whether to image again and how to select the imaging parameters. (authors)

  1. [Rehabilitation of asthmatic patients in the chest hospital (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, W

    1976-01-01

    Modern chest hospitals offer favourable conditions for the rehabilitation of asthmatic patients. In the Central Hospital for Heart- and Lung Diseases at Bad Berka 421 patients with asthma were rehabilitated under clinical conditions in 1972 and 1973. Their rehabilitation was based on individualized long-term plans for treatment taking in consideration environmental factors which might have triggered the attacks. We report on experiences with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and the results of vocational rehabilitation. 284 patients (67.4%) could return to their work, 4.5% were disabled, 16.5% remained invalids and 11.6% were old-age pensioners or children. The results depended on age, on the type of asthma, on the severity of cardio-pulmonary impairment, on certain concomitant diseases and on the patients cooperation. Possibilities for elimination of factors starting an attack sometimes proved decisive. For the maintenance of rehabilitatory success subsequent ambulatory long-term care by a specialist is provided.

  2. Increased risk of hyperthyroidism among patients hospitalized with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anders F; Kessing, Lars V

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hyperthyroidism has been associated with affective disorder in many cross-sectional studies, but longitudinal studies in this connection are scarce. We assessed whether hospitalization with depressive disorder or bipolar disorder was a risk factor for development of hyperthyroidism....... METHODS: We conducted a historical cohort study using the Danish register data. The observational period was 1977--99. Three study cohorts were identified: all patients with a first hospital admission with resulting index discharge diagnoses of depression, bipolar disorder, or osteoarthritis. The risks...... with depressive disorder did not have an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, whereas patients with bipolar disorder had an increased of risk on the margin of statistical significance, when compared to patients with osteoarthritis. Patients with bipolar disorder had a significantly increased risk of hyperthyroidism...

  3. Inhaler Education for Hospital-Based Pharmacists: How Much Is Required?

    OpenAIRE

    Cynthia Anne Jackevicius; Kenneth R Chapman

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of a more intensive educational intervention with a less intensive intervention on the ability of hospital pharmacists to be prepared to educate patients regarding inhaled device technique.DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. Inhaler technique and knowledge were assessed pre-education, immediately after and three months after education by a research assistant blinded to the educational allocation.SETTING: Tertiary hospital pharmacy department.POPULATION...

  4. Shift work in hospitals: what are the effects on patient and employee outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Peter; Dall'ora, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The healthcare sector works around the clock and requires the availability of staff 24 hours a day. This means that shift work is an essential aspect of staffing hospital departments. However, concerns have been raised about the consequences of some shift patterns for both patient and staff. Although there is no “ideal” shift system, this brief reports on evidence of the effect of shift characteristics including the length of the shift, rotation and days off on patient and employee outcomes.

  5. DIABETIC FOOT DISEASE IN KING GEORGE HOSPITAL, VISHAKAPATNAM: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY ON 100 PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Babu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot as the leading cause of lower limb amputation is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus. Effective treatment and formulation of prevention guidelines for diabetic foot require a thorough understanding of characteristics of diabetic foot patients and their ulcers, so we conducted this study to investigate these characteristics . INTRODUCTION : Necessary data was collected from case sheets of 100 diabetic foot patients admitted in King Goerge Hospital, Vishakapatnam in the year 2014

  6. Metabolic syndrome in first-time hospitalized patients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, L; Vestergaard, C H; Lund, H

    2016-01-01

    evaluated MetS and its components in first-time hospitalized patients with depression (N = 52) and healthy controls (N = 50) (18-45 years). Physical activity, aerobic fitness, sleeping disturbances, smoking and dietary habits, and psychopharmacological treatment were recorded at baseline for all...

  7. Antituberculosis drugs and hepatotoxicity among hospitalized patients in Jos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samson E Isa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Hepatotoxicity due to first-line anti-TBs, whether based on clinical features alone or backed by liver chemistry, is common among hospitalized patients in our environment. Studies to determine the predictors of hepatotoxicity to guide clinical interventions aimed at the prevention or timely identification of cases are needed.

  8. The bacteria profiles of wounds in diabetic patients hospitalized in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetic wound infections still remain a health concern such that correct identification of bacteria is essential in monitoring the spread of the infections as well as in the administration of the correct treatment. This study therefore focuses on isolating and identifying bacteria present in diabetic wounds of hospitalized patients in ...

  9. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Hospitalized Burn Patients in Gaza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUNG: Burns are serious health problems and leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. This study aimed to overview the epidemiological profile and to present outcomes among hospitalized burn patients in AL Alamy burn center in Gaza. METHODS: This was a ...

  10. Geriatric injuries among patients attending a regional hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data was collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS computer system. A total of 94 geriatric trauma patients constituting 22.7% of all trauma admissions ... Pre-hospital care was recorded in 5.3% of cases. The musculoskeletal (72.3%) and head (66.0%) regions were commonly affected.

  11. Asthma Burden in the Hospitalized Patients in North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Ghaffari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease. Genetic and environmental factors have been important role in the induction of asthma. It's estimated that asthma affect 2.7 to 35.4% of child (in average 13.4% in Iran. The aims of this study to assess the costs of asthma patients admitted in Boali hospital in Sari in the north of Iran. Patients and Methods: This descriptive study was carried out in asthma patients 1 to 20 years old that admitted in the Boali hospital in Sari from 2008 to2012. Out of 455 folders, 22 folders excluded because incomplete registrations.Results: Out of 432 patients, 280 patients (64.81% were male. 349 patients were 1-5 years old (80.78%. Average annual cost in our asthmatic patients was 1219064 Rials(Iran currency ($ 121.9 per patient, 1183655 ($ 118.3 and 1284789($ 128.5 Rials per male and per female patient respectively. Conclusions: Our study showed asthma disease has been significantly cost for patient, family

  12. Evaluation of patient wristbands and patient identification process in a training hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Canan; Celik, Yusuf; Hikmet, Neset

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the utilisation of patient wristbands (PWs) and patient identification (PI) process in a training hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in a training hospital with 640 beds, accreditied by Joint Commission International. The views of 348 patients and 419 hospital personnel on the implementation of patient wristbands and identification process were evaluated. Findings The results indicated that lack of information among patients about the importance of PWs and the misknowledge among staff participants on when, where, and by whom PWs should be put on and verified were the weakest points in this hospital. Research limitations/implications PI process must be strictly implemented according to the standard procedures of patient safety. Both patients and hospital personnel should be trained continuously, and training sessions must be held to increase their awareness about the importance of PWs and identification process. Practical implications Finding new ways and using new methods for increasing knowledge about PI and PWs are necessary. Hospital management should prepare a written PI and PW policy and procedure documents by taking the views of patients and hospital personnel and share these with them. Originality/value This study incorporates the views and attitudes of patients and health care personnel in improving health care quality by increasing awareness about PI and wristbands.

  13. THREAT helps to identify epistaxis patients requiring blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of patients who needed a blood transfusion due to epistaxis-caused anemia and to define potential risk factors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting A total cohort of 591 epistaxis patients, prospectively included between March 2007 and April 2008 at the ENT department of the University Hospital of Zurich, was evaluated concerning the need for blood transfusions. Methods The clinical charts and medical histories of these patients were evaluated. Main outcome measures Common parameters that increase the risk for severe anemia due to epistaxis. Results Twenty-two patients required blood transfusions due to their medical condition. 22.7% suffered from traumatic nosebleeds. Another 27.3% had a known medical condition with an increased bleeding tendency. These proportions were significantly higher than in the group of patients without need of blood transfusion. The odds ratio for receiving a blood transfusion was 14.0 in patients with hematologic disorders, 4.3 in traumatic epistaxis and 7.7 in posterior bleeders. The transfusion-dependent epistaxis patients suffered significantly more often from severe posterior nosebleeds with the need for a surgical therapeutic approach. Conclusions Patients with severe nosebleeds either from the posterior part of the nose or with known hematologic disorders or traumatic epistaxis should be closely monitored by blood parameter analyses to evaluate the indication for hemotransfusion. The acronym THREAT (Trauma, Hematologic disorder, and REAr origin of bleeding → Transfusion) helps to remember and identify the factors associated with an increased risk of receiving blood transfusion. PMID:23663751

  14. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments.

  15. Universal isolation precautions for patients at an academic hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Maziero,Vanessa Gomes; Vannuchi,Marli Terezinha Oliveira; Vituri,Dagmar Willamourius; Haddad,Maria do Carmo Lourenço; Tada,Cristiane Nakaya

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To apply universal isolation precautions for patients at an academic hospital by a nursing team. METHODS: This descriptive and prospective study used data from advice service of quality control and nursing care that were gathered in observational reports of universal isolation precautions for patients admitted in two surgical inpatient units during 2008 and 2010. RESULTS: The mean general classification for both units was between desirable and adequate in the observational analysis...

  16. The Journey to Meet Emerging Community Benefit Requirements in a Rural Hospital: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Allison V; Levin, Pamela F

    2015-10-22

    The Affordable Care Act requires nonprofit hospitals to collaborate with public health agencies and community stakeholders to identify and address community health needs. As a rural organization, Wabash County (Indiana) Hospital pursued new approaches to achieve these revised requirements of the community benefit mandate. Using a case study approach, the authors provide a historical review of governmental relationships with nonprofit community hospitals, offer a case study application for implementing legislative mandates and community benefit requirements, share the insights they garnered on their journey to meet the mandates, and conclude that drawing upon the existing resources in the community and using current community assets in novel ways can help conserve time, and also financial, material, and human resources in meeting legislative mandates.

  17. Expectations of hospital treatment. Conflicting views of patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodol, A E; Plutchik, R; Karasu, T B

    1980-02-01

    A 40-item therapeutic community questionnaire, developed from a survey of experts, was used to assess the treatment needs and expectations of a group of 30 hospitalized psychiatric patients. The patients' attitudes regarding an ideal ward atmosphere were compared to those, as measured previously by the identical instrument, of the treating staff. The results indicated that psychiatric inpatients found the therapeutic community modality consistent with their needs and expectations. However, staff and patients were divided in attitude toward the therapeutic community concept. The staff's definition of therapeutic community was broad and exceeded the principles of the therapeutic community experts. The patients desired a more conservative approach which combined respect and responsibility with a ward structure that was unambiguous and less democratic. Studies of ward atmosphere as well as premature termination in psychotherapy indicate that such conflicts in viewpoint between patients and staff might have detrimental effects on hospital outcome. A negotiated approach to inpatient treatment is suggested as a means to establish greater autonomy, growth in self-esteem, sense of responsibility, and increased trust on the part of hospitalized patients.

  18. Understanding patients' behavioral intentions: evidence from Iran's private hospitals industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan; Arab, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud Ghazi; Rashidian, Arash; Forushani, Abbas Rahimi; Khabiri, Roghayeh

    2014-01-01

    In the ever-increasing competitive market of private hospital industry, creating a strong relationship with the customers that shapes patients' loyalty has been considered a key factor in obtaining market share. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of customer loyalty among patients of private hospitals in Iran. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Tehran, the capital of the Islamic Republic of Iran in 2010. The study samples composed of 969 patients who were consecutively selected from eight private hospitals. The survey instrument was designed based on a review of the related literature and included 36 items. Data analysis was performed using structural equation modeling. For the service quality construct, three dimensions extracted: Process, interaction, and environment. Both process and interaction quality had significant effects on perceived value. Perceived value along with the process and interaction quality were the most important antecedents of patient overall satisfaction. The direct effect of the process and interaction quality on behavioral intentions was insignificant. Perceived value and patient overall satisfaction were the direct antecedents of patient behavioral intentions and the mediators between service quality and behavioral intentions. Environment quality of service delivery had no significant effect on perceived value, overall satisfaction, and behavioral intentions. Contrary to previous similar studies, the role of service quality was investigated not in a general sense, but in the form of three types of qualities including quality of environment, quality of process, and quality of interaction.

  19. Worsening psychosis induced by varenicline in a hospitalized psychiatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaula, Bethany A; Thomas, Michele D

    2009-07-01

    Varenicline is a novel treatment for smoking cessation; however, the agent has not been well studied in a population with severe mental illness. Varenicline can reportedly cause neuropsychiatric adverse effects, some resulting in hospitalizations and/or suicides. We describe a case of clinician-observed, worsening psychotic symptoms in a patient with chronic mental illness who was receiving varenicline. A 45-year-old woman with bipolar disorder, mixed type with psychotic features, was admitted to a psychiatric hospital due to acute decompensation after she discontinued her drug therapy. Because of the facility's smoke-free policy, the patient was not permitted to smoke cigarettes during her hospitalization. Over the next several weeks, her condition was stabilized with psychotropic drugs. Her symptoms improved, and plans were made for her discharge. Varenicline was prescribed to manage her nicotine cravings. After 2 days of treatment, staff members noted worsening of the patient's psychotic symptoms and agitation. Varenicline was discontinued, the patient's mental status returned to baseline, and she was subsequently discharged. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 7) between the patient's worsening psychosis and her varenicline therapy. This case report provides valuable support of previously published cases that demonstrate the risk of exacerbation of psychotic symptoms with varenicline use in patients with severe mental illness. With proper assessment and management of varenicline-induced neuropsychiatric effects, health care professionals can provide an important role in helping to prevent and manage worsening psychiatric symptoms.

  20. Constipation--prevalence and incidence among medical patients acutely admitted to hospital with a medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiesen, Eline; Trosborg, Ingelise; Bager, Louise; Herning, Margrethe; Lyngby, Christel; Konradsen, Hanne

    2014-08-01

    To examine the prevalence and incidence of patient-reported symptoms of constipation in acutely hospitalised medical patients. Constipation is a common medical problem with severe consequences, and most people suffer from constipation at some point in their lives. In the general population, constipation is one of the most common complaints and is a significant personal and public health burden. Alteration in patients' patterns of elimination while in hospital has long been identified as either a potential or an actual problem that requires attention. Knowledge of the prevalence and incidence of constipation during hospitalisation is only sporadic. The study was descriptive and a prospective cohort design was chosen. The Constipation Assessment Scale was translated into Danish and was used for the assessment of patient-reported bowel function. Five nurses made the assessments at admission to the acute medical ward and three days after admission. Three hundred and seventy-three patients participated in this study. Thirty-nine percent of the patients showed symptoms of constipation at admission. Of the patients who did not have the symptoms at admission, 43% developed the symptoms during the first three days of their stay in hospital. Significantly more of the older patients developed symptoms of moderate constipation. The incidence rate was 143 new cases per 1000 patient days. In this study, symptoms of constipation were common among patients acutely admitted to hospital due to different medical conditions. Symptoms of constipation were also developed during the first three days of the stay in hospital. The study highlights the need to develop both clinical guidelines towards treating constipation, and preventive measures to ensure that patients do not become constipated while staying in hospital. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Urinary incontinence in hospital patients: prevalence and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Betteloni Junqueira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to analyze the prevalence of urinary incontinence and its associated factors in hospital patients. Method: this is a cross-sectional epidemiological study whose data were collected using the instruments Sociodemographic and Clinical Data, Characteristics of Urinary Leakage and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form. Prevalence was surveyed on a single day for four consecutive months. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Student t-test, Mann-Whitney test and logistic regression (forward stepwise. Results: the final sample consisted of 319 hospital adults (57.1% female, mean age of 47.9 years (SD=21.1. The prevalence of urinary incontinence was 22.9% (28% in women and 16.1% in men and the associated factors were: female sex (OR=3.89, age (OR=1.03, asthma (OR=3.66, use of laxatives (OR=3.26, use of diaper during the evaluation (OR=2.75, use of diaper at home (OR=10.29, and use of diaper at some point during the hospital stay (OR=6.74. Conclusion: the findings of this study differ from those found in the scarce existing literature on the subject in hospital patients. There is a need for previous studies such as this before proposing the implementation of preventive and therapeutic actions during the hospital stay.

  2. Five-Year Data of Clinical Characteristics and Laboratory Findings of Hospitalized Hemophilic Patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Marlina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemophilia A has the highest incidence, more than 80% of 172.323 cases worldwide in 2012. It is stated that clinical characteristics of hemophilia A is worse than others, so it is required to prove and to know further about the clinical characteristics and severity likelihood in all hemophilic patients in order to prevent re-bleeding and re-injury and also for a better medical response. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out to 43 medical records of hospitalized hemophilic patients from 2009 to 2013 in Dr Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. The inclusion criteria were a complete patient identity (name, age, sex, written chief complaint, complete physical examination (bleeding, edema, hematoma, hemarthrosis, anemic symptoms and laboratory test results (factor level, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelet and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time. The data was collected from August‒October 2014, analyzed and presented using frequency distribution. Results: Most of the patients were 5-10 years old, male and had hemophilia A. The most common complaint was external bleeding, followed by edema. From 43 patients, 38 (88% cases were classified as severe factor deficiency, had mild to severe anemia, however the platelet count in most of the cases was in normal value. About 91% cases had prolonged Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time in moderate to severe level. Conclusions: Similar with other studies worldwide, most of the hospitalized hemophilic patients have hemophilia A. Most of the patents has moderate to severe bleeding with laboratory test result between moderate to severe level as well.

  3. Viability of gait speed test in hospitalized elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Prata Martinez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The gait speed test (GST is a physical test that can predict falls and aid in the diagnosis of sarcopenia in the elderly. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies evaluating its reproducibility in hospitalized elderly patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and reproducibility of the six-meter GST (6GST in hospitalized elderly patients. Methods: This repeated measures study involved hospitalized elderly patients (≥ 60 years of age who underwent the 6GST by the fifth day of hospitalization, were able to walk without assistance, and presented no signs of dyspnea or pain that would prevent them from performing the test. The 6GST was performed three times in sequence, with a rest period between each test, in a level corridor. Gait speed was measured in meters/second. Reproducibility was assessed by comparing the means, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs and Bland-Altman plots. Results: We evaluated 110 elderly patients in a total of 330 tests. All participants completed all of the tests. The comparisons between the speeds obtained during the three tests showed high ICCs and a low mean bias (Bland-Altman plots. The correlation and accuracy were greatest when the mean maximum speed was compared with that obtained in the third test (1.26 ± 0.44 m/s vs. 1.22 ± 0.44 m/s; ICC = 0.99; p = 0.001; mean bias = 0.04; and limits of agreement = −0.27 to 0.15. Conclusions: The 6GST was proven to be safe and to have good reproducibility in this sample of hospitalized elderly patients. The third measurement seems to correspond to the maximum speed, since the first two measurements underestimated the actual performance.

  4. Preferences for photographic art among hospitalized patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Hazel; Schroeter, Kathryn; Hanson, Andrew; Asmus, Kathryn; Grossman, Azure

    2013-07-01

    To determine the preferences of patients with cancer for viewing photographic art in an inpatient hospital setting and to evaluate the impact of viewing photographic art. Quantitative, exploratory, single-group, post-test descriptive design incorporating qualitative survey questions. An academic medical center in the midwestern United States. 80 men (n = 44) and women (n = 36) aged 19-85 years (X = 49) and hospitalized for cancer treatment. Participants viewed photographs via computers and then completed a five-instrument electronic survey. Fatigue, quality of life, performance status, perceptions of distraction and restoration, and content categories of photographs. Ninety-six percent of participants enjoyed looking at the study photographs. The photographs they preferred most often were lake sunset (76%), rocky river (66%), and autumn waterfall (66%). The most rejected photographs were amusement park (54%), farmer's market vegetable table (51%), and kayakers (49%). The qualitative categories selected were landscape (28%), animals (15%), people (14%), entertainment (10%), imagery (10%), water (7%), spiritual (7%), flowers (6%), and landmark (3%). Some discrepancy between the quantitative and qualitative sections may be related to participants considering water to be a landscape. The hypothesis that patients' preferences for a category of photographic art are affected by the psychophysical and psychological qualities of the photographs, as well as the patients' moods and characteristics, was supported. Nurses can play an active role in helping patients deal with the challenges of long hospital stays and life-threatening diagnoses through distraction and restoration interventions such as viewing photographic images of nature. Nurses can use photographic imagery to provide a restorative intervention during the hospital experience. Photographic art can be used as a distraction from the hospital stay and the uncertainty of a cancer diagnosis. Having patients view

  5. Patient safety and nursing implication: Survey in Catalan hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixas Sala, Núria; Monistrol Ruano, Olga; Espuñes Vendrell, Jordi; Sallés Creus, Montserrat; Gallardo González, Mónica; Ramón Cantón, Carme; Bueno Domínguez, María José; Llinas Vidal, Montserrat; Campo Osaba, María Antonia

    This study aims to describe the implementation of the patient safety (PS) programs in catalan hospitals and to analyze the level of nursing involvement. Multicenter cross-sectional study. To obtain the data two questionnaires were developed; one addressed to the hospital direction and another to the nurse executive in PS. The survey was distributed during 2013 to the 65 acute care hospitals in Catalonia. The questionnaire was answered by 43 nursing directors and 40 nurse executive in PS. 93% of the hospitals responded that they had a PS Program and 81.4% used a specific scoreboard with PS indicators. The referent of the hospital in PS was a nurse in 55.8% of the centres. 92.5% had a system of notification of adverse effects with an annual average of 190.3 notifications. In 86% of the centres had a nurse involved in the PS program but only in the 16% of the centres the nurse dedication was at full-time. The nurse respondents evaluate the degree of implementation of the PBS program with a note of approved and they propound as improvement increase the staff dedicated to the PS and specific academic training in PS. The degree of implementation of programs for patient safety is high in Catalan acute hospitals, while the organizational structure is highly diverse. In more than half of the hospitals the PS referent was a nurse, confirming the nurse involvement in the PS programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Implemented Initiatives on Patient Safety Culture in Fateme Al-zahra Hospital in Najafabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Izadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety improvement requires ongoing culture. This cultural change is the most important challenge that managers are faced with in creation of a safe system. This study aims to show the results of initiatives to improvement in patient safety culture in Fateme Al-zahra hospital. Method: In the quasi-experimental research, patient safety culture was measured using the Persian questionnaire on adaptation of the hospital survey on patient safety culture in 12 dimensions. The research was conducted before (January 2010 and after (September 2012 the improvement initiatives. In this study, all units were determined and no sampling method was used. Reliability of the questionnaire was tested by Alpha Chronbakh (0.83. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics indices and Independent T-Test by SPSS Software (version 18. Results: 350 questionnaires were distributed in each phaseand overall response rate was 58 and 56 percent, respectively. According to Independent T-test, Management expectations and actions, Organizational learning, Management support, Feedback and communication about error, Communication openness, Overall Perceptions of Safety, Non-punitive Response to Error, Frequency of Event Reporting, and Patient safety culture showed significant differences (P-value0.05. The mean score of Patient safety culture was 2.27 (from 5 and it was increased to 2.46 after initiatives that showed a significant difference (P-value<0.05. Conclusion: Although, improvement in patient safety culture needs teamwork and continuous attempts, the study showed that initiatives implemented in the case hospital had been effective in some dimensions. However, Teamwork within hospital units, Teamwork across units, Hospital handoffs and transitions, and Staffing dimensions were recognized for further intervention. Hospital could improve the patient safety culture with planning and measures in these dimensions.

  7. Real money: complications and hospital costs in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmila, Mark R; Jakubus, Jill L; Maggio, Paul M; Wahl, Wendy L; Dimick, Justin B; Campbell, Darrell A; Taheri, Paul A

    2008-08-01

    Major postoperative complications are associated with a substantial increase in hospital costs. Trauma patients are known to have a higher rate of complications than the general surgery population. We used the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) methodology to evaluate hospital costs, duration of stay, and payment associated with complications in trauma patients. Using NSQIP principles, patient data were collected for 512 adult patients admitted to the trauma service for > 24 hours at a Level 1 trauma center (2004-2005). Patients were placed in 1 of 3 groups: no complications (none), >or=1 minor complication (minor, eg, urinary tract infection), or >or=1 major complication (major, eg, pneumonia). Total hospital charges, costs, payment, and duration of stay associated with each complication group were determined from a cost-accounting database. Multiple regression was used to determine the costs of each type of complication after adjusting for differences in age, sex, new injury severity score, Glasgow coma scale score, maximum head abbreviated injury scale, and first emergency department systolic blood pressure. A total of 330 (64%) patients had no complications, 53 (10%) had >or= 1 minor complication, and 129 (25%) had >or= 1 major complication. Median hospital charges increased from $33,833 (none) to $81,936 (minor) and $150,885 (major). The mean contribution to margin per day was similar for the no complication and minor complication groups ($994 vs $1,115, P = .7). Despite higher costs, the patients in the major complication group generated a higher mean contribution to margin per day compared to the no complication group ($2,168, P costs when adjusted for confounding variables was $19,915 for the minor complication group (P costs associated with traumatic injury provides a window for assessing the potential cost reductions associated with improved quality care. To optimize system benefits, payers and providers should develop integrated

  8. Recurrence rate of clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Kim, Jason; Latta, Dan; Smathers, Sarah; McGowan, Karin L; Zaoutis, Theodore; Mamula, Petar; Baldassano, Robert N

    2011-01-01

    The incidence and associated morbidity of Clostridium difficile (CD) infection has been increasing at an alarming rate in North America. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhea in the USA. Patients with CDAD have longer average hospital admissions and additional hospital costs. Evidence has demonstrated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a higher incidence of CD in comparison to the general population. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of recurrence of CD in hospitalized pediatric patients with IBD compared to hospitalized controls. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether infection with CD resulted in a more severe disease course of IBD. This was a nested case control retrospective study of hospitalized pediatric patients. Diagnosis of CD was confirmed with stool Toxin A and B analysis. The following data were obtained from the medical records: demographic information, classification of IBD including location of disease, IBD therapy, and prior surgeries. In addition, prior hospital admissions within 1 year and antibiotic exposure were recorded. The same information was recorded following CD infection. Cases were patients with IBD and CD; two control populations were also studied: patients with CD but without IBD, and patients with IBD but without CD. For aim 1, a total of 111 eligible patients with IBD and CD infection and 77 eligible control patients with CD infection were included. The rate of recurrence of CD in the IBD population was 34% compared to 7.5% in the control population (P < 0.0001). In evaluating the effect of CD infection on IBD disease severity, we compared the 111 IBD patients with CD to a second control population of 127 IBD patients without CD. 57% of IBD-CD patients were readmitted with an exacerbation of disease within 6 months of infection with CD and 67% required escalation of therapy following CD infection, compared to 30% of IBD patients without CD (P

  9. Frequency of sarcopenia and associated factors among hospitalized elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bruno Prata; Batista, Anne Karine Menezes Santos; Gomes, Isabela Barboza; Olivieri, Flávia Milholo; Camelier, Fernanda Warken Rosa; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção

    2015-05-06

    Sarcopenia is an important public health problem that affects mainly elders, and has negative consequences, such as disability and even death. Due to the lack of studies evaluating sarcopenia in elderly persons hospitalized in Brazil, the aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of sarcopenia and associated factors among elders in a hospital in the city of Salvador-Brazil. This cross-sectional study included 110 hospitalized elderly patients in a multi-specialty hospital in Salvador-BA, Brazil. Inclusion criteria: were elders aged ≥60 years between the first and fifth day of hospitalization; who were able to walk without external assistance; with medical permission to walk, and who did not take vasoactive and inotropic drugs. The diagnosis of sarcopenia was determined by combining the reduction in skeletal muscle mass with muscle weakness (women, sarcopenia was described in percentages with their respective confidence intervals and logistic regression was performed for multivariate analysis of factors associated with sarcopenia. Among the 110 patients included, the frequency of sarcopenia was 21.8%, with 10.0% being of the severe type. There was a predominance of clinical profile (59.1%), such as heart disease (20.0%), pneumonia (13.6%) and skin infections (9.1%), with a Charlson index of 5.4 ± 1.8. The factors associated with sarcopenia were age (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.23), clinical profile on admission (OR = 5.15; 95% CI = 1.16-22.9) and smoking (OR = 7.8; 95% CI = 1.53-39.9). The frequency of sarcopenia in elderly hospitalized patients was high (1 in 5 elderly) and anthropometric equation can be a viable and inexpensive alternative to screening and programming intervention in this population.

  10. Use of Nutrition Standards to Improve Nutritional Quality of Hospital Patient Meals: Findings from New York City's Healthy Hospital Food Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Alyssa; Lederer, Ashley; Johnson Curtis, Christine

    2015-11-01

    Most hospital patient meals are considered regular-diet meals; these meals are not required to meet comprehensive nutrition standards for a healthy diet. Although programs exist to improve nutrition in hospital food, the focus is on retail settings such as vending machines and cafeterias vs patient meals. New York City's Healthy Hospital Food Initiative (HHFI) provides nutrition standards for regular-diet meals that hospitals can adopt, in addition to retail standards. This study was undertaken to describe regular-diet patient menus before and after implementation of the HHFI nutrition standards. The study involved pre- and post- menu change analyses of hospitals participating in the HHFI between 2010 and 2014. Eight New York City hospitals, selected based on voluntary participation in the HHFI, were included in the analyses. Nutritional content of regular-diet menus were compared with the HHFI nutrition standards. Nutrient analysis and exact Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for the analysis of the data. At baseline, no regular-diet menu met all HHFI standards, and most exceeded the daily limits for percentage of calories from fat (n=5), percentage of calories from saturated fat (n=5), and milligrams of sodium (n=6), and they did not meet the minimum grams of fiber (n=7). Hospitals met all key nutrient standards after implementation, increasing fiber (25%, Pfood service operations, indicating feasibility of this framework in a range of hospital settings. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Factors related to patient satisfaction with hospital emergency services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Bermejo Alegría, Rosa María; Más Castillo, Adelia; Hidalgo Montesinos, María Dolores; Gomis Cebrián, Rafael; Calle Urra, José Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    To determine the perceived quality variables related to satisfaction and to identify the influence of sociodemographic factors on user satisfaction with hospital emergencies. A telephone survey was conducted with a specifically designed questionnaire for use in a sample of 3,600 users of hospital emergency services in nine public hospitals in 2008 and 2009. The adjusted model including all perceived quality and sociodemographic variables explained 47.1% of the variance (adjusted R(2)). Of all the independent variables included, only eight were significant in predicting the level of patient satisfaction. These variables were related to the patient's opinion of the relationship with medical staff (p = 0.041), nurses' and porters' professionalism (p = 0.010 and 0.022), infrastructure (cleanliness and comfort) (p = 0.033 and 0.008), information received at discharge (p = 0.000), waiting time in the emergency department (p = 0.000) and the perception of treatment-diagnosis without failure (p = 0.028). The variables influencing emergency patients' satisfaction were determined, allowing areas where corrective action could be introduced to be identified. In addition, possible confounding factors that should be controlled for when comparing results among distinct hospitals were identified. The emergency satisfaction questionnaire is a useful instrument to evaluate and improve quality of care. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Urine Creatinine Concentrations in Drug Monitoring Participants and Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A; Seegmiller, Jesse C; Kloss, Julie; Apple, Fred S

    2016-10-01

    Urine drug testing is commonly performed in both clinical and forensic arenas for screening, monitoring and compliance purposes. We sought to determine if urine creatinine concentrations in monitoring program participants were significantly different from hospital in-patients and out-patients undergoing urine drug testing. We retrospectively reviewed urine creatinine submitted in June through December 2015 for all specimens undergoing urine drug testing. The 20,479 creatinine results were categorized as hospitalized patients (H) and monitoring/compliance groups for pain management (P), legal (L) or recovery (R). Median creatinine concentrations (interquartile range, mg/dL) were significantly different (P creatinine concentrations were significantly lower in the R vs. L group (Pcreatinine concentration and may indicate participants' attempts to tamper with their drug test results through dilution means. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Hospital cannot be held liable for breach of patient's privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-04

    The Minnesota Court of Appeals ruled that a law guaranteeing the confidentiality of a patient's medical records did not create a private cause of actions for damages when the patient's HIV was revealed. The plaintiff, known as [name removed], requested that his stepbrother not be told his HIV status. A relative gained access to his medical file while working at a medical center and disclosed [name removed]'s HIV status to his stepbrother. [name removed] sued the relative and the hospital. The district court ruled that he did not have a cause of action against the hospital and the Court of Appeals agreed. The State does not recognize claims for an invasion of privacy under the Minnesota Patients Bill of Rights.

  14. Patients' Care Needs: Documentation Analysis in General Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paans, Wolter; Müller-Staub, Maria

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the study is (a) to describe care needs derived from records of patients in Dutch hospitals, and (b) to evaluate whether nurses employed the NANDA-I classification to formulate patients' care needs. A stratified cross-sectional random-sampling nursing documentation audit was conducted employing the D-Catch instrument in 10 hospitals comprising 37 wards. The most prevalent nursing diagnoses were acute pain, nausea, fatigue, and risk for impaired skin integrity. Most care needs were determined in physiological health patterns and few in psychosocial patterns. To perform effective interventions leading to high-quality nursing-sensitive outcomes, nurses should also diagnose patients' care needs in the health management, value-belief, and coping stress patterns. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  15. A comparative study of ICU patient diaries vs. hospital charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Intensive care survivors often suffer from memory disorders, and some go on to develop anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress. Since the 1980s nurses have written diaries for intensive care patients to help them understand their illness and come to terms with their experiences after...... discharge. The central question we posed in this study was: Why do nurses write diaries in addition to conventional charting in the medical record? To answer this question, we compared intensive care diaries and hospital charts using textual analysis and narrative theory. The aims of our study were...... to compare patient diaries and hospital charts to explore (a) what each documentation instrument has to offer patients in their quest to make sense of their illness, and (b) why it is worthwhile for nurses to sustain the practice of writing diaries. The study findings show that the diary is coherent...

  16. Improved Functional Performance in Geriatric Patients During Hospital Stay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anders; Loeb, Mads Rohde; Andersen, Kristine Bramsen

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to evaluate the time course of changes in strength and functional performance in elderly hospitalized medical patients. DESIGN: This was a prospective observational study in elderly medical patients of age 65 years or older at a geriatric department.Measurement......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to evaluate the time course of changes in strength and functional performance in elderly hospitalized medical patients. DESIGN: This was a prospective observational study in elderly medical patients of age 65 years or older at a geriatric department.......Measurements were obtained on days 2 to 4, day 5 to 8, and days 9 to 13. Functional performance was measured with De Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) test and a 30-second chair stand test (30-s CST). Muscular strength was measured with handgrip strength. Activity level was determined with accelerometry (Activ...... in 30-s CST (P performance of the lower extremities in geriatric patients improves moderately over the time of a hospital stay...

  17. Radiation Exposure to Relatives of Patients Treated with Iodine-131 for Thyroid Cancer at Siriraj Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnonchiang, S.; Sritongkul, N.; Chaudakshetrin, P.; Tuntawiroon, M.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma patients treated with I-131 are potential source of high radiation exposure to relatives who are knowingly and willingly exposed to ionizing radiation as a result of providing support and comfort to patients undergoing radionuclide therapy. The purpose of this study is to present the results of measurements of radiation doses to relatives who designated to care fornon self-supporting patients treated with radioiodine at Radionuclide Therapy Ward, Siriraj Hospital. Twenty caregivers of 20 patients underwent radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancers with a standard protocol were given specific instructions with regard to radiation safety and provided with electronic digital dosimeter (PDM 112) to continuously measure radiation dose received on the daily basis, during three days in the hospital. On the day of patients' release, in vivo bioassays were performed on caregivers to determine the thyroid uptake estimates. The 3-day accumulative doses to caregivers to patients receiving 5.55 GBq (n=11) and 7.4 GBq (n=9) of I-131 ranged from 37 to 333 μSv and 176 to 1920 μSv respectively depending on the extent and level of supports required. The thyroid uptake estimates in all caregivers were undetectable. Electronic dosimeters indicated a maximum whole-body effective dose of 1920 μSv was more than the public dose limit of 1 mSv but within the general dose constraint of 5 mSv. Radiation dose to caregivers of a non self-supporting hospitalized patient undergoing radioiodine therapy were well below the limits recommended by the ICRP and the IAEA. The patients can be comforted with confidence that dose to caregivers will be below the 5- mSv limit. This study provides guidance for medical practitioners to obtain practical radiation safety concerns associated with hospitalized patients receiving I-131 therapy especially when patients are comforted in the hospital ward by caregivers. (author)

  18. Census of mental hospital patients and life expectancy of those unlikely to be discharged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, T; Bland, J M; Ilo, M; Walch, E; Willington, G

    1975-12-20

    A census in a London mental hospital was performed so that the numbers of patients requiring permanent care for the next 20 to 40 years could be estimated. Of 1467 resident patients 20% had been admitted in the preceding five months and 15% in the year before that. Of the 65% who had been in hospital for over 17 months 1% (16 patients) had been in hospital for over 5o years. Altogether 257 (18%) patients would probably be discharged, 339 (23%) might possibly be discharged if there were adequate community facilities, but 871 (59%) were not likely to be discharged; 239 patients under the age of 65 who had been admitted between 1950 and 1973 were unlikely to be discharged. There were about 10 new younger long-stay patients from each year's admissions. Three conditions--schizophrenia, organic brain syndrome, and affective illness--affected 79% of the population. Fourteen per cent had been employed on admission and 28% were considered employable or possibly employable. Half of those who might be considered for discharge (296) would need a hostel. No rehabilitation was needed or possible for 40% of the patients; 299 (20%) patients were chairbound or bedridden and 400 (27%) were totally dependent on nursing and 587 (40%) partly dependent. Twenty months after the census 361 (25%) patients had left (59 had been readmitted), 284 (19%) had died, and 822 (56%) had remained as inpatients. The most realistic future prediction was that 210 (14%) of these patients would still be in the hospital in 20 years and 43 (3%) in 40 years. In the light of these findings and the scarceness of resources current Department of Health and Social Security plans for phasing out mental hospitals must be challenged.

  19. Decreasing Hospital Readmission in Ileostomy Patients: Results of Novel Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Virginia O; Owi, Tari; Kumarusamy, Mathu A; Sullivan, Patrick S; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K; Maithel, Shishir K; Staley, Charles A; Sweeney, John F; Esper, Greg

    2017-04-01

    Nearly 30% of patients with newly formed ileostomies require hospital readmission from severe dehydration or associated complications. This contributes to significant morbidity and rising healthcare costs associated with this procedure. Our aim was to design and pilot a novel program to decrease readmissions in this patient population. An agreement was established with Visiting Nurse Health System (VNHS) in March 2015 that incorporated regular home visits with clinical triggers to institute surgeon-supervised corrective measures aimed at preventing patient decompensation associated with hospital readmissions. Thirty-day readmission data for patients managed with and without VNHS support for 10.5 months before and after implementation of this new program were collected. Of 833 patients with small bowel procedures, 162 were ileostomies with 47 in the VNHS and 115 in the non-VNHS group. Before program implementation, VNHS (n = 24) and non-VNHS patients (n = 54) had similar readmission rates (20.8% vs 16.7%). After implementation, VNHS patients (n = 23) had a 58% reduction in hospital readmission (8.7%) and non-VNHS patient hospital readmissions (n = 61) increased slightly (24.5%). Total cost of readmissions per patient in the cohort decreased by >80% in the pilot VNHS group. Implementation of a novel program reduced the 30-day readmission rate by 58% and cost of readmissions per patient by >80% in a high risk for readmission patient population with newly created ileostomies. Future efforts will expand this program to a greater number of patients, both institutionally and systemically, to reduce the readmission-rate and healthcare costs for this high-risk patient population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding Patient Experience Using Internet-based Email Surveys: A Feasibility Study at Mount Sinai Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Matthew; Lau, Davina; Jivraj, Tanaz; Principi, Tania; Dietrich, Sandra; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-01-01

    Email is becoming a widely accepted communication tool in healthcare settings. This study sought to test the feasibility of Internet-based email surveys of patient experience in the ambulatory setting. We conducted a study of email Internet-based surveys sent to patients in selected ambulatory clinics at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Our findings suggest that email links to Internet surveys are a feasible, timely and efficient method to solicit patient feedback about their experience. Further research is required to optimally leverage Internet-based email surveys as a tool to better understand the patient experience.

  1. The use of antibiotics in hospitalized adult typhoid patients in an Indonesian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggita Bunga Anggraini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang:Demam tifoid menduduki peringkat ke tiga dari 10 besar penyakit terbanyak pada pasien rawat inap di rumah sakit (RS di Indonesia pada tahun 2010. Selain itu terdapat peningkatan resistensi dan kasus-kasus karier, dan relaps. Penelitian ini menyajikan hasil analisis data tentang penggunaan antibiotik pada pasien tifoid dewasa rawat inap di suatu RS di Indonesia. Metode: Data penelitian diekstrak dari rekam medik pasien tifoid dewasa yang dirawat inap di RS PMI Bogor periode Juli-Desember 2012. Analisis dilakukan dengan kualitatif (DU90% dan kuantitatif (DDD/shr dengan menggunakan metode ATC/DDD. Hasil: Dari 459 pasien tifoid dewasa rawat inap diperoleh DDD/shr pasien tifoid dewasa rawat inap yang menggunakan antibiotik selama dari Juli sampai Desember 2012 sebesar 6,35 DDD/shr. Seftriakson merupakan antibiotika yang dipakai tertinggi yang setara 4,10 DDD/shr, yang berarti bahwa di antara 100 pasien tifoid, 4 pasien memakai seftriakson 2 g setiap hari. Selanjutnya, obat pada segmen 10% lebih banyak dibandingkan pada segmen 90%. Di antara 26 jenis antibiotika, 7 jenis di antaranya termasuk pada segmen DU 90% yaitu seftriakson (64,54%; levofloksasin (13,90%; ciprofloksasin (3,57%; meropenem (2,80%; metronidazol (2,52%; ampisilin-sulbaktam (1,65%; dan sefditoren pivoksil (1,60%.Kesimpulan:Antibiotik seftriakson yang paling banyak digunakan pada perawatan tifoid pasien dewasa rawat inap di rumah sakit. (Health Science Indones 2014;1:40-3Kata kunci:antibiotik, tifoid, ATC/DDD, DU 90%AbstractBackground: Typhoid fever was the third ranked disease among the top 10 diseases in hospitalized patients in Indonesia in 2011. There were increased drug resistance, increased number of carrier, and number of relapse cases. This study aimed to analyze the use of antibiotics in hospitalized adult typhoid patients in a hospital in Indonesia. Methods: The data were extracted from medical records of drug use in adult typhoid patients hospitalized

  2. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Older Patients: Management Strategies to Improve Patient Care and Clinical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago J. Avelino-Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospital malnutrition is estimated to affect as many as one in two patients at admission, while many others develop malnutrition throughout hospitalization. Despite being a common and long-standing problem among older adults, it is often unrecognized and associated with increased use of resources and negative outcomes such as increased complications, length of stay and mortality. Nutritional screening and assessment are readily available and inexpensive procedures that provide crucial information to develop nutrition care plans. These plans should determine the need for dietary modifications, enteral or parenteral nutrition, strategies for monitoring adverse events and therapeutic success, and parameters for therapy termination. Peculiarities of the geriatric context also need to be addressed, including the level of feeding assistance that will be required and the existence of conditions such as dementia, delirium and dysphagia. Providers should remain vigilant to potential adverse events that might result from nutritional interventions, working to prevent and correct them. Refeeding syndrome is of particular concern as a life-threatening condition. Finally, successful transition of care and adequate nutrition after discharge should also be a standing part of the nutrition care plan, and include patient/caregiver education.

  3. Assessment of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative in Three Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Bairami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, based on the critical standards of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI. Materials and Methods:In this cross-sectional study, conducted in 2014, we used PSFHI assessment tool to evaluate the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences; these general referral hospitals were selected purposefully. PSFHI assessment tool is comprised of 140 patient safety standards in five domains, categorized in 24 sub-domains. The five major domains include leadership and management, patient and public involvement, safe evidence-based clinical practices, safe environment, and lifelong learning. Results: All three hospitals met more than 70% of the critical standards. The highest score in critical standards (> 80% was related to the domain of leadership and management in all hospitals. The average score in the domain of safe evidence-based clinical practices was 70% in the studied hospitals. Finally, all the hospitals met 50% of the critical standards in the domains of patient and public involvement and safe environment. Conclusion: Based on the findings, PSFHI is a suitable program for meeting patient safety goals. The selected hospitals in this survey all had a high managerial commitment to patient safety; therefore, they could obtain high scores on critical standards.

  4. Depression in myocardial infarction patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqsood, S.; Khan, M.N.; Hayat, U.

    2017-01-01

    There is a considerably high prevalence of depression in post myocardial infarction (MI) patients. This study was designed with an aim to detect depression in patients with acute MI admitted to the CCU at Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study enrolled 246 male and female patients with acute MI. The patients were interviewed on the 3rd day of admission and their answers were marked according to the HADS-D scale. Results: With a cut-off score of 11, the frequency of depression in study participants was 27.24% (n=67). No statistically significant association was found between the age and sex of patients and depression. Conclusion: Depression is fairly common following acute MI and the management plans should include a consultation with psychiatric for individualized management of depression in post myocardial infarction patients. (author)

  5. Risk of venous thromboembolism in neuromyelitis optica patients hospitalized for acute relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Rebecca Straus; Gross, Robert; Zakin, Elina; Fabian, Michelle

    2017-06-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) patients may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) not only due to ambulatory disability but also due to systemic autoimmune and inflammatory mechanisms altering the hemostatic balance. To compare the risk of VTE in NMOSD versus multiple sclerosis (MS) patients hospitalized for acute relapses. Hospital admissions for MS or NMOSD exacerbations were retrospectively identified. Demographics and medical history were recorded. The relationship between visit diagnosis and presence of VTE within 6 weeks of relapse onset was assessed by univariate logistic regression. A multivariate model evaluated the relationship between diagnosis, age, race, gender, body mass index (BMI), disease modifying therapy use, oral corticosteroid use, oral contraceptive use, smoking, length of stay (LOS), and ambulatory status on VTE risk. A total of 30 NMOSD patients had 55 hospitalizations; 179 MS patients had 264 hospitalizations. Six NMOSD patients and one MS patient had VTE. NMOSD visits compared to MS visits had an odds ratio (OR) of VTE of 32.2 ( p = 0.002). NMOSD was more likely to be associated with VTE (OR = 17.4; p = 0.01) controlling for age, LOS, and ambulatory disability. NMOSD may be a risk factor for VTE. Larger prospective studies are required to confirm this risk and determine implications for prophylaxis.

  6. Hotel-based ambulatory care for complex cancer patients: a review of the University College London Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sive, Jonathan; Ardeshna, Kirit M; Cheesman, Simon; le Grange, Franel; Morris, Stephen; Nicholas, Claire; Peggs, Karl; Statham, Paula; Goldstone, Anthony H

    2012-12-01

    Since 2005, University College London Hospital (UCLH) has operated a hotel-based Ambulatory Care Unit (ACU) for hematology and oncology patients requiring intensive chemotherapy regimens and hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Between January 2005 and 2011 there were 1443 patient episodes, totaling 9126 patient days, with increasing use over the 6-year period. These were predominantly for hematological malignancy (82%) and sarcoma (17%). Median length of stay was 5 days (range 1-42), varying according to treatment. Clinical review and treatment was provided in the ACU, with patients staying in a local hotel at the hospital's expense. Admission to the inpatient ward was arranged as required, and there was close liaison with the inpatient team to preempt emergency admissions. Of the 523 unscheduled admissions, 87% occurred during working hours. An ACU/hotel-based treatment model can be safely used for a wide variety of cancers and treatments, expanding hospital treatment capacity, and freeing up inpatient beds for those patients requiring them.

  7. Statistical study on cancer patients of cancer research hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yoon Sang; Choi, Soo Yong; Won, Hyuk; Kim, Kee Hwa

    1991-01-01

    The total number of malignant neoplasms included on this study 7,787 cases(10.4%) among 74,928 cases for 2 years. On sex, females with 57.6% were much more than males with 42.4%. The highest proportion of cancer 50-59 age group. The most frequent primary site among males was found to be stomach with 36.2%, followed by liver(12.3%), lung(12.2%), esophagus(15.5%) and larynx(4.9%). In females, the first order was uterine cervix with 47.3%, followed most common type of morphology of malignant neoplasms was adenocarcinoma(39.0%) in males an squamous cell carcinoma(56.2%) in females. Among the cancer patients initially diagnosed in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the extent of disease was 4.6% for patient with carcinoma-in-situ, 76.3% for patients with localized involvement, 11.6% for patients with regional involvement and 7.5% for patients with distant involvement. Among,the cancer patients initially treatment in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the method of treatment was 19.0% for surgery, 27.7 for radiotherapy and 24.2% for chemotherapy. Among the cancer patients confirmed by medical records, 11.2% was traced more than 5 years. (Author)

  8. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective.

  9. Unplanned readmission after hospital discharge in burn patients in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafaryparvar, Zakiyeh; Adib, Masoomeh; Ghanbari, Atefeh; Leyli, Ehsan Kazemnezhad

    2018-02-21

    Burns are considered as one of the most serious health problems throughout the world. They may lead to adverse consequences and outcomes. One of these outcomes is unplanned readmission. Unplanned readmission has been commonly used as a quality indicator by hospitals and governments. This study aimed to determine the predictors of unplanned readmission in patients with burns hospitalized in a burn center in the North of Iran (Guilan province, Rasht). This retrospective analytic study has been done on the medical records of hospitalized patients with burns in Velayat Sub-Specialty Burn and Plastic Surgery Center, Rasht, Iran during 2008-2013. In general, 703 medical records have been reviewed but statistical analysis was performed on 626 medical records. All data were entered in SPSS (version 16) and analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. Among 626 patients with burns, the overall readmission rate was 5.1%. Predictors of readmission included total body surface area (OR 1.030, CI 1.011-1.049), hypertension (OR 2.923, CI 1.089-7.845) and skin graft (OR 7.045, CI 2.718-18.258). Considering the outcome, predictors following burn have a crucial role in the allocation of treatment cost for patients with burns and they can be used as one of the quality indicators for health care providers and governments.

  10. YaAn earthquake increases blood pressure among hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanwei; Luo, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wen; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Hongyong; Zeng, Chunyu

    YaAn, a city in Sichuan province, China, was struck by a major earthquake measuring 7.0 on the Richter scale on April 20, 2013. This study sought to investigate the impact of YaAn earthquake on the blood pressure (BP) among hospitalized patients in the department of cardiology. We enrolled 52 hospitalized patients who were admitted to our hospital at least three days before the day of earthquake in 2013 (disaster group) as compared with 52 patients during April 20, 2014 (nondisaster group). BP was measured three times per day and the prescription of antihypertensive medicine was recorded. The earthquake induced a 3.3 mm Hg significant increase in the mean postdisaster systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the disaster group as compared with the nondisaster group. SBP at admission was positively associated with the elevated SBP in the logistic regression model (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI):1.016-1.168, p = 0.015), but not other potential influencing factors, including antihypertensive medicine, sex, age, and body weight, excluding β-blockers. Patients with β-blockers prescription at the time of earthquake showed a blunt response to earthquake-induced SBP elevation than those who were taking other antihypertensive drugs (OR = 0.128, 95% CI: 0.019-0.876, p = 0.036). The YaAn earthquake induced significant increase in SBP even at a distance from the epicenter among hospitalized patients. The findings demonstrate that pure psychological components seem to be a cause of the pressor response and β-blockers might be better in controlling disaster-induced hypertension.

  11. A Functional Model of Quality Assurance for Psychiatric Hospitals and Corresponding Staffing Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis-Gould, Edna; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A model for quality assurance (QA) in psychiatric hospitals is described. Its functions (general QA, utilization review, clinical records, evaluation, management information systems, risk management, and infection control), subfunctions, and corresponding staffing requirements are reviewed. This model was designed to foster standardization in QA…

  12. Evaluation of Patient-Oriented Standards of Joint Commission International in Gilan and Mazandaran Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaseminejhad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Medical tourism, a multi-million-dollar industry, has had a significant effect in economic flourishing, creating jobs, and preventing the outflow of currency. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, according to joint commission international (JCI standards. Methods This was a descriptive cross sectional study conducted among teaching hospitals affiliated to Gilan and Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences during year 2015. To collect data and evaluate the hospitals, patient-oriented standards of JCI was applied. Results Amongst the eight standards, international patient safety goals (IPSG (with a score of 87.5% had the highest, and patient and family education (PFE (with a score of 53.75% had the lowest score. Hospital “4” with a score of 90.41%, had the highest, and hospital “7” with 58.90%, had the lowest rate of compliance to the standards. According to the Mann-Whitney test, the observed statistics considering a P value of ≤ 0.05 level, was not significant, therefore on a 95% certainty level, there was no significant difference between hospitals in Gilan and Mazandaran, regarding compliance with standards. Overall, the hospitals under study were relatively prepared for attracting medical tourists. Conclusions According to the results, it seems that more planning and implementation of projects is required to strengthen the axes of the joint commission regarding accreditation of hospitals and attraction of medical tourists to these centers, especially foreign tourists. Researchers are recommended to pay special attention to the university of medical sciences of two provinces for the establishment of standards and utilization of professional consultants.

  13. Comparison of the carbon footprint of different patient diets in a Spanish hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Rosario; Moliner, Enrique; Pikula, Andrej; Mena-Nieto, Angel; Ortega, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    Mitigating climate change requires management strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in any sector, including the health system. Carbon footprint calculations should play a key role in quantifying and communicating these emissions. Food is among the categories with low accuracy because the carbon footprint for food is still under development. We aimed to quantify the carbon footprint of different diets. Average carbon footprint for a normal diet was based on detailed composition data in Juan Ramón Jiménez Hospital (Huelva, Spain). In addition, the carbon footprints of 17 other therapeutic diets were estimated using a streamlined variation of each diet published by Benidorm Clinical Hospital (Spain). The carbon footprint was calculated for 18 hospital diets for a variety of patients. The reference menu corresponds to the normal diet provided to patients who do not have special dietary requirements. This menu has a low carbon footprint of 5.083 CO₂ eq/day. Hospital diets contribute to the carbon footprint of a hospital. The type of diet has a significant impact on the greenhouse gas emissions. A Mediterranean diet is associated with lower environmental impact than diets with more meat, in particular red meat. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Patients' Expectations and Perceptions of Service Quality in the Selected Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadi, Aliasghar; Shojaee, Jalil; Abedi, Ghassem; Siamian, Hasan; Abedini, Ehsan; Rostami, Farideh

    2016-04-01

    Hospital's success depends on patients' expectations, perceptions, and judgment on the quality of services provided by hospitals. This study was conducted to assess the patients' perceptions and expectations from the quality of inpatient health care in Vali-Asr hospital, Ghaemshahr, and Imam Khomeini and Shafa Hospitals, Sari. This study is applied regarding the objective of the study. Considering the research methodology, it is a descriptive - analytical study. The sample of this study consists of 600 patients with at least 24 hours of being hospitalized in internal, surgery, women, and children sectors of Vali-Asr, Ghaemshahr, Imam Khomeini, and Shafa Hospitals. Using random sampling method, the classifications relevant to the size of each class were selected. The data required was collected through the standard SERVQUAL questionnaire and then it was analyzed using the SPSS software. The overall mean value and standard deviation of expectations were equal to 10.4 and 28, respectively. The mean value for the field of perception was 69.2 and the relevant standard deviation was 26. In terms of patients and hospital visits in concrete cases, the highest priority is related to empathy. The second priority is related to physical appearance, the third priority is related to responsiveness, the fourth priority is related to assurance, and the lowest priority is related to the reliability of the SERVQUAL approach. Examining the gap between patients' perceptions and expectations, the widest gap was observed in the Vali-Asr Hospital with the mean and SD (-92.0±39.0) and the lowest gap was observed in Shafa Hospital with the mean value of (-39.9±44.0). According to The Kruskal-Wallis test, the difference observed in these three hospitals were significant. The results showed that patients' expectations had not been met in any of the examined dimensions and their consent has not been achieved. It seemed that necessary for managers and relevant authorities to plan and pay

  15. REHABILITATION NEEDS AND PLANS AMONG PATIENTS WITH CANCER, ASSESSED AT HOSPITALS AND WHEN REHABILITATION BEGINS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Maribo, Thomas; Jensen, Charlotte Maria

    and the specifics of needs and plans facilitates targeted rehabilitation interventions. Implications: Systematic needs assessment in cancer rehabilitation unveil the requirement of physical rehabilitation. Supervised physical activity renders an intervention possible tailored the special needs cancer patients have......Background: Systematic assessment of rehabilitation needs is prerequisite for sufficient rehabilitation, but little is known about patients' needs. Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe specific stated rehabilitation needs and plans among patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed...... and when municipal rehabilitation begins. Methods: Needs-assessment-forms for rehabilitation from 188 cancer patients from two hospitals and two municipal cancer rehabilitation programmes were analysed. The forms included 1) stated needs: 58 fixed areas categorised in six domains and 2) an area to document...

  16. Management of Parenteral Nutrition in Hospitalized Adult Patients [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Nystrom, Erin M; Hurley, Daniel L; McMahon, M Molly

    2017-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of malnutrition in adult hospitalized patients, surveys continue to report that many clinicians are undertrained in clinical nutrition, making targeted nutrition education for clinicians essential for best patient care. Clinical practice models also continue to evolve, with more disciplines prescribing parenteral nutrition (PN) or managing the cases of patients who are receiving it, further adding to the need for proficiency in general PN skills. This tutorial focuses on the daily management of adult hospitalized patients already receiving PN and reviews the following topics: (1) PN basics, including the determination of energy and volume requirements; (2) PN macronutrient content (protein, dextrose, and intravenous fat emulsion); (3) PN micronutrient content (electrolytes, minerals, vitamins, and trace elements); (4) alteration of PN for special situations, such as obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, refeeding, and hepatic/renal disease; (5) daily monitoring and adjustment of PN formula; and (6) PN-related complications (PN-associated liver disease and catheter-related complications).

  17. Disclosing discourses: biomedical and hospitality discourses in patient education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öresland, Stina; Friberg, Febe; Määttä, Sylvia; Öhlen, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    Patient education materials have the potential to strengthen the health literacy of patients. Previous studies indicate that readability and suitability may be improved. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze discourses inherent in patient education materials since analysis of discourses could illuminate values and norms inherent in them. Clinics in Sweden that provided colorectal cancer surgery allowed access to written information and 'welcome letters' sent to patients. The material was analysed by means of discourse analysis, embedded in Derrida's approach of deconstruction. The analysis revealed a biomedical discourse and a hospitality discourse. In the biomedical discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as the messenger of medical information while that of the patients as the carrier of diagnoses and recipients of biomedical information. In the hospitality discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as hosts who invite and welcome the patients as guests. The study highlights the need to eliminate paternalism and fosters a critical reflective stance among professionals regarding power and paternalism inherent in health care communication. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions in patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    2016-01-01

    university hospital during a 3-month period (September 2013–November 2013). Patients medication lists (n = 207) were reviewed at the time of admission and all identified PIPs were assessed for potential consequences by clinical pharmacologists. Results There were 349 PIP identified in 1291 prescriptions...... with the probability of PIP. Improving the quality of prescribing might benefit from an interprofessional approach and thus better training of physicians and nurses is needed in order to minimize PIP....

  19. The Mystery of Increased Hospitalizations of Elderly Patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of people in the United States every year. In some people, particularly the elderly and those who are ill from pre-existing conditions, bacterial pneumonia may follow influenza or even a common cold. Dr. Martin Meltzer, discusses two articles in the May 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases journal about increased pneumonia-related hospitalizations of elderly patients in England.

  20. Risk Factors of Prolonged Hospitalization in Patients with Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Onur Topcu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Number of vomiting per day and maternal serum TSH levels could help physicians to estimate the risk of prolonged hospitalization; however further investigations are needed in large population studies. Identifying the high risk patients is important both for prevention of HEG and beginning appropriate antiemetic treatment to avoid complications to reduce the economic costs. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 113-118

  1. Food intake, plate waste and its association with malnutrition in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simzari, Kobra; Vahabzadeh, Davoud; Nouri Saeidlou, Sakineh; Khoshbin, Susan; Bektas, Yener

    2017-11-16

    Hospital malnutrition is a worldwide dilemma and challenge. High levels of plate waste contribute to malnutrition-related complications in hospital. We investigated the association between the levels of plate waste, food intake and patient satisfaction with nutritional risk and malnutrition prevalence in three hospital settings. The sample population of 120 patients, aged 18-65 year, admitted consecutively over a 12 month period to 3 different educational university hospitals was included. For all the patients, diet history, anthropometric measurements, body mass index and patient satisfaction with the hospital food service was evaluated. Weight plate waste for all daily meals was done and actual intakes computed individually for each day. Nutrition risk screening (NRS)-2002 (≥ 3) tool was used for estimating the nutritionally at-risk population. Results: From one hundred twenty non-critically ill patients with a mean 8.9 ± 3.5 day length of hospital stay, 40.8% (49) were men and 59.2% (71) were female. Mean energy and protein requirements were 2,030.3 ± 409.03 kcal/day and 76.13 ± 15.33 g/day respectively. Mean intakes were 1,326 ± 681.44 kcal/day and 66.81 ± 31.66 g/day respectively. The mean percent of plate waste for lunch and dinner were 37.7 ± 29.88 and 30.4 ± 23.61 respectively. In the total population, 25% of patients were satisfied and 75% patients were unsatisfied with hospital foods. Based on BMI ( 10%), malnutrition prevalence was 12.5% and 14.2% respectively during hospitalization. The prevalence of nutritionally at-risk population was 30% at admission time and reached 33.3% at discharge. Plate waste and hospital malnutrition were highly prevalent in accompanying with increasing nutritionally risk progression. So it should be addressed as an important health issue and appropriate strategies for stimulating governmental policies should be adopted.

  2. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying; Kadri, Farid; Chaabane, Sondes; Tahon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  3. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2015-10-21

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  4. [Children's medically complex diseases unit. A model required in all our hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climent Alcalá, Francisco José; García Fernández de Villalta, Marta; Escosa García, Luis; Rodríguez Alonso, Aroa; Albajara Velasco, Luis Adolfo

    2018-01-01

    The increase in survival of children with severe diseases has led to the rise of children with chronic diseases, sometimes with lifelong disabilities. In 2008, a unit for the specific care of medically complex children (MCC) was created in Hospital La Paz. To describe the work and care activities of this Unit. Patients and methods An analysis was performed on all discharge reports of the Unit between January 2014 and July 2016. The MCC Unit has 6 beds and daily outpatient clinic. A total of 1,027 patients have been treated since the creation of the unit, with 243 from 2014. The median age was 24.2 months (IQ: 10.21-84.25). The large majority (92.59%) have multiple diseases, the most frequent chronic conditions observed were neurological (76.95%), gastrointestinal (63.78%), and respiratory diseases (61.72%). More than two-thirds (69.54%) of MCC are dependent on technology, 53.49% on respiratory support, and 35.80% on nutritional support. Hospital admission rates have increased annually. There have been 403 admissions since 2014, of which 8.93% were re-admissions within 30 days of hospital discharge. The median stay during 2014-2016 was 6 days (IQ: 3-14). The occupancy rate has been above 100% for this period. Currently, 210 patients remain on follow-up (86.42%), and 11 children (4.53%) were discharged to their referral hospitals. The mortality rate is 9.05% (22 deaths). The main condition of these 22 patients was neurological (9 patients). Infectious diseases were the leading cause of death. MCC should be treated in specialized units in tertiary or high-level hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [Patient satisfaction in hospital: critical incident technique or standardised questionnaire?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt-Abdulla, R; Bock, M; Bauer, M

    2008-03-01

    Questionnaires are usually used for the measurement of patient satisfaction, however, it is increasingly being recognized that the critical incident technique (CIT) also provides valuable insight. Questionnaires of the "Hamburger questionnaire on hospital stay" were distributed to 650 consecutive patients before discharge. Additionally 103 interviews were conducted in which the patients were asked to describe positive and negative incidents during their hospital stay. The results of both methods were then compared. A total of 369 patients returned the questionnaire and 103 patients participated in the interviews. The duration of a single interview was between 5 and 45 min with a mean of 12.7 min+/-10.1 min standard deviation (SD). Cronbach's alpha of the questionnaire was 0.9. A total of 424 incidents were reported, 301 of them were negative compared to 123 positive events. The questionnaires and interviews yielded partly similar and partly different results at category and subcategory levels concerning the areas of weaknesses and strengths in quality performance. The CIT was more concrete but did not give results for all aspects of quality. The CIT, but not the questionnaire, was able to detect 40/56 (71%) of the positive and 33/75 (44%) of the negative reports regarding medical performance and 25/42 (60%) of the positive and 15/51 (29.4%) of the negative reports of the performance of the nurses were revealed by the CIT and not by the questionnaires. The CIT gives valuable insights into the patient's perspective of strengths and weaknesses in hospital care, which might be overlooked by the questionnaire alone. However, the CIT is probably not suited for routine use because it is very time-consuming.

  6. Point prevalence of suboptimal footwear features among ambulant older hospital patients: implications for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Satyan R; McRae, Prue; Stewart, Matthew J; Webster, Joan; Fenn, Mary; Haines, Terry P

    2016-09-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to establish the point prevalence of 'suboptimal' features in footwear reported to have been used by older hospital patients when ambulating, and to explore underpinning factors for their choice of footwear. Method A cross-sectional investigation was undertaken on 95 of 149 eligible in-patients across 22 high fall-risk wards in a large metropolitan hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Results Over 70% of participants experienced an unplanned admission. Although most participants had access to some form of footwear in hospital (92%), nearly all reported ambulating in footwear with 'suboptimal' features (99%). Examples included slippers (27%), backless slippers (16%) or bare feet (27%). For patients who ambulated in bare feet, only one-third reported 'lack of access to footwear' as the primary cause, with others citing foot wounds, pain, oedema and personal choice as the main reason for bare foot ambulation. Conclusions Admitted patients frequently use footwear with 'suboptimal' features for ambulation in hospital. While some footwear options (for example well-fitting slippers) could be suited for limited in-hospital ambulation, others are clearly hazardous and might cause falls. Since footwear choices are influenced by multiple factors in this population, footwear education strategies alone may be insufficient to address the problem of hazardous footwear in at-risk patients. Footwear requirements may be more effectively addressed within a multidisciplinary team approach encompassing foot health, mobility and safety. What is known about the topic? Accidental falls while ambulating are an important health and safety concern for older people. Because certain footwear characteristics have been negatively linked to posture and balance, and specific footwear types linked to falls among seniors, the use of footwear with fewer suboptimal characteristics is generally recommended as a means of reducing the risk of falling. While footwear

  7. Attitudes of hospitalized patients toward wearing patient clothing in Tianjin, China: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: More than half of the hospitalized patients dislike wearing patient clothing because they were unaware of its functions and were skeptical about its hygiene, comfortability, fit, and appearance. Therefore, these patients must be provided with comfortable, well fitting, hygienic, and aesthetically pleasing clothing.

  8. [Required Framework for the Collection of Real-life Data: An Example from University Eye Hospital Munich].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, Karsten; Kern, Christoph; Meyer, Gerhard; Priglinger, Siegfried; Hirneiß, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Background The importance of evaluating real-life data is constantly increasing. Currently available computer systems better allow for analyses of data, as more and more data is available in a digital form. Before a project for real-life data analyses is started, technical considerations and staff, legal, and data protection procedures need to be addressed. In this manuscript, experiences made at the University Eye Hospital in Munich will be shared. Materials and Methods Legal requirements, as found in laws and guidelines governing documentation and data privacy, are highlighted. Technical requirements for information technology infrastructure and software are defined. A survey conducted by the German Ophthalmological Society, among German eye hospitals investigating the current state of digitalization, was conducted. Also, staff requirements are outlined. Results A database comprising results of 330,801 patients was set up. It includes all diagnoses, procedures, clinical findings and results from diagnostic devices. This database was approved by the local data protection officer. In less than half of German eye hospitals (n = 21) that participated in the survey (n = 54), a complete electronic documentation is done. Fourteen institutions are completely paper-based, and the remainder of the hospitals used a mixed system. Conclusion In this work, we examined the framework that is required to develop a comprehensive database containing real-life data from clinics. In future, these databases will become increasingly important as more and more innovation are made in decision support systems. The base for this is comprehensive and well-curated databases. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Framework for establishing records control in hospitals as an ISO 9001 requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qatawneh, Lina

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present the process followed to control records in a Jordanian private community hospital as an ISO 9001:2008 standard requirement. Design/methodology/approach Under the hospital quality council's supervision, the quality management and development office staff were responsible for designing, planning and implementing the quality management system (QMS) using the ISO 9001:2008 standard. A policy for records control was established. An action plan for establishing the records control was developed and implemented. On completion, a coding system for records was specified to be used by hospital staff. Finally, an internal audit was performed to verify conformity to the ISO 9001:2008 standard requirements. Findings Successful certification by a neutral body ascertained that the hospital's QMS conformed to the ISO 9001:2008 requirements. A framework was developed that describes the records controlling process, which can be used by staff in any healthcare organization wanting to achieve ISO 9001:2008 accreditation. Originality/value Given the increased interest among healthcare organizations to achieve the ISO 9001 certification, the proposed framework for establishing records control is developed and is expected to be a valuable management tool to improve and sustain healthcare quality.

  10. Requirements for Successful Adoption of a Glucose Measurement System Into a Hospital POC Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füzéry, Anna K; Cembrowski, George S

    2016-07-01

    Widespread and successful implementation of any glucose measurement system in a hospital point-of-care (POC) program requires a number of features in addition to accurate and reliable analytical performance. Such features include, but are not limited to, a system's glucose-hematocrit dependence, durability, information technology capabilities, and battery capacity and battery life. While the study of Ottiger et al in this issue supports the analytical accuracy and reliability of Bayer's CONTOUR XT® blood glucose monitoring system, the suitability of other features of this system for a hospital POC program remains to be established. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. Environmental qualities and patient wellbeing in hospital settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2013-01-01

    undertaken by Architecture and Design and the Danish Building Research Institute (Aalborg University) set out in 2008 to review research on the impact of the environmental qualities of health-care facilities on patients and staff. The objective of the review team was to develop a tool that would allow......Within the last decades the impacts of the physical environments of hospitals on healing and health-care outcomes have been subject to ample research. The amount of documentation linking the design of physical environments to patient and staff outcomes is increasing. A Danish research project...

  12. Determining the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, L V; Goddard, E; Workman, L

    2006-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalised paediatric patients at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital. A 1-day cross-sectional survey was completed in all medical and surgical wards and some specialist outpatient clinics. A total of 227 children participated in the study. Thirty-five per cent of patients were moderately malnourished (malnutrition seen, a nutrition risk-screening tool, identifying risk factors for malnutrition such as food access and vulnerability, should be developed. The tool should be used to assess nutrition status and risk during the course of hospitalisation, in addition to planning appropriate nutrition care plan interventions for discharge.

  13. Innovative financing for rural surgical patients: Experience in mission hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnanaraj Jesudian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In rural India most of the surgical patients become impoverished due to surgical treatment pushing several families below poverty line. We describe the various methods that we tried to help these patients pay for the surgical procedures without becoming impoverished. Some of them were successful and many of them were not so successful. The large turnover and innovative methods helped the mission hospitals to serve the poor and the marginalized. Some of these methods might not be relevant in areas other than Northeast India while many could be used in other areas.

  14. Demographic factors and hospital size predict patient satisfaction variance--implications for hospital value-based purchasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C; Ornstein, Katherine A; Holcombe, Randall F

    2015-08-01

    Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) incentivizes quality performance-based healthcare by linking payments directly to patient satisfaction scores obtained from Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Lower HCAHPS scores appear to cluster in heterogeneous population-dense areas and could bias Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reimbursement. Assess nonrandom variation in patient satisfaction as determined by HCAHPS. Multivariate regression modeling was performed for individual dimensions of HCAHPS and aggregate scores. Standardized partial regression coefficients assessed strengths of predictors. Weighted Individual (hospital) Patient Satisfaction Adjusted Score (WIPSAS) utilized 4 highly predictive variables, and hospitals were reranked accordingly. A total of 3907 HVBP-participating hospitals. There were 934,800 patient surveys by the most conservative estimate. A total of 3144 county demographics (US Census) and HCAHPS surveys. Hospital size and primary language (non-English speaking) most strongly predicted unfavorable HCAHPS scores, whereas education and white ethnicity most strongly predicted favorable HCAHPS scores. The average adjusted patient satisfaction scores calculated by WIPSAS approximated the national average of HCAHPS scores. However, WIPSAS changed hospital rankings by variable amounts depending on the strength of the predictive variables in the hospitals' locations. Structural and demographic characteristics that predict lower scores were accounted for by WIPSAS that also improved rankings of many safety-net hospitals and academic medical centers in diverse areas. Demographic and structural factors (eg, hospital beds) predict patient satisfaction scores even after CMS adjustments. CMS should consider WIPSAS or a similar adjustment to account for the severity of patient satisfaction inequities that hospitals could strive to correct. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  15. UTILITY OF THE DECAF SCORE IN PREDICTING IN HOSPITAL OUTCOME IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE EXACERBATION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL OF SOUTHERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Chethan Kumar A. N

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being an all too common cause for hospital admissions Worldwide poses a logistical stress for the treating physicians and hospital administration with regards to morbidity and mortality rates. Identifying upon admission those at higher risk of dying in-hospital could be useful for triaging patients to the appropriate level of care, determining the aggressiveness of therapies and timing safe discharges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utilisation of the DECAF score in predicting in hospital outcome in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Southern India. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients admitted with COPD exacerbations in K.R. Hospital, Mysore Medical College And Research Institute, Mysuru in between the May 2017 and July 2017 were taken has study subjects. A total of 80 patients were taken into the study. The duration of hospital stay, ICU admission and deaths were noted. DECAF score is applied to all study subjects and the severity of AECOPD is graded at the time of admission. The data collected and complied were then analysed for the correlation between score and subsequent management and overall outcome. RESULTS Total of 80 patients were recruited in the study. Mean age for male was 66.47, female was 70.86. Length of hospital stay was more in patients with decaf score more than 3 (average hospital stay 10 days. Patients with DECAF score of 2, 70.4% required inhalations oxygen, remaining 29.6% were managed with only bronchodilators whereas patients with DECAF score of 5 (max score in our study group there was a 100% initiation of assisted ventilation 33.3% received NIV ventilation while 66.6% required endotracheal intubation with ventilator support. In present study, 85 percent patients were survived. Total 6 patients (7.5% had died, belonging to high risk DECAF group (score 3 to 6

  16. Hospitalization and survival in patients using epoprostenol for injection in the PROSPECT observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Robert P; Schilz, Robert J; Chakinala, Murali M; Badesch, David B; Frost, Adaani E; McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Barst, Robyn J; Rosenberg, Daniel M; Miller, Dave P; Hartline, Brian K; Benton, Wade W; Farber, Harrison W

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have prospectively reported outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treated with epoprostenol in the modern-day era of oral therapy and combination treatments. The Registry to Prospectively Describe Use of Epoprostenol for Injection (Veletri, prolonged room temperature stable-epoprostenol [RTS-Epo]) in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PROSPECT) was established to prospectively describe the course of PAH in patients prescribed RTS-Epo. PROSPECT is a multicenter, US-based drug registry of primarily group 1 patients with PAH treated with RTS-Epo who were parenteral-naive or parenteral-transitioned at enrollment. Patients were followed until discontinuation of RTS-Epo, withdrawal, loss to follow-up, death, or end of study (maximum 1 year). One-year freedom from hospitalization (FH) and survival estimates were summarized by prostacyclin history (parenteral-naive or parenteral-transitioned), sex, and chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). A total of 336 patients were included. The overall 1-year FH estimate was 51.0% ± 2.8% and was lower in parenteral-naive patients than parenteral-transitioned patients (42.8% ± 4.3% vs 57.1% ± 3.7%, respectively; P = .002). FH estimates were lower in male patients than female patients (38.3% ± 5.9% vs 54.6% ± 3.2%, respectively; P < .015) and in patients with CRI than patients without CRI (17.0% ± 8.4% vs 53.7% ± 2.9%, respectively; P < .001). The overall 1-year survival estimate was 84.0% ± 2.1%. Survival was poorer in parenteral-naive patients, male patients, and patients with CRI. Risk of hospitalization and mortality remain high in patients with PAH. In particular, patients who are parenteral-naive at initiation of RTS-Epo therapy, male patients, and patients with CRI require close monitoring and aggressive clinical management.

  17. Statistical study on cancer patients of Korea cancer centre hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Kee Hwa; Mok, Kang Sung [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    The total number of malignant neoplasms included in this study 53,566 cases(14.1%) among 379,582 patients from 1984 to 1993. On sex, females with 51.3% were much more than males with 48.7%. The highest proportion of cancer patients by age was 35.0% in males and 28.4% in females, respectively for 50-59 age group. The most frequent primary site among males was found to be stomach with 33.2%, followed by liver(15.1%), lung(14.9%), esophagus(5.3%) and larynx(3.3%). In females, the first order was uterine cervix with 37.8%, followed by stomach(16.5%), breast(14.8%), thyroid gland(4.3%) and lung (3.8%). The proportion of malignant neoplasms diagnosed by histology made up 67.0%, whereas 20.2% was diagnosed by clinical investigation(X-ray, CT, MRI etc). Among the cancer patients initially diagnosed in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the extent of disease was 3.7% for patient with carcinoma-in-situ, 58.7% for patients with localized involvement, 18.4% for patients with regional involvement and 11.1% for patients with distant involvement. Among the cancer patients initially treatment in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the method of treatment was 27.5% for surgery, 22.5% for radiotherapy and 30.1% for chemotherapy. The proportion of cancer patients traced to death was only to 3.6%, 1,944 cases. Among them, 72.5% survived for less than 1 year. 17 figs, 7 tabs, 28 refs. (Author).

  18. A Prognostic Indicator for Patients Hospitalized with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Richard; Vogel, Karen; Vanderhoff, Bruce; Kelch, Benjamin P; Ferris, Frank D

    2016-12-01

    Current methods for identifying patients at risk of dying within six months suffer from clinician biases resulting in underestimation of this risk. As a result, patients who are potentially eligible for hospice and palliative care services frequently do not benefit from these services until they are very close to the end of their lives. To develop a prospective prognostic indicator based on actual survival within Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) claims data that identifies patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) who are at risk of six-month mortality. CMS claims data from January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009 were reviewed to find the first hospitalization for CHF patients with episode of care diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) 291, 292, and 293. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to determine the associations between demographic and clinical factors and six-month mortality. The resulting model was evaluated for discrimination and calibration. The resulting prospective prognostic model demonstrated fair discrimination with an ROC of 0.71 and good calibration with a Hosmer-Lemshow statistic of 0.98. Across all DRGs, 5% of discharged patients had a six-month mortality risk of greater than 50%. This prospective approach appears to provide a method to identify patients with CHF who would potentially benefit from a clinical evaluation for referral to hospice care or for a palliative care consult due to high predicted risk of dying within 180 days after discharge from a hospital. This approach can provide a model to match at-risk patients with evidenced-based care in a more consistent manner. This method of identifying patients at risk needs further prospective evaluation to see if it has value for clinicians, increases referrals to hospice and palliative care services, and benefits patients and families.

  19. Management of thallium poisoning in patients with delayed hospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong-Wen; Xu, Qing-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Zhang-Suo; Kan, Quan-Cheng; Sun, Cheng-Ye; Wang, Lexin

    2012-01-01

    To describe the clinical features and management of thallium poisoning in patients with delayed hospital admission. Fourteen patients (median age 36 years) were admitted 9-19 days after ingesting food poisoned with thallium. Clinical and laboratory data, including blood and urine thallium concentrations, were collected. Patients were treated with oral Prussian blue, a chelating agent sodium dimercaptosulfonate, and hemodialysis. All patients experienced a triad of symptoms of acute gastrointestinal upset, painful combined polyneuropathy, and hair loss after consuming poisoned food. Fatigue and skin pigmentation were observed in all patients. Abnormal liver function tests were found in 6 (42.9%) and delirium and coma were identified in 4 (28.6%). Two weeks after the poisoning, the blood and urine thallium concentration ranged from 219.0 to 1414.4 μg/L (median: 535.3) and 956.5 to 11285.0 μg/L (median: 7460.0), respectively. One patient (7.1%) with a previous history of pulmonary fibrosis died of respiratory failure in hospital. Symptoms were improved and blood or urine thallium levels were normalized in the remaining 13 patients before discharge. After a 6.5 ± 1-month follow-up, 1 patient (7.1%) developed deep venous thrombosis in the left lower limb. In another patient (7.1%), numbness in the lower limbs remained. Acute thallium poisoning is commonly manifested by gastrointestinal upset, painful polyneuropathy, and significant hair loss. Treatment strategies included Prussian blue and hemodialysis, which were associated with a good outcome in this case series.

  20. Statistical study on cancer patients of Korea cancer centre hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Kee Hwa; Kang Sung Mok

    1994-12-01

    The total number of malignant neoplasms included in this study 53,566 cases(14.1%) among 379,582 patients from 1984 to 1993. On sex, females with 51.3% were much more than males with 48.7%. The highest proportion of cancer patients by age was 35.0% in males and 28.4% in females, respectively for 50-59 age group. The most frequent primary site among males was found to be stomach with 33.2%, followed by liver(15.1%), lung(14.9%), esophagus(5.3%) and larynx(3.3%). In females, the first order was uterine cervix with 37.8%, followed by stomach(16.5%), breast(14.8%), thyroid gland(4.3%) and lung (3.8%). The proportion of malignant neoplasms diagnosed by histology made up 67.0%, whereas 20.2% was diagnosed by clinical investigation(X-ray, CT, MRI etc). Among the cancer patients initially diagnosed in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the extent of disease was 3.7% for patient with carcinoma-in-situ, 58.7% for patients with localized involvement, 18.4% for patients with regional involvement and 11.1% for patients with distant involvement. Among the cancer patients initially treatment in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the method of treatment was 27.5% for surgery, 22.5% for radiotherapy and 30.1% for chemotherapy. The proportion of cancer patients traced to death was only to 3.6%, 1,944 cases. Among them, 72.5% survived for less than 1 year. 17 figs, 7 tabs, 28 refs. (Author)

  1. Scored patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment: Length of hospital stay and mortality in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Ferreira dos SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To determine the association of a scored patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment with mortality and length of hospital stay in cancer patients. Methods Cross-sectional study carried out between July and September 2014 using secondary data collection using data from 366 medical records of patients admitted to a hospital recognized as a cancer center of excellence. The present study included patients with hospital stay over than or equal three days and minimum age of 20 years. The patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment scores were calculated and compared with the patients’ clinical and anthropometric characteristics and outcomes (death and long length of stay in hospital. Results Of the 366 patients evaluated, 36.0% were malnourished. The presence of malnutrition, according to the scored patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment, was statistically associated with the presence of metastasis (52.4%. On the other hand, malnutrition, according to the body mass index in adults (55.8% and in older elderly patients (54.2%, was associated with death (55.0%. The adjusted logistic regression model showed that the following factors were associated with prolonged hospitalization: early nutritional screening, presence of severe malnutrition, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and surgical procedures. As for mortality, the associated factors were: male reproductive system tumor, presence of metastasis, clinical treatment, prolonged hospitalization, and the presence of some degree of malnutrition. Conclusion The patient-generated Subjective Global Assessment score is an important risk marker of prolonged hospitalization and mortality rates. It is a useful tool capable of circumventing significant biases in the nutritional evaluation of cancer patients.

  2. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2013 rates; hospitals' resident caps for graduate medical education payment purposes; quality reporting requirements for specific providers and for ambulatory surgical centers. final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of the changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act) and other legislation. These changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits will be effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2012. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes made by the Affordable Care Act. Generally, these changes will be applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2012, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. In addition, we are implementing changes relating to determining a hospital's full-time equivalent (FTE) resident cap for the purpose of graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revised requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs)) that are participating in Medicare. We also are establishing new administrative, data completeness, and extraordinary circumstance waivers or extension requests requirements, as well as a reconsideration process, for quality reporting by ambulatory surgical centers

  3. Profiling quality of care for patients with chronic headache in three different German hospitals – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legal requirements for quality assurance in German rehabilitation hospitals include comparisons of providers. Objective is to describe and to compare outcome quality of care offered by three hospitals providing in-patient rehabilitative treatment exemplified for patients with chronic headache. Methods We performed a prospective three center observational study on patients suffering from chronic headache. Patients underwent interventions commonly used according to internal guidelines of the hospitals. Measurements were taken at three points in time (at admission, at discharge and 6 months after discharge. Indicators of outcome quality included pain intensity and frequency of pain, functional ability, depression, quality of life and health related behavior. Analyses of differences amongst the hospitals were adjusted by covariates due to case-mix situation. Results 306 patients from 3 hospitals were included in statistical analysis. Amongst the hospitals, patients differed significantly in age, education, diagnostic subgroups, beliefs, and with respect to some pain-related baseline values (covariates. Patients in all three hospitals benefited from intervention to a clinically relevant degree. At discharge from hospital, outcome quality differed significantly after adjustment according to case-mix only in terms of patients' global assessment of treatment results. Six months after discharge, the only detectable significant differences were for secondary outcomes like improved coping with stress or increased use of self-help. The profiles for satisfaction with the hospital stay showed clear differences amongst patients. Conclusion The results of this case study do not suggest a definite overall ranking of the three hospitals that were compared, but outcome profiles offer a multilayer platform of reliable information which might facilitate decision making.

  4. Quality Pain Management in Adult Hospitalized Patients: A Concept Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoëga, Sigridur; Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur; Wilson, Margaret E; Gordon, Debra B

    2016-01-01

    To explore the concept of quality pain management (QPM) in adult hospitalized patients. Pain is common in hospitalized patients, and pain management remains suboptimal in some settings. A concept evaluation based on Morse et al.'s method. Of more than 5,000 articles found, data were restricted to 37 selected key articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Data were extracted from the selected articles and then synthesized according to the following: definition, characteristics, boundaries, preconditions, and outcomes. QPM relates to the Structure: organizationally supported evidence-based policies, competent staff, interprofessional and specialized care, and staff accountability; screening, assessment/reassessment and communication of pain and its treatment, patient/family education, individualized evidence-based treatment, embedded in safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable services; and reduced pain severity and functional interference, decreased prevalence/severity of adverse consequences from pain or pain treatment, and increase in patient satisfaction. QPM is a multifaceted concept that remains poorly defined in the literature. Studies should aim to develop valid, reliable, and operational measures of the pillars of QPM and to look at the relationship among these factors. Authors need to state how they define and what aspects of QPM they are measuring. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Planning for patient privacy and hospitability: a must do in oncology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, James G

    2003-01-01

    The number one design challenge in the healthcare environment is the patient room. This space is one of the primary functional areas impacting hospital design and, quite often, the place of greatest controversy. This controversy is due to the length of time the patient spends in the room (compared to other areas), the amount of overall space required and the time dedicated to patient room utilization, maintenance, general arrangement and overall efficiency. In addition, there is a growing list of room types to be considered, many are of the ambulatory care, short stay and observation category. Other room types beyond the routine medical/surgical room include Intensive Care, Coronary Care, Surgical Intensive Care, Skilled Nursing, Rehabilitation and Oncology Care as well as more intensive Bone Marrow Transplantation, for example. Major features of the traditional acute care patient room require the space to be flexible, convertible, expandable and, most importantly, hospitable. For many, many years the patient room was considered a shared space with multiple beds and multiple users. The term semi-private has been used to describe the traditional two-bed and, sometimes 4-bed patient room. This article will address the programmatic elements of an inpatient area, the room and its functional components along with some examples for comparative purposes. For the oncology patient, the development of a family-focused, private room is mandatory. The private room is more flexible, less expensive to operate, safer and environmentally more appealing for the patient, family and staff.

  6. Adverse Drug Reactions Related to Drug Administration in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, Luca; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Palleria, Caterina; Mumoli, Laura; Staltari, Orietta; Squillace, Aida; Maida, Francesca; Russo, Emilio; Gratteri, Santo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2017-01-01

    Drug treatment may be related to the development of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In this paper, we evaluated the ADRs in patients admitted to Catanzaro Hospital. After we obtained the approval by local Ethical Committee, we performed a retrospective study on clinical records from March 01, 2013 to April 30, 2015. The association between drug and ADR or between drug and drug-drug-interactions (DDIs) was evaluated using the Naranjo's probability scale and Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS), respectively. During the study period, we analyzed 2870 clinical records containing a total of 11,138 prescriptions, and we documented the development of 770 ADRs. The time of hospitalization was significantly higher (P<0.05) in women with ADRs (12.6 ± 1.2 days) with respect to men (11.8± 0.83 days). Using the Naranjo score, we documented a probable association in 78% of these reactions, while DIPS revealed that about 22% of ADRs were related to DDIs. Patients with ADRs received 3052 prescriptions on 11,138 (27.4%) having a mean of 6.1±0.29 drugs that was significantly higher (P<0.01) with respect to patients not experiencing ADRs (mean of 3.4±0.13 drugs). About 19% of ADRs were not diagnosed and were treated as new diseases. Our results indicate that drug administration induces the development of ADRs also during the hospitalization, particularly in elderly women. Moreover, we also documented that ADRs in some patients are under-diagnosed, therefore, it is important to motivate healthcare to report the ADRs in order to optimize the patients' safety. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Evaluating the Risk of Re-identification of Patients from Hospital Prescription Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Khaled El; Dankar, Fida K; Vaillancourt, Régis; Roffey, Tyson; Lysyk, Mary

    2009-07-01

    Pharmacies often provide prescription records to private research firms, on the assumption that these records are de-identified (i.e., identifying information has been removed). However, concerns have been expressed about the potential that patients can be re-identified from such records. Recently, a large private research firm requested prescription records from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), as part of a larger effort to develop a database of hospital prescription records across Canada. To evaluate the ability to re-identify patients from CHEO'S prescription records and to determine ways to appropriately de-identify the data if the risk was too high. The risk of re-identification was assessed for 18 months' worth of prescription data. De-identification algorithms were developed to reduce the risk to an acceptable level while maintaining the quality of the data. The probability of patients being re-identified from the original variables and data set requested by the private research firm was deemed quite high. A new de-identified record layout was developed, which had an acceptable level of re-identification risk. The new approach involved replacing the admission and discharge dates with the quarter and year of admission and the length of stay in days, reporting the patient's age in weeks, and including only the first character of the patient's postal code. Additional requirements were included in the data-sharing agreement with the private research firm (e.g., audit requirements and a protocol for notification of a breach of privacy). Without a formal analysis of the risk of re-identification, assurances of data anonymity may not be accurate. A formal risk analysis at one hospital produced a clinically relevant data set that also protects patient privacy and allows the hospital pharmacy to explicitly manage the risks of breach of patient privacy.

  8. Statistical study on cancer patients of cancer research hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yun Sang; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Ki Wha; Kang, Sung Mok

    1993-01-01

    The total number of malignant neoplasms included in this study 15,737 cases(11.8%) among 133,251 cases for 3 years. On sex, females with 52.9% were much more than males with 47.1%. The highest proportion of cancer patients by age was 33.7% in males and 28.5% in females, respectivelty for 50-59 age group. The most frequent primary site among males was found to be stomach with 35.5%, followed by liver(14.7%), lung(13.0%), esophagus(5.4%) and colon (3.2%). In females, the first order was uterine cervix with 40.6%, followed by stomach(17.2%), breast(14.4), rectum(3.7%) and lung(3.4%). The most common type of morphology of malignant neoplasms was adenocarcinoma(47.4%) in males an squamous cell carcinoma(58.0%) in females. Among the cancer patients initially diagnosed in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the exent of disease was 2.5% for patient with carcinoma-in-situ, 54.1% for patients with localized involvement, 13.3% for patients with regional involvement and 8.5% for patients with distant involvement. Among the cancer patients initially treatment in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the method of treatment was 23.6% for surgery, 25.3% for radiotherapy and 30.3% for chemotherapy. Among the cancer patients confirmed by medical records, 7.7% was traced more than 5 years. (Author)

  9. Addressing Risk Assessment for Patient Safety in Hospitals through Information Extraction in Medical Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proux, Denys; Segond, Frédérique; Gerbier, Solweig; Metzger, Marie Hélène

    Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) is a real burden for doctors and risk surveillance experts. The impact on patients' health and related healthcare cost is very significant and a major concern even for rich countries. Furthermore required data to evaluate the threat is generally not available to experts and that prevents from fast reaction. However, recent advances in Computational Intelligence Techniques such as Information Extraction, Risk Patterns Detection in documents and Decision Support Systems allow now to address this problem.

  10. Inter-hospital Cross-validation of Irregular Discharge Patterns for Young vs. Old Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzierz, Gerald J.; Davis, William E.

    1975-01-01

    Type of discharge (irregular vs. regular) and length of time hospitalized were used as unobtrusive measures of psychiatric patient acceptance of hospital treatment regime among two groups (18-27 years and 45 years and above) of patients. (Author)

  11. 76 FR 79192 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Georgia Hospital Association...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Georgia Hospital Association Research and Education Foundation Patient Safety Organization (GHA-PSO) AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS... The Georgia Hospital Association Research and Education Foundation Patient Safety Organization (GHA...

  12. A Qualitative Study to Identify Skills and Competency Required for Hospital Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Omid; Sadeghi, Ahmad; Khammarnia, Mohammad; Siavashi, Elham; Oskrochi, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital managers aim to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their institutions through leadership and guidance of medical personnel. Fulfilling these objectives requires a holistic approach to both the management of people and institutional prioritization. The aim of this study was to identify the skills and competencies that hospital managers must demonstrate in order to achieve their objectives. Methods In 2015, a regional, multi-center qualitative study was undertaken in Shiraz, Iran. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with university hospital managers, senior managers, faculty members, and post-graduate students, and the results were analyzed using the content analysis method by MAXQDA software. Results Eight key skill themes (communication, experience, appreciation of institution logistics/infrastructure, management skills, motivation, systematic problem solving, ethics, and financial/legal awareness) were identified among the hospital managers. The common challenges that face hospital institutions include problems with hierarchical and organizational structure, excessive rules and regulations, lack of resources, poor post-graduate education, and overall management. Recurring themes with respect to how these could be addressed included changing the culture and belief structure of the hospital, restructuring the organizational hierarchy, and empowering the people. Conclusion In our cohort, practical skills, such as communication and experience, were considered more important than theoretical skills for the effective management and administration of hospitals. Therefore, we suggest that practical, skill-based training should be emphasized for students of these disciplines so they will be better suited to deal with real world challenges. Further organizational improvements also can be attained by the active and constructive involvement of senior university managers. PMID:27504159

  13. The views of domestic staff and porters when supporting patients with dementia in the acute hospital: An exploratory qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Caroline; Manthorpe, Jill

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that very many hospital patients have dementia but there are many concerns about the quality of care and support they receive. Consequently there have been numerous calls for hospital staff to have dementia training. While cleaning or domestic staff and porters form considerable parts of the hospital workforce they are infrequently considered in discussions of dementia care training and practice. This exploratory study aimed to investigate the experiences of domestic staff and porters working in an acute hospital setting who are in contact regularly with patients with dementia. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken in 2016 with seven domestic staff and five porters in one English acute hospital to investigate their views and experiences. Data were analysed thematically by constant comparison technique and theoretical sampling. Themes were identified and realistic concepts developed. Participants observed that caring attitudes and behaviour in their encounters with patients with dementia are important but challenging to put into practice. Several would have valued more information about dementia. Some noted situations in the hospital stay that seemed particularly difficult for patients with dementia such as travelling to different parts of the hospital for treatments. The study suggests the need for improving the dementia-related knowledge and skills of all non-clinical staff especially those new to the NHS. The impact of witnessing dementia symptoms and distress on emotional well-being requires further research so that ancillary staff can improve the hospital stay of patients with dementia.

  14. Determinants and time to blood transfusion among thermal burn patients admitted to Mulago Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilyewala, C; Alenyo, R; Ssentongo, R

    2017-07-06

    Blood transfusion, a practice under re-evaluation in general, remains common among thermal burn patients due to the hematological alterations associated with burns that manifest as anemia. Today advocacy is for restrictive blood transfusion taking into account individual patient characteristics. We went out to identify the parameters that may determine transfusion requirement and the time to blood transfusion for thermal burn patients in Mulago Hospital in order to build statistics and a basis to standardize future practice and Hospital protocol. 112 patients with thermal burns were enrolled into a prospective cohort study conducted in the Surgical Unit of the Accidents and Emergency Department and Burns Unit of Mulago Hospital. Relevant data on pre-injury, injury and post-injury factors was collected including relevant laboratory investigations and treatment modalities like surgical intervention. Patients were clinically followed up for a maximum period of 28 days and we identified those that were transfused. 22.3% of patients were transfused. The median time to transfusion was 17 days from time of injury and varied with different patient characteristics. The median pre-transfusion hemoglobin (Hb) level was 8.2 g/dL. Transfusion was significantly related to; admission to the intensive care unit (p = 0.001), a body mass index (BMI) burn surface area (TBSA) >20 (p = 0.049), pre-existing illness (p = 0.046), and white blood cell (WBC) count 12,000/μL (p = 0.05). Pre-existing illnesses, a low BMI, TBSA of >20%, admission to the intensive care unit and abnormalities in the WBC count are useful predictors of blood transfusion among thermal burns patients admitted to Mulago Hospital. The precise time to transfusion from time of burns injury cannot be generalized. With close monitoring of each individual patient lies the appropriateness and timeliness of their management.

  15. Sepsis in a university hospital: a prospective study for the cost analysis of patients' hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Maynara Fernanda Carvalho; Dellaroza, Mara Solange Gomes; Kerbauy, Gilselena; Grion, Cintia Magalhães Carvalho

    2016-04-01

    To estimate the cost of hospitalization of patients with severe sepsis or septic shock admitted or diagnosed in the Urgent and Emergency sector at a university hospital and followed until the clinical outcome. An epidemiological, prospective, observational study conducted in a public hospital in southern Brazil for the period of one year (August 2013 to August 2014). Sepsis notification forms, medical records and data of the cost sector were used for the collection of clinical and epidemiological data. The sample comprised 95 patients, resulting in a total high cost of hospitalization (R$ 3,692,421.00), and an average of R$ 38,867.60 per patient. Over half of the total value of the treatment of sepsis (R$ 2,215,773.50) was assigned to patients who progressed to death (59.0%). The higher costs were related to discharge, diagnosis of severe sepsis, the pulmonary focus of infection and the age group of up to 59 years. The high cost of the treatment of sepsis justifies investments in training actions and institution of protocols that can direct preventive actions, and optimize diagnosis and treatment in infected and septic patients. Estimar o custo da internação de pacientes com sepse grave ou choque séptico admitidos ou diagnosticados no setor de Urgências e Emergências de um hospital universitário e seguidos até o desfecho clínico. Estudo epidemiológico, prospectivo e observacional, realizado em um hospital público do sul do Brasil, no período de 1 ano (agosto de 2013 a agosto de 2014). A coleta dos dados clínico-epidemiológicos utilizou fichas de notificação de sepse, prontuários e dados do setor de custos. Foi realizada análise de tendência central, dispersão e quartis dos custos das internações. Amostra composta por 95 pacientes que totalizaram elevado custo da internação (R$ 3.692.421,00), com média de R$ 38.867,60 por paciente. Mais da metade do valor total do tratamento da sepse (R$ 2.215.773,50) destinou-se a pacientes que evoluíram a

  16. Transforming Patient Value: Comparison of Hospital, Surgical, and General Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Henry A; Tsypenyuk, Ella; Freeman, Susan L; Carson, Steven R; Shinefeld, Jonathan A; Hinkle, Sally M; Powers, Benjamin D; Goldberg, Amy J; DiSesa, Verdi J; Kaiser, Larry R

    2016-04-01

    Patient value (V) is enhanced when quality (Q) is increased and cost (C) is diminished (V = Q/C). However, calculating value has been inhibited by a lack of risk-adjusted cost data. The aim of this analysis was to measure patient value before and after implementation of quality improvement and cost reduction programs. Multidisciplinary efforts to improve patient value were initiated at a safety-net hospital in 2012. Quality improvement focused on adoption of multiple best practices, and minimizing practice variation was the strategy to control cost. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) risk-adjusted quality (patient mortality + safety + satisfaction + effectiveness) and cost (length of stay + direct cost) data were used to calculate patient value over 3 fiscal years. Normalized ranks in the UHC Quality and Accountability Scorecard were used in the value equation. For all hospital patients, quality scores improved from 50.3 to 66.5, with most of the change occurring in decreased mortality. Similar trends were observed for all surgery patients (42.6 to 48.4) and for general surgery patients (30.9 to 64.6). For all hospital patients, cost scores improved from 71.0 to 2.9. Similar changes were noted for all surgical (71.6 to 27.1) and general surgery (85.7 to 23.0) patients. Therefore, value increased more than 30-fold for all patients, 3-fold for all surgical patients, and almost 8-fold for general surgery patients. Multidisciplinary quality and cost efforts resulted in significant improvements in value for all hospitalized patients as well as general surgery patients. Mortality improved the most in general surgery patients, and satisfaction was highest among surgical patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Alcohol and Tobacco Use on Sodium Thiopental Requirements in General Anesthesia: A Retrospective Study of 700 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir, K. R.; Raman, S.; Knott, V. J.; Bulmer, D. R.; Hurtig, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Hospital charts of 700 patients who had undergone upper gastrointestinal surgery were reviewed to examine the relationship between alcohol abuse and dose of intravenous sodium thiopental (Pentothal) required to induce general anesthesia. Patients who required a high sodium thiopental dose (greater than 6.08 mg/kg) exhibited a higher incidence of alcoholism, heavy drinking, and heavy smoking, compared to patients who required low sodium thiopental dose (greater than 3.42 mg/kg and less than 4....

  18. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1 have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings.

  19. Associations of Hospital and Patient Characteristics with Fluid Resuscitation Volumes in Patients with Severe Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient characte....... The data indicate variations in clinical practice not explained by patient characteristics emphasizing the need for RCTs assessing fluid resuscitation volumes fluid in patients with sepsis.......PURPOSE: Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient...... characteristics and fluid resuscitation volumes in ICU patients with severe sepsis. METHODS: We explored the 6S trial database of ICU patients with severe sepsis needing fluid resuscitation randomised to hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 vs. Ringer's acetate. Our primary outcome measure was fluid resuscitation volume...

  20. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midin Marhani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356 gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298. Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented

  1. Association of Dermatology Consultations With Patient Care Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients With Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Zhang, Myron; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H

    2017-06-01

    The value of inpatient dermatology consultations has traditionally been demonstrated with frequency in changes of diagnosis and management; however, the impact of dermatology consultations on metrics such as hospital length of stay and readmission rates remains unknown. To determine the association of dermatology consultations with patient care in hospitalized patients using objective values. We retrospectively queried the deidentified database of patients hospitalized between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, at a single university medical center. A total of 413 patients with a primary inflammatory skin condition discharge diagnosis and 647 patients with primary inflammatory skin condition admission diagnosis were selected. Hospital length of stay and 1-year readmission with inflammatory skin conditions. The 413 patients with a primary inflammatory skin condition discharge diagnosis were 61.0% female and had a mean (SD) age of 55.1 (16.4) years. The 647 patients with primary inflammatory skin condition admission diagnosis were 50.8% female and had a mean (SD) age of 57.8 (15.9) years. Multivariable modeling showed that dermatology consultations were associated with a reduction of 1-year inflammatory skin condition readmissions among patients who were discharged primarily with an inflammatory skin condition (readmission probability, 0.0025; 95% CI, 0.00020-0.030 with dermatology consult vs 0.026; 95% CI, 0.0065-0.10 without; odds ratio, 0.093; 95% CI, 0.010-0.840; P = .03). No other confounding variable was associated with reduction in readmissions. Multivariable modeling also showed that dermatology consultations were associated with a reduction in the adjusted hospital length of stay by 2.64 days (95% CI, 1.75-3.53 days; P Dermatology consultations were associated with improvements of outcomes among hospitalized patients. The expansion of the role of dermatology consultation services may improve patient care in a cost-effective manner.

  2. Day hospital as an alternative to inpatient care for cancer patients: a random assignment trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, V; Stalker, M Z; Gralla, R; Scher, H I; Cimma, C; Park, D; Flaherty, A M; Kiss, M; Nelson, P; Laliberte, L

    1988-01-01

    A stratified, random-assignment trial of 442 cancer patients was conducted to evaluate medical, psychosocial, and financial outcomes of day hospital treatment as an alternative to inpatient care for certain cancer patients. Eligible patients required: a 4- to 8-hour treatment plan, including chemotherapy and other long-term intravenous (i.v.) treatment; a stable cardiovascular status; mental competence; no skilled overnight nursing; and a helper to assist with home care. Patients were ineligible if standard outpatient treatment was possible. No statistically significant (p less than 0.05) differences were found between the Adult Day Hospital (ADH) and Inpatient care in medical or psychosocial outcomes over the 60-day study period. The major difference was in medical costs--approximately one-third lower for ADH patients (p less than 0.001) than for the Inpatient group. The study demonstrates that day hospital care of medical oncology patients is clinically equivalent to Inpatient care, causes no negative psychosocial effects, and costs less than Inpatient care. Findings support the trend toward dehospitalization of medical treatment.

  3. Endoscopic findings in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients at Lacor hospital, northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alema, O N; Martin, D O; Okello, T R

    2012-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common emergency medical condition that may require hospitalization and resuscitation, and results in high patient morbidity. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the preferred investigative procedure for UGIB because of its accuracy, low rate of complication, and its potential for therapeutic interventions. To determine the endoscopic findings in patients presenting with UGIB and its frequency among these patients according to gender and age in Lacor hospital, northern Uganda. The study was carried out at Lacor hospital, located at northern part of Uganda. The record of 224 patients who underwent endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a period of 5 years between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 224 patients had endoscopy for UGIB which consisted of 113 (50.4%) males and 111 (49.6%) females, and the mean age was 42 years ± SD 15.88. The commonest cause of UGIB was esophagealvarices consisting of 40.6%, followed by esophagitis (14.7%), gastritis (12.6%) and peptic ulcer disease (duodenal and gastric ulcers) was 6.2%. The malignant conditions (gastric and esophageal cancers) contributed to 2.6%. Other less frequent causes of UGIB were hiatus hernia (1.8), duodenitis (0.9%), others-gastric polyp (0.4%). Normal endoscopic finding was 16.1% in patients who had UGIB. Esophageal varices are the commonest cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this environment as compared to the west which is mainly peptic ulcer disease.

  4. Outcomes of Noninvasive and Invasive Ventilation in Patients Hospitalized with Asthma Exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Mihaela S; Nathanson, Brian H; Lagu, Tara; Priya, Aruna; Pekow, Penelope S; Steingrub, Jay S; Hill, Nicholas S; Goldberg, Robert J; Kent, David M; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of noninvasive ventilation for patients hospitalized with asthma exacerbation. To assess clinical outcomes of noninvasive (NIV) and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) and examine predictors for NIV use in patients hospitalized with asthma. This was a retrospective cohort study at 97 U.S. hospitals using an electronic medical record database. We developed a hierarchical regression model to identify factors associated with the choice of initial ventilation and used the Laboratory Acute Physiological Score to adjust for differences in the severity of illness. We assessed the outcomes of patients treated with initial NIV or IMV in a propensity-matched cohort. Among 13,930 subjects, 73% were women and 54% were white. The median age was 53 years. Overall, 1,254 patients (9%) required ventilatory support (NIV or IMV). NIV was the initial ventilation method for 556 patients (4.0%) and IMV for 668 (5.0%). Twenty-six patients (4.7% of patients treated with NIV) had to be intubated (NIV failure). The in-hospital mortality was 0.2, 2.3, 14.5, and 15.4%, and the median length of stay was 2.9, 4.1, 6.7, and 10.9 days among those not ventilated, ventilated with NIV, ventilated with IMV, and with NIV failure, respectively. Older patients were more likely to receive NIV (odds ratio, 1.06 per 5 yr; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.11), whereas those with higher acuity (Laboratory Acute Physiological Score per 5 units: odds ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.82-0.88) and those with concomitant pneumonia were less likely to receive NIV. In a propensity-matched sample, NIV was associated with a lower inpatient risk of dying (risk ratio, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.03-0.51) and shorter lengths of stay (4.3 d less; 95% CI, 2.9-5.8) than IMV. Among patients hospitalized with asthma exacerbation and requiring ventilatory support (NIV or IMV), more than 40% received NIV. Although patients successfully treated with NIV appear to have better outcomes than those treated

  5. Risk factors of refeeding syndrome in malnourished older hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhassan, Maryam; Cuvelier, Ingeborg; Gehrke, Ilse; Marburger, Christian; Modreker, Mirja Katrin; Volkert, Dorothee; Willschrei, Hans-Peter; Wirth, Rainer

    2017-06-10

    Despite the high prevalence of malnutrition among older hospitalized persons, it is unknown how many of these malnourished patients are at risk of developing the refeeding syndrome (RFS). In this study, we sought to compare the prevalence and severity of malnutrition among older hospitalized patients with prevalence of known risk factors of RFS. This cross-sectional multicenter-study investigated older participants who were consecutively admitted to the geriatric acute care ward. Malnutrition screening was conducted using Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS-2002), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) criteria were applied for assessing patients at risk of RFS. Weight and height were measured. Degree of weight loss (WL) was obtained by interview. Serum phosphate, magnesium, potassium, sodium, calcium, creatinine and urea were analyzed according to standard procedures. The study group comprised 342 participants (222 females) with a mean age of 83.1 ± 6.8 and BMI range of 14.7-43.6 kg/m 2 . More participants were assessed at risk of malnutrition using NRS-2002 (n = 253, 74.0%) compared to MUST (n = 170, 49.7%) and MNA-SF (n = 191, 55.8%). Of total participants, 239 (69.9%; 157 females) were considered to be at risk of RFS. Based on NRS-2002, 75.9% (n = 192) of patients at risk of malnutrition are at risk of RFS whereas according to MUST and MNA-SF, 85.9% (n = 146) and 69.1% (n = 132) of patients at risk of malnutrition are exposed to high risk of RFS, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of risk of RFS is significantly increased with higher score of NRS-2002 and MUST and lower score of MNA-SF. In a stepwise multiple regression analysis, disease severity (38.2%), WL in 3 months (20.3%) and BMI (33.3%) mainly explained variance in NRS-2002, MUST and MNA-SF scores, respectively, in patients with risk of RFS. Nearly three

  6. Requirements for Successful Adoption of a Glucose Measurement System Into a Hospital POC Program

    OpenAIRE

    F?z?ry, Anna K.; Cembrowski, George S.

    2016-01-01

    Widespread and successful implementation of any glucose measurement system in a hospital point-of-care (POC) program requires a number of features in addition to accurate and reliable analytical performance. Such features include, but are not limited to, a system?s glucose-hematocrit dependence, durability, information technology capabilities, and battery capacity and battery life. While the study of Ottiger et al in this issue supports the analytical accuracy and reliability of Bayer?s CONTO...

  7. Can advanced paramedics in the field diagnose patients and predict hospital admission?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cummins, Niamh Maria

    2013-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Accurate patient diagnosis in the prehospital environment is essential to initiate suitable care pathways. The advanced paramedic (AP) is a relatively recent role in Ireland, and refers to a prehospital practitioner with advanced life-support skills and training. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare the diagnostic decisions of APs with emergency medicine (EM) physicians, and to investigate if APs, as currently trained, can predict the requirement for hospital admission. METHODS: A prospective study was initiated, whereby each emergency ambulance call received via the statutory 999 system was recorded by the attending AP. The AP was asked to provide a clinical diagnosis for each patient, and to predict if hospital admission was required. The data was then cross-referenced with the working diagnosis of the receiving emergency physician and the hospital admission records. RESULTS: A total of 17 APs participated in the study, and 1369 emergency calls were recorded over a 6-month period. Cases where a general practitioner attended the scene were excluded from the concordance analysis. Concordance with the receiving emergency physician represents 70% (525\\/748) for all cases of AP diagnosis, and is mirrored with 70% (604\\/859) correct hospital admission predictions. CONCLUSIONS: AP diagnosis and admission prediction for emergency calls is similar to other emergency medical services systems despite the relative recency of the AP programme in Ireland. Recognition of non-concordance case types may identify priorities for AP education, and drive future AP practice in areas such as \\'treat and refer\\'.

  8. Improving care for patients with acute heart failure: before, during and after hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Martin R; Anker, Stefan D; Cleland, John G F; Felker, G Michael; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Jaarsma, Tiny; Jourdain, Patrick; Knight, Eve; Massie, Barry; Ponikowski, Piotr; López-Sendón, José

    2014-12-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a common and serious condition that contributes to about 5% of all emergency hospital admissions in Europe and the USA. Here, we present the recommendations from structured discussions among an author group of AHF experts in 2013. The epidemiology of AHF and current practices in diagnosis, treatment, and long-term care for patients with AHF in Europe and the USA are examined. Available evidence indicates variation in the quality of care across hospitals and regions. Challenges include the need for rapid diagnosis and treatment, the heterogeneity of precipitating factors, and the typical repeated episodes of decompensation requiring admission to hospital for stabilization. In hospital, care should involve input from an expert in AHF and auditing to ensure that guidelines and protocols for treatment are implemented for all patients. A smooth transition to follow-up care is vital. Patient education programmes could have a dramatic effect on improving outcomes. Information technology should allow, where appropriate, patient telemonitoring and sharing of medical records. Where needed, access to end-of-life care and support for all patients, families, and caregivers should form part of a high-quality service. Eight evidence-based consensus policy recommendations are identified by the author group: optimize patient care transitions, improve patient education and support, provide equity of care for all patients, appoint experts to lead AHF care across disciplines, stimulate research into new therapies, develop and implement better measures of care quality, improve end-of-life care, and promote heart failure prevention. © 2015 Oxford PharmaGenesis Ltd.

  9. Osteomyelitis in burn patients requiring skeletal fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Desai, MH; Herndon, DN

    Deep and severe burns often present with the exposure of musculoskeletal structures and severe deformities. Skeletal fixation, suspension and/or traction are part of their comprehensive treatment. Several factors put burn patients at risk for osteomyelitis, osteosynthesis material being one of them.

  10. Characteristics of patients with measles admitted to allied hospital rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultana, A.; Sabir, S.A.; Awan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Measles, a virus borne droplet infection, is one of the leading causes of death among young children worldwide despite presence of a safe and cost-effective vaccine. Objective of our study was to identify the characteristics of measles patients admitted to Allied Hospitals, Rawalpindi. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted amongst patients admitted with measles in paediatric units of Rawalpindi Medical College Allied Hospitals, Rawalpindi. A standard proforma was used to collect data from the respondents. Results: A total of 55 patients (mean age-29.36 months) with measles were included in the study. 65.5% children were vaccinated while 34.5% were not vaccinated. Among those vaccinated 14 were male. Out of the vaccinated children 52.6% were residents of middle class areas, 31.6% lower middle class area, 10.5% upper middle class areas and 5.3% rural areas. In 55.0% of patients who were vaccinated with at least one dose of measles at nine month of age the estimated calendar months of vaccination was March to April while in 30% the overall climatic period of vaccination was of summer (May to September). Twenty one study subjects were exposed to a case of measles in the family and thirty five out of all developed at least one known complication of the disease. Pneumonia was the most common complication reported in patients (63.6%) followed by diarrhoea (27.3%). Conclusion: Majority of the patients suffering from measles were not vaccinated and the most common reason for failure to immunize children was lack of awareness. Educated and well off fathers were more likely to get their children immunized. The vaccinated children who developed measles majority were vaccinated during months of March, April and May. (author)

  11. A Proactive Approach to Penicillin Allergy Testing in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Justin R; Tarver, Scott A; Alvarez, Kristin S; Tran, Trang; Khan, David A

    Penicillin allergy testing is underutilized in inpatients despite its potential to immediately impact antibiotic treatment. Although most tested patients are able to tolerate penicillin, limited availability and awareness of this tool leads to the use of costly and harmful substitutes. We established an inpatient service at a large academic hospital to identify and test patients with a history of penicillin allergy with the goals of removing inaccurate diagnoses, reducing the use of beta-lactam alternatives, and educating patients and clinicians about the procedure. Eligible inpatients were flagged daily through the electronic medical record and prioritized via a specialized algorithm. A trained clinical pharmacist performed penicillin skin tests and challenges preemptively or by provider request. Clinical characteristics and antibiotic use were analyzed in tested patients. A total of 1203 applicable charts were detected by our system leading to 252 direct evaluations over 18 months. Overall, 228 subjects (90.5%) had their penicillin allergy removed. Of these, 223 were cleared via testing and 5 by discovery of prior penicillin tolerance. Among patients testing negative, 85 (38%) subsequently received beta-lactams, preventing 504 inpatient days and 648 outpatient days on alternative agents. Penicillin allergy testing using a physician-pharmacist team model effectively removes reported allergies in hospitalized patients. The electronic medical record is a valuable asset for locating and stratifying individuals who benefit most from intervention. Proactive testing substantially reduces unnecessary inpatient and outpatient use of beta-lactam alternatives that may otherwise go unaddressed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeni Mekov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The metabolic syndrome (MS affects 21–53% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with a higher prevalence in the early stages of COPD, with results being highly variable between studies. MS may also affect natural course of COPD—number of exacerbations, quality of life and lung function.Aim. To examine the prevalence of MS and its correlation with comorbidities and COPD characteristics in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation.Material and methods. 152 patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation were studied for presence of MS. All of them were also assessed for vitamin D status and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM. Data were gathered for smoking status and exacerbations during the last year. All patients completed CAT (COPD assessment test and mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea scale questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Duration of current hospital stay was recorded.Results. 25% of patients have MS. 23.1% of the male and 29.5% of the female patients have MS (p > 0.05. The prevalence of MS in this study is significantly lower when compared to a national representative study (44.6% in subjects over 45 years. 69.1% of all patients and 97.4% from MS patients have arterial hypertension. The presence of MS is associated with significantly worse cough and sleep (1st and 7th CAT questions; p = 0.002 and p = 0.001 respectively and higher total CAT score (p = 0.017. Average BMI is 27.31. None of the patients have MS and BMI <25. There is a correlation between the presence of MS and DM (p = 0.008 and with the number of exacerbations in the last year (p = 0.015. There is no correlation between the presence of MS and the pulmonary function.Conclusion. This study among hospitalized COPD patients finds comparable but relatively low prevalence of MS (25% compared to previously published data (21–53% and lower prevalence compared to general population (44.6%. MS may impact quality of life and the

  13. Etiology of vertigo in Thai patients at Thammasat Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunasuwan, Parichat; Bunbanjerdsuk, Sacarin; Nilsuwan, Amornwan

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the causes of vertigo in the patients at Otoneurology Clinic, Thammasat Hospital. The data of these patients, collected from the medical records between January 2010 and January 2011, were reviewed and analyzed. From one hundred and forty-nine cases, 49 cases (33%) were men and 100 cases (67%) were women, which yielded the male-to-female ratio of 1:2. The average age of patients was 55 year olds. The most common diagnostic category was peripheral vestibular disorders (80.5%). Other causes were central vestibular disorders (4.7%) and non-vestibular related (4%), whereas the remaining (10.1%) was undiagnosed. The causes of vertigo included benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: BPPV (53%), Meniere's disease (10.1%) and recurrent vestibulopathy (8.1%), while the underlying diseases found were diabetes mellitus (11.4%), hypertension (32.2%) and dyslipidemia (34.2%). In Otoneurology Clinic, Thammasat Hospital, the peripheral vestibular disorders was the main etiology of vertigo, while the three most common causes were BPPV Meniere's disease, and recurrent vestibulopathy respectively.

  14. Hospitalized cardiovascular events in patients with diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen-Khoa Bao-Anh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetes stem from chronic hyperglycemia and are thought to have overlapping pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence rate of hospitalized myocardial infarctions (MI and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME compared with diabetic patients without retinal diseases. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of a commercially insured population in an administrative claims database. DME subjects (n = 3519 and diabetes controls without retinal disease (n = 10557 were matched by age and gender. Healthcare claims were analyzed for the study period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2005. Incidence and adjusted rate ratios of hospitalized MI and CVA events were then calculated. Results The adjusted rate ratio for MI was 2.50 (95% CI: 1.83-3.41, p  Conclusion Event rates of MI or CVA were higher in patients with DME than in diabetes controls. This study is one of few with sufficient sample size to accurately estimate the relationship between DME and cardiovascular outcomes.

  15. Implementation of patient safety and patient-centeredness strategies in Iranian hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne S.; Manoochehri, Jila; Ravaghi, Hamid; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2014-01-01

    To examine the extent of implementation for patient safety (PS) and patient-centeredness (PC) strategies and their association with hospital characteristics (type, ownership, teaching status, annual evaluation grade) in Iran. A cross-sectional study through an adapted version of the MARQuIS

  16. Micafungin treatment and eradication of candiduria among hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Martin, Spencer; Sura, Mihir; Mohammed, Anisa; Golan, Yoav

    2016-11-01

    In high-risk patients, candiduria may be associated with the development of urinary tract infections (UTI) and invasive candidiasis. The triazole antifungals achieve good urine concentrations, but their use is limited by the emergence of non-albicans Candida spp. with low-triazole susceptibility. The echinocandins remain fungicidal against many azole-resistant Candida spp., but low urine concentrations limit their use. We examined the rates of candiduria elimination in micafungin-treated patients. This retrospective analysis evaluated consecutive patients with candiduria (1/2008-4/2011) who were treated with micafungin (100 mg/day) and had post-micafungin urine cultures. Patients were deemed to have either candiduria or UTI and were assessed for short-term (within 2 weeks post-micafungin) and long-term (>1 month post-micafungin) urine sterilization. Thirty-three patients meeting our inclusion criteria were identified. Of these, 16 (48 %) were diagnosed with a Candida UTI. A total of 25 patients (76 %) had Foley catheters, which were replaced in 11 (44 %) cases. The majority of patients had Candida albicans (39 %), but Candida krusei and Candida glabrata (33 %) were also isolated. Eight patients (24 %) were immunocompromised, and 29 (88 %) received broad-spectrum antibiotics. Rates of urine sterilization during micafungin treatment, 2 weeks after micafungin, and >1 month after micafungin were 81, 78, and 75 %, respectively. Among hospitalized patients with candiduria, micafungin administration was frequently associated with both short- and long-term urine sterilization. This was observed among patients with or without Foley removal and among those with Candida albicans, as well as non-albicans Candida spp.

  17. Community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization: rational decision making and interpretation of guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Douwe F; van Werkhoven, Cornelis H; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik

    2017-05-01

    This review focuses on the evidence base for guideline recommendations on the diagnosis, the optimal choice, timing and duration of empirical antibiotic therapy, and the use of microbiological tests for patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP): issues for which guidelines are frequently used as a quick reference. Furthermore, we will discuss possibilities for future research in these topics. Many national and international guideline recommendations, even on critical elements of CAP management, are based on low-to-moderate quality evidence. The diagnosis and management of CAP has hardly changed for decades. The recommendation to cover atypical pathogens in all hospitalized CAP patients is based on observational studies only and is challenged by two recent trials. The following years, improved diagnostic testing, radiologically by low-dose Computed Tomography or ultrasound and/or microbiologically by point-of-care multiplex PCR, has the potential to largely influence the choice and start of antibiotic therapy in hospitalized CAP patients. Rapid microbiological testing will hopefully improve antibiotic de-escalation or early pathogen-directed therapy, both potent ways of reducing broad-spectrum antibiotic use. Current guideline recommendations on the timing and duration of antibiotic therapy are based on limited evidence, but will be hard to improve.

  18. Inpatient dermatology: Characteristics of patients and admissions in a tertiary level hospital in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatology is primarily a non-acute, outpatient-centered clinical specialty, but substantial number of patients need indoor admission for adequate management. Over the years, the need for inpatient facilities in Dermatology has grown manifold; however, these facilities are available only in some tertiary centers. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of the diseases and outcomes of patients admitted in the dermatology inpatient Department of a tertiary care facility in eastern India. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of the admission and discharge records of all patients, collected from the medical records department, admitted to our indoor facility from 2011 to 2014. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with special emphasis on the patient's demographic profile, clinical diagnosis, final outcome, and duration of stay. Results and Analysis: A total of 375 patients were admitted to our indoor facility during the period. Males outnumbered females, with the median age in the 5th decade. Immunobullous disorders (91 patients, 24.27% were the most frequent reason for admissions, followed by various causes of erythroderma (80 patients, 21.33% and infective disorders (73 patients, 19.47%. Other notable causes included cutaneous adverse drug reactions, psoriasis, vasculitis, and connective tissue diseases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 22.2±15.7 days; ranging from 1 to 164 days. Majority of patients (312, 83.2% improved after hospitalization; while 29 (7.73% patients died from their illness. About 133 patients (35.64% required referral services during their stay, while 8 patients (2.13% were transferred to other departments for suitable management. Conclusion: Many dermatoses require inpatient care for their optimum management. Dermatology inpatient services should be expanded in India to cater for the large number of cases with potentially highly severe dermatoses.

  19. The Mystery of Increased Hospitalizations of Elderly Patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-15

    Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of people in the United States every year. In some people, particularly the elderly and those who are ill from pre-existing conditions, bacterial pneumonia may follow influenza or even a common cold. Dr. Martin Meltzer, discusses two articles in the May 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases journal about increased pneumonia-related hospitalizations of elderly patients in England.  Created: 4/15/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/30/2008.

  20. Outcomes of a telemonitoring-based program (telEPOC in frequently hospitalized COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban C

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cristóbal Esteban,1,2 Javier Moraza,1 Milagros Iriberri,3 Urko Aguirre,2,4 Begoña Goiria,5 José M Quintana,2,4 Myriam Aburto,1 Alberto Capelastegui1 1Pneumology Department, Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital, Galdakao, 2Red de Investigación en Servicios Sanitarios y Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC, Bilbao, 3Pneumology Department, Cruces Hospital, Barakaldo, 4Research Unit, Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital, Galdakao, 5Primary Care Unit, Barrualde Integrated Healthcare Organisation (OSI-Barrualde, Spain Background: The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases requires changes in health care delivery. In COPD, telemedicine appears to be a useful tool. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy (in improving health care-resource use and clinical outcomes of a telemonitoring-based program (telEPOC in COPD patients with frequent hospitalizations. Materials and methods: We conducted a nonrandomized observational study in an intervention cohort of 119 patients (Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital and a control cohort of 78 patients (Cruces Hospital, followed up for 2 years (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02528370. The inclusion criteria were two or more hospital admissions in the previous year or three or more admissions in the previous 2 years. The intervention group received telemonitoring plus education and controls usual care. Results: Most participants were men (13% women, and the sample had a mean age of 70 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 45%, Charlson comorbidity index score of 3.5, and BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity index score of 4.1. In multivariate analysis, the intervention was independently related to lower rates of hospital admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27–0.54; P<0.0001, emergency department attendance (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35–0.92; P<0.02, and 30-day readmission (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.29–0.74; P<0.001, as well as cumulative length of stay (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0

  1. Factors affecting satisfaction of patients after orthognathic surgery at a University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ahmad, Hazem T.; Al-Omari, Iyad K.; Eldurini, Laila N.; Suleiman, Ahmad A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to analyze factors that influence patient's satisfaction with orthognathic treatment and evaluate patient's perception of changes in physical and psychosocial aspects. In a retrospective clinical study conducted at Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan between December 2006 and December 2007, we examined 38 patients who had orthognathic surgery after an average follow-up of 20 months. Examination included evaluation of nerve function and temporomandibular function with Helkimo index. Patients filled out a questionnaire on treatment satisfaction and perception of physical and psychosocial changes after treatment. Patients were generally satisfied with the result, 82% agreed they would undergo treatment again. They were divided into very satisfied n=25 and less satisfied n=13 groups according to satisfaction score, with statistically significant differences found between them concerning diagnosis and follow-up period, with all vertical maxillary excess patients very satisfied and 75% of asymmetrical deformities patients less satisfied, and less satisfaction by patients more than one year postoperatively, p=0.006. Patients perceived improvement oral function, general health, appearance and interpersonal skills. Lower rates of joint and muscular pain and increased mobility of lower jaw correlated with better patient's perception of health and appearance. Although patient's report high satisfaction levels, several factors such as the temporomandibular joint function could affect patient's psychosocial adjustment after treatment. Sufficient information for patient on the treatment course is required to improve satisfaction. Controlling these factors could improve patient's quality of life. (author)

  2. Brucellosis among Hospitalized Febrile Patients in Northern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouley, Andrew J.; Biggs, Holly M.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Bartlett, John A.; Afwamba, Isaac A.; Maro, Venance P.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  3. Noninvasive ventilation in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Avdeev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV of lungs during the last two decades significantly improved the results of management of severe COPD patients with acute or chronic respiratory failure during both periods of exacerbation and stability. At present, NIV is considered to be the first-line therapy for acute exacerbation of COPD with hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis. This method of airway support turned out to be effective in patients after extubation both for the relief of excommunication from a respirator and for prophylaxis and treatment of postextubation respiratory failure. NIV was proven to be successful in patients with a combination of COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (overlap syndrome, in COPD with pneumonia and in postoperative COPD patients who have undergone lung resectional surgery. The efficacy of NIV under intensive care and intensive therapy unit conditions has stimulated the interest to the use of mask ventilation in hospitals and out-patient departments (for a prolonged domestic therapy. This article presents a review of NIV use in patients with COPD during both periods of exacerbation and stability. 

  4. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  5. The effect of hospital volume on patient outcomes in severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Hsiu-Nien

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the relation between hospital volume and outcome in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. The determination is important because patient outcome may be improved through volume-based selective referral. Methods In this cohort study, we analyzed 22,551 SAP patients in 2,208 hospital-years (between 2000 and 2009 from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Primary outcome was hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were hospital length of stay and charges. Hospital SAP volume was measured both as categorical and as continuous variables (per one case increase each hospital-year. The effect was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations accounting for hospital clustering effect. Adjusted covariates included patient and hospital characteristics (model 1, and additional treatment variables (model 2. Results Irrespective of the measurements, increasing hospital volume was associated with reduced risk of hospital mortality after adjusting the patient and hospital characteristics (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.995, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.993-0.998 for per one case increase. The patients treated in the highest volume quartile (≥14 cases per hospital-year had 42% lower risk of hospital mortality than those in the lowest volume quartile (1 case per hospital-year after adjusting the patient and hospital characteristics (adjusted OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40-0.83. However, an inverse relation between volume and hospital stay or hospital charges was observed only when the volume was analyzed as a categorical variable. After adjusting the treatment covariates, the volume effect on hospital mortality disappeared regardless of the volume measures. Conclusions These findings support the use of volume-based selective referral for patients with SAP and suggest that differences in levels or processes of care among hospitals may have contributed to the volume

  6. Tuberculosis patients hospitalized in the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon-a retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolp, S. M.; Huson, M. A. M.; Janssen, S.; Beyeme, J. O.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data on tuberculosis in Central Africa are limited. We performed a retrospective observational study on clinical characteristics of 719 hospitalized tuberculosis patients in Lambaréné, Gabon. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection rate was high (34%) and in-hospital

  7. Evaluation of health literacy status among patients in a tertiary care hospital in coastal karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U P, Rathnakar; Belman, Madhuri; Kamath, Ashwin; B, Unnikrishnan; Shenoy K, Ashok; A L, Udupa

    2013-11-01

    People with limited health literacy are more likely to make medication errors, and they have less health knowledge, worse health status, more hospitalizations, and higher healthcare costs than people with adequate literacy. The objective of this study is to assess the health literacy status among patients who are able to read and understand English attending a tertiary care hospital by using Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine [REALM] technique and to compare the health literacy levels to educational status and other baseline characteristics. A widely used word recognition method [REALM] was used to assess the HL status of 200 patients attending a tertiary care hospital in Southern India. The number of correctly pronounced words was used to assign a grade-equivalent reading level. Scores 0 to 44 indicate reading skills at or below the 6th grade level, scores from 45 to 60 represent skills at the 7th or 8th grade level, and scores above 60 indicate skills at the high-school level or higher. HL status was found below adequate level in more than 50% of the patients. Younger age group showed better HL scores compared to those aged more than 25 years. General education level or the medium of education does not truly reflect HL levels as brought out in the study. Even those with postgraduate qualification had poor HL skills. The study was carried out to find out the HL levels among patients attending a tertiary care hospital. It was assumed that the general education levels may not reflect true HL status. In view of the results of this study it can be concluded that patient's HL skills should not be taken for granted and adequate attention should be paid in educating and briefing patients whenever patients are required to interpret and understand health care related documents.

  8. Pediatric chronic patients at outpatient clinics: a study in a Latin American University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alveno, Renata A; Miranda, Caroline V; Passone, Caroline G; Waetge, Aurora R; Hojo, Elza S; Farhat, Sylvia C L; Odone-Filho, Vicente; Tannuri, Uenis; Carvalho, Werther B; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda; Silva, Clovis A

    2017-10-02

    To describe the characteristics of children and adolescentes with chronic diseases of outpatient clinics at a tertiary university hospital. A cross-sectional study was performed with 16,237 patients with chronic diseases followed-up in one year. The data were collected through the electronic system, according to the number of physician appointments in 23 pediatric specialties. Patients were divided in two groups: children (0-9 years) and adolescents (10-19 years). Early (10-14 years) and late (15-19 years) adolescent groups were also analyzed. Of the total sample, 56% were children and 46% were adolescents. The frequencies of following pediatric specialties were significantly higher in adolescents when compared with children: cardiology, endocrinology, hematology, nephrology/renal transplantation, neurology, nutrology, oncology, palliative and pain care, psychiatry, and rheumatology (p<0.05). The frequencies of emergency service visits (30% vs. 17%, p<0.001), hospitalizations (23% vs. 11%, p<0.001), intensive care unit admissions (6% vs. 2%, p<0.001), and deaths (1% vs. 0.6%, p=0.002) were significantly lower in adolescents than in children. However, the number of physician appointments (≥13) per patient was also higher in the adolescent group (5% vs. 6%, p=0.018). Further analysis comparison between early and late adolescents revealed that the first group had significantly more physician appointments (35% vs. 32%, p=0.025), and required more than two pediatric specialties (22% vs. 21%, p=0.047). Likewise, the frequencies of emergency service visits (19% vs. 14%, p<0.001) and hospitalizations (12% vs. 10%, p=0.035) were higher in early adolescents. This study evaluated a large population in a Latin American hospital and suggested that early adolescents with chronic diseases required many appointments, multiple specialties and hospital admissions. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Mini Nutritional Assessment for Hospitalized Patients in King Khalid Hospital at Hail city in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafia Bano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA has been developed to assess malnutrition in elderly  and to filter those who might get benefited from early diagnosis and treatment. The objective of the present study was to examine the nutritional profile of old age hospitalized individuals through the use of the MNA in King Khalid Hospital at Hail city of Saudi Arabia. Methods: Demographic data was gathered through a questionnaire and a modified version of MNA, which was translated into Arabic and applied to 100 elderly females aged ≥ 45 years to assess their nutritional status . The MNA version modified by  Nestle and translated into Arabic was used to evaluate the patients for this study. The descriptive analysis of variables is shown as the average ± one standard deviation. Results: Mean age of the participants was 61.12±12.4 years ranging from 45 to 92 years. The mean body mass index of total population was found to be 26.9±5.2 ranging from 18.3 to 46.5 kg/m2. The assessment scores and total malnutrition score was found to be decreasing with increasing age, showing a significant inverse correlation (P<0.01. Furthermore, the difference in the screening scores according to the age was found to be statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Because of the high prevalence of elderly patients that were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition, a more detailed evaluation of nutritional status, along with a regular follow up and dietary intervention to reverse the situation, of these patients is recommended.

  10. Can patients report patient safety incidents in a hospital setting? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jane K; Armitage, Gerry

    2012-08-01

    Patients are increasingly being thought of as central to patient safety. A small but growing body of work suggests that patients may have a role in reporting patient safety problems within a hospital setting. This review considers this disparate body of work, aiming to establish a collective view on hospital-based patient reporting. This review asks: (a) What can patients report? (b) In what settings can they report? (c) At what times have patients been asked to report? (d) How have patients been asked to report? 5 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, (Kings Fund) HMIC and PsycINFO) were searched for published literature on patient reporting of patient safety 'problems' (a number of search terms were utilised) within a hospital setting. In addition, reference lists of all included papers were checked for relevant literature. 13 papers were included within this review. All included papers were quality assessed using a framework for comparing both qualitative and quantitative designs, and reviewed in line with the study objectives. Patients are clearly in a position to report on patient safety, but included papers varied considerably in focus, design and analysis, with all papers lacking a theoretical underpinning. In all papers, reports were actively solicited from patients, with no evidence currently supporting spontaneous reporting. The impact of timing upon accuracy of information has yet to be established, and many vulnerable patients are not currently being included in patient reporting studies, potentially introducing bias and underestimating the scale of patient reporting. The future of patient reporting may well be as part of an 'error detection jigsaw' used alongside other methods as part of a quality improvement toolkit.

  11. Inhaler education for hospital-based pharmacists: how much is required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackevicius, C A; Chapman, K R

    1999-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a more intensive educational intervention with a less intensive intervention on the ability of hospital pharmacists to be prepared to educate patients regarding inhaled device technique. Randomized controlled trial. Inhaler technique and knowledge were assessed pre-education, immediately after and three months after education by a research assistant blinded to the educational allocation. Tertiary hospital pharmacy department. Hospital-based pharmacists. A 1 h 'hands-on' session with feedback (more intense education, MIE) or written materials describing inhaler use (less intense education, LIE). The change in overall score from pre-education to early posteducation for MIE was greater than for LIE (mean [95% CI]) (2.64 [1.27 to 4.01] versus 1.26 [0.05 to 2.47], PMIE group than the LIE group, a difference that was not statistically significant (1.78 [0.82 to 2.74] versus 1. 22 [0.06 to 2.39], P=0.09). Scores in both groups were lower in the late posteducation period compared with the early posteducation period. Greater increases in total score in the immediate posteducation period were associated with a low baseline score and the MIE intervention. Individual coaching in inhaler technique produces greater improvement in inhaler knowledge among hospital pharmacists than provision of written materials. However, the advantage of the more intensive intervention was short-lived, with little advantage evident in three months.

  12. Exploring relationships between hospital patient safety culture and Consumer Reports safety scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott Alan; Yount, Naomi; Sorra, Joann

    2017-02-16

    A number of private and public companies calculate and publish proprietary hospital patient safety scores based on publicly available quality measures initially reported by the U.S. federal government. This study examines whether patient safety culture perceptions of U.S. hospital staff in a large national survey are related to publicly reported patient safety ratings of hospitals. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (Hospital SOPS) assesses provider and staff perceptions of hospital patient safety culture. Consumer Reports (CR), a U.S. based non-profit organization, calculates and shares with its subscribers a Hospital Safety Score calculated annually from patient experience survey data and outcomes data gathered from federal databases. Linking data collected during similar time periods, we analyzed relationships between staff perceptions of patient safety culture composites and the CR Hospital Safety Score and its five components using multiple multivariate linear regressions. We analyzed data from 164 hospitals, with patient safety culture survey responses from 140,316 providers and staff, with an average of 856 completed surveys per hospital and an average response rate per hospital of 56%. Higher overall Hospital SOPS composite average scores were significantly associated with higher overall CR Hospital Safety Scores (β = 0.24, p Consumer Reports Hospital Safety Score, which is a composite of patient experience and outcomes data from federal databases. As hospital managers allocate resources to improve patient safety culture within their organizations, their efforts may also indirectly improve consumer-focused, publicly reported hospital rating scores like the Consumer Reports Hospital Safety Score.

  13. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of hospitalization and can be complicated by the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury is associated with major adverse kidney events (death, dialysis, and durable loss of renal function [chronic kidney disease]). Because pneumonia and acute kidney injury are in part mediated by inflammation, we hypothesized that when acute kidney injury complicates pneumonia, major adverse kidney events outcomes would be exacerbated. We sought to assess the frequency of major adverse kidney events after a hospitalization for either pneumonia, acute kidney injury, or the combination of both. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the national Veterans Affairs database for patients with a admission diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases-9 code 584.xx (acute kidney injury) or 486.xx (pneumonia) between October 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005. Three groups of patients were created, based on the diagnosis of the index admission and serum creatinine values: 1) acute kidney injury, 2) pneumonia, and 3) pneumonia with acute kidney injury. Patients with mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m were excluded. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events defined as the composite of death, chronic dialysis, or a permanent loss of renal function after the primary discharge. The observations of 54,894 subjects were analyzed. Mean age was 68.7 ± 12.3 years. The percentage of female was 2.4, 73.3% were Caucasian, and 19.7% were African-American. Differences across the three diagnostic groups were significant for death, 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, major adverse kidney events following admission, and major adverse kidney events during admission (all p pneumonia + acute kidney injury group (51% died and 62% reached major adverse kidney events). In both unadjusted and adjusted time to event analyses, patients with pneumonia + acute kidney injury

  14. Association between childhood abuse and psychiatric morbidities among hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirod Kumar Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood abuse has been linked with increased risk of adult psychiatric disorders including major depression, substance abuse, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and personality disorders. However, only a few from India attempted to study long-term consequences of childhood abuse. Our study aimed to understand the role of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse along with psychiatric co-morbidities in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to psychiatric inpatient services in the age group of 14-45 years for the 1 st time were evaluated for a history of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse on the basis of retrospective chart review. Semi-structured Performa was used to evaluate the patient with a history of child abuse, and they were diagnosed according to International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnostic criteria. Result: The prevalence of child abuse in our inpatient services was 43.29%; emotional abuse (61.9% was most commonly reported among patient followed by physical (21.43% and sexual abuse (16.67%. We observed a significant difference in terms of length of hospital stay between abuse (10.29 ± 6.01 days and nonabuse group (5.90 ± 2.43 days (t = 4.902, df = 95, P < 0.0001. The boys experienced physical abuse at a younger age (7.43 ± 2.50 years than girls (13.50 ± 0.70 years. The sexual abuse and emotional abuse were reported at a younger age in girls than boys. We found high prevalence of substance use disorders (40.47%, psychosis (19.04%, and mood disorder (28.57% among abuse group. Conclusions: The study findings highlight the developing importance of the different forms of abuse on adult psychiatric diagnosis in India. The abused patients are at high risk of the development of psychiatric disorder than the nonabuse group. The increased length of hospitalization among abused group reflects severity and complexity of child abuse. The early detection of social factors

  15. Unravelling the potential mechanisms behind hospitalization-associated disability in older patients : the hospital-associated disability and impact on daily Life (Hospital-ADL) cohort study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichardt, Lucienne A.; Aarden, Jesse J.; van Seben, Rosanne; van der Schaaf, Marike; Engelbert, Raoul H.H.; Bosch, Jos A.; Buurman, Bianca M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over 30 % of older patients experience hospitalization-associated disability (HAD) (i.e., loss of independence in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)) after an acute hospitalization. Despite its high prevalence, the mechanisms that underlie HAD remain elusive. This paper describes the

  16. Unravelling the potential mechanisms behind hospitalization-associated disability in older patients : The Hospital-Associated Disability and impact on daily Life (Hospital-ADL) cohort study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichardt, L.A.; Aarden, J.J.; van Seben, R.; van der Schaaf, M.; Engelbert, R.H.H.; Bosch, J.A.; Buurman, B.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over 30 % of older patients experience hospitalization-associated disability (HAD) (i.e., loss of independence in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)) after an acute hospitalization. Despite its high prevalence, the mechanisms that underlie HAD remain elusive. This paper describes the

  17. Barriers to quality patient care in rural district hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna E. Eygelaar

    2012-05-01

    Reliability of the instrument was verified using the Cronbach alpha coefficient and a pilot study. The validity, specifically construct and content validity, were assured by means of an extensive literature review, pilot study and use of experts. Ethics approval was obtained from the relevant stakeholders. Results showed that 272 participants (97% disagreed that provision of staff was adequate, with staff above 40 years of age more likely to disagree (p = <0.01. A statistically significant association was shown between availability of doctors and staff not being able to cope with emergencies (p = <0.01. Most participants (n =212; 76% indicated that they were not receiving continuing education, with the registered nurses more likely to disagree (χ² test, p = 0.02. Participants in both hospital types A (n = 131; 82% and B (n = 108; 91% also disagreed that provision of equipment and consumables was adequate. The research showed that inadequacies relating to human resources, professional development, consumables and equipment influenced the quality of patient care. Urgent attention should be given to the problems identified to ensure quality of patient care in rural hospitals.

  18. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  19. HOSPITAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS: A STUDY OF ELECTRONIC PATIENT RECORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Cortês

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of patient records, also known as medical records, is related to different needs and objectives, as they constitute permanent documents on the health of patients. With the advancement of information technologies and systems, patient records can be stored in databases, resulting in a positive impact on patient care. Based on these considerations, a research question that arises is “what are the benefits and problems that can be seen with the use of electronic versions of medical records?” This question leads to the formulation of the following hypothesis: although problems can be identified during the process of using electronic record systems, the benefits outweigh the difficulties, thereby justifying their use. To respond to the question and test the presented hypothesis, a research study was developed with users of the same electronic record system, consisting of doctors, nurses, and administrative personnel in three hospitals located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The results show that, despite some problems in their usage, the benefits of electronic patient records outweigh possible disadvantages.

  20. Patient satisfaction with a hospital-based neuropsychology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Amie; Millar, Elisa; Dorstyn, Diana

    2016-09-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop and pilot a measure of patient satisfaction that encompasses themes, activities, settings and interactions specific to the neuropsychological assessment process. Methods A focus group of out-patients (n=15) was surveyed to identify the factors commonly associated with a satisfactory neuropsychological experience. Responses informed a purposely designed 14-item patient satisfaction scale (α=0.88) that was completed by 66 hospital out-patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Results Satisfaction with the neuropsychological assessment process was generally reported, with the testing phase (85%) rated significantly more favourably than the pre-assessment (79%) and feedback (70%) phases. Commentaries provided by 32 respondents identified interpersonal facilitators to a satisfactory neuropsychological assessment experience, but also dissatisfaction with physical aspects of the testing environment in addition to service availability. Conclusions The patient satisfaction scale can be used as a quality assurance tool to evaluate neuropsychological service delivery. Large-scale research is needed to confirm the scale's psychometric properties. Further research may also include a broader perspective on the consumers' experience of neuropsychological services.

  1. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Patient safety climate and worker safety behaviours in acute hospitals in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Cakil; Flin, Rhona; Mearns, Kathryn

    2013-06-01

    To obtain a measure of hospital safety climate from a sample of National Health Service (NHS) acute hospitals in Scotland and to test whether these scores were associated with worker safety behaviors, and patient and worker injuries. Data were from 1,866 NHS clinical staff in six Scottish acute hospitals. A Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire measured hospital safety climate (Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture), worker safety behaviors, and worker and patient injuries. The associations between the hospital safety climate scores and the outcome measures (safety behaviors, worker and patient injury rates) were examined. Hospital safety climate scores were significantly correlated with clinical workers' safety behavior and patient and worker injury measures, although the effect sizes were smaller for the latter. Regression analyses revealed that perceptions of staffing levels and managerial commitment were significant predictors for all the safety outcome measures. Both patient-specific and more generic safety climate items were found to have significant impacts on safety outcome measures. This study demonstrated the influences of different aspects of hospital safety climate on both patient and worker safety outcomes. Moreover, it has been shown that in a hospital setting, a safety climate supporting safer patient care would also help to ensure worker safety. The Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire has proved to be a usable method of measuring both hospital safety climate as well as patient and worker safety outcomes. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pattern of Leukaemia Patients Admitted in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Any tissue of the body can give rise to cancer. However, those tissues which multiply rapidly are at high risk of developing cancer and haematopoietic system is one of them. Neoplasms of this system are known as leukaemia and lymphoma, according to the types of white cells involved.Study of cancer patterns in different societies, however can contribute a substantial knowledge about the aetiology of cancer. The present Study was designed and aimed to estimate the frequency of different types of leukaemia in patients admitted in Ayub Teaching hospital Abbottabad. Methods: Data from the patients admitted at oncology Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 2010 to 2015 was collected and analysed to calculate cumulative and year-wise frequency of leukaemia and its major types. Frequency distribution with reference to gender and age was also calculated. Results: In our analysis about 16 percent patients had acute myelocytic leukaemia and 32 percent patients had acute lymphocytic leukaemia; while chronic myeloid leukaemia outnumbered chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (11 percent and 3 percent); Hodgkin lymphoma was seen in 18 percent cases while Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was present in 20 percent cases. Out of the total, 150 cases (75 percent) belonged to mountainous areas of Hazara, i.e., 40 cases belonged to Kohistan, another 40 cases were residents of Battagram, 45 cases belonged to hilly areas of Mansehra and 25 cases to Kaghan valley, while only 50 (25 percent) cases were from the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts, i.e., 20 and 30 cases respectively. Conclusion: Leukaemia is more common in hilly areas of Hazara, since majority of the cases belonged to well-known mountainous regions of Kohistan, Battagram, Kaghan or Mansehra and only few cases belonged to the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts. (author)

  4. [The development of a portable life support device for transporting pre-hospital critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen-xing; Wu, Tai-hu; Meng, Xing-ju; Lu, Heng-zhi; Zheng, Jie-wen; Wang, Hai-tao

    2012-06-01

    To describe a portable life support device for transportation of pre-hospital patients with critical illness. The characteristics and requirements for urgent management during transportation of critically ill patients to a hospital were analyzed. With adoption of the original equipment, with the aid of staple of the art soft ware, the overall structure, its installation, fixation, freedom from interference, operational function were studied, and the whole system of life support and resuscitation was designed. The system was composed by different modules, including mechanical ventilation, transfusion, aspiration, critical care, oxygen supply and power supply parts. The system could be fastened quickly to a stretcher to form portable intensive care unit (ICU), and it could be carried by different size vehicles to provide nonstop treatment by using power supply of the vehicle, thus raising the efficiency of urgent care. With characteristics of its small size, lightweight and portable, the device is particularly suitable for narrow space and extreme environment.

  5. Breakdown in informational continuity of care during hospitalization of older home-living patients: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mari Olsen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The successful transfer of an older patient between health care organizations requires open communication between them that details relevant and necessary information about the patient's health status and individual needs. The objective of this study was to identify and describe the process and content of the patient information exchange between nurses in home care and hospital during hospitalization of older home-living patients.Methods: A multiple case study design was used. Using observations, qualitative interviews and document reviews, the total patient information exchange during each patient's episode of hospitalization (n = 9, from day of admission to return home, was captured.Results: Information exchange mainly occurred at discharge, including a discharge note sent from hospital to home care, and telephone reports from hospital nurse to home care nurse, and meetings between hospital nurse and patient coordinator from the municipal purchaser unit. No information was provided from the home care nurses to the hospital nurses at admission. Incompleteness in the content of both written and verbal information was found. Information regarding physical care was more frequently reported than other caring dimensions. Descriptions of the patients’ subjective experiences were almost absent and occurred only in the verbal communication.Conclusions: The gap in the information flow, as well as incompleteness in the content of written and verbal information exchanged, constitutes a challenge to the continuity of care for hospitalized home-living patients. In order to ensure appropriate nursing follow-up care, we emphasize the need for nurses to improve the information flow, as well as to use a more comprehensive approach to older patients, and that this must be reflected in the verbal and written information exchange.

  6. Factors associated with Salmonella shedding among equine colic patients at a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L M; Morley, P S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Salman, M D; Gentry-Weeks, C

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate factors potentially associated with fecal Salmonella shedding among equine patients hospitalized for colic at a veterinary teaching hospital and to determine the effects of probiotic treatment on fecal Salmonella shedding and clinical signs. Longitudinal study and controlled trial. 246 equine colic patients. History and medical information were obtained from patient records. Fecal and environmental samples were submitted for aerobic bacterial culture for Salmonella enterica. Fifty-one patients were treated with a commercially available probiotic; 46 were treated with a placebo. Logistic regression was used to evaluate data. Salmonella organisms were detected in feces from 23 (9%) patients at least once during hospitalization. Patients were more likely to shed Salmonella organisms if diarrhea was evident equine patients hospitalized at a veterinary teaching hospital because of colic and that pathogen monitoring in patients and the hospital environment and use of barrier nursing precautions for equine colic patients are beneficial.

  7. The Role of Rotavirus Infection Requiring Treatment in a Hospital in Children with Diarrheal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.Yu. Stepanova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the prognostic and diagnostic value of some clinical and biological factors in the development of acute intestinal rotavirus infection in children. We observed 161 children aged 1 month to 6 years. 81 children were diagnosed with rotavirus infection, and 80 — with secretory diarrhea of unknown origin. Treatment of children was carried out in a hospital. Analysis of clinical and anamnestic data enabled to choose the most prognostically and diagnostically important predictors out of 117 studied risk factors. The authors investigated the association of clinical and biological factors with the severity of rotavirus infection, which would highlight the groups of children with high risk of rotavirus infection, which requires treatment in a hospital. The practical application of the results of this work should be the optimization of early diagnostics of rotavirus infections and timeliness of preventive measures.

  8. [Hospitalization rate in relation to severe complications of transrectal prostate biopsy: About 2715 patients biopsied].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarelle, B; Perrin, P; Devonec, M; Paparel, P; Ruffion, A

    To identify hospitalizations directly related to a complication occurring within 30 days following a transrectal prostate biopsy (PBP). Overall hospitalization rates, mortality rates, potential predisposing factors for complications. Single-center study including all patients who underwent PBP between January 2005 and January 2012. Any hospitalization occurring within 30 days of the PBP for urgent motive was considered potentially attributable to biopsy. We identified the reason for hospitalization with direct complications (urinary infection or fever, rectal bleeding, bladder caillotage, retention) and indirect (underlying comorbidities decompensation) of the biopsy. The contributing factors were anticoagulant or antiplatelet treatment well as waning immunity factors (corticosteroid therapy, HIV, chemotherapy or immunodulateur). Among 2715 men who underwent PBP, there were 120 (4.4%) hospitalizations including 28 (1.03%) caused by the biopsy. Twenty-five (0.92%) were related to a direct complication of biopsy: 14 (56%) for urinary tract infection or fever including 1 hospitalization in intensive care, 5 (20%) for rectal bleeding which required several transfusions 1, 10 (40%) urinary retention and 3 (0.11%) for an indirect complication (2 coronary syndromes and 1 respiratory failure). Several direct complications were associated in 3 cases. Only two hospitalizations associated with rectal bleeding were taking an antiplatelet or anticoagulant. There was no association between hospitalization for urinary tract infections and a decreased immune status. The first death observed in our study occurred at D31 of pulmonary embolism (advanced metastatic patient with bladder cancer). Twenty (60.6%) patients urgently hospitalized did not have prostate cancer. Within this large sample of patients the overall rate of hospitalization due to the realization of a PBP was 1%. It has not been found predictive of complications leading to hospitalization. 4. Copyright © 2016

  9. Risk management and errors in the surgical clinic of Serres hospital compared with the requirements of standard OHSAS 18001: 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eleni Megalomystaka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the measures implemented to manage risks at work in the surgical clinic of a public hospital in Northern Greece, in relation to the requirements of the standard OHSAS 18001: 1999, and to refer to an integrated program to manage those risks. The right to safe and high-quality patient care and management of adverse events is part of the quality system and must be pursued by every health organization. In recent years, in Greece, there are measures taken by the country to align with European Union directives on matters related to safety in the workplace. In this direction, this hospital takes the initiative to reduce accidents and improve working conditions. The ELOT 1801 is a model for the management of health and safety, it is compatible and has technical equivalence with the corresponding BSI-OHSAS 18001: 1999. Since the relevant investigation found that the implementation of policy on health and safety in the surgical clinic under hospital study showed that there is a will by the authorities to adopt and implement procedures that contribute to the proper management and reduction of upcoming events. However, improvement actions are related to staff training can be made in the provision of health services, while considered necessary staffing the department with personnel and equipping adequate consumables.

  10. Ozonation for source treatment of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater - ozone lifetime and required ozone dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamilla Marie Speht; Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Chhetri, Ravi Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Ozonation aimed at removing pharmaceuticals was studied in an effluent from an experimental pilot system using staged moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) tanks for the optimal biological treatment of wastewater from a medical care unit of Aarhus University Hospital. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC......) and pH in samples varied considerably, and the effect of these two parameters on ozone lifetime and the efficiency of ozone in removing pharmaceuticals were determined. The pH in the effluent varied from 5.0 to 9.0 resulting in approximately a doubling of the required ozone dose at the highest p......H for each pharmaceutical. DOC varied from 6 to 20 mg-DOC/L. The ozone required for removing each pharmaceutical, varied linearly with DOC and thus, ozone doses normalized to DOC (specific ozone dose) agreed between water samples (typically within 15%). At neutral pH the specific ozone dose required...

  11. Reorganization of a hospital catering system increases food intake in patients with inadequate intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freil, M; Nielsen, MA; Blitz, B

    2006-01-01

    Background : Low food intake is a frequent problem in undernourished hospital patients. Objective: To study whether a reorganization of a hospital catering system enabling patients to choose their evening meal individually, in combination with an increase in the energy density of the food....... Conclusions: Reorganization of a hospital catering system can increase energy and protein intake and reduce waste substantially....

  12. Patient Hand Hygiene at Home Predicts Their Hand Hygiene Practices in the Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Anna; Sethi, Ajay; Shulkin, Emily; Caniza, Rachell; Zerbel, Sara; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-01-01

    We examine factors associated with hand hygiene practices of hospital patients. Hygiene decreased compared to at home, and home practices were strongly associated with hospital practices. Understanding and leveraging the intrinsic value some patients associate with hand hygiene may be important for improving overall hospital hygiene and decreasing healthcare-associated infections.

  13. The role of expectations in patient assessments of hospital care: an example from a university hospital network, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Coskun; Akgün, H Seval; Al Assaf, A F

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to document a study, in which the SERVQUAL scale was used to evaluate hospital services, conducting a preliminary assessment of patient attitudes regarding the important aspects of service dimensions. The SERVQUAL scale was implemented into routine use at the Baskent University Hospitals Network in Baskent, Turkey. The study consisted of 550 randomly chosen patients who presented to any member hospital in that network during January and February 2006 and received treatment as inpatients or outpatients at those healthcare facilities. The SERVQUAL scale was utilised to evaluate hospital services. A questionnaire was completed by a total of 472 (86.0 per cent) patients. The perceived scores of the patients were higher than expected for an ordinary hospital but lower than expected for a high-quality hospital. The highest difference between the perceived service score and the expected service score was found at the Alanya Application and Research Center in Alanya, Turkey. The paper demonstrates the use of the SERVQUAL scale in measuring the functional quality of the hospitals assessed.

  14. Iatrogenia em pacientes idosos hospitalizados Iatrogeny in hospitalized elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurico T. Carvalho-Filho

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Analisar as complicações iatrogênicas apresentadas por idosos hospitalizados. Estudo retrospectivo dos prontuários de 96 pacientes, 48 do sexo masculino e 48 do feminino, com idades variando de 60 a 93 anos (média: 75,7 anos, hospitalizados durante o ano de 1995 em enfermaria geriátrica. A análise da evolução dos pacientes durante o período de hospitalização permitiu evidenciar: 1 em 42 (43,7% pacientes ocorreram uma ou mais complicações iatrogênicas, num total de 56 episódios; 2 manifestações relacionadas aos procedimentos diagnósticos corresponderam a 17,9% das iatrogenias; 3 alterações relacionadas às medidas terapêuticas corresponderam a 58,9%, sendo 32,1% referentes à terapêutica farmacológica e 26,8% a outros procedimentos terapêuticos; 4 manifestações iatrogênicas não relacionadas diretamente às afecções (úlceras de decúbito, quedas e fraturas corresponderam a 23,2%; 5 a presença de manifestações iatrogênicas correlacionou-se com período mais prolongado de internação; 6 cinco pacientes faleceram em conseqüência direta de complicações iatrogênicas. A iatrogenia é freqüente em pacientes idosos hospitalizados, podendo determinar manifestações graves e mesmo fatais. Como uma significativa proporção dessas complicações pode ser evitada através de medidas adequadas, deve-se procurar identificar suas causas e desenvolver métodos para previni-la ou reduzir seus efeitos.PURPOSE: To evaluate the iatrogenic complications in hospitalized elderly patients. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Review of the medical records of 96 patients, 48 men and 48 women, aged 60 to 93 years (75.7 years on average, hospitalized in a geriatric ward during 1995. RESULTS: The study of the medical records of the patients showed: 1 forty-two (43.7% of the elderly had one or more iatrogenic illnesses, with a total of 56 occurrences; 2 complications due to diagnostic tests corresponded to 17.9% of the iatrogenic disorders; 3

  15. Patient opinion of the doctor-patient relationship in a public hospital in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alan S; Verjee, Mohamud A; Musson, David; Iqbal, Navid A; Mosleh, Tayseer M; Zainel, Abdulwahed A; Al-Salamy, Yassir

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the factors associated with the level of satisfaction of outpatients in their relationship with their doctor at the largest public hospital in Qatar. This study was a cross-sectional survey of attitudes. Researchers surveyed 626 outpatients at Hamad General Hospital in Doha, Qatar from September 2009 to January 2010 using a novel questionnaire assessing satisfaction with patients' interaction(s) with their doctor (spent time with patient, took case seriously, maintained confidentiality, and the overall quality of visit). Mean responses on 4 Likert scale items (one to 5) were as follows: "spent enough time with patient" = 4.39; "doctor took case seriously" = 4.57; "satisfaction with doctor-patient confidentiality" = 4.71; "overall quality of visit" = 4.46. Age, gender, citizenship, level of education, and number of visits did not significantly impact the level of satisfaction. For 73.1% of patients, the physician's qualification was the most important factor in choosing a doctor. Of those surveyed, 40.7% of men and 28.1% of women preferred to see a doctor of their own gender. A positive correlation between perceived communication and satisfaction with the doctor-patient encounter was established. This study found that patients in the Out-Patient Department at Hamad Hospital were highly satisfied with their relationships with their doctors, and physician qualification was the most significant factor in choosing a doctor. A significant number of males and females preferred a physician of their own gender. Communication difficulty correlated with lower satisfaction.

  16. Factors Associated with Decision to Hospitalize Emergency Department Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talan, David A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department (ED hospitalizations for skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI have increased, while concern for costs has grown and outpatient parenteral antibiotic options have expanded. To identify opportunities to reduce admissions, we explored factors that influence the decision to hospitalize an ED patient with a SSTI. Methods: We conducted a prospective study of adults presenting to 12 U.S. EDs with a SSTI in which physicians were surveyed as to reason(s for admission, and clinical characteristics were correlated with disposition. We employed chi-square binary recursive partitioning to assess independent predictors of admission. Serious adverse events were recorded. Results: Among 619 patients, median age was 38.7 years. The median duration of symptoms was 4.0 days, 96 (15.5% had a history of fever, and 46 (7.5% had failed treatment. Median maximal length of erythema was 4.0cm (IQR, 2.0-7.0. Upon presentation, 39 (6.3% had temperature >38oC, 81 (13.1% tachycardia, 35 (5.7%, tachypnea, and 5 (0.8% hypotension; at the time of the ED disposition decision, these findings were present in 9 (1.5%, 11 (1.8%, 7 (1.1%, and 3 (0.5% patients, respectively. Ninety-four patients (15.2% were admitted, 3 (0.5% to the intensive care unit (ICU. Common reasons for admission were need for intravenous antibiotics in 80 (85.1%; the only reason in 41.5%, surgery in 23 (24.5%, and underlying disease in 11 (11.7%. Hospitalization was significantly associated with the following factors in decreasing order of importance: history of fever (present in 43.6% of those admitted, and 10.5% discharged; maximal length of erythema >10cm (43.6%, 11.3%; history of failed treatment (16.1%, 6.0%; any co-morbidity (61.7%, 27.2%; and age >65 years (5.4%, 1.3%. Two patients required amputation and none had ICU transfer or died. Conclusion: ED SSTI patients with fever, larger lesions, and co-morbidities tend to be hospitalized, almost all to non-critical areas

  17. Pre-hospital physical activity status affects in-hospital course of elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takamichi; Obayashi, Tohru; Hattori, Eijirou; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Niwa, Akihiro; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2010-03-01

    The clinical course of elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can sometimes unexpectedly result in an adverse outcome even when therapy appears to be successful. We suspect that specific factors may characterize this worsening of status during hospitalization. This study examines whether the pre-hospital physical activity status of the elderly treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for AMI affects their in-hospital course. We studied 110 consecutive patients, aged 80 or older, who had undergone emergent PCI for AMI. Patients were divided into two groups based on clinical presentation: Better Killip class (Killip classes I and II) and Worse Killip class (Killip classes III and IV). Patients were also divided into two groups based on pre-hospital physical activity status, determined retrospectively by review of medical records: Good physical activity (n=57) comprising those able to go out alone independently and Poor physical activity comprising those mainly confined to home (n=53). The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 9.1% for the study population. The Worse Killip class group had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than the Better Killip class group (27.8% vs 5.4%, respectively; p=0.0102). In addition, the Poor physical activity group had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than the Good physical activity group (15.1% vs. 3.5%, respectively; p=0.047). These data suggest that pre-hospital physical activity status in elderly patients with AMI may affect in-hospital mortality as well as Killip class.

  18. Identification of relevant ICF categories by patients in the acute hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Eva; Huber, Erika Omega; Stucki, Gerold; Herceg, Malvina; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Quittan, Michael

    To describe functioning and health of patients in the acute hospital and to identify the most common problems using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Cross-sectional survey in a convenience sample of neurological, musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary patients requiring rehabilitation in the acute hospital. The second level categories of the ICF were used to collect information on patients' problems. For the ICF components Body Functions, Body Structures and Activities and Participation absolute and relative frequencies of impairments/limitations in the study population were reported. For the component Environmental Factors absolute and relative frequencies of perceived barriers or facilitators were reported. The mean age in the sample was 57.6 years with a median age of 60.5, 49% of the patients were female. In 101 patients with neurological conditions, 115 ICF categories had a prevalence of 30% and more: 32 categories of Body Functions, 13 categories of Body Structures, 32 categories of Activities and Participation and 38 categories of Environmental Factors. In 105 patients with cardiopulmonary conditions, 80 categories had a prevalence of 30% and more: 36 categories of Body Functions, eight categories of Body Structures, 10 categories of Activities and Participation and 26 categories of Environmental Factors. In 90 patients with musculoskeletal conditions, 61 categories had a prevalence of 30% and more: 14 categories of Body Functions, five categories of Body Structures, 16 categories of Activities and Participation and 26 categories of Environmental Factors. This study is a first step towards the development of ICF Core Sets for patients in the acute hospital.

  19. Preparation to care for confused older patients in general hospitals: a study of UK health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Amanda; Knight, Alec; Harwood, Rowan; Gladman, John R F

    2014-07-01

    in the UK, two-thirds of patients in general hospitals are older than 70, of whom half have dementia or delirium or both. Our objective was to explore doctors, nurses and allied health professionals' perceptions of their preparation to care for confused older patients on general hospital wards. : using a quota sampling strategy across 11 medical, geriatric and orthopaedic wards in a British teaching hospital, we conducted 60 semi-structured interviews with doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals and analysed the data using the Consensual Qualitative Research approach. : there was consensus among participants that education, induction and in-service training left them inadequately prepared and under-confident to care for confused older patients. Many doctors reported initial assessments of confused older patients as difficult. They admitted inadequate knowledge of mental health disorders, including the diagnostic features of delirium and dementia. Handling agitation and aggression were considered top priorities for training, particularly for nurses. Multidisciplinary team meetings were highly valued but were reported as too infrequent. Participants valued specialist input but reported difficulties gaining such support. Communication with confused patients was regarded as particularly challenging, both in terms of patients making their needs known, and staff conveying information to patients. Participants reported emotional and behavioural responses including frustration, stress, empathy, avoidance and low job satisfaction. : our findings indicate that a revision of training across healthcare professions in the UK is required, and that increased specialist support should be provided, so that the workforce is properly prepared to care for older patients with cognitive problems. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  20. Hospital Related Stress Among Patients Admitted to a Psychiatric In-patient Unit in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha KS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric patient’s attitudes towards hospitalization have found an association between patient perceptions of the ward atmosphere and dissatisfaction. The aim of the study was to determine the aspects of stress related to hospitalization in inpatients admitted to a psychiatric facility. Fifty in-patients of both sexes admitted consecutively to a psychiatric unit in a General Hospital were asked to rate the importance of, and their satisfaction with, 38 different aspects of in-patient care and treatment. Results showed that the major sources of stress were related to having a violent patient near to his/her bed; being away from family; having to stay in closed wards; having to eat cold and tasteless food; losing income or job due to illness, being hospitalized away from home; not able to understand the jargons used by the clinical staff and not getting medication for sleep. A well-differentiated assessment of stress and satisfaction has implications for the evaluation of the quality of psychiatric care and for the improvement of in-patient psychiatric care.

  1. Hospital Costs of Foreign Non-Resident Patients: A Comparative Analysis in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Borrell, Elena; Renart-Vicens, Gemma; Saez, Marc; Carreras, Marc

    2017-09-14

    Although patient mobility has increased over the world, in Europe there is a lack of empirical studies. The aim of the study was to compare foreign non-resident patients versus domestic patients for the particular Catalan case, focusing on patient characteristics, hospitalisation costs and differences in costs depending on the typology of the hospital they are treated. We used data from the 2012 Minimum Basic Data Set-Acute Care hospitals (CMBD-HA) in Catalonia. We matched two case-control groups: first, foreign non-resident patients versus domestic patients and, second, foreign non-resident patients treated by Regional Public Hospitals versus other type of hospitals. Hospitalisation costs were modelled using a GLM Gamma with a log-link. Our results show that foreign non-resident patients were significantly less costly than domestic patients (12% cheaper). Our findings also suggested differences in the characteristics of foreign non-resident patients using Regional Public Hospitals or other kinds of hospitals although we did not observe significant differences in the healthcare costs. Nevertheless, women, 15-24 and 35-44 years old patients and the days of stay were less costly in Regional Public Hospitals. In general, acute hospitalizations of foreign non-resident patients while they are on holiday cost substantially less than domestic patients. The typology of hospital is not found to be a relevant factor influencing costs.

  2. High survival rates and associated factors among ebola virus disease patients hospitalized at donka national hospital, conakry, Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Chughtai, Morad; Bah, Elhadj Ibrahima; Barry, Moumié; Béavogui, Kézély; Loua, Tokpagnan Oscar; Malik, Ahmed A

    2015-02-01

    Anecdotal reports suggesting that survival rates among hospitalized patients with Ebola virus disease in Guinea are higher than the 29.2% rate observed in the current epidemic in West Africa. Survival after symptom onset was determined using Kaplan Meier survival methods among patients with confirmed Ebola virus disease treated in Conakry, Guinea from March 25, 2014, to August 5, 2014. We analyzed the relationship between survival and patient factors, including demographics and clinical features. Of the 70 patients analyzed [mean age ± standard deviation (SD), 34 ± 14.1; 44 were men], 42 were discharged alive with a survival rate among hospitalized patients of 60% (95% confidence interval, 41.5-78.5%). The survival rate was 28 (71.8%) among 39 patients under 34 years of age, and 14 (46.7%) among 30 patients aged 35 years or greater (p = 0.034). The rates of myalgia (3 of 42 versus 7 of 28, p = 0.036) and hiccups (1 of 42 versus 5 of 28, p = 0.023) were significantly lower among patients who survived. Our results provide insights into a cohort of hospitalized patients with Ebola virus disease in whom survival is prominently higher than seen in other cohorts of hospitalized patients.

  3. Transfusion requirements in elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Praleene; Bäck, Anne Caroline; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2017-01-01

    Managing haemostasis in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery remains a challenge. There is no established laboratory test to predict transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery. We investigated whether preoperative Thromboelastography (TEG) with Platelet Mapping Assay (PMA......) or Multiple Electrode Aggrometry (MEA) could predict transfusion requirements in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or combined CABG with aortic or mitral valve replacement. We prospectively investigated 199 patients undergoing elective CABG or combined procedures. PMA and MEA...

  4. Lifestyle Factors in Late Adolescence Associate With Later Development of Diverticular Disease Requiring Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järbrink-Sehgal, M Ellionore; Schmidt, Peter T; Sköldberg, Filip; Hemmingsson, Tomas; Hagström, Hannes; Andreasson, Anna

    2018-04-12

    The burden of diverticular disease on society is high and is increasing with an aging population. It is therefore important to identify risk factors for disease development or progression. Many lifestyle behaviors during adolescence affect risk for later disease. We searched for adolescent lifestyle factors that affect risk of diverticular disease later in life. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 43,772 men (age, 18-20 y) conscripted to military service in Sweden from 1969 through 1970, with a follow-up period of 39 years. All conscripts underwent an extensive mental and physical health examination and completed questionnaires covering alcohol consumption, smoking, and use of recreational drugs; cardiovascular fitness was assessed using an ergometer cycle at the time of conscription. Outcome data were collected from national registers to identify discharge diagnoses of diverticular disease until the end of 2009. We performed Cox regression analysis to determine whether body mass index, cardiovascular fitness, smoking, use of recreational drugs, alcohol consumption, and risky use of alcohol, at time of conscription are independent risk factors for development of diverticular disease. Overweight and obese men had a 2-fold increased risk of diverticular disease compared to normal-weight men (hazard ratio, 2.00; P diverticular disease requiring hospitalization (P = .009). Smoking (P = .003), but not use of recreational drugs (P = .11), was associated with an increased risk of diverticular disease requiring hospitalization. Risky use of alcohol, but not alcohol consumption per se, was associated with a 43% increase in risk of diverticular disease requiring hospitalization (P = .007). In a retrospective analysis of data from 43,772 men in Sweden, we associated being overweight or obese, a smoker, a high-risk user of alcohol, and/or having a low level of cardiovascular fitness in late adolescence with an increased risk of developing diverticular

  5. Prevalence of malnutrition and associated factors among hospitalized elderly patients in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Sami H; Alamri, Sultan H

    2017-07-03

    Malnutrition is a nutritional disorder that adversely affects the body from a functional or clinical perspective. It is very often observed in the elderly population. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized elderly patients and its associated factors and outcomes in terms of length of stay and mortality in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In a cross-sectional study, we evaluated the nutritional status of hospitalized elderly patients using the most recent version of the short form of Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-SF). A total of 248 hospitalized patients were included (70.0 ± 7.7 years; 60% female). According to the MNA-SF, a total of 76.6% patients were either malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Malnourished patients had significantly lower levels of serum albumin (28.2 ± 7.7), hemoglobin (10.5 ± 1.8), and lymphocyte (1.7 ± 0.91). They had increased tendency to stay in the hospital for longer durations (IQR, 5-11 days; median = 7 days) and had a mortality rate of 6.9%. Malnutrition was highly prevalent among hospitalized elderly and was associated with increased length of stay and mortality.

  6. Radioactive waste management for a radiologically contaminated hospitalized patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina Jomir, G.; Michel, X.; Lecompte, Y.; Chianea, N.; Cazoulat, A.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase following caring for a radiologically contaminated patient in a hospital decontamination facility must be anticipated at a local level to be truly efficient, as the volume of waste could be substantial. This management must comply with the principles set out for radioactive as well as medical waste. The first step involves identification of radiologically contaminated waste based on radioactivity measurement for volume reduction. Then, the management depends on the longest radioactive half-life of contaminative radionuclides. For a half-life inferior to 100 days, wastes are stored for their radioactivity to decay for at least 10 periods before disposal like conventional medical waste. Long-lived radioactive waste management implies treatment of liquid waste and special handling for sorting and packaging before final elimination at the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ANDRA). Following this, highly specialized waste management skills, financial responsibility issues and detention of non-medical radioactive sources are questions raised by hospital radioactive waste management in the post-accidental phase. (authors)

  7. Insulin Therapy for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Marie E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been established that hyperglycemia with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes increases both mortality and disease-specific morbidity in hospitalized patients1–4 and that goal-directed insulin therapy can improve outcomes.5–9 During the past decade, since the widespread institutional adoption of intensified insulin protocols after the publication of a landmark trial,5,10 the pendulum in the inpatient diabetes literature has swung away from achieving intensive glucose control and toward more moderate and individualized glycemic targets.11,12 This change in clinical practice is the result of several factors, including challenges faced by hospitals to coordinate glycemic control across all levels of care,13,14 publication of negative prospective trials,15,16 revised recommendations from professional organizations,17,18 and increasing evidence on the deleterious effect of hypoglycemia.19–22 This article reviews the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia during illness, the mechanisms for increased complications and mortality due to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, beneficial mechanistic effects of insulin therapy and provides updated recommendations for the inpatient management of diabetes in the critical care setting and in the general medicine and surgical settings.23,24 PMID:22575413

  8. Novel bed integrated ventilation method for hospital patient rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Kokora, Monika

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a novel method for advanced ventilation of hospital wards leading to improved air quality at reduced ventilation rate. The idea is to evacuate the bio-effluents generated from patients’ body by local exhaustion before being spread in the room. This concept was realized by using...... a mattress having a suction opening from which bio-effluents generated from human body are exhausted. Experiments were conducted in a full-scale two-bed hospital room mock-up, 4.7 x 5.3 x 2.6 m3 (W x L x H). Only one of the patients’ beds was equipped with the ventilated mattress. The room was air...... conditioned via mixing total volume ventilation system supplying air through a ceiling mounted diffuser. All experiments were performed at room air temperature of 23ºC. A thermal manikin was used to simulate a polluting patient on the bed equipped with the ventilated mattress. Two heated dummies were used...

  9. Measuring patient safety culture in Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Chi; Li, Hung-Hui

    2010-06-07

    Patient safety is a critical component to the quality of health care. As health care organizations endeavour to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. In this research, the authors use the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) questionnaire to assess the culture of patient safety in Taiwan and attempt to provide an explanation for some of the phenomena that are unique in Taiwan. The authors used HSOPSC to measure the 12 dimensions of the patient safety culture from 42 hospitals in Taiwan. The survey received 788 respondents including physicians, nurses, and non-clinical staff. This study used SPSS 15.0 for Windows and Amos 7 software tools to perform the statistical analysis on the survey data, including descriptive statistics and confirmatory factor analysis of the structural equation model. The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSOPSC survey was 64%, slightly higher than the average positive response rate for the AHRQ data (61%). The results showed that hospital staff in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture in their organization. The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was "Teamwork within units", similar to the results reported in the US. The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was "Staffing". Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Taiwan and the US in three dimensions, including "Feedback and communication about error", "Communication openness", and "Frequency of event reporting". The HSOPSC measurement provides evidence for assessing patient safety culture in Taiwan. The results show that in general, hospital staffs in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture within their organization. The existence of discrepancies between the US data and the Taiwanese data suggest that cultural uniqueness should be taken into

  10. Potentially avoidable inpatient nights among warfarin receiving patients; an audit of a single university teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, Dónall

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant (OAT) that needs active management to ensure therapeutic range. Initial management is often carried out as an inpatient, though not requiring inpatient facilities. This mismatch results in financial costs which could be directed more efficaciously. The extent of this has previously been unknown. Here we aim to calculate the potential number of bed nights which may be saved among those being dose optimized as inpatients and examine associated factors. METHODS: A 6 week prospective audit of inpatients receiving OAT, at Cork University Hospital, was carried out. The study period was from 11th June 2007 to 20th July 2007. Data was collected from patient\\'s medications prescription charts, medical record files, and computerised haematology laboratory records. The indications for OAT, the patient laboratory coagulation results and therapeutic intervals along with patient demographics were analysed. The level of potentially avoidable inpatient nights in those receiving OAT in hospital was calculated and the potential cost savings quantified. Potential avoidable bed nights were defined as patients remaining in hospital for the purpose of optimizing OAT dosage, while receiving subtherapeutic or therapeutic OAT (being titred up to therapeutic levels) and co-administered covering low molecular weight heparin, and requiring no other active care. The average cost of euro638 was taken as the per night hospital stay cost for a non-Intensive Care bed. Ethical approval was granted from the Ethical Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals, Cork, Ireland. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients were included in the audit. There was 94 men (59.4%) and 64 women (40.6%). The mean age was 67.8 years, with a median age of 70 years.Atrial Fibrillation (43%, n = 70), followed by aortic valve replacement (15%, n = 23) and pulmonary emboli (11%, n = 18) were the commonest reasons for prescribing OAT. 54% had previously been prescribed OAT prior to

  11. Hospital triage system for adult patients using an influenza-like illness scoring system during the 2009 pandemic--Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Rodriguez-Noriega

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus emerged during 2009. To help clinicians triage adults with acute respiratory illness, a scoring system for influenza-like illness (ILI was implemented at Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, Mexico.A medical history, laboratory and radiology results were collected on emergency room (ER patients with acute respiratory illness to calculate an ILI-score. Patients were evaluated for admission by their ILI-score and clinicians' assessment of risk for developing complications. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from intermediate and high-risk patients for influenza testing by RT-PCR. The disposition and ILI-score of those oseltamivir-treated versus untreated, clinical characteristics of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 patients versus test-negative patients were compared by Pearson's Chi(2, Fisher's Exact, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests.Of 1840 ER patients, 230 were initially hospitalized (mean ILI-score = 15, and the rest were discharged, including 286 ambulatory patients given oseltamivir (median ILI-score = 11, and 1324 untreated (median ILI-score = 5. Fourteen (1% untreated patients returned, and 3 were hospitalized on oseltamivir (median ILI-score = 19. Of 371 patients tested by RT-PCR, 104 (28% had pandemic influenza and 42 (11% had seasonal influenza A detected. Twenty (91% of 22 imaged hospitalized pandemic influenza patients had bilateral infiltrates compared to 23 (38% of 61 imaged hospital test-negative patients (p<0.001. One patient with confirmed pandemic influenza presented 6 days after symptom onset, required mechanical ventilation, and died.The triaging system that used an ILI-score complimented clinicians' judgment of who needed oseltamivir and inpatient care and helped hospital staff manage a surge in demand for services.

  12. INVESTIGATING THE PATIENT SATISFACTION WITHIN ROMANIAN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HOSPITALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihoc Florin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Although it is not commonly accepted within healthcare services industry, the importance of marketing is more and more recognized nowadays by the organizations activating in the field. Current perception resides in a series of factors as: ethical aspects involved in the delivery process; special characteristics of the market; particular profile and behavior of the consumers of healthcare services and probably because of the inadequate understanding of the marketing role in the life of an organization. A deep analysis in the field of healthcare services will emphasize not only its complexity, but also its interdisciplinary feature under many aspects, as it is an area where many fields of interest are intersecting, both economic and social. It also reveals a particular field of study with many particular features - considered a sensitive field (Popa and Vladoi 2010: 232. Generated using the SERVQUAL model, the data presented in the paper are the result of a quantitative research designed to measure and compare the patient/client satisfaction degree for public and private medical services provided by the Romanian hospitals. The aim of the research is to identify and to measure the gap that appears between the patient/client’ expectations and perceptions regarding the delivered services; to identify the potential profile of the private Romanian hospitals’ clients regarding the demographic features and also to pin-point correlations between the image created in the mind of the Romanian patients/clients and the type of medical services (public or private they were using. We consider that the results of this research are valuable for the managers of the medical units in order to initiate series of actions aiming to improve the quality of their services and, as a result the patient/clients’ satisfaction degree. Later being one of the most important performance indicators of an organization that activates in a highly competitive business

  13. Axiomatic Design of a Framework for the Comprehensive Optimization of Patient Flows in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Arcidiacono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lean Management and Six Sigma are nowadays applied not only to the manufacturing industry but also to service industry and public administration. The manifold variables affecting the Health Care system minimize the effect of a narrow Lean intervention. Therefore, this paper aims to discuss a comprehensive, system-based approach to achieve a factual holistic optimization of patient flows. This paper debates the efficacy of Lean principles applied to the optimization of patient flows and related activities, structures, and resources, developing a theoretical framework based on the principles of the Axiomatic Design. The demand for patient-oriented and efficient health services leads to use these methodologies to improve hospital processes. In the framework, patients with similar characteristics are clustered in families to achieve homogeneous flows through the value stream. An optimization checklist is outlined as the result of the mapping between Functional Requirements and Design Parameters, with the right sequence of the steps to optimize the patient flow according to the principles of Axiomatic Design. The Axiomatic Design-based top-down implementation of Health Care evidence, according to Lean principles, results in a holistic optimization of hospital patient flows, by reducing the complexity of the system.

  14. Is it morally permissible for hospital nurses to access prisoner-patients' criminal histories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, information about a person's criminal history is accessible with a name and date of birth. Ruth Crampton has studied nurses' care for prisoner-patients in hospital settings and found care to be perfunctory and reactive. This article examines whether it is morally permissible for nurses in hospital settings to access information about prisoner-patients' criminal histories. Nurses may argue for a right to such information based on the right to personal safety at work or the obligation to provide prisoner-patients with the care that they deserve. These two arguments are considered and rejected. It is further argued that accessing information about a prisoner-patient's criminal history violates nurses' duty to care. Care, understood through Sarah Ruddick's account as work and relationship, requires nurses to be open and unbiased in order to do their part in forming a caring relationship with patients. Knowledge of a prisoner-patient's criminal history inhibits the formation of this relationship and thus violates nurses' duty to care.

  15. Axiomatic Design of a Framework for the Comprehensive Optimization of Patient Flows in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcidiacono, Gabriele; Matt, Dominik T.; Rauch, Erwin

    2017-01-01

    Lean Management and Six Sigma are nowadays applied not only to the manufacturing industry but also to service industry and public administration. The manifold variables affecting the Health Care system minimize the effect of a narrow Lean intervention. Therefore, this paper aims to discuss a comprehensive, system-based approach to achieve a factual holistic optimization of patient flows. This paper debates the efficacy of Lean principles applied to the optimization of patient flows and related activities, structures, and resources, developing a theoretical framework based on the principles of the Axiomatic Design. The demand for patient-oriented and efficient health services leads to use these methodologies to improve hospital processes. In the framework, patients with similar characteristics are clustered in families to achieve homogeneous flows through the value stream. An optimization checklist is outlined as the result of the mapping between Functional Requirements and Design Parameters, with the right sequence of the steps to optimize the patient flow according to the principles of Axiomatic Design. The Axiomatic Design-based top-down implementation of Health Care evidence, according to Lean principles, results in a holistic optimization of hospital patient flows, by reducing the complexity of the system. © 2017 Gabriele Arcidiacono et al.

  16. Work ability among hospital food service professionals: multiple associated variables require comprehensive intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Frida Marina; Martinez, Maria Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The work of hospital food service is characterized by demands that can be associated with work ability--WA. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with WA among hospital food service professionals and recommend intervention measures. This is a cross sectional study carried out in 2009, conducted in a hospital of São Paulo, Brazil. Participants were 76 (96.2%) of the eligible. They filled out a questionnaire including socio-demographic data, life styles, working conditions and WA. Multivariate linear regression analyses were performed. Factors associated with WA were age (p = 0.051), over commitment (p = 0.011), effort-reward ratio (p = 0.002) and work injuries (p work injuries is consistent with the theoretical model that demonstrated that health status is the basis to maintain the WA. The association of effort-reward imbalance shows that issues related with work organization are relevant for these workers. The association of overcommittment suggests that workers recognize their responsibility with the therapeutic processes of patients. Results showed a number of features of different nature that should be taken into account when implementing measures to improve the WA, to be applied at different levels: individual, task and institutional.

  17. Reorganization of a hospital catering system increases food intake in patients with inadequate intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freil, M.; Nielsen, M. A.; Biltz, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Low food intake is a frequent problem in undernourished hospital patients. Objective: To study whether a reorganization of a hospital catering system enabling patients to choose their evening meal individually, in combination with an increase in the energy density of the food, increases......: Reorganization of a hospital catering system can increase energy and protein intake and reduce waste substantially. Keywords: hospital food; nutritional risk; undernutrition...

  18. Long-term outcome in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome requiring mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsch, J; Galldiks, N; Bender, A; Kollmar, R; Bösel, J; Hobohm, C; Günther, A; Schirotzek, I; Fuchs, K; Jüttler, E

    2013-05-01

    We aimed to determine long-term disability and quality of life in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) who required mechanical ventilation (MV) in the acute phase. Our retrospective cohort study included 110 GBS patients admitted to an intensive care unit and requiring MV (01/1999-08/2010) in nine German tertiary academic medical centers. Outcome was determined 1 year or longer after hospital admission using the GBS disability scale, Barthel index (BI), EuroQuol-5D (EQ-5D) and Fatigue Severity Scale. Linear/multivariate regression analysis was used to analyze predicting factors for outcome. Mean time to follow up was 52.6 months. Hospital mortality was 5.5 % and long-term mortality 13.6 %. Overall 53.8 % had a favorable outcome (GBS disability score 0-1) and 73.7 % of survivors had no or mild disability (BI 90-100). In the five dimensions of the EQ-5D "mobility", "self-care", "usual activities", "pain" and "anxiety/depression" no impairments were stated by 50.6, 58.4, 36.4, 36.4 and 50.6 % of patients, respectively. A severe fatigue syndrome was present in 30.4 % of patients. Outcome was statistically significantly correlated with age, type of therapy and number of immunoglobulin courses. In GBS-patients requiring MV in the acute phase in-hospital, and long-term mortality are lower than that in previous studies, while long-term quality of life is compromised in a large fraction of patients, foremost by immobility and chronic pain. Efforts towards improved treatment approaches should address autonomic dysfunction to further reduce hospital mortality while improved rehabilitation concepts might ameliorate long-term disability.

  19. Does hospital ownership affect patient experience? An investigation into public-private sector differences in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérotin, Virginie; Zamora, Bernarda; Reeves, Rachel; Bartlett, Will; Allen, Pauline

    2013-05-01

    Using patient experience survey data, the paper investigates whether hospital ownership affects the level of quality reported by patients whose care is funded by the National Health Service in areas other than clinical quality. We estimate a switching regression model that accounts for (i) some observable characteristics of the patient and the hospital episode; (ii) selection into private hospitals; and (iii) unmeasured hospital characteristics captured by hospital fixed effects. We find that the experience reported by patients in public and private hospitals is different, i.e. most dimensions of quality are delivered differently by the two types of hospitals, with each sector offering greater quality in certain specialties or to certain groups of patients. However, the sum of all ownership effects is not statistically different from zero at sample means. In other words, hospital ownership in and of itself does not affect the level of quality of the average patient's reported experience. Differences in mean reported quality levels between the private and public sectors are entirely attributable to patient characteristics, the selection of patients into public or private hospitals and unobserved characteristics specific to individual hospitals, rather than to hospital ownership. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.